WorldWideScience

Sample records for environmental management principles

  1. Incorporating evolutionary principles into environmental management and policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lankau, Richard; Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Harris, David J.

    2011-01-01

    As policymakers and managers work to mitigate the effects of rapid anthropogenic environmental changes, they need to consider organisms’ responses. In light of recent evidence that evolution can be quite rapid, this now includes evolutionary responses. Evolutionary principles have a long history...... in conservation biology, and the necessary next step for the field is to consider ways in which conservation policy makers and managers can proactively manipulate evolutionary processes to achieve their goals. In this review, we aim to illustrate the potential conservation benefits of an increased understanding...... of evolutionary history and prescriptive manipulation of three basic evolutionary factors: selection, variation, and gene flow. For each, we review and propose ways that policy makers and managers can use evolutionary thinking to preserve threatened species, combat pest species, or reduce undesirable evolutionary...

  2. Lean principles adoption in environmental management system (EMS - ISO 14001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Puvanasvaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the characteristic of the lean principles into ISO 14001 and to propose linkage of the lean principles and ISO 14001.Design/methodology/approach: To achieve the objective of the study, literature survey and quantitative research method using questionnaires survey are used.Findings and Originality/value: The findings of this study confirm that ISO 14001 certified company adopted lean production practices.  The study also proves that lean principles have positive and significant relationship with ISO 14001 EMS and the linkage can be made between lean principles and ISO 14001 to achieve Continual Improvement.Research limitations/implications: The small sizes of the sample of the participating companies are the main limitations of this study and this research mainly focuses on the manufacturing environment and services industry.Practical implications: This research show that all ISO 14001 companies do adopt at least one lean production practices and the main findings are lean principles has positive and highly significant relationship with ISO 14001 requirements.  This is because the integration of lean principles into ISO 14001 will serve practical methods for ISO14001 EMS to achieve the continual improvement.Originality/value: This research is amongst the first to study the combined lean principles with ISO 1400.  Based on the current situation, there is no integration within this two management system. 

  3. USER principle as relating the human environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernakis

    2005-01-01

    The environmental variable can be understood as the resulting biosphere space that has suffered the occurrence of pre-biotic, biotic and anthropic processes. This necessary expansion of the environmental frontier allows understand clearly the magnitude the great complexity of the process immersed in the current environmental problematic. This, taking into account the analysis of the reference systems used by the different species to face their interaction with the nature. Hence, it is necessary to evaluate the human referential process of reality, as a responsible specie of the derange shown by the Environmental Mother Eve. The latest hominid development of an Artificial Reference System (ARS) (linguistic symbols), points to the constitution of the casual factor that triggers such an environmental problematic. The expansive dynamics accomplished by the ARS has not always made reference to the natural ambience that created them. The formulation of the Unprivilegeness of Symbolic Endogenous Referents (USER) Principle (Kernakis 1986, 1997), as a necessary epistemological consequence of the Special Relativity from Einstein, entails to the reversion of the local privileges created by the ARS, stating a referential crisis as alternative to a potential environmental collapse. AII these could lead to the most intra-specific understanding with the nature, antonomastical fragmented by the privileges of the ARS. Such integration species-nature would allow to make possible an spontaneous natural-cultural arranging of the environmental balance

  4. Who should do what in environmental management? Twelve principles for allocating responsibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, E.

    2015-01-01

    In environmental management there is often discussion on the allocation of responsibilities. Such discussions can continue for a long time and can form an obstacle for effective action. In this article twelve normative principles for the allocation of responsibilities are identified, coming from

  5. A cost benefit review of applying quality assurance principles to project management of environmental cleanup programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakes, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper shows the cost/benefit mechanism used for applying the theory and practical aspects of QA principles as a management tool to project management of environmental cleanup projects. This includes reviewing and guidelines and requirements to determine the practical aspects of applying these requirements to environmental project management. Thus, there is a feedback loop for comparison of the cost/benefits of application of each stage of the project. The project's major stages include planning, environmental sampling, analysis of data samples, data/information management to include reporting, and follow- up, post-cleanup sampling with continued data management. A comparison is also made of the theory with the practical aspects of each of these stages

  6. Five principles for the practice of knowledge exchange in environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M S; Stringer, L C; Fazey, I; Evely, A C; Kruijsen, J H J

    2014-12-15

    This paper outlines five principles for effective practice of knowledge exchange, which when applied, have the potential to significantly enhance the impact of environmental management research, policy and practice. The paper is based on an empirical analysis of interviews with 32 researchers and stakeholders across 13 environmental management research projects, each of which included elements of knowledge co-creation and sharing in their design. The projects focused on a range of upland and catchment management issues across the UK, and included Research Council, Government and NGO funded projects. Preliminary findings were discussed with knowledge exchange professionals and academic experts to ensure the emerging principles were as broadly applicable as possible across multiple disciplines. The principles suggest that: knowledge exchange needs to be designed into research; the needs of likely research users and other stakeholders should be systematically represented in the research where possible; and long-term relationships must be built on trust and two-way dialogue between researchers and stakeholders in order to ensure effective co-generation of new knowledge. We found that the delivery of tangible benefits early on in the research process helps to ensure continued motivation and engagement of likely research users. Knowledge exchange is a flexible process that must be monitored, reflected on and continuously refined, and where possible, steps should be taken to ensure a legacy of ongoing knowledge exchange beyond initial research funding. The principles have been used to inform the design of knowledge exchange and stakeholder engagement guidelines for two international research programmes. They are able to assist researchers, decision-makers and other stakeholders working in contrasting environmental management settings to work together to co-produce new knowledge, and more effectively share and apply existing knowledge to manage environmental change

  7. Environmental management in the Australian minerals and energy industries: principles and practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, D.R. [ed.] [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia). Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Dept. of Agriculture

    1996-12-31

    This is a comprehensive reference text on the principles and practices of environmental management being developed and implemented in Australia`s mining and energy industries. It also present a set of case histories focused on individual minerals (coal, sand, aluminium, iron ore, base metals, uranium, mineral sands, construction materials and petroleum). The 5 of the 20 chapters of particular relevance to the coal industry have been abstracted separately for the IEA Coal Research CD-ROM. 800 refs.

  8. Principles of project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of project management as practiced by NASA management personnel are presented. These principles are given as ground rules and guidelines to be used in the performance of research, development, construction or operational assignments.

  9. TRANSFORMING THE SRS ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS: COMMUNICATION AND APPLIED PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldivar, E.

    2010-01-20

    A process for communicating information relating to core business functions that also encourages improving internal communications has been established at SRS. This process continues to grow and strengthen as the multiple Contractors, Regulators and DOE-SR relationships mature. A number of management communication tools have been initiated, retooled, rebooted or continued with enhancements to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. The types of information that are the focus of this improved process are feedback from the customer and from informational exchange forums (i.e., Challenge Opportunity and Resolution (COR), SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT), Environmental Quality Management Division (EQMD), Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC), etc.). These forums, SRS environmental functions centralization, and the creation of a Regulatory Integration process allows for cross-functional decision making, problem solving and information sharing that involves the field organizations, Environmental Compliance Authorities (ECA), Subject Matter Experts (SME), DOE and the Regulators. Numerous examples of effective decision-making and problem solving will be shared. Lessons Learned involving inadequate communications and the resulting impacts on the environment, customer satisfaction, and relationships will also be discussed. Additionally, the focus on improved communications also includes maintaining awareness of business activities. The tools being utilized to facilitate the continuing improvement of internal communications include weekly staff meetings for all individuals within the organization, quarterly ECA and SME meeting, quarterly Regulatory Integration & Environmental Services (RI&ES) All-Hands meetings hosted by the Director, bi-weekly EQMD and EQMD Lite meetings with the customer, bi-annual SRIT meetings, and COR meetings on an as need basis. In addition, an existing Required Reading Program

  10. Itch Management: General Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Like pain, itch is a challenging condition that needs to be managed. Within this setting, the first principle of itch management is to get an appropriate diagnosis to perform an etiology-oriented therapy. In several cases it is not possible to treat the cause, the etiology is undetermined, there are several causes, or the etiological treatment is not effective enough to alleviate itch completely. This is also why there is need for symptomatic treatment. In all patients, psychological support and associated pragmatic measures might be helpful. General principles and guidelines are required, yet patient-centered individual care remains fundamental. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The general principles and consequences of environmental radiation exposure in relation to Canada's nuclear fuel waste management concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1989-09-01

    This document reviews the general principles and biological consequences of environmental radiation exposure. Particular attention was paid to the ICRP principle that if individual humans are adequately protected, then populations of other living organisms are likely to be sufficiently protected. The data reviewed in this document suggest that this principle is usually valid, although some theoretical concerns were noted with respect to effects of bioaccumulation of certain radionuclides in aquatic organisms

  12. Environmental management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guicherit, R.

    1996-01-01

    Elements of a national environmental management system include: • monitoring networks to establish the prevailing environmental quality; • emission inventories, and projected emission inventories based on population growth, increase of traffic density, and economie growth; taking into account

  13. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  14. Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin

    The doctoral research project is co-financed by DUCED-I&UA and is part of a joint effort of Thai, Malay, South African and Danish universities to conduct collaborative research on the overarching theme "Environmental Management: Globalisation and Industrial Governance in Developing Countries......". The PhD project is expected to conclude ultimo 2005. Environmental management and cleaner production (CP) are both internationally recognised as tools for minimising environmental impacts of production or services. However, several studies have shown that especially SMEs, which probably amount to more...

  15. Principles of Burn Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dominika Lipowska; Jowza, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    This article describes pathophysiology of burn injury-related pain and the basic principles of burn pain management. The focus is on concepts of perioperative and periprocedural pain management with extensive discussion of opioid-based analgesia, including patient-controlled analgesia, challenges of effective opioid therapy in opioid-tolerant patients, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The principles of multimodal pain management are discussed, including the importance of psychological counseling, perioperative interventional pain procedures, and alternative pain management options. A brief synopsis of the principles of outpatient pain management is provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, M.; Mondino, M.

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, unlike in the past, companies have to operate in a context of sustainable development, in which the economic and social development, production and consumption have to take into account the medium and long term impact on environment. The article sets forth some considerations about these subjects, which are assuming a growing importance in the management of companies: the variable environment may for instance be a factor of discrimination between being competitive or not. In order to characterise the context within which the environmental management has to be applied, some basic concepts about environmental management systems, Life Cycle Assessment, and Eco labeling are illustrated. As an example of application of the methodology described, a brief reference to the Italgas Group Environmental Report is given [it

  17. Quality Management Principles in the Management of Shipboard Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Koljatić

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental control of vessels is a management functionthat requires applied technology, training and diligentmanagement. Quality Management is a tool for developing environmentalprograms to control corporate environmental exposures.The management of environmental regulations, requirementsand concerns requires a systematic approach. QualityManagement (QM embodies principles of policy delineation,operations accountability, documentation and review.These principles are all transferable to most aspects of shipmanagement. Properly implemented, they assign respective responsibilitiesfor both shore side and shipboard staff Both ISMand IS0-9000 Certification requirements embody the principlesof QM as requirements for certification. If, however, onelooks beyond the certification process, these principles makegood business sense. The benefits of QM are both economic aswell as assisting in corporate risk management. This paper willfocus on the risk management benefits as they apply of environmentalhealth programs in the marine environment includingports.

  18. Environmental Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goals Recycling Green Purchasing Pollution Prevention Reusing Water Resources Environmental Management Stewardship » Environmental Protection » Environmental Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System is a systematic method for assessing mission activities, determining the

  19. Principles of managing stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. Marquis; Rodney Jacobs

    1989-01-01

    Forest stands are managed to achieve some combination of desired products or values. These products or values may include income and tangible benefits from timber production or fees for hunting rights and other recreational activities. The values may be intangible, such as the enjoyment of seeing wildlife or flowering plants, or the simple satisfaction of knowing that...

  20. Managing Complex Environmental Risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Mikael [Karlstad Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    2006-09-15

    Environmental and public health risks are often handled in a process in which experts, and sometimes policy makers, try their best to quantitatively assess, evaluate and manage risks. This approach harmonises with mainstream interpretations of sustainable development, which aim at defining a desirable relationship between human and natural systems, for instance by policies that define limit values of different forms of disturbances. However, under conditions of high scientific incertitude, diverging values and distrust, this approach is far from satisfactory. The use of cell phones, hazardous chemicals, nuclear or fossil energy systems, and modern biotechnology are examples of activities causing such risks with high complexity. Against this background, a complementary interpretation of the concept of sustainable development is suggested. This interpretation is operationalised through new formulations of three common principles for public risk management; the precautionary principle, the polluter pays principle and the principle of public participation. Implementation of these reformulated principles would challenge some foundations of present mainstream views on environmental decision-making, but would on the other hand contribute to improved practices for long-term human welfare and planetary survival (full text of contribution)

  1. Managing Complex Environmental Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Environmental and public health risks are often handled in a process in which experts, and sometimes policy makers, try their best to quantitatively assess, evaluate and manage risks. This approach harmonises with mainstream interpretations of sustainable development, which aim at defining a desirable relationship between human and natural systems, for instance by policies that define limit values of different forms of disturbances. However, under conditions of high scientific incertitude, diverging values and distrust, this approach is far from satisfactory. The use of cell phones, hazardous chemicals, nuclear or fossil energy systems, and modern biotechnology are examples of activities causing such risks with high complexity. Against this background, a complementary interpretation of the concept of sustainable development is suggested. This interpretation is operationalised through new formulations of three common principles for public risk management; the precautionary principle, the polluter pays principle and the principle of public participation. Implementation of these reformulated principles would challenge some foundations of present mainstream views on environmental decision-making, but would on the other hand contribute to improved practices for long-term human welfare and planetary survival (full text of contribution)

  2. Capacity and principles of participation of the provincial fund of environmental protection and water management in Cracow in Cracow program of elimination of low emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolek, K.; Sarzynski, H. [Provincial Fund of Environmental Protection and Water Management in Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    In general, the principles of environmental protection was determined by Law issued January 31, 1980. Certain detailed solutions have been included in several amendments in subsequent years and the uniformed text of the Law on Environmental Protection and Creation was published in 1994. The Provincial Fund of Environmental Protection and Water Management was established in 1989 but until 1993 the Fund has no legal status. The main purpose of the creation of such fund was to assign certain financial means to the defined tasks related to environmental protection. This way the fund accumulates financial means from the fees paid for the usage of the natural environmental for business purposes and from penalties becoming due in the case of non-observance of the environmental protection standards. On the other hand, the Fund spends money for tasks in the field of environmental protection requiring urgent implementation. It should be added that - after few amendments brought into force - the Provincial Funds are able to assign a greater amount of money to the implementation of these tasks. The basic purposes of Provincial Fund activity, defined by Law, determine the policy and criteria of the selection of undertaking. This is also a base for making programs of activity and for creation of the list of priorities. The environmental protection problems in the individual provinces are different. Therefore, the scope of works partly financed by the Fund is very differentiated both in essence and in the method of financing. The former system of subsidies is now being replaced with a wide range of partial financing of undertakings in the field of environmental protection. The system of selection of these undertakings has been changed essentially. The selection of tasks and methods of their financing is based on economic criteria.

  3. The precautionary principle and pharmaceutical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callréus, Torbjörn

    2005-01-01

    Although it is often vigorously contested and has several different formulations, the precautionary principle has in recent decades guided environmental policy making in the face of scientific uncertainty. Originating from a criticism of traditional risk assessment, the key element of the precautionary principle is the justification for acting in the face of uncertain knowledge about risks. In the light of its growing invocation in various areas that are related to public health and recently in relation to drug safety issues, this article presents an introductory review of the main elements of the precautionary principle and some arguments conveyed by its advocates and opponents. A comparison of the characteristics of pharmaceutical risk management and environmental policy making (i.e. the setting within which the precautionary principle evolved), indicates that several important differences exist. If believed to be of relevance, in order to avoid arbitrary and unpredictable decision making, both the interpretation and possible application of the precautionary principle need to be adapted to the conditions of pharmaceutical risk management.

  4. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited

  5. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited

  6. The precautionary principle in environmental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebel, D; Tickner, J; Epstein, P; Lemons, J; Levins, R; Loechler, E L; Quinn, M; Rudel, R; Schettler, T; Stoto, M

    2001-01-01

    Environmental scientists play a key role in society's responses to environmental problems, and many of the studies they perform are intended ultimately to affect policy. The precautionary principle, proposed as a new guideline in environmental decision making, has four central components: taking preventive action in the face of uncertainty; shifting the burden of proof to the proponents of an activity; exploring a wide range of alternatives to possibly harmful actions; and increasing public participation in decision making. In this paper we examine the implications of the precautionary principle for environmental scientists, whose work often involves studying highly complex, poorly understood systems, while at the same time facing conflicting pressures from those who seek to balance economic growth and environmental protection. In this complicated and contested terrain, it is useful to examine the methodologies of science and to consider ways that, without compromising integrity and objectivity, research can be more or less helpful to those who would act with precaution. We argue that a shift to more precautionary policies creates opportunities and challenges for scientists to think differently about the ways they conduct studies and communicate results. There is a complicated feedback relation between the discoveries of science and the setting of policy. While maintaining their objectivity and focus on understanding the world, environmental scientists should be aware of the policy uses of their work and of their social responsibility to do science that protects human health and the environment. The precautionary principle highlights this tight, challenging linkage between science and policy. PMID:11673114

  7. INTEGRATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Tomescu Ada Mirela

    2012-01-01

    The relevance of management as significant factor of business activity can be established on various management systems. These will help to obtain, organise, administrate, evaluate and control particulars: information, quality, environmental protection, health and safety, various resources (time, human, finance, inventory etc). The complexity of nowadays days development, forced us to think ‘integrated’. Sustainable development principles require that environment management policies and p...

  8. Macro-environmental policy: Principles and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppes, G.

    1993-01-01

    The central theme of this book is how macro-environmental policy can be developed, which does not prescribe or suggest specific technologies and products bu realizes the environmental quality desired by changing the general context. The publication is composed of four main parts. The framework for analysis and the normative principles for policy design and evaluation, the first two parts, form the analytic core. The framework for analysis gives a classification of instruments in terms of permutations of a limited number of defining elements. The normative principles guide choices in instrument design and, as the flexible response strategy, guide their application in specific policies. Detailing two main new instruments (the standard method for life cycle analysis and the substance deposit, and applying the instrument strategy as developed to the cases make up the next two parts

  9. Goals and Principles of Environmental Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylicz, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at how contemporary environmental (including climate) policy problems are phrased in terms of effectiveness, efficiency, and equity. The latter three concepts have served as foci of theoretical discussions among economists who analyse these issues and identify criteria that determine relevant regulations and programmes adopted by governments. The paper starts with a discussion of Pigouvian taxation as model instrument used in order to solve policy problems. It analyses to what extent and under what circumstances alternative instruments - such as marketable pollution permits - can achieve environmental and climate goals while serving other purposes too. Coase theorem is used as a reference for discussing what government interventions are indeed indispensable to achieve both explicit and tacit policy goals. Popular principles and practically applied 'rules of thumb' - such as the Polluter Pays Principle - are then reviewed. The next part is devoted to examining market structures as they influence environmental outcomes of economic activities. This is followed by a discussion of Environmental Tax Reforms which seems to inspire much of the economic thinking about contemporary policies. An outlook for the 21st century concludes the paper.

  10. The principle of cooperation in environmental law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengeling, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The study prepared by order of the Federal Office for Environmental Protection describes the cooperation principle in German environmental policy. It presents examples from various areas of environmental protection, i.a. the participation of third-parties in government decisions. The functions, advantages, problems and risks of cooperation are dealt with. The study focuses on the constitutional and administrative fundamentals for the evaluation of the admissibility and limits of cooperation. On the one hand, there has to be cooperation between State and Society, on the other, there is a normative separation of the two in accordance with constitutional law. The study points out scopes of action for cooperation between State and Society. (RST) [de

  11. Exploration of Environmental Management

    OpenAIRE

    Li Shushu; Li Ruilong; Chen Rui

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of domestic and international research, this article takes research on peasant household and agricultural managements as base points, aims to build environmental management model, establish government-led, an effective environmental management mechanism between the government and peasant household. Analyzes the role of peasant household’ environmental management in the regional environmental improvement from the aspect of theoretical analysis and analyze significant factors affec...

  12. Principles and practices of sustainable water management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bixia Xu

    2010-01-01

    Literature related to sustainable water management is reviewed to illustrate the relationship among water management, sustainability (sustainable development), and sustainable water management. This review begins with the explanation on the definition of sustainable water management, followed by a discussion of sustainable water management principles and practices.

  13. Volume II: Ecosystem management: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Jensen; P.S. Bourgeron

    1994-01-01

    This document provides land managers with practical suggestions for implementing ecosystem management. It contains 28 papers organized into five sections: historical perspectives, ecological principles, sampling design, case studies, and implementation strategies.

  14. Life Cycle Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Stig; Jørgensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, Morten Als

    1996-01-01

    A precondition for environmentally conscious management is the awareness of the environmental impact potentials created by an industrial company. There is an obvious need for management tools to support the implementation of relevant environmental criteria into the industrial decision making...... processes. The discipline of life cycle environmental management (LCEM) focuses on the incorporation of environmental criteria from the life cycles of products and other company activities into the company management processes. This paper introduces the concept of LCEM as an important element...... of the complete set of environmental objects in an industrial manufacturing company....

  15. Analysis of Environmental Law Enforcement Mechanism Based on Economic Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongjun; Shao, Haohao; Cai, Xuesen

    2017-11-01

    Strengthening and improving the environmental law enforcement mechanism is an important way to protect the ecological environment. This paper is based on economical principles, we did analysis of the marginal management costs by using Pigou means and the marginal transaction costs by using Coase means vary with the quantity growth of pollutant discharge Enterprises. We analyzed all this information, then we got the conclusion as follows. In the process of strengthening the environmental law enforcement mechanism, firstly, we should fully mobilize all aspects of environmental law enforcement, such as legislative bodies and law enforcement agencies, public welfare organizations, television, newspapers, enterprises, people and so on, they need to form a reasonable and organic structure system; then we should use various management means, such as government regulation, legal sanctions, fines, persuasion and denounce, they also need to form an organic structural system.

  16. Methodical ecologization principles in construction management

    OpenAIRE

    Nuzhina Irina Pavlovna; Yudakhina Olga Borisovna

    2015-01-01

    In the article the subject of ecologization of construction sector is presented, the necessity of ecologization technology and technological processes is proved. The article also presents principles of ecologically friendly management of construction and investment activities and describes these principles in detail.

  17. Violations of Management Principles within Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, Andrew F.; Sikula, John P.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of effective management commonly violated by educational institutions include: (1) unity of command; (2) division or specialization of labor; (3) delegation of authority; and (4) authority equal to responsibility. (JMF)

  18. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  19. Bookkeeping information use for implementing management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian Virgil BĂLUŢĂ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the principles used for the new projects and agreed by the enterprisers is that of 3D. In order to apply this principle, one needs to use bookkeeping information. In the attempt of managers to be successful in business, there is also used the bookkeeping information. The managers use a series of practices in order to increase the companies’ performance. For most cases, the account department helps the successful managerial practices with adequate information and procedures.

  20. 75 FR 9878 - Draft Principles and Standards Sections of the “Economic and Environmental Principles and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Draft Principles and Standards Sections of the ``Economic and... the ``Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources... may be accessed at the Internet addresses indicated: ``Economic and Environmental Principles and...

  1. Energy managing of outsourcing principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uran, Vedran

    2004-01-01

    Outsourcing means ownership or rent, management and user transmission of one type of operation of a certain company whose core-business is not that to another company bearing that business as the core one. That kind of operation and management relationship among certain activities in this work paper is described between companies of public, services and industrial sector and outsourcing company for energy supply. Benefits and barriers of outsourcing company for energy supply in Croatia are discussed. (Author)

  2. The precautionary principle in international environmental law and international jurisprudence

    OpenAIRE

    Tubić, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    This paper analysis international regulation of the precautionary principle as one of environmental principles. This principle envisages that when there are threats of serious and irreparable harm, as a consequence of certain economic activity, the lack of scientific evidence and full certainty cannot be used as a reason for postponing efficient measures for preventing environmental harm. From economic point of view, the application of precautionary principle is problematic, because it create...

  3. INTEGRATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomescu Ada Mirela

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of management as significant factor of business activity can be established on various management systems. These will help to obtain, organise, administrate, evaluate and control particulars: information, quality, environmental protection, health and safety, various resources (time, human, finance, inventory etc. The complexity of nowadays days development, forced us to think ‘integrated’. Sustainable development principles require that environment management policies and practices are not good in themselves but also integrate with all other environmental objectives, and with social and economic development objectives. The principles of sustainable development involve that environment management policies and practices. These are not sound in them-self but also integrate with all other environmental objectives, and with social and economic development objectives. Those objectives were realized, and followed by development of strategies to effects the objective of sustainable development. Environmental management should embrace recent change in the area of environmental protection, and suit the recently regulations of the field -entire legal and economic, as well as perform management systems to meet the requirements of the contemporary model for economic development. These changes are trailed by abandon the conventional approach of environmental protection and it is replaced by sustainable development (SD. The keys and the aims of Cleaner Productions (CP are presented being implemented in various companies as a non-formalised environmental management system (EMS. This concept is suggested here as a proper model for practice where possible environmental harmful technologies are used -e.g. Rosia Montana. Showing the features and the power of CP this paper is a signal oriented to involve the awareness of policy-makers and top management of diverse Romanian companies. Many companies in European countries are developing

  4. Comprehensive Environmental Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjeresen, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory is in the process of initiating and then implementing a Comprehensive Environmental Management Plan (CEMP). There are several environmental impact and compliance drivers for this initiative. The Los Alamos CEMP is intended to be a flexible, long-range process that predicts, minimizes, treats, and disposes of any waste generated in execution of the Los Alamos mission - even if that mission changes. The CEMP is also intended to improve stakeholder and private sector involvement and access to environmental information. The total quality environmental management (TQEM) process will benchmark Los Alamos to private sector and DOE operations, identify opportunities for improvement, prioritize among opportunities, implement projects, measure progress, and spur continuous improvement in Environmental Management operations

  5. Essays on environmental management

    OpenAIRE

    Marbuah, George

    2016-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the economic literature on invasive species, social capital connection to climate change and environmental good provision as well as energy demand management. It contains five independent papers connected by the broader theme of environmental management. Two papers (I and II) deal with invasive species while the third and fourth probes the effect of social capital on carbon dioxide emissions (CO₂) and individuals’ decision to contribute toward environmental protecti...

  6. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    Principles and Management of Adrenal Cancer is a comprehensive presentation of the medical and surgical management of neoplastic diseases of the adrenal glands. It consists of two parts. The first provides an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, pathology, and advances in methods of diagnosis and imaging techniques. The second deals with specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. (orig./MG)

  7. Mobility management principle, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shanzhi; Hu, Bo; Ai, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This is the first book devoted to mobility management, covering the important principles, technologies and applications of mobility management based on years of academic research and industry experiences. The content is organized according to the reference models proposed by the authors, and emphasizes on technical principles rather than protocol details; a systematic and comprehensive introduction is presented yet without losing focuses; the existing technologies in cellular system, mobile Internet and IMS/SIP are also extensively compared. This book can be an indispensable reference for mobile communication engineers, computer network engineers, researchers and anyone else involved in academic, industrial and standardization activities on mobility management.

  8. Environmental Requirements Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  9. Energy conversion and management principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Petrecca, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overall view of energy conversion and management in industry and in buildings by following the streams of energy from the site boundaries to the end users. Written for an audience of both practitioners and faculty/students, Energy Conversion and Management: Principles and Applications presents general principles of energy conversion and energy sources, both traditional and renewable, in a broad range of facilities such as electrical substations, boiler plants, heat and power plants, electrical networks, thermal fluid distributions lines and insulations, pumps and fans, ai

  10. Environmental Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site on Environmental Management Systems (EMS) provides information and resources related to EMS for small businesses and private industry, as well as local, state and federal agencies, including all the EPA offices and laboratories.

  11. Comprehensive Environmental Management Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjeresen, D.L.; Roybal, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information about Los Alamos National Laboratory's Comprehensive Environmental Management Plan. The topics covered include: waste minimization, waste generation, environmental concerns, public relations of the laboratory, and how this plan will help to answer to the demands of the laboratory as their mission changes

  12. Environmental Compliance Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A.; Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy

  13. Irrigation water management: Basic principles and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ella, Victor B.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation defines the term, irrigation, as well as explains the common methods of irrigation in attempt to define the fundamental principles needed to wisely design an irrigation system. It outlines a typical drip irrigation set-up, and discusses management of an irrigation system, including water volume application suggestions. LTRA-5 (Agroforestry and Sustainable Vegetable Production)

  14. Management by Grid Principles or Situationalism: Which?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Robert R.; Mouton, Jane S.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts to resolve the leadership theory controversy between situationalism and the one-best-way approach. Indicates the validity of the latter and the lack of predictive value of the former. Results indicated administrators chose the 9,9 alternative and rejected situationally prescribed answers, reflecting a management by principles (behavioral…

  15. Environmental Management Fact Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    In recent years, the need for nuclear materials has decreased and the Department of Energy (DOE) has focused greater attention on cleaning up contamination left from past activities. The Office of Environmental Management (EM) within DOE is responsible for managing waste and cleaning up contamination at DOE sites across the nation. This collection…

  16. Environmental management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    An Environmental Management System was implemented in ANAV in 1999, including the two nuclear sites of the Asco and Vandellos II nuclear power plants. This implementation entailed formulation of the ANAV Environmental Policy, preparation of an Environmental Management Plan (PLAGMA) supported by the Environmental Aspects Manuals (MASMA) of each site and their operating procedures, modification of the organizational structure to create the Environment Unit, in charge of implementing the SIGEMA, and the Environment Committee, the governing body that reviews the results obtained and environmental goals to be achieved, and direct involvement of all the different ANAV organization in continuous improvement of the SIGEMA implementation. Special attention is paid to evolution of the environmental indicators, to communication and specific training in environmental issues, and to waste management and the different programs for increasing waste recycling and assessment, as well as to minimization programs. The article details the different approaches used to improve the environmental results in these last five years, which have allowed ANAV to maintain the ISO-14001 Certification since 1999. (Author)

  17. Subsidiarity in Principle: Decentralization of Water Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Stoa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The subsidiarity principle of water resources management suggests that water management and service delivery should take place at the lowest appropriate governance level. The principle is attractive for several reasons, primarily because: 1 the governance level can be reduced to reflect environmental characteristics, such as the hydrological borders of a watershed that would otherwise cross administrative boundaries; 2 decentralization promotes community and stakeholder engagement when decision-making is localized; 3 inefficiencies are reduced by eliminating reliance on central government bureaucracies and budgetary constraints; and 4 laws and institutions can be adapted to reflect localized conditions at a scale where integrated natural resources management and climate change adaptation is more focused. Accordingly, the principle of subsidiarity has been welcomed by many states committed to decentralized governance, integrated water resources management, and/or civic participation. However, applications of decentralization have not been uniform, and in some cases have produced frustrating outcomes for states and water resources. Successful decentralization strategies are heavily dependent on dedicated financial resources and human resource capacity. This article explores the nexus between the principle of subsidiarity and the enabling environment, in the hope of articulating factors likely to contribute to, or detract from, the success of decentralized water resources management. Case studies from Haiti, Rwanda, and the United States’ Florida Water Management Districts provide examples of the varied stages of decentralization.

  18. Sustainable development and the nature of environmental legal principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Verschuuren

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, “things” lawyers call “principles” of environmental law will be discussed from a theoretical perspective. Three fundamental questions are answered: 1. Where does the high moral value that is usually attributed principles come from? 2. What is the exact difference between a principle and a legal rule, and between a principle and a policy? 3. What is the relationship between a principle and more concrete legal rules and policies? It is argued that principles of environmental law receive their high moral value from the ideal of sustainable development. An ideal is a value that is explicit, implicit or latent in the law, or the public and moral culture of a society or group that usually cannot be fully realised, and that partly transcends contingent, historical formulations, and implementations in terms of rules and principles. Principles form a necessary link between directly applicable and enforceable environmental legal rules and the underlying ideal. They are a necessary medium for ideals to find their way into concrete rules and can be used to bridge the gap between the morality of duty and the morality of aspiration. Because of their basis in (written or unwritten law and their possible direct and intense influence on legal rules concerning activities that may harm the environment, they must be placed within the morality of duty: a bridgehead within the morality of duty reaching out for the morality of aspiration. From the general function of principles of forming a beachhead in the morality of duty, nine more concrete functions can be derived. These functions principles, both of a substantive and of a procedural nature, have, make it possible to distinguish them from legal rules. It must be acknowledged, however, that there is no very strict separation between principles on one side and rules on the other: environmental norms can be placed on a sliding scale with rules on one side and principles on the other side

  19. Environmental management in public hospitals: Environmental management in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Pablo Rodríguez-Miranda; César Augusto García-Ubaque; María Camila García-Vaca

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Activities in hospitals have environmental impacts which may pose risks to human and environmental health if they are not managed correctly. For this reason, it is necessary to implement an environmental management plan in hospitals that not only focuses on solid waste management but includes all aspects associated with health within institutions. Objective: To review environmental management aspects related to public hospitals in order to identify environmental management a...

  20. Environmental management system in companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanno, C.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental management system, as the whole coordinated initiatives 'environmental oriented' introduced by companies in their organization, is discussed. Strategic weight that companies have to be present at the environmental management system is enlisted. Finally, the new professional figures of environmental technicians and environmental manager is discussed

  1. Environmental management systems

    OpenAIRE

    Misiak, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Considering environmental protection requirements in business operations may, in the long run, determine if a lasting comparative advantage can be achieved. That is why our textbook, rich in case studies, identifies not only the threats a business may pose to the environment but stresses the ways of reducing its negative impact. It discusses, among other things, the concept of corporate social responsibility, environmental management systems, methods and the importance of eco-labelling goods ...

  2. Principles and objective of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in various nuclear applications, for example, in the use of radionuclides in medicine, industry and research or in the nuclear fuel cycle. It must be managed in a safe way independent of its very different characteristics. Establishing the basic safety philosophy is an important contribution to promoting and developing international consensus in radioactive waste management. The principles of radioactive waste management were developed with supporting text to provide such a safety philosophy. They cover the protection of human health and the environment now and in the future within and beyond national borders, the legal framework, the generation and management of radioactive wastes, and the safety of facilities. Details of the legal framework are provided by defining the roles and responsibilities of the Member State, the regulatory body and the waste generators and operators of radioactive waste management facilities. These principles and the responsibilities in radioactive waste management are contained in two recently published top level documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme which is the IAEA's contribution to foster international consensus in radioactive waste management. As the two documents have to cover all aspects of radioactive waste management they have to be formulated in a generic way. Details will be provided in other, more specific documents of the RADWASS programme as outlined in the RADWASS publication plant. The RADWASS documents are published in the Agency's Safety Series, which provides recommendations to Member Sates. Using material from the top level RADWASS documents a convention on the safety of radioactive waste management is under development to provide internationally binding requirements for radioactive waste management. (author). 12 refs

  3. MANAGER PRINCIPLES AS BASIS OF MANAGEMENT STYLE TRANSFORMATION

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Kopytov

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers an approach which is based on non-conventional mechanisms of management style formation. The preset level of sustainable management is maintained by self-organized environment created in the process of management style transformation in efficient management principles. Their efficiency is checked within an adaptive algorithm. The algorithm is developed on the basis of combination of evaluative tools  and base of operational  proves. The operating algorithm capability is te...

  4. Approaching Environmental Cleanup Costs Liability Through Insurance Principles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corbin, Michael A

    1994-01-01

    .... Applying insurance industry principles to environmental cleanup costs liability will provide a firm foundation to reduce the risk of loss to the taxpayer, reduce cleanup costs, and stimulate private...

  5. Emergency nurses' knowledge of pain management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, P; Buschmann, M

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine areas of emergency nurses' knowledge deficit regarding pain management, and to identify barriers to pain management as perceived by emergency nurses. Data were collected anonymously in a mail survey using a 52-item knowledge questionnaire addressing pain management principles and asking emergency nurses (Illinois Emergency Nurses Association members) to rate various barriers as to how often they affect their practice. Questionnaires were mailed to all Illinois ENA members (n = 1000). Three hundred five emergency nurses' questionnaires were returned. A significant deficit existed on 2 domains of knowledge: understanding of the terms "addiction," "tolerance," and "dependence"; and knowledge of various pharmacologic analgesic principles. Nurses with a master's degree or higher, or those who attended a 1-day seminar on pain management, achieved statistically significantly higher scores. The 2 barriers identified by emergency nurses as the most common were the inability to administer medication until a diagnosis is made (53%), and inadequate assessment of pain and pain relief (48%) (the percentage indicates how often the emergency nurses believed the barrier was present in their practice). The data indicate that emergency nurses may not have a good understanding of the management of pain with drugs, or of such issues as risk of addiction.

  6. Environmental and resource management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1996-01-01

    Artiklen bringer bl.a. de seneste resultater (i forkortet udgave) fra et igangværende flerårigt forskningsprojekt - The Danish Environmental Management Survey (DEMS) - der sigter efter løbende at analysere og vurdere den igangværende 'forgrønnelse' i erhvervslivet i et longitudinalt perspektiv...

  7. Principles for assessing disease management outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Sidorov, Jaan; Fetterolf, Don; Wennberg, David; Eisenberg, Edward; Cousins, Michael; Hoffman, Joel; Haughton, John; Charlton, Warwick; Krause, David; Woolf, Allen; Mcdonough, Kenneth; Todd, Warren; Fox, Kathe; Plocher, David; Juster, Iver; Stiefel, Matt; Villagra, Victor; Duncan, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Disease management (DM) is rapidly becoming an important force in the late 20th and early 21st century as a strategy for managing the chronic illness of large populations. Given the increasing visibility of DM programs, the clinical, economic and financial impact of this support are vital to DM program accountability and its acceptance as a solution to the twin challenges of achieving affordable, quality health care. Measuring and reporting outcomes in DM is difficult. DM programs must adapt to local market conditions and customer desires, which in turn limits generalizability, and still account for the overlapping/interlocking/multifaceted nature of the interventions included in any DM program. The Disease Management Association of America convened a Steering Committee to suggest a preferred approach, not a mandated or standardized approach for DM program evaluation. This paper presents the Steering Committee's "Consensus Statement" and "Guiding Principles" for robust evaluation.

  8. Itinerary implementation of an environmental management system and its benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Căpuşneanu, Sorinel/I; Martinescu (Oprea), Dana Maria/G

    2010-01-01

    This article treats the problem of environmental management system starting from definition and objectives stipulated according to ISO 14001. The success of implementation of the environmental management system consists in respecting its principles. It is described the role of employers' organizations in promoting environmental management systems. Also, there are described the implementation stages of an environmental management system in Romania. Each unrolled stage is synthesized and argued...

  9. Ten financial management principles for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O

    1988-03-01

    Financial insolvency is the primary cause of hospital failure. Managers may analyze a hospital's financial statements to anticipate and prevent fiscal problems. Ten measures of fiscal status may be used to evaluate the following: operating profitability nonoperating income equity growth liquidity debt capacity age of facilities revenue generation replacement funds receivables survivability Based on data from the Financial Analysis Service, Catholic hospitals are doing better than other U.S. hospitals in some areas of financial preparedness. In most areas, however, all hospitals suffer by comparison with manufacturers. The 10 principles of solvent and successful operations can help hospitals improve financial resiliency.

  10. The precautionary principle in international environmental law and international jurisprudence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubić Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysis international regulation of the precautionary principle as one of environmental principles. This principle envisages that when there are threats of serious and irreparable harm, as a consequence of certain economic activity, the lack of scientific evidence and full certainty cannot be used as a reason for postponing efficient measures for preventing environmental harm. From economic point of view, the application of precautionary principle is problematic, because it creates larger responsibility for those who create possible risks, comparing to the previous period. The precautionary principle can be found in numerous international treaties in this field, which regulate it in a very similar manner. There is no consensus in doctrine whether this principle has reached the level of international customary law, because it was interpreted differently and it was not accepted by large number of countries in their national legislations. It represents a developing concept which is consisted of changing positions on adequate roles of science, economy, politics and law in the field of environmental protection. This principle has been discussed in several cases before International Court of Justice and International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea.

  11. Environmental management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been delegated the responsibility for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) cleanup of the nuclear weapons complex. The nature and magnitude of the waste management and environmental remediation problem requires the identification of technologies and scientific expertise from domestic and foreign sources. Within the United States, operational DOE facilities, as well as the decontamination and decommissioning of inactive facilities, have produced significant amounts of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In order to ensure worker safety and the protection of the public, DOE must: (1) assess, remediate, and monitor sites and facilities; (2) store, treat, and dispose of wastes from past and current operations; and (3) develop and implement innovative technologies for environmental restoration and waste management. The EM directive necessitates looking beyond domestic capabilities to technological solutions found outside US borders. Following the collapse of the Soviet regime, formerly restricted elite Soviet scientific expertise became available to the West. EM has established a cooperative technology development program with Russian scientific institutes that meets domestic cleanup objectives by: (1) identifying and accessing Russian EM-related technologies, thereby leveraging investments and providing cost-savings; (2) improving access to technical information, scientific expertise, and technologies applicable to EM needs; and (3) increasing US private sector opportunities in Russian in EM-related areas

  12. The precautionary principle in environmental regulations for drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Crawford-Brown, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The precautionary principle has been proposed as a means of providing increased safety for consumers of drinking water. While the principle has received increased attention over the past 2 decades, it remains rather poorly defined both in law and practice. Hence, the implications for application in risk-based decisions on water quality are not fully developed. This paper examines a series of philosophical, practical and decision-theoretic issues related to the application of the principle in such decisions, highlighting areas where at least the intent of the principle is already well embedded in environmental regulation through margins of safety, and identifying residual issues. A conclusion is drawn that full application of the principle may be driven forward both by programmes such as REACH in the EU, and by the emerging Water Framework Directive and multi-stakeholder approaches to climate change mitigation and adaptation.

  13. Principles of power frequency magnetic field management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugate, D.; Feero, W.

    1995-01-01

    At the most general level, magnetic field management is the creation, elimination, or modification of sources in order to alter the spatial distribution of magnetic fields over some region of space. The two main options for magnetic field management are source modification (elimination or modification of original sources) and cancellation (creation of new sources). Source modification includes any changes in the layout or location of field sources, elimination of ground paths, or any options that increase the distance between sources and regions of interest. Cancellation involves the creation of new magnetic field sources, passive and/or active that produce magnetic fields that are opposite to the original fields in the region of interest. Shielding using materials of high conductivity and/or high permeability falls under the cancellation option. Strategies for magnetic field management, whether they are source modification or cancellation, typically vary on a case to case basis depending on the regions of interest, the types of sources and resulting complexity of the field structure, the field levels, and the attenuation requirements. This paper gives an overview of magnetic field management based on fundamental concepts. Low field design principles are described, followed by a structured discussion of cancellation and shielding. The two basic material shielding mechanisms, induced current shielding, and flux-shunting are discussed

  14. Environmental management report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braathen, Ole-Anders

    2012-01-01

    One of NILU's main goals is to study the impact of pollution. It is thus very important for the institute to have control of the impact the institute's own activities may have on the environment and to reduce the impact as far as possible. NILU has for many years been working to reduce the impact. In order to take this one step further, it was decided that the institute should restructure the work according to a relevant environmental standard and to seek certification according to the same standard. The chosen standard is ISO 14001:2004 (Environmental management systems: Requirements with guidance for use) and NILU achieved certification according to this standard in October 2010.(Author)

  15. Environmental management report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braathen, Ole-Anders

    2012-07-01

    One of NILU's main goals is to study the impact of pollution. It is thus very important for the institute to have control of the impact the institute's own activities may have on the environment and to reduce the impact as far as possible. NILU has for many years been working to reduce the impact. In order to take this one step further, it was decided that the institute should restructure the work according to a relevant environmental standard and to seek certification according to the same standard. The chosen standard is ISO 14001:2004 (Environmental management systems: Requirements with guidance for use) and NILU achieved certification according to this standard in October 2010.(Author)

  16. Environmental management report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braathen, Ole-Anders

    2011-01-01

    One of NILU's main goals is to study the impact of pollution. It is thus very important for the institute to have control of the impact the institute's own activities may have on the environment and to reduce the impact as far as possible. NILU has for many years been working to reduce the impact. In order to take this one step further, it was decided that the institute should restructure the work according to a relevant environmental standard and to seek certification according to the same standard. The chosen standard is ISO 14001:2004 (Environmental management systems: Requirements with guidance for use) and NILU achieved certification according to this standard in October 2010.(Author)

  17. Environmental management report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braathen, Ole-Anders

    2011-07-01

    One of NILU's main goals is to study the impact of pollution. It is thus very important for the institute to have control of the impact the institute's own activities may have on the environment and to reduce the impact as far as possible. NILU has for many years been working to reduce the impact. In order to take this one step further, it was decided that the institute should restructure the work according to a relevant environmental standard and to seek certification according to the same standard. The chosen standard is ISO 14001:2004 (Environmental management systems: Requirements with guidance for use) and NILU achieved certification according to this standard in October 2010.(Author)

  18. Environmental Management: the Ideology of Natural Resource Rational Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, V. M.; Gogolin, V. A.; Yazevich, M. Yu; Baumgarten, M. I.; Dyagileva, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of the ontological and methodological principles of environmental management. These principles form the united ideology of natural resource rational use as the environment preservation basis. Consideration of environmental issues from the environmental management point of view is stipulated by the concern of the scientific community about the existence of mankind and the sphere of its inhabiting. The need to overcome the stereotypes existing in mass consciousness about safe and environmentally friendly consumption is stressed. The process of forming environmental management policy should contribute to the stabilization (balancing) of the consumers’ expectations and collective decision-making based on a public ecological consensus.

  19. Environmental Land Management in Tajikistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhmudov, Zafar; Ergashev, Murod

    2015-04-01

    Tackling Environmental Land Management in Tajikistan "Project approach" Khayrullo Ibodzoda, Zafar Mahmoudov, Murod Ergashev, Kamoliddin Abdulloev Among 28 countries in Europe and Central Asia, Tajikistan is estimated to be the most vulnerable to the climate change impacts depending on its high exposure and sensitivity combined with a very low adaptive capacity. The agricultural sector of Tajikistan is subject to lower and more erratic rainfalls, as well as dryness of water resources due to the possible temperature rising in the region, high evaporation, reducing the accumulation of snow in the mountain glaciers and increased frequency of extreme events. Climate change and variability are likely to pose certain risks, especially for those who prefer natural agriculture or pasture management that just reinforces the need for sound, adapted to new climatic conditions and improved principles of land management. Adoption of new strategies and best practices on sustainable land and water management for agricultural ecosystems will help the farmers and communities in addressing the abovementioned problems, adapt and become more resilient to changing climate by increasing wellbeing of local population, and contributing to food security and restoring productive natural resources. The Environmental Land Management and Rural Livelihoods Project is being financed by the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) and Global Environment Facility (GEF). The Project goal is to enable the rural population to increase their productive assets by improving management of natural resources and building resilience to climate change in selected climate vulnerable sites. The project will facilitate introduction of innovative measures on land use and agricultural production by providing small grants at the village level and grants for the Pasture User Groups (PUGs) at jamoat level in order to implement joint plans of pasture management and wellbred livestock, also for the Water User

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS CERTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniko Miler-Virc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ISO 14001 prescribes the requirements for a system, not environmental performance itself. Similarly, certification is of the management system itself, not environmental performance. An audit is not conducted to ascertain whether your flue gas emissions are less than X part per million nitrous oxide or that your wastewater effluent contains less that Y milligrams of bacteria per litre. Consequently, the procces of auditing the system for compliance to the standard entails checking to see that all of the necessary components of a functioning system are present and working properly.           A company can have a complete and fully functional EMS as prescribed by ISO 14001 without being certified. As certification can add to the time and expense of EMS development, it is important for you to establish, in advance, whether certification is of net benefit to you. Although most companies that develop an EMS do in fact certify, there are cases where certification does not add immediate value. Certification is not always beneficial to small and medium sized companies. Certification is not always necessary for companies with one or two large clients with environmental demands who are satisfied that you have a functional EMS (second-party declaration. Whatever decision you make, it is important to remember that just as a driver′s licence does not automatically make you a good driver, ISO 14001 certification does not automatically make your company environmentally benign or ensure that you will continually improve environmental performance. The system is only as good as the people who operate it.

  1. Basic principles, contents, and benefits of an integrated management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzin, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    The basic principles and contents of an integrated management system are presented. The report focuses on the benefits and the experience accumulated in using an integrated management system. Integrated management systems are characterized by 2 features in particular: - On the one hand, by a system holistically controlling and describing all processes within a company which are necessary to achieve the company policy and company goals as defined. - On the other hand, it combines in one integrated management system various different aspects (such as quality, environmental protection, and safety) and the resulting requirements. Successful implementation of an integrated management system requires a clear commitment by company management to the integrated management system serving as a management tool. Implementation must be assigned the appropriate importance in the company. It must not be viewed as an instrument preserving 'status quo.' Instead, it must be seen as a tool for long-term improvement of the company. Application of the integrated management system minimizes the probability of occurrence of events, but is not able to reduce it to zero. (orig.)

  2. Environmental restoration and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleman, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this Five-Year Plan is to establish an agenda for compliance and cleanup against which progress will be measured. DOE is committed to an open and participatory process for developing a national priority system for expenditure of funds. This system will be based on scientific principles and risk reduction in terms that are understandable to the public. The Plan will be revised annually, with a five-year planning horizon. For FY 1991--1995, this Plan encompasses total program activities and costs for DOE Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, Waste Management Operations, and Applied R ampersand D. It addresses hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, mixed wastes (radioactive and hazardous), and sanitary wastes. It also addresses facilities and sites contaminated with or used in the management of those wastes. The Plan does not include the Safety and Health Program (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health) or programs of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. It does include the annual Defense Programs contribution to the Nuclear Waste Fund for disposal of defense high-level waste and research toward characterizing the defense waste form for repository disposal

  3. Environmental management in public hospitals: Environmental management in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Rodríguez-Miranda

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Hospitals can apply broader environmental management instruments, including life cycle analysis of their products and services and monitoring of the carbon footprint; they may also take into account the different areas of environmental impact of their operation.

  4. Environmental Management Performance Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDER, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) a monthly summary of the Central Plateau Contractor's Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. Only current FH workscope responsibilities are described and other contractor/RL managed work is excluded. Please refer to other sections (BHI, PNNL) for other contractor information. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the contractor baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual subproject (e.g., Plutonium Finishing Plant, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. All information is updated as of January 31, 2002 unless otherwise noted. ''Stoplight'' boxes are used to indicate at a glance the condition of a particular safety area. Green boxes denote either (1) the data are stable at a level representing ''acceptable'' performance, or (2) an improving trend exists. Yellows denote the data are stable at a level from which improvement is needed. Red denotes a trend exists in a non-improving direction

  5. Environmental Management Performance Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDER, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) a monthly summary of the Central Plateau Contractor's Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. Only current FH workscope responsibilities are described and other contractor/RL managed work is excluded. Please refer to other sections (BHI, PNNL) for other contractor information. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the contractor baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual subproject (e.g., Plutonium Finishing Plant, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. All information is updated as of the end of May 2002 unless otherwise noted. ''Stoplight'' boxes are used to indicate at a glance the condition of a particular safety area. Green boxes denote either (1) the data are stable at a level representing ''acceptable'' performance, or (2) an improving trend exists. Yellows denote the data are stable at a level from which improvement is needed. Red denotes a trend exists in a non-improving direction

  6. Environmental Management vitrification activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumrine, P.H. [Waste Policy Institute, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Both the Mixed Waste and Landfill Stabilization Focus Areas as part of the Office of Technology Development efforts within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Division have been developing various vitrification technologies as a treatment approach for the large quantities of transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed and Mixed Low Level Wastes that are stored in either landfills or above ground storage facilities. The technologies being developed include joule heated, plasma torch, plasma arc, induction, microwave, combustion, molten metal, and in situ methods. There are related efforts going into development glass, ceramic, and slag waste form windows of opportunity for the diverse quantities of heterogeneous wastes needing treatment. These studies look at both processing parameters, and long term performance parameters as a function of composition to assure that developed technologies have the right chemistry for success.

  7. Environmental Management vitrification activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumrine, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    Both the Mixed Waste and Landfill Stabilization Focus Areas as part of the Office of Technology Development efforts within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Division have been developing various vitrification technologies as a treatment approach for the large quantities of transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed and Mixed Low Level Wastes that are stored in either landfills or above ground storage facilities. The technologies being developed include joule heated, plasma torch, plasma arc, induction, microwave, combustion, molten metal, and in situ methods. There are related efforts going into development glass, ceramic, and slag waste form windows of opportunity for the diverse quantities of heterogeneous wastes needing treatment. These studies look at both processing parameters, and long term performance parameters as a function of composition to assure that developed technologies have the right chemistry for success

  8. Women's Environmental Literacy As Social Capital In Environmental Management For Environmental Security of Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asteria, Donna; Herdiansyah, Herdis; Wayan Agus Apriana, I.

    2016-02-01

    This study is about experience of women's role in environmental management to raise environmental security and form of women's emancipation movement. Environmental concerns conducted by residents of urban women who become environmental activists based on environmental literacy. Because of that, women's experience in interacting with both physic and social environment have differences in managing the environment including managing household waste by applying the principles of the 3Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle) and their persuasive efforts on their communities. This is the key to achieving sustainable development by anticipating environmental problem and preserving the environment. This study is conducted qualitative research method and its type is descriptive-explanative. The result of this study is environmental literacy of women activist on pro-environment action in their community that has achieved spiritual environmental literacy. Environmental literacy may differ due to internal and external condition of each individual. Pro-environment activities conducted as a form of responsibility of environmental concern such as eco-management, educational, and economic action, by persuading residents to proactively and consistently continue to do environmental management and develop a sense of community in shaping the networks of environmental concern in local context for global effect.

  9. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT IN THE LIFECYCLE OF PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kulczycka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the aims of the European Commission (EC activities is to introduce uniform rules for the environmental performance assessment based on the life cycle assessment method (LCA, which can be widely used e.g. in eco-labeling, assessment of goods, services, technology, etc. Therefore, from 1 November 2013 the European Commission implemented a pilot phase of the project on developing common methods for measuring the environmental performance of the product and organisation, aims to develop guidance documents in this field. The pilot phase includes development of the Category Rules relating to the calculation, verification and communication for environmental footprint of the 25 categories of products and two organizations. Therefore, the article presents the principle of environmental performance based on life cycle assessment in relation to the objectives of the proposed methodology of environmental footprint.

  10. Environmental management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, K.C.; Bhat, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Safety of the environment is given due attention right at the design state of nuclear energy installations. Besides this engineered safety environmental protection measures are taken on (a) site selection criteria (b) waste management practices (c) prescribing dose limits for the public (d) having intensive environmental surveillance programme and (e) emergency preparedness. The paper enumerates the application of these protection measures in the environmental management to make the nuclear industry as an example to follow in the goal of environmental safety. (author)

  11. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report.

  12. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report

  13. Adaptive Management of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, J. Angus; Watts, Robyn J.; Allan, Catherine; Conallin, John C.

    2018-03-01

    Adaptive management enables managers to work with complexity and uncertainty, and to respond to changing biophysical and social conditions. Amid considerable uncertainty over the benefits of environmental flows, governments are embracing adaptive management as a means to inform decision making. This Special Issue of Environmental Management presents examples of adaptive management of environmental flows and addresses claims that there are few examples of its successful implementation. It arose from a session at the 11th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics held in Australia, and is consequently dominated by papers from Australia. We classified the papers according to the involvement of researchers, managers and the local community in adaptive management. Five papers report on approaches developed by researchers, and one paper on a community-led program; these case studies currently have little impact on decision making. Six papers provide examples involving water managers and researchers, and two papers provide examples involving water managers and the local community. There are no papers where researchers, managers and local communities all contribute equally to adaptive management. Successful adaptive management of environmental flows occurs more often than is perceived. The final paper explores why successes are rarely reported, suggesting a lack of emphasis on reflection on management practices. One major challenge is to increase the documentation of successful adaptive management, so that benefits of learning extend beyond the project where it takes place. Finally, moving towards greater involvement of all stakeholders is critical if we are to realize the benefits of adaptive management for improving outcomes from environmental flows.

  14. Environmental Management in Product Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Forman, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    between existing resources, norms and values and external pressures for environmental management (second section). A model for the types of corporate network relations that need to be mapped and understood in order to analyze and/or develop environmental management in a product chain (third section......The chapter aims at giving background to companies, consultants, governmental regulators, NGOs etc. for the analysis and planning of environmental management in specific product chains through: A framework for understanding environmental management in product chains as shaped by the interaction......). An overview of examples from our own research and from literature of the type and the role of environmental issues and initiatives in product chains (fourth section). A typology for characterizing corporate strategies as part of environmental management in product chains and characterizing those competencies...

  15. Marine environmental protection, sustainability and the precautionary principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.; Santillo, D.; Stringer, R.

    1999-01-01

    The global oceans provide a diverse array of ecosystem services which cannot be replaced by technological means and are therefore of potentially infinite value. While valuation of ecosystem services is a useful qualitative metric, unresolved uncertainties limit its application in the regulatory and policy domain. This paper evaluates current human activities in terms of their conformity to four principles of sustainability. Violation of any one of the principles indicates that a given activity is unsustainable and that controlling measures are required. Examples of human uses of the oceans can be evaluated using these principles, taking into account also the transgenerational obligations of the current global population. When three major issues concerning the oceans: Land based activities, fisheries and climatic change are examined in this way, they may easily be shown to be globally unsustainable. It is argued that effective environmental protection can best be achieved through the application of a precautionary approach. (author)

  16. INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. Book Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through a wide range of information and topics, Integrated Watershed Management Principles and Practice shows how involved the watershed management planning process can be. The book is informative, and the author obviously has researched the subject thoroughly. The book's case...

  17. Strategic Environmental Assessment: Integrated environmental management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism_2004.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 70155 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism_2004.pdf... and Tourism Other topics in the series of overview information documents on the concepts of, and approaches to, integrated environmental management are listed below. Further titles in this series are being prepared and will be made available periodically...

  18. Environmental management systems implemented in the Spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, R.; Fernandez Guisado, M. B.; Hortiguela, R.; Bustamante, L. F.; Esparza, J. L.; Villareal, M.; Yague, F.

    2013-01-01

    The companies that own the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants, aware of social concern and in the context of a growing demanding environmental legislation, have a permanent commitment to the electricity production based on the principles of a maximum respect for the environment, safety, quality, professionalism and continuous improvement. In order to minimize the environmental impact of their plants they have implemented and Environmental Management System based on the ISO 14001 Standard. They minimize the environmental impact by identifying the significant environmental aspects and defining the corresponding objectives. This article describes the referred environmental management systems and their environmental objectives, as applied and defined by the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants. (Author)

  19. 78 FR 18562 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water... ``Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources Implementation... Secretary of the Army to revise the ``Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and...

  20. 78 FR 18562 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water... the Army to revise the ``Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related... Army to revise the ``Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land...

  1. 78 FR 31521 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water... the Army to revise the ``Economic and Environmental Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related.... L. 110-114) directed the Secretary of the Army to revise the ``Economic and Environmental Principles...

  2. Auditing of environmental management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čuchranová Katarína

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental auditing has estabilished itself as a valueable instrument to verify and help to improve the environmental performance.Organizations of all kinds may have a need to demonstrate the environmental responsibility. The concept of environmental management systems and the associated practice of environmental auditing have been advanced as one way to satisfy this need.These system are intended to help an organization to establish and continue to meet its environmental policies, objectives, standards and other requirements.Environmental auditing is a systematic and documented verification process of objectively obtaining and evaluating audit evidence to determine whether an organizations environmental management system conforms to the environmental management system audit criteria set by the organization and for the communication of the results of this process to the management.The following article intercepts all parts of preparation environmental auditing.The audit programme and procedures should cover the activities and areas to be considered in audits, the frequency of audits, the responsibilities associated with managing and conducting audits, the communication of audit results, auditor competence, and how audits will be conducted.The International Standard ISO 140011 estabilishes the audit procedures that determine conformance with EMS audit criteria.

  3. Corporate environmental management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    With increasing population and economic growth and related demand for energy and natural resources as well, pollution, waste production and environmental sustainability have become issues of uttermost importance. For quite some time self-regulation, i.e. voluntary implementation of environmental......: how does industry respond to the environmental challenge? The paper concludes that despite the apparent attractiveness of self-regulation in industry, voluntary options tend not to be widely adopted thus pointing to a continued strong need for an effective regulation of industry’s environmental...

  4. Data management for environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of managing environmental research data is to develop a resource sufficient for the study and potential solution of environmental problems. Consequently, environmnetal data management must include a broad spectrum of activities ranging from statistical analysis and modeling, through data set archiving to computer hardware procurement. This paper briefly summarizes the data management requirements for environmental research and the techniques and automated procedures which are currently used by the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Included in these requirements are readily retrievable data, data indexed by categories for retrieval and application, data documentation (including collection methods), design and error bounds, easily used analysis and display programs, and file manipulation routines. The statistical analysis system (SAS) and other systems provide the automated procedures and techniques for analysis and management of environmental research data

  5. Environmental management & audit 2: Management systems

    OpenAIRE

    2018-01-01

    The present scientific monograph, entitled “Environmental management & audit“, is the result of three years’ work on an international project entitled “Environmental management in Russian companies – retraining courses for the sensibilization for and integration of Eco-Audit programs in corporate decision-making (RECOAUD)”. Within its more than 600 pages, the monograph features interesting texts written by 31 authors from the European Union and the Russian Federation, edited by dr. Borut Jere...

  6. Scope of environmental risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Riordan, T

    1979-01-01

    Environmental risk management embraces three techniques for project appraisal: cost/benefit analysis, environmental impact analysis and risk assessment. It also explicitly relates scientific investigations to political judgments, sometimes so closely that the two cannot be separated. Indeed it is now apparent that environmental risk management encompasses procedures both to review the relative merits and priorities of policies as well as to appraise the environmental risks of particular schemes. Until recently this relationship has not been fully appreciated, so much imagination and innovation is still required to develop the most-suitable mechanisms for review.

  7. General principles of the quality management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutaniemi, P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the presentation is to outline some general infrastructure of nuclear industry with regard to the quality management; to emphasise significance of safety management as an integral part of the quality management; and to highlight different steps of the management process in a near-time working, at an annual level and as a strategic process

  8. Environmental risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    A professional, audit able environmental approach is the only path a responsible government, institution or company can take. Such an approach can be applied to a small petrol station, an oil refinery or a multi-million dollar mining development. Environmental issues cannot be divorced from socio-economic criteria; each impacts on the other. Twenty years ago, financial criteria ruled decision making and the environment tagged along a poor third to social and safety issues. Today, financial issued are still dominant, but decision makers realised that environmental issues hold the same weight as socio-economic criteria and the three are inexorably intertwined. (author)

  9. ETHICAL ASPECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cîrstea Ştefan-Dragoş

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to outline the main economical and social benefits that can be obtained by adopting an ethical attitude of the organisations which use a performant environmental management. From the idea that the human being is the master of nature, it was passed to the view according to which the human being must ensure a balance between consumption and the use of resources. In order to achieve our goal we identified the factors that lead to long term or even permanent destructive effects over the environment and we briefly present the reasons for which the organizations adopt and implement environmental management systems. Also, the difficulties encountered in implementing environmental strategies have been briefly enumerated and the competitive and economic advantages that can be achieved by adopting an efficient environmental management and the main reasons that grant to the environmental management a special significance were exposed. This theoretical paper emphasizes the importance of the adoption by organizations of a "green behavior" and reveals correlations between sustainability, economic growth and environmental performance in organizations. The analysis of the ethical aspects of environmental management shows the links that can be created between the development of an ethical culture of organizations and the achievement of the environmental excellence. The research provides an overview of the concept of environmental ethics and encloses it within the scope of environmental management. Someone needs to explain why an increasing number of organizations, both large and small, are setting up environmental management systems, making environmental investments and reducing risks over and beyond legal requirements, even when the benefits are not at all obvious, even in the long run. Also, this paper provides some practical examples of organizations environmental problems and points out how these organizations adapted their

  10. Some principles to guide wilderness campsite management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1990-01-01

    Seven principles, derived from research on wilderness campsites, are proposed: (1) campsite impacts are complex; (2) impact is inevitable with repetitive use of campsites; (3) impact occurs rapidly, recovery occurs slowly; (4) the relationship between use and impact is asymptotic; (5) certain sites are more durable than others; (6) certain users cause less impact than...

  11. Peat in environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinttilae, R.

    1998-01-01

    Peat is the largest natural resource of Finland. The DS-reserves of peat are more than seven times larger than those of wood. Peat is known as a domestic source of energy. Peat is, however, more than an energy source. The most significant problem of water protection in Finland is the eutrophication of the water courses. The reduction of concentrated loads and large emissions sources has up to now been the target for the water protection. The control of diffuse loads has been more difficult. The environmental use of peat can reduce the loads on watercourses, and especially the diffuse emissions. The natural and unique properties of peat can be utilized in several targets: agriculture, pisciculture, fur farming, in small and medium sized industry, and in processing of waste waters of both municipalities and rural areas, as well as in different environmental hazards. The present use of environmental peat is just a small fragment of the annual growth of peat reserves in Finland. The amount of protected mires is about ten times larger than the amount of peatlands taken into peat production. The use of environmental peat makes it possible to reduce the diffuse loads significantly in the future. This, however, requires willingness of cooperation and development by the entrepreneurs, authorities, and peat producers. The present use of agricultural peat binds about three times more phosphor and nearly one and a half fold nitrogen fertilizers compare to the emissions caused by peat production. It has to be noticed that the utilization of peat in reduction of environmental loads does not cause any secondary waste problem. The final product formed can usually be composted and used e.g. in soil remediation or in construction of green areas. The tightening environmental regulations and international agreements increase the utilization of peat. As the demand of peat increased the quality requirements for peat will be increased. Certain grain size and the restoration of the

  12. Principles of environmental legislation in UN, EU and Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Danica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A key turning point regarding to environmental protection was the United Nations Conference on the Human environment held in Stockholm, in1972. On the Conference was adopted the UN Declaration on the Human environment. On that occasion established fundamental principles of environmental protection. At the Conference, UNEP, held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. has adopted the UN Declaration on the Environmental protection and sustainable development.. The Council of Europe has adopted a number of documents in which the central part is the protection of the environment. The Council of Europe adopted the following conventions: Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural habitats in 1979; Convention on Civil Liability for Damage Resulting from Activities Dangerous to the Environment in 1993; Convention on the protection of Environment trough Criminal Law, in 1998; and European Landscape Convention in 2000. The Constitution of Republic of Serbia proclaims the right to a healthy environment, but also establishes the obligation of all, to conserve and improve it. The fundamental principles of environmental protection system in our county are regulated by the following. The Law on Environmental Protection, The Law on Environment Impact, The Law on Environment Strategic Impact and The Law on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control. These Laws are aimed towards establishing an environmental management system and providing protection from natural balance degradation. With a great number of Laws in particular sectors of environmental protection, Republic of Serbia received modern legislation, which formed, a good basis for economic and social activities involved in environmental protection.

  13. Principles of data management facilitating information sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Data is a valuable corporate asset and its effective management can be vital to success. This professional guide covers all the key areas of data management, including database development and corporate data modelling. The new edition covers web technology and its relation to databases and includes material on the management of master data.

  14. Principles for ecologically based invasive plant management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy J. James; Brenda S. Smith; Edward A. Vasquez; Roger L. Sheley

    2010-01-01

    Land managers have long identified a critical need for a practical and effective framework for designing restoration strategies, especially where invasive plants dominate. A holistic, ecologically based, invasive plant management (EBIPM) framework that integrates ecosystem health assessment, knowledge of ecological processes, and adaptive management into a successional...

  15. 76 FR 21877 - Environmental Management Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of call for nominations for appointment to the Environmental Management Advisory Board. SUMMARY... Environmental Management Advisory Board. DATES: Nominations will be accepted through May 13, 2011. ADDRESSES...

  16. Wildland fire and fuel management: principles for effective communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Toman; Bruce Shindler

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss four principles identified through recent research for effective citizen-agency communication and examine their use in accomplishing fire management objectives. Principles include the following: (1) effective communication is a product of effective planning; (2) both unidirectional (one-way) and interactive approaches are part of successful...

  17. Business rules management principles in the Dutch governmental context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Martijn Zoet; Koen Smit

    2016-01-01

    From the article: Abstract Since more and more business rules management solutions are utilized, organizations search for guidance to design such solutions. Principles are often applied to guide the design of information systems in general. Scientific research on principles for business rules

  18. Teaching Principles of Management through Experiential and Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutan, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Management faculties often use cases, simulations, and research projects to achieve learning objectives in the Principles of Management class. This class typically aims to introduce students to the topics of "planning, organizing, coordinating, staffing, directing, budgeting, controlling, and evaluating functions of management; leadership…

  19. Compliance Principles for Decision Management Solutions at the Dutch Government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Martijn Zoet; Koen Smit; Dr.ir. Raymond Slot

    2016-01-01

    From the article: Abstract Since decision management is becoming an integrated part of business process management, more and more decision management implementations are realized. Therefore, organizations search for guidance to design such solutions. Principles are often applied to guide the design

  20. Resilience and environmental management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental law plays a key role in shaping policy for sustainability. In particular, the types of legal instruments, institutions, and the response of law to the inherent variability in socio-ecological systems is critical. Sustainability likely must occur via the institutions...

  1. New standard environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriola, Luca; Luciani, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The ISO 14001:2004 standard, like ISO 9001:2000 on quality management, transcends the preventive approach (based on a rigid and more or less adequate process-management model still mainly inspired by traditional production methods) and introduces in its stead a highly flexible approach applicable to any socio-economic activity. It is structured by processes rather than system elements, and is based on the quest for efficacy and ongoing improvement [it

  2. Safety principles and design management of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Qirui; Cheng Pingdong

    1997-01-01

    The basic safety consideration and detailed design principles in the design of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant is elaborated. The management within the frame setting up by 'safety culture' and 'quality culture'

  3. Integrating Agronomic Principles with Management Experience in Introductory Agronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorst, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Explains the use of a cropping systems project to teach agronomic principles and crop management techniques, and to enhance communication skills. Provides a sample progress report instructions sheet which was used for the project. (Author/RT)

  4. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot: A multidisciplinary approach accounting for the complex pathobiology and biomechanics of the diabetic foot is crucial to decrease the rate of amputations.

  5. Conceptualizing strategic environmental assessment: Principles, approaches and research directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Bram, E-mail: b.noble@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning, and School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A5 (Canada); Nwanekezie, Kelechi [Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A5 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    Increasing emphasis has been placed in recent years on transitioning strategic environmental assessment (SEA) away from its environmental impact assessment (EIA) roots. Scholars have argued the need to conceptualize SEA as a process designed to facilitate strategic thinking, thus enabling transitions toward sustainability. The practice of SEA, however, remains deeply rooted in the EIA tradition and scholars and practitioners often appear divided on the nature and purpose of SEA. This paper revisits the strategic principles of SEA and conceptualizes SEA as a multi-faceted and multi-dimensional assessment process. It is suggested that SEA can be conceptualized as series of approaches operating along a spectrum from less to more strategic – from impact assessment-based to strategy-based – with each approach to SEA differentiated by the specific objectives of SEA application and the extent to which strategic principles are reflected in its design and implementation. Advancing the effectiveness of SEA requires a continued research agenda focused on improving the traditional SEA approach, as a tool to assess the impacts of policies, plans and programs (PPPs). Realizing the full potential of SEA, however, requires a new research agenda — one focused on the development and testing of a deliberative governance approach to SEA that can facilitate strategic innovations in PPP formulation and drive transitions in short-term policy and initiatives based on longer-term thinking. - Highlights: • SEA facilitates strategic thinking, enabling transitions toward sustainability. • SEA is conceptualized as a spectrum of approaches, from IA-based to strategy-based. • Each approach variably emphasizes strategic principles in its design and practice. • There is no one conceptualization of SEA that is best, SEA is fit for PPP purpose. • Research is needed to advance SEA to facilitate strategic PPP transformations.

  6. Conceptualizing strategic environmental assessment: Principles, approaches and research directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Bram; Nwanekezie, Kelechi

    2017-01-01

    Increasing emphasis has been placed in recent years on transitioning strategic environmental assessment (SEA) away from its environmental impact assessment (EIA) roots. Scholars have argued the need to conceptualize SEA as a process designed to facilitate strategic thinking, thus enabling transitions toward sustainability. The practice of SEA, however, remains deeply rooted in the EIA tradition and scholars and practitioners often appear divided on the nature and purpose of SEA. This paper revisits the strategic principles of SEA and conceptualizes SEA as a multi-faceted and multi-dimensional assessment process. It is suggested that SEA can be conceptualized as series of approaches operating along a spectrum from less to more strategic – from impact assessment-based to strategy-based – with each approach to SEA differentiated by the specific objectives of SEA application and the extent to which strategic principles are reflected in its design and implementation. Advancing the effectiveness of SEA requires a continued research agenda focused on improving the traditional SEA approach, as a tool to assess the impacts of policies, plans and programs (PPPs). Realizing the full potential of SEA, however, requires a new research agenda — one focused on the development and testing of a deliberative governance approach to SEA that can facilitate strategic innovations in PPP formulation and drive transitions in short-term policy and initiatives based on longer-term thinking. - Highlights: • SEA facilitates strategic thinking, enabling transitions toward sustainability. • SEA is conceptualized as a spectrum of approaches, from IA-based to strategy-based. • Each approach variably emphasizes strategic principles in its design and practice. • There is no one conceptualization of SEA that is best, SEA is fit for PPP purpose. • Research is needed to advance SEA to facilitate strategic PPP transformations.

  7. The Aalborg Approach to Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew; Nielsen, Eskild Holm

    2002-01-01

    The Article Briefly Presents the Master Programme in Environmental Management at Aalborg University......The Article Briefly Presents the Master Programme in Environmental Management at Aalborg University...

  8. Environmental performance management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwant, J.W.H.; Grant, R.O.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the environmental programme developed by Shell U.K. Exploration and Production (EXPRO) aiming at a continuous improvement of its environmental performance. The company operates a total of 33 platforms in the North Sea and has 3 land based gas treatment plants. This paper, therefore, relates mainly to the offshore environment. The programme is driven by adopting a goal setting policy. The plan was initiated mid 1990 when an inventory was made of all gaseous emissions, liquid effluents and solid waste discharges of EXPRO's operations during 1989. This baseline was used to identify the largest waste steams and to set priorities for the subsequent improvement programme. Areas for improvement are: atmospheric emissions from venting, flaring and the use of Freons and Halons, the use of Oil Based Mud (OBM), produced water and the disposal of industrial waste. The programme has gained momentum and targets have been set

  9. Environmental management: A system approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petak, William J.

    1981-05-01

    This paper presents a system framework whose purpose is to improve understanding of environmental management. By analyzing the links between elements of the environmental management system, it is possible to construct a model that aids thinking systematically about the decision-making subsystem, and other subsystems, of the entire environmental management system. Through a multidisciplinary environmental approach, each of the individual subsystems is able to adapt to threats and opportunities. The fields of government, market economics, social responsibility and ecology, for example, are so complex that it is extremely difficult to develop a framework that gives full consideration to all aspects. This paper, through the application of a highly idealized system framework, attempts to show the general relationships that exist between complex system elements.

  10. Principles of Data Management Facilitating Information Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Organisations increasingly view data as a valuable corporate asset and its effective management can be vital to success. This professional guide covers all the key areas including database development, data quality and corporate data modelling. It provides the knowledge and techniques required to successfully implement the data management function.

  11. Construction quality management principles and good practice

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Quality management is essential for facilitating the competitiveness of modern day commercial organizations. Excellence in quality management is a requisite for construction organizations who seek to remain competitive and successful. The challenges presented by competitive construction markets and large projects that are dynamic and complex necessitate the adoption and application of quality management approaches. This textbook is written in line with the ISO 9001:2008 standard and provides a comprehensive evaluation of quality management systems and tools. Their effectiveness in achieving project objectives is explored, as well as applications in corporate performance enhancement. Both the strategic and operational dimensions of quality assurance are addressed by focusing on providing models of best practice. The reader is supported throughout by concise and clear explanations and with self-assessment questions. Practical case study examples show how various evaluative-based quality management systems and t...

  12. Environmental Accounting as a Tool for Environmental Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental Accounting as a Tool for Environmental Management System. ... This paper reviews about the relationship of environmental accounting and environmental ... to legal and regulation requirement, to reduce cost from customer

  13. Principles for decisions involving environmental and health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Decision making with respect to safety is becoming more and more complex. The risk involved must be taken into account together with numerous other factors such as the benefits, the uncertainties and the public perception. Can the decision maker be aided by some kind of system, general rules of thumb, or broader perspective on similar decisions? This question has been addressed in a joint Nordic project relating to nuclear power. Modern techniques for risk assessment and management have been studied and parallels drawn to such areas as offshore safety and management of genotoxic chemicals in the environment. The topics include synoptic vs. incrementalistic approaches to decision making, health hazards from radiation and genotoxic chemicals, value judgments in decision making, definitions of low risks, risk comparisons, and principles for decision making when risks are involved. (author) 47 refs

  14. Environmental data management at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.W.; Williams, J.

    1994-01-01

    FERMCO supports DOE's ongoing initiatives for the continuous improvement of site restoration through the development and application of innovative technologies. A major thrust of FERMCO's efforts has been the enhancement of environmental data management technology for the site. The understanding of environmental data is the fundamental basis for determining the need for environmental restoration, developing and comparing remedial alternatives, and reaching a decision on how to clean up a site. Environmental data management at Fernald is being focused on two major objectives: to improve the efficiency of the data management process, and to provide a better understanding of the meaning of the data at the earliest possible time. Environmental data at Fernald is typically a soil or groundwater sample collected by one of the field geologists. These samples are then shipped to one or more laboratories for analysis. After the analyses are returned from the laboratories the data are reviewed and qualified for usability. The data are then used by environmental professionals for determining nature and extent of contamination. Additionally, hazardous waste materials whether generated during production or during cleanup, may be sampled to characterize the waste before shipment or treatment. The data management process, which uses four major software systems, is presented graphically

  15. United nations Supported principles for Responsible Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godemann, Jasmin; Moon, Jeremy; Haertle, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    and various ecological system crises. The United Nations supported Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative is an important catalyst for the transformation of management education and a global initiative to change and reform management education in order to meet the increasing......The expectation that management education institutions should be leading thought and action on issues related to corporate responsibility and sustainability has been reinforced in the light of their association with business leaders' failings, including corporate corruption, the financial crisis...

  16. Principles and paradigms of pediatric cataract management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basti Surendra

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Propensity for increased postoperative inflammation and capsular opacification, a refractive state that is constantly in a state of flux due to growth of the eye, difficulty in documenting anatomic and refractive changes due to poor compliance, and a tendency to develop amblyopia, makes management of cataract in the child different from that in the adult. The recent past has unraveled several caveats of pediatric cataract management - the importance of atraumatic surgery and complete removal of lens matter, benefits of in-the-bag intraocular lens(IOL implantation, role of titrating IOL power to counter refractive changes due to growth of the eye, prudery of continuously following these eyes for early detection of aphakic glaucoma and benefits of some surgical innovations. Although these promise to significantly improve our management of pediatric cataract, their long-term benefits are yet to be determined. We will also have to harness newer techniques, especially in the areas of wound construction and capsule management, and will have to develop effective strategies for the refractive management of infantile aphakia.

  17. Environmental health research in Japan - management of environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masahisa [Lake Biwa Research Institute (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Briefly discussed the topics on emerging environmental health risks, their assessment and management, with special emphasis on groundwater management , environmental contamination, source protection, new drinking water and ambient water quality standards; and sophistication in instrumentation in environmental quality measurements, hazards and risk assessment and control, technology development in environmental health risk management.

  18. Environmental health research in Japan - management of environmental risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahisa Nakamura

    1996-01-01

    Briefly discussed the topics on emerging environmental health risks, their assessment and management, with special emphasis on groundwater management , environmental contamination, source protection, new drinking water and ambient water quality standards; and sophistication in instrumentation in environmental quality measurements, hazards and risk assessment and control, technology development in environmental health risk management

  19. Principles of effective USA federal fire management plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc D.; Roberts, Susan L.; Wills, Robin; Brooks, Matthew L.; Winford, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Federal fire management plans are essential implementation guides for the management of wildland fire on federal lands. Recent changes in federal fire policy implementation guidance and fire science information suggest the need for substantial changes in federal fire management plans of the United States. Federal land management agencies are also undergoing land management planning efforts that will initiate revision of fire management plans across the country. Using the southern Sierra Nevada as a case study, we briefly describe the underlying framework of fire management plans, assess their consistency with guiding principles based on current science information and federal policy guidance, and provide recommendations for the development of future fire management plans. Based on our review, we recommend that future fire management plans be: (1) consistent and compatible, (2) collaborative, (3) clear and comprehensive, (4) spatially and temporally scalable, (5) informed by the best available science, and (6) flexible and adaptive. In addition, we identify and describe several strategic guides or “tools” that can enhance these core principles and benefit future fire management plans in the following areas: planning and prioritization, science integration, climate change adaptation, partnerships, monitoring, education and communication, and applied fire management. These principles and tools are essential to successfully realize fire management goals and objectives in a rapidly changing world.

  20. IP Address Management Principles and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Rooney, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This book will be the first covering the subject of IP address management (IPAM). The practice of IPAM includes the application of network management disciplines to IP address space and associated network services, namely DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and DNS (Domain Name System). The consequence of inaccurately configuring DHCP is that end users may not be able to obtain IP addresses to access the network. Without proper DNS configuration, usability of the network will greatly suffer as the name-to-address lookup process may fail. Imagine having to navigate to a website or send a

  1. Tetralogy of Fallot: General Principles of Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Tacy E; Kim, Yuli Y

    2015-11-01

    Repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is one of the most common diagnoses encountered when caring for adults with congenital heart disease. Although long-term survival after childhood TOF repair is excellent, morbidity is common and most patients require reintervention in adulthood. This review provides an overview of key surveillance and management issues for adults with TOF, including residual right ventricular outflow tract disease and timing of pulmonary valve replacement, arrhythmias and risk stratification, left-sided heart disease and heart failure, and pregnancy management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Business Principles and Management. Curriculum Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This senior high school curriculum guide offers a general overview of the American business system and a study of various forms of business ownership, internal organization and management functions of business, and the financing of business. Ten areas are explored in the course: (1) capitalism; (2) money, credit, and banking; (3) government and…

  3. The Principles of Marketing and Relationship Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, Aline

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the concepts of marketing and relationship management as they apply to libraries. Topics include perceptions of the profession; environments that libraries operate in; connecting content and users through access and services; and the need for reliable and consistent collection of effective data. (Author/LRW)

  4. New Engineering Principles in Atrium Smoke Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valkvist, Morten Birk Sabroe

    A typical atrium smoke management setup was divided into characteristic flow regions; axisymmetric plume, ceiling jet/approach flow, rotation region and spill plume. A grid convergence study was conducted on each of the flow regions in order to determine the non-dimensional grid resolution required...

  5. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-07-01

    This program summary book is a compendium of project summaries submitted by principal investigators in the Environmental Management Science Program and Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program). These summaries provide information about the most recent project activities and accomplishments. All projects will be represented at the workshop poster sessions, so you will have an opportunity to meet with the researchers. The projects will be presented in the same order at the poster session as they are presented in this summary book. Detailed questions about an individual project may be directed to the investigators involved.

  6. Integrating Sustainable Development in Chemical Engineering Education: The Application of an Environmental Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanes, M. T.; Palomares, A. E.; Sanchez-Tovar, R.

    2012-01-01

    The principles of sustainable development have been integrated in chemical engineering education by means of an environmental management system. These principles have been introduced in the teaching laboratories where students perform their practical classes. In this paper, the implementation of the environmental management system, the problems…

  7. Radiological protection and environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fonseca, A.

    2010-01-01

    From the beginning of its industrial activity twenty five years ago, the Juzbado Factory of Enusa Group has always upheld a strong commitment with Radiological Protection and environmental respect and protection. Consequently, the evolution of dose shows a downward trend over the years. Although production has been increased gradually, the average doses to workers have stayed below 1 mSv. In order to identify and prevent the potential environmental impacts of its industrial activity and minimize its impact on the surroundings, the facility develops and environmental management system according to UNE-EN-ISO 14001 since 1999. (Author)

  8. Environmental management in product chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Forman, Marianne; Hansen, Anne Grethe

    of environmental initiatives, a number of recommendations for governmental regulation, which can support the further diffusion of environmental management in product chains, are developed. Furthermore, the report describes a number of theoretical perspectives from sociology of technology, organisation theory......This report presents the analyses of the shaping, implementation and embedding of eight types of environmental initiatives in product chains. The analyses focus on • the role of the type of product and branch, of the size of the companies and of governmental regulation • the focus...... of the environmental concerns and the reductions in environmental impact • organisational changes which have been part of the embedding of the initiatives The analyses are based on 25 cases from national and international product chains involving one or more Danish companies. Based on the analyses of the eight types...

  9. Environmental Aspects of Load Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaravicius, Juozas

    2004-02-01

    This study approaches load management from an environmental perspective. It identifies and discusses the possible environmental benefits of load management and evaluates their significance, primary focusing on CO 2 emissions reduction. The analysis is carried out on two levels: national - the Swedish electricity market, and local - one electric utility in southern Sweden. Our results show the importance of considering the influence of site-specific or level-specific conditions on the environmental effects of load management. On the national level, load management measures can hardly provide significant environmental benefits, due to the high hydropower production in Sweden, which is the demand following production source. Emission reductions will rather be the result of energy efficiency measures, which will cut the load demand as well as the energy demand. However, when it comes to a local (utility) level, where load management is considered as an alternative to an installation of peak diesel power plant, the benefits are clear. It is demonstrated that significant CO 2 emissions savings can be achieved due to avoided peak diesel power production

  10. Managing clinical education through understanding key principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joanne; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, a practicum facilitated the integration of on-campus learning and practical workplace training. Over the past 3 decades, an educative practicum has evolved that promotes clinical reasoning, including analytical and evaluative abilities, through reflective practice. Anecdotal evidence indicates that the delivery of clinical education within medical radiation science entry-level programs continues to vacillate between traditional practicums and the new reflective practicums. To review the literature about clinical education within the medical radiation sciences and identify key principles for practitioners seeking to reflect upon and improve their approach to teaching and supporting students in the clinical environment. A search of 3 major journal databases, Internet searches, and hand searches of reference lists were conducted to identify literature about clinical education in the medical radiation sciences from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2012. Twenty-two studies were included in this review. The 5 key elements associated with clinical education include the clinical support model and quality, overcoming the theory-practice gap, learning outcomes and reliable and valid assessment, preparing and supporting students, and accommodating differing teaching and learning needs. Many factors influence the quality of clinical education, including the culture of the clinical environment and clinical leadership roles. Several approaches can help students bridge the theory-practice gap, including simulators, role-playing activities, and reflective journals. In addition, clinical educators should use assessment strategies that objectively measure student progress, and they should be positive role models for their students. The successful clinical education of students in the medical radiation sciences depends upon the systems, structures, and people in the clinical environment. Clinical education is accomplished through the collaborative efforts of the

  11. Principles of pediatric mandibular fracture management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Izaddoost, Shayan; Hatef, Daniel A; Hollier, Larry

    2009-03-01

    Mandible fractures are commonplace in today's craniofacial practice; however, managing the infrequent, operative pediatric mandible injury requires a thorough knowledge base and thoughtful approach. Not only do these patients demonstrate variable anatomy due to differing stages of dental eruption, but condylar disruption may translate into long-term growth disturbance. In addition, patient immaturity often complicates cooperation, and both fixation strategies and postoperative planning must take this into account. As a supplement to the authors' video presentation, the present article focuses on repair of the symphyseal fracture and bilateral condylar injuries in the pediatric patient.

  12. [Principles of management in biological infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płusa, Tadeusz

    2012-11-01

    The effectiveness of the management in respiratory infection is depending on the nature of the biological pathogen and the immune status of the patient. For this reason, providing assistance to victims the organ function support, similarly as defining the pathogen and targeted antibiotic therapy should be applied. Available diagnostic tests provide rapid ability to identify the pathogen and antibiotics are able to control infection. Lack of efficacy of treatment may indicate the diversity of the pathogen than previously known and raises suspicion of biological warfare pathogen.

  13. Tunnel Vision in Environmental Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Discusses problem-solving styles in environmental management and the specific deficiencies in these styles that might be grouped under the label "tunnel vision," a form of selective attention contributing to inadequate problem-formulation, partial solutions to complex problems, and generation of additional problems. Includes educational…

  14. Interactions management in environmental policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram; Franco Garcia, Maria Maria; Micallef, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to address regulator-management interactions in environmental policy with reference to direct regulations, social regulations and market-based regulation. Design/methodology/approach: Revision of literature to identify the European Union regulations for companies producing

  15. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  16. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index

  17. Solid waste management. Principles and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrappa, Ramesha [Karnataka State Pollution Control Board, Biomedical Waste, Bangalore (India); Bhusan Das, Diganta [Loughborough Univ. of Technology (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-11-01

    Solid waste was already a problem long before water and air pollution issues attracted public attention. Historically the problem associated with solid waste can be dated back to prehistoric days. Due to the invention of new products, technologies and services the quantity and quality of the waste have changed over the years. Waste characteristics not only depend on income, culture and geography but also on a society's economy and, situations like disasters that affect that economy. There was tremendous industrial activity in Europe during the industrial revolution. The twentieth century is recognized as the American Century and the twenty-first century is recognized as the Asian Century in which everyone wants to earn 'as much as possible'. After Asia the currently developing Africa could next take the center stage. With transitions in their economies many countries have also witnessed an explosion of waste quantities. Solid waste problems and approaches to tackling them vary from country to country. For example, while efforts are made to collect and dispose hospital waste through separate mechanisms in India it is burnt together with municipal solid waste in Sweden. While trans-boundary movement of waste has been addressed in numerous international agreements, it still reaches developing countries in many forms. While thousands of people depend on waste for their lively hood throughout the world, many others face problems due to poor waste management. In this context solid waste has not remained an issue to be tackled by the local urban bodies alone. It has become a subject of importance for engineers as well as doctors, psychologist, economists, and climate scientists and any others. There are huge changes in waste management in different parts of the world at different times in history. To address these issues, an effort has been made by the authors to combine their experience and bring together a new text book on the theory and practice of the

  18. Environmental management of business processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Čančer

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the decision-makers in enterprises will accept the goals of environmental management only if they are motivated enough, comprehensible and useful tools should be generated to support environmentally oriented business decision-making. For that reason, a general optimisation model of the multiphase business process is presented in this paper. This model includes the possibilities for an integrated approach to environmental protection so that it can be applied as a scenario by the business process simulation for the evaluation of environmentally oriented business decisions on business performance. Furthermore, development and application possibilities of the presented model are introduced. Some measures of resource efficiency are developed using the presented optimisation model.

  19. Environmental management (Republic of Macedonia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A number of institutions are responsible for environmental monitoring, however, coordination between these agencies is poor. Also, not all parameters typically used to index pollution are measured due to lack of resources, unavailability of chemicals for analysis and obsolete equipment. The cause-effect relationship between health and pollution is not clearly known, except for a new urban areas. In order to create an efficient environmental management system, alterations of the present institutional structure are imperative. It is necessary to strengthen the Ministry of Urban Planning, Construction and Development as a short-term task to consider the need for establishing a separate Ministry of Environment in the long-term. The Ministry of Environment should be supported by an Environmental Institute, a modern inspection service and a department for staff training and international cooperation. The need to reinforce local units responsible for environmental enforcement is especially emphasized. (author)

  20. Conference on Environmental Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Oppenheimer, Dorothy; Brogden, William; Environmental Data Management

    1976-01-01

    Throughout the world a staggering amount of resources have been used to obtain billions of environmental data points. Some, such as meteorological data, have been organized for weather map display where many thousands of data points are synthesized in one compressed map. Most environmental data, however, are still widely scattered and generally not used for a systems approach, but only for the purpose for which they were originally taken. These data are contained in relatively small computer programs, research files, government and industrial reports, etc. This Conference was called to bring together some of the world's leaders from research centers and government agencies, and others concerned with environmental data management. The purpose of the Conference was to organize discussion on the scope of world environmental data, its present form and documentation, and whether a systematic approach to a total system is feasible now or in the future. This same subject permeated indirectly the Stockholm Conference...

  1. After the Conference of United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. The principles of the state environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The realization of the Slovak Strategy, principles and priorities of state environmental policy determinate implementation and observance of then principles of the state environmental policy. These principles are reviewed

  2. Environmental management the supply chain perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Christina W Y; Lun, Y H Venus; Cheng, T C E

    2015-01-01

    In view of the increasing quest for environmental management in businesses, this book provides a good reference to firms to understand how they may manage their supply chains to improve business and environmental performance. The book consists of six chapters covering such topics as environmental management, environmental management practices with supply chain efforts, collaborative environmental management, organizational capabilities in environmental management, environmental disclosure, and closed-loop supply chains. The book presents theory-driven discussions on the link between environmental management and business performance in the context of supply chain management. The book will be useful for firms to learn from the research findings and real-life cases to develop plans to implement environmental management practices jointly with supply chain partners.

  3. Environmental policy in brown coal mining in accordance with the precautionary measures principle and polluter pays principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, R.; Wacker, H.

    1993-01-01

    The precautionary measures principle and the polluter pays principle in brown coal mining are discussed. Ground water subsidence and landscape destruction are local or regional problems and thus easily detectable. If damage cannot be avoided, its authors are known and will pay. In spite of all this, the German brown coal industry is well able to compete on the world market with others who don't care about the environmental damage they may cause. (orig./HS)) [de

  4. Environmental management as situated practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar; Krause, Franz; Hartmann, Niklas Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We propose an analysis of environmental management (EM) as work and as practical activity. This approach enables empirical studies of the diverse ways in which professionals, scientists, NGO staffers, and activists achieve the partial manageability of specific “environments”. In this introduction......, we sketch the debates in Human Geography, Management Studies, and Science and Technology Studies to which this special issue contributes. We identify the limits of understanding EM though the framework of ecological modernisation, and show how political ecology and work-place studies provide...... to be assessed, or as simply the implementation of dominant projects and the materialisation of hegemonic discourse. Such a shift renders EM as always messy practices of engagement, critique and improvisation. We conclude that studying the distributed and situated managing agencies, actors and their practices...

  5. Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2013-01-01

    Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management is a comprehensive text and resource book designed to explain the latest developments and new complexities of managing modern bars - be they stand alone or part of larger institutions such as hotels and resorts. Consumer expectations have changed, and a bar today must deliver an integrated social experience in a safe modern environment, which also offers the latest products and services in a professional and engaging fashion. Against ...

  6. Layout and flow of dermatology clinics: principles from operations management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jordan V

    2018-04-15

    Dermatology is a medical specialty that experiences high patient demand and long patient wait times. Dermatology clinics should look for ways to improve efficiency through the incorporation of principles from operations management. Addressing the layout and flow of a clinic can lead to operational efficiency. An ideal layout may lead to increased patient volume, satisfaction, and retention.

  7. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    atherosclerosis is the most important principle in the management ... Lynne Tudhope is President of the Diabetic Foot Working Group of South Africa and ... functional and physiological status belies ... contrast volume is always of paramount .... the adequacy of blood circulation to ... population costs the health care system of.

  8. Learning Characteristics of Small Business Managers: Principles for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Lynn M.; Hide, Sophie; Legg, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on the second half of a two-part study that identified relevant content for safety audit training in small businesses. The specific aim of the paper is to determine the preferred learning styles and approaches of managers in these businesses in order to identify some principles which could be used to tailor…

  9. Chapter 14. Nutritive principles in restoration and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce L. Welch

    2004-01-01

    Most range management or revegetation programs are aimed at providing forage to support the needs of range animals. Among these needs are supplying the nutrients required to drive the physiological processes of the animal body. One major principle in this report is that there is no "perfect forage species" that will supply all the nutrients needed by any...

  10. ISO 14000 : environmental management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, C.; Emard, C.; Lalonde, G.; Levesque, A.; Robitaille, R.; Rollin, A.L.; Thibeault, I.

    1996-01-01

    This book is addressed to the managers, professionals, and government agents which wish to know the philosophy of the step as well as the stages to be followed for the establishment of a system of environmental management in conformity with the standards of the series ISO 14000. This work locates ISO 14000 in the historical context of its development by describing the bonds with other standards in place of which those of the series ISO 9000. This book answers questions that arise regarding a companies step toward accreditation to ISO 14000

  11. Understanding and applying principles of social cognition and decision making in adaptive environmental governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental governance systems are under greater pressure to adapt and to cope with increased social and ecological uncertainty from stressors like climate change. We review principles of social cognition and decision making that shape and constrain how environmental governance...

  12. Environmental protection and management guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-15

    In British Columbia, oil and gas activities on private or Crown land are subject to regulations in terms of environmental practices. This environmental protection and management guidebook seeks to provide information on the Oil and Gas Activities Act. All sections from the regulation: water, riparian values, wildlife and wildlife habitat, conserving soil, forest health, invasive plants, natural range barriers, seismic lines, areas to be restored and old growth management areas, resource features and cultural heritage resources, are covered in this document. The minimum acceptable operational standards and practices for oil and gas activities in British Columbia are described. This guide is intended to provide clients and stakeholders with recommendations concerning the planning phase, before any permits are applied for, and concerning permissions or authorizations generally for oil and gas activities in British Columbia.

  13. Motivations for Proactive Environmental Management

    OpenAIRE

    Khanna, Madhu; Speir, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which there are differential incentives that motivate the adoption of environmental management practices (EMPs) and pollution prevention (P2) methods. We analyze the role of internal drivers such as managerial attitudes towards the environment and external pressures using both observed characteristics of facilities and perceived pressures. We estimate a structural equation model using survey data from facilities in Oregon that involves simultaneous estimation...

  14. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL's application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents

  15. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-06-10

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  16. Hanford Environmental Information System Configuration Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Configuration Management Plan establishes the software and data configuration control requirements for the HEIS and project-related databases maintained within the Environmental Restoration Contractor's data management department

  17. Assessment of the implementation of environmental management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the implementation of environmental management system in the construction ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... The Environmental Management System (EMS) illustrates a possible solution to reduce the ...

  18. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management: About this journal. Journal Home > Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs.

  20. MDOT Materials Laboratories : Environmental Management Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this EMP was to develop and implement a comprehensive Environmental : Management Plan for MDOT Materials Laboratories. This goal was achieved through : perfonnance of environmental audits to identify potential environmental impacts, and b...

  1. 75 FR 51026 - Environmental Management Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Advisory... EMAB is to provide the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) with advice and...

  2. Choice of mineral fertilizer substitution principle strongly influences LCA environmental benefits of nutrient cycling in the agri-food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanserud, Ola Stedje; Cherubini, Francesco; Øgaard, Anne Falk; Müller, Daniel B; Brattebø, Helge

    2018-02-15

    Increased nutrient cycling in the agri-food system is a way to achieve a healthier nutrient stewardship and more sustainable food production. In life cycle assessment (LCA) studies, use of recycled fertilizer products is often credited by the substitution method, which subtracts the environmental burdens associated with avoided production of mineral fertilizer from the system under study. The environmental benefits from avoided fertilizer production can make an important contribution to the results, but different calculation principles and often implicit assumptions are used to estimate the amount of avoided mineral fertilizer. This may hinder comparisons between studies. The present study therefore examines how the choice of substitution principles influences LCA results. Three different substitution principles, called one-to-one, maintenance, and adjusted maintenance, are identified, and we test the importance of these in a case study on cattle slurry management. We show that the inventory of avoided mineral fertilizer varies greatly when the different principles are applied, with strong influences on two-thirds of LCA impact categories. With the one-to-one principle, there is a risk of systematically over-estimating the environmental benefits from nutrient cycling. In a sensitivity analysis we show that the difference between the principles is closely related to the application rate and levels of residual nutrients in the soil. We recommend that LCA practitioners first and foremost state and justify the substitution method they use, in order to increase transparency and comparability with other studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 76 FR 27344 - Water Resources Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Mojave National Preserve, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... and resource management activities must be guided by general principles that can be applied to... Resources Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Mojave National Preserve, San Bernardino County... Management Plan/ Environmental Impact Statement for Mojave National Preserve. SUMMARY: In accordance with Sec...

  4. Application of VLLW management principles to the CEA research centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetat, P.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes the content of a CEA policy relating to very low level waste management elaborated in application of the waste management principles defined in France. The policy deals with very low level waste, subject to recycling, incineration or landfill disposal. It does not deal with reuse. The following principles are applicable to waste streams produced by CEA nuclear installations either during operating or dismantling activities. The policy deals only with very low level wastes (VLLW) (order of magnitude: <100 Bq/g for high energy emitters). It does not deal with low, intermediate or high level waste, which are either recycled or incinerated in nuclear industry or disposed of in the Aube surface disposal (CSA) or kept in intermediate storage, before geological disposal or any alternative final solution

  5. Treatment principles for the management of mold infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Lewis, Russell E

    2014-11-06

    Survival rates among immunocompromised patients with invasive mold infections have markedly improved over the last decade with earlier diagnosis and new antifungal treatment options. Yet, increasing antifungal resistance, breakthrough infections with intrinsically resistant fungi, and potentially life-threatening adverse effects and drug interactions are becoming more problematic, especially with prolonged therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for treating invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis provide excellent guidance on the initial workup and treatment of these molds, but they cannot address all of the key management issues. Herein, we discuss 10 general treatment principles in the management of invasive mold disease in immunocompromised patients and discuss how these principles can be integrated to develop an effective, individualized treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voulvoulis, N [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-15

    Pharmaceuticals are a highly variable group of organic compounds with the potential to cause harm to aquatic ecosystems and human health. Thousands of tones of pharmacologically active substances are used annually but surprisingly little is known about their ultimate fate in the environment. The data collected to date, rarely provide information on the processes that determine their environmental fate and although they receive considerable pharmacological and clinical testing during development, knowledge of their ecotoxicity is poor. One major concern is that antibiotics found in sewage effluent may cause increased resistance amongst natural bacterial populations. The debate over risks associated with chemicals in the environment represents more than just another disagreement in the scientific community. It has opened the door to a new way of thinking about the onset of uninherited diseases, the nature of scientific investigation, and the role of scientific knowledge in the policymaking process. For example, research evidence on endocrine disruption collected over the last few years has changed dramatically the way we think about chemical risks. In part, this change has also been attributed to the precautionary principle, as a new approach to environmental policy forged in Europe. The term ''precautionary approach'' declares an obligation to control the dangerous substances even before a definitive causal link had been established between the chemicals and health or environmental effects, and represents a radical departure from traditional approaches to risk assessment and particularly risk management, which includes an integration of the assessment, communication and mitigation of risks.

  7. Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voulvoulis, N. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-15

    Pharmaceuticals are a highly variable group of organic compounds with the potential to cause harm to aquatic ecosystems and human health. Thousands of tones of pharmacologically active substances are used annually but surprisingly little is known about their ultimate fate in the environment. The data collected to date, rarely provide information on the processes that determine their environmental fate and although they receive considerable pharmacological and clinical testing during development, knowledge of their ecotoxicity is poor. One major concern is that antibiotics found in sewage effluent may cause increased resistance amongst natural bacterial populations. The debate over risks associated with chemicals in the environment represents more than just another disagreement in the scientific community. It has opened the door to a new way of thinking about the onset of uninherited diseases, the nature of scientific investigation, and the role of scientific knowledge in the policymaking process. For example, research evidence on endocrine disruption collected over the last few years has changed dramatically the way we think about chemical risks. In part, this change has also been attributed to the precautionary principle, as a new approach to environmental policy forged in Europe. The term ''precautionary approach'' declares an obligation to control the dangerous substances even before a definitive causal link had been established between the chemicals and health or environmental effects, and represents a radical departure from traditional approaches to risk assessment and particularly risk management, which includes an integration of the assessment, communication and mitigation of risks.

  8. Principles for urban stormwater management to protect stream ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Christopher J.; Booth, Derek B.; Burns, Matthew J.; Fletcher, Tim D.; Hale, Rebecca L.; Hoang, Lan N.; Livingston, Grant; Rippy, Megan A.; Roy, Allison; Scoggins, Mateo; Wallace, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Urban stormwater runoff is a critical source of degradation to stream ecosystems globally. Despite broad appreciation by stream ecologists of negative effects of stormwater runoff, stormwater management objectives still typically center on flood and pollution mitigation without an explicit focus on altered hydrology. Resulting management approaches are unlikely to protect the ecological structure and function of streams adequately. We present critical elements of stormwater management necessary for protecting stream ecosystems through 5 principles intended to be broadly applicable to all urban landscapes that drain to a receiving stream: 1) the ecosystems to be protected and a target ecological state should be explicitly identified; 2) the postdevelopment balance of evapotranspiration, stream flow, and infiltration should mimic the predevelopment balance, which typically requires keeping significant runoff volume from reaching the stream; 3) stormwater control measures (SCMs) should deliver flow regimes that mimic the predevelopment regime in quality and quantity; 4) SCMs should have capacity to store rain events for all storms that would not have produced widespread surface runoff in a predevelopment state, thereby avoiding increased frequency of disturbance to biota; and 5) SCMs should be applied to all impervious surfaces in the catchment of the target stream. These principles present a range of technical and social challenges. Existing infrastructural, institutional, or governance contexts often prevent application of the principles to the degree necessary to achieve effective protection or restoration, but significant potential exists for multiple co-benefits from SCM technologies (e.g., water supply and climate-change adaptation) that may remove barriers to implementation. Our set of ideal principles for stream protection is intended as a guide for innovators who seek to develop new approaches to stormwater management rather than accept seemingly

  9. Strategic environmental assessment: Integrated environmental management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Audouin, M

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This document has been written for a wide audience. Its objective is to serve as an initial reference text. The aim is to provide an introductory information source to government authorities, environmental practitioners, nongovernmental...

  10. Principles and practices in managing the wastes resulting from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladescu, Gabriela; Oprescu, Theodor; Niculae, Ortenzia; Stan, Camelia

    2004-01-01

    The main objective in the management of radioactive wastes is the population and environment protection now and for the future without burdening the next generation with tasks other than their own. Achieving this objective is feasible if one takes into account the general principles internationally adopted and also the practices referring to the radioactive wastes, which can be summarized as: avoiding, minimizing, recovering, recycling, and storing. Minimizing the amount of wastes already produced resides in freeing part of them from the nuclear control by means of a process coined as classification. To implement such a process one must have in mind the premises required by classification and freeing the radioactive wastes from the regulating control, based on the legislation regarding the radioactive waste management and the measuring techniques and the corresponding procedures, as well. The target of this work was elaborating a proposal concerning the kind of classifying the radioactive waste in order to take them out from the nuclear control complying at the same time with the principles of minimizing and re-using as much as possible. The chapter 2.1 presents the frame of policy and regulations governing the process of management radioactive wastes. Here a proposal of classification of radioactive wastes is advanced based on the Romanian excepting levels adopted also by other countries, interpretation of the natural background, and the constraints concerning the radioactive and dangerous wastes. The chapter 2.2 presents the general principles of classifying the radioactive materials, of diluting the non-homogeneous distribution in solid materials as well as of the principles implied in the process of taking out some radioactive materials from the reach of regulating nuclear control. The chapter 2.3 deals with application of the radioactive waste management principles to reach a classification that entails taking these waste out from the reach of nuclear control

  11. Radiotherapy and wound healing: principles, management and prospects (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieringer, Matthias; Gosepath, Jan; Naim, Ramin

    2011-08-01

    Radiation therapy is a major therapeutic modality in the management of cancer patients. Over 60% of these patients receive radiotherapy at some point during their course of treatment and over 90% will develop skin reactions after therapy. Problematic wound healing in radiation-damaged tissue constitutes a major surgical difficulty and despite all efforts, irradiated skin remains a therapeutic challenge. This review provides an overview of the fundamental principles of radiation therapy with regards to the wound healing in normal and irradiated skin. Furthermore, it presents techniques that describe how to prevent and manage skin side effects as well as prospects that may improve cutaneous wound repair in general and in irradiated skin.

  12. Leadership and management principles in libraries in developing countries

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Learn leadership skills from achievements at special libraries in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Central America! Leadership and Management Principles in Libraries in Developing Countries is a compilation of success stories epitomizing management and leadership strategies from developing nations around the globe. This book focuses on library administrators from Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Central America who have significantly transformed their library services in spite of limited funds and a lack of resources. You'll learn about their achievements, their techniques, and t

  13. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 10: environmental effects related to radioactive waste management associated with LWR fuel reprocessing - mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant; environmental effects related to transporting radioactive wastes associated with LWR fuel reprocessing and fabrication; environmental effects related to radioactive waste management associated with LWR fuel reprocessing - retrievable waste storage facility; environmental effects related to geologic isolation of LWR fuel reprocessing wastes; and integrated systems for commercial radioactive waste management

  14. 41 CFR 102-3.95 - What principles apply to the management of advisory committees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What principles apply to...-FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT How Are Advisory Committees Managed? § 102-3.95 What principles... principles to the management of their advisory committees: (a) Provide adequate support. Before establishing...

  15. The principles of radioactive waste management. A publication within the RADWASS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This publication defines the objective of radioactive waste management and the associated set of internationally agreed principles. The Safety Fundamentals include the objective of radioactive waste management and fundamental principles of radioactive waste management. The fundamental principles fall into the following general subject areas: protection of human health, protection of the environment, protection beyond national borders, responsibility to future generations and implementation procedures. Each principle is stated, and supporting and explanatory information pertaining to the principle is provided. 1 fig

  16. Implementing Environmental Management Accounting: Status and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cost Accounting - and its Interaction with Eco-Efficiency Performance Measurement and Indicators; Stefan Schaltegger and Marcus Wagner. 4. Environmental Accounting Dimensions: Pros and Cons of Trajectory Convergence and Increased Efficiency; Pontus Cerin and Staffan Laestadius. 5. Process and Content......Table of contents Preface. 1. Environmental Management Accounting: Innovation or Managerial Fad?; Pall Rikhardsson, Martin Bennett, Jan Jaap Bouma and Stefan Schaltegger. Section 1 Progress. 2. Challenges for Environmental Management Accounting; Roger L. Burritt 3. Current Trends in Environmental......: Visualizing the Policy Challenges of Environmental Management Accounting; Dick Osborn. Section 2 Exploring EMA implementation issues. 6. Environmental Performance and the Quality of Corporate Environmental Reports: The Role of Environmental Management Accounting; Marcus Wagner. 7. Environmental Risk...

  17. Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAILY, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) has established a document hierarchy as part of its integrated management system. The Strategic Plan defines the vision, values, missions, strategic goals, high-level outcomes, and the basic strategies in achieving those outcomes. As shown in Figure 1-1, the Site Specification derives requirements from the Strategic Plan and documents the top-level mission technical requirements for the work involved in the RL Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (EM). It also provides the basis for all contract technical requirements. Since this is limited to the EM work, neither the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) nor the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) non-EM science activities are included. Figure 1-1 also shows the relationship between this Site Specification and the other Site management and planning documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this document represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents

  18. Environmental Management Audit: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Audit completed for the Southwestern Power Administration. During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed. The onsite portion of the Southwestern Audit was conducted from November 30 through December 11, 1992, by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and activities as part of the Assistant Secretary's Environmental Audit Program. This program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities/activities regarding compliance with laws, regulations, DOE Orders, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Environmental Management Audit stresses DOE's policy that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The Environmental Management Audit focuses on management systems and programs, whereas the Environmental Baseline Audit conducted in March 1991 focused on specific compliance issues. The scope of the Southwestern Environmental Management Audit included a review of all systems and functions necessary for effective environmental management. Specific areas of review included: Organizational Structure; Environmental Commitment; Environmental Protection Programs; Formality of Environmental Programs; Internal and External Communication; Staff Resources, Training, and Development; and Program Evaluation, Reporting, and Corrective Action

  19. Integration of operational research and environmental management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemhof - Ruwaard, J.M.

    1996-01-01


    The subject of this thesis is the integration of Operational Research and Environmental Management. Both sciences play an important role in the research of environmental issues. Part I describes a framework for the interactions between Operational Research and Environmental Management.

  20. Framework for assessing causality in disease management programs: principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; MacDowell, Martin

    2003-01-01

    To credibly state that a disease management (DM) program "caused" a specific outcome it is required that metrics observed in the DM population be compared with metrics that would have been expected in the absence of a DM intervention. That requirement can be very difficult to achieve, and epidemiologists and others have developed guiding principles of causality by which credible estimates of DM impact can be made. This paper introduces those key principles. First, DM program metrics must be compared with metrics from a "reference population." This population should be "equivalent" to the DM intervention population on all factors that could independently impact the outcome. In addition, the metrics used in both groups should use the same defining criteria (ie, they must be "comparable" to each other). The degree to which these populations fulfill the "equivalent" assumption and metrics fulfill the "comparability" assumption should be stated. Second, when "equivalence" or "comparability" is not achieved, the DM managers should acknowledge this fact and, where possible, "control" for those factors that may impact the outcome(s). Finally, it is highly unlikely that one study will provide definitive proof of any specific DM program value for all time; thus, we strongly recommend that studies be ongoing, at multiple points in time, and at multiple sites, and, when observational study designs are employed, that more than one type of study design be utilized. Methodologically sophisticated studies that follow these "principles of causality" will greatly enhance the reputation of the important and growing efforts in DM.

  1. Life cycle costing of waste management systems: Overview, calculation principles and case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Sanchez, Veronica; Kromann, Mikkel A.; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed and comprehensive cost model for the economic assessment of solid waste management systems. The model was based on the principles of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) and followed a bottom-up calculation approach providing detailed cost items for all key technologies within...... regarding the cost assessment of waste management, namely system boundary equivalency, accounting for temporally distributed emissions and impacts, inclusions of transfers, the internalisation of environmental impacts and the coverage of shadow prices, and there was also significant confusion regarding...

  2. Profiling the environmental risk management of Chinese local environmental agencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Zhang, L.; Mol, A.P.J.; Lu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing frequency and impact of environmental accidents have pushed the issue of environmental risk management (ERM) to the top of the Chinese governments’ agendas and popularized the term ‘emergency response.’ Although the boundary between environmental accidents and other types of accidents

  3. Environmental Governance as a Model of Environmental Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Kristianto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of environmental governance does not promise practical solutions and provides short guidance in solving intertwined environmental problems in Indonesia. But at least environmental concept is useful when we try to realize environmental management in Indonesia currently. The worst is that the mistake has become routine manifesting in pragmatism in environmental management. Before it all too late, it is better that we keep in mind a German proverb in the beginning of this writing, which more or less, means “ we do not know what the future brings, but we know that we should act.”

  4. The Equator Principles, Project Finance and the Challenge of Social and Environmental Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Equator Principles, launched in 2003 and revamped in 2006, are a set of voluntary principles designed to help private lenders make socially and environmentally responsible project financing decisions. This paper explores the impact of these principles on the disclosures of two signatory banks, focusing on type of information disclosures that have resulted and the substance of these disclosures. The work considers whether it is  possible to ascertain from publicly available information how the practices of the banks may have changed in order to focus on their stated social and environmental responsibilities. It is concluded that although the Equator Principles have marked the beginning of the banking sectors acknowledgement of their role in social and environmental responsibility, at this stage insufficient information is being disclosed to determine the impact these principles are having on actual banking practices.

  5. Japanese experiences of environmental management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, T. [Toyo University, Itakura (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Japan experienced a very rapid industrialization and economic growth in the era of income doubling in 1960s and at the same time it experienced very severe damage from various types of environmental pollution. In this paper, historical development of population, GNP, energy consumption with classification of petroleum, coal and electric power, and CO{sub 2} emission are introduced as basic background data on Japanese development. The tragic experience of Minamata disease and Itai-itai disease caused by methyl mercury and cadmium, respectively, are introduced. In two tables, historical development of water pollution and air pollution are summarized. Regarding solid wastes management, the total mass balance in Japan and recent development in legislation framework for enhancement of recycling of wastes are introduced briefly.

  6. Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives

  7. IN QUEST OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SERVICES: EVIDENCE FROM TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Durmus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Proposal: Architectural design companies increasingly recognize that time spent on management is not at the expense of their production and there are always better ways to organize business. Although architects have long placed a traditional emphasis on quality, quality management is still a new concept for the majority of architectural design companies, which have to organize relatively more complicated operations nowadays to meet their clients’ expectations. This study aims to understand how architectural design companies define quality and explores the extent to which Total Quality Management (TQM principles like continual improvement, employee involvement, customer satisfaction and others can be pertinent in these companies. Adopting a qualitative research strategy, the authors interviewed with the owner-managers of 10 widely-recognized architectural design companies of different size in Istanbul. The results from the content analysis of semi-structured interview data suggest that i TQM principles cannot be directly applied in architectural design companies without an appropriate translation; ii special characteristics of design services are important to explain quality-related perceptions of owner-managers; iii the owner-managers feel the pressure from the changing internal and external environmental conditions, however few of them adopt a systematic and documented approach to quality management. Architectural design offices which aim to establish a quality management system can benefit from this study to understand potential problem areas on their road.

  8. Achieving sustainable plant disease management through evolutionary principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiasui; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J

    2014-09-01

    Plants and their pathogens are engaged in continuous evolutionary battles and sustainable disease management requires novel systems to create environments conducive for short-term and long-term disease control. In this opinion article, we argue that knowledge of the fundamental factors that drive host-pathogen coevolution in wild systems can provide new insights into disease development in agriculture. Such evolutionary principles can be used to guide the formulation of sustainable disease management strategies which can minimize disease epidemics while simultaneously reducing pressure on pathogens to evolve increased infectivity and aggressiveness. To ensure agricultural sustainability, disease management programs that reflect the dynamism of pathogen population structure are essential and evolutionary biologists should play an increasing role in their design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. What principles should govern the use of managed entry agreements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemp, Marianne; Frønsdal, Katrine; Facey, Karen

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To ensure rapid access to new potentially beneficial health technologies, obtain best value for money, and ensure affordability, healthcare payers are adopting a range of innovative reimbursement approaches that may be called Managed Entry Agreements (MEAs). METHODS: The Health...... Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Policy Forum sought to identify why MEAs might be used, issues associated with implementation and develop principles for their use. A 2-day deliberative workshop discussed key papers, members' experiences, and collectively addressed four policy questions...... that resulted in this study. RESULTS: MEAs are used to give access to new technologies where traditional reimbursement is deemed inappropriate. Three different forms of MEAs have been identified: management of budget impact, management of uncertainty relating to clinical and/or cost...

  10. The precautionary principle in fisheries management under climate change: How the international legal framework formulate it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifah, E.; Imanullah, M. N.

    2018-03-01

    One of the objectives of fisheries management is to reach long-term sustainable benefits of the fish stocks while reducing the risk of severe or irreversible damage to the marine ecosystem. Achieving this objective needs, the good scientific knowledge and understanding on fisheries management including scientific data and information on the fish stock, fishing catch, distribution, migration, the proportion of mature fish, the mortality rate, reproduction as well as the knowledge on the impact of fishing on dependent and associated species and other species belonging to the same ecosystem, and further the impact of climate change and climate variability on the fish stocks and marine ecosystem. Lack of this scientific knowledge may lead to high levels of uncertainty. The precautionary principle is one of the basic environmental principles needed in overcoming this problem. An essence of this principle is that, in facing the serious risk as a result of the limited scientific knowledge or the absence of complete evidence of harm, it should not prevent the precautionary measures in minimizing risks and protecting the fish stocks and ecosystem. This study aims to examine how the precautionary principle in fisheries management be formulated into the international legal framework, especially under the climate change framework.

  11. A Study on improvement of comprehensive environmental management system - activation of liberalized environmental management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hweu Sung; Kang, Chul Goo [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    As a part of improvement on a comprehensive environmental management system, this study was attempted to find an activating policy for a liberalized environmental management. This study provided an activation plan of reasonable environmental regulation reform and liberalized environmental management through the analysis of foreign examples and domestic situation. Furthermore, it analyzed an institutional mechanism for a smooth operation of liberalized environmental management. 68 refs., 5 figs., 51 tabs.

  12. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines; » Copyright Notice. Author Guidelines. Guide to Authors: The Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) are based in Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Bahir Dar University, ...

  13. Environmentally sound management of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, T.

    2002-01-01

    Environmentally sound management or ESM has been defined under the Basel Convention as 'taking all practicable steps to ensure that hazardous wastes and other wastes are managed in a manner which will protect human health and the environment against the adverse effects which may result from such wastes'. An initiative is underway to develop and implement a Canadian Environmentally Sound Management (ESM) regime for both hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials. This ESM regime aims to assure equivalent minimum environmental protection across Canada while respecting regional differences. Cooperation and coordination between the federal government, provinces and territories is essential to the development and implementation of ESM systems since waste management is a shared jurisdiction in Canada. Federally, CEPA 1999 provides an opportunity to improve Environment Canada's ability to ensure that all exports and imports are managed in an environmentally sound manner. CEPA 1999 enabled Environment Canada to establish criteria for environmentally sound management (ESM) that can be applied by importers and exporters in seeking to ensure that wastes and recyclable materials they import or export will be treated in an environmentally sound manner. The ESM regime would include the development of ESM principles, criteria and guidelines relevant to Canada and a procedure for evaluating ESM. It would be developed in full consultation with stakeholders. The timeline for the development and implementation of the ESM regime is anticipated by about 2006. (author)

  14. Training and Education of Environmental Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Sinding, Knud; Madsen, Henning

    An analysis of the training backgrounds of environmental managers in a range of environmentally advanced European companies reveals the very broad qualifications ideally required of these managers. At the same time, however, it is found that the provision of training opportunities relevant...... for this important category of managers is both limited in scope and foundation, and highly dependent on the randomly distributed efforts of educators with an environmental interest....

  15. Community Relations: DOD’s Approach for Using Resources Reflects Sound Management Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    COMMUNITY RELATIONS DOD’s Approach for Using Resources Reflects Sound Management Principles Report to...Sound Management Principles What GAO Found The Department of Defense’s (DOD) approach for determining which community relations activities to...undertake reflects sound management principles —both for activities requested by non-DOD entities and for activities initiated by the department. DOD and

  16. INTEGRATING HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES IN FORMULARY MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Monica; Khoo, Ai Leng; Zhao, Ying Jiao; Lin, Liang; Lim, Boon Peng

    2016-01-01

    Effective formulary management in healthcare institutions safeguards rational drug use and optimizes health outcomes. We implemented a formulary management program integrating the principles of health technology assessment (HTA) to improve the safe, appropriate, and cost-effective use of medicine in Singapore. A 3-year formulary management program was initiated in 2011 in five public healthcare institutions. This program was managed by a project team comprising HTA researchers. The project team worked with institutional pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees to: (i) develop tools for formulary drug review and decision making; (ii) enhance the HTA knowledge and skills of formulary pharmacists and members of P&T committees; (iii) devise a prioritization framework to overcome resource constraints and time pressure; and (iv) conceptualize and implement a framework to review existing formulary. Tools that facilitate drug request submission, drug review, and decision making were developed for formulary drug inclusion. A systematic framework to review existing formulary was also developed and tested in selected institutions. A competency development plan was rolled out over 2 years to enhance formulary pharmacists' proficiency in systematic literature search and review, meta-analysis, and pharmacoeconomic evaluation. The plan comprised training workshops and on-the-job knowledge transfer between the project team and institutional formulary pharmacists through collaborating on selected drug reviews. A resource guide that consolidated the tools and templates was published to encourage the adoption of best practices in formulary management. Based on the concepts of HTA, we implemented an evidence-based approach to optimize formulary management.

  17. Waste minimization fundamental principles used in radioactive waste management plan for decommissioning of a CANDU - 600 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, Gheorghe; Georgescu, Roxana Cristiana; Sociu, Florin

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of waste minimization are to limit the generation and spread of radioactive contamination and to reduce the amount of wastes for storage and disposal, thereby limiting any consequent environmental impact, as well as the total costs associated with contaminated material management. This objective will be achieved by: reviewing the sources and characteristics of radioactive materials arising from Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) activities; reviewing waste minimization principles and current practical applications, together with regulatory, technical, financial and political factors influencing waste minimization practices; and reviewing current trends in improving waste minimization practices during Decontamination and Decommissioning. The main elements of a waste minimization strategy can be grouped into four areas: source reduction, prevention of contamination spread, recycle and reuse, and waste management optimization. For sustaining this objective, the following principles and procedures of wastes management are taken into account: safety and environment protection principles; principles regarding the facility operation; quality assurance procedures; procedures for material classification and releasing. (authors)

  18. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY FOR SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    With growing world population, diminishing resources, and realization of the harmful effects of various pollutants, research focus in environmental management has shifted towards sustainability. The goal of a sustainable management strategy is to promote the structure and operati...

  19. Protecting the environment for future generations. Principles and actors in international environmental law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proelss, Alexander (ed.) [Trier Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Environmental and Technology Law

    2017-08-01

    This book compiles the written versions of presentations held at the occasion of an international symposium entitled ''Protecting the Environment for Future Generations - Principles and Actors in International Environmental Law''. The symposium was organized by the Institute of Environmental and Technology Law of Trier University (IUTR) on the basis of a cooperation scheme with the Environmental Law Institute of the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, and took place in Trier on 29-30 October 2015. It brought together a distinguished group of experts from Europe and abroad to address current issues of international and European environmental law. The main objective of the symposium was to take stock of the actors and principles of international and European environmental law, and to analyze how and to what extent these principles have been implemented on the supranational and domestic legal levels.

  20. Geothermal power plants principles, applications, case studies and environmental impact

    CERN Document Server

    DiPippo, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 3e, this single resource covers all aspects of the utilization of geothermal energy for power generation using fundamental scientific and engineering principles. Its practical emphasis is enhanced by the use of case studies from real plants that increase the reader's understanding of geothermal energy conversion and provide a unique compilation of hard-to-obtain data and experience. Important new chapters cover Hot Dry Rock, Enhanced Geothermal Systems, and Deep Hydrothermal Systems. New, international case studies provide practical, hands-on knowledge.

  1. Geothermal power plants principles, applications, case studies and environmental impact

    CERN Document Server

    DiPippo, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Ron DiPippo, Professor Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, is a world-regarded geothermal expert. This single resource covers all aspects of the utilization of geothermal energy for power generation from fundamental scientific and engineering principles. The thermodynamic basis for the design of geothermal power plants is at the heart of the book and readers are clearly guided on the process of designing and analysing the key types of geothermal energy conversion systems. Its practical emphasis is enhanced by the use of case studies from real plants that increase the reader'

  2. Hanford Environmental Management Program implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Management Program (HEMP) was established to facilitate compliance with the applicable environmental statues, regulations, and standards on the Hanford Site. The HEMP provides a structured approach to achieve environmental management objectives. The Hanford Environmental Management Program Plan (HEMP Plan) was prepared as a strategic level planning document to describe the program management, technical implementation, verification, and communications activities that guide the HEMP. Four basic program objectives are identified in the HEMP Plan as follows: establish ongoing monitoring to ensure that Hanford Site operations comply with environmental requirements; attain regulatory compliance through the modification of activities; mitigate any environmental consequences; and minimize the environmental impacts of future operations at the Hanford Site. 2 refs., 24 figs., 27 tabs

  3. Environmental management systems and organizational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg

    2000-01-01

    and environmental management systems. The structure of the organizations has changed, the relationships with external partners have strengthened and the implementation of quality and environmental management systems has trimmed the organizations to manage and develop these areas. The organization analysis is based......The establishment of an environmental management system and its continuous improvements is a process towards a reduction of the companies' and the products' environmental impact. The organizations' ability to change is crucial in order to establish a dynamic environmental management system...... and to achieve continuous environmental improvements. The study of changes gives an insight into how organizations function, as well as their forces and barriers. This article focuses on the organizational changes that two companies have undergone from 1992 up until today in connection with their quality...

  4. Environmental radiation: basic principles, biological facts, potential risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodemann, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    This book describes the complex processes that underlie the effects of different types of radiation at the cellular, organ and organismic level. Technical terms central to the subject matter are printed in italicize and explained in a glossary along with all physical quantities and dimensional units referred to. Through a systematic presentation of various aspects of the effects of environmental radiation on humans the author has endeavoured to make it clear that any discussion on potential health hazards must be conducted specific to the type of radiation in question. Furthermore, to study these issues meaningfully one must have a knowledge of the scientific basis of interactions between the various types of radiation and biological systems and be able to assess the relative impact of environmental radiation compared with other environmental health hazards

  5. What principles should govern the use of managed entry agreements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemp, Marianne; Frønsdal, Katrine B; Facey, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To ensure rapid access to new potentially beneficial health technologies, obtain best value for money, and ensure affordability, healthcare payers are adopting a range of innovative reimbursement approaches that may be called Managed Entry Agreements (MEAs). The Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Policy Forum sought to identify why MEAs might be used, issues associated with implementation and develop principles for their use. A 2-day deliberative workshop discussed key papers, members' experiences, and collectively addressed four policy questions that resulted in this study. MEAs are used to give access to new technologies where traditional reimbursement is deemed inappropriate. Three different forms of MEAs have been identified: management of budget impact, management of uncertainty relating to clinical and/or cost-effectiveness, and management of utilization to optimize performance. The rationale for using these approaches and their advantages and disadvantages differ. However, all forms of MEA should take the form of a formal written agreement among stakeholders, clearly identifying the rationale for the agreement, aspects to be assessed, methods of data collection and review, and the criteria for ending the agreement. MEAs should only be used when HTA identifies issues or concerns about key outcomes and/or costs and/or organizational/budget impacts that are material to a reimbursement decision. They provide patient access and can be useful to manage technology diffusion and optimize use. However, they are administratively complex and may be difficult to negotiate and their effectiveness has yet to be evaluated.

  6. Environmental management in the National Power Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petel, M.R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental management in the National Power Corporation (NPC) is enshrined in the corporate charter. Environmental management practice can be traced back to the past purely hydroelectric power generation days, of the corporation. One good thing about nuclear power plant project of NPC, is that it required a formalization and documentation of environmental management, as part of the licensing procedure for the project. Thereafter, environmental management had been strengthened and institutionalized in the corporation. Succeeding years had also witnessed the escalation of the development and diversification of electricity generation sources, including the development of geothermal power, and to a small extent yet, renewable energy, such as wind power. The corporation has also intensified the installation of transmission lines of varying sizes in various locations and has gone, for now, for its internal needs, into telecommunications. With the anticipated further developments in the power sector, i.e., the ever increasing demand for power and the privitization of the power industry, new challenges loom in environmental management for the sector. The parallel developments in the environmental sciences and the collective experiences in power generation and environmental management, locally and abroad, will be very handy in meeting the challenges. The increasing stringency of environmental regulations and standards are also providing continuing challenges to all power utilities like NPC. Globally, the power scenario points towards challenging environmental management requirements, in view of the increasing complexity and gravity of environmental problems facing nations. NPC will still be a player in this scenario and therefore, will need to respond accordingly. (author)

  7. Principles for Management of Intraoperative Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukop, Philemon; Chandrasekaran, Vankatachalam

    2015-12-01

    Intraoperative Type A aortic dissection is a rare pathology with incidence of 0.06-0.32%. It is associated with a high mortality between 30-50%. Some associated risk factors, including hypertension, enlarged aorta, peripheral vascular disease, advanced age, atheroma, and high arterial pressure on cardiopulmonary bypass, have been identified. Modification of these risk factors could reduce the incidence of this event. Prompt diagnosis and management, with the aid of intraoperative trans-esophageal echocardiography and/or epi-aortic ultrasound has been shown to reduce the mortality to 17%. We illustrate the principles of management of this pathology with the case of a 62-year-old female who developed acute Type A aortic dissection while undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair.

  8. The long-term management of nuclear emergencies: The principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.; Cherp, A.; Gray, P.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term impact of the Chernobyl accident on the most affected populations in Belarus (Ukraine)) and the Russian Federation is still evident in terms of a continuing elevated level of thyroid cancer, prominent psychosocial effects, a depressed economy and a low level of well being. Some of these impacts are directly and primarily attributable to exposure to ionising radiation, while others have more complex origins and have evolved over the period since the accident. It is argued that although these latter impacts were largely unpredictable at the time of the accident, they could have been minimised had an appropriate management plan been in force. The principles underlying such a management plan for use in future accidents are enumerated. An essential component in further developing such a plan would be a thorough review of the experience of the Chernobyl accident in order to 'learn the lessons' that accident holds. (authors)

  9. Principles of Antibiotic Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael T; Niederman, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) encompasses a broad spectrum of disease severity and may require outpatient, inpatient, or intensive care management. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely offending pathogens and the severity of disease. This review summarizes key principles in starting treatment and provides recommended empiric therapy regimens for each site of care. In addition, we discuss the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory role macrolides play in CAP, as well as specific information for managing individual CAP pathogens such as community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae . We also examine several novel antibiotics being developed for CAP and review the evidence guiding duration of therapy and current best practices for the transition of hospitalized patients from intravenous antibiotics to oral therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Environmental policies and the pollution prevention principle. Das Vorsorgeprinzip in der Umweltpolitik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, H M

    1992-01-01

    The pollution prevention principle has become the dominant environmental-policy guideline in the Federal Republic of Germany and in the European Communities. The compatibility of the pollution prevention principle with the dominating ecological-economics theory is analyzed, and the differences between the pollution prevention and the polluter principle as a significant, economically founded guideline are defined on the basis of the results obtained. The implementation of the pollution prevention principle, which is understood as an extensive ecologization of the socio-economic structures, is discussed evaluating the contribution of normative and empirical ethics and investigating three closely related aspects, i.e. the development of a pollution prevention target system, the suitability of environmental-policy instruments with regard to different levels of prevention, and the national and democratic institutional prerequisites. The prospects of the pollution prevention principle within the European Communities are discussed on the basis of these findings. (orig.).

  11. The Professionalization of Risk Management: What Role can the ISO 31000 Risk Management Principles Play?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olechowski, Alison; Oehmen, Josef; Seering, W.

    2016-01-01

    an empirical investigation and discussion of the eleven principles of the ISO 31000:2009 Risk Management Standard via a large-scale survey of engineering and product development practitioners. Adhering to the risk management principles at a high level was found to be a significant factor in better reaching......Risk management is increasingly seen as a means of improving the likelihood of success in complex engineering projects. Yet the presence of a legitimacy gap, driven by the lack of empirical validation of published best practices, might explain low adoption of risk management on projects. We present...... cost, schedule, technical and customer targets, in addition to achieving a more stable project execution. This finding suggests that, rather than a single rigid standard or an ever-changing set of detailed methods, the ISO principles have potential to be the basis for our shared understanding of best...

  12. Skin carcinomas: Radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Johnson, Christopher R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have led to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of properties and routes of spread of the diverse

  13. Culture, intangibles and metrics in environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Terre; Gregory, Robin; Klain, Sarah; Roberts, Mere; Chan, Kai M

    2013-03-15

    The demand for better representation of cultural considerations in environmental management is increasingly evident. As two cases in point, ecosystem service approaches increasingly include cultural services, and resource planners recognize indigenous constituents and the cultural knowledge they hold as key to good environmental management. Accordingly, collaborations between anthropologists, planners, decision makers and biodiversity experts about the subject of culture are increasingly common-but also commonly fraught. Those whose expertise is culture often engage in such collaborations because they worry a practitioner from 'elsewhere' will employ a 'measure of culture' that is poorly or naively conceived. Those from an economic or biophysical training must grapple with the intangible properties of culture as they intersect with economic, biological or other material measures. This paper seeks to assist those who engage in collaborations to characterize cultural benefits or impacts relevant to decision-making in three ways; by: (i) considering the likely mindset of would-be collaborators; (ii) providing examples of tested approaches that might enable innovation; and (iii) characterizing the kinds of obstacles that are in principle solvable through methodological alternatives. We accomplish these tasks in part by examining three cases wherein culture was a critical variable in environmental decision making: risk management in New Zealand associated with Māori concerns about genetically modified organisms; cultural services to assist marine planning in coastal British Columbia; and a decision-making process involving a local First Nation about water flows in a regulated river in western Canada. We examine how 'culture' came to be manifest in each case, drawing from ethnographic and cultural-models interviews and using subjective metrics (recommended by theories of judgment and decision making) to express cultural concerns. We conclude that the characterization of

  14. US - Former Soviet Union environmental management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been delegated the responsibility for US DOE's cleanup of nuclear weapons complex. The nature and the magnitude of the waste management and environmental remediation problem requires the identification of technologies and scientific expertise from domestic and foreign sources. This booklet makes comparisons and describes coordinated projects and workshops between the USA and the former Soviet Union

  15. Environmental Management Performance Report 11/1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management performance by: US Department of Energy, Richland Operation

  16. Environmental management systems in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg; Smink, Carla

    2004-01-01

    The article presents som empirical findings regarding environmental management systems of four companies in the automotive industry in South Africa.......The article presents som empirical findings regarding environmental management systems of four companies in the automotive industry in South Africa....

  17. Application of remote sensing to environmental management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, J F

    1980-01-01

    The contribution of remote sensing to environmental management procedures at the sub-regional scale is examined in relation to the County Structure environmental management plan for Merseyside County, England. The various seasons, scales and emulsions used for aerial photography in the county are indicated, and results of aerial surveys of the distribution of derelict and despoiled land and of natural environments are presented and compared with ground surveys. The use of color infrared and panchromatic aerial photographs indicating areas of environmental stress and land use in the formulation, implementation and monitoring of environmental management activities is then discussed.

  18. Environmental conflicts: Key issues and management implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental crises and problems throughout the world are widespread and increasing rapidly. In relation to these concerns, the article discusses the following aspects: people and the environment, environmental conflicts, climate change and environmental conflicts, and management implications. The section on people ...

  19. Improving risk management: from lame excuses to principled practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paté-Cornell, Elisabeth; Cox, Louis Anthony

    2014-07-01

    The three classic pillars of risk analysis are risk assessment (how big is the risk and how sure can we be?), risk management (what shall we do about it?), and risk communication (what shall we say about it, to whom, when, and how?). We propose two complements as important parts of these three bases: risk attribution (who or what addressable conditions actually caused an accident or loss?) and learning from experience about risk reduction (what works, and how well?). Failures in complex systems usually evoke blame, often with insufficient attention to root causes of failure, including some aspects of the situation, design decisions, or social norms and culture. Focusing on blame, however, can inhibit effective learning, instead eliciting excuses to deflect attention and perceived culpability. Productive understanding of what went wrong, and how to do better, thus requires moving past recrimination and excuses. This article identifies common blame-shifting "lame excuses" for poor risk management. These generally contribute little to effective improvements and may leave real risks and preventable causes unaddressed. We propose principles from risk and decision sciences and organizational design to improve results. These start with organizational leadership. More specifically, they include: deliberate testing and learning-especially from near-misses and accident precursors; careful causal analysis of accidents; risk quantification; candid expression of uncertainties about costs and benefits of risk-reduction options; optimization of tradeoffs between gathering additional information and immediate action; promotion of safety culture; and mindful allocation of people, responsibilities, and resources to reduce risks. We propose that these principles provide sound foundations for improving successful risk management. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. Skin carcinomas: radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K. A.; Johnson, Christopher R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have lead to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of tumor biological properties of the diverse malignant

  1. Development of the environmental data management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatebe, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Yurina; Shirato, Seiichi; Sato, Yoshinori

    2012-02-01

    The recent society requires business activities with environmental consideration to every enterprise. Also, Japanese laws require those activities. For example, 'Law Concerning the Promotion of Business Activities with Environmental Consideration by Specified Corporations, etc, by Facilitating Access to Environmental Information, and Other Measures' (Environmental Consideration Law) mandates publication of a report relating to the activities of environmental consideration to each enterprise above designated size. 'Act on the Rational Use of Energy' mandates the report of the results of energy consumption and the long-term plan of the rational use of energy. Moreover, 'Act on Promotion of Global Warming Countermeasures' mandates the report of the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to those, 'Water Pollution Control Law', 'Waste Management and Public Cleaning Law' and other environmental laws as well as environmental ordinances require business activities with environmental consideration to all companies. So, it is very important for Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to report business activities with environmental consideration in order to build up trustful relations with the nation and communities. The Environmental Data Management System has been developed as the data base of business activities with environmental consideration in JAEA and as the means to promote the activities at every site and office of JAEA. This report summarizes the structure of the Environmental Data Management System, kinds of environmental performance data treated by the system, and gathering methods of the data. (author)

  2. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierowski, J. V.; Henry, L. G.; Dooley, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning planning of any scale and for recording

  3. Is environmental management an economically sustainable business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotschol, Antje; De Giovanni, Pietro; Esposito Vinzi, Vincenzo

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates whether environmental management is an economically sustainable business. While firms invest in green production and green supply chain activities with the primary purpose of reducing their environmental impact, the reciprocal relationships with economic performance need to be clarified. Would firms and suppliers adjust their environmental strategies if the higher economic value that environmental management generates is reinvested in greening actions? We found out that environmental management positively influences economic performance as second order (long term) target, to be reached conditioned by higher environmental performance; in addition, firms can increase their performance if they reinvest the higher economic value gained through environmental management in green practices: While investing in environmental management programs is a short term strategy, economic rewards can be obtained only with some delays. Consequently, environmental management is an economically sustainable business only for patient firms. In the evaluation of these reciprocal relationships, we discovered that green supply chain initiatives are more effective and more economically sustainable than internal actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Proximal femoral fractures: Principles of management and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravi; Banerjee, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to review the principles involved in the management of proximal femoral fractures as reported in the literature. Methods: A medical literature search in the MEDLINE (PubMed) and Cochrane database was undertaken to review strategies and principles in proximal femoral fracture treatment. Randomized control trials and meta analysis were given preference while case reports/small series were rejected. Results and conclusions: Early anatomical reduction and surgical fixation remains the best option to reduce the risk of complications like non-union and avascular necrosis in treating fracture neck femurs. Cancellous screws continue to be the preferred treatment for fixation of neck femur fractures in younger population until the benefit of using sliding hip screws is validated by large multicentric studies. In the geriatric age group, early prosthetic replacement brings down the mortality and morbidity associated with neck femur fractures. Sliding hip screw (DHS) is the best available option for stable inter trochanteric fractures. The use of intramedullary nails e.g. PFN is beneficial in treating inter trochanteric fractures with comminution and loss of lateral buttress. Intramedullary implants have been proven to have increased success rates in subtrochanteric fractures and should be preferred over extramedullary plate fixation systems. PMID:25983451

  5. Do flow principles of operations management apply to computing centres?

    CERN Document Server

    Abaunza, Felipe; Hameri, Ari-Pekka; Niemi, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    By analysing large data-sets on jobs processed in major computing centres, we study how operations management principles apply to these modern day processing plants. We show that Little’s Law on long-term performance averages holds to computing centres, i.e. work-in-progress equals throughput rate multiplied by process lead time. Contrary to traditional manufacturing principles, the law of variation does not hold to computing centres, as the more variation in job lead times the better the throughput and utilisation of the system. We also show that as the utilisation of the system increases lead times and work-in-progress increase, which complies with traditional manufacturing. In comparison with current computing centre operations these results imply that better allocation of jobs could increase throughput and utilisation, while less computing resources are needed, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the centre. From a theoretical point of view, in a system with close to zero set-up times, as in the c...

  6. Environmental issues in operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulingam, Suresh

    Adoption of sustainable operating practices is becoming an increasingly important issue for many organizations in the world today. In this dissertation, I use empirical methods to investigate factors that influence the adoption of sustainable practices and also identify issues that may hinder the adoption of such practices. I explore these issues in two diverse settings. In Chapter 1, I investigate the adoption and non-adoption of energy efficiency initiatives using a database of over 100,000 recommendations provided to more than 13,000 small and medium sized manufacturing firms. Even though the average payback across all recommendations is just over one year, many of these profitable opportunities are not implemented. Using a probit instrumental variable model, I identify four biases in the adoption of these recommendations. First, managers are myopic as they miss out on many profitable opportunities. Second, managers are more influenced by upfront costs than by net benefits when evaluating such initiatives. Third, adoption of a recommendation depends not only on its characteristics but also on the sequence in which the recommendations are presented. Adoption rates are higher for initiatives appearing early in a list of recommendations. Finally, adoption is not influenced by the number of options provided to decision makers. This contributes to the debate about whether or not choice overload occurs. We highlight decision biases previously unobserved in the Operations Management literature using field data rather than experimental data. We draw implications for enhancing adoption of energy efficiency initiatives and for other decision contexts where a collection of process improvement recommendations are made to firms. In Chapter 2, I examine the depth of adoption of the voluntary LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards for green buildings. Depth of adoption refers to the extent to which the buildings adopt practices related to the standard

  7. EcoPrinciples Connect: A Pilot Project Matching Ecological Principles with Available Data to Promote Ecosystem-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, R. G.; Erickson, A.; Mach, M.; Hale, T.; McGregor, A.; Prahler, E. E.; Foley, M.; Caldwell, M.; Hartge, E. H.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean and coastal practitioners work within existing financial constraints, jurisdictions, and legislative authorities to manage coastal and marine resources while seeking to promote and maintain a healthy and productive coastal economy. Fulfilling this mandate necessitates incorporation of best available science, including ecosystem-based management (EBM) into coastal and ocean management decisions. To do this, many agencies seek ways to apply lessons from ecological theory into their decision processes. However, making direct connections between science and management can be challenging, in part because there is no process for linking ecological principles (e.g., maintaining species diversity, habitat diversity, connectivity and populations of key species) with available data. Here we explore how incorporating emerging data and methods into resource management at a local scale can improve the overall health of our coastal and marine ecosystems. We introduce a new web-based interface, EcoPrinciples Connect, that links marine managers to scientific and geospatial information through the lens of these ecological principles, ultimately helping managers become more efficient, more consistent, and advance the integration of EBM. The EcoPrinciples Connect tool grew directly out of needs identified in response to a Center for Ocean Solutions reference guide, Incorporating Ecological Principles into California Ocean and Coastal Management: Examples from Practice. Here we illustrate how we have worked to translate the information in this guide into a co-developed, user-centric tool for agency staff. Specifically, we present a pilot project where we match publicly available data to the ecological principles for the California San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission. We will share early lessons learned from pilot development and highlight opportunities for future transferability to an expanded group of practitioners.

  8. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-07-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), in partnership with the Office of Energy Research (ER), designed, developed, and implemented the Environmental Management Science Program as a basic research effort to fund the scientific and engineering understanding required to solve the most challenging technical problems facing the government's largest, most complex environmental cleanup program. The intent of the Environmental Management Science Program is to: (1) Provide scientific knowledge that will revolutionize technologies and cleanup approaches to significantly reduce future costs, schedules, and risks. (2) Bridge the gap between broad fundamental research that has wide-ranging applications such as that performed in the Department's Office of Energy Research and needs-driven applied technology development that is conducted in Environmental Management's Office of Science and Technology. (3) Focus the nation's science infrastructure on critical Department of Energy environmental problems. In an effort to share information regarding basic research efforts being funded by the Environmental Management Science Program and the Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program), this CD includes summaries for each project. These project summaries, available in portable document format (PDF), were prepared in the spring of 1998 by the principal investigators and provide information about their most recent project activities and accomplishments.

  9. Principles of capacity management, applied in the mental health context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitz, Kathryn; Watson, Darryl

    2017-06-22

    Objective The aim of the paper was to describe a suite of capacity management principles that have been applied in the mental health setting that resulted in a significant reduction in time spent in two emergency departments (ED) and improved throughput. Methods The project consisted of a multifocal change approach over three phases that included: (1) the implementation of a suite of fundamental capacity management activities led by the service and clinical director; (2) a targeted Winter Demand Plan supported by McKinsey and Co.; and (3) a sustainability of change phase. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse the performance data that was collected through-out the project. Results This capacity management project has resulted in sustained patient flow improvement. There was a reduction in the average length of stay (LOS) in the ED for consumers with mental health presentations to the ED. At the commencement of the project, in July 2014, the average LOS was 20.5h compared with 8.5h in December 2015 post the sustainability phase. In July 2014, the percentage of consumers staying longer than 24h was 26% (n=112); in November and December 2015, this had reduced to 6% and 7 5% respectively (less than one consumer per day). Conclusion Improving patient flow is multifactorial. Increased attendances in public EDs by people with mental health problems and the lengthening boarding in the ED affect the overall ED throughput. Key strategies to improve mental health consumer flow need to focus on engagement, leadership, embedding fundamentals, managing and target setting. What is known about the topic? Improving patient flow in the acute sector is an emerging topic in the health literature in response to increasing pressures of access block in EDs. What does this paper add? This paper describes the application of a suite of patient flow improvement principles that were applied in the mental health setting that significantly reduced the waiting time for consumers in two EDs

  10. Waste management - an integral part of environmental management systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, Ulrich

    1998-12-01

    To consider waste as a resource instead of an annoyance with which the management has to cope with, has become an unavoidable task for modern managers. The task the management has to take to secure competitiveness in an environment of rising complexity of production processes and further increasing legal requirements, is to manage waste as much as other recourses are managed. Waste has to be considered an aspect of planning and decision process just as business plans or logistics are. Main themes discussed in this publication comprise waste management, implementation of waste management as an integral part of environmental management systems, and management approach to waste - the results. 4 figs.

  11. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    Environmental effects (including accidents) associated with facility construction, operation, decommissioning, and transportation in the management of commercially generated radioactive waste were analyzed for plants and systems assuming a light water power reactor scenario that produces about 10,000 GWe-yr through the year 2050. The following alternative fuel cycle modes or cases that generate post-fission wastes requiring management were analyzed: a once-through option, a fuel reprocessing option for uranium and plutonium recycle, and a fuel reprocessing option for uranium-only recycle. Volume 1 comprises five chapters: introduction; summary of findings; approach to assessment of environmental effects from radioactive waste management; environmental effects related to radioactive management in a once-through fuel cycle; and environmental effects of radioactive waste management associated with an LWR fuel reprocessing plant. (LK)

  12. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    Environmental effects (including accidents) associated with facility construction, operation, decommissioning, and transportation in the management of commercially generated radioactive waste were analyzed for plants and systems assuming a light water power reactor scenario that produces about 10,000 GWe-yr through the year 2050. The following alternative fuel cycle modes or cases that generate post-fission wastes requiring management were analyzed: a once-through option, a fuel reprocessing option for uranium and plutonium recycle, and a fuel reprocessing option for uranium-only recycle. Volume 1 comprises five chapters: introduction; summary of findings; approach to assessment of environmental effects from radioactive waste management; environmental effects related to radioactive management in a once-through fuel cycle; and environmental effects of radioactive waste management associated with an LWR fuel reprocessing plant

  13. The orientation, principles, priorities and aims of the state environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This chapter contains: (A) The orientation and priorities of state environmental policy of the government of the Slovak Republic which were approved 18 November 1993 by the resolution No 339. On the basis of the Strategy, principles and priorities of state environmental policy 70 short-terminable aims up to 1996, next 59 middle-terminable of aims up to years 2000 - 2010 and 33 general and partial long-terminable aims up to 2030 and longer were formulated. The Strategy is determined by next 5 branches oriented priorities: (1) air protection before pollutants and the global environmental safety; (2) organization of sufficiency of drinking water and decreasing of pollution of other waters under permissible limits; (3) soil protection before degeneration and organization of non-defected food-stuffs and other wares; (4) minimization of formation, use and good waste liquidate; (5) preservation of bio-diversity, preservation and rational use of natural reserves and optimization of place structure and use of the country. (B) The principles and priorities of state environmental policy determinate implementation and observance of then principles of the state environmental policy. (C) Total 162 aims of the Strategy of the state environmental policy and next followed programs, projects and measures of the environmental policy of the Slovak Republic can be grouped into 4 blocks: (1) the environmental policy in the protection of air, water and before of risk factors, in the nuclear safety and waste economy (environmental safety; (2) the environmental policy in protection of the nature and the country, protection and use of mineral surroundings, soils and forest;; (3) the environmental policy in the economy; (4) the environmental policy in the guidance, education, public information, organization, control and coordination of the ministration on the environment. These aims are grouped into 10 sectors. (D) The government of the Slovak republic has first National environmental

  14. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  15. Basic environmental principles for the promotion of clean and efficient energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanmer, R.; Connor-Lajambe, H.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reiterate what might be considered basic principles for promoting clean and efficient energy. These principles have very important implications for the design of energy supply and transportation facilities, but they go far beyond that to unify such design with the design, use and maintenance of many other types of facilities and goods. These principles also affect the way we consider energy security in the context of sustainable development. In annex, this paper presents the recommendation of the Council, with a list of environmentally favourable energy options. (TEC). 2 refs., Annex

  16. Revealing Adaptive Management of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine; Watts, Robyn J.

    2018-03-01

    Managers of land, water, and biodiversity are working with increasingly complex social ecological systems with high uncertainty. Adaptive management (learning from doing) is an ideal approach for working with this complexity. The competing social and environmental demands for water have prompted interest in freshwater adaptive management, but its success and uptake appear to be slow. Some of the perceived "failure" of adaptive management may reflect the way success is conceived and measured; learning, rarely used as an indicator of success, is narrowly defined when it is. In this paper, we document the process of adaptive flow management in the Edward-Wakool system in the southern Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Data are from interviews with environmental water managers, document review, and the authors' structured reflection on their experiences of adaptive management and environmental flows. Substantial learning occurred in relation to the management of environmental flows in the Edward-Wakool system, with evidence found in planning documents, water-use reports, technical reports, stakeholder committee minutes, and refereed papers, while other evidence was anecdotal. Based on this case, we suggest it may be difficult for external observers to perceive the success of large adaptive management projects because evidence of learning is dispersed across multiple documents, and learning is not necessarily considered a measure of success. We suggest that documentation and sharing of new insights, and of the processes of learning, should be resourced to facilitate social learning within the water management sector, and to help demonstrate the successes of adaptive management.

  17. Integrating Ecosystem-Based Management Principles of Adaptive Management and Stakeholder Engagement in California Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, A.; Martone, R. G.; Hazen, L.; Mease, L.; Gourlie, D.; Le Cornu, E.; Ourens, R.; Micheli, F.

    2016-12-01

    California's fisheries management law, the Marine Life Management Act (MLMA) of 1998, signaled a transformative shift from traditional single-species management to an ecosystem-based approach. In response, the fisheries management community in California is striving to integrate new science and management innovations while maximizing its limited capacity. However, data gaps, high compliance costs, capacity constraints, and limited access to the best available data and technologies persist. Here we present two decision support tools being developed to aid California fisheries managers as they continue to implement ecosystem-based management (EBM). First, to practice adaptive management, a key principle of EBM, managers must know whether and how their decisions are meeting their management objectives over time. Based on a cross-walk of MLMA goals with metrics and indicators from sustainable fishery certification programs, we present a flexible and practical tool for tracking fishery management performance in California. We showcase a draft series of decision trees and questionnaires managers can use to quantitatively or qualitatively measure both ecological and social outcomes, helping them to prioritize management options and limited resources. Second, state fisheries managers acknowledge the need for more effective stakeholder engagement to facilitate and inform decision-making and long-term outcomes, another key principle of EBM. Here, we present a pilot version of a decision-support tool to aid managers in choosing the most appropriate stakeholder engagement strategies in various types of decision contexts. This online tool will help staff identify their engagement goals, when they can strategically engage stakeholders based on their needs, and the fishery characteristics that will inform how engagement strategies are tailored to specific contexts. We also share opportunities to expand these EBM tools to other resource management contexts and scales.

  18. Risk management frameworks for human health and environmental risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Cindy; Hrudey, Steve; Shortreed, John; Craig, Lorraine; Krewski, Daniel; Furgal, Chris; McColl, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical review of the risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication approaches currently being undertaken by key national, provincial/state, territorial, and international agencies was conducted. The information acquired for review was used to identify the differences, commonalities, strengths, and weaknesses among the various approaches, and to identify elements that should be included in an effective, current, and comprehensive approach applicable to environmental, human health and occupational health risks. More than 80 agencies, organizations, and advisory councils, encompassing more than 100 risk documents, were examined during the period from February 2000 until November 2002. An overview was made of the most important general frameworks for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication for human health and ecological risk, and for occupational health risk. In addition, frameworks for specific applications were reviewed and summarized, including those for (1)contaminated sites; (2) northern contaminants; (3) priority substances; (4) standards development; (5) food safety; (6) medical devices; (7) prescription drug use; (8) emergency response; (9) transportation; (10) risk communication. Twelve frameworks were selected for more extensive review on the basis of representation of the areas of human health, ecological, and occupational health risk; relevance to Canadian risk management needs; representation of comprehensive and well-defined approaches; generalizability with their risk areas; representation of "state of the art" in Canada, the United States, and/or internationally; and extent of usage of potential usage within Canada. These 12 frameworks were: 1. Framework for Environmental Health Risk Management (US Presidential/Congressional Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, 1997). 2. Health Risk Determination: The Challenge of Health Protection (Health and Welfare Canada, 1990). 3. Health Canada Decision

  19. Integrating total quality management principles with the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, D. [Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy has recently required its field offices, contractors, and subcontractors to implement DOE Order 5700.6C, ``Quality Assurance,`` for all work on waste management contracts. The order restructures the 18 criteria of NQA-1 and focuses on the role of management in achieving and assuring quality, performance of activities to achieve and assure quality, and management`s assessment of its performance for the purpose of identifying improvements to be made. The DOE order also introduces elements of the total quality management (TQM) philosophy, which were not present in DOE Order 5700.6B. The research community within DOE has recently issued a document entitled DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide, which is more explicit about the integration of TQM principles with the implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C in research facilities. The Environmental Protection Agency is sponsoring a quality assurance standard (ANSI/ASQC E-4) to replace EPA`s QAMS 005/80. The new standard is consistent with DOE Order 5700.6C, and it also stresses the integration of TQM principles within the quality assurance process. This paper discusses the intent and philosophy of the 10 criteria of the new DOE order, the status of ANSI/ASQC E-4, and how to effectively integrate TQM principles into the quality assurance process as the conversion is made from NQA-1 to DOE Order 5700.6C. The purpose and value of DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide for research will also be discussed.

  20. Economic environmental management of drilling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longwell, H.J.; Akers, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents significant environmental and regulatory initiatives developed by Exxon's New Orleans Drilling Organization. Specifically, the paper will cover drilling waste minimization techniques and disposal options, recycling of drilling waste streams, and environmentally managed drilling location design considerations. The implementation of some of these initiatives at Exxon's Chalkley field land locations have resulted in a fifty percent reduction in drilling location waste management costs. Some of these same initiatives have been successfully applied to Exxon's barge drilling locations. For operations at the environmentally sensitive Mobile Bay, Exxon contracted with a local company and assisted in the development of an economically and environmentally superior drilling waste disposal and treatment system. In summary, it is possible for drilling operators to pro-actively manage escalating environmental and regulatory challenges through the implementation of economic and practical initiatives

  1. Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA®) Pacific Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA®) is a web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) tool that assists both emergency responders and...

  2. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) is based in ... Remote sensing and gis applications in determining shoreline and surface ... Assessment Of Labile Metals In Effluents From Lubricating Oil Company In ...

  3. Corporate environmental management and information technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2001-01-01

    software, the Internet, computer networks, telecommunications devices, etc. Information technology also has an impact on how companies perform environmental management. This paper looks at the relations between corporate environmental management and information technology. First it presents a framework...... for mapping information technology. Using this framework it focuses on the use of information technology in corporate environmental management, describes the market for standard environmental management information systems and implementation experiences from one large international company.......Information technology has changed, is changing and will continue to change the face of business as we further enter the Information Society. Today it would be difficult for a company to function effectively without the aid of various information technologies such as accounting software, production...

  4. Corporate Environmental Management and Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2000-01-01

    software, the internet, computer networks, telecommunications devices, etc. Information technology also has an impact on how companies perform environmental management. This paper explores the relations between environmental management and information technology in general terms. It offers a classification...... framework for the use of information technology in corporate environmental management (CEM), describes the market for standard environmental management information systems solutions, what main functionalities are available and what main trends are visible.......Information technology has changed, is changing and will continue to change the face of business as we further enter the Information Society. Today it would be difficult for a company to function effectively without the aid of various information technologies such as accounting software, production...

  5. Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA®) Pacific Northwest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA®) is a web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) tool that assists both emergency responders and...

  6. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management. ... Impacts of Organic Wastes on Water Quality of Woji Creek in Port Harcourt, Nigeria ... of Old Netim Village in Akamkpa Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria ...

  7. Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA®), Great Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA®) is a web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) tool that assists both emergency responders and...

  8. Challenges of solid waste management and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges of solid waste management and environmental sanitation in Ibadan North ... African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues ... inadequate manpower and welfare, poor provision of health services, negative attitudes, ...

  9. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management. ... Types Of Contributions. Original research papers; review articles; case studies and short communications. 3. Copyright ... Example: Chukwu, M; Olusegun, AW; Mohammed, SSD.

  10. Environmental management systems: An industry viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottenbreit, R.

    1993-01-01

    Imperial Oil is upgrading systems used to ensure protection of health and safety and to facilitate the internalization and integration of environmental considerations into its business. Work in progress related to this upgrading is reported. The upgrading was undertaken partly in response to increased expectations from stakeholders and from the notion that improvement of the environmental, health, and safety (EH ampersand S) aspects of business can have the effect of improving reliability, lowering expenses, and minimizing liabilities. The responsibility for establishing environmental policy and direction as well as the environmental management framework rests with Imperial Oil's management committee and the EH ampersand S committee of the board of directors. Responsibility and accountability for implementation and sustainment of environmental processes and systems resides with line management. One of the management systems, the Operations Integrity Management Framework, is described. Elements of this framework include management leadership, accountability, and commitment; risk assessment and management; management of change; personnel and training; incident investigation and analysis; and facilities design and construction. 2 figs

  11. Environmental asset management: Risk management systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naudé, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available bnaude@csir.co.za Charl Petzer Council for Scientific and Industrial Research PO Box 395 Pretoria 0001 South Africa +2712 841 4292 CPetzer1@csir.co.za Copyright © 2017 by B Naudé, C Petzer. Published and used by INCOSE with permission.... Charl Petzer is registered professional engineer with 30 years of programme/project management as well as systems engineering experience in military and other environments. He has been the lead systems engineer, as well as programme manager on several...

  12. Quality Management Principles and Benefits of their Implementation in Central Banks

    OpenAIRE

    Radoica Luburić

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the principles of quality management and benefits of their implementation in central banks. It is based on new principles of quality management, in particular to: customer focus, leadership, engagement of people, process approach, improvement, evidence-based decision making, and, relationship management. With a view to continuously improving their performance and achieving sustained success, central banks have a realistic opportunity to use these principles in an effici...

  13. US - Former Soviet Union environmental management activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been delegated the responsibility for US DOE`s cleanup of nuclear weapons complex. The nature and the magnitude of the waste management and environmental remediation problem requires the identification of technologies and scientific expertise from domestic and foreign sources. This booklet makes comparisons and describes coordinated projects and workshops between the USA and the former Soviet Union.

  14. Environmental management systems in South-Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg; Smink, Carla Kornelia

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses some of the empirical findings regarding envi-ronmental management systems (EMS) of four companies in the automotive industry in South Africa and compares some of the findings to Danish and international experiences.......The paper presents and discusses some of the empirical findings regarding envi-ronmental management systems (EMS) of four companies in the automotive industry in South Africa and compares some of the findings to Danish and international experiences....

  15. Environmental management: The bank's policy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In order to play a leadership role in the environmental recovery of central and eastern Europe, the Bank will pursue the following policy priorities: assistance to the countries of operations in environmental policy formulation, including the development of effective legal and regulatory instruments, the adoption of appropriate emissions and effluents standards and the creation of the institutional and human resources capacity to monitor and enforce them; promoting the use of a variety of economic instruments to address the underlying cause of environmental degradation and the adoption of market-based techniques in environmental management programmes; encouraging the development of an environmental goods and services industry in the countries of operations, of commercially viable investments in environmental technologies and pollution prevention and control, and by funding environmental infrastructure projects; initiation of, or support for, special studies and programmes to address regional and national environmental problems and to promote environmental education within the population and institutions of the countries of operations; adoption of adequate environmental assessment, management planning, audit and monitoring procedures throughout its activities; and promoting the adoption and implementation of procedures for provision of information to, and consultation with, all levels of government and the general public - especially potentially affected parties - concerning environmental matters

  16. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) is based in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Its aim is to publish original research output in the area of Geography, Ecology, Botany, Conservation studies, Food and Nutrition, Water Resources, ...

  17. Environmental Management Guide for Educational Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Since 1996, APPA and CSHEMA, the Campus Safety Health and Environmental Management Association, have collaborated to produce guidance documents to help educational facilities get ahead of the moving target that is environmental compliance. This new 2017 edition will help you identify which regulations pertain to your institution, and assist in…

  18. 77 FR 67808 - Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management... Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) with advice and recommendations on corporate issues...

  19. Corporate environmental information systems (CEIS). Standards und structural principles; Betriebliche Umweltinformationssysteme (BUIS). Anforderungen und struktureller Aufbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflaum, H.; Guderian, J.; Kuemmel, R. [UMSICHT, Inst. fuer Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik e.V., Oberhausen (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    Appropriate organization structures, environmental controlling systems, and corporate environmental information systems (CEIS) are generally considered to be the essential instruments of a modern environmental management. Frequently, acceptance problems have been observed with respect to the installation of a CEIS due to the facts that there are no legal demands to implement such a system and, on the other hand, that theoretically based definitions of standards and structural principles of an CEIS are not yet available. As a consequence, different isolated solutions with rather low efficiency were hurriedly implemented by various companies. Regarding more precise request profiles for CEI systems, the present paper deals with the structural environment and the priority targets of an enterprise and with the organizational integration of environmental tasks. The operationalization into typical function fields yields tools to derive rough enterprise models, to analyze information streams and to select environmentally relevant information as well as the routes which they tend to go. Based on these fundamental instruments, a CEIS architecture (structure and organization) can be developed whose realization is eventually supported by a ten-step plan. Existing EDP solutions are deliberately excluded in order to verify the general validity of the system architecture and to encourage creative potentials. The CEIS concept presented here, however, requires a transformation into operative practice, i.e. adjustment, completion, and combination of the elements concerning the detailed conditions of the enterprise under study. (orig.) [Deutsch] Als wesentliche Instrumente modernen Umweltmanagements werden gemeinhin eine entsprechend ausgerichtete Organisationsstruktur, ein Umweltcontrollingsystem (UCS) und ein betriebliches Umweltinformationssystem (BUIS) angesehen. Die Einfuehrung eines BUIS in Industrieunternehmen stoesst aber erfahrungsgemaess auf Akzeptanzschwierigkeiten. Dies

  20. Influence of Character Development and Principle-Based Management on Worker Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weaver, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... The final section defines a management philosophy based on sound principles that produce motivated individuals of strong character, creating a successful organization. Recommendations for implementation finalize this paper.

  1. Principles of adoption of the successful environmental practices used in developed countries into mining industry in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaitis, Alexandra

    2013-04-01

    presence of the audit and monitoring that do not address the local conditions of the mining operations. Based on the above the following concepts were thought of to improve the environmental conditions in mining sector: 1. Was developed the Regional Environmental Management principle based on the local conditions such as physiographic region, local population, and socioeconomic conditions of the area; 2. Devised were criteria for the risk assessment for developing countries. Where the fundamental principals were public health, both near and far from the operation, environmental and biodiversity impact, waste management, long- and short- term rehabilitation plans, compliance with international standards and norms. 3. Developed was the mechanism of the economic motivation to make mining operations "environmentally friendly" that includes defrayal of expenses from both direct and indirect damages. 4. Identified were spheres of possible cooperation between mining companies, government organizations, and the NGOs. These include development of international standards for Good Neighbor Agreement, exchange of environmental information, exchange of successful environmental, health, and safety practices between mining operations from developed and developing countries. The study showed the dire necessity for the mining industry that operates in developing countries to adopt the successful environmental practices used in developed countries. To achieve this goal the Regional Environmental Management principle, the risk assessment criteria, the mechanism of the economic motivation and the principles for international cooperation can play an extremely important role.

  2. The relationship between top managers' environmental attitudes and environmental management in hotel companies

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jeongdoo

    2009-01-01

    Environmental management and sustainability have been recent important issues in the hospitality industry. The hotel industry, as a main sector of the hospitality industry, has benefited from environmental initiatives through improving corporate image and increasing resource and energy efficiency. Among various environmental issues that have been addressed in the hotel industry, managerial influence on environmental management is rarely investigated. The purpose of this study was to ex...

  3. Modern Management Principles Come to the Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataha, John C; Mouradian, Wendy E; Slayton, Rebecca L; Sorensen, John A; Berg, Joel H

    2016-04-01

    The University of Washington School of Dentistry may be the first dental school in the nation to apply lean process management principles as a primary tool to re-engineer its operations and curriculum to produce the dentist of the future. The efficiencies realized through re-engineering will better enable the school to remain competitive and viable as a national leader of dental education. Several task forces conducted rigorous value stream analyses in a highly collaborative environment led by the dean of the school. The four areas undergoing evaluation and re-engineering were organizational infrastructure, organizational processes, curriculum, and clinic operations. The new educational model was derived by thoroughly analyzing the current state of dental education in order to design and achieve the closest possible ideal state. As well, the school's goal was to create a lean, sustainable operational model. This model aims to ensure continued excellence in restorative dental instruction and to serve as a blueprint for other public dental schools seeking financial stability in this era of shrinking state support and rising costs.

  4. Implementation of the Environmental Management System in Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, M.; Kralj, M.; Rojc, J.

    2008-01-01

    Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO) is a public institution assigned to provide effective, safe and responsible management of all kinds of radioactive waste in Slovenia from the moment they arise to their final disposal. Therefore it holds an important role in environmental protection. Its main assignment is to provide conditions for permanent disposal of radioactive waste. It is also authorised to perform public service of radioactive waste management from small producers that includes: collection of the waste from small producers at the producers' premises, transportation to the storage facility, treatment, conditioning storage of RW from small producers; acceptance of radioactive waste in case of emergency situation (e.g. transport accidents); acceptance of radioactive waste in case of unknown producer; operation and management of Central Interim Storage of Radioactive Waste. The quality of ARAO performance in carrying out its mission is assured by implementing the environmental management system according to the standard ISO 14001:2004. Its effectiveness was confirmed by certification in October 2007. The ISO 14001:2004 certificate represents a permanent commitment of ARAO to implement and improve the environmental management system and to include environmental aspects in all its activities, especially in performing the public service. We developed own evaluation criteria for determination of relevant environmental impacts and aspects. ARAO has defined its environmental policy and objectives, it evaluates its environmental impacts yearly, and defines its environmental programmes that not only fulfil legal requirements but tend even to reduce the impacts below legally set levels. A very important environmental programme in the last few years was the reconstruction of the storage facility. Public information and communication programmes are considered to be important also from the environmental management point of view, because public shows great interest in

  5. Environmental Management Performance Report July 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) a monthly summary of the Project Hanford Management Contractor's (PHMC) Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcont.

  6. Linking environmental and stakeholder management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    is to discuss how the influence from an increasing number of stakeholders may influence the companies to adopt a more proactive attitude towards environmentally related initiatives. The first part of the paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most relevant......Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards a more sustainable way of conduct. But recently an increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders including employees, customers, neighbours, NGO's etc has been observed. The purpose of this paper...... stakeholder groups and their influence. Based on a recent survey among Danish companies the second part of the paper will report on the actual perceived influence from a variety of stakeholders to force companies to introduce environmentally-related initiatives. The results will then be discussed in light...

  7. Green knowledge management to support environmental sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dornhoefer, Mareike-Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability, environmental management and green initiatives are topics which gradually developed into trends since the late 1980s, not only in research institutions, but also in public and private organizations. While the usage of energy and other resources are increasing, these organizations search for new possibilities to reduce the economic, ecologic and social burdens and consequences of office and production environments for employees and nature. While certified environmental management systems were established already in the 1990s, green approaches and technologies are only about 10 years old and steadily developing. Decisions about a fitting strategy and the support of suitable measures inside an organization always require knowledge provided for the decision makers. Furthermore it is of importance to record the environmental consequences of the operational business and to not only record data and information, but to create a context and deduce the knowledge for future activities. Based on this situation, the work addresses the main research question of how �classical'' knowledge management might be further developed or transformed into Green Knowledge Management and how it addresses the goals of sustainability, especially ecological sustainability, environmental management and green approaches alike? The definition of Green Knowledge Management consists of five factors, which are discussed systematically, explored conceptually and documented with the help of practical examples. Different knowledge management models and their respective building blocks are analyzed to deduce how knowledge processes might interact with environmental ones as well as green aspects. Also different types of knowledge management systems are analysed for their application possibilities. A planning and decision making tool in form of a three dimensional cube, the ''Green Knowledge Management Cube'' is introduced on a conceptual level and documented

  8. Analysis of Corporate Environmental Management: Methodological Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    in business presents a challenge to management, however, since it implies a fundamental change in some of the ways of operating a company. This paper will briefly discuss how information on the actual extent of environmental management in Danish companies and the way it is applied has been collected based......Human activities cannot avoid influencing conditions in the natural environment one way or the other. This includes as well common activities in the business sector. But during the past few decades, environmental disasters in Seveso and Bhopal, and the Exxon Valdes oil spill in Alaska have...... contributed to an increasing awareness of the effect of business activities on the physical environment. To assist companies reduce, evaluate, monitor and control their environmental impact the concept of corporate environmental and resource management has been developed. Implementation of this concept...

  9. Decision support for utility environmental risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balson, W.E.; Wilson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews a number of decision support methods developed and applied by Decision Focus Incorporated to help utility personnel manage current environmental problems. This work has been performed for the Environmental Risk Analysis Program of EPRI's Environment Division, and also for a number of electric utilities across the country. These are two distinct types of decision support software tools that have been created: economic risk management and environmental risk analysis. These types differ primarily in the identification of who will make a decision. Economic risk management tools are directed primarily at decisions made by electric utilities. Environmental risk analysis tools are directed primarily at decisions made by legislative or regulatory agencies, about which a utility may wish to comment

  10. Environmental Management Strategy: Four Forces Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Martin W.; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  11. Environmental management strategy: four forces analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Martin W; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  12. Teaching Professionals Environmental Management and Cleaner Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ulrik; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Thorsen, Nils

    -ters. The target groups are professional environmental managers working in businesses including consultants, governmental institutions and organizations. To get access to the education the students must have a technical/nature science competence at master level or bachelor level combined with relevant job...... experience. Generally participants have had 5-15 years of practical experience and are in the position of a internal or external job change towards new tasks that require new knowledge, methodologies or management/co-ordination skills. The education of "Masters of Environmental Management" (MEM) started...

  13. Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program`s essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan.

  14. Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program's essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan

  15. Environmental Monitoring and the Gas Industry: Program Manager Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory D. Gillispie

    1997-12-01

    This document has been developed for the nontechnical gas industry manager who has the responsibility for the development of waste or potentially contaminated soil and groundwater data or must make decisions based on such data for the management or remediation of these materials. It explores the pse of common analytical chemistry instrumentation and associated techniques for identification of environmentally hazardous materials. Sufficient detail is given to familiarize the nontechnical reader with the principles behind the operation of each technique. The scope and realm of the techniques and their constituent variations are portrayed through a discussion of crucial details and, where appropriate, the depiction of real-life data. It is the author's intention to provide an easily understood handbook for gas industry management. Techniques which determine the presence, composition, and quantification of gas industry wastes are discussed. Greater focus is given to traditional techniques which have been the mainstay of modem analytical benchwork. However, with the continual advancement of instrumental principles and design, several techniques have been included which are likely to receive greater attention in fiture considerations for waste-related detection. Definitions and concepts inherent to a thorough understanding of the principles common to analytical chemistry are discussed. It is also crucial that gas industry managers understand the effects of the various actions which take place before, during, and after the actual sampling step. When a series of sample collection, storage, and transport activities occur, new or inexperienced project managers may overlook or misunderstand the importance of the sequence. Each step has an impact on the final results of the measurement process; errors in judgment or decision making can be costly. Specific techniques and methodologies for the collection, storage, and transport of environmental media samples are not

  16. The relevance and impact of Ethical Consciousness on Environmental Management in Zambia: A philosophical critique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mweshi, John

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation is informed by the need for adequate ethical consciousness in view of the perceived need for public responsibility, cooperation and participation in ensuring sound environmental management. It investigates and critiques the extent to which an adequate range of ethical principles has been incorporated in Zambia's attempts to address environmental issues.The investigation focused on the role of government policy, education system and the mass media in promoting responsible environmental management and practices by raising environmental ethical consciousness. The study confirmed the preponderance of economic utilitarianism with regard to environmental issues. (author)

  17. Managing technological and environmental dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    The field of MoT cannot continue indefinitely to ignore the importance of the natural environment as a fundamental basis for technological development. This paper will therefore focus on the various linkages between management of technology and sustainable development, discussing both the current...

  18. THE POSITION OF STATE RESPONSIBILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION BY CORPORATE : The Legal Studies of Implementation Paradigm Polluter Pay Principle in Environmental Law Enforcement in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maret Priyanta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development activities is one of the government's efforts in order to realize a fairness and prosperous for the society. The natural resources management through the business activities carried out by the corporation, became one of the important factors in the success of national development. One of the impacts of development activities on the environment is the environmental pollution because of the utilization of natural resources. The pollution has caused a decrease in the quality of human life and other living creatures. Differences paradigm or way people view the polluter pays principle and the position of the responsibility of States to discredit the corporation still there is a difference of view and understanding. It is see from the practice of application of the Social and Environmental Responsibility (TJSL, which seems to have been removing corporate responsibility and involvement allocationof State budget revenue and expenditure of the State to penangulangan pollution, which performed by the corporation. This has led to uncertainty in the law enforcement environment in Indonesia. This study aimed to describe the problem from the legal aspect and theory in relation to the position of state responsibility and corporate environmental pollution in the environmental legal system. This study uses normative juridical approach, through the method of approach to legislation, the conceptual approach, and an analytical approach. The scope of this normative juridical research includes the study of the principles and theory of law. Paradigm reform of the principles of pollution should be change or reform based on theory of law, whereby the position and extent of responsibility of states and corporations definitely be regulated in the Indonesia environmental legal system.

  19. Microbial ecology to manage processes in environmental biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmann, Bruce E

    2006-06-01

    Microbial ecology and environmental biotechnology are inherently tied to each other. The concepts and tools of microbial ecology are the basis for managing processes in environmental biotechnology; and these processes provide interesting ecosystems to advance the concepts and tools of microbial ecology. Revolutionary advancements in molecular tools to understand the structure and function of microbial communities are bolstering the power of microbial ecology. A push from advances in modern materials along with a pull from a societal need to become more sustainable is enabling environmental biotechnology to create novel processes. How do these two fields work together? Five principles illuminate the way: (i) aim for big benefits; (ii) develop and apply more powerful tools to understand microbial communities; (iii) follow the electrons; (iv) retain slow-growing biomass; and (v) integrate, integrate, integrate.

  20. Quality Management Principles and Benefits of their Implementation in Central Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luburić Radoica

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the principles of quality management and benefits of their implementation in central banks. It is based on new principles of quality management, in particular to: customer focus, leadership, engagement of people, process approach, improvement, evidence-based decision making, and, relationship management. With a view to continuously improving their performance and achieving sustained success, central banks have a realistic opportunity to use these principles in an efficient and effective manner whereby the top management certainly holds the most responsibility. Quality management principles are analysed herein both in their original form and in terms of their implementation in the financial system and its most prominent entity - central bank. The article also incorporates new standard-related terms such as `context` and `risk-based thinking` that significantly strengthen quality management principles and contribute to a more effective and efficient achievement of sustainable success.

  1. Integrating Environmental and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards im-proved environmental performance. However, there has also been increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders, including employees, customers, neighbours and NGOs, etc. In order to improve corporate...... relationships with various stakeholders, companies need to be able to identify these stakeholders and assess their influence. The first part of this paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most significant stakeholder groups and their influence on corporate...

  2. Theoretical principles of marketing management are on enterprises of agroindustrial complex

    OpenAIRE

    LEVKIV G.YA.; LISOVIY A.V.

    2012-01-01

    In the article theoretical principles of marketing management are analysed and generalized on the enterprises of APK. The strategic are considered conceptually innovative orientiri in the system of marketing management

  3. Managing environmental aspects resulting from energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Human health and environmental impacts of fossil fuel energy consumptions are examined and the ongoing effort to align energy management plans with sustainable development strategies and environmental management systems is described. Human health impacts are manifested in mortality rates, hospital admissions, visits to emergency rooms and physicians' offices, reduced physical performance, increase in the use of medications, impaired pulmonary function and a variety of lesser (or less perceptible) effects. Environmental impacts are demonstrated through climatic change, increase in greenhouse gas emissions, increase in smog, acid rain, and soil, groundwater and surface water contamination. The importance of commitment, integrated planning, measurement and evaluation, periodic review and improvement and documentation in aligning energy and environmental management plans are highlighted, along with the need for behavioral and operational changes, the creation of employee awareness and training, and the adoption of green procurement and life cycle costing. Adoption of the ISO 14000 approach to managing energy consumption is also seen as an important step in the direction of integrated energy and environmental management and sustainable development

  4. Principles of managed intellectual activity in training psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I. Zakharova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the possibility of using the principles of gradual development of intellectual activity in the training experts of developmental psychology. The issue of the managed development of professional work components is being raised. A possible way of working is discussed analysing the features of child actual development aimed at discovering the reasons for the learning difficulties, which served as an excuse for the parents to seek psychological assistance. The method of analysis becomes an important competence of a consulting psychologist against the background of a high variety of forms of mental development. Development of readymade algorithms for solving a problem situation, covering all their diversity seems next to impossible. In this regard, there is a need to prepare students for an independent analysis of a specific life situation. It is the ability to this kind of analysis that ensures the expert’s preparedness to develop recommendations that contribute to harmonizing the child’s development. Elaboration of this competence implies the integration of knowledge and skills acquired in various training courses. This possibility is provided by shaping the student’s orientation in the learned action taking into account its level structure. Semantically speaking, orientation allows one to recover the logic of the child’s examination and child development according to the goal set. The orientation is based on the mechanisms and conditions of mental development. The choice of adequate diagnostic tools becomes an independent task of the analysis that requires understanding of the available techniques and diagnostic tools. Summing up, the operational level of orientation provides competent use of the means chosen during diagnostic examination. Taking into account the orientation level of the developed activity makes it possible to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the process of training into psychologist expert

  5. 36 CFR 1220.32 - What records management principles must agencies implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Responsibilities § 1220.32 What records management principles must agencies implement? Agencies must create and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records management principles must agencies implement? 1220.32 Section 1220.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL...

  6. A pharmacy business management simulation exercise as a practical application of business management material and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Brent L; Gunturi, Rahul; Sullivan, Donald

    2014-04-17

    To implement a pharmacy business management simulation exercise as a practical application of business management material and principles and assess students' perceived value. As part of a pharmacy management and administration course, students made various calculations and management decisions in the global categories of hours of operation, inventory, pricing, and personnel. The students entered the data into simulation software and a realistic community pharmacy marketplace was modeled. Course topics included accounting, economics, finance, human resources, management, marketing, and leadership. An 18-item posttest survey was administered. Students' slightly to moderately agreed the pharmacy simulation program enhanced their knowledge and understanding, particularly of inventory management, cash flow statements, balance sheets, and income statements. Overall attitudes toward the pharmacy simulation program were also slightly positive and students also slightly agreed the pharmacy simulation program enhanced their learning of pharmacy business management. Inventory management was the only area in which students felt they had at least "some" exposure to the assessed business management topics during IPPEs/internship, while all other areas of experience ranged from "not at all" to "a little." The pharmacy simulation program is an effective active-learning exercise and enhanced students' knowledge and understanding of the business management topics covered.

  7. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Kriegner, Christopher J.; Schew, William A.; Kaczmar, Swiatoslav W.; Traister, Matthew; Wilson, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted

  8. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Kriegner, Christopher J.; Schew, William A.; Kaczmar, Swiatoslav W.; Traister, Matthew; Wilson, David J. [O' Brien and Gere, Ecological Sciences, E. 512 Township Line Road, Two Valley Square, Suite 120, Blue Bell, PA 19422 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted. (author)

  9. Environmental Management System ISO 14001

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, Syed

    2010-01-01

    This is a must-have tool for any company in the process of adopting and incorporating the ISO 14001:2004 requirements, this book and accompanying CD-ROM provides the latest updates and amendments and translates the ISO language into actionable strategy. Offering administrative solutions to managers of all sorts, it includes practical examples of policies with objectives, targets, and action plans applicable to any process related industry or an ordinary organization. With template formats and hands-on flow charts to describe step-by-step system development, documentation, and implementation ph

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT: TOWARDS A NEW SCIENCE OF SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Systems Management (ESM) is the management of environmental problems at the systems level fully accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the environment. This includes socio-economic dimensions as well as the usual physical and life science aspects of environm...

  11. Technology development and transfer in environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.; Karnovitz, A.; Yarbrough, M.

    1994-01-01

    Federal efforts to develop and employ the innovative technologies needed to clean up contaminated facilities would greatly benefit from a greater degree of interaction and integration with the energies and resources of the private sector. Yet there are numerous institutional, economic, and regulatory obstacles to the transfer and commercialization of environmental restoration and waste management technologies. These obstacles discourage private sector involvement and investment in Federal efforts to develop and use innovative technologies. A further effect is to impede market development even where private sector interest is high. Lowering these market barriers will facilitate the commercialization of innovative environmental cleanup technologies and expedite the cleanup of contaminated Federal and private facilities. This paper identifies the major barriers to transfer and commercialization of innovative technologies and suggests possible strategies to overcome them. Emphasis is placed on issues particularly relevant to the Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) program, but which are applicable to other Federal agencies confronting complex environmental cleanup problems

  12. Addressing Complexity in Environmental Management and Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Kirschke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Governance for complex problem solving has been increasingly discussed in environmental sustainability research. Above all, researchers continuously observe that sustainability problems are complex or “wicked”, and suggest participatory models to address these problems in practice. In order to add to this debate, this study suggests a more differentiated theoretical approach to define governance for complex environmental problem solving than in previous studies. The approach consists of two vital steps: First, we operationalize complexity and define management strategies for solving environmental sustainability problems based on findings from psychology research. Second, we identify governance strategies that facilitate these management strategies. Linking those strategies suggests that the role of diverse institutions, actors, and interactions differs for five key dimensions of complexity: goals, variables, dynamics, interconnections, and informational uncertainty. The results strengthen systematic analyses of environmental sustainability problems in both theory and practice.

  13. First Principles Investigations of Technologically and Environmentally Important Nano-structured Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujata

    In the course of my PhD I have worked on a broad range of problems using simulations from first principles: from catalysis and chemical reactions at surfaces and on nanostructures, characterization of carbon-based systems and devices, and surface and interface physics. My research activities focused on the application of ab-initio electronic structure techniques to the theoretical study of important aspects of the physics and chemistry of materials for energy and environmental applications and nano-electronic devices. A common theme of my research is the computational study of chemical reactions of environmentally important molecules (CO, CO2) using high performance simulations. In particular, my principal aim was to design novel nano-structured functional catalytic surfaces and interfaces for environmentally relevant remediation and recycling reactions, with particular attention to the management of carbon dioxide. We have studied the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO), both in the presence and absence of hydrogen, on graphitic edges. Using first-principles calculations we have studied several reactions of CO with carbon nanostructures, where the active sites can be regenerated by the deposition of carbon decomposed from the reactant (CO) to make the reactions self-sustained. Using statistical mechanics, we have also studied the conditions under which the conversion of CO to graphene and carbon dioxide is thermodynamically favorable, both in the presence and in the absence of hydrogen. These results are a first step toward the development of processes for the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of CO in a hydrogen atmosphere. We have elucidated the atomic scale mechanisms of activation and reduction of carbon dioxide on specifically designed catalytic surfaces via the rational manipulation of the surface properties that can be achieved by combining transition metal thin films on oxide

  14. Environmental Management Performance Report for December 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-02-16

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: U. S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FHI) and its subcontractors, Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for EM and EM Science and Technology (S&T) Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the four sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A listing of what is contained in the sections can be found in the Table of Contents.

  15. Environmental Management Performance Report April 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FHI) and its subcontractors; Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors; Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for EM and EM Science and Technology (S and T) Mission; and Office of Safety Regulation of the TWRS Privatization Contractor. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the four sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries.

  16. Environmental Management Performance Report November 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors; Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors; Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission; and Office of Safety Regulation of the TWRS Privatization Contractor. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the four sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  17. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management and...

  18. Implementation of environmental management in China

    OpenAIRE

    Håkansson, Susanna

    2005-01-01

    This thesis project was carried out within the cooperation between theIndustrial Ecology Department at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH),Stockholm, Sweden and Center for Space Thermal Science of ShandongUniversity, Jinan, China. The aim of this thesis report is to investigate Environmental ManagementSystem (EMS) and its support system, give a general view of theenvironmental work in companies in China, and make recommendation forSwedish joint ventures how they should work with environmental...

  19. Environmental marketing within organic agriculture system management

    OpenAIRE

    O. Shkuratov; V. Kyporenko

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with economic content of environmental marketing in the management system organic agriculture that allows operators of organic market to effectively plan the production of organic agricultural products and ensure the optimal balance between social and economic indicators throughout the life cycle of the product. Structural-logical scheme on the formation of environmentally oriented motivation of organic agricultural products consumer behavior has been grounded.

  20. Representation and management of narrative information theoretical principles and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Zarri, Gian Piero

    2009-01-01

    Written from a multidisciplinary perspective, this book supplies an exhaustive description of NKRL and of the associated knowledge representation principles. It also constitutes an invaluable source of reference for practitioners, researchers and graduates.

  1. Alternative techniques for environmental project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, S.

    1994-01-01

    Beginning in the late 1970s and early 1980s, increased regulation and recognition of ground water as an important natural resource led industry to address subsurface contamination at many sites. This caused the industry's dependence on environmental consultants to increase drastically. Initially, the accepted practice for addressing environmental concerns was to rely upon consultants to determine appropriate work scope, budgets, procedures and regulatory interaction. While significant advances have been made in technology and consulting services, improvement in project management and cost containment have been limited. In order to effectively manage environmental projects, it is imperative that business risks and standardized project management practices be factored into environmental solutions. A standardized environmental project management program was developed and applied to projects at petroleum marketing facilities throughout the United States. Following development and implementation, detailed studies were conducted to measure the value of standardization in reducing costs and enhancing efficiencies. The results indicate significant improvement in both reducing project costs and in enhancing the efficiency of consultants

  2. Environmental Restoration Program Control Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental Restoration managers need to demonstrate that their programs are under control. Unlike most industrial programs, the public is heavily involved in Environmental Restoration activities. The public is demanding that the country prove that real progress is being made towards cleaning up the environment. A Program Control Management System can fill this need. It provides a structure for planning, work authorization, data accumulation, data analysis and change control. But it takes time to implement a control system and the public is losing its patience. This paper describes critical items essential to the quick development and implementation of a successful control system

  3. Applying lean management principles to the creation of a postpartum hemorrhage care bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Beth

    2013-10-01

    A lean management process is a set of interventions, each of which creates value for the customer. Lean management is not a new concept, but is relatively new to health care. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the most common cause of maternal death worldwide in both developing and developed countries. We applied lean management principles as an innovative approach to improving outcomes in patients with PPH. Initial results using principles of lean management indicated significant improvements in response time and family-centered care. When applied rigorously and throughout the organization, lean principles can have a dramatic effect on productivity, cost and quality. © 2013 AWHONN.

  4. Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, D.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Groenewold, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    The Energy ampersand Environmental Research Center (EERC), a contract-supported organization focused on technology research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD ampersand C), is entering its second year of a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to facilitate the development, demonstration, and commercialization of innovative environmental management (EM) technologies in support of the activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Science and Technology (EM-50) under DOE's EM Program. This paper reviews the concept and approach of the program under the METC-EERC EM Cooperative Agreement and profiles the role the program is playing in the commercialization of five EM technologies

  5. Environmental remediation and waste management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

  6. Environmental remediation and waste management information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA's CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information

  7. Environmental management in North American mining sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Zunaira; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the environmental issues and management practices in the mining sector in the North America. The sustainable measures on waste management are recognized as one of the most serious environmental concerns in the mining industry. For mining activities, it will be no surprise that the metal recovery reagents and acid effluents are a threat to the ecosystem as well as hazards to human health. In addition, poor air quality and ventilation in underground mines can lead to occupational illness and death of workers. Electricity usage and fuel consumption are major factors that contribute to greenhouse gases. On the other hand, many sustainability challenges are faced in the management of tailings and disposal of waste rock. This paper aims to highlight the problems that arise due to poor air quality and acid mine drainage. The paper also addresses some of the advantages and limitations of tailing and waste rock management that still have to be studied in context of the mining sector. This paper suggests that implementation of suitable environmental management tools like life cycle assessment (LCA), cleaner production technologies (CPTs), and multicriteria decision analysis (MCD) are important as it ultimately lead to improve environmental performance and enabling a mine to focus on the next stage of sustainability.

  8. Radiation protection principles applied to conventional industries producing deleterious environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of the radiation protection standards, for the population at large, with the conventional pollutants ambient standards, reveals differences in basic principles which result in more relaxed ambient standards for conventional pollutants and consequently, the penalization of the nuclear industry, due to the increased cost of its safety measures. It is proposed that radiation protection principles should be used as a prototype for pollutants having harmful environmental effects and that radiation health physicists should be active in the application of these principles of population protection. A case study of atmospheric release of SO 2 , under different conditions, is analyzed, to emphasize the importance of consideration of the size of the exposed population. (H.K.)

  9. Environmental Restoration Project - Systems Engineering Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.

    1998-06-01

    This Environmental Restoration (ER) Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes relevant Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) management processes and shows how they implement systems engineering. The objective of this SEMP is to explain and demonstrate how systems engineering is being approached and implemented in the ER Project. The application of systems engineering appropriate to the general nature and scope of the project is summarized in Section 2.0. The basic ER Project management approach is described in Section 3.0. The interrelation and integration of project practices and systems engineering are outlined in Section 4.0. Integration with sitewide systems engineering under the Project Hanford Management Contract is described in Section 5.0

  10. Incorporating co-management within your environmental management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, D.A.; Maher, S.

    1998-01-01

    The meaning of co-management in the renewable resource sector in terms of government and First Nations relations was explained. Co-management is a short term for co-operative management and has a formative history in the Northwest Territories, particularly in wildlife management. For example, co-management bridged the gap between the aboriginal way of hunting with those of the government. The aboriginal system was associated by self regulation based on traditional knowledge whereas the government system emphasized science, laws and regulations. At present, there are few examples of co-management in the oil and gas sector. This paper described the lessons that could be learned from previous examples of co-management and how those lessons might apply to an Environmental Management System (EMS) for the private oil and gas sector. 3 refs

  11. Flexibility as a management principle in dementia care: the Adards example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Bester, Allan

    2006-08-01

    Flexibility is an essential ingredient of person-centered care. We illustrate the potential impact of flexibility by portraying a nursing home that uses flexibility in its approach to residents and staff members. The paper describes the management strategies, principles, and environmental features used by the Adards nursing home in Australia. Adards' flexibility in daily work and task scheduling promotes both resident and staff autonomy, which in turn allows for higher staffing levels, lower staff turnover, and more typical life experiences for residents than is found in many long-term-care facilities in the United States. The article provides an example and a basis for future discussion on this topic, with the hope that it will prompt other institutions to expand the level of flexibility in their policies and procedures.

  12. Waste Management Strategy in The Netherlands. Part 2. Strategy Principles and Influencing Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkate, B.R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This report reflects the Dutch input prepared in the framework of work package 2 of the EU thematic network COMPAS, which deals with the identification of alternative waste management strategies and issues influencing strategy selection in EU member states and their applicant countries. All elements that could have an effect in identifying alternative policies to manage (long-lived) radioactive wastes are addressed in this report. After a short introduction, in chapter 1, about some general issues influencing decision-making such as public acceptance, involvement, perception and (European) legislation, the considered disposal methods and disposal requirements are given in chapter 2. Chapter 3 of this report deals with the background topics of the current waste management strategy in The Netherlands. A detailed overview of (basic) strategy principles and their influencing issues is the subject of chapter 4. Issues considered include: safety and environmental impact; technical limitations; nuclear materials safeguards; monitoring and retrievability; ethical issues; public acceptance; (timing of) strategy development and implementation; and economical considerations. Relevant additional issues that could have an effect in identifying alternative waste management strategy are provided in appendices, including signed treaties (appendix B) and nuclear statutory regulations (appendix C)

  13. Environmental dredging residual generation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patmont, Clay; LaRosa, Paul; Narayanan, Raghav; Forrest, Casey

    2018-05-01

    The presence and magnitude of sediment contamination remaining in a completed dredge area can often dictate the success of an environmental dredging project. The need to better understand and manage this remaining contamination, referred to as "postdredging residuals," has increasingly been recognized by practitioners and investigators. Based on recent dredging projects with robust characterization programs, it is now understood that the residual contamination layer in the postdredging sediment comprises a mixture of contaminated sediments that originate from throughout the dredge cut. This mixture of contaminated sediments initially exhibits fluid mud properties that can contribute to sediment transport and contamination risk outside of the dredge area. This article reviews robust dredging residual evaluations recently performed in the United States and Canada, including the Hudson River, Lower Fox River, Ashtabula River, and Esquimalt Harbour, along with other projects. These data better inform the understanding of residuals generation, leading to improved models of dredging residual formation to inform remedy evaluation, selection, design, and implementation. Data from these projects confirm that the magnitude of dredging residuals is largely determined by site conditions, primarily in situ sediment fluidity or liquidity as measured by dry bulk density. While the generation of dredging residuals cannot be avoided, residuals can be successfully and efficiently managed through careful development and implementation of site-specific management plans. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:335-343. © 2018 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2018 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  14. Henry Fayol’s 14 Principles of Management: Implications for Libraries and Information Centres

    OpenAIRE

    Uzuegbu, C. P.; Nnadozie, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses generally on the ‘fourteen principles of management’ by Henri Fayol. However, it specifically analyses their application to and implications for libraries and information centres. An extensive review of published works on management generally, and library management in particular, was conducted. This yielded vital insights on the original meaning and later modifications of these principles, as well as their application in the management of various organisation...

  15. Legal Analysis of the Korea Radioactive Waste Management Act in the aspect of IAEA Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, M. H.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    According to the Principles of Radioactive Waste Management, the IAEA SAFETY SERIES NO-111-F, IAEA declared 9 doctrines. The IAEA advised a country that operates nuclear power plant to adopt the principles. As a member of the IAEA, Korea has also discussed about a unified policy and enacting law for radioactive waste management to follow the doctrines. This study analyzed the recently enacted Korea Radioactive Waste Management Act and verified whether the Act successfully follows the doctrine or not

  16. Energy efficiency through integrated environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benromdhane, Souad Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Integrated environmental management became an economic necessity after industrial development proved to be unsustainable without consideration of environmental direct and indirect impacts. Energy dependency and air pollution along with climate change grew into major challenges facing developed and developing countries alike. Thus, a new global market structure emerged and changed the way we do trade. The search intensified for alternatives to petroleum. However, scientists, policy makers, and environmental activists agreed to focus on strategic conservation and optimization of energy use. Environmental concerns will remain partially unaddressed with the current pace of consumption because greenhouse gas emissions will continue to rise with economic growth. This paper discusses energy efficiency, steady integration of alternative sources, and increased use of best available technologies. Energy criteria developed for environmental labeling certification are presented. Our intention is to encourage manufacturers and service providers to supply consumers with less polluting and energy-consuming goods and services, inform consumers of the environmental and energy impacts, and thereby instill sustainable and responsible consumption. As several programs were initiated in developed countries, environmental labeling requirements created barriers to many exports manufactured in developing countries, affecting current world trade and putting more pressure on countries to meet those requirements. Defining an institutional and legal framework of environmental labeling is a key challenge in implementing such programs for critical economic sectors like tourism, textiles, and food production where energy needs are the most important aspect to control. A case study of Tunisia and its experience with eco-labeling is presented.

  17. Decision Support for Environmental Management of Industrial ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-hazardous solid materials from industrial processes, once regarded as waste and disposed in landfills, offer numerous environmental and economic advantages when put to beneficial uses (BUs). Proper management of these industrial non-hazardous secondary materials (INSM) requires estimates of their probable environmental impacts among disposal as well as BU options. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently approved new analytical methods (EPA Methods 1313–1316) to assess leachability of constituents of potential concern in these materials. These new methods are more realistic for many disposal and BU options than historical methods, such as the toxicity characteristic leaching protocol. Experimental data from these new methods are used to parameterize a chemical fate and transport (F&T) model to simulate long-term environmental releases from flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) when disposed of in an industrial landfill or beneficially used as an agricultural soil amendment. The F&T model is also coupled with optimization algorithms, the Beneficial Use Decision Support System (BUDSS), under development by EPA to enhance INSM management. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the methodologies and encourage similar applications to improve environmental management and BUs of INSM through F&T simulation coupled with optimization, using realistic model parameterization.

  18. Understanding and applying principles of social cognition and decision making in adaptive environmental governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. DeCaro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental governance systems are under greater pressure to adapt and to cope with increased social and ecological uncertainty from stressors like climate change. We review principles of social cognition and decision making that shape and constrain how environmental governance systems adapt. We focus primarily on the interplay between key decision makers in society and legal systems. We argue that adaptive governance must overcome three cooperative dilemmas to facilitate adaptation: (1 encouraging collaborative problem solving, (2 garnering social acceptance and commitment, and (3 cultivating a culture of trust and tolerance for change and uncertainty. However, to do so governance systems must cope with biases in people's decision making that cloud their judgment and create conflict. These systems must also satisfy people's fundamental needs for self-determination, fairness, and security, ensuring that changes to environmental governance are perceived as legitimate, trustworthy, and acceptable. We discuss the implications of these principles for common governance solutions (e.g., public participation, enforcement and conclude with methodological recommendations. We outline how scholars can investigate the social cognitive principles involved in cases of adaptive governance.

  19. Research on the Enhancement Effects of Using Ecological Principles in Managing the Lifecycle of Industrial Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libin Guo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a performance level concept for industrial land use. The performance level concept uses ecological principles to evaluate index systems for industrial land. We used this concept to integrate local economics, land use, development potential, environmental health and ecosystem management with innovation, harmony, floral preservation, and shared land use. The concept helps promote the efficient use of industrial land and the sustainable use of land resources. We used the chemical medicine manufacturing industry in Chongqing Changshou Economic and Technological Development Zone as a case study. We selected eight companies for analysis and calculated an industrial land performance level for each company. We created three industrial land performance levels: growth potential type, positive development type, and inefficient recession type. To determine economic development and land sustainability, we applied administrative, economic, legal and technical measures to evaluate the entire lifecycle of industrial land. This lifecycle included preliminary project audit access, mid-period dynamic supervision and post land exit management. We conclude by proposing measures to mitigate environmental harm occurring from the intensive use of land for industrial use.

  20. Industrial Ecology and Environmental Lean Management: Lights and Shadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Ioppolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Current industrial production is driven by increasing globalization, which has led to a steady increase in production volumes and complexity of products aimed at the pursuit of meeting the needs of customers. In this context, one of the main tools in the management of customer value is Lean Manufacturing or Production, though it is considered primarily as a set of tools to reduce the total cost of the resources needed to achieve such needs. This philosophy has recently been enriched in the literature with case studies that link Lean Management (LM with the improvement of environmental sustainability. The consequence is an expansion of the Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM; indeed, CIM, currently, combining and integrating the key business functions (e.g., business, engineering, manufacturing, and information management with a view of the life cycle, does not highlight the strategic role of the environmental aspects. In order to deal with the increasingly rapid environmental degradation that is reflected in society, in terms of both economy and quality of life, Industrial Ecology (IE introduced a new paradigm of principles and instruments of analysis and decision support (e.g., Life Cycle Assessment—LCA, Social Life Cycle Assessment -SLCA, Material Flow Account—MFA, etc. that can be considered as the main basis for integrating the environmental aspects in each strategy, design, production, final product, and end of life management, through the re-engineering of processes and activities towards the development of an eco-industrial system. This paper presents the preliminary observations based on a analysis of both theories (LM-IE and provides a possible assessment of the key factors relevant to their integration in a “lean environmental management”, highlighting both positives (lights and possible barriers (shadows.

  1. Environmental and organizational determinants of quality management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de; Wal, G. van der

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain more insight into the organizational and environmental determinants of the implementation of quality management in health care organizations. Primary survey data were collected in 1995 in a large nationwide study within 15 fields of health care and health

  2. Department of Geography and Environmental Management, Universi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-01-05

    Jan 5, 2016 ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies & Management 9 (1): 14 – 21, 2016. ISSN:1998-0507 ... A egunle had better quality housing than the slums of Badia,. Iwaya and ... One of such problems relating to housing is the ...

  3. Recapturing the corporate environmental management research agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    2009-01-01

    of corporate environmental management, and to identify any new critical and innovative research which moves beyond the compliance and certification approach. It discusses the threatening effects of consumption and industrialization which the decision makers worldwide have continuously face during the past....

  4. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management: Advanced Search ... AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR conference) NOT theses); Search for an exact ...

  5. Hazards of solid waste management: bioethical problems, principles, and priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Margaret N.

    1978-01-01

    The putative hazards of solid waste management cannot be evaluated without placing the problem within a cultural climate of crisis where some persons consider such by-products of “high, hard technology” to have raised unresolved moral and ethical issues. In order to assist scientific and technical efforts to protect public health and safety, a bioethical perspective requires us to examine three controversial aspects of policy-making about public safety. Failure to recognize the qualitative difference between two cognitive activities—risk-measurements (objective, scientific probabilities) and safety-judgments (subjective, shifting value priorities)—has had three unfortunate consequences. Sophisticated methods of risk analysis have been applied in a piecemeal, haphazard, ad hoc fashion within traditional institutions with the false expectation that incremental risk-reducing programs automatically ensure public health and safety. Ethical priorities require, first and foremost, a whole new field of data arranged for comparable risk-analyses. Critics of cost/risk/benefit quantifications attack the absurdity of “putting a price on human life” but have not been confronted with its threefold ethical justification. The widening discrepancy in risk-perceptions and loss of mutual confidence between scientific experts and ordinary citizens has placed a burden of social responsibility on members of the scientific and technical community to engage in more effective public education through the political process, notwithstanding advocates of a nonscientific adversary process. The urgency of effective public education has been demonstrated by the extent to which we have lost our historically balanced judgment about the alleged environmental hazards posed by advanced technology. PMID:738238

  6. LCA for assessing the environmental performance of a company with the environmental management system ISO 14000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigamonti, L.; Perotto, E.

    2008-01-01

    The environmental management system is an ordered pattern to treat and manage environmental issues and to improve the environmental performance of companies. It is proposed an example of application of LCA to a manufacturing company with ISO 14000. [it

  7. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  8. Planning for and managing environmental restoration waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.Q.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used to support the management of environmental restoration (ER) waste. A general description is provided of the tools and techniques that have been developed and applied to produce waste generation forecast data and treatment, storage, and disposal capacity needs. The ER Program can now consistently manage ER waste streams from initial generation through ultimate disposal. Utilizing the valuable information that results from application of strategically planned systems and techniques demonstrates the ability to provide the necessary waste management support for the ER cleanup process

  9. Clarifying the Imperative of Integration Research for Sustainable Environmental Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Dovers

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses why integration is important in doing research for developing policy and practice of sustainable environmental management. The imperative of integration includes environmental, social, economic, and other disciplinary considerations, as well as stakeholder interests. However, what is meant by integration is not always clear. While the imperative is being increasingly enunciated, the challenges it presents are difficult and indicate a long term pursuit. This paper clarifies the different dimensions of integration, as an important preliminary step toward advancing mutual understanding and the development of approaches. The paper identifies the driving forces for integration, discusses when integration is required, categorises forms of integration, and proposes principles to inform research programs and projects.

  10. Management systems for environmental restoration projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbert, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the success fo large environmental restoration projects depends on sound management systems to guide the team of organizations and individuals responsible for the project. Public concern about and scrutiny of these environmental projects increase the stakes for those involved in the management of projects. The Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) uses a system approach to performing and improving the work necessary to meet FUSRAP objectives. This approach to preforming and improving the work necessary to meet FUSRAP objectives. This approach is based upon management criteria embodied in DOE cost and schedule control system and the quality assurance requirements. The project team used complementary criteria to develop a system of related parts and processes working together to accomplish the goals of the project

  11. Applying Agile Principles in Teaching Undergraduate Information Technology Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budu, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how the traditional teaching and learning activities over the years have been challenged to be agile--easily adaptable to changing classroom conditions. Despite this new phenomenon, there is a perceived paucity of agile-in-teaching research. Available studies neither focus on the use of agile principles beyond delivering…

  12. MBA theory and application of business and management principles

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the relevant subjects in the curriculum of an MBA program. Covering many different fields within business, this book is ideal for readers who want to prepare for a Master of Business Administration degree. It provides discussions and exchanges of information on principles, strategies, models, techniques, methodologies and applications in the business area.

  13. The Environmental Management Project Manager's Handbook for improved project definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to providing high quality products that satisfy customer needs and are the associated with this goal, DOE personnel must possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to ensure successful job performance. In addition, there must be recognition that the greatest obstacle to proper project performance is inadequate project definition. Without strong project definition, DOE environmental management efforts are vulnerable to fragmented solutions, duplication of effort, and wastes resources. The primary means of ensuring environmental management projects meet cost and schedule milestones is through a structured and graded approach to project definition, which is the focus of this handbook

  14. The principle of environmental compatible energy supply in energy law characteristics and environmental (energy) legal connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecher, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    The course of the investigation follows the path of the electric power. Considered are the electricity industry value-added stages with their environmental impact and their relevant legal regulations. The focus in each case are the environmentally relevant legal rules of EnWG, whose own contributions are examined for environmental objective as well as the interaction with other legislation. First, the value chain of the supply or production of primary energy sources is considered closer. Second, the conversion of primary energy sources in electricity is to take in the view. The conversion plant depending on widely varying environmental impacts and the relevant legal instruments are shown. Thirdly comes the electricity downstream value-added level of network operations, through which the electric power is transmitted and distributed. In the fourth stage, the effect of support of the legal requirements for the storage of electricity is considered. Fifth value chain is the distribution, through which the direct relationship between suppliers and customers is organized. [de

  15. Management of contaminated territories -- radiological principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann-Jensen, P.; Belyaev, S.T.; Demin, V.F.; Rolevich, I.V.; Likhtariov, I.A.; Kovgan, L.N.; Bariakhtar, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of internationally agreed principles and guidance for the management of contaminated territories and the international development of intervention guidance since the Chernobyl accident is reviewed. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicates that the international advice on intervention existing at the time of the Chernobyl accident was not fully understood by decision makers neither in Western Europe nor in the former USSR and that the guidance failed to address adequately the difficult social problems which can arise after a serious nuclear accident. The differences between CIS practice and international guidance, both conceptually and practically, are identified. The general response of the authorities in the former USSR regarding many early actions for protection of the affected population after the Chernobyl accident were broadly reasonable and consistent with internationally established guidelines pertaining at the time of the accident. During the years following the accident, decisions on countermeasures in the former USSR were based on four different criteria: annual dose, lifetime dose, temporary permissible levels in foodstuffs and surface contamination density of 137 Cs. Due to socio-psychological and political factors, requirements for radiation protection were made more and more strict. The CIS criteria of today for different protective actions and strategies are given in terms of annual doses or activity concentrations of 137 Cs in different foodstuffs. International guidance is given as intervention levels in terms of avertable doses by specific countermeasures and as action levels. Action levels refer to different protective actions or protection strategies. Action levels are levels above which remedial actions are taken and below which they are not, and they refer to the maximum residual dose without any action. The CIS criteria are conceptually a system of action levels rather than a set of intervention levels

  16. Seeking a consensus: water management principles from the monotheistic scriptures

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan; Maliva, Robert G.; Missimer, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Religious and cultural values related to water use and management are important motivation for many people of the world. Although much has been written related to water management and use in Islam, fewer authors have attempted to evaluate water

  17. Environmental management systems implemented in the Spanish nuclear power plants; Sistemas de gestion ambiental implantados en las centrales nucleares espanolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, R.; Fernandez Guisado, M. B.; Hortiguela, R.; Bustamante, L. F.; Esparza, J. L.; Villareal, M.; Yague, F.

    2013-09-01

    The companies that own the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants, aware of social concern and in the context of a growing demanding environmental legislation, have a permanent commitment to the electricity production based on the principles of a maximum respect for the environment, safety, quality, professionalism and continuous improvement. In order to minimize the environmental impact of their plants they have implemented and Environmental Management System based on the ISO 14001 Standard. They minimize the environmental impact by identifying the significant environmental aspects and defining the corresponding objectives. This article describes the referred environmental management systems and their environmental objectives, as applied and defined by the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants. (Author)

  18. Wilderness management principles: science, logical thinking or personal opinion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1995-01-01

    Recreational use adversely affects the ecological integrity of wilderness. Wilderness managers face the challenge of keeping this loss of ecological integrity to minimal levels, a task that must be accomplished primarily through management of wilderness visitors. For the past 30 years, researchers have assisted managers by assessing problems associated with...

  19. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  20. HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian Puente

    1998-07-25

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics.

  1. HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian Puente

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics

  2. The Precautionary Principle: implications for risk management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltelli, Andrea; Funtowicz, Silvio

    2004-01-01

    The European Commission has published a Communication on the Precautionary Principle and a White Book on Governance. These provide us (as research civil servants of the Commission) an institutional framework for handling scientific information that is often incomplete, uncertain, and contested. But, although the Precautionary Principle is intuitively straightforward to understand, there is no agreed way of applying it to real decision-making. To meet this perceived need, researchers have proposed a vast number of taxonomies. These include ignorance auditing, type one-two-three errors, a combination of uncertainty and decision stakes through post-normal science and the plotting of ignorance of probabilities against ignorance of consequences. Any of these could be used to define a precautionary principle region inside a multidimensional space and to position an issue within that region. The role of anticipatory research is clearly critical but scientific input is only part of the picture. It is difficult to imagine an issue where the application of the Precautionary Principle would be non-contentious. From genetically-modified food to electro-smog, from climate change to hormone growth in meat, it is clear that: 1) risk and cost-benefit are only part of the picture; 2) there are ethical issues involved; 3) there is a plurality of interests and perspectives that are often in conflict; 4) there will be losers and winners whatever decision is made. Operationalization of the Precautionary Principle must preserve transparency. Only in this way will the incommensurable costs and benefits associated with different stakeholders be registered. A typical decision will include the following sorts of considerations: 1) the commercial interests of companies and the communities that depend on them; 2) the worldviews of those who might want a greener, less consumerist society and/or who believe in the sanctity of human or animal life; 3) potential benefits such as enabling the

  3. Patient education. Timeless principles of learning: a solid foundation for enhancing chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Paula M; Suter, W Newton

    2008-02-01

    The use of evidence-based principles of learning can contribute to the empowerment of patients as they adopt self-management skills aligned with healthy behaviors. This article, jointly written by a nurse and an educator, describes these timeless principles and how home care clinicians and patients benefit from their use.

  4. Artificial intelligence and knowledge management principles in secure corporate intranets

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M.Sc. (Computer Science) Corporations throughout the world are facing numerous challenges in today’s competitive marketplace and are continuously looking for new and innovative means and methods of gaining competitive advantage. One of the means used to gain this advantage is that of information technology, and all the associated technologies and principles. These are primarily used to facilitate business processes and procedures that are designed to provide this competitive advantage. Sig...

  5. The precaution principle in the human affairs management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godard, O.; Bourdeaux, I.; Dab, W.; Ewald, F.; Fabiani, J.L.; Gilbert, C.; Hermitte, M.A.; Hourcade, J.Ch.; Huber, G.; Laverie, M.; Martin, G.J.; Megie, G.; Pelegrin, J.; Reveret, J.P.; Weber, J.; Wynne, B.

    1997-01-01

    The precaution principle is applied in the example of The nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom, Windscale reactor and the Sellafield reprocessing plant. In the first case, an interpretation mistake in the behaviour of sediments in Irish Sea leads to a pollution by plutonium 239, and finally the admissible contamination of sediments became a possible ingestion of plutonium in atmosphere because of transport of this radioisotope from the sediments to the surface waters and then to atmosphere with this possibility of ingestion by man and ingestion is a more severe pollution than contamination. The second example is the difference of behaviour of Cesium 137 in front of acid soils or clayey soils, difference that the researchers did not see in United Kingdom around Sellafield plant but the Chernobyl accident brought to the fore this difference of behaviour. These examples proved if it was needed that scientific knowledge is uncomplete and consequently the precaution principle is highly required. Furthermore, the cases of the blood transfusion and the Aids virus, the impact on health of power lines and the ozone layer are also reviewed to enlight this precaution principle. (N.C.)

  6. Are EMS environmentally effective? The link between environmental management systems and environmental performance in European companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertin, J.; Berkhout, F.G.H.; Wagner, M.; Tyteca, D.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of a large dataset on the environmental performance of European companies in five industrial sectors, this paper examines the question of whether the presence of an environmental management system (EMS) has a positive impact on the eco-efficiency of companies. It begins with a

  7. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenkamer, B.M.; Baan, C.A.; Putters, Kim; van Oers, J.A.M.; Drewes, Hanneke

    2018-01-01

    Purpose A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying collaborative

  8. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenkamer, Betty; Baan, Caroline; Putters, Kim; van Oers, Hans; Drewes, Hanneke

    2018-01-01

    Purpose A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying collaborative

  9. Integrating removal actions and remedial actions: Soil and debris management at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goidell, L.C.; Hagen, T.D.; Strimbu, M.J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Taylor, A.C.; Weese, T.E.; Yerace, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1991, excess soil and debris generated at the Fernald Environmental management Project (FEMP) have been managed in accordance with the principles contained in a programmatic Removal Action (RvA) Work Plan (WP). This plan provides a sitewide management concept and implementation strategy for improved storage and management of excess soil and debris over the period required to design and construct improved storage facilities. These management principles, however, are no longer consistent with the directions in approved and draft Records of Decision (RODs) and anticipated in draft RODs other decision documents. A new approach has been taken to foster improved management techniques for soil and debris that can be readily incorporated into remedial design/remedial action plans. Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This paper describes the methods that were applied to address the issues associated with keeping the components of the new work plan field implementable and flexible; this is especially important as remedial design is either in its initial stages or has not been started and final remediation options could not be precluded

  10. 75 FR 40845 - Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at Structure Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... NIOSH 141-A] Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at... publication entitled ``Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at... fires in unoccupied structures to using established risk management principles at all structure fires...

  11. The specificity of functions and principles of fiscal management

    OpenAIRE

    Comaniciu, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The multiple changes which take place in the public sector due to the economical social and political processes and phenomenon impose the development and the perfecting of public management in order to assure efficiency and efficacy. Although in the specialty literature, the concept of fiscal management or management of fiscal activity is not very well defined, we will try to define this concept, to identify the fundamental and specific objectives, to specify the content of specific functions...

  12. Seeking a consensus: water management principles from the monotheistic scriptures

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2015-03-13

    Religious and cultural values related to water use and management are important motivation for many people of the world. Although much has been written related to water management and use in Islam, fewer authors have attempted to evaluate water management through the lens of other religions. The common thread of monotheism, specifically worship of the one God of Abraham, binds together the world\\'s largest two religions (Islam and Christianity). Judaism also falls within this monotheistic group and is especially important in the context of Middle Eastern water management. As agriculture consumes approximately 70% of all fresh water used in the world today, proper management of water within its context is of critical and global importance. This paper presents an effort to build consensus from a monotheistic scripture-based perspective related to water management in agriculture. If greater dialog and agreement about water management can be attained within and among monotheists, complex issues related to transboundary water management, reuse and conservation could be resolved with less conflict, creating a shared overall management vision.

  13. Essential Principles for Reform of Chemicals Management Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  14. Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management - The Drinks Handbook

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2013-01-01

    Murphy, J. (2013) The Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management - The Drinks Handbook, Goodfellows Publishing Ltd, Oxford, England. The Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management - The Drinks Handbook is an authoritative resource and comprehensive training guide, essential for all students, bartenders, sommeliers, mixologists, waiters and food and beverage practitioners the world over. Written and configured in an accessible and user-friendly style, packed with ...

  15. Environmental management audit, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) has established, as part of the internal oversight responsibilities within Department of Energy (DOE), a program within the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), to conduct environmental audits at DOE's operating facilities. This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Audit of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This Environmental Management Audit was conducted by the DOE's Office of Environmental Audit from October 26 through November 6, 1992. The audit's objective is to advise the Secretary as to the adequacy of UMTRA's environmental programs, and management organization in ensuring environmental protection and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. This Environmental Management Audit's scope was comprehensive and covered all areas of environmental management with the exception of environmental programs pertaining to the implementation of the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which is the responsibility of the DOE Headquarters Office of NEPA Oversight

  16. Analysis of DOE international environmental management activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategic Plan (April 1994) states that DOE`s long-term vision includes world leadership in environmental restoration and waste management activities. The activities of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) can play a key role in DOE`s goals of maintaining U.S. global competitiveness and ensuring the continuation of a world class science and technology community. DOE`s interest in attaining these goals stems partly from its participation in organizations like the Trade Policy Coordinating Committee (TPCC), with its National Environmental Export Promotion Strategy, which seeks to strengthen U.S. competitiveness and the building of public-private partnerships as part of U.S. industrial policy. The International Interactions Field Office task will build a communication network which will facilitate the efficient and effective communication between DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, and contractors. Under this network, Headquarters will provide the Field Offices with information on the Administration`s policies and activities (such as the DOE Strategic Plan), interagency activities, as well as relevant information from other field offices. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will, in turn, provide Headquarters with information on various international activities which, when appropriate, will be included in reports to groups like the TPCC and the EM Focus Areas. This task provides for the collection, review, and analysis of information on the more significant international environmental restoration and waste management initiatives and activities which have been used or are being considered at LLNL. Information gathering will focus on efforts and accomplishments in meeting the challenges of providing timely and cost effective cleanup of its environmentally damaged sites and facilities, especially through international technical exchanges and/or the implementation of foreign-development technologies.

  17. Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, D.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Groenewold, G.H. [Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), a contract-supported organization focused on technology research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD&C), is entering its second year of a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to facilitate the development, demonstration, and commercialization of innovative environmental management (EM) technologies in support of the activities of DOE`s Office of Environmental Science and Technology (EM-50) under DOE`s EM Program. This paper reviews the concept and approach of the program under the METC-EERC EM Cooperative Agreement and profiles the role the program is playing in the commercialization of five EM technologies.

  18. Sustainability principles in strategic environmental assessment: A framework for analysis and examples from Italian urban planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamorgese, Lydia, E-mail: lydial@tin.it; Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@unitn.it

    2013-09-15

    This paper presents a framework for analysing the degree of consideration of sustainability principles in Strategic environmental assessment (SEA), and demonstrates its application to a sample of SEA of Italian urban plans. The framework is based on Gibson's (2006) sustainability principles, which are linked to a number of guidance criteria and eventually to review questions, resulting from an extensive literature review. A total of 71 questions are included in the framework, which gives particular emphasis to key concepts, such as intragenerational and intergenerational equity. The framework was applied to review the Environmental Report of the urban plans of 15 major Italian cities. The results of this review show that, even if sustainability is commonly considered as a pivotal concept, there is still work to be done in order to effectively integrate sustainability principles into SEA. In particular, most of the attention is given to mitigation and compensation measures, rather than to actual attempts to propose more sustainable planning decisions in the first place. Concerning the proposed framework of analysis, further research is required to clarify equity concerns and particularly to identify suitable indicators for operationalizing the concepts of intra/inter-generational equity in decision-making. -- Highlights: ► A framework was developed in order to evaluate planning against sustainability criteria. ► The framework was applied to analyse how sustainable principles are addressed in 15 Italian SEA reports. ► Over 85% of the reports addressed, to some extent, at least 40% of the framework questions. ► Criteria explicitly linked to intra and inter-generational equity are rarely addressed.

  19. Student Perceptions in Teaching Principles of Management Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Mohammad A.; Etnyre, Vance

    2015-01-01

    Teaching concepts of information systems to general business students through a course such as management information systems (MIS) can be challenging in today's fast-changing environment of information technology (IT). Such a course must provide not only an understanding of the development, applications, and management of information systems, but…

  20. Food quality management : a technological and managerial principles and practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luning, P.A.; Marcelis, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    This book describes Food Quality Management in one integrated concept. Firstly, all relevant aspects of food quality management are brought into one model, which forms the framework for this book. Secondly, the authors introduce the techno-managerial approach. This approach starts from the idea that

  1. Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donna L; Lloyd, James W; Marrinan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs.

  2. Guiding principles for management of forested, agricultural, and urban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover; Karl W.J. Williard

    2015-01-01

    Human actions must be well planned and include consideration of their potential influences on water and aquatic ecosystems - such consideration is the foundation of watershed management. Watersheds are the ideal land unit for managing and protecting water resources and aquatic health because watersheds integrate the physical, biological and chemical processes within...

  3. The implementation of sustainability principles in project management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert Gilbert Silvius; Debby Goedknegt

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming clear that the project management practice must embrace sustainability in order to develop into a 'true profession' (Silvius et al., 2012). In project management, sustainability can be gained in both the product of the project and in the process of delivering the product. (Gareis et

  4. The long-term management of contaminated areas; the principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.; Cherp, A.; Gray, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: There are three primary aspects to be considered in the remediation of areas contaminated by the accidental release of radioactivity, these are: the environment; health and well-being, including the psychological impact on the resident and adjaqent populations; the economic and social status of the affected populations. These aspects cannot be seen as independent of one another. In the case of the Chernobyl accident they have mutually interacted to produce a downward spiral in the quality of life of the affected populations. This paper will discuss the lessons that have emerged from that experience and propose ways in which. There is much, in practical terms, that can be done to manage, in both the short and the long term, the environmental aspects of the contamination, both at the collective and the individual levels. How effectively this is done and is seen to be done, will be a powerful determinant of the success in dealing with the other two primary aspects. Ring fencing the risk into the contaminated areas by the prohibition of processes that disperse the risk to populations outside the affected areas can be counterproductive for the affected population with minimal real detriment for the wider unaffected populations. In the case of the Chernobyl accident it can be argued that health and well-being have been more adversely affected by the psychosocial aspects of the accident than by the direct effects of radiation. A larger than real effect an health is perceived and this leads to the five dimensions of the psychosocial effect, social disruption of communities, illness behaviour, readiness to attribute illness to radiation, changed lifestyle habits, stress related illness. The effects of radiation exposure, if any, will appear after a few to tens of years. Their incidence should be carefully monitored in relation to the previous experience and the experience in comparable populations, in an open and objective way. The perception that health

  5. Products and Processes Innovation from the Perspective of Environmental Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Theis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the present scenario of globalization of the economy, the dynamics of the market determines the speed of change in business models, environmental aspects can contribute to the design of technological innovations. Given this perception, the general objective of this research was to investigate how industrial organizations in the metal-mechanic sector, located in the Vale do Rio dos Sinos region, reconcile the product innovation activities and processes, with the structuring principles of environmental management. This economic segment is characterized as one that has the highest rates of innovation and greater investment in research and development. Data were collected through a survey research with managers of 159 companies of the analysis unit. Evidence collected provided the realization that innovations tend to be adjustments made to the legal provisions that require the mitigation of environmental impacts in the production process, especially in reducing pollution and using less toxic assets, which does not generate sufficient stimulus to the development of new products.

  6. Design principles and algorithms for automated air traffic management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents design principles and algorithm for building a real time scheduler. The primary objective of the scheduler is to assign arrival aircraft to a favorable landing runway and schedule them to land at times that minimize delays. A further objective of the scheduler is to allocate delays between high altitude airspace far from the airport and low altitude airspace near the airport. A method of delay allocation is described that minimizes the average operating cost in the presence of errors in controlling aircraft to a specified landing time.

  7. 1998 Environmental Management Science Program Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is a collaborative partnership between the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science (DOE-SC), and the Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to sponsor basic environmental and waste management related research. Results are expected to lead to reduction of the costs, schedule, and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. The EMSP research portfolio addresses the most challenging technical problems of the EM program related to high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, mixed waste, nuclear materials, remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and health, ecology, or risk. The EMSP was established in response to a mandate from Congress in the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. Congress directed the Department to ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs, develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective''. This mandate followed similar recommendations from the Galvin Commission to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. The EMSP also responds to needs identified by National Academy of Sciences experts, regulators, citizen advisory groups, and other stakeholders

  8. Managing environmental liabilities at manufactured gas sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, G.S.; Ammann, P.R.; Kolbe, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Many gas and electric utilities have inherited environmental liabilities from some of the more than 1,500 former manufactured gas plants (MGPs) which supplied a major source of energy in the US from the early 1800s to the mid 1900s. Common materials found at these sites include coal and oil tars, tar/water emulsions, sludges, spent oxides (including cyanide compounds), lampblack, ash, and clinker. There are several issues related to the cleanup of these former MGP sites that benefit from strategic management. First, utilities faced with near-term decisions can carefully analyze and document the value and impact of alternative strategies under various uncontrollable ''future states of the world'', expanding the analysis to review the more global, long-term impacts of near-term decisions, while at the same time creating the necessary documentation in case prudence becomes an issue in the future. Second, throughout the site assessment and remedial process, utilities can employ decision analytic tools to map out possible remediation, cost recovery, and litigation strategies as well as their potential costs, thus providing early information to focus management attention and expenditures on areas with the highest benefit. Third, in many states, utilities are and will be involved in rate hearings concerning the recovery of environmental costs, requiring attention to questions concerning who should pay--the ratepayer or the shareholder. This paper describes analytical tools and economic arguments that have been sued by several utilities to address management of these environmental liabilities

  9. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  10. Methodology of environmental risk assessment management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša T. Bakrač

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful protection of environment is mostly based on high-quality assessment of potential and present risks. Environmental risk management is a complex process which includes: identification, assessment and control of risk, namely taking measures in order to minimize the risk to an acceptable level. Environmental risk management methodology: In addition to these phases in the management of environmental risk, appropriate measures that affect the reduction of risk occurrence should be implemented: - normative and legal regulations (laws and regulations, - appropriate organizational structures in society, and - establishing quality monitoring of environment. The emphasis is placed on the application of assessment methodologies (three-model concept, as the most important aspect of successful management of environmental risk. Risk assessment methodology - European concept: The first concept of ecological risk assessment methodology is based on the so-called European model-concept. In order to better understand this ecological risk assessment methodology, two concepts - hazard and risk - are introduced. The European concept of environmental risk assessment has the following phases in its implementation: identification of hazard (danger, identification of consequences (if there is hazard, estimate of the scale of consequences, estimate of consequence probability and risk assessment (also called risk characterization. The European concept is often used to assess risk in the environment as a model for addressing the distribution of stressors along the source - path - receptor line. Risk assessment methodology - Canadian concept: The second concept of the methodology of environmental risk assessment is based on the so-called Canadian model-concept. The assessment of ecological risk includes risk arising from natural events (floods, extreme weather conditions, etc., technological processes and products, agents (chemical, biological, radiological, etc

  11. The role of sustainable development and the associated principles of environmental law and governance in the Anthropocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, Jonathan; Kotzé, Louis

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, I tried to answer the question what, in the Anthropocene, is or can be the role of the concept of sustainable development and the associated principles of environmental law. In order to get an answer to this question, I first assessed the current impact of the principles of

  12. Improving Autopsy Report Turnaround Times by Implementing Lean Management Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Susan; Chiasson, David A; Cassidy, Debra; Somers, Gino R

    2018-01-01

    The autopsy is an integral part of the service of a large academic pathology department. Timely reporting is central to providing good service and is beneficial for many stakeholders, including the families, the clinical team, the hospital, and the wider community. The current study aimed to improve hospital-consented autopsy reporting times (turnaround time, TAT) by using lean principles modified for a healthcare setting, with an aim of signing out 90% of autopsies in 90 days. An audit of current and historical TATs was performed, and a working group incorporating administrative, technical, and professional staff constructed a value stream map documenting the steps involved in constructing an autopsy report. Two areas of delay were noted: examination of the microscopy and time taken to sign-out the report after the weekly autopsy conference. Several measures were implemented to address these delays, including visual tracking using a whiteboard and individualized tracking sheets, weekly whiteboard huddles, and timelier scheduling of clinicopathologic conference rounds. All measures resulted in an improvement of TATs. In the 30 months prior to the institution of lean, 37% of autopsies (53/144) were signed out in 90 days, with a wide variation in reporting times. In the 30 months following the institution of lean, this improved to 74% (136/185) ( P lean; 63 days post-lean). The application of lean principles to autopsy sign-out workflow can significantly improve TATs and reduce variability, without changing staffing levels or significantly altering scheduling structure.

  13. Life cycle costing of waste management systems: Overview, calculation principles and case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica, E-mail: vems@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljoevej, Building 113, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Kromann, Mikkel A. [COWI A/S, Parallelvej 2, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljoevej, Building 113, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We propose a comprehensive model for cost assessment of waste management systems. • The model includes three types of LCC: Conventional, Environmental and Societal LCCs. • The applicability of the proposed model is tested with two case studies. - Abstract: This paper provides a detailed and comprehensive cost model for the economic assessment of solid waste management systems. The model was based on the principles of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) and followed a bottom-up calculation approach providing detailed cost items for all key technologies within modern waste systems. All technologies were defined per tonne of waste input, and each cost item within a technology was characterised by both a technical and an economic parameter (for example amount and cost of fuel related to waste collection), to ensure transparency, applicability and reproducibility. Cost items were classified as: (1) budget costs, (2) transfers (for example taxes, subsidies and fees) and (3) externality costs (for example damage or abatement costs related to emissions and disamenities). Technology costs were obtained as the sum of all cost items (of the same type) within a specific technology, while scenario costs were the sum of all technologies involved in a scenario. The cost model allows for the completion of three types of LCC: a Conventional LCC, for the assessment of financial costs, an Environmental LCC, for the assessment of financial costs whose results are complemented by a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for the same system, and a Societal LCC, for socio-economic assessments. Conventional and Environmental LCCs includes budget costs and transfers, while Societal LCCs includes budget and externality costs. Critical aspects were found in the existing literature regarding the cost assessment of waste management, namely system boundary equivalency, accounting for temporally distributed emissions and impacts, inclusions of transfers, the internalisation of environmental

  14. Life cycle costing of waste management systems: Overview, calculation principles and case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Kromann, Mikkel A.; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a comprehensive model for cost assessment of waste management systems. • The model includes three types of LCC: Conventional, Environmental and Societal LCCs. • The applicability of the proposed model is tested with two case studies. - Abstract: This paper provides a detailed and comprehensive cost model for the economic assessment of solid waste management systems. The model was based on the principles of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) and followed a bottom-up calculation approach providing detailed cost items for all key technologies within modern waste systems. All technologies were defined per tonne of waste input, and each cost item within a technology was characterised by both a technical and an economic parameter (for example amount and cost of fuel related to waste collection), to ensure transparency, applicability and reproducibility. Cost items were classified as: (1) budget costs, (2) transfers (for example taxes, subsidies and fees) and (3) externality costs (for example damage or abatement costs related to emissions and disamenities). Technology costs were obtained as the sum of all cost items (of the same type) within a specific technology, while scenario costs were the sum of all technologies involved in a scenario. The cost model allows for the completion of three types of LCC: a Conventional LCC, for the assessment of financial costs, an Environmental LCC, for the assessment of financial costs whose results are complemented by a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for the same system, and a Societal LCC, for socio-economic assessments. Conventional and Environmental LCCs includes budget costs and transfers, while Societal LCCs includes budget and externality costs. Critical aspects were found in the existing literature regarding the cost assessment of waste management, namely system boundary equivalency, accounting for temporally distributed emissions and impacts, inclusions of transfers, the internalisation of environmental

  15. The INEL approach: Environmental Restoration Program management and implementation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives of the INEL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program management approach are to facilitate meeting mission needs through the successful implementation of a sound, and effective project management philosophy. This paper outlines the steps taken to develop the ER program, and explains further the implementing tools and processes used to achieve what can be viewed as fundamental to a successful program. The various examples provided will demonstrate how the strategies for implementing these operating philosophies are actually present and at work throughout the program, in spite of budget drills and organizational changes within DOE and the implementing contractor. A few of the challenges and successes of the INEL Environmental Restoration Program have included: a) completion of all enforceable milestones to date, b) acceleration of enforceable milestones, c) managing funds to reduce uncosted obligations at year end by utilizing greater than 99% of FY-95 budget, d) an exemplary safety record, e) developing a strategy for partial Delisting of the INEL by the year 2000, f) actively dealing with Natural Resource Damages Assessment issues, g) the achievement of significant project cost reductions, h) and implementation of a partnering charter and application of front end quality principles

  16. Environmental Activity of Mining Industry Leaders in Poland in Line with the Principles of Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Woźniak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As mining companies reveal more and more public information about themselves, the behaviour fosters a better image. This article aims to present two industry leaders in the context of environmental requirements they have met (status at the end of 2015, acting in compliance with the general principles of a socially responsible business. The choice of KGHM (Kombinat Gorniczo-Hutniczy Miedzi companies (copper ores and other accompanying elements CG PGE (Capital Group Polska Grupa Energetyczna S.A. (lignite was dictated by their significant share in the mining industry in Poland. The environmental aspects of the integrated monthly reports were listed and grouped in detail in accordance with the applicable Global Reporting Initiative (GRI and GRI G4 Mining and Metals guidelines. The values of environmental indicators have been analysed over the years, including inter alia data concerning gas emissions, that is, CO2, SOx, NOx, PM or generated waste and sewage. Also, with regard to the environmental aspect of the work, energy consumption in companies is presented together with the characteristics of the fuel balance. The final part of the article compares the value of the revenues to the budgets of local government units (communes from the operating fee paid by entrepreneurs and expenditures of these municipalities on environmental protection, as additional support by these entities (2013–2015.

  17. Integrated and ecosystemic approaches for bridging the gap between environmental management and port management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Onetti, Javier; Scherer, Marinez E G; Barragán, Juan Manuel

    2018-01-15

    The rapid exploitation of coastal and marine ecosystemic capital is on course to reach a critical point. The difficulty of implementing Integrated and ecosystem based management models, taking into the account the great complexity of the marine socio-ecological systems, has resulted in a significant gap between theory and practice. The majority of authors emphasize difficulties in engaging and convincing private stakeholders and a number of economic sectors involved in these processes. This reticence is traditionally more pronounced in the port sector, despite their important role in the transformation of coastal and marine areas. This paper seeks to establish bridges between the Environmental Management systems and Tools (EMT) of economic sectors and the Integrated and Ecosystem Based Management models (IEBM). To achieve this goal, an effort has been made to rethink concepts and principles traditionally used in EMT to bring them into line with those of IEBM. A DPSIR adapted framework is proposed and applied in a conceptual model, where the necessary elements for environmental management tools and ecosystemic models coexist. The logic of ecosystem services has been included, with special attention to the variable of human behaviour. How the proposals fit into the reality of the maritime-port sector was analysed in a transversal way, seeking Socio-Ecological Port System (SEPS) perspectives. This made it possible to move from Environmental Management Systems to an Integrated and Ecosystem Based Port Environmental Management System (PEMS-IEB). From a managerial perspective, it was also suggested that an additional DPSIR framework should be applied to the "response" component, the management system itself, understood as a system with its own elements, processes and interrelations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality Management Plan for the Environmental Assessment and Innovation Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality management plan (QMP) which identifies the mission, roles, responsibilities of personnel with regard to quality assurance and quality management for the environmental assessment and innovation division.

  19. Environmental systems analysis of wastewater management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerrman, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The history of wastewater management tells us that efforts have been made at solving only one problem at the time; sanitation during the first half of the 20th Century followed by eutrophication of lakes and sea and, for the past ten years, recycling of nutrients. After the 'Brundtland Report', 1987, a reversal of the debate occurred where water management was discussed in a more holistic manner than before. The concept sustainable development became widely accepted and was put into practice. This thesis suggests a framework for evaluating the sustainability of wastewater systems, which contains the use of criteria and system analytical evaluation methods matching each criterion. The main categories of criteria are identified as: Health and Hygiene, Social and Cultural, Environmental, Economic and Functional and Technical. The usability of different concepts of Environmental Systems Analysis for evaluating environmental criteria of wastewater systems is also investigated. These studies show that a substance-flow model combined with evaluation methods from Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), sometimes complemented with Exergy Analysis or Analysis of Primary Energy, is a beneficial approach for evaluating environmental impacts and the usage of resources. The substance-flow model ORWARE (ORganic WAste REsearch) combined with LCA was used to compare four systems structures for the management of household wastewater and solid organic waste, namely Conventional System, Irrigation of Energy Forests, Liquid Composting and Urine Separation. This study shows a potential for further development of the three alternative systems. The comparative study also included some development of system analytical methods. This thesis shows how the contribution from oxidation of ammonia should be included in the eutrophication impact category. Furthermore, a method is given for prioritization of the most relevant impacts from wastewater management by using normalisation of these impacts in

  20. Principles of management of open fractures | Buteera | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 14, No 2 (2009) > ... Background: Open fractures are known orthopedic emergencies associated with risk of infection and healing problems. ... The goals of management of open fractures are prevention of infection, ...

  1. Guide to Developing an Environmental Management System - Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page takes you though the basic steps (Plan, Do, Check, Act) of building an Environmental Management System (EMS) as they are outlined in the 2001 Second Edition of Environmental Management Systems: An Implementation Guide. Plan section.

  2. Empirical research on drive mechanism of firms' environmental management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Jingshan; Qin Ying

    2007-01-01

    Firms'transformation from passive envrionmental management to active environmental management is the key to solving environmental problems. This paper empirically studies the impact of environmental management incentives on environmental management through model construction. Based on the data and reality of China, we can build a concept model of environmental management driving mechanism, and put forward theoretical hypothesis that can be tested: take the 13 environmental management behaviors (EMBs) as substitute of the comprehensiveness, introduce counting variables, and use NB model, Possion Model and Ordered Probit model the regression analysis. The theory and methods brought forward in this paper will provide references for firms in China to further implement voluntary environmental management, and offer advises and countertneasures for leaders to implement environmental management effectively.

  3. The precautionary principle and chemicals management: The example of perfluoroalkyl acids in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Ian T; Vestergren, Robin; Wang, Zhanyun; Scheringer, Martin; McLachlan, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Already in the late 1990s microgram-per-liter levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were measured in water samples from areas where fire-fighting foams were used or spilled. Despite these early warnings, the problems of groundwater, and thus drinking water, contaminated with perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) including PFOS are only beginning to be addressed. It is clear that this PFAS contamination is poorly reversible and that the societal costs of clean-up will be high. This inability to reverse exposure in a reasonable timeframe is a major motivation for application of the precautionary principle in chemicals management. We conclude that exposure can be poorly reversible; 1) due to slow elimination kinetics in organisms, or 2) due to poorly reversible environmental contamination that leads to continuous exposure. In the second case, which is relevant for contaminated groundwater, the reversibility of exposure is not related to the magnitude of a chemical's bioaccumulation potential. We argue therefore that all PFASs entering groundwater, irrespective of their perfluoroalkyl chain length and bioaccumulation potential, will result in poorly reversible exposures and risks as well as further clean-up costs for society. To protect groundwater resources for future generations, society should consider a precautionary approach to chemicals management and prevent the use and release of highly persistent and mobile chemicals such as PFASs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Henry Fayol’s 14 Principles of Management: Implications for Libraries and Information Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzuegbu, C. P.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses generally on the ‘fourteen principles of management’ by Henri Fayol. However, it specifically analyses their application to and implications for libraries and information centres. An extensive review of published works on management generally, and library management in particular, was conducted. This yielded vital insights on the original meaning and later modifications of these principles, as well as their application in the management of various organisations. Consequently, the strengths and weaknesses of these principles were examined to determine their suitability in libraries and information centres. Inferences, illustrations, and examples were drawn from both developed and developing countries which gives the paper a global perspective. Based on available literature, it was concluded that Fayol’s principles of management are as relevant to libraries as they are in other organisations. The paper, therefore, recommends that in addition to modifying some aspects to make these principles more responsive to the peculiar needs of libraries, further research should be undertaken to expand the breadth of these principles and ascertain their impacts on the management of information organisations.

  5. Multidisciplinary management of chronic heart failure: principles and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Newton, Phillip J; Tankumpuan, Thitipong; Paull, G; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl

    2015-10-01

    Globally, the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) challenges health systems. The high burden of disease and the costs associated with hospitalization adversely affect individuals, families, and society. Improved quality, access, efficiency, and equity of CHF care can be achieved by using multidisciplinary care approaches if there is adherence and fidelity to the program's elements. The goal of this article was to summarize evidence and make recommendations for advancing practice, education, research, and policy in the multidisciplinary management of patients with CHF. Essential elements of multidisciplinary management of CHF were identified from meta-analyses and clinical practice guidelines. The study factors were discussed from the perspective of the health care system, providers, patients, and their caregivers. Identified gaps in evidence were used to identify areas for future focus in CHF multidisciplinary management. Although there is high-level evidence (including several meta-analyses) for the efficacy of management programs for CHF, less evidence exists to determine the benefit attributable to individual program components or to identify the specific content of effective components and the manner of their delivery. Health care system, provider, and patient factors influence health care models and the effective management of CHF and require focus and attention. Extrapolating trial findings to clinical practice settings is limited by the heterogeneity of study populations and the implementation of models of intervention beyond academic health centers, where practice environments differ considerably. Ensuring that individual programs are both developed and assessed that consider these factors is integral to ensuring adherence and fidelity with the core dimensions of disease management necessary to optimize patient and organizational outcomes. Recognizing the complexity of the multidisciplinary CHF interventions will be important in advancing the design

  6. Environmental development plan. LWR commercial waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the planning and managerial requirements and schedules needed to evaluate and assess the environmental, health and safety (EH and S) aspects of the Commercial Waste Management Program (CWM). Environment is defined in its broadest sense to include environmental, health (occupational and public), safety, socioeconomic, legal and institutional aspects. This plan addresses certain present and potential Federal responsibilities for the storage, treatment, transfer and disposal of radioactive waste materials produced by the nuclear power industry. The handling and disposal of LWR spent fuel and processed high-level waste (in the event reprocessing occurs) are included in this plan. Defense waste management activities, which are addressed in detail in a separate EDP, are considered only to the extent that such activities are common to the commercial waste management program. This EDP addresses three principal elements associated with the disposal of radioactive waste materials from the commercial nuclear power industry, namely Terminal Isolation Research and Development, Spent Fuel Storage and Waste Treatment Technology. The major specific concerns and requirements addressed are assurance that (1) radioactivity will be contained during waste transport, interim storage or while the waste is considered as retrievable from a repository facility, (2) the interim storage facilities will adequately isolate the radioactive material from the biosphere, (3) the terminal isolation facility will isolate the wastes from the biosphere over a time period allowing the radioactivity to decay to innocuous levels, (4) the terminal isolation mode for the waste will abbreviate the need for surveillance and institutional control by future generations, and (5) the public will accept the basic waste management strategy and geographical sites when needed

  7. 77 FR 22772 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board AGENCY: Office of Environmental Management, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of renewal. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 14(a)(2... Secretariat, General Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the Environmental Management Site...

  8. 75 FR 9885 - Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management... purpose of EMAB is to provide the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) with advice and...

  9. 76 FR 31319 - Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management... purpose of EMAB is to provide the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) with advice and...

  10. 76 FR 71959 - Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management... of EMAB is to provide the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) with advice and...

  11. 76 FR 5364 - Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management... Board: The purpose of EMAB is to provide the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) with...

  12. Principles of disaster management lesson. 12: structuring organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, F C

    2001-01-01

    This lesson discusses various structures for organizations that have functional roles in disaster responses, relief, and/or management activities. It distinguishes between pyramidal and matrix structures, and notes the advantages and disadvantages of each in relation to disasters. Span of control issues are dissected including the impact of the "P" factor on the performance of disaster managers and workers including its relationship to the coordination and control function. The development of a Table of Organization and how it relates to departmentalization within an organization also is provided.

  13. FEATURES THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES EFFECT ON INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Vasylyshyna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The whole history of humanity is evidence that it sought and continues to seek to optimize the efficiency of the phenomenon of business through rationalization of engagement and use of intellectual, psychological and physical potential of each individual or group of individuals to work to achieve the goals set by the determined community of people depending on prevailing in this community needs and motives, which are the driving force behind its development. The development of effective, adapted to modern conditions of management mechanisms of power companies by using an integrated and systematic management of intellectual resources. Key words: intellectual capital, power company, intellectual product, knowledge, business. JEL: M 20

  14. The precautionary principle as a provisional instrument in environmental policy: The Montreal Protocol case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, J. Roger

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • I examine whether a policy invoked under the Precautionary Principle can move beyond provisional status. • I review the certainty of conclusions based upon the Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project. • There is high certainty that anthropogenic ozone depletion has health consequences in polar regions. • Current research focuses on long term projections of risk that perpetuates high uncertainty. • Establishment of a community to generate Assessments acts to perpetuate the period of uncertainty. - Abstract: Environmental studies identify possible threats to the health of the public or the environment when the scientific certainty of risk is low, but the potential cost is high. Governments may respond by invoking the Precautionary Principle, holding that scientific certainty is not required to take actions that reduce possible risk. EU guidelines suggest that precautionary measures remain provisional until sufficient scientific certainty is generated. Here I study the Scientific Assessments produced for the Montreal Protocol, and the scientific community that generates them, and ask whether a long-standing program of scientific investigation and monitoring can generate sufficient scientific certainty to move beyond dependence on the Precautionary Principle. When the Montreal Protocol was ratified, many scientists strongly suspected that anthropogenic substances like chlorofluorocarbons were depleting stratospheric ozone. Although the risk was uncertain, the perceived cost to public health of ozone depletion was high. A quarter century after formulating the Montreal Protocol, science can define the conditions for ozone depletion with great certainty, but uncertainty remains in determining the scale and distribution of the attributable increase in damaging ultra-violet (UV) radiation. Organisations, such as NASA, and scientists that contribute to the Scientific Assessments comprise the community in which the scientific consensus of risk is

  15. A decade of democracy: environmental management in a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Aucamp

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The world’s focus on the environment started in 1972 with the Conference of the United Nations on the Human Environment in Stockholm. This led to the formation of the United Nations’ Environmental Programme (UNEP. The new interest in the role of the humans in the environment only picked up momentum after the publication of the report, Our Common Future by the World Commission on Development and the Environment, led by Harlem Gro Brundtland and the follow-up Conference in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 (The Earth Summit. The main products from this conference were the Earth Charter and the Agenda 21 principles and action plans. Not long after this event South Africa had a change in government in 1994. The new Constitution that was accepted in 1996 is one of the few constitutions that contain pertinent clauses pertaining to the protection of the environment. Environmental legislation such as the new National Environmental Management Act, a National Water Act, a Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, an Air Quality Management Bill has been adapted since 1994. A huge number of non-governmental organisations (NGOs attended the Rio Conference. Some, like Greenpeace (and locally Earthlife Africa, developed pressure groups that pressurised governments to give more attention to the protection of the environment and to improve environmental management. During this period results of scientific research that had a large impact on humankind’s perception of the environment, were published. The discovery of the hole in the ozone layer and of the increase in global warming led to great public interest. This led to conventions and protocols that have been ratified by most countries in the world, for example 189 out of a possible 191 countries ratified the Montreal Protocol for the Protection of the Ozone Layer by June 2004. The private sector responded and today it is the norm to report about the “Triple Bottom-line” (economic, social and

  16. Battle Management Language: Proof of Principle and Future Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, N. M.de; Krom, P.P.J. de; Schade, U.; Pullen, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The NATO Modeling and Simulation Group Technical Activity 048 (MSG-048) was chartered in 2006 to investigate the potential of a Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) for Multinational and NATO interoperation of command and control systems with Modeling and Simulation. At its May, 2007

  17. [Principles of multidisciplinary management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrol, B; Mayer, M

    2015-12-01

    Given the gradual progression observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, organization of care in multidisciplinary consultations is essential for optimal management of the different aspects of the disease. Drawing up a care plan is always preceded by a specific consultation for the announcement of the diagnosis with both the parents and the child. Explaining to the child the origin of his problems with simple words, telling him that why he experienced a particular symptom has been understood, is a fundamental step. The child needs to receive the information at different times of the disease following the rhythms of the disease stages, with an appropriate lead time. With the progress achieved in managing this disease, more than 90% of these children now live into adulthood. The switch from pediatric consultations to adult consultations, marking the transition from childhood management at adulthood, is a major challenge in the organization of care. Although today death occurs most often in adulthood, some children die in childhood. For the majority of teams who care for children, whatever the initial pathology may be, the notion of care continuity and accompaniment from the announcement of the disease to the terminal phase is essential. Increasing numbers of therapeutic trials have been developed over the past few years aiming to investigate children with DMD. However, they must not neglect the overall management of these patients and provide the best accompaniment possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrological principles for sustainable management of forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irena F. Creed; Gabor Z. Sass; Jim M. Buttle; Julia A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Forested landscapes around the world are changing as a result of human activities, including forest management, fire suppression, mountaintop mining, conversion of natural forests to plantations, and climate change (Brockerhoff et al., 2008; Cyr et al., 2009; Johnston et al., 2010; Miller et al., 2009; Kelly et al., 2010; Palmer et al., 2010). Forests...

  19. Blended Learning for Faculty Professional Development Incorporating Knowledge Management Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Adjunct faculty comprise a large percentage of part-time faculty for many colleges and universities today. Adjunct faculty are hired because they are experts in their content areas; however, this does not guarantee that they are skilled in effective classroom management. These instructors can become bewildered and frustrated because they lack the…

  20. Environmental management control systems for carbon emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Di Giacomo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This paper aims to focus on a global consulting company and examine how it struggled to establish an effective environmental management control system for carbon emissions for its employees’ air travel. The organisation was motivated to reduce its carbon emissions both to comply with regulation and to enhance or maintain corporate reputation. Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes a case study approach, examining internal and external documents as well as conducting interviews with senior staff. Findings – The case study investigates how Beta’s management implemented a system to reduce carbon emissions. The organisation focused on air travel, but the study finds that employee travel preferences did not radically change. Rather than reduction in carbon emissions, as planned by head office, air travel carbon emissions actually increased during the period, and, as a consequence, the reported reduction targets were significantly adjusted downwards to meet the new realities. Practical implications – The study has implications for both policy and practice for organisations seeking to improve their sustainability performance. Originality/value – The study responds to calls in the literature to undertake research to identify how management practices might reduce negative sustainability impacts, as there is little evidence of what management practices and accounting tools are being adopted, particularly in relation to carbon emissions from air travel. The paper adds to the creation of new accounting, giving visibility to carbon emission management through case study analysis.

  1. Principles of accounting in the information space of foreign economic activity management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Yu. Gordopolov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents scientific results confirming the influence of the external environment on the need for revision of accounting principles in accordance with the characteristics of economic activity. A model of the relationship between the management system and the subsystem of accounting of the subject of foreign economic activity was developed. The study substantiates the approach to the formation of information in accounting, which indirectly depends on how the system of management of foreign economic activity at the enterprise is constructed. The influence of accounting information support on creation of the communication space of the system of management of foreign economic activity is determined. The directions of transformation of accounting principles of foreign economic operations in the context of the influence of the management system of foreign economic activity of the enterprise are presented. The article presents the proposed changes in the part of the transformation of accounting principles of foreign economic activity.

  2. Adding Dynamic Innovation to Environmental Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Kirsten

    Over the last two decades, a number of organizations have implemented Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to assure a systematic approach and continuous improvements. Such systems include a number of “rules” for specific actions to be taken by members of the organization in given situations....... While such procedures may ensure a certain level of environmental effort they also tend to favor a learning style in the organization based on optimization of already known actions. This is among other things due to the fact that a certified EMS should include regular audits, and to the people...... in the organization it may become a purpose in itself to avoid failures that may lead to a nonconformity remark in the audit report. How then encourage a more dynamic and experimenting learning style that may support the requirements for continuous improvements, enhance cooperation with stakeholders and add...

  3. Environmental management initiatives and stakeholder influences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    in Danish industrial companies. These findings are discussed in the light of similar reported results and case studies of companies which are reportedly pioneers in the introduction of environmental initiatives from a number of EU countries. Implications for theory, practice and training are addressed...... of change, from the point of view of stakeholder theory, from a merely reactive attitude in industry, where companies only tend to respond to stakeholder pressure which cannot be ignored (e.g. ex post responses to one or two stakeholders, such as regulators and customers), towards an increasingly proactive...... attitude characterised by ex ante responses to several strategic groups of stakeholders (including NGOs, employees, neighbours, etc.). The present situation is illustrated by the findings in two recent surveys concerning perceived stakeholder influence in relation to environmental management initiatives...

  4. Biomedical waste management: Incineration vs. environmental safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Public concerns about incinerator emissions, as well as the creation of federal regulations for medical waste incinerators, are causing many health care facilities to rethink their choices in medical waste treatment. As stated by Health Care Without Harm, non-incineration treatment technologies are a growing and developing field. Most medical waste is incinerated, a practice that is short-lived because of environmental considerations. The burning of solid and regulated medical waste generated by health care creates many problems. Medical waste incinerators emit toxic air pollutants and toxic ash residues that are the major source of dioxins in the environment. International Agency for Research on Cancer, an arm of WHO, acknowledged dioxins cancer causing potential and classified it as human carcinogen. Development of waste management policies, careful waste segregation and training programs, as well as attention to materials purchased, are essential in minimizing the environmental and health impacts of any technology.

  5. Energy and environmental management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.K. (Energy Auditing Agency Ltd., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    The threat of global warming, environmental instability and the possible use of green or carbon taxes on fossil fuels has increased the need for energy efficiency. Energy Conservation is now recognised as one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways of limiting or reducing CO[sub 2] emissions. Large UK companies are now assessing how much CO[sub 2] they dissipate to the environment and reviewing strategies to reduce this either in response to consumer demand or as a corporate policy decision. Computer-based information systems already exist to monitor and report on fluctuations in energy consumption. These are called Monitoring and Targeting (M and T) systems. This paper explains what M and T systems are and how they are being extended to cover reporting on corporate fuel-based CO[sub 2] emissions to help provide an integrated energy and environmental-management information system. (author).

  6. Adaptive social impact management for conservation and environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Hallam, Maery; Bennett, Nathan J

    2018-04-01

    Concerns about the social consequences of conservation have spurred increased attention the monitoring and evaluation of the social impacts of conservation projects. This has resulted in a growing body of research that demonstrates how conservation can produce both positive and negative social, economic, cultural, health, and governance consequences for local communities. Yet, the results of social monitoring efforts are seldom applied to adaptively manage conservation projects. Greater attention is needed to incorporating the results of social impact assessments in long-term conservation management to minimize negative social consequences and maximize social benefits. We bring together insights from social impact assessment, adaptive management, social learning, knowledge coproduction, cross-scale governance, and environmental planning to propose a definition and framework for adaptive social impact management (ASIM). We define ASIM as the cyclical process of monitoring and adaptively managing social impacts over the life-span of an initiative through the 4 stages of profiling, learning, planning, and implementing. We outline 14 steps associated with the 4 stages of the ASIM cycle and provide guidance and potential methods for social-indicator development, predictive assessments of social impacts, monitoring and evaluation, communication of results, and identification and prioritization of management responses. Successful ASIM will be aided by engaging with best practices - including local engagement and collaboration in the process, transparent communication of results to stakeholders, collective deliberation on and choice of interventions, documentation of shared learning at the site level, and the scaling up of insights to inform higher-level conservation policies-to increase accountability, trust, and perceived legitimacy among stakeholders. The ASIM process is broadly applicable to conservation, environmental management, and development initiatives at various

  7. Above the fray in environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullin, R.

    1993-01-01

    Despite a generally disappointing performance in the environmental management sector last year, companies in the water treatment business are still held in high regard by Wall Street. The $2.9-billion US market grew 8% last year, and a 6%-8% advance is forecast for the next few years, although discretionary environmental management projects are expected to lag the recovery. Growth is driven largely by the sheer volume of water used in the US-42.3 billion gal/day or 168 gal/day, per capita, with heavy industries using up to 1,000 gal/minute-and the proliferation of regulations affecting water treatment. Recent regulations include the Safe Water Drinking Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ban on landfilling hazardous wastes, and the ban on ocean dumping of municipal waste. The Clean Water Act of 1987 is scheduled to be reauthorized this year, but final rulings are not expected until mid-1994. Among the probable new rules are control and treatment of municipal and farm storm waters and runoff, treatment of contaminated sediments, toxics use reduction targets, a nationwide (rather than state-by-state) ban on phosphate detergents, nationwide standardization of water quality criteria, and further protection for wetlands. From water supply through processing, power generation, and eventual discharge, water treatment firms are now positioning themselves as environmental leaders, stewards who can lead industry into an environmentally correct future. Despite some differences in organization, basic strategies seem to be the same among top firms, where the trend is to meld all customers' needs into a single program of analysis, design, delivery, and monitoring

  8. Burning Mouth Syndrome: Aetiopathogenesis and Principles of Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, J.; Bouckaert, M.; Ballyram, R.; Lemmer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic debilitating oral condition characterised by a burning sensation of the oral mucosa in an otherwise apparently normal person. Its aetiology and pathogenesis are obscure, but both psychogenic factors and peripheral and central neuropathies appear to be implicated. There is no cure for BMS, and treatment with either local or systemic medications focuses on the relief of symptoms and on improving quality of life. In recalcitrant cases, psychological/psychiatric intervention may be helpful. In order to improve treatment outcomes, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this syndrome might provide a basis for the development of more effective management strategies. In this short review, we discuss current knowledge of the diagnosis, aetiopathogenesis, and management of BMS. PMID:29180911

  9. Burning Mouth Syndrome: Aetiopathogenesis and Principles of Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Feller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic debilitating oral condition characterised by a burning sensation of the oral mucosa in an otherwise apparently normal person. Its aetiology and pathogenesis are obscure, but both psychogenic factors and peripheral and central neuropathies appear to be implicated. There is no cure for BMS, and treatment with either local or systemic medications focuses on the relief of symptoms and on improving quality of life. In recalcitrant cases, psychological/psychiatric intervention may be helpful. In order to improve treatment outcomes, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this syndrome might provide a basis for the development of more effective management strategies. In this short review, we discuss current knowledge of the diagnosis, aetiopathogenesis, and management of BMS.

  10. PRINCIPLES OF STOCK PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT FOR INDIVIDUAL INVESTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Tussayeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the management of equity risk in the US market. We investigate methods of diversification, the method of using a simplified version of the index and invest in securities, depending on the coefficient “beta” and the company’s capitalization. The paper provides guidance on the easy and simple way of investing that will not use the services of professional intermediaries.

  11. [The precautionary principle applied to blood transfusion. What is its impact on practices and risk management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergon, E; Moutel, G; Duchange, N; Bellier, L; Hervé, C; Rouger, P

    2004-07-01

    The precautionary principle has boomed in the French public health sector through blood transfusion. There has been, however, no perambulatory reflection on the definition, objectives, methods of application or consequences of this principle. The question of the pertinence of its application remains unanswered. This study, based on interviews with blood transfusion practitioners, aims to establish their perceptions of the precautionary principle's application in this specific field and of its consequences in terms of risk management and patients' rights. The pros and cons of this application are analysed based on these perceptions. According to our analysis, the precautionary principle seems to be born of confusion. It is seen more as a way to protect decision makers than patients and, if taken to extremes, could prejudice medical logic. Nevertheless, it also brings measures which renew and encourage evolution in transfusion risk management.

  12. Social and Environmental Issues in Corporative Management: A Romanian Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia DASCĂLU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of monitoring entities environmental impact entails ability, respect for the environment and reduction of the ecological footprint. This research defines Romanian trends as regards the effects and actions to adapt to climate change and characterizes corporate management in terms of compliance with environmental management systems requirements. The main objective is to assess the current state of environmental management implementation and identifies relevant social and environmental issues that companies use to include in corporate management. The current agenda would allow developing a framework for environmental management implementation in Romanian entities, in order to assume the corporate social responsibility.

  13. Environmental management: a re-emerging vector control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, S K

    1994-01-01

    Vector control may be accomplished by environmental management (EM), which consists of permanent or long-term modification of the environment, temporary or seasonal manipulation of the environment, and modifying or changing our life styles and practices to reduce human contact with infective vectors. The primary focus of this paper is EM in the control of human malaria, filariasis, arboviruses, Chagas' disease, and schistosomiasis. Modern EM developed as a discipline based primarily in ecologic principles and lessons learned from the adverse environmental impacts of rural development projects. Strategies such as the suppression of vector populations through the provision of safe water supplies, proper sanitation, solid waste management facilities, sewerage and excreta disposal systems, water manipulation in dams and irrigation systems, vector diversion by zooprophylaxis, and vector exclusion by improved housing, are discussed with appropriate examples. Vectors of malaria, filariasis, Chagas' disease, and schistosomiasis have been controlled by drainage or filling aquatic breeding sites, improved housing and sanitation, the use of expanded polystyrene beads, zooprophylaxis, or the provision of household water supplies. Community participation has been effective in the suppression of dengue vectors in Mexico and the Dominican Republic. Alone or combined with other vector control methods, EM has been proven to be a successful approach to vector control in a number of places. The future of EM in vector control looks promising.

  14. Management of colon stents based on Bernoulli's principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-01

    The colonic self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) has been widely used for "bridge to surgery" and palliative therapy. However, if the spread of SEMS is insufficient, not only can a decompression effect not be obtained but also perforation and obstructive colitis can occur. The mechanism of occurrence of obstructive colitis and perforation was investigated by flow dynamics. Bernoulli's principle was applied, assuming that the cause of inflammation and perforation represented the pressure difference in the proximal lumen and stent. The variables considered were proximal lumen diameter, stent lumen diameter, flow rate into the proximal lumen, and fluid density. To model the right colon, the proximal lumen diameter was set at 50 mm. To model the left-side colon, the proximal lumen diameter was set at 30 mm. For both the right colon model and the left-side colon model, the difference in pressure between the proximal lumen and the stent was less than 20 mmHg, when the diameter of the stent lumen was 14 mm or more. Both the right colon model and the left-side colon model were 30 mmHg or more at 200 mL s -1 when the stent lumen was 10 mm or less. Even with an inflow rate of 90-110 mL s -1 , the pressure was 140 mmHg when the stent lumen diameter was 5 mm. In theory, in order to maintain the effectiveness of SEMS, it is necessary to keep the diameter of the stent lumen at 14 mm or more.

  15. Corporate Sustainability Management and Environmental Ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuler, Douglas; Rasche, Andreas; Etzion, Dror

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews four key orientations in environmental ethics that range from an instrumental understanding of sustainability to one that acknowledges the intrinsic value of sustainable behavior (i.e., sustainable resource use, conservation and preservation, rights-based perspectives, and deep...... ecology). It then shows that the current scholarly discourse around corporate sustainability management—as reflected in environment management (EM), corporate social responsibility (CSR), and corporate political activity (CPA)—mostly favors an instrumental perspective on sustainability. Sustainable...... business practices are viewed as anthropocentric and are conceptualized as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Based on these observations, we speculate about what corporate sustainability management might look like if it applied ethical orientations that emphasize the intrinsic value of nature...

  16. STRATEGIC PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES, PROGRAMS AND PORTFOLIOS OF THE MEDICAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Борисовна ДАНЧЕНКО

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief overview of the latest research in the direction of the use of the project-based approach to the management of medical institutions. It is shown that medicine today is a project-oriented area, and modern scientific studies suggest the use of not only the project management approach and portfolio management. The various scientific sources proposed the classification of projects of medical institutions, mechanisms of formation of projects portfolios of such institutions. The concept of integrated management of medical institutions, which includes strategic, project, portfolio, program management approach (S3P-concept, is offered. According to this concept, the process of S3P-management of the medical institution will include four stages, which are closely interrelated. For the first time, the pair principles of S3P-management are formulated. The proposed concept and principles of S3P-management of medical institution require further development and creating of models, methods and integrated management tools, as well as the development of a system of indicators verify compliance with the organization's strategy of its projects, projects portfolios and programs. This concept and the proposed integrated management principles are universal and can be applied to any project-oriented area.

  17. Regionalization of municipal solid waste management in Japan: balancing the proximity principle with economic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Itaru; Thomson, Vivian E

    2007-07-01

    The proximity principle - disposing of waste close to its origin - has been a central value in municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Japan for the last 30 years and its widespread adoption has helped resolve numerous "Not in My Backyard" issues related to MSW management. However, MSW management costs have soared, in large part because of aggressive recycling efforts and because most MSW is incinerated in a country that has scarce landfill capacity. In addition, smaller, less sophisticated incinerators have been closed because of high dioxin emissions. Rising costs combined with the closure of smaller incinerators have shifted MSW management policy toward regionalization, which is the sharing of waste management facilities across municipalities. Despite the increased use of regionalized MSW facilities, the proximity principle remains the central value in Japanese MSW management. Municipal solid waste management has become increasingly regionalized in the United States, too, but different driving forces are at work in these two countries. The transition to regionalized MSW management in Japan results from strong governmental control at all levels, with the central government providing funds and policy direction and prefectures and municipalities being the primary implementing authorities. By contrast, market forces are a much stronger force with US MSW management, where local governments - with state government oversight - have primary responsibility for MSW management. We describe recent changes in Japan's MSW programs. We examine the connections between MSW facility regionalization, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, the proximity principle, coordination among local governments, central government control, and financing mechanisms.

  18. Environmental management in Slovenian industrial enterprises - Empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Čančer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available timulated with the firm belief that environmental management helps enterprises to achieve business success, expressed by a majority of managers in the sample enterprises, we present the results of an empirical study in the Slovene processing industry. The purpose of our research work is to identify, analyse and present the importance of the environment in business decision-making, the role of environmental management in strategic decision-making and its distribution across the business functions; environmental performance in business processes; the use of the methods for environmentally oriented business decision-making and the developmental tendencies of environmental management in Slovene enterprises of the processing industry. We define the key drivers of environmental management and their effect on the environmental behaviour of these enterprises. We present and interpret data indicating that environmental management is caused not only by compliance and regulation, but also by competition and enterprises’ own initiative.

  19. Driving external chemistry optimization via operations management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, F Christopher; Frost, Heather N; Ling, Xiaolan; Perry, David A; Sakata, Sylvie K; Bailey, Simon; Fobian, Yvette M; Sloan, Leslie; Wood, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Confronted with the need to significantly raise the productivity of remotely located chemistry CROs Pfizer embraced a commitment to continuous improvement which leveraged the tools from both Lean Six Sigma and queue management theory to deliver positive measurable outcomes. During 2012 cycle times were reduced by 48% by optimization of the work in progress and conducting a detailed workflow analysis to identify and address pinch points. Compound flow was increased by 29% by optimizing the request process and de-risking the chemistry. Underpinning both achievements was the development of close working relationships and productive communications between Pfizer and CRO chemists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Ethical principles of management and planning during influenza pandemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubar', O I; Asatrian, A Zh

    2012-01-01

    The article is dedicated to an actual problem of ethical component inclusion into the system of management and planning of epidemic control measures during threat emergence and in the course of influenza pandemic (epidemic) progress. Data regarding development of international ethical guidelines during influenza including WHO recommendations are presented and analysis of normative documents in Russian Federation is given. A necessity of comprehension and accounting of ethical values in pandemic preparedness is shown, main directions of action and responsibility are revealed. Key ethical positions of planning and implementation of measures during influenza pandemic are outlined, compliance with those determines the level of public support and thus provides the effectiveness of the implemented measures.

  1. Practical application of the ALARA principle in management of the nuclear legacy: optimization under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham; Sneve, Malgorzata K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiological protection has a long and distinguished history in taking a balanced approach to optimization. Both utilitarian and individual interests and perspectives are addressed through a process of constrained optimisation, with optimisation intended to lead to the most benefit to the most people, and constraints being operative to limit the degree of inequity among the individuals exposed. At least, expressed simplistically, that is what the recommendations on protection are intended to achieve. This paper examines the difficulties in achieving that objective, based on consideration of the active role of optimisation in regulatory supervision of the historic nuclear legacy. This example is chosen because the application of the ALARA principle has important implications for some very major projects whose objective is remediation of existing legacy facilities. But it is also relevant because timely, effective and cost efficient completion of those projects has implications for confidence in the future development of nuclear power and other uses of radioactive materials. It is also an interesting example because legacy management includes mitigation of some major short and long term hazards, but those mitigating measures themselves involve operations with their own risk, cost and benefit profiles. Like any other complex activity, a legacy management project has to be broken down into logistically feasible parts. However, from a regulatory perspective, simultaneous application of ALARA to worker protection, major accident risk mitigation and long-term environmental and human health protection presents its own challenges. Major uncertainties which exacerbate the problem arise from ill-characterised source terms, estimation of the likelihood of unlikely failures in operational processes, and prospective assessment of radiological impacts over many hundreds of years and longer. The projects themselves are set to run over decades, during which time the

  2. Statistics for environmental science and management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manly, B.F.J

    2009-01-01

    .... Additional topics covered include environmental monitoring, impact assessment, censored data, environmental sampling, the role of statistics in environmental science, assessing site reclamation...

  3. Environmental Management Performance Report March 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) a report of the Project Hanford Management Contractors' (PHMC) Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes the PHMC EM performance. In addition, it includes some PHMC-level data not detailed elsewhere in the report. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the PHMC baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual mission area (e.g., Waste Management, Spent Nuclear fuels , etc.), in support of Section A of the report. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes. Unless otherwise noted, the Safety, Conduct of Operations, and Cost/schedule data contained herein is as of January 31, 2000. All other information is as of March 1, 2000

  4. Environmental Management Performance Report May 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-FU) a report of the Project Hanford Management Contractors' (PHMC)' Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes the PHMC EM performance. In addition, it includes some PHMC-level data not detailed elsewhere in the report. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the PHMC baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual Project (e.g., Waste Management, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes. Unless otherwise noted, the Safety, Conduct of Operations, Metrics, and Cost/Schedule data contained herein is as of March 31, 2000. All other information is updated as noted

  5. Environmental Management Performance Report May 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-FU) a report of the Project Hanford Management Contractors' (PHMC)' Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes the PHMC EM performance. In addition, it includes some PHMC-level data not detailed elsewhere in the report. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the PHMC baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual Project (e.g., Waste Management, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes. Unless otherwise noted, the Safety, Conduct of Operations, Metrics, and Cost/Schedule data contained herein is as of March 31, 2000. All other information is updated as noted.

  6. Environmental Management Performance Report June 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) a monthly summary of the Project Hanford Management Contractor's (PHMC) Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. In addition to project-specific information, it includes some PHMC-level data not detailed elsewhere in the report. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the PHMC baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual Project (e.g., Waste Management, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. Unless otherwise noted, the Safety, Conduct of Operations, and Cost/Schedule data contained herein is as of April 30, 2000. All other information is updated as of May 19, unless otherwise noted.

  7. Environmental Management Performance Report September 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) a monthly summary of the Project Hanford Management Contractor's (PHMC) Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. In addition to project-specific information, it includes some PHMC-level data not detailed elsewhere in the report. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the PHMC baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual Project (e.g., Waste Management, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. Unless otherwise noted, the Safety, Conduct of Operations, and Cost/Schedule data contained herein is as of July 31, 2000. All other information is updated as of August 24, unless otherwise noted. ''Stoplight'' boxes are used to indicate at a glance the condition of a particular area. Green boxes denote on schedule. Yellows denote behind schedule but recoverable. Red is either missed or unrecoverable

  8. Environmental Management Performance Report March 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-03-16

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) a report of the Project Hanford Management Contractors' (PHMC) Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes the PHMC EM performance. In addition, it includes some PHMC-level data not detailed elsewhere in the report. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the PHMC baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual mission area (e.g., Waste Management, Spent Nuclear fuels , etc.), in support of Section A of the report. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes. Unless otherwise noted, the Safety, Conduct of Operations, and Cost/schedule data contained herein is as of January 31, 2000. All other information is as of March 1, 2000.

  9. Solutions for environmental reporting and energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhonen, T.

    2004-01-01

    Especially two areas of energy applications - environmental reporting and energy management - are emphasized due to the current EU legislation and opening energy markets. Emissions reporting is driven by several EU directives and international agreements, like Emissions Trading Scheme. The directives guide implementation of the emission information management and reporting procedures, but requirements and differences defined by the local authorities are challenging both for the system supplier and for the energy producer. Energy management of industrial energy production (CHP) is an application, which offers real-time tools for forecasting mill's energy need and optimizing the energy balance between a mill's own production, purchases and consumption. This can bring significant reductions in mill energy costs and consumption. For these applications, the exact and well-managed information is needed. Data is retrieved from plant historians and event databases, ERP's and external sources. Calculation applications generate characteristic values (KPI's), which are used for monitoring operation, improving plant availability and boosting performance. Common office tools, like MS Excel, are the most convenient tools for reporting and processing information. Integration tools are needed to combine data from several sources to a single channel, handling messaging between applications and distributing information. (author)

  10. Implementing an environmental management system in a irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Doherty, James

    1998-01-01

    Environmental management is at different stages in the countries where there are commercial irradiation facilities. There are therefore differing perspectives on the role of an Environmental Management System, ranging from compliance with the Regulatory framework to a desire to be proactive. An effective Environmental Management System (EMS) facilitates compliance, while also providing the framework for assessment and improvement of a company's environmental impact and overall performance

  11. NETL-EERC ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christina B. Behr-Andres; Daniel J. Daly

    2001-07-31

    This final report summarizes the accomplishments of the 6-year Environmental Management Cooperative Agreement (EMCA) between the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), a nonprofit, contract-supported unit of the University of North Dakota, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The first portion of the report summarizes EMCA's structure, activities, and accomplishments. The appendix contains profiles of the individual EMCA tasks. Detailed descriptions and results of the tasks can be found separately in published Final Topical Reports. EMCA (DOE Contract No. DE-FC21-94MC31388) was in place from the fall of 1994 to the summer of 2001. Under EMCA, approximately $5.4 million was applied in three program areas to expedite the commercialization of 15 innovative technologies for application in DOE's EM Program ($3.8 million, or 69% of funds), provide technical support to the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA; $1.04 million, or 19% of funds), and provide for the coordination of the EMCA activities ($0.62 million, or 11% of funds). The following sections profile the overall accomplishments of the EMCA program followed by a summary of the accomplishments under each of the EMCA areas: commercialization, DDFA technical support, and management. Table 1 provides an overview of EMCA, including program areas, program activities, the duration and funding of each activity, and the associated industry partner, if appropriate.

  12. Environmental Management Systems and Sustainability in SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Satya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental sustainability in manufacturing sector has been allocated a major consideration in the international literature. Due to growing concerns over the high effect of SMEs on world manufacturing industries and their contribution to pollution; this research attempts to focus on the key parameters that interact in the application of environmental management system, taking into account the main features of SMEs and also the integral role of industrial entrepreneurs in inspiring their firms’ approaches. The paper explores the potential opportunities which enable these enterprises to move towards organizations with high level of responsibility regarding environmental protection in order to provide a healthier life for future generations. Case investigation is carried out on an adhesive manufacturing company, which covers a notable market share within the sector. The research identifies that the company requires developing both internal and external entities within an explicit plan to revolutionize the recruitment patterns. Given the lack of adequate studies in adhesive technology, more researches are recommended in the future to consider the sustainable innovations on a broader sample of adhesive manufacturing companies to perform the life-cycle analysis due to the harmful organic compounds and toxic vapours of the adhesive products.

  13. Economic evaluations in pain management: principles and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asche, Carl V; Seal, Brian; Jackson, Kenneth C; Oderda, Gary M

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes how investigators may design, conduct, and report economic evaluations of pharmacotherapy for pain and symptom management. Because economic evaluation of therapeutic interventions is becoming increasingly important, there is a need for guidance on how economic evaluations can be optimally conducted. The steps required to conduct an economic evaluation are described to provide this guidance. Economic evaluations require two or more therapeutic interventions to be compared in relation to costs and effects. There are five types of economic evaluations, based on analysis of: (1) cost-effectiveness, (2) cost-utility, (3) cost-minimization, (4) cost-consequence, and (5) cost-benefit analyses. The six required steps are: identify the perspective of the study; identify the alternatives that will be compared; identify the relevant costs and effects; determine how to collect the cost and effect data; determine how to perform calculation for cost and effects data; and determine the manner in which to depict the results and draw comparisons.

  14. Gazprom: internal structure, management principles and financial flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, Valery; Moe, Arild.

    1996-01-01

    Gazprom is responsible for over 95% of total Russian natural gas production and is one of the largest companies in the world. As well as being of major importance in the Russian domestic energy balance, it is also the largest gas trader in the world, supplying about half the gas imported into western and east-central Europe. The scale of these external activities means that the terms on which it supplies gas to its customers will have an impact on business beyond the gas industry. This study investigates the roots of the company and analyses its current organisation, management structure and financial flows. The main topics covered are: the Russian gas industry in the Soviet era; the organisational structure of Gazprom after privatisation; pricing policy; the company's financial position; Gazprom in relation to the domestic economy and the outside world. (9 figures; 7 tables). (author)

  15. [The modern principles of management of intermittent claudication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamzatov, T H; Svetlikov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Number of patients with peripheral arterial disease, despite various national public health programs, remains high and has no steady downward trend over the past few decades. Despite recent advances in drug therapy, сonservative approach in the management of peripheral arterial disease is often neglected by vascular surgeons. However, vast majority of patients with intermittent claudication, who receive comprehensive conservative treatment, including risk factor modification, exercise and drug therapy, may get significant improvement in quality of life by partial or complete relief of symptoms related to the disease. Patients strictly adhering to medical recommendations has favorable prognosis and progression of disease to the stage of critical limb ischemia is very unlikely. Noncompliant patients and those who continue smoking in particular, often experience progression of symptoms related to the disease. That may result in the need for surgical intervention aiming to prevent or delay the onset of critical limb ischemia.

  16. Livedoid vasculopathy: A review of pathogenesis and principles of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Biju; Neema, Shekhar; Verma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous disease manifesting as recurrent ulcers on the lower extremities. The ulceration results in atrophic, porcelain white scars termed as atrophie blanche. The pathogenesis is yet to be understood with the main mechanism being hypercoagulability and inflammation playing a secondary role. The important procoagulant factors include protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden mutation, antithrombin III deficiency, prothrombin gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. Histopathology of livedoid vasculopathy is characterized by intraluminal thrombosis, proliferation of the endothelium and segmental hyalinization of dermal vessels. The treatment is multipronged with anti-thrombotic measures such as anti-platelet drugs, systemic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic therapy taking precedence over anti-inflammatory agents. Colchicine, hydroxychloroquine, vasodilators, intravenous immunoglobulin, folic acid, immunosuppressive therapy and supportive measures are also of some benefit. A multidisciplinary approach would go a long way in the management of these patients resulting in relief from pain and physical as well as psychological scarring.

  17. Environmental Protection Tools in Agricultural Management Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, Agnieszka; Taszakowski, Jaroslaw; Janus, Jaroslaw; Bozek, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Land consolidation is a fundamental instrument for agricultural management. It facilitates comprehensive changes in the agricultural, social, and ecological domains. Consolidation and post-consolidation development-related investments are an opportunity to improve living conditions in rural areas, and simultaneously ensure its positive impact on the environment. One of the primary goals of consolidation, directly specified in the Act on land consolidation, is to improve farming conditions. In Poland, consolidation is possible due to EU funds: RDP 2007-2013 and RDP 2014-2020. In order for individual villages to be granted EU funds for consolidation and post-consolidation development under the Rural Development Programme 2014-2020, their consolidation has to implement actions with positive impact on the environment and the landscape. The goal of this paper is to analyse documentation in the form of assumptions for a land consolidation project enclosed to an RDP 2014-2020 grant application and project information sheets as the basis for environmental impact assessment in the context of detailed presentation of environmental protection solutions that ensure a positive impact of the project on the environment and landscape. The detailed study involved 9 villages in the Malopolskie Voivodeship, which applied for EU grants for land consolidation in the current financial perspective. The paper specifies the existing state of the analysed villages as regards the natural environment, lists agricultural management instruments that have a positive impact on the environment, and demonstrates that planning of actions aimed at environmental protection is a necessary element of assumptions for land consolidation projects.

  18. Implementation of Supply Chain Management (SCM in pharmaceutical company, general principles and case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Nakov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Supply Chain Management (SCM in pharmaceutical industry is defined as a “responsible SCM” and its implementation is according to the principles of: business ethics, rights of labor and principles of healthy and safe working environment. Pharmaceutical companies with implemented “responsible SCM” have to use management systems to facilitate continuous improvement in accordance with their working principles. The main purpose of this management system is to ensure the consistency, reliability and continuous improvement of all workflows within an organization.The analyzed case describes the project of European generic pharmaceutical company, which intends to implement best practice SCM operations for five European manufacturing sites and European logistics organizations (active ingredients supply, distribution centers, affiliate customers and third party manufacturers. The main objectives of the project were the creation of the future improved To-Be situation through implementation of new SCM models to the existing To-Day situation.

  19. Life cycle costing of waste management systems: overview, calculation principles and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Kromann, Mikkel A; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides a detailed and comprehensive cost model for the economic assessment of solid waste management systems. The model was based on the principles of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) and followed a bottom-up calculation approach providing detailed cost items for all key technologies within modern waste systems. All technologies were defined per tonne of waste input, and each cost item within a technology was characterised by both a technical and an economic parameter (for example amount and cost of fuel related to waste collection), to ensure transparency, applicability and reproducibility. Cost items were classified as: (1) budget costs, (2) transfers (for example taxes, subsidies and fees) and (3) externality costs (for example damage or abatement costs related to emissions and disamenities). Technology costs were obtained as the sum of all cost items (of the same type) within a specific technology, while scenario costs were the sum of all technologies involved in a scenario. The cost model allows for the completion of three types of LCC: a Conventional LCC, for the assessment of financial costs, an Environmental LCC, for the assessment of financial costs whose results are complemented by a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for the same system, and a Societal LCC, for socio-economic assessments. Conventional and Environmental LCCs includes budget costs and transfers, while Societal LCCs includes budget and externality costs. Critical aspects were found in the existing literature regarding the cost assessment of waste management, namely system boundary equivalency, accounting for temporally distributed emissions and impacts, inclusions of transfers, the internalisation of environmental impacts and the coverage of shadow prices, and there was also significant confusion regarding terminology. The presented cost model was implemented in two case study scenarios assessing the costs involved in the source segregation of organic waste from 100,000 Danish households and

  20. Organizing principles and management climate in high-performing municipal elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajonius, Petri; Kazemi, Ali; Tengblad, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - Previous research has shown that user-oriented care predicts older persons' satisfaction with care. What is yet to be researched is how senior management facilitates the implementation of user-oriented care. The purpose of this study is to investigate the organizing principles and management climate characterizing successful elderly care. Design/methodology/approach - The department in one highly ranked municipality was selected and compared with a more average municipality. On-site in-depth semi-structured interviews with department managers and participatory observations at managers' meetings were conducted in both municipalities. Findings - Results revealed three key principles for successful elderly care: organizing care from the viewpoint of the older person; recruiting and training competent and autonomous employees; instilling a vision for the mission that guides operations at all levels in the organization. Furthermore, using climate theory to interpret the empirical material, in the highly successful municipality the management climate was characterized by affective support and cognitive autonomy, in contrast to a more instrumental work climate primarily focusing on organizational structure and doing the right things characterizing the more average municipality. Originality/value - The authors suggest that guiding organizing principles are intertwined with management climate and that there are multiple perspectives that must be considered by the management, that is, the views of the older persons, the co-workers and the mission. These results can guide future care quality developments, and increase the understanding of the importance of organizational climate at the senior management level.

  1. MODEL OF IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BY MULTI - SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovanovic

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on doctoral dissertation which is oriented on improving environmental management system using multi - software. In this doctoral dissertation will be used key results of master thesis which is oriented on quantification environmental aspects and impacts by artificial neural network in organizations. This paper recommend improving environmental management system in organization using Balanced scorecard model and MCDM method - AHP (Analytic hierarchy process based on group decision. BSC would be spread with elements of Environmental management system and used in area of strategic management system in organization and AHP would be used in area of checking results getting by quantification environmental aspects and impacts.

  2. Environmental management in the Hydro-Electric Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlon, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Tasmanian Hydro Electric Commission (HEC) is a large and diverse organization, providing electricity generation, transmission, distribution and retail services throughout Tasmania. It is a significant manager of Tasmania's land and water resources and, as a consequence, has important environmental responsibilities. This paper outlines the background to conflict with the environmental movement over power generation development projects in south western Tasmania and the development of an environmental policy. As part of the environmental policy, the HEC has prepared environmental reviews, audits and risk assessment and is currently developing and implementing a comprehensive environmental management system. The HEC sees the introduction of the environmental management system as demonstrating a commitment to continuing environmental improvement and in establishing itself as a Tasmanian and national leader in the area of environmental management. 1 tab., 2 figs., 4 refs

  3. Environmental Management Performance Report - October 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDER, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) a monthly summary of the Central Plateau Contractor's Environmental Management (EM) performance by Fluor Hanford (FH) and its subcontractors. Only current FH workscope responsibilities are described and other contractor/RL managed work is excluded. Please refer to other sections (BHI, PNNL) for other contractor information. Section A, Executive Summary, provides an executive level summary of the cost, schedule, and technical performance described in this report. It summarizes performance for the period covered, highlights areas worthy of management attention, and provides a forward look to some of the upcoming key performance activities as extracted from the contractor baseline. The remaining sections provide detailed performance data relative to each individual subproject (e.g., Plutonium Finishing Plant, Spent Nuclear Fuels, etc.), in support of Section A of the report. All information is updated as of the end of October 2002 unless otherwise noted. ''Stoplight'' boxes are used to indicate at a glance the condition of a particular safety area. Green boxes denote either (1) the data are stable at a level representing ''acceptable'' performance, or (2) an improving trend exists. Yellows denote the data are stable at a level from which improvement is needed. Red denotes a trend exists in a non-improving direction

  4. Use of the environmental resource management and analysis system at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erjavec, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    In the past, hazardous waste site characterization and remediation using computer-based technologies has been a difficult and time-consuming process because of the need to analyze data using non-interfaced computer and software environments. The Environmental Resource Management and Analysis System (ERMA) was developed as an innovative approach to the management, analyses and depiction of data collected during a hazardous site remediation. A modular, multi-disciplined software package, ERMA integrates an environmental database management system with variety of Geographic Information System technologies. ERMA capabilities include spatial analysis, three-dimensional subsurface geologic interpretation and modeling, terrain modeling, and groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling. ERMA's data management is provided through a set of user-modifiable, graphic interface tools that permit complex data queries, data modification and reporting. An ERMA prototype has been implemented at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (a Department of Energy cleanup site) using groundwater monitoring and elevation data collected over the last few years. ERMA has enabled the precision posting of data from the 853 groundwater monitoring wells at the site. Data from these wells have ben used to define the piezometric surface of the Great Miami Aquifer and correlate it with the uranium concentration contours of an identified groundwater plume. Using spatial query capabilities, radioactive sampling results from monitoring wells have been compared to contour maps defining the extent of the plume to determine the validity of those maps and the need for additional well locations

  5. 78 FR 79658 - Environmental Impact Statement; Animal Carcass Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...] Environmental Impact Statement; Animal Carcass Management AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service... prepare an environmental impact statement to examine the potential environmental effects of animal carcass... of animal carcass management options used throughout the United States. The EIS will analyze and...

  6. Lean environmental management integration system for sustainability of ISO 14001:2004 standard implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Puvanasvaran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a model for integrating Lean Principles with ISO 14001 Environmental Management System.Design/methodology/approach: To achieve the objective of the study, the methodology used in this study is based on preliminary literature review of ISO 14001 standards and Lean Principles as well as certain case reports from various proponents and authors of ISO 14001 and Lean as noted in various articles and journals and some books.Findings and Originality/value: The findings of this study are a new model called Lean Environmental Management Integration System (LEMIS has been developed and leads to the creation of these measurement standards for evaluating the organization, making its environmental efforts more realistic, focused and attainable.Research limitations/implications: Future research should be conducted case studies in this direction are required to be conducted for examining the feasibility of amalgamation and implementing ISO 14001:2004 standards with the philosophy of Lean Principles to enable the achievement of world class standards.Practical implications: This model helps to eliminate any wasteful processes in the organization’s implementation of the ISO 14001 standard thus leading to higher environmental performance.  Integrating the standard with Lean principles through LEMIS model helps to specify these performance measures making the standard achieve sustainability and continual improvement.Originality/value: This study presents a unique approach of integrating the two main models, namely Lean Principles and ISO 14001 Environmental Management System, as a single framework benefiting contemporary organizations.

  7. Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities is to provide managers and senior staff at the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and its contractors with timely and concise information on Hanford Site environmental and waste management activities. Each edition updates the information on the topics in the previous edition, deletes those determined not to be of current interest, and adds new topics to keep up to date with changing environmental and waste management requirements and issues. Section A covers current waste management and environmental restoration issues. In Section B are writeups on national or site-wide environmental and waste management topics. Section C has writeups on program- and waste-specific environmental and waste management topics. Section D provides information on waste sites and inventories on the site. 15 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities is to provide managers and senior staff at the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and its contractors with timely and concise information on Hanford Site environmental and waste management activities. Each edition updates the information on the topics in the previous edition, deletes those determined not to be of current interest, and adds new topics to keep up to date with changing environmental and waste management requirements and issues. Section A covers current waste management and environmental restoration issues. In Section B are writeups on national or site-wide environmental and waste management topics. Section C has writeups on program- and waste-specific environmental and waste management topics. Section D provides information on waste sites and inventories on the site. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. The process of life-cycle cost analysis on the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, D.Y.; Jacoboski, J.A.; Fisher, L.A.; Beirne, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Estimating Services Department of the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) is formalizing the process of life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) for the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The LCCA process is based on the concepts, principles, and guidelines described by applicable Department of Energy's (DOE) orders, pertinent published literature, and the National Bureau of Standards handbook 135. LCC analyses will be performed following a ten-step process on the FEMP at the earliest possible decision point to support the selection of the least-cost alternatives for achieving the FERMCO mission

  10. Pacific Canada's Rockfish Conservation Areas: using Ostrom's design principles to assess management effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darienne Lancaster

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available International declines in marine biodiversity have lead to the creation of marine protected areas and fishery reserve systems. In Canada, 164 Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCAs were implemented between 2003 and 2007 and now cover 4847.2 km² of ocean. These reserves were created in response to widespread concern from fishers and nongovernmental organizations about inshore rockfish (genus Sebastes population declines. We used the design principles for effective common-pool resource management systems, originally developed by Elinor Ostrom, to assess the social and ecological effectiveness of these conservation areas more than 10 years after their initial implementation. We assessed the relative presence or absence of each design principle within current RCA management. We found that 2 of the 11 design principles were moderately present in the recreational fishery. All other design principles were lacking for the recreational sector. We found that 2 design principles were fully present and 5 were moderately present in the commercial sector. Four design principles were lacking in the commercial sector. Based on this analysis, we highlight 4 main areas for management improvement: (1 create an education and outreach campaign to explain RCA rules, regulations, boundaries, and the need for marine conservation; (2 increase monitoring of users and resources to discourage noncompliance and gather the necessary data to create social buy-in for marine conservation; (3 encourage informal nested governance through stakeholder organizations for education and self-regulation (e.g. fisher to fisher; and (4 most importantly, create a formal, decadal RCA review process to gather stakeholder input and make amendments to regulations and RCA boundaries. This information can be used to inform spatial management systems both in Canada and internationally. This analysis also contributes to a growing literature on effectively scaling up small-scale management techniques

  11. 76 FR 50204 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY...-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Committee of the Environmental Management Site- Specific... management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Purpose of...

  12. HIGH QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL PRINCIPLES APPLIED TO THE ARCHITECTONIC DESIGN SELECTION PROCEDURE: THE NUTRE LAB CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Barroso Krause

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to produce more sustainable buildings has been influencing the design decisions all over the world. That’s why it is imperative, in Brazil, the development of strategies and method to aid the decision making during the design process, focused on high quality environmental. This paper presents a decision support tool based on the principles of sustainable construction developed by the Project, Architecture and Sustainability Research Group (GPAS of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – Brazil. The methodology has been developed for the selection of a preliminary design of a laboratory to be built at Rio Technology Park at the University campus. The support provided by GPAS occurred in three stages: the elaboration of the Reference Guide for the competitors, the development of a methodology to evaluate the proposed solutions (based on environmental performance criteria and the assistance of the members of jury in the trial phase. The theoretical framework was based upon the concepts of the bioclimatic architecture, the procedures specified by the certification HQE® (Haute Qualité Environnementale and the method suggested by the ADDENDA® architecture office. The success of this experience points out the possibility to future application in similar cases.

  13. Right to Place: A Political Theory of Animal Rights in Harmony with Environmental and Ecological Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Panagiotarakou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is on the “right to place” as a political theory of wild animal rights. Out of the debate between terrestrial cosmopolitans inspired by Kant and Arendt and rooted cosmopolitan animal right theorists, the right to place emerges from the fold of rooted cosmopolitanism in tandem with environmental and ecological principles. Contrary to terrestrial cosmopolitans—who favour extending citizenship rights to wild animals and advocate at the same time large-scale humanitarian interventions and unrestricted geographical mobility—I argue that the well-being of wild animals is best served by the right to place theory on account of its sovereignty model. The right to place theory advocates human non-interference in wildlife communities, opposing even humanitarian interventions, which carry the risk of unintended consequences. The right to place theory, with its emphasis on territorial sovereignty, bases its opposition to unrestricted geographical mobility on two considerations: (a the non-generalist nature of many species and (b the potential for abuse via human encroachment. In a broader context, the advantage of the right to place theory lies in its implicit environmental demands: human population control and sustainable lifestyles.

  14. Outline of environmental impact of waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This document presents background information on the environmental impacts from the management and disposal of radioactive waste for seven reference fuel cycles selected by INFCE Working Group 7, but excluding the health and safety impact on man. The main factors considered were: use of natural resources, land, water, energy, labour and materials; effects of chemical and thermal effluents; effects of meteorology, hydrology and natural hazards; and social effects. The environmental impacts are generally largest for the once-through fuel cycles and smallest for the FBR and HWR U/Th cycles, due to the impacts being correlated to uranium requirements. The main impact is the use of land which varies from 0.1 - 1.6 ha/GWa with the FBR strategy requiring the smallest use of land and the LWR once-through strategy the largest. The land use for mill tailings is, except for the FBR and U/Th cycles, dominant compared to the land use for the rest of the fuel cycle

  15. Cumulative Environmental Management Association : Wood Buffalo Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, B.

    2001-01-01

    The recently announced oil sands development of the Wood Buffalo Region in Alberta was the focus of this power point presentation. Both mining and in situ development is expected to total $26 billion and 2.6 million barrels per day of bitumen production. This paper described the economic, social and environmental challenges facing the resource development of this region. In addition to the proposed oil sands projects, this region will accommodate the needs of conventional oil and gas production, forestry, building of pipelines and power lines, municipal development, recreation, tourism, mining exploration and open cast mining. The Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) was inaugurated as a non-profit association in April 2000, and includes 41 members from all sectors. Its major role is to ensure a sustainable ecosystem and to avoid any cumulative impacts on wildlife. Other work underway includes the study of soil and plant species diversity, and the effects of air emissions on human health, wildlife and vegetation. The bioaccumulation of heavy metals and their impacts on surface water and fish is also under consideration to ensure the quality and quantity of surface water and ground water. 3 figs

  16. THOSE ISSUES AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES IN THE ORGANIZATION ENTITIES MILK INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGETA-MIHAELA ZAHARIA (CRIVAC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the features of the entities in the dairy industry. At first, a brief description of the dairy industry in Romania, giving priority factors that contribute to the development of this market. As in any economic unit, organization of management accounting and cost calculation is particularly important activity managers are required to study all factors and exercise influence principles, their implications, and then, taking account of them to choose the most appropriate form of organization of management accounting and cost calculation. Were analyzed and described in the study, factors and principles that characterize the entities in the dairy industry and have an influence in the organization of management accounting, but also in determining costs.

  17. Stakeholders and environmental management practices: an institutional framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmas, Magali [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Toffel, Michael W. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Despite burgeoning research on companies' environmental strategies and environmental management practices, it remains unclear why some firms adopt environmental management practices beyond regulatory compliance. This paper leverages institutional theory by proposing that stakeholders - including governments, regulators, customers, competitors, community and environmental interest groups, and industry associations - impose coercive and normative pressures on firms. However, the way in which managers perceive and act upon these pressures at the plant level depends upon plant- and parent-company-specific factors, including their track record of environmental performance, the competitive position of the parent company and the organizational structure of the plant. Beyond providing a framework of how institutional pressures influence plants' environmental management practices, various measures are proposed to quantify institutional pressures, key plant-level and parent-company-level characteristics and plant-level environmental management practices. (Author)

  18. Contact Us About Managing the Quality of Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contact us form for the EPA Quality Program regarding quality management activities for all environmental data collection and environmental technology programs performed by or for the Agency and the EPA Information Quality Guidelines.

  19. the environmental management system of the south african national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magagula, Bheki

    installation linked to the EMS or advancing the corporate environmental statement .... management challenges in South Africa range from strategic waste ..... 17 Wang, X. “Exploring trends, sources, and causes of environmental funding: A.

  20. A science data gateway for environmental management: A SCIENCE DATA GATEWAY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, Boris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krishnan, Harinarayan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kushner, Gary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lansing, Carina [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Porter, Ellen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Romosan, Alexandru [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shoshani, Arie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, Haruko [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weidmer, Arthur [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Kesheng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Science data gateways are effective in providing complex science data collections to the world-wide user communities. In this paper we describe a gateway for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) framework. Built on top of established web service technologies, the ASCEM data gateway is specifically designed for environmental modeling applications. Its key distinguishing features include: (1) handling of complex spatiotemporal data, (2) offering a variety of selective data access mechanisms, (3) providing state of the art plotting and visualization of spatiotemporal data records, and (4) integrating seamlessly with a distributed workflow system using a RESTful interface. ASCEM project scientists have been using this data gateway since 2011.

  1. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamer, Betty; Baan, Caroline; Putters, Kim; van Oers, Hans; Drewes, Hanneke

    2018-04-09

    Purpose A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying collaborative strategies to improve pharmaceutical care and the contextual factors and mechanisms through which these principles operate. Design/methodology/approach The evaluation was informed by a realist methodology examining the links between PHM strategies, their outcomes and the contexts and mechanisms by which these strategies operate. Guiding principles were identified by grouping context-specific strategies with specific outcomes. Findings In total, ten guiding principles were identified: create agreement and commitment based on a long-term vision; foster cooperation and representation at the board level; use layered governance structures; create awareness at all levels; enable interpersonal links at all levels; create learning environments; organize shared responsibility; adjust financial strategies to market contexts; organize mutual gains; and align regional agreements with national policies and regulations. Contextual factors such as shared savings influenced the effectiveness of the guiding principles. Mechanisms by which these guiding principles operate were, for instance, fostering trust and creating a shared sense of the problem. Practical implications The guiding principles highlight how collaboration can be stimulated to improve pharmaceutical care while taking into account local constraints and possibilities. The interdependency of these principles necessitates effectuating them together in order to realize the best possible improvements and outcomes. Originality/value This is the first study using a realist approach to understand the guiding principles underlying collaboration to improve pharmaceutical care.

  2. Environmental management frameworks for offshore mining: the New Zealand approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ellis, Joanne

    2017-07-27

    The New Zealand region contains untapped natural mineral, oil, and gas resources while also supporting globally unique and diverse faunal communities that need to be managed sustainably. In this paper key information from the international literature is reviewed that can underpin an Environmental Mining Management System which includes elements of Environmental Risk Assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmental Management Planning. This paper focuses on four developing areas of seafloor mining activities presently being undertaken or planned in the New Zealand region: hydrocarbons (oil and gas), minerals, ironsands and phosphorite nodules. A number of issues with the implementation of environmental management systems are identified including the difficulty of assessing new marine activities or technologies and the need for standardised reporting metrics. Finally, the development of ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning is discussed which will be required to enhance environmental mining management frameworks in New Zealand.

  3. Quality management principles and practices impact on the companies' quality performance

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Síria Alves; Sampaio, Paulo; Saraiva, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Publicado em "Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Quality Engineering and Management" Purpose - The aim of this paper is to expose the conceptual model which pretends to reflect the relationship between the use and implementation of quality management principles and practices and their impact on the companies’ quality performance. Design/methodology/approach – Based on the literature review carried out, we have identified the most common and used quality manageme...

  4. IMPACT OF THE PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING ON THE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela CREŢU

    2014-01-01

    The paper studied the impact of the financial accounting principles on the management accounting. There are similarities and differences between the financial accounting and management accounting. The differences are numerous, but in the present paper we are more interested in similarities that are very deep. Not accidentally, in other accounting systems, two types of accounting information form one functional, integrated circuit (accounting monism in U.S.A. or accounting systems of compromis...

  5. Integrated Water Resources Management: contrasting principles, policy, and practice, Awash River Basin, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mersha, A.; Fraiture, de C.M.S.; Mehari, Alem; Masih, I.; Alamirew, T.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) has been a dominant paradigm for water sector reform worldwide over the past two decades. Ethiopia, among early adopters, has developed a water policy, legislations, and strategy per IWRM core principles. However, considerable constraints are still in its

  6. Business Simulation Exercises in Small Business Management Education: Using Principles and Ideas from Action Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Jonas; Tell, Joakim; Politis, Diamanto

    2010-01-01

    Recent calls to close the rigour-relevance gap in business school education have suggested incorporating principles and ideas from action learning in small business management education. In this paper we discuss how business simulation exercises can be used as a platform to trigger students' learning by providing them with a platform where they…

  7. Population health management guiding principles to stimulate collaboration and improve pharmaceutical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Steenkamer (Betty); C.A. Baan (Caroline); K. Putters (Kim); H.A.M. Oers (Hans); H.W. Drewes (Hanneke W.)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractPurpose: A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying

  8. Application of the Total Quality Management Approach Principles and the ISO 9000 Standards in Engineering Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo; Frank, Moti

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the applicability of the definition, principles, and underlying strategies of total quality management (TQM) for engineering education. Describes several tools and methods for the implementation of TQM and its suitability for a variety of school activities. Presents a TQM course outline combining lectures, discussions, suggested…

  9. Total Quality Education: Profiles of Schools That Demonstrate the Power of Deming's Management Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoker, Michael J.; Wilson, Richard B.

    This book presents profiles of schools that have demonstrated the power of Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) principles. It describes schools that have successfully applied those strategies for change. The book explores what public education needs most--a compelling but flexible action plan for improvement. Chapter 1 offers a rationale for…

  10. A Methodology for Building Faculty Support for the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloni, Michael J.; Smith, Shane D.; Napshin, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from extant literature indicates that faculty support is a critical driver for implementing the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), particularly for schools pursuing an advanced, cross-disciplinary level of sustainability integration. However, there is limited existing research offering insight into how…

  11. The Efficiency Challenge: Creating a Transformative Learning Experience in a Principles of Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Rita A.; Carlon, Donna M.; Downs, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the results of the "Efficiency Challenge," a 10-week, Principles of Management course activity that uses reflection and goal setting to help students understand the concept of operational efficiency. With transformative learning theory as a lens, we base our report on 4 years' worth of student reflections regarding…

  12. Service-Learning and Integrated Course Redesign: Principles of Management and the Campus Kitchen Metaproject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Brenda L.; Pragman, Claudia H.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the process of redesigning a Principles of Management course to integrate a service-learning metaproject. The metaproject was Campus Kitchen, a food recovery and delivery program operated on a handful of university campuses across the United States. We used L. Dee Fink's integrated course design approach as well as systems…

  13. Solar radiation as a forest management tool: a primer of principles and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard G. Halverson; James L. Smith

    1979-01-01

    Forests are products of solar radiation use. The sun also drives the hydrologic cycle on forested watersheds. Some basic concepts of climatology and solar radiation are summarized in including earth-sun relations, polar tilt, solar energy, terrestrial energy, energy balance, and local energy. An example shows how these principles can be applied in resource management....

  14. Concrescent Conversations: Generating a Cooperative Learning Experience in Principles of Management--A Postmodern Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akan, Obasi Haki

    2005-01-01

    By taking a postmodern ontology that elevates becoming over the modern ontology of being, the author of this article proposes a theory and describes a method that teachers can use to enhance students' cooperative learning of management principles. The author asserts that the social construction of learning groups is an effect of organizing…

  15. Fernald Environmental Management Project 1995 site environmental report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes the 1995 Site Environmental Report for the Fernald site. It describes the Fernald site mission, exposure pathways, and environmental standards and guidelines. An overview is presented of the impact these activities have on the local environment and public health. Environmental monitoring activities measure and estimate the amount of radioactive and nonradioactive materials that may leave the site and enter the surrounding environment

  16. Fernald Environmental Management Project 1995 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The Fernald site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This 1995 Site Environmental Report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site's ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site's progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY MODEL BASED ON ISO 14000 MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina SITNIKOV

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide corporations, as well as their stakeholders, are more conscious of the need for environmental management, SR behaviour, and sustainable growth and development. International Standards are becoming more significant for corporations to work towards common environmental management practices. ISO 14001 is the first and the broadest standard intended at a more responsible approach of corporations and the world’s most acknowledged framework for environmental management systems that assist...

  18. Environmental radiation control and quality management system in design and operation of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    New environmental regulations and radiation safety standards are being implemented almost daily to ensure radiation safety, in particular for practices causing exposures to undue radiation doses. A particular emphasis of real challenge for organizations and users of radiation sources has to be for proper radiological safety assessment and is becoming cost effectively to be prepared for auditing. Special concern for the environment is of global . nature, and hence environmental auditing has been and will continue to be an essential practice for improving the environment and for meeting the relevant regulations and standards. In general, most facilities that deal with radioactive sources undertake strict safety measures in terms of personnel radiation protection, handling procedures and security. Hence, those measures should comply with the requirements of the environmental protection standards. Accordingly, a successful quality management system must balance realities of organization and personnel in achieving quality objectives. Organizational principles are found in the technical aspects of' quality management, such as, charting, requirements, measurements, procedures, ... , etc. Human principles are found in the communication side of quality management (e.g. meetings, ,decision making, ,teams, ... , etc). The quality management must understand and balance skills needed to blend them together. Large gamma irradiators present a high potential radiation hazard to the surrounding environment, since the amount of radioactivity is of the order of (P Bq) and a very high dose rates are produced during irradiation. Application of environmental radiation control deemed by regulatory authority and a proper quality management system by the utility would serve public health and safety

  19. Principles and applications of knowledge management in the BC industry (with examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Bizjak

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many definitions define Knowledge Management as capturing, organizing and storing knowledge by different methods from various sources and transforming it into enduring value. The knowledge management is one of the most important principles that companies must explore and use to gain the competitive advantage, even in buildings and construction industry. There are various projects of knowledge management for the BC industry. One such project is e-COGNOS. Its key issues are knowledge management in the construction domain and documents interdependencies and consistency across projects and between enterprises. At the Urban Planning Institute of the Republic of Slovenia we are using very crude methods of knowledge management or we even can not call it a knowledge management. It is more or less information services or document management. With new technologies like Microsoft SharePoint services, we are hoping that we will be able to advance these old methods and use accumulated knowledge in a more sophisticated way.

  20. Environmental Decision Making on Acid Mine Drainage Issues in South Africa: An Argument for the Precautionary Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morodi, T J; Mpofu, Charles

    2017-06-28

    This paper examines the issue of acid mine drainage in South Africa and environmental decision making processes that could be taken to mitigate the problem in the context of both conventional risk assessment and the precautionary principle. It is argued that conventional risk assessment protects the status quo and hence cannot be entirely relied upon as an effective tool to resolve environmental problems in the context of South Africa, a developing country with complex environmental health concerns. The complexity of the environmental issues is discussed from historical and political perspectives. An argument is subsequently made that the precautionary principle is an alternative tool, and its adoption can be used to empower local communities. This work, therefore, adds to new knowledge by problematising conventional risk assessment and proposing the framing of the acid mine drainage issues in a complex and contextual scenario of a developing country-South Africa.