WorldWideScience

Sample records for environmental atmospheric sampling

  1. Evaluating the suitability of different environmental samples for tracing atmospheric pollution in industrial areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francová, Anna; Chrastný, Vladislav; Šillerová, Hana; Vítková, Martina; Kocourková, Jana; Komárek, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Samples of lichens, snow and particulate matter (PM 10 , 24 h) are used for the source identification of air pollution in the heavily industrialized region of Ostrava, Upper Silesia, Czech Republic. An integrated approach that uses different environmental samples for metal concentration and Pb isotope analyses was applied. The broad range of isotope ratios in the samples indicates a combination of different pollution sources, the strongest among them being the metallurgical industry, bituminous coal combustion and traffic. Snow samples are proven as the most relevant indicator for tracing metal(loid)s and recent local contamination in the atmosphere. Lichens can be successfully used as tracers of the long-term activity of local and remote sources of contamination. The combination of PM 10 with snow can provide very useful information for evaluation of current pollution sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puckett, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Environmental Sampling (ES) is a technology option that can have application in transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The basic process is to take a sample from the environment, e.g., soil, water, vegetation, or dust and debris from a surface, and through very careful sample preparation and analysis, determine the types, elemental concentration, and isotopic composition of actinides in the sample. The sample is prepared and the analysis performed in a clean chemistry laboratory (CCL). This ES capability is part of the IAEA Strengthened Safeguards System. Such a Laboratory is planned to be built by JAERI at Tokai and will give Japan an intrinsic ES capability. This paper presents options for the use of ES as a transparency measure for nuclear nonproliferation

  3. New method of radiation measurement at carbon isotope 14 low level in an environmental atmospheric sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormos, J.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of preparation is proposed to extract the atmospheric carbon trapped in the solution of soda coming from air sampling in environment with a carbon-14 bubbler (type H.A.G. 7000). It is based on the neutralisation of the global soda solution got from bubbling pots by nitric acid, the complete desorption of the carbon under gaseous oxidized form (CO 2 ) and its trapping in a only capacity containing a reactive. The whole of the device is scanned by air at steady rate. A test catch of the reactive and of the trapped carbon dioxide is then blended to a glistening liquid (Permafluor E+) and measured in beta counting by scintillation in liquid medium with a counter for the measurement of low energy beta emitters at very low level of activity (Quantulus type). this method allows to get a limit of detection equal to 5 mBq/m 3 for the atmospheric organic carbon. The principal interest of this method is its quickness and simplicity of setting in motion for a measurement of 14 C in the atmospheric carbon dioxide at a level of natural activity. (N.C.)

  4. Radioactivity in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaro, Laura

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this practical work is to familiarize the student with radioactivity measures in environmental samples. For that were chosen samples a salt of natural potassium, a salt of uranium or torio and a sample of drinkable water

  5. Mass spectrometry as a potential tool to monitor depleted uranium as a marker in atmospheric contamination and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Arae, H.; Zunic, Z.S.

    2016-01-01

    With rapid advances in nuclear applications and technology, an equal spread in the misuse of radiological material across the globe is inevitable. The role of nuclear forensics becomes necessary in today's world for the control of fissile materials, IAEA safeguards, arms control, nuclear archaeology, national security and increase in access to international databases. In the case of any incidents, conclusions drawn from the nuclear forensic analyses, coupled with law enforcement and intelligence information, may support attribution-the identification of individuals or groups responsible for the acts. Currently, well documented, measurement-traceable, post-nuclear detonation materials do not exist to support post-detonation nuclear forensic sample analysis. Post-detonation reference materials would allow for analytical method development, measurement performance test, and serve as quality control materials to achieve metrological traceability and measurement accuracy

  6. Atmospheric Sampling of Microorganisms with UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, D. G., III

    2017-12-01

    Many microorganisms relevant to crops, domestic animals, and humans are transported over long distances through the atmosphere. Some of these atmospheric microbes catalyze the freezing of water at higher temperatures and facilitate the onset of precipitation. A few have crossed continents. New technologies are needed to study the movement of microorganisms in the atmosphere. We have used unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to study the transport of microorganisms tens to hundreds of meters above the ground. These UAS are equipped with unique devices for collecting microbes in the atmosphere during flight. Autonomous systems enable teams of UAS to perform complex atmospheric sampling tasks, and coordinate flight missions with one another. Data collected with UAS can be used to validate and improve disease forecasting models along highways in the sky, connecting transport scales across farms, states, and continents. Though terrestrial environments are often considered a major contributor to atmospheric microbial aerosols, little is known about aquatic sources of microbial aerosols. Droplets containing microorganisms can aerosolize from the water surface, liberating them into the atmosphere. We are using teams of unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) and UAS to study the aerosolization of microbes from aquatic environments. Controlled flume studies using highspeed video have allowed us to observe unique aerosolization phenomena that can launch microbes out of the water and into the air. Unmanned systems may be used to excite the next generation of biologists and engineers, and raise important ethical considerations about the future of human-robot interactions.

  7. Environmental sampling for trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Often too little attention is given to the sampling before and after actual instrumental measurement. This leads to errors, despite increasingly sensitive analytical systems. This is one of the first books to pay proper attention to representative sampling. It offers an overview of the most common techniques used today for taking environmental samples. The techniques are clearly presented, yield accurate and reproducible results and can be used to sample -air - water - soil and sediments - plants and animals. A comprehensive handbook, this volume provides an excellent starting point for researchers in the rapidly expanding field of environmental analysis. (orig.)

  8. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Samples are routinely collected and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, ground water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project.

  9. Solid phase micro-extraction in environmental atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Ping; Wei Lifan; Tan Yun

    2002-01-01

    Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) is an advanced technique of sample pretreatment in environmental atmosphere analysis, i.e., a sampling method of extracting volatile organic compounds from environmental gas. According to the primary survey on the theory and application of SPME, a suitable extraction tip, i.e., a coated fused silica fiber, is selected to construct a SPME apparatus. This SPME apparatus is used to extract volatile organic compounds from environmental atmosphere and a qualitative detection is conducted in gas chromatography-mass spectrometer system. Good experimental results are obtained

  10. Environmental factor atmosphere. Umweltfaktor Atmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogosjan, C P

    1981-01-01

    This book presents chapters on constitution of atmosphere, sun energy, air temperature, ocean-currents and heat transfer, annual specialities of pressure field, low and high pressure areas, hurricanes, formation of clouds and rainfall, climate variations, weather and weather forecast, artificial influence of weather and climate.

  11. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1997 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. In addition, Section 3.0, Biota, also reflects a rotating collection schedule identifying the year a specific sample is scheduled for collection. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The sampling methods will be the same as those described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan, US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, DOE/RL91-50, Rev. 1, US Department of Energy, Richland, Washington

  12. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program

  13. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  14. Atmospheric dispersion and environmental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1992-11-01

    Methods are described for assessing early radiation doses due to atmospheric releases of radionuclides, i.e. inhalation and external exposure from the plume and from deposited activity. Data to be used in these assessments are presented. The purpose of the present work is to evaluate methods and data that could be used in emergency situations as well as for emergency planning purposes. The most important direct pathways following a release of airborne radionuclides to the atmosphere are the inhalation pathway and the external exposure pathway from ground-deposited activity. For long-lived radionuclides like 134 Cs and 137 Cs the committed effective external dose from deposited acitivity is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the committed effective dose from inhalation. Similarly, the committed effective dose from inhalation is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the external γ-dose originating directly from the plume. (au) (21 tabs., 2 ills., 37 refs.)

  15. A novel atmospheric tritium sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lailai; Xia, Zhenghai; Gu, Shaozhong; Zhang, Dongxun; Bao, Guangliang; Han, Xingbo; Ma, Yuhua; Deng, Ke; Liu, Jiayu; Zhang, Qin; Ma, Zhaowei; Yang, Guo; Liu, Wei; Liu, Guimin

    2018-06-01

    The health hazard of tritium is related to its chemical form. Sampling different chemical forms of tritium simultaneously becomes significant. Here a novel atmospheric tritium sampling system (TS-212) was developed to collect the tritiated water (HTO), tritiated hydrogen (HT) and tritiated methane (CH3T) simultaneously. It consisted of an air inlet system, three parallel connected sampling channels, a hydrogen supply module, a methane supply module and a remote control system. It worked at air flow rate of 1 L/min to 5 L/min, with temperature of catalyst furnace at 200 °C for HT sampling and 400 °C for CH3T sampling. Conversion rates of both HT and CH3T to HTO were larger than 99%. The collecting efficiency of the two-stage trap sets for HTO was larger than 96% in 12 h working-time without being blocked. Therefore, the collected efficiencies of TS-212 are larger than 95% for tritium with different chemical forms in environment. Besides, the remote control system made sampling more intelligent, reducing the operator's work intensity. Based on the performance parameters described above, the TS-212 can be used to sample atmospheric tritium in different chemical forms.

  16. Soil sampling for environmental contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    The Consultants Meeting on Sampling Strategies, Sampling and Storage of Soil for Environmental Monitoring of Contaminants was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency to evaluate methods for soil sampling in radionuclide monitoring and heavy metal surveys for identification of punctual contamination (hot particles) in large area surveys and screening experiments. A group of experts was invited by the IAEA to discuss and recommend methods for representative soil sampling for different kinds of environmental issues. The ultimate sinks for all kinds of contaminants dispersed within the natural environment through human activities are sediment and soil. Soil is a particularly difficult matrix for environmental pollution studies as it is generally composed of a multitude of geological and biological materials resulting from weathering and degradation, including particles of different sizes with varying surface and chemical properties. There are so many different soil types categorized according to their content of biological matter, from sandy soils to loam and peat soils, which make analytical characterization even more complicated. Soil sampling for environmental monitoring of pollutants, therefore, is still a matter of debate in the community of soil, environmental and analytical sciences. The scope of the consultants meeting included evaluating existing techniques with regard to their practicability, reliability and applicability to different purposes, developing strategies of representative soil sampling for cases not yet considered by current techniques and recommending validated techniques applicable to laboratories in developing Member States. This TECDOC includes a critical survey of existing approaches and their feasibility to be applied in developing countries. The report is valuable for radioanalytical laboratories in Member States. It would assist them in quality control and accreditation process

  17. Atmospheric plasma processes for environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shapoval, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Plasma chemistry is a rapidly growing field which covers applications ranging from technological processing of materials, including biological tissues, to environmental remediation and energy production. The so called atmospheric plasma, produced by electric corona or dielectric barrier discharges in a gas at atmospheric pressure, is particularly attractive for the low costs and ease of operation and maintenance involved. The high concentrations of energetic and chemically active species (e.g...

  18. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. The routine sampling plan for the SESP has been revised this year to reflect changing site operations and priorities. Some sampling previously performed at least annually has been reduced in frequency, and some new sampling to be performed at a less than annual frequency has been added. Therefore, the SESP schedule reflects sampling to be conducted in calendar year 1991 as well as future years. The ground-water sampling schedule is for 1991. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operation, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford evirons

  19. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. The routine sampling plan for the SESP has been revised this year to reflect changing site operations and priorities. Some sampling previously performed at least annually has been reduced in frequency, and some new sampling to be performed at a less than annual frequency has been added. Therefore, the SESP schedule reflects sampling to be conducted in calendar year 1991 as well as future years. The ground-water sampling schedule is for 1991. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operation, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford evirons.

  20. Atmospheric Gas Tracers in Groundwater: Theory, Sampling. Measurement and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayari, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Some of the atmospheric gasses posses features that are sought in an environmental tracer of hydrogeologic interest. Among these, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hegzafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform, krypton-85 etc. have found increasing use in groundwater age dating studies during the last ten years. This paper explains the theory of their use as tracer and discusses the major concerns as related to their sampling and analyses. Factors affecting their applicability and the approach to interpret tracer gas data is briefly outlined

  1. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring the onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. The Hanford Environmental Health Foundation is responsible for monitoring the nonradiological parameters as defined in the National Drinking Water Standards while PNL conducts the radiological monitoring of the onsite drinking water. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize the expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site

  2. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring the onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. The Hanford Environmental Health Foundation is responsible for monitoring the nonradiological parameters as defined in the National Drinking Water Standards while PNL conducts the radiological monitoring of the onsite drinking water. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize the expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

  3. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  4. Atmosphere Resource Recovery & Environmental Monitoring for Long Duration Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery & Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) for Long Duration Exploration Project project is maturing Atmosphere Revitalization...

  5. Fallout Concentration Various Environmental Samples in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutarman

    2001-01-01

    The testing of nuclear weapons have been carried out by the advanced countries, such as United States, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, France, China, India and Pakistan, since about 1945 until 1998. Nuclear weapons tests were conducted at various locations, on and above the earth's surface or underground or on and under the ocean's surface. Nuclear explosions caused the radionuclides of fission product, such as 131 l, 89 Sr, 90 Sr, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and 239 Pu released to the atmospheric layer. In the atmospheric layer, the long-lived radionuclides, i.e, 90 Sr dan 137 Cs will be distributed into the environment as the fallout radionuclides, and deposited in the various environmental samples (soil, water, and biota). In general, at several locations in Indonesia the 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the various environmental samples still can be detected. The data of measurement results of 90 Sr and 137 Cs concentrations were generally lower than that from some countries in the northern hemisphere. (author)

  6. Environmental effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon, W.; Baliunas, S.L.; Robinson, A.B.; Robinson, Z.W.

    1999-01-01

    A review of the literature concerning the environmental consequences of increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide leads to the conclusion that increases during the 20th century have produced no deleterious effects upon global climate or temperature. Increased carbon dioxide has, however, markedly increased plant growth rates as inferred from numerous laboratory and field experiments. There is no clear evidence, nor unique attribution, of the global effects of anthropogenic CO 2 on climate. Meaningful integrated assessments of the environmental impacts of anthropogenic CO 2 are not yet possible because model estimates of global and regional climate changes on interannual, decadal and centennial timescales remain highly uncertain.(author)

  7. Laser Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Bililign

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lasers and laser spectroscopic techniques have been extensively used in several applications since their advent, and the subject has been reviewed extensively in the last several decades. This review is focused on three areas of laser spectroscopic applications in atmospheric and environmental sensing; namely laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, and photoluminescence (PL techniques used in the detection of solids, liquids, aerosols, trace gases, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs.

  8. Organic contaminants in environmental atmospheres and waters

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez González, Noelia

    2011-01-01

    This Doctoral Thesis focuses on the development of efficient and highly sensitive analytical methods for determining organic contaminants in atmospheric, aquatic and house dust samples. The proposed analytical methods are based on single and comprehensive gas chromatography followed by different detectors (including mass spectrometry and nitrogen chemiluminiscence detection) and different sample preparation methods that have the aim of minimising the consumption of organic solvents in the who...

  9. Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monsi; Howard, David

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) is a project focused on evolving existing and maturing emerging 'closed loop' atmosphere revitalization (AR) life support systems that produce clean, breathable air for crewmembers, and developing a suite of low mass, low power environmental monitors to detect and measure air- and waterborne constituents and contaminants. The objective is to improve reliability and efficiency, reduce mass and volume, and increase recovery of oxygen from carbon dioxide created by human metabolism from 43% to greater than 90%. The technology developments under ARREM are vital to extending human space missions from low-Earth orbit like the International Space Station to destinations deeper into space such as Mars where dependency on Earth for resupply of maintenance items and critical life support elements such as water and oxygen is not possible. The primary goal of the ARREM project is to demonstrate that systems meet the more stringent performance parameters for deep space exploration and are compatible with other systems within closed loop life support through a series of integrated tests performed in an environmental test chamber capable of simulating human metabolic activities and measuring systems outputs.

  10. Sampling and chemical analysis in environmental samples around Nuclear Power Plants and some environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Woo; Han, Man Jung; Cho, Seong Won; Cho, Hong Jun; Oh, Hyeon Kyun; Lee, Jeong Min; Chang, Jae Sook [KORTIC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Twelve kinds of environmental samples such as soil, seawater, underground water, etc. around Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs) were collected. Tritium chemical analysis was tried for the samples of rain water, pine-needle, air, seawater, underground water, chinese cabbage, a grain of rice and milk sampled around NPPs, and surface seawater and rain water sampled over the country. Strontium in the soil that sere sampled at 60 point of district in Korea were analyzed. Tritium were sampled at 60 point of district in Korea were analyzed. Tritium were analyzed in 21 samples of surface seawater around the Korea peninsular that were supplied from KFRDI(National Fisheries Research and Development Institute). Sampling and chemical analysis environmental samples around Kori, Woolsung, Youngkwang, Wooljin Npps and Taeduk science town for tritium and strontium analysis was managed according to plans. Succeed to KINS after all samples were tried.

  11. Atmospheric dispersion models for environmental pollution applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    Pollutants are introduced into the air by many of man's activities. The potentially harmful effects these can cause are, broadly speaking, of two kinds: long-term, possibly large-scale and wide-spread chronic effects, including long-term effects on the earth's climate; and acute, short-term effects such as those associated with urban air pollution. This section is concerned with mathematical cloud or plume models describing the role of the atmosphere, primarily in relation to the second of these, the acute effects of air pollution, i.e., those arising from comparatively high concentration levels. The need for such air pollution modeling studies has increased spectacularly as a result of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1968 and, especially, two key court decisions; the Calvert Cliffs decision, and the Sierra Club ruling on environmental non-degradation

  12. Use of passive sampling for atmospheric tritium monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira Ideias, P.; Pierrard, O.; Tournieux, D. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France); Tenailleau, L. [Marine nationale (France)

    2014-07-01

    Tritium is one of the most important radionuclide in environmental radiological monitoring. In French civil and military nuclear facilities, the releases levels are between 100 to 100 000 higher than any other radionuclide (rare gas excluded). Moreover these levels will probably increase in the next decades. With an average energy of 6 keV, the beta particle from tritium radioactive decay is difficult to detect and quantify within the environmental levels. To monitor the tritium in the air, French actors (authorities, operator, and experts) commonly use atmospheric bubblers and water vapour condensers. This type of sampling approach is time-consuming and very costly. To simplify and complete these methods, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), had developed an atmospheric tritium monitoring device based on passive sampling. The passive sampler developed consists in a small container designed with a patented specific geometry and filled with 13X molecular sieve. This system is based on free diffusion flow principle (Fick's law). The driving force is the partial pressure gradient existing between the environmental atmosphere and the passive sampler. The constancy of the sampling rate for different moisture conditions assures the representativeness of the proposed device. The desorption bench developed specifically allows the recovery of 99% of the water vapour sampled in the molecular sieve. More than 99% of the sampled tritium (HTO) activity is recovered in the range between 0 and 100 Bq.L{sup -1}. Above 100 Bq.L{sup -1} to 25 k Bq.L{sup -1} (max tested activity), it was verified that no more than 3% of the tritium remains in the molecular sieve.. Thus, the use of passive sampler provides: - a representative sampling method, - a good detection limit (0,01 Bq.m{sup -3}), - no electric power supply needs, - a wide range of sampling duration (1 day to 1 month), - a low-cost method for monitoring. Different performance tests were

  13. Sampling of Atmospheric Precipitation and Deposits for Analysis of Atmospheric Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Skarżyńska, K.; Polkowska, Ż; Namieśnik, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews techniques and equipment for collecting precipitation samples from the atmosphere (fog and cloud water) and from atmospheric deposits (dew, hoarfrost, and rime) that are suitable for the evaluation of atmospheric pollution. It discusses the storage and preparation of samples for analysis and also presents bibliographic information on the concentration ranges of inorganic and organic compounds in the precipitation and atmospheric deposit samples.

  14. Analysis of atmospheric particulate samples via instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a powerful analytical technique for the elemental characterization of atmospheric particulate samples. It is a true multielement technique with adequate sensitivity to determine 30 to 40 elements in a sample of atmospheric particulate material. Its nondestructive nature allows sample reanalysis by the same or a different analytical technique. In this paper as an example of the applicability of INAA to the study of atmospheric particulate material, a study of the emissions from municipal incinerators is described

  15. Application of PIXE analysis to atmospheric environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Mikio

    1997-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of the atmospheric aerosols is a fundamental to understand the behavior of aerosols in the atmosphere. The analysis of atmospheric aerosols is the most preferable fields of the PIXE. In this paper, the characteristics of atmospheric aerosols are reviewed at first, and the sampling method of atmospheric aerosols for the PIXE samples and the characterization of atmospheric aerosols using the PIXE analysis are discussed. (author)

  16. Atmospheric environmental implications of propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Allan J.; Bennett, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Three independent studies have been conducted for assessing the impact of rocket launches on the earth's environment. These studies have addressed issues of acid rain in the troposphere, ozone depletion in the stratosphere, toxicity of chemical rocket exhaust products, and the potential impact on global warming from carbon dioxide emissions from rocket launches. Local, regional, and global impact assessments were examined and compared with both natural sources and anthropogenic sources of known atmospheric pollutants with the following conclusions: (1) Neither solid nor liquid rocket launches have a significant impact on the earth's global environment, and there is no real significant difference between the two. (2) Regional and local atmospheric impacts are more significant than global impacts, but quickly return to normal background conditions within a few hours after launch. And (3) vastly increased space launch activities equivalent to 50 U.S. Space Shuttles or 50 Russian Energia launches per year would not significantly impact these conclusions. However, these assessments, for the most part, are based upon homogeneous gas phase chemistry analysis; heterogeneous chemistry from exhaust particulates, such as aluminum oxide, ice contrails, soot, etc., and the influence of plume temperature and afterburning of fuel-rich exhaust products, need to be further addressed. It was the consensus of these studies that computer modeling of interactive plume chemistry with the atmosphere needs to be improved and computer models need to be verified with experimental data. Rocket exhaust plume chemistry can be modified with propellant reformulation and changes in operating conditions, but, based upon the current state of knowledge, it does not appear that significant environmental improvements from propellant formulation changes can be made or are warranted. Flight safety, reliability, and cost improvements are paramount for any new rocket system, and these important aspects

  17. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  18. The development of a Martian atmospheric Sample collection canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczycki, E.; Galey, C.; Kennedy, B.; Budney, C.; Bame, D.; Van Schilfgaarde, R.; Aisen, N.; Townsend, J.; Younse, P.; Piacentine, J.

    The collection of an atmospheric sample from Mars would provide significant insight to the understanding of the elemental composition and sub-surface out-gassing rates of noble gases. A team of engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology have developed an atmospheric sample collection canister for Martian application. The engineering strategy has two basic elements: first, to collect two separately sealed 50 cubic centimeter unpressurized atmospheric samples with minimal sensing and actuation in a self contained pressure vessel; and second, to package this atmospheric sample canister in such a way that it can be easily integrated into the orbiting sample capsule for collection and return to Earth. Sample collection and integrity are demonstrated by emulating the atmospheric collection portion of the Mars Sample Return mission on a compressed timeline. The test results achieved by varying the pressure inside of a thermal vacuum chamber while opening and closing the valve on the sample canister at Mars ambient pressure. A commercial off-the-shelf medical grade micro-valve is utilized in the first iteration of this design to enable rapid testing of the system. The valve has been independently leak tested at JPL to quantify and separate the leak rates associated with the canister. The results are factored in to an overall system design that quantifies mass, power, and sensing requirements for a Martian atmospheric Sample Collection (MASC) canister as outlined in the Mars Sample Return mission profile. Qualitative results include the selection of materials to minimize sample contamination, preliminary science requirements, priorities in sample composition, flight valve selection criteria, a storyboard from sample collection to loading in the orbiting sample capsule, and contributions to maintaining “ Earth” clean exterior surfaces on the orbiting sample capsule.

  19. Sampling method of environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This manual provides sampling methods of environmental samples of airborne dust, precipitated dust, precipitated water (rain or snow), fresh water, soil, river sediment or lake sediment, discharged water from a nuclear facility, grains, tea, milk, pasture grass, limnetic organisms, daily diet, index organisms, sea water, marine sediment, marine organisms, and that for tritium and radioiodine determination for radiation monitoring from radioactive fallout or radioactivity release by nuclear facilities. This manual aims at the presentation of standard sampling procedures for environmental radioactivity monitoring regardless of monitoring objectives, and shows preservation method of environmental samples acquired at the samplingpoint for radiation counting for those except human body. Sampling techniques adopted in this manual is decided by the criteria that they are suitable for routine monitoring and any special skillfulness is not necessary. Based on the above-mentioned principle, this manual presents outline and aims of sampling, sampling position or object, sampling quantity, apparatus, equipment or vessel for sampling, sampling location, sampling procedures, pretreatment and preparation procedures of a sample for radiation counting, necessary recording items for sampling and sample transportation procedures. Special attention is described in the chapter of tritium and radioiodine because these radionuclides might be lost by the above-mentioned sample preservation method for radiation counting of less volatile radionuclides than tritium or radioiodine. (Takagi, S.)

  20. Isotope dilution analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.; Lesny, J.; Korenova, Z.; Klas, J.; Klehr, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope dilution analysis has been used for the determination of several trace elements - especially metals - in a variety of environmental samples, including aerosols, water, soils, biological materials and geological materials. Variations of the basic concept include classical IDA, substoichiometric IDA, and more recently, sub-superequivalence IDA. Each variation has its advantages and limitations. A periodic chart has been used to identify those elements which have been measured in environmental samples using one or more of these methods. (author)

  1. Hanford site environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1 open-quotes General Environmental Protection Program,close quotes and DOE Order 5400.5, open-quotes Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.close quotes The sampling methods are described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, DOE/RL91-50, Rev. 2, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland, Washington. This document contains the 1998 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section of this document describes the planned sampling schedule for a specific media (air, surface water, biota, soil and vegetation, sediment, and external radiation). Each section includes the sample location, sample type, and analyses to be performed on the sample. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be planned for 1998 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. In addition, a map is included for each media showing sample locations

  2. Generalized atmospheric sampling of self-avoiding walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rensburg, E J Janse; Rechnitzer, A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new Monte Carlo method for sampling lattice self-avoiding walks. The method, which we call 'GAS' (generalized atmospheric sampling), samples walks along weighted sequences by implementing elementary moves generated by the positive, negative and neutral atmospheric statistics of the walks. A realized sequence is weighted such that the average weight of states of length n is proportional to the number of self-avoiding walks from the origin c n . In addition, the method also self-tunes to sample from uniform distributions over walks of lengths in an interval [0, n max ]. We show how to implement GAS using both generalized and endpoint atmospheres of walks and analyse our data to obtain estimates of the growth constant and entropic exponent of self-avoiding walks in the square and cubic lattices.

  3. Determination of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide by sampling with impregnated filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano, J.A.; Palomares, F.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of filters impregnated with triethanolamine for the collection and subsequent determination of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is studied taking into account the influence of several parameters: storage of filters, reagents, elapsed time, sampling efficiency, etc. The results obtained for sampling times of 24 hours are satisfactory. (author) [es

  4. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental protection Program,'' and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.'' The sampling methods are described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, DOE/RL-91-50, Rev.2, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland, Washington. This document contains the CY1999 schedules for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes the sampling location, sample type, and analyses to be performed on the sample. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 1999 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. In addition, a map is included for each media showing approximate sampling locations

  5. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program: and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The sampling design is described in the Operations Office, Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland DOE/RL-91-50, Rev.2, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland, Washington. This document contains the CY 2000 schedules for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 2000 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. In addition, a map showing approximate sampling locations is included for each media scheduled for collection

  6. Diagnostic herd sensitivity using environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigre, Håkan; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Seyfarth, Anne Mette

    either at farm or slaughter. Three sample matrices were collected; dust samples (5 environmental swabs), nasal swabs (10 pools with 5 animals per pool) and air samples (1 filter). Based on the assumption that MRSA occurred in all 48 herds the overall herd sensitivity was 58% for nasal swabs, 33% for dust....... In our example, the prevalence of infected pigs in each herd was estimated from the pooled samples of nasal swabs. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of animal prevalence on the probability to detect MRSA in the dust and air samples at herd level. The results show a significant increase...

  7. Environmental consequences of atmospheric krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    This project examines the thesis that atmospheric background ionization is relevant to the understanding of weather. Projections of future world-wide use of nuclear energy imply that sufficient krypton-85 will be produced and may be released to significantly alter the natural ionization background. The scope of the project includes an assessment of krypton-85 on the electrical aspects of the atmosphere as well as the consequences of an altered electrical state of the atmosphere. The results of a first approximation model for the effects of krypton-85 on the atmosphere show that the electric field at the surface of the ocean would be reduced by about 25 percent and at a continental station by about 15 percent. At about two kilometers altitude, the electric field would be reduced by about 14 percent over the oceans and 16 percent over the land. The effects decrease quickly with increasing altitude. Analytical studies of the equations for fair weather atmospheric electricity yield solutions suitable for the interpretation of time dependent phenomena with periods longer than a few seconds. A brief analysis shows that a perfect assessment is not necessary to make an error-free decision regarding krypton-85 control measures. From the viewpoint of a decision-maker, those aspects that could swing the decision from one alternative to another are priority areas for analysis

  8. Practical reporting times for environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4 degrees C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions

  9. Practical reporting times for environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

  10. Atmospheric deposition and environmental quality in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosello, R.

    1993-01-01

    For Italy's Po River hydrological basin, artificial reservoirs have a great importance; water reserve is about 1600 million cubic meters for the hydroelectric reservoirs and about 76 million cubic meters for irrigation. Relevant to studies on water quality and acidification in the Po River Basin, this paper reviews some aspects of research on atmospheric deposition, i.e., geographical variability, long term trends, and effects on surface waters

  11. Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric Environmental Research. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This progress report submitted by Fraunhofer Institut fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, reviews the institute's scientific and technical atmospheric environmental research activities of 1990. Emphasis was on research into the atmospheric circulation of CH 4 and N 2 O, the determination of the distribution and of the time characteristics of trace substances of environmental relevance, and on studies of the effects of pollutants on the vegetation. Major efforts went into the development of instruments and the modeling of the atmosphere in support of the experimental work. The FhG activities advance the research into the chemical behavior of the atmosphere, the possible effects of man-made changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere on the greenhouse effect, the regional pollutant loads, and the effects of ground-level UV-B radiation. The activities are part of international and national joint research projects, e.g. EUROTRAC, IGAC, and ICAT. (orig./KW) [de

  12. Passive sampling for the isotopic fingerprinting of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, B. A.; MacLagan, D.; Spoznar, N.; Kaplan, R.; Chandan, P.; Stupple, G.; Zimmerman, L.; Wania, F.; Mitchell, C. P. J.; Steffen, A.; Monaci, F.; Derry, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies show that there are variations in the mercury (Hg) isotopic signature of atmospheric Hg, which demonstrates the potential for source tracing and improved understanding of atmospheric cycling of Hg. However, current methods for both measuring atmospheric Hg and collecting enough atmospheric Hg for isotopic analyses require expensive instruments that need power and expertise. Additionally, methods for collecting enough atmospheric Hg for isotopic analysis require pumping air through traps for long periods (weeks and longer). Combining a new passive atmospheric sampler for mercury (Hg) with novel Hg isotopic analyses will allow for the application of stable Hg isotopes to atmospheric studies of Hg. Our group has been testing a new passive sampler for gaseous Hg that relies on the diffusion of Hg through a diffusive barrier and adsorption onto a sulphur-impregnated activated carbon sorbent. The benefit of this passive sampler is that it is low cost, requires no power, and collects gaseous Hg for up to one year with linear, well-defined uptake, which allows for reproducible and accurate measurements of atmospheric gaseous Hg concentrations ( 8% uncertainty). As little as one month of sampling is often adequate to collect sufficient Hg for isotopic analysis at typical background concentrations. Experiments comparing the isotopic Hg signature in activated carbon samples using different approaches (i.e. by passive diffusion, by passive diffusion through diffusive barriers of different thickness, by active pumping) and at different temperatures confirm that the sampling process itself does not impose mass-independent fractionation (MIF). However, sampling does result in a consistent and thus correctable mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) effect. Therefore, the sampler preserves Hg MIF with very high accuracy and precision, which is necessary for atmospheric source tracing, and reasonable MDF can be estimated with some increase in error. In addition to

  13. Analysis procedure for americium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, R.W.; Hayes, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Several methods for the analysis of 241 Am in environmental samples were evaluated and a preferred method was selected. This method was modified and used to determine the 241 Am content in sediments, biota, and water. The advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. The method is also suitable for 244 Cm analysis

  14. PIXE - Analysis for environmental and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, G.B.

    1980-04-01

    The usefulness and accuracy of PIXE as an analytical tool in the study of trace elements in environmental samples of the Brazilian Cerrado are discussed. The report lists actual and forthcoming publications resulting from the study. The mechanism of exchange of elements in solution in water to aerosols has been investigated. For details of the procedure the reader is referred to an earlier report

  15. Dynamics of radioactive lead isotopes in the global environmental atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Yuya; Kosako, Toshiso

    2006-01-01

    Fundamental information of radioactive lead isotopes, which used as the atmospheric tracer in the global environmental atmosphere, is reviewed. Emanation and exhalation of Rn and Tn, parent nuclide, is stated. Some reports on measurement and application of short-lived lead isotopes are reported. Transfer of radioactive lead isotopes in the atmosphere, vertical profiles of radon, thoron, and short-lived lead isotopes for different turbulent mixing conditions, deposition to aerosol, basic processes of Rn decay product behavior in air defining 'unattached' and 'aerosol-attached' activities, seasonal variation of atmospheric 210 Pb concentration at Beijing and Chengdu, seasonal variation of atmospheric 212 Pb concentration at several observation sites in Japan Islands, and variation in the atmospheric concentration of 212 Pb along with SO 2 are shown. (S.Y.)

  16. Nuclear techniques for analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The main purposes of this meeting were to establish the state-of-the-art in the field, to identify new research and development that is required to provide an adequate framework for analysis of environmental samples and to assess needs and possibilities for international cooperation in problem areas. This technical report was prepared on the subject based on the contributions made by the participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 9 papers

  17. Environmental sample banking-research and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards (NBS), in cooperation with the Environment Protection Agency and the National Science Foundation, is engaged in a research program establishing methodology for environmental sample banking. This program is aimed toward evaluating the feasibility of a National Environment Specimen Bank (NESB). The capability for retrospective chemical analyses to evaluate changes in our environment would provide useful information. Much of this information could not be obtained using data from previously analyzed samples. However, to assure validity for these stored samples, they must be sampled, processed and stored under rigorously evaluated, controlled and documented conditions. The program currently under way in the NBS Analytical Chemistry Division has 3 main components. The first is an extension survey of available literature concerning problems of contamination, losses and storage. The components of interest include trace elements, pesticides, other trace organics (PCBs, plasticizers, etc.), radionuclides and microbiological species. The second component is an experimental evaluation of contamination and losses during sampling and sample handling. Of particular interest here is research into container cleaning methodology for trace elements, with respect to adsorption, desorption, leaching and partial dissolution by various sample matrices. The third component of this program is an evaluation of existing methodology for long-term sample storage

  18. Consideration of impact of atmospheric intrusion in subsurface sampling for investigation of suspected underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrey, J.D.; Bowyer, T.W.; Haas, D.A.; Hayes, J.C.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive noble gases radioxenon and radioargon constitute the primary smoking gun of an underground nuclear explosion. The aim of subsurface sampling of soil gas as part of an on-site inspection (OSI) is to search for evidence of a suspected underground nuclear event. It has been hypothesized that atmospheric gas can disturb soil gas concentrations and therefore potentially add to problems in civilian source discrimination verifying treaty compliance under the comprehensive nuclear-test ban treaty. This work describes a study of intrusion of atmospheric air into the subsurface and its potential impact on an OSI using results of simulations from the underground transport of environmental xenon (UTEX) model. (author)

  19. TECHNIQUES WITH POTENTIAL FOR HANDLING ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES IN CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An assessment of the methods for handling environmental samples prior to capillary electrophoresis (CE) is presented for both aqueous and solid matrices. Sample handling in environmental analyses is the subject of ongoing research at the Environmental Protection Agency's National...

  20. Intrepretation of work area and environmental sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, P.D.; Alvarez, J.L.; Novick, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    Meaningful interpretation of widely variable airborne contamination measurements is a difficult problem. Exposure limits, action levels, etc., are rigid interpretations of inherently variable environmental or workplace conditions, and are useful for control and regulatory compliance evaluations. Such limits force actions to reduce contamination, but have limited usefulness as benchmarks for evaluating isolated or nonrepresentative measurements. This paper deals with interpretation of exposure based on nonrepresentative sampling. The use of hard limits for interpreting measurements of legal record simplifies judgment during cursory audits; more aggressive questioning of the validity of these records may effectively invalidate them in a courtroom situation

  1. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation applied to biological and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simabuco, S.M.; Matsumoto, E.; Jesus, E.F.O.; Lopes, R.T.; Perez, C.; Nascimento Filho, V.F.; Costa, R.S.S.; Tavares do Carmo, M.G.; Saunders, C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence has been applied for trace elements in water and aqueous solutions, environmental samples and biological materials after sample preparation and to surface analysis of silicon wafers. The present paper shows some results of applications for rainwater, atmospheric particulate material, colostrum and nuclear samples. (author)

  2. Osmium in environmental samples from Northeast Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodushkin, Ilia [Division of Applied Geology, Lulea University of Technology, S-971 87 Lulea (Sweden); ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: ilia.rodushkin@alsglobal.com; Engstroem, Emma [Division of Applied Geology, Lulea University of Technology, S-971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Soerlin, Dieke; Ponter, Christer; Baxter, Douglas C. [ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Lulea (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Osmium (Os) concentrations and {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os isotope abundance ratios are presented for sedimentary materials, soils, humus, plants, mushrooms, mosses and lichens collected in the vicinity of the town of Lulea, Northeast Sweden, the data for biological specimens being the first reported. Contributions from sampling and varying exposure time to the observed environmental variability were evaluated. Sedimentary materials (from both fresh and brackish water) are most elevated in radiogenic {sup 187}Os, followed by inorganic soil horizons, mushrooms and humus. The Os isotopic compositions of plants, mosses and lichens are much less radiogenic, with mean {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os lying within a relatively narrow 0.3-0.6 range. Significant temporal variations in Os concentrations and isotopic compositions of plant samples are attributed to integrative uptake of airborne Os with non-radiogenic composition. Measured Os concentrations in biological matrices increase in the order: small shrub leaves (blueberry and lingonberry) {<=} spruce needles {<=} mushrooms {<=} tree leaves {<=} pine needles < mosses << lichens. The concentrations found in three different species of plant were used to provide the first estimates of gaseous osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) in the environment. Though the Os content of samples from Northeast Sweden does not differ significantly from matrix-matched international reference materials (not certified for Os) of abiotic origin, the estimates of gaseous OsO{sub 4} concentrations are roughly an order of magnitude higher than have been reported for particle-bound Os in other studies. The pronounced spatial variations between relatively closely situated sites in mean {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os ratios for samples of the same species (presumably with the same dominating uptake mechanism) point to the presence of different local Os sources. This study therefore demonstrates that emissions of Os from automobile catalytic converters are not the only

  3. Osmium in environmental samples from Northeast Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodushkin, Ilia; Engstroem, Emma; Soerlin, Dieke; Ponter, Christer; Baxter, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    Osmium (Os) concentrations and 187 Os/ 188 Os isotope abundance ratios are presented for sedimentary materials, soils, humus, plants, mushrooms, mosses and lichens collected in the vicinity of the town of Lulea, Northeast Sweden, the data for biological specimens being the first reported. Contributions from sampling and varying exposure time to the observed environmental variability were evaluated. Sedimentary materials (from both fresh and brackish water) are most elevated in radiogenic 187 Os, followed by inorganic soil horizons, mushrooms and humus. The Os isotopic compositions of plants, mosses and lichens are much less radiogenic, with mean 187 Os/ 188 Os lying within a relatively narrow 0.3-0.6 range. Significant temporal variations in Os concentrations and isotopic compositions of plant samples are attributed to integrative uptake of airborne Os with non-radiogenic composition. Measured Os concentrations in biological matrices increase in the order: small shrub leaves (blueberry and lingonberry) ≤ spruce needles ≤ mushrooms ≤ tree leaves ≤ pine needles 4 ) in the environment. Though the Os content of samples from Northeast Sweden does not differ significantly from matrix-matched international reference materials (not certified for Os) of abiotic origin, the estimates of gaseous OsO 4 concentrations are roughly an order of magnitude higher than have been reported for particle-bound Os in other studies. The pronounced spatial variations between relatively closely situated sites in mean 187 Os/ 188 Os ratios for samples of the same species (presumably with the same dominating uptake mechanism) point to the presence of different local Os sources. This study therefore demonstrates that emissions of Os from automobile catalytic converters are not the only source of contemporary environmental contamination

  4. Sampling atmospheric pesticides with SPME: Laboratory developments and field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junxia; Tuduri, Ludovic; Mercury, Maud; Millet, Maurice; Briand, Olivier; Montury, Michel

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the atmospheric exposure of the greenhouse workers to pesticides, solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used under non-equilibrium conditions. Using Fick's law of diffusion, the concentrations of pesticides in the greenhouse can be calculated using pre-determined sampling rates (SRs). Thus the sampling rates (SRs) of two modes of SPME in the lab and in the field were determined and compared. The SRs for six pesticides in the lab were 20.4-48.3 mL min -1 for the exposed fiber and 0.166-0.929 mL min -1 for the retracted fiber. In field sampling, two pesticides, dichlorvos and cyprodinil were detected with exposed SPME. SR with exposed SPME for dichlorvos in the field (32.4 mL min -1 ) was consistent with that in the lab (34.5 mL min -1 ). SR for dichlorvos in the field (32.4 mL min -1 ) was consistent with that in the lab (34.5 mL min -1 ). The trends of temporal concentration and the inhalation exposure were also obtained. - SPME was proved to be a powerful and simple tool for determining pesticides' atmospheric concentration

  5. Measurements of plutonium in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alberti, F; Risposi, L [Instituto di Fisica Applicata, University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    1996-01-01

    Within the activities connected with the start up of the PETRA Laboratory (Processo per l'Estrazione di Terre Rare ed Attinidi, i.e. process for extraction of rare earths and actinides), the Radiation Protection Unit of the J.R.C.-Ispra has carried out a well planned set of experimental measurements aimed at evaluating the zero point of the isotopes of plutonium in environmental samples by alfa spectrometry. After the International Moratorium in 1963, no release of plutonium has occurred in the environment apart from the burn up of SNAP 9A satellite in April 1964. Since then the plutonium concentration in air and in fallout samples has been continuously decreasing requiring, therefore, optimization of both instrumentation and experimental measurement procedures in order to obtain better sensibilities. In this work, the experimental methodology followed at the J.R.C.-Ispra for measurements of plutonium concentration in air, deposition and soil is described and the plutonium behaviour in these samples is reported and discussed starting from 1961.

  6. Measurements of plutonium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alberti, F.; Risposi, L.

    1996-01-01

    Within the activities connected with the start up of the PETRA Laboratory (Processo per l'Estrazione di Terre Rare ed Attinidi, i.e. process for extraction of rare earths and actinides), the Radiation Protection Unit of the J.R.C.-Ispra has carried out a well planned set of experimental measurements aimed at evaluating the zero point of the isotopes of plutonium in environmental samples by alfa spectrometry. After the International Moratorium in 1963, no release of plutonium has occurred in the environment apart from the burn up of SNAP 9A satellite in April 1964. Since then the plutonium concentration in air and in fallout samples has been continuously decreasing requiring, therefore, optimization of both instrumentation and experimental measurement procedures in order to obtain better sensibilities. In this work, the experimental methodology followed at the J.R.C.-Ispra for measurements of plutonium concentration in air, deposition and soil is described and the plutonium behaviour in these samples is reported and discussed starting from 1961

  7. Atmosphere pollutants-their health and environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, Ali Sasi; Ibsaim, Rajab A.

    2006-01-01

    The conducted studies, continuous monitoring and measuring of the atmosphere pollution surrounding the world cities for a decade in the last century demonstrated increased rates of some pollutants, often exceeded the levels which are considered to be safe for health. Most of the dangerous pollutants in the atmosphere are suspended particles, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, ozone troposphere and lead, these are the main responsible pollutant in contaminating the atmosphere leading to increase of death percentage in the major cities. For a duration of nearly a century, atmosphere pollution accidents in cities like London approved that inhaling contaminated air is dangerous and deadly sometimes. In 1880 2200 person from London inhabitants have died when coal smoke with heating and industrial gases have been accumulated to form a toxic smog of sulfur oxide gas and suspended particles in the atmosphere of the city. In this paper we discuss type of atmosphere pollutants and their health and environmental effects on human being, creatures and earth and ways of eliminating that.(Author)

  8. Environmental Sampling, Monitoring and Site Assessment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical data on environmental quality with regard to the presence of radiological contamination of all kinds regulated...

  9. Program of environmental and bio monitoring sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, H.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about the importance of the biological signs to determine the environmental features characteristics.The low level of taxonomic resolution and the environmental perturbation is determined by the bio monitoring techniques

  10. Loess as an environmental archive of atmospheric trace element deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazina, T.; Winkel, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental archives such as ice cores, lake sediment cores, and peat cores have been used extensively to reconstruct past atmospheric deposition of trace elements. These records have provided information about how anthropogenic activities such as mining and fossil fuel combustion have disturbed the natural cycles of various atmospherically transported trace elements (e.g. Pb, Hg and Se). While these records are invaluable for tracing human impacts on such trace elements, they often provide limited information about the long term natural cycles of these elements. An assumption of these records is that the observed variations in trace element input, prior to any assumed anthropogenic perturbations, represent the full range of natural variations. However, records such as those mentioned above which extend back to a maximum of ~400kyr may not capture the potentially large variations of trace element input occurring over millions of years. Windblown loess sediments, often representing atmospheric deposition over time scales >1Ma, are the most widely distributed terrestrial sediments on Earth. These deposits have been used extensively to reconstruct continental climate variability throughout the Quaternary and late Neogene periods. In addition to being a valuable record of continental climate change, loess deposits may represent a long term environmental archive of atmospheric trace element deposition and may be combined with paleoclimate records to elucidate how fluctuations in climate have impacted the natural cycle of such elements. Our research uses the loess-paleosol deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) to quantify how atmospheric deposition of trace elements has fluctuated in central China over the past 6.8Ma. The CLP has been used extensively to reconstruct past changes of East Asian monsoon system (EAM). We present a suite of trace element concentration records (e.g. Pb, Hg, and Se) from the CLP which exemplifies how loess deposits can be used as an

  11. Management of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monsi; Perry, Jay; Howard, David

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Exploration Systems Program's Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project is working to further optimize atmosphere revitalization and environmental monitoring system architectures. This paper discusses project management strategies that tap into skill sets across multiple engineering disciplines, projects, field centers, and industry to achieve the project success. It is the project's objective to contribute to system advances that will enable sustained exploration missions beyond Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) and improve affordability by focusing on the primary goals of achieving high reliability, improving efficiency, and reducing dependence on ground-based logistics resupply. Technology demonstrations are achieved by infusing new technologies and concepts with existing developmental hardware and operating in a controlled environment simulating various crewed habitat scenarios. The ARREM project's strengths include access to a vast array of existing developmental hardware that perform all the vital atmosphere revitalization functions, exceptional test facilities to fully evaluate system performance, and a well-coordinated partnering effort among the NASA field centers and industry partners to provide the innovative expertise necessary to succeed.

  12. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  13. Bird specimens track 135 years of atmospheric black carbon and environmental policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBay, Shane G.; Fuldner, Carl C.

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric black carbon has long been recognized as a public health and environmental concern. More recently, black carbon has been identified as a major, ongoing contributor to anthropogenic climate change, thus making historical emission inventories of black carbon an essential tool for assessing past climate sensitivity and modeling future climate scenarios. Current estimates of black carbon emissions for the early industrial era have high uncertainty, however, because direct environmental sampling is sparse before the mid-1950s. Using photometric reflectance data of >1,300 bird specimens drawn from natural history collections, we track relative ambient concentrations of atmospheric black carbon between 1880 and 2015 within the US Manufacturing Belt, a region historically reliant on coal and dense with industry. Our data show that black carbon levels within the region peaked during the first decade of the 20th century. Following this peak, black carbon levels were positively correlated with coal consumption through midcentury, after which they decoupled, with black carbon concentrations declining as consumption continued to rise. The precipitous drop in atmospheric black carbon at midcentury reflects policies promoting burning efficiency and fuel transitions rather than regulating emissions alone. Our findings suggest that current emission inventories based on predictive modeling underestimate levels of atmospheric black carbon for the early industrial era, suggesting that the contribution of black carbon to past climate forcing may also be underestimated. These findings build toward a spatially dynamic emission inventory of black carbon based on direct environmental sampling.

  14. Environmental significance of atmospheric emission resulting from in situ burning of oiled salt marsh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devai, I.; DeLaune, R.D.; Henry, C.B. Jr.; Roberts, P.O.; Lindau, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    The environmental significance of atmospheric emissions resulting from in-situ burning used as remediation technique for removal of petroleum hydrocarbons entering Louisiana coastal salt marshes was quantified. Research conducted documented atmospheric pollutants produced and emitted to the atmosphere as the result of burning of oil contaminated wetlands. Samples collected from the smoke plume contained a variety of gaseous sulfur and carbon compounds. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide were the main volatile sulfur compounds. In contrast, concentrations of sulfur dioxide were almost negligible. Concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide in the smoke plume increased compared to ambient levels. Air samples collected for aromatic hydrocarbons in the smoke plume were dominated by pyrogenic or combustion derived aromatic hydrocarbons. The particulate fraction was dominated by phenanthrene and the C-1 and C-2 alkylated phenanthrene homologues. The vapor fraction was dominated by naphthalene and the C-1 to C-3 naphthalene homologues. (author)

  15. Hydration of Atmospheric Molecular Clusters: Systematic Configurational Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildgaard, Jens; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Bilde, Merete; Elm, Jonas

    2018-05-09

    We present a new systematic configurational sampling algorithm for investigating the potential energy surface of hydrated atmospheric molecular clusters. The algo- rithm is based on creating a Fibonacci sphere around each atom in the cluster and adding water molecules to each point in 9 different orientations. To allow the sam- pling of water molecules to existing hydrogen bonds, the cluster is displaced along the hydrogen bond and a water molecule is placed in between in three different ori- entations. Generated redundant structures are eliminated based on minimizing the root mean square distance (RMSD) of different conformers. Initially, the clusters are sampled using the semiempirical PM6 method and subsequently using density func- tional theory (M06-2X and ωB97X-D) with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. Applying the developed algorithm we study the hydration of sulfuric acid with up to 15 water molecules. We find that the additions of the first four water molecules "saturate" the sulfuric acid molecule and are more thermodynamically favourable than the addition of water molecule 5-15. Using the large generated set of conformers, we assess the performance of approximate methods (ωB97X-D, M06-2X, PW91 and PW6B95-D3) in calculating the binding energies and assigning the global minimum conformation compared to high level CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 reference calculations. The tested DFT functionals systematically overestimates the binding energies compared to cou- pled cluster calculations, and we find that this deficiency can be corrected by a simple scaling factor.

  16. Exploring Earth's Atmospheric Biology using a Platform-Extensible Sampling Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, D.; Rothschild, L.

    2012-12-01

    The interactions between Earth's atmosphere and its biosphere, or aerobiology, remain a significant unknown. What few studies have been done conclusively show that Earth's atmosphere has a rich and dynamic microbial presence[Bowers et al., 2010]; that microbes suspended in air survive over long times (1-2 weeks)[Smith et al., 2010] and travel great distances (>5000 km)[Kellogg and Griffin, 2006]; that some airborne bacteria actively nucleate ice crystals, affecting meteorology[Delort et al., 2010]; and that the presence of microbes in the atmosphere has other planetary-scale effects[Delort et al., 2010]. Basic questions, however, such as the number of microbes present, their activity level and state, the different species present and their variance over time and space, remain largely unquantified. Compounding the significant physical and environmental challenges of reliable aerobiological sampling, collection and analysis of biological samples at altitudes above ~10-20 km has traditionally used ad hoc instrumentation and techniques, yielding primarily qualitative analytical results that lack a common basis for comparison[Bowers et al., 2010]. There is a strong need for broad-basis, repeatable, reliably comparable data about aerobiological basics. We describe here a high-altitude environmental and biological sampling project designed specifically to address these issues. The goal is a robust, reliable, re-usable sampling system, with open reproducibility and adaptability for multiple low-cost flight platforms (including ground-tethered systems, high-altitude balloons, and suborbital sounding rockets); by establishing a common modular payload structure for high-altitude sampling with appeal to a broad user base, we hope to encourage widespread collection of comparable aerobiological data. We are on our third prototype iteration, with demonstrated function of two sample capture modules, a support backbone (tracking, data logging, event response, etc.), a simple ground

  17. Environmental and emergency response capabilities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's radiological air sampling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.C.

    1980-05-01

    Environmental and emergency response radiological air sampling capabilities of the Environmental Surveillance Group at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. The air sampling program provides a supplementary check on the adequacy of containment and effluent controls, determines compliance with applicable protection guides and standards, and assesses potential environmental impacts on site environs. It also allows evaluation of potential individual and total population doses from airborne radionuclides that may be inhaled or serve as a source of external radiation. The environmental program is sufficient in scope to detect fluctuations and long-term trends in atmospheric levels of radioactivity originating onsite. The emergency response capabilities are designed to respond to both onsite unplanned releases and atmospheric nuclear tests

  18. [Sample preparation methods for chromatographic analysis of organic components in atmospheric particulate matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-09-01

    The determination of organic composition in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is of great importance in understanding how PM affects human health, environment, climate, and ecosystem. Organic components are also the scientific basis for emission source tracking, PM regulation and risk management. Therefore, the molecular characterization of the organic fraction of PM has become one of the priority research issues in the field of environmental analysis. Due to the extreme complexity of PM samples, chromatographic methods have been the chief selection. The common procedure for the analysis of organic components in PM includes several steps: sample collection on the fiber filters, sample preparation (transform the sample into a form suitable for chromatographic analysis), analysis by chromatographic methods. Among these steps, the sample preparation methods will largely determine the throughput and the data quality. Solvent extraction methods followed by sample pretreatment (e. g. pre-separation, derivatization, pre-concentration) have long been used for PM sample analysis, and thermal desorption methods have also mainly focused on the non-polar organic component analysis in PM. In this paper, the sample preparation methods prior to chromatographic analysis of organic components in PM are reviewed comprehensively, and the corresponding merits and limitations of each method are also briefly discussed.

  19. Radiation Target Area Sample Environmental Chamber (RTASEC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Payload Systems Inc. proposes the Radiation Target Area Sample Environmental Chamber (RTASEC) as an innovative approach enabling radiobiologists to investigate the...

  20. Applications of Liquid-Phase Microextraction in the Sample Preparation of Environmental Solid Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Prosen

    2014-01-01

    Solvent extraction remains one of the fundamental sample preparation techniques in the analysis of environmental solid samples, but organic solvents are toxic and environmentally harmful, therefore one of the possible greening directions is its miniaturization. The present review covers the relevant research from the field of application of microextraction to the sample preparation of environmental solid samples (soil, sediments, sewage sludge, dust etc.) published in the last decade. Several...

  1. New fundamental and environmental aspects of atmospheric corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leygraf, C.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion involves chemical, electrochemical, and physical processes in three phases (solid, liquid, and gas and two interfaces (solid/liquid and liquid/gas. Because of inherent experimental and conceptual difficulties, scientific efforts to characterize this highly complex interfacial regime came relatively late into the field. With the access and development of surface and interface sensitive analytical techniques, it has lately become possible to perform molecular in situ analyses of the interfaces involved in atmospheric corrosion. This lecture presents some highlights from our fundamental research in atmospheric corrosion, performed at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. It includes results from the most recent efforts in our research group to provide a molecular understanding of the interfacial regime that governs atmospheric corrosion. Using copper or zinc as substrate and carboxylic acid as corrosion stimulator in the humidity-containing atmosphere, results have been obtained with particular emphasis on probing the metal oxide/water interface (by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS combined with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and sum frequency generation (SFG and the water/gas interface (by SFG, respectively. While research in atmospheric corrosion traditionally has aimed at understanding how the environment influences the metal, the opposite question- how the metal influences the environment during atmospheric corrosion- may be of equally technical importance. Some examples of on-going research on new environmental aspects of atmospheric corrosion of zinc will also be presented.

    La corrosión atmosférica implica procesos químicos, electroquímicos y físicos en tres fases (sólido, liquido y gas y dos interfases (sólido/líquido y líquido/gas. A causa de dificultades experimentales y conceptuales los esfuerzos científicos para caracterizar el proceso, interfacial

  2. Determination of radium-226 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, R.P.; Turnage, N.E.; Kanipe, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of soil and water samples for 226 Ra by gamma spectrometry with a Ge(Li) detector was compared with that by radiochemical separation followed by 222 Rn de-emanation. Lower limits of detection (LLD) for 226 Ra were calculated for the two analytical techniques. The Ge(Li) system was found to have an LLD for soil comparable to that calculated for the de-emanation procedure, but the Ge(Li) system was found to have a significantly higher LLD for water samples. Cost analysis indicated that the cost of 222 Ra determination with a Ge(Li) system can be less than with the de-emanation procedure if the Ge(Li) system can perform at least one other isotopic anaysis per sample

  3. Sampling quality assurance guidance in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This document introduces quality assurance guidance pertaining to the design and implementation of sampling procedures and processes for collecting environmental data for DOE's Office of EM (Environmental Restoration and Waste Management)

  4. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1993-03-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others

  5. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goheen, S C; McCulloch, M; Thomas, B L; Riley, R G; Sklarew, D S; Mong, G M; Fadeff, S K [eds.; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others.

  6. Determination of carbon-14 environmental samples by mixing 14CO2 with a liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Sanz, M.R.; Gomez, V.; Heras, M.C.; Beltran, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 ( 14 CO 2 ) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO 2 ) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discused and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author)

  7. Determination of Carbon-14 in environmental samples by mixing 14CO2 with a liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M. R.; Gomez, V.; Heras, M. C.; Beltran, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discussed and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author) 10 refs

  8. New trends in sample preparation techniques for environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cláudia; Ribeiro, Ana Rita; Maia, Alexandra S; Gonçalves, Virgínia M F; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Environmental samples include a wide variety of complex matrices, with low concentrations of analytes and presence of several interferences. Sample preparation is a critical step and the main source of uncertainties in the analysis of environmental samples, and it is usually laborious, high cost, time consuming, and polluting. In this context, there is increasing interest in developing faster, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly sample preparation techniques. Recently, new methods have been developed and optimized in order to miniaturize extraction steps, to reduce solvent consumption or become solventless, and to automate systems. This review attempts to present an overview of the fundamentals, procedure, and application of the most recently developed sample preparation techniques for the extraction, cleanup, and concentration of organic pollutants from environmental samples. These techniques include: solid phase microextraction, on-line solid phase extraction, microextraction by packed sorbent, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe).

  9. Analysis of mercury in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoester, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility to determine mercury in sub-ppm levels in biological samples has been studied through neutron activation analysis , using as standards aliquots of mercury nitrate solution, deposited on treated cellulose with thio acetamide and ammonia. Sample and standards were irradiated simultaneously in quartz ampoules during 8 hours at a flux of 5 x 10 13 n/cm 2 s and were counted in a hyper pure germanium detector after 4 weeks of decay. Corrections were made for the interference of 75 Se in the 279 keV photopeak used in the determination. The results obtained for the reference materials IAEA-H-8(horse kidney), IAEA-M A-A2(fish flesh) and IAEA-M A-A-1(cope pod homogenate) were (0.91±0.07), (0.56±0.02) and (0.17±0.02) ppm, versus certified values of (0.91±0.08), (0.47±0.02) and (0.28±0.01) ppm respectively. (EMR). 54 refs., 8 app

  10. Organically bound tritium analysis in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglan, N. [CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon (France); Kim, S.B. [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Cossonnet, C. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/STEME/LMRE, Orsay (France); Croudace, I.W.; Warwick, P.E. [GAU-Radioanalytical, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Fournier, M. [IRSN/DG/DMQ, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Galeriu, D. [IFIN-HH, Horia-Hulubei, Inst. Phys. and Nucl. Eng., Bucharest (Romania); Momoshima, N. [Kyushu University, Radioisotope Ctr., Fukuoka (Japan); Ansoborlo, E. [CEA/DEN/DRCP/CETAMA, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2015-03-15

    Organically bound tritium (OBT) has become of increased interest within the last decade, with a focus on its behaviour and also its analysis, which are important to assess tritium distribution in the environment. In contrast, there are no certified reference materials and no standard analytical method through the international organization related to OBT. In order to resolve this issue, an OBT international working group was created in May 2012. Over 20 labs from around the world participated and submitted their results for the first intercomparison exercise results on potato (Sep 2013). The samples, specially-prepared potatoes, were provided in March 2013 to each participant. Technical information and results from this first exercise are discussed here for all the labs which have realised the five replicates necessary to allow a reliable statistical treatment. The results are encouraging as the increased number of participating labs did not degrade the observed dispersion of the results for a similar activity level. Therefore, the results do not seem to depend on the analytical procedure used. From this work an optimised procedure can start to be developed to deal with OBT analysis and will guide subsequent planned OBT trials by the international group.

  11. Using high-frequency sampling to detect effects of atmospheric pollutants on stream chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2009-01-01

    We combined information from long-term (weekly over many years) and short-term (high-frequency during rainfall and snowmelt events) stream water sampling efforts to understand how atmospheric deposition affects stream chemistry. Water samples were collected at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, VT, a temperate upland forest site that receives elevated atmospheric...

  12. Ash contents of foodstuff samples in environmental radioactivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Shinji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hayano, Kazuhiko; Nonaka, Nobuhiro

    2004-01-01

    Statistical data of the ash content in various environmental samples obtained from an environmental radioactivity survey project commissioned by the Japanese government of Science and Technology Agency (at present Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Sciences and Technology) during the past 10 years are expressed for establishing a standard of ash content in environmental samples based on radioactivity analysis. The ash content for some kinds of environmental samples such as dietary food, milk, Japanese radish, spinach, fish, green tea and potato was reviewed in the light of statistical and stochastic viewpoints. For all of the samples reviewed in this paper, the coefficient of variation varied from 4.7% for milk to 36.3% for cabbage. Dietary food and milk samples were reviewed more than 1900 and 1400 samples, respectively. Especially, ash content of dietary food depended mainly on the dietary culture reflected on the period. However it showed an almost invariant distribution within 18.7% of coefficient of variation during the past 10 years. Pretreatment of environmental samples especially ashing processes are important from the viewpoint on environmental radioactivity analysis, which is one of the especial fields in analytical chemistry. Statistical reviewed data obtained in this paper may be useful for sample preparation. (author)

  13. How to take environmental samples for stable isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    It is possible to analyse a diverse range of samples for environmental investigations. The main types are soil/sediments, vegetation, fauna, shellfish, waste and water. Each type of samples requires different storage and collection methods. Outlined here are the preferred methods of collection to ensure maximum sample integrity and reliability. (author).

  14. How to take environmental samples for stable isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    It is possible to analyse a diverse range of samples for environmental investigations. The main types are soil/sediments, vegetation, fauna, shellfish, waste and water. Each type of samples requires different storage and collection methods. Outlined here are the preferred methods of collection to ensure maximum sample integrity and reliability. (author).

  15. How to take environmental samples for stable isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    It is possible to analyse a diverse range of samples for environmental investigations. The main types are soil/sediments, vegetation, fauna, shellfish, waste and water. Each type of samples requires different storage and collection methods. Outlined here are the preferred methods of collection to ensure maximum sample integrity and reliability. (author).

  16. How to take environmental samples for stable isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    It is possible to analyse a diverse range of samples for environmental investigations. The main types are soil/sediments, vegetation, fauna, shellfish, waste and water. Each type of samples requires different storage and collection methods. Outlined here are the preferred methods of collection to ensure maximum sample integrity and reliability. (author)

  17. The importance of sound methodology in environmental DNA sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. M. Wilcox; K. J. Carim; M. K. Young; K. S. McKelvey; T. W. Franklin; M. K. Schwartz

    2018-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling - which enables inferences of species’ presence from genetic material in the environment - is a powerful tool for sampling rare fishes. Numerous studies have demonstrated that eDNA sampling generally provides greater probabilities of detection than traditional techniques (e.g., Thomsen et al. 2012; McKelvey et al. 2016; Valentini et al...

  18. Atmospheric Gas Tracers in Groundwater: Theory, Sampling. Measurement and Interpretation; Yeraltisuyunda Atmosferik Gaz Izleyiciler: Kuram, Oernekleme, Oelcuem ve Yorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayari, C S [Hacettepe University, Ankara(Turkey)

    2002-07-01

    Some of the atmospheric gasses posses features that are sought in an environmental tracer of hydrogeologic interest. Among these, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hegzafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform, krypton-85 etc. have found increasing use in groundwater age dating studies during the last ten years. This paper explains the theory of their use as tracer and discusses the major concerns as related to their sampling and analyses. Factors affecting their applicability and the approach to interpret tracer gas data is briefly outlined.

  19. Applications of liquid-phase microextraction in the sample preparation of environmental solid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Helena

    2014-05-23

    Solvent extraction remains one of the fundamental sample preparation techniques in the analysis of environmental solid samples, but organic solvents are toxic and environmentally harmful, therefore one of the possible greening directions is its miniaturization. The present review covers the relevant research from the field of application of microextraction to the sample preparation of environmental solid samples (soil, sediments, sewage sludge, dust etc.) published in the last decade. Several innovative liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques that have emerged recently have also been applied as an aid in sample preparation of these samples: single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). Besides the common organic solvents, surfactants and ionic liquids are also used. However, these techniques have to be combined with another technique to release the analytes from the solid sample into an aqueous solution. In the present review, the published methods were categorized into three groups: LPME in combination with a conventional solvent extraction; LPME in combination with an environmentally friendly extraction; LPME without previous extraction. The applicability of these approaches to the sample preparation for the determination of pollutants in solid environmental samples is discussed, with emphasis on their strengths, weak points and environmental impact.

  20. Applications of Liquid-Phase Microextraction in the Sample Preparation of Environmental Solid Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Prosen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction remains one of the fundamental sample preparation techniques in the analysis of environmental solid samples, but organic solvents are toxic and environmentally harmful, therefore one of the possible greening directions is its miniaturization. The present review covers the relevant research from the field of application of microextraction to the sample preparation of environmental solid samples (soil, sediments, sewage sludge, dust etc. published in the last decade. Several innovative liquid-phase microextraction (LPME techniques that have emerged recently have also been applied as an aid in sample preparation of these samples: single-drop microextraction (SDME, hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME. Besides the common organic solvents, surfactants and ionic liquids are also used. However, these techniques have to be combined with another technique to release the analytes from the solid sample into an aqueous solution. In the present review, the published methods were categorized into three groups: LPME in combination with a conventional solvent extraction; LPME in combination with an environmentally friendly extraction; LPME without previous extraction. The applicability of these approaches to the sample preparation for the determination of pollutants in solid environmental samples is discussed, with emphasis on their strengths, weak points and environmental impact.

  1. Source apportionment and environmental fate of lead chromates in atmospheric dust in arid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Figueroa, Diana; González-Grijalva, Belem; Romero, Francisco; Ruiz, Joaquin; Pedroza-Montero, Martín; Rivero, Carlos Ibañez-Del; Acosta-Elías, Mónica; Ochoa-Landin, Lucas; Navarro-Espinoza, Sofía

    2018-03-07

    The environmental fate of lead derived from traffic paint has been poorly studied in developing countries, mainly in arid zones. For this purpose, a developing city located in the Sonoran desert (Hermosillo, Mexico), was chosen to conduct a study. In this paper the lead chromate (crocoite) sources in atmospheric dust were addressed using a combination of Raman microspectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Pb isotope measurements. A high concentration of Pb and Cr as micro- and nanostructured pigments of crocoite is reported in yellow traffic paint (n=80), road dust (n=146), settled dust in roofs (n=21), and atmospheric dust (n=20) from a developing city located in the Sonoran Desert. 10 samples of peri-urban soils were collected for local geochemical background. The paint photodegradation and erosion of the asphaltic cover are enhanced by the climate, and the presence of the mineral crocoite (PbCrO 4 ) in road dust with an aerodynamic diameter ranging from 100nm to 2μm suggests its integration into the atmosphere by wind resuspension processes. A positive PbCr correlation (R 2 =0.977) was found for all studied samples, suggesting a common source. The Pb-isotope data show signatures in atmospheric dust as a product of the mixing of two end members: i) local soils and ii) crocoite crystals as pigments in paint. The presence of lead chromates in atmospheric dust has not been previously documented in Latin America, and it represents an unknown health risk to the exposed population because the identified size of crystals can reach the deepest part of lungs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural Radioactivity Pattern of Surabaya Water Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosidi; Agus Taftazani

    2007-01-01

    The gross β radioactivity and natural radionuclide of Surabaya environmental samples pattern have been evaluated. The environmental samples were chosen randomly at 12 locations. The environment samples were water (fresh, estuary and coastal), sediment, eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms, Mangrove (Rhizophora stylosa), (Moolgarda delicatus) fish and (Johnius (Johnieops) borneensis) (Sharpnose hammer croaker) fish. The water sample was evaporated; the sediment sample was dried and ground; the biotic samples was burnt at the temperature 500 °C ; The gross β measurement using GM detector and the radionuclides has been identified by γ spectrometer. From the investigation results could be concluded that the natural radioactivity of environmental samples was very low. gross-β of water samples were lower than the threshold value of local government regulation of Surabaya no: 2 year 2004 (1 Bq/L). The distribution of gross-β activity of eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms was higher than the other biotic, water and sediment samples as well as the accumulation of radionuclides in the water organism was taken place. The result of identification using γ spectrometer has detected 7 of radionuclides, i.e 210 Pb, 212 Pb, 214 Pb, 208 Tl, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, and 40 K in all sample. The distribution factor of sediment F D was less than bioaccumulation factor of biotic F B and it indicates that there the radionuclide accumulation migration follows the pattern of water - sediment - biotic sample. (author)

  3. Magnetic signature of daily sampled urban atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Matzka, Jürgen; Davila, Alfonso Fernández; Petersen, Nikolai

    The magnetic signature of two sets of daily sampled particulate matter (PM) collected in Munich, Germany, were examined and compared to variations in other pollution data and meteorological data using principal component analysis. The magnetic signature arising from the magnetic minerals in the PM was examined using a fast and highly sensitive magnetic remanence measurement. The longest data set studied was 160 days, significantly longer than that of similar magnetic PM studies improving the statistical robustness. It was found that the variations in the mass-dependent magnetic parameters displayed a complicated relationship governed by both the meteorological conditions and the PM loading rate, whereas mineralogy/grain-size-dependent magnetic parameters displayed little variation. A six-fold increase in the number of vehicles passing the sampling locations only doubled the magnetic remanence of the samples, suggesting that the measured magnetic signature is in addition strongly influenced by dispersion rates. At both localities the saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) was found to be strongly correlated with the PM mass, and it is suggested that measuring SIRM as a proxy for PM monitoring is a viable alternative to magnetic susceptibility when the samples are magnetically too weak. The signal was found to be dominated by magnetite-like grains less than 100 nm in diameter which is thought to be derived primarily from vehicles. Such small grains are known to be particularly dangerous to humans. There was also evidence to suggest from magnetic stability parameters that the magnetite-like grains were covered with an oxidised rim. The concentration of magnetic PM was in the range of 0.3-0.5% by mass.

  4. Gamma spectrometric analyses of environmental samples at PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruq, M.U.; Parveen, N.; Ahmed, B.; Aziz, A.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma spectrometric analyses of air and other environmental samples from PINSTECH were carried out. Air particulate samples were analyzed by a Ge(Li) detector on a computer-based multichannel analyzer. Other environmental samples were analyzed by a Na(T1) scintillation detector spectrometer and a multichannel analyzer with manual analysis. Concentration of radionuclides in the media was determined and the sources of their production were identified. Age of the fall out was estimated from the ratios of the fission products. (authors)

  5. Radiological analyses of Marshall Islands environmental samples, 1974--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse, N.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Cua, F.T.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from the radiological analysis of environmental samples collected in the Marshall Islands during 1974 through 1976. Most of the samples were collected on or near the Bikini Atoll and included plants, soil, fish, catchment water, and sediments, with emphasis on local marine and terrestrial food items. Data are presented from γ spectral analysis and the content of 90 Sr and transuranic elements in the samples

  6. [Establishment and assessment of QA/QC method for sampling and analysis of atmosphere background CO2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-xin; Zhou, Ling-xi; Xia, Ling-jun; Wang, Hong-yang; Fang, Shuang-xi

    2014-12-01

    To strengthen scientific management and sharing of greenhouse gas data obtained from atmospheric background stations in China, it is important to ensure the standardization of quality assurance and quality control method for background CO2 sampling and analysis. Based on the greenhouse gas sampling and observation experience of CMA, using portable sampling observation and WS-CRDS analysis technique as an example, the quality assurance measures for atmospheric CO,sampling and observation in the Waliguan station (Qinghai), the glass bottle quality assurance measures and the systematic quality control method during sample analysis, the correction method during data processing, as well as the data grading quality markers and data fitting interpolation method were systematically introduced. Finally, using this research method, the CO2 sampling and observation data at the atmospheric background stations in 3 typical regions were processed and the concentration variation characteristics were analyzed, indicating that this research method could well catch the influences of the regional and local environmental factors on the observation results, and reflect the characteristics of natural and human activities in an objective and accurate way.

  7. Screening of IAEA environmental samples for fissile material content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembree, Doyle M. Jr.; Carter, Joel A.; Devault, Gerald L.; Whitaker, J. Michael; Glasgow, David

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Analysis of environmental samples for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Strengthened Safeguards Systems program requires that stringent measures be taken to control contamination. To facilitate contamination control, it is extremely useful to have some estimate of the fissile content of a given sample prior to beginning sample preparation and analysis. This is particularly true for laboratories that employ clean rooms during sample preparation. A review of the analytical results for samples submitted between January 1, 1999 and September 1, 2000 revealed that the total uranium content values ranged from 0.2 to greater than 500,000 ng/sample. Poor estimates of the uranium or plutonium content in the samples have caused some of the laboratories in the IAEA Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) to experience clean laboratory contamination, sample cross contamination, and non-ideal uranium spike additions. This has led to significant increases in analysis costs (e.g., recertification of clean rooms after removing contamination, and rerunning samples) and degradation in data quality. A number of methods have been proposed for screening environmental samples for fissile material content, including gamma spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence, kinetic phosphorimetry (KPA), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Gamma spectrometry and x-ray fluorescence are suitable for screening samples with microgram or greater quantities of uranium. ICP-MS and KPA are used successfully in some DOE NWAL laboratories to screen environmental samples. A neutron activation analysis (NAA) method that offers numerous advantages over other screening techniques for environmental samples has recently been proposed. Fissile materials such as 239 Pu and 235 U can be made to undergo fission in the intense neutron field to which they are exposed during neutron activation analysis (NAA). Some of the fission products emit neutrons referred to as 'delayed

  8. Determination of Pu, Am and Cm in Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujaniene, G. [SRI Centre for Physical Sciences and Technology, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2013-07-15

    The determination of actinides in the environmental samples at a lower detection limit is required for monitoring purposes and for environmental research. The method for Pu, Am and Cm measurements in soil and sediment samples provides high recoveries and good decontamination from interfering radionuclides. The main steps of the method involve digestion of the samples, separation of radionuclides from matrix using the TOPO /cyclohexane extraction and final purification using extraction Eichrom resins (TEVA, TRU). The accuracy and precision of Pu, Am and Cm analyses were tested using IAEA RM No 135, NIST SRM No 4350b, No 4357 and in intercomparison runs organized by the Riso National Laboratory, Denmark, and in the proficiency tests organized by National Physical Laboratory, UK. The method was applied for measurement of radionuclides in aerosol samples (ashes {approx}30 g), bottom sediments (50-80 g dr. wt) and soil (including Chernobyl soil) samples. (author)

  9. Development of analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Satoshi; Magara, Masaaki; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Esaka, Fumitaka; Hirayama, Fumio; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Inagawa, Jun; Suzuki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Kazunari; Kokubu, Yoko S.; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Ohzu, Akira

    2007-01-01

    JAEA has been developing, under the auspices of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, analytical techniques for ultra-trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples in order to contribute to the strengthened safeguards system. Development of essential techniques for bulk and particle analysis, as well as screening, of the environmental swipe samples has been established as ultra-trace analytical methods of uranium and plutonium. In January 2003, JAEA was qualified, including its quality control system, as a member of the JAEA network analytical laboratories for environmental samples. Since 2004, JAEA has conducted the analysis of domestic and the IAEA samples, through which JAEA's analytical capability has been verified and improved. In parallel, advanced techniques have been developed in order to expand the applicability to the samples of various elemental composition and impurities and to improve analytical accuracy and efficiency. This paper summarizes the trace of the technical development in environmental sample analysis at JAEA, and refers to recent trends of research and development in this field. (author)

  10. Detection of the actinides and cesium from environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew Spencer

    Detection of the actinides and cesium in the environment is important for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation to safeguards and nuclear forensics. The utilization of multiple different elemental concentrations and isotopic ratios together can significantly improve the ability to attribute contamination to a unique source term and/or generation process; however, the utilization of multiple elemental "signatures" together from environmental samples requires knowledge of the impact of chemical fractionation for various elements under a variety of environmental conditions (including predominantly aqueous versus arid conditions). The research reported in this dissertation focuses on three major areas: 1. Improving the understanding of actinide-mineral interactions at ultra-low concentrations. Chapter 2 reports a batch sorption and modeling study of Np(V) sorption to the mineral goethite from attomolar to micromolar concentrations. 2. Improving the detection capabilities for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) analyses of ultra-trace cesium from environmental samples. Chapter 4 reports a new method which significantly improves the chemical yields, purification, sample processing time, and ultimately, the detection limits for TIMS analyses of femtogram quantities of cesium from a variety of environmental sample matrices. 3. Demonstrating how actinide and cesium concentrations and isotopic ratios from environmental samples can be utilized together to determine a wealth of information including environmental transport mechanisms (e.g. aqueous versus arid transport) and information on the processes which generated the original material. Chapters1, 3 and 5 demonstrate these principles using Pu, Am, Np, and Cs concentrations and isotopic ratios from contaminated soils taken near the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (a low level radioactive waste disposal site in southeastern Idaho).

  11. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental samples: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a stable technetium isotope, and the high mobility and long half-life, 99Tc is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity as well as nuclear waste management. 99Tc is also an important tracer for oceanographic...... research due to the high technetium solubility in seawater as TcO4−. A number of analytical methods, using chemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurement techniques, have been developed over the past decades for determination of 99Tc in different environmental samples....... This article summarizes and compares recently reported chemical separation procedures and measurement methods for determination of 99Tc. Due to the extremely low concentration of 99Tc in environmental samples, the sample preparation, pre-concentration, chemical separation and purification for removal...

  12. Environmental aspects: - Atmospheric, - aquatic, - terrestrial dispersion of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmann, R.

    1982-01-01

    After general introductory remarks the paper deals with the dispersion of radionuclides in the atmosphere and in the aquatic environment as well as with the transfer through the terrestrial environment. (RW)

  13. AAS determination of total mercury content in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalova, M.; Zemberyova, M.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods for determination of total mercury content in environmental samples soils, and sediments, were compared. Dissolution procedure of soils, sediments, and biological material under elevated pressure followed by determination of mercury by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry using a MHS-1 system and direct total mercury determination without any chemical pretreatment from soil samples using a Trace Mercury Analyzer TMA-254 were compared. TMA-254 was also applied for the determination of mercury in various further standard reference materials. Good agreement with certified values of environmental reference materials was obtained. (authors)

  14. Sample preparation of environmental samples using benzene synthesis followed by high-performance LSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippis, S. De; Noakes, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques have been widely employed as the detection method for determining environmental levels of tritium and 14 C. Since anthropogenic and nonanthropogenic inputs to the environment are a concern, sampling the environment surrounding a nuclear power facility or fuel reprocessing operation requires the collection of many different sample types, including agriculture products, water, biota, aquatic life, soil, and vegetation. These sample types are not suitable for the direct detection of tritium of 14 C for liquid scintillation techniques. Each sample type must be initially prepared in order to obtain the carbon or hydrogen component of interest and present this in a chemical form that is compatible with common chemicals used in scintillation counting applications. Converting the sample of interest to chemically pure benzene as a sample preparation technique has been widely accepted for processing samples for radiocarbon age-dating applications. The synthesized benzene is composed of the carbon or hydrogen atoms from the original sample and is ideal as a solvent for LSC with excellent photo-optical properties. Benzene synthesis followed by low-background scintillation counting can be applied to the preparation and measurement of environmental samples yielding good detection sensitivities, high radionuclide counting efficiency, and shorter preparation time. The method of benzene synthesis provides a unique approach to the preparation of a wide variety of environmental sample types using similar chemistry for all samples

  15. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental samples: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Keliang; Hou Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Wu Wangsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The source term, physicochemical properties, environmental distribution and behaviour of 99 Tc are presented. ► Various sample pre-treatment and pre-concentration techniques of technetium are discussed. ► Chemical separation and purification techniques for 99 Tc in environmental samples are reviewed. ► Measurement techniques for 99 Tc in environmental level and automated analytical methods are reviewed. ► The reported analytical methods of 99 Tc are critically compared to provide overall information. - Abstract: Due to the lack of a stable technetium isotope, and the high mobility and long half-life, 99 Tc is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity as well as nuclear waste management. 99 Tc is also an important tracer for oceanographic research due to the high technetium solubility in seawater as TcO 4 − . A number of analytical methods, using chemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurement techniques, have been developed over the past decades for determination of 99 Tc in different environmental samples. This article summarizes and compares recently reported chemical separation procedures and measurement methods for determination of 99 Tc. Due to the extremely low concentration of 99 Tc in environmental samples, the sample preparation, pre-concentration, chemical separation and purification for removal of the interferences for detection of 99 Tc are the most important issues governing the accurate determination of 99 Tc. These aspects are discussed in detail in this article. Meanwhile, the different measurement techniques for 99 Tc are also compared with respect to advantages and drawbacks. Novel automated analytical methods for rapid determination of 99 Tc using solid extraction or ion exchange chromatography for separation of 99 Tc, employing flow injection or sequential injection approaches are also discussed.

  16. Determination of uranium and its isotopic ratios in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flues Szeles, M.S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of uranium and its isotopic ratios ( sup(235)U/ sup(238)U and sup(234U/ sup(238)U) is established in the present work. The method can be applied in environmental monitoring programs of uranium enrichment facilities. The proposed method is based on the alpha spectrometry technique which is applied after a purification of the sample by using an ionic exchange resin. The total yield achieved was (91 + 5)% with a precision of 5%, an accuracy of 8% and a lower limit of detection of 7,9 x 10 sup(-4)Bq. The uranium determination in samples containing high concentration of iron, which is an interfering element present in environmental samples, particularly in soil and sediment, was also studied. The results obtained by using artificial samples containing iron and uranium in the ratio 1000:1, were considered satisfactory. (author)

  17. Technical Note: New methodology for measuring viscosities in small volumes characteristic of environmental chamber particle samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Renbaum-Wolff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, a method for the determination of viscosities of small sample volumes is introduced, with important implications for the viscosity determination of particle samples from environmental chambers (used to simulate atmospheric conditions. The amount of sample needed is < 1 μl, and the technique is capable of determining viscosities (η ranging between 10−3 and 103 Pascal seconds (Pa s in samples that cover a range of chemical properties and with real-time relative humidity and temperature control; hence, the technique should be well-suited for determining the viscosities, under atmospherically relevant conditions, of particles collected from environmental chambers. In this technique, supermicron particles are first deposited on an inert hydrophobic substrate. Then, insoluble beads (~1 μm in diameter are embedded in the particles. Next, a flow of gas is introduced over the particles, which generates a shear stress on the particle surfaces. The sample responds to this shear stress by generating internal circulations, which are quantified with an optical microscope by monitoring the movement of the beads. The rate of internal circulation is shown to be a function of particle viscosity but independent of the particle material for a wide range of organic and organic-water samples. A calibration curve is constructed from the experimental data that relates the rate of internal circulation to particle viscosity, and this calibration curve is successfully used to predict viscosities in multicomponent organic mixtures.

  18. Gamma-ray self-attenuation corrections in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robu, E.; Giovani, C.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-spectrometry is a commonly used technique in environmental radioactivity monitoring. Frequently the bulk samples that should be measured differ with respect to composition and density from the reference sample used for efficiency calibration. Correction factors should be applied in these cases for activity measurement. Linear attenuation coefficients and self-absorption correction factors have been evaluated for soil, grass and liquid sources with different densities and geometries.(authors)

  19. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics in environmental waters: sample preparation and determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltini, Andrea; Sturini, Michela; Maraschi, Federica; Profumo, Antonella

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview on the analytical methods proposed in the last decade for trace fluoroquinolone (FQ) determination in environmental waters. A large number of studies have been developed on this topic in reason of the importance of their monitoring in the studies of environmental mobility and potential degradation pathways. Every step of the analysis has been carefully considered, with a particular attention to sample preparation, in relationship with the problems involved in the analysis of real matrices. The different strategies to minimise interference from organic matter and to achieve optimal sensitivity, especially important in those samples with lower FQ concentrations, were also highlighted. Results and progress in this field have been described and critically commented. Moreover, a worldwide overview on the presence of FQs in the environmental waters has been reported.

  20. Rapid methods for measuring radionuclides in food and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The application of ICP/mass spectrometry for the isotopic analysis of environmental samples, the use of drum assayers for measuring radionuclides in food and a rapid procedure for the measurement of the transuranic elements and thorium, performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are discussed

  1. NUCAPS: NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System Environmental Data Record (EDR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of numerous retrieved estimates of hydrological variables and trace gases as Environmental Data Record (EDR) products from the NOAA Unique...

  2. Vertical Sampling Scales for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Measurements from Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Hemingway

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The lowest portion of the Earth’s atmosphere, known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL, plays an important role in the formation of weather events. Simple meteorological measurements collected from within the ABL, such as temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind velocity, are key to understanding the exchange of energy within this region, but conventional surveillance techniques such as towers, radar, weather balloons, and satellites do not provide adequate spatial and/or temporal coverage for monitoring weather events. Small unmanned aircraft, or aerial, systems (sUAS provide a versatile, dynamic platform for atmospheric sensing that can provide higher spatio-temporal sampling frequencies than available through most satellite sensing methods. They are also able to sense portions of the atmosphere that cannot be measured from ground-based radar, weather stations, or weather balloons and have the potential to fill gaps in atmospheric sampling. However, research on the vertical sampling scales for collecting atmospheric measurements from sUAS and the variabilities of these scales across atmospheric phenomena (e.g., temperature and humidity is needed. The objective of this study is to use variogram analysis, a common geostatistical technique, to determine optimal spatial sampling scales for two atmospheric variables (temperature and relative humidity captured from sUAS. Results show that vertical sampling scales of approximately 3 m for temperature and 1.5–2 m for relative humidity were sufficient to capture the spatial structure of these phenomena under the conditions tested. Future work is needed to model these scales across the entire ABL as well as under variable conditions.

  3. A fully blanketed early B star LTE model atmosphere using an opacity sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A.P.; Wright, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A fully blanketed LTE model of a stellar atmosphere with Tsub(e) = 21914 K (thetasub(e) = 0.23), log g = 4 is presented. The model includes an explicit representation of the opacity due to the strongest lines, and uses a statistical opacity sampling technique to represent the weaker line opacity. The sampling technique is subjected to several tests and the model is compared with an atmosphere calculated using the line-distribution function method. The limitations of the distribution function method and the particular opacity sampling method used here are discussed in the light of the results obtained. (author)

  4. Analytical techniques for measurement of 99Tc in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Three new methods have been developed for measuring 99 Tc in environmental samples. The most sensitive method is isotope dilution mass spectrometry, which allows measurement of about 1 x 10 -12 grams of 99 Tc. Results on analysis of five samples by this method compare very well with values obtained by a second independent method, which involves counting of beta particles from 99 Tc and internal conversion electrons from /sup 97m/Tc. A third method involving electrothermal atomic absorption has also been developed. Although this method is not as sensitive as the first two techniques, the cost per analysis is expected to be considerably less for certain types of samples

  5. Diagnostics for environmental aspects of pulsed atmospheric discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutgers, W.R.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostics for the study of pulsed atmospheric discharges are discussed. To obtain parameters for describing conversion processes of pollutants into harmless products many diagnostic techniques are in use and under development. In this contribution electrical, optical and chemical diagnostics used in air and wastewater remediation are reviewed

  6. Diagnostics for environmental aspects of pulsed atmospheric discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutgers, W.R.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2001-07-01

    Diagnostics for the study of pulsed atmospheric discharges are discussed. To obtain parameters for describing conversion processes of pollutants into harmless products many diagnostic techniques are in use and under development. In this contribution electrical, optical and chemical diagnostics used in air and wastewater remediation are reviewed.

  7. Infrared characterization of environmental samples by pulsed photothermal spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, W.; Foerstendorf, H.; Heise, K.H.; Nicolai, R.; Schamlott, A.; Ortega, J.M.; Glotin, F.; Prazeres, R.

    2004-01-01

    Low concentration of toxic radioactive metals in environmental samples often limits the interpretation of results of infrared studies investigating the interaction processes between the metal ions and environmental compartments. For the first time, we could show that photothermal infrared spectroscopy performed with a pulsed free electron laser can provide reliable infrared spectra throughout a distinct spectral range of interest. In this model investigation, we provide vibrational absorption spectra of a rare earth metal salt dissolved in a KBr matrix and a natural calcite sample obtained by photothermal beam deflection (PTBD) technique and FT-IR (Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy, respectively. General agreement was found between all spectra of the different recording techniques. Spectral deviations were observed with samples containing low concentration of the rare earth metal salt indicating a lower detection limit of the photothermal method as compared to conventional FT-IR spectroscopy. (authors)

  8. Environmental monitoring master sampling schedule, January--December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for calendar year 1990 for the Environment Surveillance and Ground-Water Monitoring Projects. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operations, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs. This schedule includes ground-water sampling performed by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

  9. Environmental monitoring master sampling schedule: January--December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for calendar year 1989 for the Surface and Ground-Water Environmental Monitoring Projects. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operations, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. This schedule includes routine ground-water sampling performed by PNL for Westinghouse Hanford Company, but does not include samples that may be collected in 1989 to support special studies or special contractor projects, or for quality control. The sampling schedule for Site-wide chemical monitoring is not included here, because it varies each quarter as needed, based on past results and operating needs. This schedule does not include Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water sampling performed by PNL for Hanford Site contractors, nor does it include sampling that may be done by other DOE Hanford contractors

  10. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1994-04-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division of the DOE. Methods are prepared for entry into DOE Methods as chapter editors, together with DOE and other participants in this program, identify analytical and sampling method needs. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types. open-quotes Draftclose quotes or open-quotes Verified.close quotes. open-quotes Draftclose quotes methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. open-quotes Verifiedclose quotes methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations

  11. What have we learned from intensive atmospheric sampling field programmes of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.C.; Wofsy, S.C.; Daube, B.C.; Matross, D.M.; Chow, V.Y.; Gottlieb, E.; Pathmathevan, M.; Munger, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial and temporal gradients in atmospheric CO 2 contain signatures of carbon fluxes, and as part of inverse studies,these signatures have been combined with atmospheric models to infer carbon sources and sinks. However, such studies have yet to yield finer-scale, regional fluxes over the continent that can be linked to ecosystem processes and ground-based observations. The reasons for this gap are twofold: lack of atmospheric observations over the continent and model deficiencies in interpreting such observations. This paper describes a series of intensive atmospheric sampling field programmes designed as pilot experiments to bridge the observational gap over the continent and to help test and develop models to interpret these observations. We summarize recent results emerging from this work,outlining the role of the intensive atmospheric programmes in collecting CO 2 data in both the vertical and horizontal dimensions. These data: (1) quantitatively establish the spatial variability of CO 2 and the associated errors from neglecting this variability in models; (2) directly measure regional carbon fluxes from airmass-following experiments and (3) challenge models to reduce and account for uncertainties in atmospheric transport. We conclude with a look towards the future, outlining ways in which intensive atmospheric sampling can contribute towards advancing carbon science

  12. Determination of strontium-90 in the environmental samples at PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perveen, N.; Aziz, A.

    1979-01-01

    Strontium-90 a bone seeking radionuclide and a long lived beta emitter is one of the toxic radionuclides detected in the environment arising mainly from the fall out from nuclear detonations. Its concentration in various environmental media such as air, precipitation, surface water, vegetables and other items of diet was measured. This report describes the method of collection, treatment and radiochemical analyses of environmental samples for the determination of Sr-90. The levels of Sr-90 concentration in these media are also recorded. (authors)

  13. Experience with environmental sampling at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenstam, G. af; Bush, W.; Janov, J.; Kuhn, E.; Ryjinski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sampling has been used routinely by the IAEA since 1996 after the IAEA Board of Governors approved it in March 1995 as a new technique to strengthen safeguards and improve efficiency. In enrichment plants it is used to confirm that there has been no production of highly enriched uranium (HEU), or production of uranium at above the declared enrichment. The use of environmental sampling is based on the assumption that every process, no matter how leak tight, will release small amounts of process material to the environment. Even though these releases of nuclear material are extremely small in gas centrifuge enrichment plants, and well below levels of concern from a health physics and safety standpoint, they are detectable and their analysis provides an indication of the enrichment of the material that has been processed in the plant. The environmental samples at enrichment plants are collected by swiping selected areas of the plant with squares of cotton cloth (10x10 cm) from sampling kits prepared in ultra clean condition. The squares of cotton cloth sealed in plastic bags are sent for analysis to the Network Analytical Laboratories. The analysis includes the measurement of the uranium isotopic composition in uranium-containing particles by Thermal lonization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS) or Secondary ION Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Since the implementation of environmental sampling, swipes have been collected from 240 sampling points at three gas centrifuge plants of URENCO, which have a total throughput of more than 8,000 tonnes of uranium per year. The particle analysis results generally reflected the known operational history of the plants and confirmed that they had only been operated to produce uranium with enrichment less than 5% 235 U. The information about the content of the minor isotopes 234 U and 236 U also indicates that depleted and recycled uranium were sometimes used as feed materials in some plants. An example is given of the TIMS particle

  14. Sorption models and their application in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, Nariman H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) were found in some environmental soils not high enough to pose problems for human health. The health may be affected by increasing of NORM at some environmental soils. Four soil samples obtained from certain coastal regions in Egypt. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) of the uranium ( 238 U) series, thorium ( 232 Th) series and the radioactive isotope of potassium ( 40 K) were measured. The soil samples were selected from the situations where the radionuclide concentrations are significantly higher than the average level of other sites. It were chemically analyzed for the uranium, silicon aluminum and iron. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) were determined, it was found lower in the presence of Fe-silicates suggested that Fe-hydroxide had precipitin at the exchangeable edge sites of the clay minerals. The pH of the solid particles at which the net total surface charge is zero was known as the point of zero charge (PZC). The PZC is very important in determining the affinity of the soil samples for different cations and anions. The aim of this work is to determine the natural radiological hazardous of radionuclide at four environmental coastal soil samples in Egypt. The point of zero surface charge was determined using titration tests. Sorption model was developed for this purpose. (author)

  15. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, open-quotes Draftclose quotes or open-quotes Verifiedclose quotes. open-quotes Draftclose quotes methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. open-quotes Verifiedclose quotes methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy

  16. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes}. {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes} methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy.

  17. Efficacy of passive sampler collection for atmospheric NO2 isotopes under simulated environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Justin G; Yu, Zhongjie; Elliott, Emily M

    2017-07-30

    Nitrogen oxides or NO x (NO x = NO + NO 2 ) play an important role in air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate. The isotopic compositions of anthropogenic and natural NO 2 sources are wide-ranging, and they can be used to constrain sources of ambient NO 2 and associated atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. While passive sample collection of NO 2 isotopes has been used in field studies to determine NO x source influences on atmospheric deposition, this approach has not been evaluated for accuracy or precision under different environmental conditions. The efficacy of NO 2 passive sampler collection for NO 2 isotopes was evaluated under varied temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions in a dynamic flux chamber. The precision and accuracy of the filter NO 2 collection as nitrite (NO 2 - ) for isotopic analysis were determined using a reference NO 2 gas tank and through inter-calibration with a modified EPA Method 7. The bacterial denitrifer method was used to convert 20 μM of collected NO 2 - or nitrate (NO 3 - ) into N 2 O and was carried out on an Isoprime continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. δ 15 N-NO 2 values determined from passive NO 2 collection, in conditions of 11-34 °C, 1-78% RH, have an overall accuracy and precision of ±2.1 ‰, and individual run precision of ±0.6 ‰. δ 18 O-NO 2 values obtained from passive NO 2 sampler collection, under the same conditions, have an overall precision of ± 1.3 ‰. Suitable conditions for passive sampler collection of NO 2 isotopes are in environments ranging from 11 to 34 °C and 1 to 78% RH. The passive NO 2 isotope measurement technique provides an accurate method to determine variations in atmospheric δ 15 N-NO 2 values and a precise method for determining atmospheric δ 18 O-NO 2 values. The ability to measure NO 2 isotopes over spatial gradients at the same temporal resolution provides a unique perspective on the extent and seasonality of fluctuations in atmospheric NO 2

  18. New Frontiers Science at Venus from Orbit plus Atmospheric Gas Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne; Dyar, Melinda; Hensley, Scott; Helbert, Joern; VOX Science and Engineering Teams

    2017-10-01

    Venus remains the most Earth-like body in terms of size, composition, surface age, and insulation. Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) determines how Earth’s twin diverged, and enables breakthroughs in our understanding of rocky planet evolution and habitability. At the time of the Decadal Survey the ability to map mineralogy from orbit (Helbert et al.) and present-day radar techniques to detect active deformation were not fully appreciated. VOX leverages these methods and in-situ noble gases to answer New Frontiers science objectives:1. Atmospheric physics/chemistry: noble gases and isotopes to constrain atmospheric sources, escape processes, and integrated volcanic outgassing; global search for current volcanically outgassed water.2. Past hydrological cycles: global tessera composition to determine the role of volatiles in crustal formation.3. Crustal physics/chemistry: global crustal mineralogy/chemistry, tectonic processes, heat flow, resolve the catastrophic vs. equilibrium resurfacing debate, active geologic processes and possible crustal recycling.4. Crustal weathering: surface-atmosphere weathering reactions from redox state and the chemical equilibrium of the near-surface atmosphere.5. Atmospheric properties/winds: map cloud particle modes and their temporal variations, and track cloud-level winds in the polar vortices.6. Surface-atmosphere interactions: chemical reactions from mineralogy; weathering state between new, recent and older flows; possible volcanically outgassed water.VOX’s Atmosphere Sampling Vehicle (ASV) dips into and samples the well-mixed atmosphere, using Venus Original Constituents Experiment (VOCE) to measure noble gases. VOX’s orbiter carries the Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM) and the Venus Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (VISAR), and maps the gravity field using Ka-band tracking.VOX is the logical next mission to Venus because it delivers: 1) top priority atmosphere, surface, and interior science; 2) key global data for

  19. Nuclear analytical techniques and their application to environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieser, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given on nuclear analytical techniques and their application to environmental samples. Measurement of the inherent radioactivity of elements or radionuclides allows determination of natural radioelements (e.g. Ra), man-made radioelements (e.g. Pu) and radionuclides in the environment. Activation analysis, in particular instrumental neutron activation analysis, is a very reliable and sensitive method for determination of a great number of trace elements in environmental samples, because the most abundant main constituents are not activated. Tracer techniques are very useful for studies of the behaviour and of chemical reactions of trace elements and compounds in the environment. Radioactive sources are mainly applied for excitation of characteristic X-rays (X-ray fluorescence analysis). (author)

  20. Results of tritium measurement in environmental samples and drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Ryoji; Hirai, Yasuo

    1983-01-01

    In Ibaraki prefecture, the tritium concentration in the drainage from the nuclear facilities has been measured since 1974. Then, with the start of operation of the fuel reprocessing plant in 1977, the tritium concentration in environmental samples was to be measured also in order to examine the effect of the drainage on the environment. The results of the tritium measurement in Ibaraki prefecture up to about 1980 are described: sampling points, sampling and measuring methods, the tritium concentration in the drainage, air, inland water and seawater, respectively. The drainages have been taken from Japan Atomic Power Company, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (with the fuel reprocessing plant). The samples of air, inland water and seawater have been taken in the areas concerned. The tritium concentration was measured by a low-background liquid scintillation counter. The measured values in the environment have been generally at low level, not different from other areas. (Mori, K.)

  1. Spectrophotometric Determination of Boron in Environmental Water Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San San; Khin Win Kyi; Kwaw Naing

    2002-02-01

    The present paper deals with the study on the methods for the determination of boron in the environmental water samples. The standard methods which are useful for this determination are discussed thoroughly in this work. Among the standard methods approved by American Public Health Association, the carmine method was selected for this study. Prior to the determination of boron in the water samples, the precision and accuracy of the methods of choice were examined by using standard boron solutions. The determination of Boron was carried out by using water samples, waste water from Aquaculture Research Centre, University of Yangon, the Ayeyarwady River water near Magway Myathalon Pagoda in Magway Division, ground water from Sanchaung Township, and tap water from Universities' Research Centre, University of Yangon. Analyses of these water samples were done and statistical treatment of the results was carried out. (author)

  2. Development of environmental sample analysis techniques for safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magara, Masaaki; Hanzawa, Yukiko; Esaka, Fumitaka

    1999-01-01

    JAERI has been developing environmental sample analysis techniques for safeguards and preparing a clean chemistry laboratory with clean rooms. Methods to be developed are a bulk analysis and a particle analysis. In the bulk analysis, Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer or Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer are used to measure nuclear materials after chemical treatment of sample. In the particle analysis, Electron Probe Micro Analyzer and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer are used for elemental analysis and isotopic analysis, respectively. The design of the clean chemistry laboratory has been carried out and construction will be completed by the end of March, 2001. (author)

  3. Neutron activation analysis for environmental sample in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busamongkol, Arporn; Nouchpramool, Sunun; Bunprapob, Supamatthree; Sumitra, Tatchai

    2003-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis has been applied for the trace elements analysis in environmental samples. Thirty three samples of airborne particulate were collected every week at Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC) during the period of June 1998 to March 1999. The Ti, I, Mg, Na, V, K, Cl, Al, Mn, Ca, As, Sm, Sb, Br, La, Ce, Th, Cr, Cs, Sc, Rb, Fe, Zn and Co were analyzed by Neutron Activation Analysis utilizing 2 MW TRIGA MARK III research reactor. The certified reference materials 1632a and 1633a from National Bureau of Standard were select as standard. (author)

  4. Sample test cases using the environmental computer code NECTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponting, A.C.

    1984-06-01

    This note demonstrates a few of the many different ways in which the environmental computer code NECTAR may be used. Four sample test cases are presented and described to show how NECTAR input data are structured. Edited output is also presented to illustrate the format of the results. Two test cases demonstrate how NECTAR may be used to study radio-isotopes not explicitly included in the code. (U.K.)

  5. Determination and interpretation of environmental water samples contaminated by uranium mining activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.; Volke, P.; Helling, C.; Merkel, B.J.; Dudel, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of environmental behavior of uranium is based on several steps of data analysis and statistical inference. First step is sampling and analyzing of uranium in field samples by routine laboratory methods. Such methods have to fulfill multiple requirements like robustness, efficiency, low detection limit and precision. A comparison of different approaches in assigning uncertainty to experimentally obtained analytical data shows that classical error estimation is not significantly inferior to more sophisticated modern techniques like inverse regression or orthogonal regression. A second step is the correlation of analytical data with current state of insight into environmental behavior of uranium. Such a correlation furthers the choice of adequate geochemical models and quality of geochemical data base for subsequent detailed analysis, e.g. by geochemical modeling. An appraisal of the individual steps in this complex analysis is given on the basis of statistical procedures for calibration and an E H -pH diagram of uranium for atmospheric conditions. (orig.)

  6. Developing a passive trap for diffusive atmospheric {sup 14}CO{sub 2} sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Jennifer C.; Xu, Xiaomei [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Fahrni, Simon M. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Institute of Particle Physics, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Lupascu, Massimo [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Department of Geography, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Czimczik, Claudia I. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} measurement is an unique tool to quantify source-based emissions of CO{sub 2} for both the urban and natural environments. Acquiring a sample that temporally integrates the atmospheric {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} signature that allows for precise {sup 14}C analysis is often necessary, but can require complex sampling devices, which can be difficult to deploy and maintain, especially for multiple locations. Here we describe our progress in developing a diffusive atmospheric CO{sub 2} molecular sieve trap, which requires no power to operate. We present results from various cleaning procedures, and rigorously tested for blank and memory effects. Traps were tested in the environment along-side conventional sampling flasks for accuracy. Results show that blank and memory effects can be minimized with thorough cleaning and by avoiding overheating, and that diffusively collected air samples agree well with traditionally canister-sampled air.

  7. Environmental sampling accounting at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, C.C.; Wood, M.B.

    1978-06-01

    At the Savannah River Plant Environmental Monitoring Laboratories, a computer-based systematic accounting method was developed to ensure that all scheduled samples are collected, processed through the laboratory, and counted without delay. The system employs an IBM 360/195 computer with a magnetic tape master file, an on-line disk file, and cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. Scheduling and accounting are accomplished by using computer-generated schedules, collection labels, and output/input cards. For each scheduled sample and analysis, a printed card is issued for collection, laboratory analysis, and counting. The cards also contain information needed by personnel performing the jobs, such as sample location, aliquot to be processed, or procedure number. Manual entries are made on the cards when each step in the process is completed. Additional pertinent data are also manually entered on the cards; e.g., entries are made explaining why a sample is not collected, the sample aliquot in the event a nonstandard aliquot is processed, field measurement results, and analytical results. These manually entered data are keypunched and read into the computer files. The computer files are audited daily, and summaries of samples not processed in pre-established normal time intervals are issued. The progress of sample analyses can also be readily determined at any time using the CRT terminal. Historic data are also maintained on magnetic tape and workload summaries are issued showing the number of samples and number of determinations per month

  8. Environmental sampling: Issues for the cut-off regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearey, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The fissile material cut-off treaty (FMCT) initiative under the Conference on Disarmament mandate is envisioned to include certain aspects of environmental sampling and monitoring. One of the intents of this treaty is to bring certain non-NPT signatories (e.g., threshold states) under this treaty agreement along with the nuclear weapon states (NWSs). This paper provides a brief overview of some of the relevant issues that may be involved in the implementation and use of environmental monitoring for (1) verification of the cut-off regime declarations, (2) the detection of undeclared activities, and, (3) application in non-routine inspections. The intent is to provide backstopping information important for treaty negotiators. Specific issues addressed within this paper include signature sampling, differences in the proposed detection regime, potential signature integrators, specific examples and spoofing concerns. Many of these issues must be carefully considered and weighed in order to create a credibly verifiable inspection regime. Importantly, the cut-off treaty must enable nondiscriminatory implementation, while carefully assuring that nonproliferation treaty requirements are maintained (i.e., preventing unintentional release of critical weapons design information--potentially through environmental sampling and analysis)

  9. Transuranium analysis methodologies for biological and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessman, R.A.; Lee, K.D.; Curry, B.; Leventhal, L.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical procedures for the most abundant transuranium nuclides in the environment (i.e., plutonium and, to a lesser extent, americium) are available. There is a lack of procedures for doing sequential analysis for Np, Pu, Am, and Cm in environmental samples, primarily because of current emphasis on Pu and Am. Reprocessing requirements and waste disposal connected with the fuel cycle indicate that neptunium and curium must be considered in environmental radioactive assessments. Therefore it was necessary to develop procedures that determine all four of these radionuclides in the environment. The state of the art of transuranium analysis methodology as applied to environmental samples is discussed relative to different sample sources, such as soil, vegetation, air, water, and animals. Isotope-dilution analysis with 243 Am ( 239 Np) and 236 Pu or 242 Pu radionuclide tracers is used. Americium and curium are analyzed as a group, with 243 Am as the tracer. Sequential extraction procedures employing bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)orthophosphoric acid (HDEHP) were found to result in lower yields and higher Am--Cm fractionation than ion-exchange methods

  10. Analysis of polychlorinated n-alkanes in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, F J; Parera, J; Galceran, M T

    2006-10-01

    Polychlorinated n-alkanes (PCAs), also known as chlorinated paraffins (CPs), are highly complex technical mixtures that contain a huge number of structural isomers, theoretically more than 10,000 diastereomers and enantiomers. As a consequence of their persistence, tendency to bioaccumulation, and widespread and unrestricted use, PCAs have been found in aquatic and terrestrial food webs, even in rural and remote areas. Recently, these compounds have been included in regulatory programs of several international organizations, including the US Environmental Protection Agency and the European Union. Consequently, there is a growing demand for reliable methods with which to analyze PCAs in environmental samples. Here, we review current trends and recent developments in the analysis of PCAs in environmental samples such as air, water, sediment, and biota. Practical aspects of sample preparation, chromatographic separation, and detection are covered, with special emphasis placed on analysis of PCAs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The advantages and limitations of these techniques as well as recent improvements in quantification procedures are discussed.

  11. Sampling, storage and sample preparation procedures for X ray fluorescence analysis of environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    X ray fluorescence (XRF) method is one of the most commonly used nuclear analytical technique because of its multielement and non-destructive character, speed, economy and ease of operation. From the point of view of quality assurance practices, sampling and sample preparation procedures are the most crucial steps in all analytical techniques, (including X ray fluorescence) applied for the analysis of heterogeneous materials. This technical document covers recent modes of the X ray fluorescence method and recent developments in sample preparation techniques for the analysis of environmental materials. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. A comparison of some radionuclide contents in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Kunio; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Los, I.P.; Kamarikov, I.Yu.; Buzinny, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    Global contamination by radionuclides was likely induced through the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986. Environmental samples such as fish, milk, total diet samples etc., collected in Kiev, in the vicinity of Chernobyl, and Mito city, Japan, were analyzed for six selected radionuclides. After samples were dry-ashed, radioactivities of Cs-137, Cs-134, K-40, Co-60, and Mn-54 were determined by gamma-ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector. Strontium-90 was determined by low-background beta-spectrometry after chemical separations by fuming nitric acid. Concentrations of radioactivities in the Kiev samples, in the vicinity of the Chernobyl, are shown below. For comparison, values obtained in Japan, including literature values, are shown in parentheses. Radioactivities in airborne dust were: Sr-90, 63 mBq/m 3 (0.001-0.1); Cs-137, 26 mBg/m 3 (0.001-1); Cs-134, 4 mBq/m 3 ; Co-60, 4 mBq/m 3 ; Mn-54, 2 mBq/m 3 . Radioactivities of milk were as follows; Sr-90, 0.25-1.2 Bq/liter (0.01-0.1); Cs-137, 6-77 Bq/liter (0.01-1); Cs-134, 2-8 Bq/liter. Radioactivities of Sr-90 and Cs-137 for fish (carp), were found to be 3-75 Bq/kg-fresh (0.76-0.98) and 46-2130 Bq/kg-fresh (<0.8), respectively. It was observed that the daily intake of Sr-90 and Cs-137 were 0.25 Bq (0.1) and 0.43 Bq (0.1) per person, respectively. Due to the small number of samples analyzed it is premature to draw a firm conclusion from this study. However, the levels of radionuclides in environmental samples were found to differ between Kiev and Mito with wide ranges depending on the samples. (author)

  13. Environmental sample accounting at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, C.C.; Wood, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant Environmental Monitoring Laboratories, a computer-based systematic accounting method was developed to ensure that all scheduled samples are collected, processed through the laboratory, and counted without delay. The system employs an IBM 360/195 computer with a magnetic tape master file, an online disk file, and cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. Scheduling and accounting are accomplished using computer-generated schedules, bottle labels, and output/ input cards. A printed card is issued for the collecting, analyzing, and counting of each scheduled sample. The card also contains information for the personnel who are to perform the work, e.g., sample location, aliquot to be processed, and procedure to be used. Manual entries are made on the card when each step in the process is completed. Additional pertinent data such as the reason a sample is not collected, the need for a nonstandard aliquot, and field measurement results are keypunched and then read into the computer files as required. The computer files are audited daily and summaries showing samples not processed in pre-established normal schedules are provided. The progress of sample analyses is readily determined at any time using the CRT terminal. Historic data are maintained on magnetic tape, and workload summaries showing the number of samples and number of determinations per month are issued. (author)

  14. Atmospheric Sampling of Aerosols to Stratospheric Altitudes using High Altitude Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerde, E. A.; Thomas, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide represents a long-lived atmospheric component relevant to global climate change, it is also understood that many additional contributors influence the overall climate of Earth. Among these, short-lived components are more difficult to incorporate into models due to uncertainties in the abundances of these both spatially and temporally. Possibly the most significant of these short-lived components falls under the heading of “black carbon” (BC). There are numerous overlapping definitions of BC, but it is basically carbonaceous in nature and light absorbing. Due to its potential as a climate forcer, an understanding of the BC population in the atmosphere is critical for modeling of radiative forcing. Prior measurements of atmospheric BC generally consist of airplane- and ground-based sampling, typically below 5000 m and restricted in time and space. Given that BC has a residence time on the order of days, short-term variability is easily missed. Further, since the radiative forcing is a result of BC distributed through the entire atmospheric column, aircraft sampling is by definition incomplete. We are in the process of planning a more comprehensive sampling of the atmosphere for BC using high-altitude balloons. Balloon-borne sampling is a highly reliable means to sample air through the entire troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Our system will incorporate a balloon and a flight train of two modules. One module will house an atmospheric sampler. This sampler will be single-stage (samples all particle sizes together), and will place particles directly on an SEM sample stub for analysis. The nozzle depositing the sample will be offset from the center of the stub, placing the aerosol particles toward the edge. At various altitudes, the stub will be rotated 45 degrees, providing 6-8 sample “cuts” of particle populations through the atmospheric column. The flights will reach approximately 27 km altitude, above which the balloons

  15. Development of an automatic sampling device for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraud, V.

    2007-12-01

    Two sampling strategies were studied to develop an automatic instrument for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyl compounds. Because of its specificity towards carbonyls compounds, sampling by using a transfer of gaseous phase in a liquid phase associated with a simultaneous chemical derivatization of the trapped compounds was first studied. However, this method do not allow a quantitative sampling of all studied carbonyl compounds, nor a continuous measurement in the field. To overcome the difficulties, a second strategy was investigated: the cryogenic adsorption onto solid adsorbent followed by thermodesorption and a direct analysis by GC/MS. Collection efficiency using different solid adsorbents was found greater than 95% for carbonyl compounds consisting of 1 to 7 carbons. This work is a successful first step towards the realization of the automatic sampling device for a continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds. (author)

  16. Direct separation of plutonium by thermochromatography from environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, L.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    2002-01-01

    A thermochromatographic separation was performed on plutonium from environmental soil samples. This procedure was investigated with the goal to measure low concentrations of plutonium by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The soil sample was chlorinated by thionylchloride as reactive gas at a temperature of 1400 K. The volatile chlorides were separated chromatographically and deposited in a temperature gradient tube filled with quartz grains. Results about the deposition behaviour of the elements were obtained. Two different formalisms based on the thermodynamic functions are used to describe the experimental data. One formula is used to describe the deposition behaviour of microscopic amounts of plutonium (adsorption), the other formula for macroamounts of the main matrix elements (desublimation). The calculated values are in a reasonable agreement with the experimental data. A determination of plutonium content was successfully made for a referenced sea sediment (IAEA-135) after the thermochromatographic sample preparation for ICP-MS. (orig.)

  17. The measure of radiocarbon in the drating of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Pessenda, L.C.; Camargo, P.B. de

    1990-01-01

    An analytical system for radiocarbon dating of environmental samples (charcoal, shell, wood, etc.) using low level liquid scintillation spectrometry has been developed and optimized at Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture of the University of Sao Paulo. Physical and chemical pretreatment of samples to remove oils, resins, carbonates and fulvic and humic acids; the benzene synthesis of NBS oxalic acid standard, calcium carbonate P.A. and marble and the results of benzene yield; the optimization of radiocarbon counting window; the effect of scintillators PPO-POPOP and butyl PBD on the efficiency of detection and background of radiocarbon, are described. Samples of charcoal, shell and wood, previously dated at the radiocarbon laboratories of Centre des Faibles Radioactives, France, and Instituto de Geociencias of USP, are analysed for preliminary laboratory intercomparison. (author) [pt

  18. Modified electrode voltammetric sensors for trace metals in environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Christopher M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nafion-modified mercury thin film electrodes have been investigated for the analysis of trace metals in environmental samples of waters and effluent by batch injection analysis with square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The method, involving injection over the detector electrode of untreated samples of volume of the order of 50 microlitres has fast response, blocking and fouling of the electrode is minimum as shown by studies with surface-active components. Comparison is made between glassy carbon substrate electrodes and carbon fibre microelectrode array substrates, the latter leading to a small sensitivity enhancement. Application to analysis of river water and industrial effluent for labile zinc, cadmium, lead and copper ions is demonstrated in collected samples and after acid digestion.

  19. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of organic compounds in source samples and in atmospheric fine particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Christopher G; Schauer, James J; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-10-15

    Source sample extracts of vegetative detritus, motor vehicle exhaust, tire dust paved road dust, and cigarette smoke have been silylated and analyzed by GC-MS to identify polar organic compounds that may serve as tracers for those specific emission sources of atmospheric fine particulate matter. Candidate molecular tracers were also identified in atmospheric fine particle samples collected in the San Joaquin Valley of California. A series of normal primary alkanols, dominated by even carbon-numbered homologues from C26 to C32, the secondary alcohol 10-nonacosanol, and some phytosterols are prominent polar compounds in the vegetative detritus source sample. No new polar organic compounds are found in the motor vehicle exhaust samples. Several hydrogenated resin acids are present in the tire dust sample, which might serve as useful tracers for those sources in areas that are heavily impacted by motor vehicle traffic. Finally, the alcohol and sterol emission profiles developed for all the source samples examined in this project are scaled according to the ambient fine particle mass concentrations attributed to those sources by a chemical mass balance receptor model that was previously applied to the San Joaquin Valley to compute the predicted atmospheric concentrations of individual alcohols and sterols. The resulting underprediction of alkanol concentrations at the urban sites suggests that alkanols may be more sensitive tracers for natural background from vegetative emissions (i.e., waxes) than the high molecular weight alkanes, which have been the best previously available tracers for that source.

  20. A note on {sup 207}Bi in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossew, P. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute of Environment and Sustainability, Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring Group. Via Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra, Vatican City State, Holy See (Italy)]. E-mail: peter.bossew@jrc.it; Lettner, H. [Institute of Physics and Biophysics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, A-5020 Salzburg (Austria)]. E-mail: herbert.lettner@sbg.ac.at; Hubmer, A. [Institute of Physics and Biophysics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, A-5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Traces of the radionuclide {sup 207}Bi were identified in soil and cryoconite (glacier sediment) samples from Alpine regions of Austria. This nuclide has been produced in thermonuclear explosions mainly in the early 1960s and subsequently dispersed in the atmosphere. Activity concentrations up to 22 Bq/kg d.m. have been found. The ratio {sup 207}Bi:{sup 137}Cs(global fallout) equals (1.70 {+-} 0.12)10{sup -3}, which is in accordance with literature data. When low levels of {sup 207}Bi are assessed by gamma spectrometry, corrections must be made for a gamma line produced in the lead shield by neutron activation due to cosmic neutrons.

  1. Stable isotope characterization of pan-derived and directly sampled atmospheric water vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maric, R.; St. Amour, N.A.; Gibson, J.J.; Edwards, T.W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Isotopic characterization of atmospheric water vapour, δ A , and its temporal variability are important prerequisites for quantifying water balance of surface reservoirs and partitioning of evaporation and transpiration fluxes using isotope techniques. Here we present results from a detailed comparison of several methods for determining δ A in field situations, (i) by back-calculation from isotopic and micrometeorological monitoring of a steady-state terminal reservoir (standard Class-A evaporation pan) using boundary-layer mass transfer models [1], (ii) through direct (cryogenic) sampling of ambient atmospheric moisture, and (iii) using the precipitation-equilibrium approximation (i.e., δ A =δ P - ε*)

  2. Stability of metal ions in aqueous environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattonetti, A.

    1976-01-01

    The time lapse between the collection of aqueous environmental samples and the analysis affects the original ionic concentration. Studies have proven the nonionic species in a water sample have more of an effect on the veracity of an analysis than the ''container wall'' effect, and that adjustment to a pH of 2 at sample collection time is a ''Pyrrhic victory.'' Lead, for example, will commonly increase an order of magnitude when unfiltered samples are adjusted to a pH of 2 upon collection. This effect is greatest when elemental ions are present in the ng ml -1 range and lessens as the original ionic concentration increases. Data are presented that behooves filtration of stream water and rainwater samples prior to any acidification step. The need to acidify the resulting filtrate is also discussed. Lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, manganese, iron, copper, silver, zinc, cadmium, aluminum, indium, and lead are examined. The insoluble phase retained on the filter can be digested with acid and also analyzed. The separate analysis of the filtrate and filter will give a true representation of the occurrence of these metals in nature. Flame and flameless atomic aborption and emission are used to perform the trace analyses

  3. Molecular Identification of Gambierdiscus and Fukuyoa (Dinophyceae from Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty F. Smith

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP is increasing across the Pacific and the distribution of the causative dinoflagellates appears to be expanding. Subtle differences in thecal plate morphology are used to distinguish dinoflagellate species, which are difficult to determine using light microscopy. For these reasons we sought to develop a Quantitative PCR assay that would detect all species from both Gambierdiscus and Fukuyoa genera in order to rapidly screen environmental samples for potentially toxic species. Additionally, a specific assay for F. paulensis was developed as this species is of concern in New Zealand coastal waters. Using the assays we analyzed 31 samples from three locations around New Zealand and the Kingdom of Tonga. Fourteen samples in total were positive for Gambierdiscus/Fukuyoa and two samples were also positive using the F. paulensis assay. Samples from the Kermadec Islands were further characterized using high-throughput sequencing metabarcoding. The majority of reads corresponded to Gambierdiscus species with three species identified at all sites (G. australes, G. honu and G. polynesiensis. This is the first confirmed identification of G. polynesiensis, a known ciguatoxin producer, in New Zealand waters. Other known toxin-producing genera were also detected, included Alexandrium, Amphidinium, Azadinium, Dinophysis, Ostreopsis, and Prorocentrum.

  4. Rapid extraction and assay of uranium from environmental surface samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Christopher A.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Speakman, Robert J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Addleman, Raymond Shane

    2017-10-01

    Extraction methods enabling faster removal and concentration of uranium compounds for improved trace and low-level assay are demonstrated for standard surface sampling material in support of nuclear safeguards efforts, health monitoring, and other nuclear analysis applications. A key problem with the existing surface sampling swipes is the requirement for complete digestion of sample and sampling matrix. This is a time-consuming and labour-intensive process that limits laboratory throughput, elevates costs, and increases background levels. Various extraction methods are explored for their potential to quickly and efficiently remove different chemical forms of uranium from standard surface sampling material. A combination of carbonate and peroxide solutions is shown to give the most rapid and complete form of uranyl compound extraction and dissolution. This rapid extraction process is demonstrated to be compatible with standard inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods for uranium isotopic assay as well as screening techniques such as x-ray fluorescence. The general approach described has application beyond uranium to other analytes of nuclear forensic interest (e.g., rare earth elements and plutonium) as well as heavy metals for environmental and industrial hygiene monitoring.

  5. Nonactivation interaction techniques in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nonactivation interaction analytical methods are based on the interaction processes of nuclear and X-ray radiation with a sample, leading to their absorption and backscattering, to the ionization of gases or excitation of fluorescent X-ray by radiation, but not to the activation of determined elements. From the point of view of environmental analysis, the most useful nonactivation interaction techniques are X-ray fluorescence by photon or charged particle excitation, ionization of gases by nuclear radiation, elastic scattering of charged particles and backscattering of beta radiation. The significant advantage of these methods is that they are nondestructive. (author)

  6. Concentration and speciation of radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, C.; Desideri, D.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.

    2000-01-01

    The paper will describe three examples dealing with the measure of some natural (U, Th, 2 10Pb, 4 0K) and artificial ( 1 37Cs, 9 0Sr, 2 39 +2 40Pu, 2 41Am) radionuclides in environmental samples such as mosses, sediments, soils. Extraction chromatography, liquid extraction, selective precipitation and electroplating were used to isolate the radionuclides, except for gamma emitters which were detected by gamma spectrometry. Alpha spectrometry were used to measure the alpha emitters and low background beta detector to measure the beta emitters

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of vanadium in environmental and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekha, D.; Krishnapriya, B.; Subrahmanyam, P.; Reddyprasad, P.; Dilip Kumar, J.; Chiranjeevi, P.

    2007-01-01

    The method is based on oxidation of p-nitro aniline by vanadium (V) followed by coupling reaction with N-(1-naphthalene-1-y1)ethane-1, 2-diaminedihydrochloride (NEDA) in basic medium of pH 8 to give purple colored derivative. The derivative having an λ max 525nm is stable for 10 days. Beer's law is obeyed for vanadium (V) in the concentration range of 0.03-4.5 μg ml -1 . The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of vanadium in environmental and biological samples. (author)

  8. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  9. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  10. Sampling and measurement of long-lived radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, F.P.; Goles, R.W.; Kaye, J.H.; Rieck, H.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The volatile and semivolatile long-lived man-made radionuclides 3 H, 14 C, 79 Se, 85 Kr, 99 Tc, 129 I, 135 Cs, and 137 Cs are of concern in operation of nuclear facilities because they are difficult and expensive to contain and once emitted to the environment they become permanent ecological constituents with both local and global distributions. Species-selective sampling and analytical methods (radiochemical, neutron activation, and mass spectrometric) have been developed for many of these nuclides with sensitivities well below those required for radiation protection. These sampling and analytical methods have been applied to the measurement of current environmental levels of some of the more ecologically important radionuclides. The detection and tracing of long-lived radionuclides is being conducted in order to establish base-line values and to study environmental behavior. This paper describes detection and measurement techniques and summarizes current measurement results

  11. On development of system for environmental monitoring of atmospheric air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. В. Волкодаева

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests the directions for development of the system of environmental monitoring of atmospheric air quality in the Russian Federation, namely: an increase in the number of stationary control posts for atmospheric pollution in each specific city; expansion of the list of cities where constant measurements of pollutant concentrations are conducted; expansion of the list of controlled impurities through the introduction of automated air quality monitoring systems, the development of computational methods for monitoring air quality, including not only information on pollution levels in terms of compliance with hygienic standards, but also assessment of pollution levels from the perspective of environmental risk to the health of the population. There is a great sensitivity of plants to the low quality of atmospheric air in comparison with the sensitivity of animals and humans. The air quality standards for vegetation are given. It is proposed to evaluate the quality of atmospheric air not only from the point of view of the impact on human health, but taking into account the impact on vegetation, to include in the program route observations carried out by mobile atmospheric air monitoring laboratories, territories with public green areas, which will increase the information content of atmospheric air monitoring and the state of green spaces. In connection with the increasing noise level in large cities and the lack of a permanent noise monitoring system, it is proposed to equip existing and new monitoring stations with noise level meters to provide reliable information for the development of relevant environmental measures.

  12. Developing a Vacuum Electrospray Source To Implement Efficient Atmospheric Sampling for Miniature Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Quan; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Xinqiong; Qian, Xiang; Ni, Kai; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-12-05

    The performance of a miniature mass spectrometer in atmospheric analysis is closely related to the design of its sampling system. In this study, a simplified vacuum electrospray ionization (VESI) source was developed based on a combination of several techniques, including the discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface, direct capillary sampling, and pneumatic-assisted electrospray. Pulsed air was used as a vital factor to facilitate the operation of electrospray ionization in the vacuum chamber. This VESI device can be used as an efficient atmospheric sampling interface when coupled with a miniature rectilinear ion trap (RIT) mass spectrometer. The developed VESI-RIT instrument enables regular ESI analysis of liquid, and its qualitative and quantitative capabilities have been characterized by using various solution samples. A limit of detection of 8 ppb could be attained for arginine in a methanol solution. In addition, extractive electrospray ionization of organic compounds can be implemented by using the same VESI device, as long as the gas analytes are injected with the pulsed auxiliary air. This methodology can extend the use of the proposed VESI technique to rapid and online analysis of gaseous and volatile samples.

  13. Detection of iodine-129 in some environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagao

    1981-01-01

    The recent accumulation of the long-lived isotope of iodine, 129 I, which is released in environment by the peaceful use of nuclear energy or nuclear test explosion is becoming important in the view point of the internal exposure by the low level radiation. The studies on the detection of determination of 129 I in environmental samples so far published are still very few. The authors tried to detect 129 I in some Japanese seaweeds and soil samples with the aid of the activation method by using the nuclear reaction of 129 I(n, #betta#) 130 I. The samples analysed in this work are tangle (Laminaria japonica) for daily food grown in Hidaka, Hokkaido and uncultivated soil collected in Tokai, Ibaraki Pref. As the #betta#-ray peak indicator for 130 I, cesium oxide and the aged radioisotope product of 131 I are also subjected to the neutron irradiation. From cesium oxide, 130 I is formed by the reaction of 133 Cs(n, α) 130 I. An aged vial of the 131 I product is expected to contain very minute amounts of 129 I which is also produced both by the fission of uranium and neutron capture reaction of tellurium followed by #betta# - -decay. The #betta#-ray spectra for the soil sample, cesium oxide and the aged 131 I vial are shown in Fig. 1. No appreciable peak was found for the seaweeds sample. In the #betta#-ray spectra for irradiated cesium oxide and the aged 131 I vial, several typical peaks for 130 I were observed. By comparing with these peaks, several small peaks which appear at around 418, 536 and 739 keV in the soil sample can be attributed to those of 130 I. The 129 I content in the soil sample is roughly estimated to be 2 x 10 - 10 Bq/g. (author)

  14. An Environmentally Friendly, Cost-Effective Determination of Lead in Environmental Samples Using Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Underwood, Melinda N.; Cloud, Joshua L.; Harshman, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with heavy metals such as lead presents many health risks. Simple, effective, and field-portable methods for the measurement of toxic metals in environmental samples are vital tools for evaluating the risks that these contaminants pose. This article describes the use of new developments in anodic stripping…

  15. Determination of 241Am and 244Cm in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonino, N.O.; Grinman, A.D.R.; Serdeiro, N.H.

    1998-01-01

    The present technique describes a method to separate, purify and measure low levels of americium and curium in different environmental samples such as sediments, soils, water, vegetables, and air filters. The determination of radionuclides in theses environmental matrices have analytical problems, since a simple method doesn't exist for the purification, which is indispensable for its later measuring alpha spectrometry. The developed technique consist on taking an aliquot of the sample to analyze, to add tracer as americium 243 and curium 242, and to dissolve the matrix in a such way to have a clear solution. For the isolation of the americium and curium of the other actinides ar used as separation techniques: precipitation with Fe 3+ , anionic and cationic exchange, and extraction with a appropriate organic solvent. The purification of the americium and curium is followed by the electrodeposition habitually used. The measurement is carried out by alpha spectrometry with a detector of implanted ion. The detection limit for this techniques is of 0,002 Bq/l or 0,2 mBq in the case of filters. (author)

  16. Atmospheric concentrations and trends of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) over 7 years of sampling in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Shoieb, Mahiba; Schuster, Jasmin K; Eng, Anita; Harner, Tom

    2018-07-01

    Poly- and per-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) were monitored at 21 sites in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network. Atmospheric concentrations previously reported from 2009 were compared to concentrations measured at these sites in 2013 and 2015, to assess trends over 7 years of monitoring. Concentrations of the fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and fluorinated sulfonamides and sulfonamidoethanols (FOSAs and FOSEs) were stable at these sites from 2009 to 2015 with no significant difference (p > 0.05) in concentrations. Elevated concentrations of all the neutral PFAS were detected at the urban sites as compared to the polar/background sites. The perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs), meanwhile, saw a significant increase (p  0.05). Concentrations of the PFSAs and the PFCAs were similar at all location types, showing the global reach of these persistent compounds. Concentrations of the cyclic VMS (cVMS) were at least an order of magnitude higher than the linear VMS (lVMS) and the PFAS. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) saw a weak significant increase in concentrations from 2009 to 2013 (p < 0.05), however, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3) had a strong significant decrease in concentrations from 2009 to 2015 (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Study on the atmospheric component with the scope of analyses on the environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrara, V.; La Camera, F.

    1989-03-01

    This work has been carried out following a specific request from Italian National Department for Environment and shows technical approaches and methodologies of analyses and forecasts set up for environmental impact studies referred to 'atmospheric environment'. This work is presented according to the general items and objectives fixed by the same Department in the wider operative system for the application in Italy of environmental impact procedures. (author)

  18. Atmospheric pressure surface sampling/ionization techniques for direct coupling of planar separations with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-06-18

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of environmental samples containing heavy hydrocarbon components in environmental forensic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raia, J.C.; Blakley, C.R.; Fuex, A.N.; Villalanti, D.C.; Fahrenthold, P.D. [Triton Anal Corp, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-03-01

    This article presents a procedure to evaluate and characterize environmental samples containing mixtures of hydrocarbons over a wide boiling range of materials that include fuels and other products used in commerce. The range of the method extends to the higher boiling and heavier molecular weight hydrocarbon products in the range of motor oil, bunker fuel, and heavier residue materials. The procedure uses the analytical laboratory technique of high-temperature simulated distillation along with mathematical regression of the analytical data to estimate the relative contribution of individual products in mixtures of hydrocarbons present in environmental samples. An analytical technique to determine hydrocarbon-type distributions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with nitric oxide ionization spectrometry evaluation is also presented. This type of analysis allows complex hydrocarbon mixtures to be classified by their chemical composition, or types of hydrocarbons that include paraffins, cycloparaffins, monoaromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Characteristic hydrocarbon patterns for example, in the relative distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are valuable for determining the potential origin of materials present in environmental samples. These methods provide quantitative data for hydrocarbon components in mixtures as a function of boiling range and 'hydrocarbon fingerprints' of the types of materials present. This information is valuable in assessing environmental impacts of hydrocarbons at contaminated sites and establishing the liabilities and cost allocations for responsible parties.

  20. Separation Techniques for Quantification of Radionuclides in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Galanda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The reliable and quantitative measurement of radionuclides is important in order to determine environmental quality and radiation safety, and to monitor regulatory compliance. We examined soil samples from Podunajske Biskupice, near the city of Bratislava in the Slovak Republic, for the presence of several natural (238U, 232Th, 40K and anthropogenic (137Cs, 90Sr, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Am radionuclides. The area is adjacent to a refinery and hazardous waste processing center, as well as the municipal incinerator plant, and so might possess an unusually high level of ecotoxic metals. We found that the levels of both naturally occurring and anthropogenic radionuclides fell within the expected ranges, indicating that these facilities pose no radiological threat to the local environment. During the course of our analysis, we modified existing techniques in order to allow us to handle the unusually large and complex samples that were needed to determine the levels of 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Am activity. We also rated three commercial techniques for the separation of 90Sr from aqueous solutions and found that two of them, AnaLig Sr-01 and Empore Extraction Disks, were suitable for the quantitative and reliable separation of 90Sr, while the third, Sr-Spec Resin, was less so. The main criterion in evaluating these methods was the chemical recovery of 90Sr, which was less than we had expected. We also considered speed of separation and additional steps needed to prepare the sample for separation.

  1. Radioactive contamination of the environmental samples in Hanoi in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Huy Uyen; Bui Van Loat; Dang Phuong Nam; Cao Anh Duc; Pham Quang Dien; Nguyen Hao Quang

    1990-01-01

    More than 30 environmental samples from soil, paddy, rice, fruits, vegetables and beans, sesame, tea, bananas, fishes at Hanoi markets in 1989 were analysed by gamma ray spectrometry with the low background system for studying natural and artificial radioactive elements. Among several samples from Hanoi in such kind as cultivated soils, tea, dried bamboo shoots, isotope Cs 137 that used be generated from nuclear explosives was found with contents (30 - 1000) x 10 -5 Bq/g; Cs 137 contents in Japanese rice (0.4 - 3) x 10 -5 Bq/g. Cs 137 is radioactive so Cs 137 contents in Vietnamese rice are 300 times higher than Cs 137 contents in Japanese rice but they are hundred times lower than international standard. Among vegetables, fruits, shrimps, fishes in Hanoi markets, artificial isotopes were not found and natural isotopes were few. Even radioactive daughter and granddaughter in uranium series in potatoes were not found. In some samples K 40 was also appeared, for example in cultivated soils (0.78 Bq/g), in dried bamboo shoots (0.73 Bq/g). (author). 2 refs., 3 figs

  2. Comparison of DNA preservation methods for environmental bacterial community samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael A; Pratte, Zoe A; Kellogg, Christina A

    2013-02-01

    Field collections of environmental samples, for example corals, for molecular microbial analyses present distinct challenges. The lack of laboratory facilities in remote locations is common, and preservation of microbial community DNA for later study is critical. A particular challenge is keeping samples frozen in transit. Five nucleic acid preservation methods that do not require cold storage were compared for effectiveness over time and ease of use. Mixed microbial communities of known composition were created and preserved by DNAgard(™), RNAlater(®), DMSO-EDTA-salt (DESS), FTA(®) cards, and FTA Elute(®) cards. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and clone libraries were used to detect specific changes in the faux communities over weeks and months of storage. A previously known bias in FTA(®) cards that results in lower recovery of pure cultures of Gram-positive bacteria was also detected in mixed community samples. There appears to be a uniform bias across all five preservation methods against microorganisms with high G + C DNA. Overall, the liquid-based preservatives (DNAgard(™), RNAlater(®), and DESS) outperformed the card-based methods. No single liquid method clearly outperformed the others, leaving method choice to be based on experimental design, field facilities, shipping constraints, and allowable cost. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental consequences of nuclear war (SCOPE 28), Vol. 1: Physical and atmospheric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittock, A.B.; Ackerman, T.P.; Crutzen, P.J.; MacCracken, M.C.; Shapiro, C.S.; Turco, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an interdisciplinary look at current scientific knowledge of the possible environmental consequences of a nuclear war. The authors assess the likely magnitude of changes in sunlight, temperature, precipitation, atmospheric chemistry, and more. Volume One reviews existing nuclear arsenals, war scenarios, immediate and subsequent effects

  4. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included

  5. Analysis of selected phytotoxins and mycotoxins in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Corinne C; Schenzel, Judith; Strobel, Bjarne W; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2009-11-01

    Natural toxins such as phytotoxins and mycotoxins have been studied in food and feed for decades, but little attention has yet been paid to their occurrence in the environment. Because of increasing awareness of the presence and potential relevance of micropollutants in the environment, phytotoxins and mycotoxins should be considered and investigated as part of the chemical cocktail in natural samples. Here, we compile chemical analytical methods to determine important phytotoxins (i.e. phenolic acids, quinones, benzoxazinones, terpenoids, glycoalkaloids, glucosinolates, isothiocyanates, phytosterols, flavonoids, coumestans, lignans, and chalcones) and mycotoxins (i.e. resorcyclic acid lactones, trichothecenes, fumonisins, and aflatoxins) in environmentally relevant matrices such as surface water, waste water-treatment plant influent and effluent, soil, sediment, manure, and sewage sludge. The main problems encountered in many of the reviewed methods were the frequent unavailability of suitable internal standards (especially isotope-labelled analogues) and often absent or fragmentary method optimization and validation.

  6. Radioactive kryptonates in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''radioactive Kryptonates'' is used for substances into which atoms or ions of the radioactive nuclide 85 Kr are incorporated. The basis of the use of radioactive Kryptonates in analytical chemistry is that during a chemical reaction the crystalline lattice of the kryptonated carrier is destroyed, the carrier consumed, and the radioactive krypton released (radio-release method). Analysis can be made with a calibration curve or by comparison with a standard. Radio-release methods with the aid of radioactive Kryptonates as analytical reagents are very useful for the analysis of environmental samples, e.g. for the determination of air pollutants (ozone, sulphur dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, mercury); and water pollutants (oxygen, dichromate, vanadium, hydrochloric acid, sulphur dioxide). (author)

  7. Gamma-spectrometry of extended sources for analysing environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarosievitz, B.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the environmental activity concentration by gamma spectrometers require the determination of the full-energy-peak efficiency as a function of photon energy over the detector range. This can be done by experiments or by calculation. For simple cases, experiments are straightforward, but if the decay scheme is complex, cascade effects modify detection efficiency. Also, actual detection efficiency depends on the detection geometry. All these effects are treated as corrections or modifications of the simple value cases which are especially relevant when applied to large volume of environmental samples. In this thesis calculations are made, using the GEANT MC program, for realistic experimental situations that have been performed, and these calculations are validated. The calculational and experimental results have been compared, and if it proves to be satisfactory, the results can be relied on even for cases when no direct experimental observation is possible. The general problems of gamma spectroscopy and correction problems are discussed. The two main tools, the experimental setup and the simulation program are described. A careful checking of the simulation results and the consequences are presented. (R.P.)

  8. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental and radioactive waste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferencova, M.; Peter Tkac, P.

    2007-01-01

    Technetium is known for its high mobility in a soil-water system in non-reducing aerobic condition and also high bio-availability for plants, because the most stable form of technetium in natural surface environment is pertechnetate which is highly soluble. The chemical form of technetium changes with environmental conditions. Concentration of technetium in the environment is very low, therefore many separation steps are needed for technetium determination. It has been developed a method for the routine determination of technetium-99 from environmental matrices and radioactive wastes using technetium-99m as an internal yield monitor. Technetium-99 is extracted from the soil samples with nitric acid. Many contaminants are co-precipitated with ferric hydroxide and technetium in the supernatant is pre-concentrated and further purified using anion exchange chromatography. Final separation of technetium was achieved by extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from sulphuric acid or pure water. The chemical yield is determined through the measurement of technetium-99m by scintillation counting system and the technetium-99 activity is measured using proportional counter after decay of the technetium-99m activity. Typical recoveries for this method are in the order 50-60 % (authors)

  9. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Dapartment of Energy's (DOE's) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples

  10. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Dapartment of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples.

  11. Atmospheric models in the numerical simulation system (SPEEDI-MP) for environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    As a nuclear emergency response system, numerical models to predict the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Evolving these models by incorporating new schemes for physical processes and up-to-date computational technologies, a numerical simulation system, which consists of dynamical models and material transport models for the atmospheric, terrestrial, and oceanic environments, has been constructed to apply for various environmental studies. In this system, the combination of a non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamic model and Lagrangian particle dispersion model is used for the emergency response system. The utilization of detailed meteorological field by the atmospheric model improves the model performance for diffusion and deposition calculations. It also calculates a large area domain with coarse resolution and local area domain with high resolution simultaneously. The performance of new model system was evaluated using measurements of surface deposition of 137 Cs over Europe during the Chernobyl accident. (author)

  12. The determinants of atmospheric SO2 concentrations. Reconsidering the environmental Kuznets curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Robert K.; Davidsdottir, Brynhildur; Garnham, Sophie; Pauly, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This analysis explores the effects of income and the spatial intensity of economic activity on the atmospheric concentration of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that there is a U-shaped relation between income and atmospheric concentration of SO 2 and an inverted U-shaped relation between the spatial intensity of economic activity and SO 2 concentrations. These results suggest that the spatial intensity of economic activity, rather than income, provides the impetus for policies and technologies that reduce SO 2 emissions. Based on this result, the atmospheric concentration of SO 2 in developing nations may decline faster than indicated by previous analyses. The potential for this decline depends on the rate at which income grows relative to population. The trade-off between the effects of income gains and the spatial intensity of economic activity on the atmospheric concentration of SO 2 is consistent with the notion that environmental problems can be ameliorated by slowing population growth and increasing income levels

  13. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Koji; Kitamura, Shinich; Konyuba, Yuji; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control

  14. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  15. Conformity Assessment in Nuclear Material and Environmental Sample Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aregbe, Y.; Jakopic, R.; Richter, S.; Venchiarutti, C.

    2015-01-01

    Safeguards conclusions are based to a large extent on comparison of measurement results between operator and safeguards laboratories. Measurement results must state traceability and uncertainties to be comparable. Recent workshops held at the IAEA and in the frame of the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), reviewed different approaches for Nuclear Material Balance Evaluation (MBE). Among those, the ''bottom-up'' approach requires assessment of operators and safeguards laboratories measurement systems and capabilities. Therefore, inter-laboratory comparisons (ILCs) with independent reference values provided for decades by JRC-IRMM, CEA/CETAMA and US DOE are instrumental to shed light on the current state of practice in measurements of nuclear material and environmental swipe samples. Participating laboratories are requested to report the measurement results with associated uncertainties, and have the possibility to benchmark those results against independent and traceable reference values. The measurement capability of both the IAEA Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) and the nuclear operator's analytical services participating in ILCs can be assessed against the independent reference values as well as against internationally agreed quality goals, in compliance with ISO 13528:2005. The quality goals for nuclear material analysis are the relative combined standard uncertainties listed in the ITV2010. Concerning environmental swipe sample analysis, the IAEA defined measurement quality goals applied in conformity assessment. The paper reports examples from relevant inter-laboratory comparisons, looking at laboratory performance according to the purpose of the measurement and the possible use of the result in line with the IUPAC International Harmonized Protocol. Tendencies of laboratories to either overestimate and/or underestimate uncertainties are discussed using straightforward graphical tools to evaluate

  16. Environmental consequences of atmosphereic krypton-85. Final report, January 1, 1977-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Krypton-85 is a radioactive inert gas produced during normal operations of the nuclear fuel cycle. The quantities of krypton-85, that will be produced in the next century, are sufficient, if released, to alter the electrical state of the atmosphere. The principal hypothesis is that an anthropogenic alteration of the electric state of the atmosphere could alter other meterological phenomena and lead to significant environmental impacts. The goal of this project was to explore some areas of basic science related to the evaluation of that hypothesis. The approach was primarily theoretical. The following topics were addressed: a first approximation model to estimate the effects of krypton-85 on the electrical state of the atmosphere; an analysis of the pathways between krypton-85 production and the atmosphere; an analytical model for fair weather atmospheric electricity; and a dipole model for atmospheric electricity. The results will provide a framework on which detailed models can be built. The results should provide better understanding of some topics in atmospheric electricity

  17. Deepwater Horizon MC252 deepwater benthic communities data from the Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA) containing sediment toxicity sample results and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (TPAH) results, habitat injury zones, mesophotic coral reef resources, and related deep-sea area injury toxicity results collected from samples taken from 2010-09-16 to 2011-12-04 in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NCEI Accession 0163817)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Archival Information Package (AIP) contains Environmental Resource Management Application (ERMA) GIS layers that represent sample locations for workplan...

  18. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George C; Hall, Bradley D; Harth, Christina M; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Jeongsoon; Montzka, Stephen A; Mühle, Jens; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K; Weiss, Ray F

    The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113); the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b); and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%.

  19. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Rhoderick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12, trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11, and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113; the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22 and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b; and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a, all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%.

  20. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bradley D.; Harth, Christina M.; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Jeongsoon; Montzka, Stephen A.; Mühle, Jens; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113); the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b); and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%. PMID:26753167

  1. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for δ18O and δ15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean δ18O values were within 0.5‰ of the δ18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the δ15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean δ15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean δ18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean δ15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the δ15N and δ18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in δ15N and δ18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic

  2. Treating Sample Covariances for Use in Strongly Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Polly J.; Lawless, Amos S.; Nichols, Nancy K.

    2018-01-01

    Strongly coupled data assimilation requires cross-domain forecast error covariances; information from ensembles can be used, but limited sampling means that ensemble derived error covariances are routinely rank deficient and/or ill-conditioned and marred by noise. Thus, they require modification before they can be incorporated into a standard assimilation framework. Here we compare methods for improving the rank and conditioning of multivariate sample error covariance matrices for coupled atmosphere-ocean data assimilation. The first method, reconditioning, alters the matrix eigenvalues directly; this preserves the correlation structures but does not remove sampling noise. We show that it is better to recondition the correlation matrix rather than the covariance matrix as this prevents small but dynamically important modes from being lost. The second method, model state-space localization via the Schur product, effectively removes sample noise but can dampen small cross-correlation signals. A combination that exploits the merits of each is found to offer an effective alternative.

  3. Evaluation of environmental damage due to atmospheric pollution caused by power economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burneikis, J.; Shtreimikiene, D.

    1996-01-01

    Methods to evaluate the environmental damage due to atmospheric pollution caused by power economy are presented. The products of burning fossil fuel (CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x and ashes) make the bulk of the pollutants that are being discharged into the atmosphere. To evaluate the damage caused by these pollutants an empirical method is suggested. The direct and analytical methods are used as a basis in collecting data for the empirical evaluation. All the three methods are described and empirical formulas suggested for calculating environmental damage due to burning fossil fuel in thermal power stations. The authors prove the necessity to change the present system of environmental taxes in Lithuania, which are purely symbolic. (author). 8 refs., 9 tabs

  4. The determination of plutonium isotopes in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siripirom, Lopchai.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration of plutonium in environmental samples such as soil, water, and surface air in the middle part of Thailand were studied. The surface air were collected only at the fifth floor of the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP). Plutonium-242 was used as a tracer. Soil and air samples were dissolved by pyrosulphate fusion, and plutonium was co-precipitated with barium sulfate. Then dissolved the precipitate in perchloric acid. Plutonium was extracted out by using solvent bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Plutonium in water samples were coprecipitated with iron (III) hydroxide and were dissolved in 8 M. nitric acid. Then the plutonium was separated out by using anion exchange resin, Dowex 1x4. After the solvent extraction or the anion exchange, plutonium was coprecipitated with cerous hydroxide. The activities of plutonium were measured by a surface barrier detector for about 24 hours. Lower limit of detection for 1,440 minutes is 0.012 pCi. These studies showed that only plutonium-239, 240 was observed. The range of activities of plutonium-239, 240 in soil were 0.002-0.157 pCi/g (dry), in water were 0.1-81 f Ci/l, and in air were 7-330 a Ci/m 3 . However, the plutonium concentrations in these studies are far below the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for general population which is equal to 3x10 8 f Ci/l of water and 5x10 6 a Ci/m 3 of air

  5. Development of analytical methods for the separation of plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium from environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, S.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, separation methods have been developed for the analysis of anthropogenic transuranium elements plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium from environmental samples contaminated by global nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The analytical methods utilized in this study are based on extraction chromatography. Highly varying atmospheric plutonium isotope concentrations and activity ratios were found at both Kurchatov (Kazakhstan), near the former Semipalatinsk test site, and Sodankylae (Finland). The origin of plutonium is almost impossible to identify at Kurchatov, since hundreds of nuclear tests were performed at the Semipalatinsk test site. In Sodankylae, plutonium in the surface air originated from nuclear weapons testing, conducted mostly by USSR and USA before the sampling year 1963. The variation in americium, curium and neptunium concentrations was great as well in peat samples collected in southern and central Finland in 1986 immediately after the Chernobyl accident. The main source of transuranium contamination in peats was from global nuclear test fallout, although there are wide regional differences in the fraction of Chernobyl-originated activity (of the total activity) for americium, curium and neptunium. The separation methods developed in this study yielded good chemical recovery for the elements investigated and adequately pure fractions for radiometric activity determination. The extraction chromatographic methods were faster compared to older methods based on ion exchange chromatography. In addition, extraction chromatography is a more environmentally friendly separation method than ion exchange, because less acidic waste solutions are produced during the analytical procedures. (orig.)

  6. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Artificial radioactivity in the environmental samples as IAEA reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salagean, M.; Pantelica, A.

    1998-01-01

    . Uncontaminated by nuclear activities: IAEA-327, Podsolic soil collected in 1990 from the Moscow region and considered uncontaminated by radionuclides of the Chernobyl accident or by other nuclear activities. The results obtained by our laboratory are in good agreement with the certified IAEA data. Generally, the concentration of the artificial radionuclides in the investigated samples is higher than that expected from the influence of global fallout in the intercomparison materials distributed before Chernobyl accident. Concerning the nature of these investigated IAEA reference materials, very high values for the concentration levels of cesium radionuclides especially in IAEA-373 (grass) and IAEA-375 (soil) samples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl Power Station after the nuclear accident in 1986 were found. High levels of radioactivities for the artificial radionuclides were also determined in the samples collected in the neighbourhood of the nuclear installations, especially in marine sediment (IAEA-135). It is of interest to point out the high concentration of cesium radionuclides in IAEA-300 sediment collected in 1992 in the Baltic Sea in comparison with the IAEA-306 sediment collected also in the Baltic Sea in 1986. It seems to be an increase of the Baltic Sea artificial radioactivity by accumulation in time. Marine sediment constitutes an important component of marine ecosystem since it represents the final sink for any releases of wastes into the sea. These certified radioactive materials are very useful to all laboratories engaged in the radioactive pollution investigations on environmental samples. (authors)

  8. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Capability of environmental sampling to detect undeclared cask openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckstead, L.W.; Efurd, D.W.; Hemberger, P.H.; Abhold, M.E.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the signatures that would allow monitors to detect diversion of nuclear fuel (by a diverter) from a storage area such as a geological repository. Due to the complexity of operations surrounding disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository, there are several places that a diversion of fuel could take place. After the canister that contains the fuel rods is breached, the diverter would require a hot cell to process or repackage the fuel. A reference repository and possible diversion scenarios are discussed. When a canister is breached, or during reprocessing to extract nuclear weapons material (primarily Pu), several important isotopes or signatures including tritium, 85 Kr, and 129 I are released to the surrounding environment and have the potential for analysis. Estimates of release concentrations of the key signatures from the repository under a hypothetical diversion scenario are presented and discussed. Gas analysis data collected from above-ground storage casks at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) are included and discussed in the report. In addition, LANL participated in gas sampling of one TAN cask, the Castor V/21, in July 1997. Results of xenon analysis from the cask gas sample are presented and discussed. The importance of global fallout and recent commercial reprocessing activities and their effects on repository monitoring are discussed. Monitoring and instrumental equipment for analysis of the key signature isotopes are discussed along with limits of detection. A key factor in determining if diversion activities are in progress at a repository is the timeliness of detection and analysis of the signatures. Once a clandestine operation is suspected, analytical data should be collected as quickly as possible to support any evidence of diversion

  10. Capability of environmental sampling to detect undeclared cask openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckstead, L.W.; Efurd, D.W.; Hemberger, P.H.; Abhold, M.E.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the signatures that would allow monitors to detect diversion of nuclear fuel (by a diverter) from a storage area such as a geological repository. Due to the complexity of operations surrounding disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository, there are several places that a diversion of fuel could take place. After the canister that contains the fuel rods is breached, the diverter would require a hot cell to process or repackage the fuel. A reference repository and possible diversion scenarios are discussed. When a canister is breached, or during reprocessing to extract nuclear weapons material (primarily Pu), several important isotopes or signatures including tritium, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I are released to the surrounding environment and have the potential for analysis. Estimates of release concentrations of the key signatures from the repository under a hypothetical diversion scenario are presented and discussed. Gas analysis data collected from above-ground storage casks at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) are included and discussed in the report. In addition, LANL participated in gas sampling of one TAN cask, the Castor V/21, in July 1997. Results of xenon analysis from the cask gas sample are presented and discussed. The importance of global fallout and recent commercial reprocessing activities and their effects on repository monitoring are discussed. Monitoring and instrumental equipment for analysis of the key signature isotopes are discussed along with limits of detection. A key factor in determining if diversion activities are in progress at a repository is the timeliness of detection and analysis of the signatures. Once a clandestine operation is suspected, analytical data should be collected as quickly as possible to support any evidence of diversion.

  11. Voltammetric technique, a panacea for analytical examination of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahir, E.; Mohiuddin, S.; Naqvi, I.I.

    2012-01-01

    Voltammetric methods for trace metal analysis in environmental samples of marine origin like mangrove, sediments and shrimps are generally recommended. Three different electro-analytical techniques i.e. polarography, anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and adsorptive stripping voltammetry (ADSV) have been used. Cd/sub 2/+, Pb/sub 2/+, Cu/sub 2/+ and Mn/sub 2/+ were determined through ASV, Cr/sub 6/+ was analyzed by ADSV and Fe/sub 2/+, Zn/sub 2/+, Ni/sub 2/+ and Co/sub 2/+ were determined through polarography. Out of which pairs of Fe/sub 2/+Zn/sub 2/+ and Ni/sub 2/+Co/sub 2/+ were determined in two separate runs while Cd/sub 2/+, Pb/sub 2/+, Cu/sub 2/+ were analyzed in single run of ASV. Sensitivity and speciation capabilities of voltammetric methods have been employed. Analysis conditions were optimized that includes selection of supporting electrolyte, pH, working electrodes, sweep rate etc. Stripping voltammetry was adopted for analysis at ultra trace levels. Statistical parameters for analytical method development like selectivity factor, interference, repeatability (0.0065-0.130 macro g/g), reproducibility (0.08125-1.625 macro g/g), detection limits (0.032-5.06 macro g/g), limits of quantification (0.081-12.652 macro g/g), sensitivities (5.636-2.15 nA mL macro g-1) etc. were also determined. The percentage recoveries were found in between 95-105% using certified reference materials. Real samples of complex marine environment from Karachi coastline were also analyzed. The standard addition method was employed where any matrix effect was evidenced. (author)

  12. Application of SIMS to the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyama, Haruhiko

    2003-01-01

    As an example of surface analysis of environmental samples, SIMS was applied to airborne particulates, fish otoliths (a calcareous ear-stone) and biotites (a rock-forming aluminosilicate mineral). Airborne particulates deposited on leaf surface were analyzed directly by fast atom bombardment (FAB)-SIMS using an O 2 primary neutral beam. Some metal elements, such as Pb, of aerosol origin could be detected. Local areas of a thin section of an otolith were analyzed by FAB-SIMS. Line scans and images of secondary ions revealed seasonal periodicity in Sr, Na and K concentrations in the otolith that corresponded to the annual band structure. Surface alteration of acid-treated and naturally weathered biotites was studied by SIMS depth profiling using an O - primary ion. The depth profile of the acid-treated biotite showed the formation of an altered surface layer rich in Si. In contrast a thick altered surface layer was not observed and Al was held on the surface under natural weathering

  13. Methods to maximise recovery of environmental DNA from water samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheyda Hinlo

    Full Text Available The environmental DNA (eDNA method is a detection technique that is rapidly gaining credibility as a sensitive tool useful in the surveillance and monitoring of invasive and threatened species. Because eDNA analysis often deals with small quantities of short and degraded DNA fragments, methods that maximize eDNA recovery are required to increase detectability. In this study, we performed experiments at different stages of the eDNA analysis to show which combinations of methods give the best recovery rate for eDNA. Using Oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus as a study species, we show that various combinations of DNA capture, preservation and extraction methods can significantly affect DNA yield. Filtration using cellulose nitrate filter paper preserved in ethanol or stored in a -20°C freezer and extracted with the Qiagen DNeasy kit outperformed other combinations in terms of cost and efficiency of DNA recovery. Our results support the recommendation to filter water samples within 24hours but if this is not possible, our results suggest that refrigeration may be a better option than freezing for short-term storage (i.e., 3-5 days. This information is useful in designing eDNA detection of low-density invasive or threatened species, where small variations in DNA recovery can signify the difference between detection success or failure.

  14. Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. Kenneth; Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick; Russo, Richard E.; Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Carado, Anthony J.

    2017-01-03

    A liquid sampling, atmospheric pressure, glow discharge (LS-APGD) device as well as systems that incorporate the device and methods for using the device and systems are described. The LS-APGD includes a hollow capillary for delivering an electrolyte solution to a glow discharge space. The device also includes a counter electrode in the form of a second hollow capillary that can deliver the analyte into the glow discharge space. A voltage across the electrolyte solution and the counter electrode creates the microplasma within the glow discharge space that interacts with the analyte to move it to a higher energy state (vaporization, excitation, and/or ionization of the analyte).

  15. High-resolution real-time optical studies of radiological air sample filtration processes in an environmental continuous air monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, John C.; Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Schery, Stephen D.; Alcantara, Raul E.

    1999-01-01

    The need for a continuous air monitor capable of quick and accurate measurements of airborne radioactivity in close proximity to the work environment during waste management, site restoration, and D&D operations led to the Los Alamos National Laboratory development of an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM). Monitoring the hostile work environment of waste recovery, for example, presents unique challenges for detector design for detectors previously used for the clean room conditions of the typical plutonium laboratory. The environmental and atmospheric conditions (dust, high wind, etc.) influence aerosol particle penetration into the ECAM sampling head as well as the build-up of deposits on the ECAM filter.

  16. Atmospheric Deposition: Sampling Procedures, Analytical Methods, and Main Recent Findings from the Scientific Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amodio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere is a carrier on which some natural and anthropogenic organic and inorganic chemicals are transported, and the wet and dry deposition events are the most important processes that remove those chemicals, depositing it on soil and water. A wide variety of different collectors were tested to evaluate site-specificity, seasonality and daily variability of settleable particle concentrations. Deposition fluxes of POPs showed spatial and seasonal variations, diagnostic ratios of PAHs on deposited particles, allowed the discrimination between pyrolytic or petrogenic sources. Congener pattern analysis and bulk deposition fluxes in rural sites confirmed long-range atmospheric transport of PCDDs/Fs. More and more sophisticated and newly designed deposition samplers have being used for characterization of deposited mercury, demonstrating the importance of rain scavenging and the relatively higher magnitude of Hg deposition from Chinese anthropogenic sources. Recently biological monitors demonstrated that PAH concentrations in lichens were comparable with concentrations measured in a conventional active sampler in an outdoor environment. In this review the authors explore the methodological approaches used for the assessment of atmospheric deposition, from the analysis of the sampling methods, the analytical procedures for chemical characterization of pollutants and the main results from the scientific literature.

  17. Cesium-137 and natural radionuclides in soils from southern Brazil and soils and others environmental samples from Antarctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, L.A.

    1993-04-01

    This work presents a study of environmental artificial and natural radioactivity levels in soil samples from the Southern Brazil and in soils and other environmental samples form Antarctica. Artificial radioactivity was determined by measuring Cs-137 which is a 30.1 year half-life man-made radionuclide produced in the past by atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons. Natural radioactivity was determined by measuring some radionuclides belonging to Th-232 and U-238 natural radioactive families, and of K-40 concentrations. Several types of soils from Southern Brazil; and soil samples, marine sediments, lichens, mosses and algae collected at King George and other nearby islands (South Shetland Archipelago, Antarctica) were analyzed. A gamma-ray spectrometer was used to measure radioactivity levels of the collected samples and its overall characteristics are analyzed in this work. (author)

  18. Determination of platinum group metals by ICP-AES in environmental samples after preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasankova, R.; Sommer, L.

    1999-01-01

    Platinum group metal (PGM) may have toxic properties and their presence in the environment represent danger for human health. With the introduction of automobile catalytic converters containing PGM, the emission of these noble metals into atmosphere has increased. Platinum, palladium and rhodium are used in this catalytic converters to decrease toxic emissions of carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides in vehicles exhaust gases. These catalysts are mobile sources of PGM into the environment. Thus, increased platinum concentrations have been found in various objects of environment because of the massive introduction of such catalytic converters are present. The preconcentration and separation of PGM and their determination by ICP-AES in environmental samples are described

  19. Quantitation of 11 alkylamines in atmospheric samples: separating structural isomers by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Bryan K.; Quilty, Aleya T.; Di Lorenzo, Robert A.; Ziegler, Susan E.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.

    2017-03-01

    Amines are important drivers in particle formation and growth, which have implications for Earth's climate. In this work, we developed an ion chromatographic (IC) method using sample cation-exchange preconcentration for separating and quantifying the nine most abundant atmospheric alkylamines (monomethylamine (MMAH+), dimethylamine (DMAH+), trimethylamine (TMAH+), monoethylamine (MEAH+), diethylamine (DEAH+), triethylamine (TEAH+), monopropylamine (MPAH+), isomonopropylamine (iMPAH+), and monobutylamine (MBAH+)) and two alkyl diamines (1, 4-diaminobutane (DABH+) and 1, 5-diaminopentane (DAPH+)). Further, the developed method separates the suite of amines from five common atmospheric inorganic cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+). All 16 cations are greater than 95 % baseline resolved and elute in a runtime of 35 min. This paper describes the first successful separation of DEAH+ and TMAH+ by IC and achieves separation between three sets of structural isomers, providing specificity not possible by mass spectrometry. The method detection limits for the alkylamines are in the picogram per injection range and the method precision (±1σ) analyzed over 3 months was within 16 % for all the cations. The performance of the IC method for atmospheric application was tested with biomass-burning (BB) particle extracts collected from two forest fire plumes in Canada. In extracts of a size-resolved BB sample from an aged plume, we detected and quantified MMAH+, DMAH+, TMAH+, MEAH+, DEAH+, and TEAH+ in the presence of Na+, NH4+, and K+ at molar ratios of amine to inorganic cation ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 1000. Quantities of DEAH+ and DMAH+ of 0.2-200 and 3-1200 ng m-3, respectively, were present in the extracts and an unprecedented amine-to-ammonium molar ratio greater than 1 was observed in particles with diameters spanning 56-180 nm. Extracts of respirable fine-mode particles (PM2. 5) from a summer forest fire in British Columbia in 2015 were found to contain iMPAH+, TMAH+, DEAH

  20. Supplemental mathematical formulations, Atmospheric pathway: The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppo, J.G.; Buck, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is an integrated software implementation of physics-based fate and transport models for health and environmental risk assessments of both radioactive and hazardous pollutants. This atmospheric component report is one of a series of formulation reports that document the MEPAS mathematical models. MEPAS is a ''multimedia'' model; pollutant transport is modeled within, through, and between multiple media (air, soil, groundwater, and surface water). The estimated concentrations in the various media are used to compute exposures and impacts to the environment, to maximum individuals, and to populations

  1. Expectations for Particulate Contamination Relevant to in Situ Atmospheric Sampling for Compositional Analysis at Uranus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M. H.

    2017-12-01

    NASA and ESA are considering options for in situ science with atmospheric entry probes to the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. Nominal probe entry mass is in the 300-kg range, although a miniaturized secondary probe option is being studied in the 30-kg range. In all cases, compositional sampling would commence near the 100-mbar level at Uranus, after ejection of the heat shield and deployment of the descent parachute. In this presentation, I review existing literature on the composition, mass loading, and vertical distribution of condensed material that the probe may encounter. Sample inlets for measurement of the gas composition should be heated to avoid potential buildup of condensate, which would block the flow of atmospheric gas into composition sensors. Heating rate and temperature values -- sufficient to keep sample inlets clean under various assumptions -- will be presented. Three main types of condensed material will be considered: Stratospheric hydrocarbon ices: Solar UV photolyzes CH4, leading to the production of volatile hydrocarbons with higher C/H ratios. These species diffuse from their production regions into colder levels where the ices of C2H2, C2H6, and C4H2 condense. Some studies have also considered condensation of C3H8, C4H10, C6H6, and C6H2. Gunk: The hydrocarbon ices are thought to become polymerized due to irradiation from solar UV. The exact composition of the resulting gunk is not known. Solid-state photochemical processing may produce the traces of reddish (blue-absorbing) haze material, present in the troposphere at temperatures warm enough to sublimate the simple hydrocarbon ices. Tropospheric ices: In the region accessible to probes under study (P < 10 bar), much thicker condensation clouds may form from volatile gases CH4, NH3, and H2S. If large amounts of NH3 are sequestered in the deeper H2O liquid cloud, then the S/N ratio could exceed 1 in the probe-accessible region of the atmosphere, leading to NH4SH and H2S ices below the CH4

  2. Atmospheric environmental protection in China: Current status, developmental trend and research emphasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Honghong; Hao, Jiming; Tang, Xiaolong

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric environmental quality in China has been improving due to a variety of programs implemented by the Chinese government in recent decades. However, air pollution is still serious because of rapid socioeconomic development and increased energy consumption. Atmospheric environmental problems appear to be complex and regional in nature, and China's climate is aggravated by global climatic change. Air pollution originates from multiple sources and the effect on public human health will increase. The influence of acid rain in southern China will be long term, and the impact of climate change will rise. In order to reduce the adverse effects of air pollutants on the environment, the total number of emission sources from major industry, fine particle pollutants, SO 2 emissions from power plants and the vehicle exhaust must be lowered and strictly controlled. The energy structure will affect the quality of the atmosphere for a long time. Increased energy efficiency, optimization of energy structure and the generation of a sustainable consumption and production patterns will provide opportunities to resolve regional and the global environmental problems

  3. Storage Effects on Sample Integrity of Environmental Surface Sampling Specimens with Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, K Allison; O'Connell, Heather A; Rose, Laura J; Noble-Wang, Judith A; Arduino, Matthew J

    The effect of packaging, shipping temperatures and storage times on recovery of Bacillus anthracis . Sterne spores from swabs was investigated. Macrofoam swabs were pre-moistened, inoculated with Bacillus anthracis spores, and packaged in primary containment or secondary containment before storage at -15°C, 5°C, 21°C, or 35°C for 0-7 days. Swabs were processed according to validated Centers for Disease Control/Laboratory Response Network culture protocols, and the percent recovery relative to a reference sample (T 0 ) was determined for each variable. No differences were observed in recovery between swabs held at -15° and 5°C, (p ≥ 0.23). These two temperatures provided significantly better recovery than swabs held at 21°C or 35°C (all 7 days pooled, p ≤ 0.04). The percent recovery at 5°C was not significantly different if processed on days 1, 2 or 4, but was significantly lower on day 7 (day 2 vs. 7, 5°C, 10 2 , p=0.03). Secondary containment provided significantly better percent recovery than primary containment, regardless of storage time (5°C data, p ≤ 0.008). The integrity of environmental swab samples containing Bacillus anthracis spores shipped in secondary containment was maintained when stored at -15°C or 5°C and processed within 4 days to yield the optimum percent recovery of spores.

  4. Seasonal comparison of moss bag technique against vertical snow samples for monitoring atmospheric pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Hanna; Berisha, Anna-Kaisa; Mäkinen, Joni

    2016-03-01

    This is the first study seasonally applying Sphagnum papillosum moss bags and vertical snow samples for monitoring atmospheric pollution. Moss bags, exposed in January, were collected together with snow samples by early March 2012 near the Harjavalta Industrial Park in southwest Finland. Magnetic, chemical, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), K-means clustering, and Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) data showed parallel spatial trends of pollution dispersal for both materials. Results strengthen previous findings that concentrate and slag handling activities were important (dust) emission sources while the impact from Cu-Ni smelter's pipe remained secondary at closer distances. Statistically significant correlations existed between the variables of snow and moss bags. As a summary, both methods work well for sampling and are efficient pollutant accumulators. Moss bags can be used also in winter conditions and they provide more homogeneous and better controlled sampling method than snow samples. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Random sampling technique for ultra-fast computations of molecular opacities for exoplanet atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Opacities of molecules in exoplanet atmospheres rely on increasingly detailed line-lists for these molecules. The line lists available today contain for many species up to several billions of lines. Computation of the spectral line profile created by pressure and temperature broadening, the Voigt profile, of all of these lines is becoming a computational challenge. Aims: We aim to create a method to compute the Voigt profile in a way that automatically focusses the computation time into the strongest lines, while still maintaining the continuum contribution of the high number of weaker lines. Methods: Here, we outline a statistical line sampling technique that samples the Voigt profile quickly and with high accuracy. The number of samples is adjusted to the strength of the line and the local spectral line density. This automatically provides high accuracy line shapes for strong lines or lines that are spectrally isolated. The line sampling technique automatically preserves the integrated line opacity for all lines, thereby also providing the continuum opacity created by the large number of weak lines at very low computational cost. Results: The line sampling technique is tested for accuracy when computing line spectra and correlated-k tables. Extremely fast computations ( 3.5 × 105 lines per second per core on a standard current day desktop computer) with high accuracy (≤1% almost everywhere) are obtained. A detailed recipe on how to perform the computations is given.

  6. New Lipids From Cultured Archaea and Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Bradley, A. S.; Hebting, Y.; Jahnke, L. L.; Embaye, T.; Orphan, V. J.

    2006-12-01

    The intact polar lipids of Archaea comprise cores with isoprenoid hydrocarbon chains with 20, 25 or 40 carbon atoms linked through ether bonds to glycerol. These cores can take the form of diethers or membrane- spanning tetraethers. Together with their wide array of polar head groups, these compounds are structurally diverse and potentially very useful as taxonomic markers for making assessments of microbial diversity independently of genomic approaches. Furthermore, the recalcitrant hydrocarbon chains of these lipids are the only really effective means to identify the presence of Archaea in ancient sedimentary environments. The advent of new LC-MS methods has enabled ready identification and quantification of intact polar lipids in cultures and environmental samples based on comparisons with appropriate standard compounds [1, 2]. However, these LC-MS analyses of intact lipids have also revealed the presence of additional compounds and it is likely that many of these represent chemical structures that are new to science. Elucidating these structures is a major analytical challenge because, generally, only minute amounts of material available for chemical characterization. In order to study these potentially new structures, one layer of information can be obtained by chemical degradation to remove and identify the polar head groups [2]. Cleavage of the ether bonds releases the hydrocarbon chains for their further characterization. One class of core lipids, the 3-hydroxyarchaeols, escaped detection for many years because strong acid treatments in the analysis protocols had destroyed hydroxyl-containing isoprenoid chains. We have now re-examined the lipids of a thermophilic methanogen, M. thermolithotrophicus, using mild procedures and avoiding strong acids. As well as the known compounds archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol and sn-3-hydroxyarchaeol, we encountered dihydroxyarchaeol. Moreover, the hydroxylated archaeols were found to exist as a very complex mixture of

  7. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  8. Development of analytical techniques for water and environmental samples (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Chul Hun; Jeon, Chi Wan; Jung, Kang Sup; Song, Kyung Sun; Kim, Sang Yeon [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop new analytical methods with good detection limit for toxic inorganic and organic compounds. The analyses of CN, organic acids, particulate materials in environmental samples have been done using several methods such as Ion Chromatography, SPE, SPME, GC/MS, GC/FID, SPLITT (split-flow thin cell fractionation) during the second year of this project. Advantage and disadvantage of several distillation method (by KS, JIS, EPA) for CN analysis in wastewater were investigated. As the results, we proposed new distillation apparatus for CN analysis, which was proved to be simpler, faster and to get better recovery than conventional apparatus. And ion chromatograph/pulsed amperometric detector (IC/PAD) system instead of colorimetry for CN detection was setup to solve matrix interference. And SPE(solid phase extraction) and SPME (solid phase micro extraction) as liquid-solid extraction technique were applied to the analysis of phenols in wastewater. Optimum experimental conditions and factors influencing analytical results were determined. From these results, It could be concluded that C{sub 18} cartridge and polystyrene-divinylbenzene disk in SPE method, polyacrylate fiber in SPME were proper solid phase adsorbent for phenol. Optimum conditions to analyze phenol derivatives simultaneously were established. Also, Continuous SPLITT (Split-flow thin cell) Fractionation (CSF) is a new preparative separation technique that is useful for fractionation of particulate and macromolecular materials. CSF is carried out in a thin ribbon-like channel equipped with two splitters at both inlet and outlet of the channel. In this work, we set up a new CSF system, and tested using polystyrene latex standard particles. And then we fractionated particles contained in air and underground water based on their sedimentation coefficients using CSF. (author). 27 refs., 13 tabs., 31 figs.

  9. A critical review of nuclear activation techniques for the determination of trace elements in atmospheric aerosols, particulates and sludge samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dams, R.

    1992-01-01

    Activation analysis is one of the major techniques for the determination of many minor and trace elements in a large variety of solid environmental and pollution samples, such as atmospheric aerosols, particulate emissions, fly ash, coal, incineration ash and sewage sludge, etc. Neutron activation analysis of total, inhalable or respirable airborne particulate matter collected on a filter or in a cascade impactor on some substrate, is very popular. By Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) up to 45 elements can be determined. The irradiation and counting procedures can be adapted to optimize the sensitivity for particular elements. The precision is largely governed by counting statistics and a high accuracy can be obtained after calibration with multi-elemental standards. Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis (RNAA) is applied only when extremely low limits of determination are required. Instrumental Photon Activation Analysis (IPAA) is complementary to INAA, since some elements of environmental interest can be determined which do not produce appropriate radionuclides by neutron irradiation. Charged Particle Activation Analysis (CPAA) is used in particular circumstances such as for certification purposes or coupled to radiochemical separations for extremely low concentrations. (author)

  10. A method to combine non-probability sample data with probability sample data in estimating spatial means of environmental variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Gruijter, de J.J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating spatial means of environmental variables of a region from data collected by convenience or purposive sampling, validity of the results can be ensured by collecting additional data through probability sampling. The precision of the pi estimator that uses the probability sample can be

  11. Natural vs. Anthropogenic Contribution to Atmospheric Dust at Rural Site: Potential of Environmental Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, E.; Kapicka, A.; Grison, H.; Kotlik, B.; Zboril, R.; Korbelova, Z.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic properties of environmental samples are very sensitive in detecting strongly magnetic compounds such as magnetite and maghemite and can help in assessing concentration and grain-size distribution of these minerals. This information can be helpful in estimating, e.g., the source of pollutants, monitoring pollution load, or investigating seasonal and climatic effects. We studied magnetic properties of particulate matter ( PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and TSP - total suspended particles), collected over 32-48 hours in a small settlement in south Bohemia during heating and non-heating season. The site is rather remote, with negligible traffic and industrial contributions to air pollution. Thus, the suggested seasonal effect should be dominantly due to local (domestic) heating, burning wood or coal. Our results show typical differences in PMx concentration, which is much higher in the winter (heating) sample, accompanied by SEM analyses and magnetic data oriented on concentration and grain-size distribution of magnetite/maghemite particles. While PM concentrations are significantly higher in winter, differeces between concentration of Fe-oxides in summer and winter are not that significant. In both summer and winter, more FeO was in coarser PM10 than in the finer fractions. This is in good agreement with SEM observations. Grain-size sensitive parameters are different for summer and winter PMx samples, suggesting different source of PMx. It seems that domestic heating does not produce significant amount of FeO oxides in this site, its contribution during heating season compensates for the decay from natural sources (and/or agriculture) during summer. Our results prove the high sensitivity of magnetic methods in terms of concentration of ferrimagnetic Fe-oxides. However, their potential to discriminate unambiguously their origin is still questioned. This study is supported by the Czech Science Foundation through grant #P210/10/0554.; Fig. 1. Relative enhancement (determined

  12. Remarks on the sampling procedures for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomingas, R [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Lufthygiene und Silikoseforschung

    1979-01-01

    Despite all efforts to optimize the sampling procedure for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) a part of the PAH is lost during the sampling period. The amount of loss depends on the vapour pressure, the air flow rate, the oxidants in the suspended matter and on the sampling time. The sampling time in return is determined by the PAH concentration in the atmosphere and cannot be shortened infinitely, at least not at the expense of the air flow rate. When the concentration of the PAH is extremely low, a repeated change of the filters is advisable. Losses of PAH even occur when filters are stored in the dark. An evaluation of these losses is difficult for many reasons. There is no relationship between the amount of loss and time unit; the decrease of each PAH is different and seems to depend on the composition of the particulate matter collected on the filter. The disappearance of the PAH from the filter is a continual process, therefore a rapid performance of the analysis is inevitable.

  13. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (Trot), excitation temperature (Texc), electron number density (ne), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ~ 1000 K and ~ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ~ 3 × 1015 cm- 3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (laser ablation sample introduction.

  14. Environmental impact of atmospheric fugitive emissions from amine based post combustion CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attalla, M.I.; Azzi, M.; Jackson, P.; Angove, D. [CSIRO, Newcastle, NSW (Australia). Energy Technology Div

    2009-07-01

    Amine solvent-based chemical absorption of CO{sub 2} is the most mature technology for post combustion capture (PCC) and will likely to be the first to reach commercial scale application. As such, potentially millions of tonnes of solvent will be used per year. In order to ensure the viability of PCC, the potential environmental impacts of fugitive emissions on terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments must be investigated. This study used controlled laboratory/ pilot scale experiments to determine the major chemical components emitted under different operating conditions. As well, the atmospheric photo-oxidation products of amines were studied in a smog chamber under ambient conditions. The environmental concerns associated with these emissions include entrainment of the amine/ammonia with the treated flue gas and their associated atmospheric chemical reaction pathways; formation of ammonia and other amine degradation products can be entrained with the flue gas to the atmosphere; nitrosamines may form as a result of the reaction between an amine and nitrogen oxide; and the mounting evidence of the presence of amines in particulate phase. The chemical compositions of potential fugitive emissions in the flue gases from the CO{sub 2} capture system were estimated. The CSIRO smog chamber was then used to assess the potential environmental impact of selected relevant compounds in terms of their reactivities to produce secondary products. These secondary products were then characterized to determine their potential health risk factors. An air quality model was used to evaluate the potential impact of using amine solutions for CO{sub 2} capture and to determine the trade-off between CO{sub 2} capture and local and regional air quality.

  15. Atmospheric aerosol dispersion models and their applications to environmental risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Mazur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Numerical models of dispersion of atmospheric pollutants are widely used to forecast the spread of contaminants in the air and to analyze the effects of this phenomenon. The aim of the study is to investigate the possibilities and the quality of diagnosis and prediction of atmospheric transport of aerosols in the air using the dispersion model of atmospheric pollutants, developed at the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMWM in Warsaw. Material and methods. A model of the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants, linked with meteorological models in a diagnostic mode, was used to simulate the transport of the cloud of aerosols released during the crash near the town of Ożydiw (Ukraine and of volcanic ash – during the volcanic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. Results. Possible directions of dispersion of pollutants in the air and its concentration in the atmosphere and deposition to the soil were assessed. The analysis of temporal variability of concentrations of aerosols in the atmosphere confirmed that the model developed at IMWM is an effective tool for diagnosis of air quality in the area of Poland as well as for determination of exposure duration to the aerosol clouds for different weather scenarios. Conclusions. The results are a confirmation of the thesis, that because in the environmental risk assessment, an important element is not only current information on the level of pollution concentrations, but also the time of exposure to pollution and forecast of these elements, and consequently the predicted effects on man or the environment in general; so it is necessary to use forecasting tools, similar to presented application. The dispersion model described in the paper is an operational tool for description, analysis and forecasting of emergency situations in case of emissions of hazardous substances.

  16. Sampling tritiated water vapor from the atmosphere by an active system using silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, E.T.S.I. de Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alegria, N., E-mail: natalia.alegria@ehu.es [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, E.T.S.I. de Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, E.T.S.I. de Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Among the different methods used to collect the tritiated water vapor (HTO) contained in the atmosphere, one of the most worldwide used is its collection using an air pump, which forces the air to pass through a dry silica gel trap. The silica gel is then distilled to remove the water collected, which is measured in a liquid scintillation counting system. In this paper, an analysis of the water collection efficiency of the silica gel has been done as a function of the temperatures involved, the dimensions of the pipe driving the air into the silica gel traps, the air volume passing through the trap and the flow rates used. Among the obtained conclusions, it can be pointed out that placing the traps inside a cooled container, the amount of silica gel needed to collect all the water contained in the air passing through these traps can be estimated using a weather forecast and a psychometric chart. To do this, and as thermal equilibrium between incoming and open air should be established, a suitable design of the sampling system is proposed. - Highlights: > To recollect the atmosphere air tritiated water vapor, an active system was used. > The system is an air pump and three traps with silica gel connected by a rubber pipe. > The silica gel retention depends on the meteorological conditions and the flow rate. > The amount of water collected and the mass of silica gel need were calculated, F.

  17. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manard, Benjamin T. [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sarkar, Arnab [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marcus, R. Kenneth [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (T{sub rot}), excitation temperature (T{sub exc}), electron number density (n{sub e}), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N{sub 2} and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ∼ 1000 K and ∼ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (< 1 mm{sup 3} volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction. - Highlights: • Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) • LS-APGD as a secondary

  18. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (T rot ), excitation temperature (T exc ), electron number density (n e ), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N 2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ∼ 1000 K and ∼ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ∼ 3 × 10 15 cm −3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source ( 3 volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction. - Highlights: • Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) • LS-APGD as a secondary excitation source for laser-ablated (LA

  19. Sampling and characterization of aerosols formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; McCulla, W.H.; Pickrell, P.W.; Branam, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    When gaseous UF 6 is released into the atmosphere, it rapidly reacts with ambient moisture to form an aerosol of uranyl fluoride and HF. As part of our Safety Analysis program, we have performed several experimental releases of UF 6 (from natural uranium) in contained volumes in order to investigate techniques for sampling and characterizing the aerosol materials. The aggregrate particle morphology and size distribution have been found to be dependent upon several conditions, including the relative humidity at the time of the release and the elapse time after the release. Aerosol composition and settling rate have been investigated using isokinetic samplers for the separate collection of UO 2 F 2 and HF, and via laser spectroscopic remote sensing (Mie scatter and infrared spectroscopy). 8 references

  20. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: atmospheric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rote, D.M.; Brubaker, K.L.; Lee, J.L.

    1980-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a preliminary, three-year program to investigate the impacts of the construction and operation of a satellite power system, of unprecedented scale. The Department of Energy's program, titled The Concept Development and Evaluation Program, focused its investigations on a Reference System description that calls for the use of either silicon (Si) or gallium aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) photovoltaic cells on 60 satellites to be constructed in GEO over a 30-yr period. Rectennas would be constructed on the ground to receive microwave energy from the satellites. Each satellite-rectenna pair is designed to produce 5 GW of power on an essentially continuous basis for use as a baseload power source for an electric power distribution system. The environmental assessment part of the program was divided into five interdependent task areas. The present document constitutes the final technical report on one of the five task areas, the Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects, and as such presents an in-depth summary of work performed during the assessment program. The issues associated with SPS activities in the troposphere are examined. These include tropospheric weather modification related to rectenna operations and rocket launches, and air quality impacts related to rocketlaunch ground clouds. Then progressing upward through the various levels of the atmosphere, the principal middle and upper atmospheric effects associated with rocket effluents are analyzed. Finally, all of the potential SPS atmospheric effects are summarized

  1. Fate and potential environmental effects of methylenediphenyl diisocyanate and toluene diisocyanate released into the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tury, Bernard; Pemberton, Denis; Bailey, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Information from a variety of sources has been collected and summarized to facilitate an overview of the atmospheric fate and potential environmental effects of emissions of methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) or toluene diisocyanate (TDI) to the atmosphere. Atmospheric emissions of both MDI and TDI are low, both in terms of concentration and mass, because of their low volatility and the need for careful control over all aspects of their lifecycle from manufacture through disposal. Typical emission losses for TDI are 25 g/t of TDI used in slabstock foam production. MDI emission losses are lower, often less than 1 g/t of MDI used. Dispersion modeling predicts that concentrations at the fenceline or beyond are very low for typical releases. Laboratory studies show that TDI (and by analogy MDI) does not react with water in the gas phase at a significant rate. The primary degradation reaction of these aromatic diisocyanates in the atmosphere is expected to be oxidation by OH radicals with an estimated half-life of one day. Laboratory studies also show that this reaction is not expected to result in increased ground-level ozone accumulation.

  2. Final Report: Laser-Based Optical Trap for Remote Sampling of Interplanetary and Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stysley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Applicability to Early Stage Innovation NIAC Cutting edge and innovative technologies are needed to achieve the demanding requirements for NASA origin missions that require sample collection as laid out in the NRC Decadal Survey. This proposal focused on fully understanding the state of remote laser optical trapping techniques for capturing particles and returning them to a target site. In future missions, a laser-based optical trapping system could be deployed on a lander that would then target particles in the lower atmosphere and deliver them to the main instrument for analysis, providing remote access to otherwise inaccessible samples. Alternatively, for a planetary mission the laser could combine ablation and trapping capabilities on targets typically too far away or too hard for traditional drilling sampling systems. For an interstellar mission, a remote laser system could gather particles continuously at a safe distance; this would avoid the necessity of having a spacecraft fly through a target cloud such as a comet tail. If properly designed and implemented, a laser-based optical trapping system could fundamentally change the way scientists designand implement NASA missions that require mass spectroscopy and particle collection.

  3. Using smartphone technology to reduce health impacts from atmospheric environmental hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, F. H.; Wheeler, A. J.; Williamson, G. J.; Campbell, S. L.; Jones, P. J.; Koolhof, I. S.; Lucani, C.; Cooling, N. B.; Bowman, D. M. J. S.

    2018-04-01

    Background: Global environmental change is exacerbating human vulnerability to adverse atmospheric conditions including air pollution, aeroallergens such as pollen, and extreme weather events. Public information and advisories are a central component of responses to mitigate the human impacts of environmental hazards. Digital technologies are emerging as a means of providing personalised, timely and accessible warnings. Method: We describe AirRater, an integrated online platform that combines symptom surveillance, environmental monitoring, and notifications of changing environmental conditions via a free smartphone app. It was developed and launched in Tasmania, Australia (population 510 000), with the aim of reducing health impacts and improving quality of life in people with conditions such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. We present environmental data, user uptake and results from three online evaluation surveys conducted during the first 22 months of operation, from October 2015 through August 2017. Results: There were 3,443 downloads of the app from all regions of Tasmania. Of the 1,959 individuals who registered, 79% reported having either asthma or allergic rhinitis. Downloads increased during adverse environmental conditions and following publicity. Symptom reports per active user were highest during spring (72%), lowest in autumn (37%) and spiked during periods of reduced air quality. In response to online surveys, most users reported that the app was useful and had improved their understanding of how environmental conditions affect their health, and in some cases had prompted action such as the timely use of medication. Conclusion: Active engagement and consistent positive feedback from users demonstrates the potential for considerable individual, clinical and wider public health benefits from integrated and personalised monitoring systems such as AirRater. The perceived health benefits require objective verification, and such systems need to address

  4. Integrated Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Technology Demonstration for Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Knox, James C.; Parrish, Keith J.; Roman, Monserrate C.; Jan, Darrell L.

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the frontiers of deep space continues to be defined by the technological challenges presented by safely transporting a crew to and from destinations of scientific interest. Living and working on that frontier requires highly reliable and efficient life support systems that employ robust, proven process technologies. The International Space Station (ISS), including its environmental control and life support (ECLS) system, is the platform from which humanity's deep space exploration missions begin. The ISS ECLS system Atmosphere Revitalization (AR) subsystem and environmental monitoring (EM) technical architecture aboard the ISS is evaluated as the starting basis for a developmental effort being conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) via the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) Project.. An evolutionary approach is employed by the ARREM project to address the strengths and weaknesses of the ISS AR subsystem and EM equipment, core technologies, and operational approaches to reduce developmental risk, improve functional reliability, and lower lifecycle costs of an ISS-derived subsystem architecture suitable for use for crewed deep space exploration missions. The most promising technical approaches to an ISS-derived subsystem design architecture that incorporates promising core process technology upgrades will be matured through a series of integrated tests and architectural trade studies encompassing expected exploration mission requirements and constraints.

  5. Comparison of methods for the quantification of the different carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Teresa; Mirante, Fátima; Almeida, Elza; Pio, Casimiro

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon consists of: organic carbon (OC, including various organic compounds), elemental carbon (EC, or black carbon [BC]/soot, a non-volatile/light-absorbing carbon), and a small quantity of carbonate carbon. Thermal/optical methods (TOM) have been widely used for quantifying total carbon (TC), OC, and EC in ambient and source particulate samples. Unfortunately, the different thermal evolution protocols in use can result in a wide elemental carbon-to-total carbon variation. Temperature evolution in thermal carbon analysis is critical to the allocation of carbon fractions. Another critical point in OC and EC quantification by TOM is the interference of carbonate carbon (CC) that could be present in the particulate samples, mainly in the coarse fraction of atmospheric aerosol. One of the methods used to minimize this interference consists on the use of a sample pre-treatment with acid to eliminate CC prior to thermal analysis (Chow et al., 2001; Pio et al., 1994). In Europe, there is currently no standard procedure for determining the carbonaceous aerosol fraction, which implies that data from different laboratories at various sites are of unknown accuracy and cannot be considered comparable. In the framework of the EU-project EUSAAR, a comprehensive study has been carried out to identify the causes of differences in the EC measured using different thermal evolution protocols. From this study an optimised protocol, the EUSAAR-2 protocol, was defined (Cavali et al., 2009). During the last two decades thousands of aerosol samples have been taken over quartz filters at urban, industrial, rural and background sites, and also from plume forest fires and biomass burning in a domestic closed stove. These samples were analysed for OC and EC, by a TOM, similar to that in use in the IMPROVE network (Pio et al., 2007). More recently we reduced the number of steps in thermal evolution protocols, without significant repercussions in the OC/EC quantifications. In order

  6. Assessment of the Capability of the NGDS Prototype to Replace the JBAIDS for Environmental Sample Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Diagnostic System (JBAIDS) for environmental sample analysis. JUPITR ATD and USAF members analyzed environmental samples using the FilmArray...requires 60+ min for sample preparation, whereas the FilmArray system (right) uses highly multiplexed assay pouches that require ᝺ min for sample...supported the evaluation of the BDCoE by analyzing spiked DFU samples using the Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnostic System (JBAIDS) and the

  7. BAYESIAN ENTROPY FOR SPATIAL SAMPLING DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate Matter (PM) has been linked to widespread public health effects, including a range of serious respiratory and cardiovascular problems, and to reduced visibility in may parts of the United States, see the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report (2004) and relevant...

  8. a study of predictors of environmental behaviour using us samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ressed in curriculum development and instructional practice. The ultimate goal of ... lem solving behaviour may not be given due consid- eration because ... ion strategies. Respondents were assessed regard- ing their perceived ability to influence the sol- ution of environmental problems/issues either as an individual or ...

  9. Novel approaches for 90Sr analyses in contaminated environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavasi, N.; Sahoot, S.K.; Area, H.; Aono, T.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive strontium isotopes are generated with high cumulative fission yield (5-6 %) during thermal neutron fission in a nuclear reactor. The physical half-life of 89 Sr (50.52 d) is short but that of 90 Sr (28.8 y) is long enough to generate radioecological repercussions. 90 Sr has a long-lasting biological half-life (∼18 y) in the human body, due to its chemical similarity to calcium the importance of 90 Sr analysis is emphasized in case of a nuclear disaster. The world-wide spread of 90 Sr, as a background, is derived from the global atmospheric fallout contributed by large-scale atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted from 1945. In case of local contamination, nuclear accidents are not the only source of 90 Sr isotope, misconducted underground nuclear weapon tests; improper handling of by-products of nuclear weapon production or normal operation of nuclear facilities (e.g. reprocessing plants) can be taken into account

  10. Analysis of environmental samples by roentgen fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hroncova, E.; Ladomersky, J.

    2004-01-01

    We can use it to analyse nearly all elements of solid and liquid samples. The possibility of analysing solid samples in compact shape, in powder or either under shape of fine layers shortens appreciably the total time of analysis, that is in addition to its no destructiveness, the main reason of as a XRF favourite method. (authors)

  11. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoskowitz, Josh; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Safiq, Alexandrea; Smith, Jeremy; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the samples and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The PIXE experiments were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. X-Ray energy spectra were measured with a silicon drift detector and analyzed with GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the aerosols. A broad range of elements from silicon to zinc were detected with significant sulfur concentrations measured for particulate matter between 0.25 and 0.5 μm in size. The PIXE analysis will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  12. Sampling procedure, receipt and conservation of water samples to determine environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, M.; Navarro, E.; Payeras, J.

    2009-01-01

    The present document informs about essential goals, processes and contents that the subgroups Sampling and Samples Preparation and Conservation believe they should be part of the procedure to obtain a correct sampling, receipt, conservation and preparation of samples of continental, marine and waste water before qualifying its radioactive content.

  13. Determination of uranium in industrial and environmental samples. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sweify, F H; Shehata, M K; Metwally, E M; El-Shazly, E A.A.; El-Naggar, H A [Nuclear Chemistry Department, Hot Laborities Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The phosphate ores used at `Abu zaabal fertilizer and chemical company` for the production of some chemicals and fertilizers contain detectable amounts of uranium. In this study, the content of uranium in samples of different products of fertilizers, gypsum, and phosphate ore were determined using NAA, and gamma ray spectroscopy of the irradiated samples. Another method based on measuring the natural radioactivity of {sup 238} U series for non-irradiated samples using gamma-ray spectroscopy was also used for determine uranium content in the samples. In the NAA method, the content of U(ppm) in the samples was been computed from the photopeak activity of the lines = 106.1, 228.2, and 277.5 KeV of {sup 239} Np induced in the irradiated samples, and the uranium standard simultaneously irradiated. the gamma-ray spectra, and the decay curves are given. In the second method the gamma-ray spectra of the natural radioactivity of the samples and uranium standard were measured. The gamma-transition of energies 295.1, 251.9 KeV for {sup 214} Pb; 609.3, 768.4, 1120.3, 1238.1 KeV for {sup 214} Bi were determined. The uranium {sup 23U} traces in drainage water was also determined spectrophotometrically using arsenazo-III after preconcentration of uranium from the pretreated drainage water in column packed with chelex-100 resin. The recovery was found to be 90 {+-} 5%. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Simultaneous determination of plutonium and uranium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Shufen

    1993-01-01

    Plutonium and uranium in a plant sample ash was simultaneously determined by using anion exchange resin columns, and concentrated hydrochloric acid and nitric acid. At the final stage of the determination of the nuclides, each of them was electrodeposited together with a little amount of molybdenum carrier onto a stainless steel plate and measured by α-ray spectrometer. The recoveries of uranium and plutonium from the plant samples determined by adding internal standard 236 Pu which was 100% and 63%, respectively

  15. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1982. Atmospheric physics. Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The first article in this report, although dealing with simple terrain, summarizes an effort to obtain measures of parameters important in transport and diffusion in the lower atmosphere solely by use of a Doppler acoustic sounding system. The second article describes participation in a multiagency experiment (Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment, SEADEX) to study the fate of materials released over a surface with notable surface nonuniformities, specifically at a coastal nuclear power plant during onshore flow conditions. The third and fourth articles in this report address research on the local behavior of pollutants emitted from diesel engines in urban areas. Most effort was directed toward field studies on circulation patterns in street canyons, exchange rates with the atmosphere above rooftops, and characterization of particles in outdoor urban microclimates. The remainder of the report is quite diverse and contains multiple articles on perhaps only one or two types of research. One is numerical modeling of the behavior of atmospheric pollutants, especially gaseous and particulate substances associated with acid deposition. The modeling and theoretical capabilities have been developed in part to consider potential nonlinear relationships between anthropogenic emissions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds and the distant deposition of resulting acidifying substances. On the experimental side, field phases of research designed to compare methods of analyses of precipitation samples and to study local urban effects on precipitation chemistry were completed. Each report is indexed separately.

  16. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1982. Atmospheric physics. Part 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The first article in this report, although dealing with simple terrain, summarizes an effort to obtain measures of parameters important in transport and diffusion in the lower atmosphere solely by use of a Doppler acoustic sounding system. The second article describes participation in a multiagency experiment (Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment, SEADEX) to study the fate of materials released over a surface with notable surface nonuniformities, specifically at a coastal nuclear power plant during onshore flow conditions. The third and fourth articles in this report address research on the local behavior of pollutants emitted from diesel engines in urban areas. Most effort was directed toward field studies on circulation patterns in street canyons, exchange rates with the atmosphere above rooftops, and characterization of particles in outdoor urban microclimates. The remainder of the report is quite diverse and contains multiple articles on perhaps only one or two types of research. One is numerical modeling of the behavior of atmospheric pollutants, especially gaseous and particulate substances associated with acid deposition. The modeling and theoretical capabilities have been developed in part to consider potential nonlinear relationships between anthropogenic emissions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds and the distant deposition of resulting acidifying substances. On the experimental side, field phases of research designed to compare methods of analyses of precipitation samples and to study local urban effects on precipitation chemistry were completed. Each report is indexed separately

  17. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization with polydimethylsiloxane as extraction phase and sample plate material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaikkinen, A. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kotiaho, T. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kostiainen, R. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kauppila, T.J., E-mail: tiina.kauppila@helsinki.fi [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-12-03

    Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry (MS) that can be used to ionize polar as well as neutral and completely non-polar analytes. In this study polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as a solid phase extraction sorbent for DAPPI-MS analysis. Pieces of PDMS polymer were soaked in an aqueous sample, where the analytes were sorbed from the sample solution to PDMS. After this, the extracted analytes were desorbed directly from the polymer by the hot DAPPI spray solvent plume, without an elution step. Swelling and extracting the PDMS with a cleaning solvent prior to extraction diminished the high background in the DAPPI mass spectrum caused by PDMS oligomers. Acetone, hexane, pentane, toluene, diisopropylamine and triethylamine were tested for this purpose. The amines were most efficient in reducing the PDMS background, but they also suppressed the signals of low proton affinity analytes. Toluene was chosen as the optimum cleaning solvent, since it reduced the PDMS background efficiently and gave intensive signals of most of the studied analytes. The effects of DAPPI spray solvents toluene, acetone and anisole on the PDMS background and the ionization of analytes were also compared and extraction conditions were optimized. Anisole gave a low background for native PDMS, but toluene ionized the widest range of analytes. Analysis of verapamil, testosterone and anthracene from purified, spiked wastewater was performed to demonstrate that the method is suited for in-situ analysis of water streams. In addition, urine spiked with several analytes was analyzed by the PDMS method and compared to the conventional DAPPI procedure, where sample droplets are applied on PMMA surface. With the PDMS method the background ion signals caused by the urine matrix were lower, the S/N ratios of analytes were 2-10 times higher, and testosterone, anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene that were not detected from PMMA in urine

  18. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization with polydimethylsiloxane as extraction phase and sample plate material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaikkinen, A.; Kotiaho, T.; Kostiainen, R.; Kauppila, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry (MS) that can be used to ionize polar as well as neutral and completely non-polar analytes. In this study polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as a solid phase extraction sorbent for DAPPI-MS analysis. Pieces of PDMS polymer were soaked in an aqueous sample, where the analytes were sorbed from the sample solution to PDMS. After this, the extracted analytes were desorbed directly from the polymer by the hot DAPPI spray solvent plume, without an elution step. Swelling and extracting the PDMS with a cleaning solvent prior to extraction diminished the high background in the DAPPI mass spectrum caused by PDMS oligomers. Acetone, hexane, pentane, toluene, diisopropylamine and triethylamine were tested for this purpose. The amines were most efficient in reducing the PDMS background, but they also suppressed the signals of low proton affinity analytes. Toluene was chosen as the optimum cleaning solvent, since it reduced the PDMS background efficiently and gave intensive signals of most of the studied analytes. The effects of DAPPI spray solvents toluene, acetone and anisole on the PDMS background and the ionization of analytes were also compared and extraction conditions were optimized. Anisole gave a low background for native PDMS, but toluene ionized the widest range of analytes. Analysis of verapamil, testosterone and anthracene from purified, spiked wastewater was performed to demonstrate that the method is suited for in-situ analysis of water streams. In addition, urine spiked with several analytes was analyzed by the PDMS method and compared to the conventional DAPPI procedure, where sample droplets are applied on PMMA surface. With the PDMS method the background ion signals caused by the urine matrix were lower, the S/N ratios of analytes were 2-10 times higher, and testosterone, anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene that were not detected from PMMA in urine

  19. Seasonal atmospheric deposition variations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and comparison of some deposition sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgül, Askın; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2011-03-01

    Ambient air and bulk deposition samples were collected between June 2008 and June 2009. Eighty-three polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were targeted in the samples. The average gas and particle PCB concentrations were found as 393 ± 278 and 70 ± 102 pg/m(3), respectively, and 85% of the atmospheric PCBs were in the gas phase. Bulk deposition samples were collected by using a sampler made of stainless steel. The average PCB bulk deposition flux value was determined as 6,020 ± 4,350 pg/m(2) day. The seasonal bulk deposition fluxes were not statistically different from each other, but the summer flux had higher values. Flux values differed depending on the precipitation levels. The average flux value in the rainy periods was 7,480 ± 4,080 pg/m(2) day while the average flux value in dry periods was 5,550 ± 4,420 pg/m(2) day. The obtained deposition values were lower than the reported values given for the urban and industrialized areas, yet close to the ones for the rural sites. The reported deposition values were also influenced by the type of the instruments used. The average dry deposition and total deposition velocity values calculated based on deposition and concentration values were found as 0.23 ± 0.21 and 0.13 ± 0.13 cm/s, respectively.

  20. Effects of easily ionizable elements on the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venzie, Jacob L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    A series of studies has been undertaken to determine the susceptibility of the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) atomic emission source to easily ionizable element (EIE) effects. The initial portions of the study involved monitoring the voltage drop across the plasma as a function of the pH to ascertain whether or not the conductivity of the liquid eluent alters the plasma energetics and subsequently the analyte signal strength. It was found that altering the pH (0.0 to 2.0) in the sample matrix did not significantly change the discharge voltage. The emission signal intensities for Cu(I) 327.4 nm, Mo(I) 344.7 nm, Sc(I) 326.9 nm and Hg(I) 253.6 nm were measured as a function of the easily ionizable element (sodium and calcium) concentration in the injection matrix. A range of 0.0 to 0.1% (w/v) EIE in the sample matrix did not cause a significant change in the Cu, Sc, and Mo signal-to-background ratios, with only a slight change noted for Hg. In addition to this test of analyte response, the plasma energetics as a function of EIE concentration are assessed using the ratio of Mg(II) to Mg(I) (280.2 nm and 285.2 nm, respectively) intensities. The Mg(II)/Mg(I) ratio showed that the plasma energetics did not change significantly over the same range of EIE addition. These results are best explained by the electrolytic nature of the eluent acting as an ionic (and perhaps spectrochemical) buffer

  1. Evaluating the reproducibility of environmental radioactivity monitoring data through replicate sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Silver, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, about 10% of the sampling effort in the environmental monitoring program represents replicate sample collection. Replication of field samples was initiated as part of the quality assurance program for environmental monitoring to determine the reproducibility of environmental measurements. In the laboratory these replicates are processed along with routine samples. As all components of variance are included in analysis of such field samples, comparison of the analytical data from replicate analyses provides a basis for estimating the overall reproducibility of the measurements. The replication study indicates that the reproducibility of environmental radioactivity monitoring data is subject to considerably more variability than is indicated by the accompanying counting errors. The data are also compared with analyses of duplicate aliquots from a well mixed sample or with duplicate aliquots of samples with known radionuclide content. These comparisons show that most of the variability is associated with the collection and preparation of the sample rather than with the analytical procedures

  2. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-01-21

    This document contains the calendar year 2011 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and the Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis. If a sample will not be collected in 2011, the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2011.

  3. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2006-01-27

    This document contains the calendar year 2006 schedules for the routine and non-routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 2006 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. The project document package (PDP) for Surface Environmental Surveillance contains the milestone control log for the issuing of CY06 Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule WBS 4.2.3.21.3.03, milestone: RL00430306 (4830106-12).

  4. The application of x-ray fluorescence and diffraction to the characterization of environmental assessment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Censullo, A.C.; Briden, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the results of tests on environmental assessment samples are reported on. The utility of the J.W. Criss fundamental parameters computer program is evaluated for samples in which only one standard per element was used and where the standard matrix did not strictly resemble the unknown matrix. The environmental significance of a sample is dependent not only on its elemental composition, but also on the species or phases which the elements comprise. X-ray powder diffraction may be used to advantage for speciation. Multi-phase environmental assessment samples are amenable to XRD interpretation. Some results of the application of the Joint Committee on Power Diffraction Standards computer interpretatin of typical environmental samples are discussed. They were shown to contribute to the specification of the complex samples that are encountered in environmental assessments

  5. Silica nanoparticles capture atmospheric lead: implications in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xifei; Shen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Jianping; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination in the air is a severe global problem, most notably in China. Removal of Pb from polluted air remains a significant challenge. It is unclear what potential effects silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) exposure can have on atmospheric Pb. Here we first characterized the features of SiNPs by measuring the particle size, zeta potential and the specific surface area of SiO(2) particles using a Nicomp 380/ZLS submicron particle sizer, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). We measured the content of the metal Pb adsorbed by SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It is found that SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants absorb more atmospheric Pb compared to either blank control or micro-sized SiO(2) particles in a time-dependent manner. This is the first study demonstrating that SiNPs exposure can absorb atmospheric Pb in the polluted environment. These novel findings indicate that SiNPs have potential to serve as a significant adsorbent of Pb from industrial pollution, implicating a potentially novel application of SiNPs in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)reg-sign: Atmospheric pathway formulations. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppo, J.G.; Buck, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is an integrated software implementation of physics-based fate and transport models for health and environmental risk assessments of both radioactive and hazardous pollutants. This atmospheric component report is one of a series of formulation reports that document the MEPAS mathematical models. MEPAS is a multimedia model; pollutant transport is modeled within, through, and between multiple media (air, soil, groundwater, and surface water). The estimated concentrations in the various media are used to compute exposures and impacts to the environment, to maximum individuals, and to populations. The MEPAS atmospheric component for the air media documented in this report includes models for emission from a source to the air, initial plume rise and dispersion, airborne pollutant transport and dispersion, and deposition to soils and crops. The material in this report is documentation for MEPAS Versions 3.0 and 3.1 and the MEPAS version used in the Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS) Version 1.0

  7. Investigation of environmental samples by low-level gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, M [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc., Dresden (Germany); Niese, S [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc., Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The average sample number in our laboratory is about 200 per month (12% technical solid state, 30% geological solid state, 6% geological solid state with low mass, 12% biological, 11% water directly, 25% water after chemical separation, 4% others). In 54% of the measurements the background continuum, and though the detection limit, is determined only by the detector himself and not by the compton continuum from high energy lines in the sample. Some examples in the presented work aim to prove the advantages of gamma ray spectrometry in the underground laboratory Felsenkeller. (orig./DG)

  8. Natural and anthropogenic {sup 236}U in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, Peter [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: peter.steier@univie.ac.at; Bichler, Max [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, Technische Universitaet Wien, Stadionallee 2, Wien A-1020 (Austria); Keith Fifield, L. [Department of Nuclear Physics, RSPhysSE, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Quinto, Francesca [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy); Richter, Stephan [Euopean Commission, Directorate-General Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Srncik, Michaela [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Terrasi, Philippo [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy); Wacker, Lukas [Institute for Particle Physics, HPK H25, Schafmattstrasse 20, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Wallner, Anton [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Wallner, Gabriele [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Wilcken, Klaus M. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 OQF (United Kingdom); Maria Wild, Eva [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2008-05-15

    The interaction of thermal neutrons with {sup 235}U results in fission with a probability of {approx}85% and in the formation of {sup 236}U (t{sub 1/2} = 2.3 x 10{sup 7} yr) with a probability of {approx}15%. While anthropogenic {sup 236}U is, therefore, present in spent nuclear fuel at levels of {sup 236}U/U up to 10{sup -2}, the expected natural ratios in the pre-anthropogenic environment range from 10{sup -14} to 10{sup -10}. At VERA, systematic investigations suggest a detection limit below {sup 236}U/U = 5 x 10{sup -12} for samples of 0.5 mg U, while chemistry blanks of {approx}2 x 10{sup 7} atoms {sup 236}U per sample limit the sensitivity for smaller samples. We have found natural isotopic ratios in uranium reagents separated before the onset of human nuclear activities, in uranium ores from various origins and in water from a subsurface well in Bad Gastein, Austria. Anthropogenic contamination was clearly visible in soil and rivulet samples from Salzburg, Austria, whereas river sediments from Garigliano river (Southern Italy) were close to the detection limit. Finally, our natural in-house standard Vienna-KkU was calibrated against a certified reference material (IRMM REIMEP-18 A)

  9. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular ...

  10. Total Decomposition of Environmental Radionuclide Samples with a Microwave Oven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon Garcia, Bernd Kahn

    1998-01-01

    Closed-vessel microwave assisted acid decomposition was investigated as an alternative to traditional methods of sample dissolution/decomposition. This technique, used in analytical chemistry, has some potential advantages over other procedures. It requires less reagents, it is faster, and it has the potential of achieving total dissolution because of higher temperatures and pressures

  11. GY SAMPLING THEORY IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 2: SUBSAMPLING ERROR MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampling can be a significant source of error in the measurement process. The characterization and cleanup of hazardous waste sites require data that meet site-specific levels of acceptable quality if scientifically supportable decisions are to be made. In support of this effort,...

  12. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  13. ICP-MS applications for the analysis of geological materials and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendl, J.

    1997-01-01

    This work deals with applications of inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry applications for the analysis of geological materials and environmental samples. There are instrumentation, calibration, alternatives of sample introduction, interferences, trace elements analysis, rare earth elements and uranium and thorium, precious metals, isotopic analysis and environmental analysis discussed

  14. The sampling and analysing methods of radionuclides used in the Nordic countries for environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taipale, Tarja K.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioecology Group under the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy has considered it to be of great importance to improve the comparability of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Nordic countries, a basic requirement for co-ordinated research programmes. In case of emergency, good comparability between the results obtained will be required for mutual assistance. Therefore several intercomparison exercises have been carried out between the laboratories measuring environmental radioactivity. The exercises have proved very useful and have led to a more comprehensive and systematic survey of the environmental measurement methodology used so far by the Nordic laboratories. Furthermore it is considered necessary to make some recommendations or even to reach an agreement on how to present the results in order to make the comparison of, at least, monitoring data easier. This report is based on the answers received from the participating laboratories to a questionnaire sent by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki

  15. The sampling and analysing methods of radionuclides used in the Nordic countries for environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipale, Tarja K [ed.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioecology Group under the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy has considered it to be of great importance to improve the comparability of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Nordic countries, a basic requirement for co-ordinated research programmes. In case of emergency, good comparability between the results obtained will be required for mutual assistance. Therefore several intercomparison exercises have been carried out between the laboratories measuring environmental radioactivity. The exercises have proved very useful and have led to a more comprehensive and systematic survey of the environmental measurement methodology used so far by the Nordic laboratories. Furthermore it is considered necessary to make some recommendations or even to reach an agreement on how to present the results in order to make the comparison of, at least, monitoring data easier. This report is based on the answers received from the participating laboratories to a questionnaire sent by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki.

  16. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry system for measurement of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pibida, L.; McMahon, C.A.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Bushaw, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    A resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) system has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for sensitive and selective determination of radio-cesium in the environment. The overall efficiency was determined to be 4x10-7 with a combined (laser and mass spectrometer) selectivity of 108 for both 135Cs and 137Cs with respect to 133Cs. RIMS isotopic ratio measurements of 135Cs/ 137Cs were performed on a nuclear fuel burn-up sample and compared to measurements on a similar system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results of preliminary RIMS investigations on a freshwater lake sediment sample are also discussed

  17. Application of WSP method in analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacho, M.; Slugen, V.; Hinca, R.; Sojak, S.; Krnac, S.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of activity in natural samples is specific especially because of its low level and high background interferences. Reduction of background interferences could be reached using low background chamber. Measurement geometry in shape of Marinelli beaker is commonly used according to low level of activity in natural samples. The Peak Net Area (PNA) method is the world-wide accepted technique for analysis of gamma-ray spectra. It is based on the net area calculation of the full energy peak, therefore, it takes into account only a fraction of measured gamma-ray spectrum. On the other hand, the Whole Spectrum Processing (WSP) approach to the gamma analysis makes possible to use entire information being in the spectrum. This significantly raises efficiency and improves energy resolution of the analysis. A principal step for the WSP application is building up the suitable response operator. Problems are put in an appearance when suitable standard calibration sources are unavailable. It may be occurred in the case of large volume samples and/or in the analysis of high energy range. Combined experimental and mathematical calibration may be a suitable solution. Many different detectors have been used to register the gamma ray and its energy. HPGe detectors produce the highest resolution commonly available today. Therefore they are they the most often used detectors in natural samples activity analysis. Scintillation detectors analysed using PNA method could be also used in simple cases, but for complicated spectra are practically inapplicable. WSP approach improves resolution of scintillation detectors and expands their applicability. WSP method allowed significant improvement of the energetic resolution and separation of "1"3"7Cs 661 keV peak from "2"1"4Bi 609 keV peak. At the other hand the statistical fluctuations in the lower part of the spectrum highlighted by background subtraction causes that this part is still not reliably analyzable. (authors)

  18. Self-attenuation of gamma rays during radioactivity concentration analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, D.; Dharmasiri, J.; Akber, R.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopy using HPGe detector systems is a readily used technique for routine analysis of radioactivity in environmental samples. The systems are generally calibrated using standards of known radioactivity and composition. Radioactivity in environmental samples is generally distributed in the bulk of the material. When a sample of finite thickness is analysed through gamma spectroscopy, a proportion of the gamma rays emitted from the sample is either stopped or scattered from the sample material itself. These processes of self-absorption and self-attenuation depend upon the physical and elemental composition of the sample and the energy of the gamma radiation. Since environmental samples vary in composition, instrument calibration using a fixed matrix composition may not be valid for a diversity of samples. We selected and analysed five sample matrices to investigate the influence of self-absorption and self-attenuation in environmental samples. Our selection consisted of bentonite and kaolin representing clay, quartz representing silica, ash representing prepared biota, and analytical grade MnO 2 representing a co-precipitant used for extractive radioactivity from aqueous samples. Our findings show that within 5% of uncertainty the silica based standards can be used to cover the environmental samples of varying clay (silica content). The detection efficiency for ash and MnO 2 could be different particularly in the 30 - 100 keV energy range. The differences in sample behaviour can be explained on the basis of atomic number, mass number and density

  19. Guidance for establishment and implementation of a national sample management program in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The role of the National Sample Management Program (NSMP) proposed by the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to be a resource for EM programs and for local Field Sample Management Programs (FSMPs). It will be a source of information on sample analysis and data collection within the DOE complex. Therefore the NSMP's primary role is to coordinate and function as a central repository for information collected from the FSMPs. An additional role of the NSMP is to monitor trends in data collected from the FSMPs over time and across sites and laboratories. Tracking these trends will allow identification of potential problems in the sampling and analysis process

  20. Studies on 129I and 14C in environmental samples by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out studies on 129 I and 14 C in environmental samples by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry). In this paper summary of our results are described. Iodine is an essential element for humans and it pays an important role in thyroid gland. There are more than 30 isotopes of iodine. Among radioiodines 129 I has the longest half-life (1.57x10 7 y). This nuclide is released into the environment from nuclear weapons test, accidents of nuclear facilities (e.g. Chernobyl accident) and operation of spent fuel reprocessing plants. Since soil accumulates iodine, we have focused on the levels of both 129 I and 127 I in surface soils. In our previous studies, we used NAA (neutron activation analysis) for the determination. However, due to the limitation of its analytical sensitivity we could not detect 129 I in samples from background areas. In this study we have analyzed 129 I/ 127 I ratios by AMS and 127 I concentrations by ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma spectrometry) after separation of iodine from soil by pyrohydrolysis and solvent extraction techniques. Using these methods, we have analyzed samples collected from different areas in Japan. Analytical results for surface soils collected from background areas were in the ranges 1.4 x 10 -5 - 4.6 x 10 -3 Bq/Kg as 129 I concentrations and 3.9 x 10 -11 - 3.0 x 10 -8 as 129 I/ 127 I ratios. The 129 I levels in Tokaimura, where a spent fuel reprocessing plant is located, were one to three orders of magnitude higher than those in background samples. The levels were higher in forest soils than those in field and rice paddy soils due to the interception effect of atmospheric 129 I by tree canopies. A wide range of stable iodine concentrations (0.4-143ppm) was observed. Rice paddy soils contained significantly lower iodine than forest and upland field soils. This should be explained by the desorption of iodine from the rice paddies due to microbial activities during the cultivation. Vertical distributions of 129 I

  1. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2007-01-31

    This document contains the calendar year 2007 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 2007 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2007.

  2. Novel sampling methods for atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) in a high altitude alpine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenthaler, I; Jakobi, G; Kaiser, A; Kirchner, M; Kräuchi, N; Niedermoser, B; Schramm, K-W; Sedivy, I; Staudinger, M; Thanner, G; Weiss, P; Moche, W

    2009-12-01

    High- and low-volume active air samplers as well as bulk deposition samplers were developed to sample atmospheric SOCs under the adverse conditions of a mountain environment. Active sampling employed separate filters for different European source regions. Filters were switched depending on daily trajectory forecasts, whose accuracy was evaluated post hoc. The sampling continued on three alpine summits over five periods of four months. The prevailing trajectories varied stronger between sampling periods than between stations. The sampling equipment (active and bulk deposition) proved dependable for operation in a mountain environment, with idle times being mainly due to non-routine manipulations and connectivity.

  3. Iron Oxide Minerals in Atmospheric Dust and Source Sediments-Studies of Types and Properties to Assess Environmental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H. L.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Till, J. L.; Flagg, C.; Kokaly, R. F.; Munson, S.; Landry, C.; Lawrence, C. R.; Hiza, M. M.; D'Odorico, P.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Ferric oxide minerals in atmospheric dust can influence atmospheric temperatures, accelerate melting of snow and ice, stimulate marine phytoplankton productivity, and impact human health. Such effects vary depending on iron mineral type, size, surface area, and solubility. Generally, the presence of ferric oxides in dust is seen in the red, orange, or yellow hues of plumes that originate in North Africa, central and southwest Asia, South America, western North America, and Australia. Despite their global importance, these minerals in source sediments, atmospheric dust, and downwind aeolian deposits remain poorly described with respect to specific mineralogy, particle size and surface area, or presence in far-traveled aerosol compounds. The types and properties of iron minerals in atmospheric dust can be better understood using techniques of rock magnetism (measurements at 5-300 K), Mössbauer and high-resolution visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy; chemical reactivity of iron oxide phases; and electron microscopy for observing directly the ferric oxide coatings and particles. These studies can elucidate the diverse environmental effects of iron oxides in dust and can help to identify dust-source areas. Dust-source sediments from the North American Great Basin and Colorado Plateau deserts and the Kalahari Desert, southern Africa, were used to compare average reflectance values with a magnetic parameter (hard isothermal remanent magnetization, HIRM) for ferric oxide abundance. Lower reflectance values correspond strongly with higher HIRM values, indicating that ferric oxides (hematite or goethite, or both) contribute to absorption of solar radiation in these sediments. Dust deposited to snow cover of the San Juan Mountains (Colorado) and Wasatch Mountains (Utah) was used to characterize dust composition compared with properties of sediments exposed in source-areas identified from satellite retrievals. Results from multiple methods indicate that

  4. Specific activity of 129I in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, P.M.; Iyer, M.R.; Bhat, I.S.; Somasundaram, S.; Subramanian, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    129 I finds its way into the environment as a result of man-made nuclear operations. It is also formed by the interaction of cosmic rays with xenon isotopes and spontaneous fission of naturally occurring uranium. 129 I and stable 127 I contents of thyroid, milk, seaweed and aplysia cell samples collected from around a fuel reprocessing plant were estimated by neutron activation analysis method. The annual 129 I intake of an individual works out to be about 0.3 Bq as compared to the natural radioactivity content in human body of about 5000 Bq. (author). 3 tabs

  5. Levels of tritium in soils and vegetation near Canadian nuclear facilities releasing tritium to the atmosphere: implications for environmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Kwamena, N.-O.A.; Ilin, M.; Wilk, M.; Clark, I.D.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) were measured over two growing seasons in vegetation and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of four nuclear facilities and two background locations in Canada. At the background locations, with few exceptions, OBT concentrations were higher than HTO concentrations: OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation varied between 0.3 and 20 and values in soil varied between 2.7 and 15. In the vicinity of the four nuclear facilities OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation and soils deviated from the expected mean value of 0.7, which is used as a default value in environmental transfer models. Ratios of the OBT activity concentration in plants ([OBT] plant ) to the OBT activity concentration in soils ([OBT] soil ) appear to be a good indicator of the long-term behaviour of tritium in soil and vegetation. In general, OBT activity concentrations in soils were nearly equal to OBT activity concentrations in plants in the vicinity of the two nuclear power plants. [OBT] plant /[OBT] soil ratios considerably below unity observed at one nuclear processing facility represents historically higher levels of tritium in the environment. The results of our study reflect the dynamic nature of HTO retention and OBT formation in vegetation and soil during the growing season. Our data support the mounting evidence suggesting that some parameters used in environmental transfer models approved for regulatory assessments should be revisited to better account for the behavior of HTO and OBT in the environment and to ensure that modelled estimates (e.g., plant OBT) are appropriately conservative. - Highlights: • We measured tritium in soils and plants near four nuclear facilities in Canada. • OBT/HTO ratios in plants are higher than default value in environmental models. • OBT/HTO ratios in background soils reflect historically higher atmospheric tritium. • Implications for environmental transfer models are discussed

  6. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of fungi in the genus Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Binbin; Ross, Shane D.; Prussin, Aaron J.; Schmale, David G.

    2014-09-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. We hypothesized that (1) atmospheric concentrations of Fusarium spores in an agricultural ecosystem vary with height and season and (2) transport distances from potential inoculum source(s) vary with season. To test these hypotheses, spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season, and produced mean transport distances of 1.4 km for the spring, 1.7 km for the summer, 1.2 km for the fall, and 4.1 km for the winter. Environmental signatures that predict atmospheric loads of Fusarium could inform disease spread, air pollution, and climate change.

  7. PIXE analysis of marine environmental samples from the Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Shitashima, Kiminori; Tsubota, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Aerosol samples from the western North Pacific Ocean are collected during a cruise of R/V Hakuhomaru from Japan to Hawaii and they are analyzed by PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission). Concentrations of radon daughters are measured with CR-39 track detectors mounted on the impactor to estimate the transport time of air mass from the Asian Continent. Distributions of particulate element concentrations clearly demonstrate the influence of the westerlies. Strong correlations are observed between fine sulphur concentrations and those of heavy metals such as Fe and Zn. Vertical profiles of heavy metal elements contained in marine particulates are also investigated at a trench in the Pacific Ocean and basins in the Japan Sea. Particulate element concentrations determined by PIXE agree well with those determined by chemical analysis of filtered/total water. Remarkable changes in depth profiles of particulate manganese are observed at the trench, which suggest horizontal transport of marine particulates from the trench wall. (N.K.)

  8. Guidance for establishment and implementation of field sample management programs in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The role of the National Sample Management Program (NSMP) proposed by the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to be a resource for EM programs and for local Field Sample Management Programs (FSMPs). It will be a source of information on sample analysis and data collection within the DOE complex. The purpose of this document is to establish the suggested scope of the FSMP activities to be performed under each Operations Office, list the drivers under which the program will operate, define terms and list references. This guidance will apply only to EM sampling and analysis activities associated with project planning, contracting, laboratory selection, sample collection, sample transportation, laboratory analysis and data management

  9. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Supply Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the Node 1 ECLS ACS subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for that subsystem.

  10. o-TOF ICPMS analysis of environmental, food and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejcova, A.; Cernohorsky, T.; Ludvikova, I.; Pouzar, M.; Capova, L.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: o-TOF ICPMS was used for inorganic analysis of environmental, food and biological samples. The method validity was proved by analysis of spiked samples, reference materials, by determination without/with internal standards and the standard addition technique. The technique was shown to be powerful, and reliable for analysis of the samples mentioned, and high sample throughput enables environmental or biological screening studies. Independent of the number of elements analyzed, complete analysis and whole mass spectra are gained from a small sample amount in a very short time. (author)

  11. Environmental sampling plan for Kwajalein Atoll Lagoon: 2017 Kwajalein sampling event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Since the early 1980s, the U.S DOE Marshall Islands Program at LLNL has provided radiological monitoring of the marine and terrestrial environment at nuclear affected atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. The fundamental aim of these studies was to identify the level and distribution of key residual fallout radionuclide in the environment, improve understanding of prevalent radiation exposure pathways, and develop predictive dose assessments for resettled and resettling atoll population groups. These data and information were essential in terms of guiding the development of effective and environmentally protective remedial measures, and promoting potential actions to improve on food safety and security.

  12. An overview of sample preparation procedures for LC-MS multiclass antibiotic determination in environmental and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Marazuela, María Dolores; Herranz, Sonia; Rodriguez, Erika

    2009-10-01

    Antibiotics are a class of pharmaceuticals that are of great interest due to the large volumes of these substances that are consumed in both human and veterinary medicine, and due to their status as the agents responsible for bacterial resistance. They can be present in foodstuffs and in environmental samples as multicomponent chemical mixtures that exhibit a wide range of mechanisms of action. Moreover, they can be transformed into different metabolites by the action of microorganisms, as well as by other physical or chemical means, resulting in mixtures with higher ecotoxicities and risks to human health than those of the individual compounds. Therefore, there is growing interest in the availability of multiclass methods for the analysis of antimicrobial mixtures in environmental and food samples at very low concentrations. Liquid chromatography (LC) has become the technique of choice for multiclass analysis, especially when coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem MS (LC-MS(2)). However, due to the complexity of the matrix, in most cases an extraction step for sample clean-up and preconcentration is required before analysis in order to achieve the required sensitivities. This paper reviews the most recent developments and applications of multiclass antimicrobial determination in environmental and food matrices, emphasizing the practical aspects of sample preparation for the simultaneous extraction of antimicrobials from the selected samples. Future trends in the application of LC-MS-based techniques to multiclass antibiotic analysis are also presented.

  13. Identification and assay of radionuclides in the environmental samples following Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, S.

    1987-01-01

    In India radioactivity was detected from 2 May 1986 onwards. A variety of samples were assayed for radionuclides in the environmental samples originating from the Chernobyl reactor accident. These are: Cotton swipe samples from aircrafts, air filters, milk, goat thyroids, grass, vegetables and tap waters. The results are presented in the paper

  14. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, "Environmental Protection Program," and DOE Order 5400.5, "Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment." The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the "Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office." This document contains the calendar year 2008 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis. If a sample will not be collected in 2008, the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2008.

  15. Novel sampling methods for atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) in a high altitude alpine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offenthaler, I. [Umweltbundesamt GmbH (Austria); Jakobi, G. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (German Research Centre for Environmental Health) (Germany); Kaiser, A. [ZAMG-Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geo-dynamik (Austria); Kirchner, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (German Research Centre for Environmental Health) (Germany); Kraeuchi, N. [WSL-Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (Switzerland); Niedermoser, B. [ZAMG-Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geo-dynamik (Austria); Schramm, K.-W. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (German Research Centre for Environmental Health) (Germany); Sedivy, I. [WSL-Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (Switzerland); Staudinger, M. [ZAMG-Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geo-dynamik (Austria); Thanner, G.; Weiss, P. [Umweltbundesamt GmbH (Austria); Moche, W., E-mail: wolfgang.moche@umweltbundesamt.a [Umweltbundesamt GmbH (Austria)

    2009-12-15

    High- and low-volume active air samplers as well as bulk deposition samplers were developed to sample atmospheric SOCs under the adverse conditions of a mountain environment. Active sampling employed separate filters for different European source regions. Filters were switched depending on daily trajectory forecasts, whose accuracy was evaluated post hoc. The sampling continued on three alpine summits over five periods of four months. The prevailing trajectories varied stronger between sampling periods than between stations. The sampling equipment (active and bulk deposition) proved dependable for operation in a mountain environment, with idle times being mainly due to non-routine manipulations and connectivity. - Equipment for direction-specific air sampling and bulk deposition sampling in mountains was developed and tested.

  16. Isotope dilution and sampling factors of the quality assurance and TQM of environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.

    1999-01-01

    Sampling and preparatory treatment of environmental objects is discussed from the view of their information content, functional speciation of the pollutant, statistical distribution treatment and uncertainty assessment. During homogenization of large samples, a substantial information may be lost and validity of environmental information becomes vague. Isotope dilution analysis is discussed as the most valuable tool for both validity of analysis and evaluation of samples variance. Data collection for a non-parametric statistical treatment of series of 'non-representative' sub-samples, and physico-chemical speciation of analyte may actually better fulfill criteria of similarity and representativeness. Large samples are often required due to detection limits of analysis, but the representativeness of environmental samples should by understood not only by the mean analyte concentration, but also by its spatial and time variance. Hence, heuristic analytical scenarios and interpretation of results must be designed by cooperation of environmentalists and analytical chemists. (author)

  17. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of environmental samples by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorov, N B; Popov, A M; Zaytsev, S M; Labutin, T A

    2015-01-01

    The key achievements in the determination of trace amounts of components in environmental samples (soils, ores, natural waters, etc.) by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry are considered. Unique capabilities of this method make it suitable for rapid analysis of metals and alloys, glasses, polymers, objects of cultural heritage, archaeological and various environmental samples. The key advantages of the method that account for its high efficiency are demonstrated, in particular, a small amount of analyzed material, the absence of sample preparation, the possibility of local and remote analysis of either one or several elements. The use of chemometrics in laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for qualitative sample classification is described in detail. Various approaches to improving the figures of merit of quantitative analysis of environmental samples are discussed. The achieved limits of detection for most elements in geochemical samples are critically evaluated. The bibliography includes 302 references

  18. Method validation and uncertainty evaluation of organically bound tritium analysis in environmental sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Zeng, Fan; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Qin, Hong-Juan; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Guo, Gui-Yin; Yang, Li-Tao; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2014-08-01

    The analytical method for organically bound tritium (OBT) was developed in our laboratory. The optimized operating conditions and parameters were established for sample drying, special combustion, distillation, and measurement on a liquid scintillation spectrometer (LSC). Selected types of OBT samples such as rice, corn, rapeseed, fresh lettuce and pork were analyzed for method validation of recovery rate reproducibility, the minimum detection concentration, and the uncertainty for typical low level environmental sample was evaluated. The combustion water recovery rate of different dried environmental sample was kept at about 80%, the minimum detection concentration of OBT ranged from 0.61 to 0.89 Bq/kg (dry weight), depending on the hydrogen content. It showed that this method is suitable for OBT analysis of environmental sample with stable recovery rate, and the combustion water yield of a sample with weight about 40 g would provide sufficient quantity for measurement on LSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a reference method and sampling system for continuous monitoring of environmental HT and HTO concentration in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchrin, G.

    1992-06-01

    A differential sampling system to monitor environmental Tritiated Water Vapour (HT) and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas (HTO) concentrations in the atmosphere was developed and tested. The sampler consists of an aerosol filter, diaphragm pump, absorption trap for HTO (molecular sieve), supply of H 2 carrier (electrolysis unit), conversion trap for HT (Pd-impregnated molecular sieve), flow meter and gas meter. The sampler operates with a flow rate between 30 and 80 1/h, with a typical sampling period of one week. Vacuum desorption at high temperature is used to extract the HTO collected in the absorption and conversion traps. Tritium analysis is carried out using liquid scintillation spectrometry or gas proportional counting. The sampler is equipped with built-in safety systems and can operate in remote places. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Determination of natural alpha-emitting isotopes of uranium and thorium in environmental and geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    It is described the complete radiochemical procedure used for the determination of uranium and thorium isotopes in environmental and geological samples by alpha spectrometry. Source preparation methods, alpha-counting and spectral analysis are also included

  1. Engineering Task Plan to Expand the Environmental Operational Envelope of Core Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan authorizes the development of an Alternative Generation and Analysis (AGA). The AGA will determine how to expand the environmental operating envelope during core sampling operations

  2. A review of analytical techniques for the determination of carbon-14 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, G.M.; Brown, R.M.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains a brief summary of analytical techniques commonly used for the determination of radiocarbon in a variety of environmental samples. Details of the applicable procedures developed and tested in the Environmental Research Branch at Chalk River Laboratories are appended

  3. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2010-01-08

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford Site environs per regulatory requirements. This document contains the calendar year 2010 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and the Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis. If a sample will not be collected in 2010, the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2010.

  4. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2009-01-20

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1 and DOE Order 5400.5. This document contains the calendar year 2009 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis. If a sample will not be collected in 2009, the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2009.

  5. Green Aspects of Techniques for the Determination of Currently Used Pesticides in Environmental Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Tankiewicz; Jacek Namieśnik; Jolanta Stocka; Marek Biziuk

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides are among the most dangerous environmental pollutants because of their stability, mobility and long-term effects on living organisms. Their presence in the environment is a particular danger. It is therefore crucial to monitor pesticide residues using all available analytical methods. The analysis of environmental samples for the presence of pesticides is very difficult: the processes involved in sample preparation are labor-intensive and time-consuming. To date, it has been standa...

  6. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2005-01-19

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs. This document contains the calendar year 2005 schedules for the routine and non-routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project.

  7. Speciation of organotin compounds in environmental samples by GC-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahcic, M.; Milacic, R.; Scancar, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Analytical procedure using 15 m GC column was applied for simultaneous speciation of OTCs in various environmental samples. Methyl-, butyl-, phenyl- and octyl- tin species were quantitatively determined. different extraction reagents and conditions were studied. OTCs species were derivatized by NaBEt 4 and extracted into isooctane or hexane. The applied analytical procedure considerably shortened analytical time and enabled simultaneous determination of 12 OTCs in environmental samples. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Brazilian intercomparison program data from 1991 to 1995 of radionuclide assays in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianna, Maria Elizabeth Couto M.; Tauhata, Luiz; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de; Oliveira, Josue Peter de; Clain, Almir Faria; Ferreira, Ana Cristina M.

    1998-01-01

    Historical radioanalytical data from the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) national intercomparison program from 1991 to 1995 were analyzed to evaluate the performance of sixteen Brazilian laboratories in radionuclide analyses in environmental samples. Data are comprised of measurements of radionuclides in 435 spiked environmental samples distributed in fifteen intercomparison runs comprised of 955 analyses. The general and specific radionuclide performances of the participating laboratories were evaluated relative to the reference value. Data analysis encourages improvements in beta emitter measurements

  9. Application of the CaF2(Eu) scintillator to 85Kr monitoring in atmospheric air samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmova, Ludmila; Dvorak, Zdenek; Tomasek, Milan; Stukheil, Karel

    1986-01-01

    A detection system with a CaF 2 (Eu) scintillator has been developed for monitoring β-radiation of 85 Kr in atmospheric air samples. The geometry of the detector chamber was optimized to achieve maximum detection efficiency. The design of the detector is described and values of the detection efficiency are presented for various compositions and pressures of the gaseous samples. The conditions for calibration of the detector used for monitoring of 85 Kr in enriched air samples have been established. (author)

  10. Atmospheric Dispersion Models for the Calculation of Environmental Impact: A Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, Marcelo; Gimenez, Marcelo; Felicelli, Sergio; Schlamp, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    In this paper some new comparisons are presented between the codes AERMOD, HPDM and HYSPLIT.The first two are Gaussian stationary plume codes and they were developed to calculate environmental impact produced by chemical contaminants.HYSPLIT is a hybrid code because it uses a Lagrangian reference system to describe the transport of a puff center of mass and uses an Eulerian system to describe the dispersion within the puff.The meteorological and topographic data used in the present work were obtained from runs of the prognostic code RAMS, provided by NOAA. The emission was fixed in 0.3 g/s , 284 K and 0 m/s .The surface rough was fixed in 0.1m and flat terrain was considered.In order to analyze separate effects and to go deeper in the comparison, the meteorological data was split into two, depending on the atmospheric stability class (F to B), and the wind direction was fixed to neglect its contribution to the contaminant dispersion.The main contribution of this work is to provide recommendations about the validity range of each code depending on the model used.In the case of Gaussian models the validity range is fixed by the distance in which the atmospheric condition can be consider homogeneous.In the other hand the validity range of HYSPLIT's model is determined by the spatial extension of the meteorological data.The results obtained with the three codes are comparable if the emission is in equilibrium with the environment.This means that the gases were emitted at the same temperature of the medium with zero velocity.There was an important difference between the dispersion parameters used by the Gaussian codes

  11. Microwave-ultrasound combined reactor suitable for atmospheric sample preparation procedure of biological and chemical products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagha, A.; Chemat, S.; Bartels, P.V.; Chemat, F.

    1999-01-01

    A compact apparatus in which a specific position can be irradiated by microwaves (MW) and ultrasound (US) simultaneously has been developed. The MW-US reactor has been designed for atmospheric pressure digestion and dissolution of biological and chemical products. The reactor can treat a range of

  12. Determination of neonicotinoid insecticides and strobilurin fungicides in particle phase atmospheric samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina-Fulton, Renata

    2015-06-03

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of neonicotinoids and strobilurin fungicides in the particle phase fraction of atmosphere samples. Filter samples were extracted with pressurized solvent extraction, followed by a cleanup step with solid phase extraction. Method detection limits for the seven neonicotinoid insecticides and six strobilurin fungicides were in the range of 1.0-4.0 pg/m(3). Samples were collected from June to September 2013 at two locations (Osoyoos and Oliver) in the southern Okanagan Valley Agricultural Region of British Columbia, where these insecticides and fungicides are recommended for use on tree fruit crops (apples, pears, cherries, peaches, apricots) and vineyards. This work represents the first detection of acetamiprid, imidacloprid, clothianidin, kresoxim-methyl, pyraclostrobin, and trifloxystrobin in particle phase atmospheric samples collected in the Okanagan Valley in Canada. The highest particle phase atmospheric concentrations were observed for imidacloprid, pyraclostrobin, and trifloxystrobin at 360.0, 655.6, and 1908.2 pg/m(3), respectively.

  13. Model Stellar Atmospheres and Real Stellar Atmospheres and Status of the ATLAS12 Opacity Sampling Program and of New Programs for Rosseland and for Distribution Function Opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    I discuss errors in theory and in interpreting observations that are produced by the failure to consider resolution in space, time, and energy. I discuss convection in stellar model atmospheres and in stars. Large errors in abundances are possible such as the factor of ten error in the Li abundance for extreme Population II stars. Finally I discuss the variation of microturbulent velocity with depth, effective temperature, gravity, and abundance. These variations must be dealt with in computing models and grids and in any type of photometric calibration. I have also developed a new opacity-sampling version of my model atmosphere program called ATLAS12. It recognizes more than 1000 atomic and molecular species, each in up to 10 isotopic forms. It can treat all ions of the elements up through Zn and the first 5 ions of heavier elements up through Es. The elemental and isotopic abundances are treated as variables with depth. The fluxes predicted by ATLAS12 are not accurate in intermediate or narrow bandpass intervals because the sample size is too small. A special stripped version of the spectrum synthesis program SYNTHE is used to generate the surface flux for the converged model using the line data on CD-ROMs 1 and 15. ATLAS12 can be used to produce improved models for Am and Ap stars. It should be very useful for investigating diffusion effects in atmospheres. It can be used to model exciting stars for H II regions with abundances consistent with those of the H II region. These programs and line files will be distributed on CD-ROMs.

  14. Joint sampling programme-Verification of data obtained in environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauria, D.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Salvador Allende s/no., CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br; Martins, N.S.F.; Vasconcellos, M.L.H.; Zenaro, R.; Peres, S.S.; Pires do Rio, M.A. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Salvador Allende s/no., CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    The objective of the Environmental Radiological Monitoring Control programme carried out by the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) in Brazil is to verify the licensee's compliance with the requirements for environmental monitoring of Brazilian facilities. The Joint Sampling Programme (JSP) is just one part of the control programme. In order to verify that the data reported by the licensees is representative and legitimate, this programme verifies sampling procedures, accuracy and precision of the data and the changes in the environmental conditions. This paper discusses the main findings of this programme that allowed IRD to optimize its available resources to control the monitoring of the eight facilities in Brazil.

  15. Zoonotic pathogens isolated from wild animals and environmental samples at two California wildlife hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siembieda, Jennifer L; Miller, Woutrina A; Byrne, Barbara A; Ziccardi, Michael H; Anderson, Nancy; Chouicha, Nadira; Sandrock, Christian E; Johnson, Christine K

    2011-03-15

    To determine types and estimate prevalence of potentially zoonotic enteric pathogens shed by wild animals admitted to either of 2 wildlife hospitals and to characterize distribution of these pathogens and of aerobic bacteria in a hospital environment. Cross-sectional study. Fecal samples from 338 animals in 2 wildlife hospitals and environmental samples from 1 wildlife hospital. Fecal samples were collected within 24 hours of hospital admission. Environmental samples were collected from air and surfaces. Samples were tested for zoonotic pathogens via culture techniques and biochemical analyses. Prevalence of pathogen shedding was compared among species groups, ages, sexes, and seasons. Bacterial counts were determined for environmental samples. Campylobacter spp, Vibrio spp, Salmonella spp, Giardia spp, and Cryptosporidium spp (alone or in combination) were detected in 105 of 338 (31%) fecal samples. Campylobacter spp were isolated only from birds. Juvenile passerines were more likely to shed Campylobacter spp than were adults; prevalence increased among juvenile passerines during summer. Non-O1 serotypes of Vibrio cholerae were isolated from birds; during an oil-spill response, 9 of 10 seabirds screened were shedding this pathogen, which was also detected in environmental samples. Salmonella spp and Giardia spp were isolated from birds and mammals; Cryptosporidium spp were isolated from mammals only. Floors of animal rooms had higher bacterial counts than did floors with only human traffic. Potentially zoonotic enteric pathogens were identified in samples from several species admitted to wildlife hospitals, indicating potential for transmission if prevention is not practiced.

  16. Trace elements controlling the atmospheric circulation. Atmospheric environmental research as part of future FhG research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-11-01

    Atmospheric trace substances such as methane (CH/sub 4/), ozone and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) essentially influence the biosphere. FhG research work will be consisting in the long-term measurement of trace substance concentrations in different places (e.g. South Africa, Italy, Thailand or China). An air container packed with measuring instruments and data storage equipment was sent to South America with scientists on board measuring the distribution of trace substances over the northern and southern hemisphere.

  17. Empirical insights and considerations for the OBT inter-laboratory comparison of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Bog; Roche, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Organically bound tritium (OBT) is an important tritium species that can be measured in most environmental samples, but has only recently been recognized as a species of tritium in these samples. Currently, OBT is not routinely measured by environmental monitoring laboratories around the world. There are no certified reference materials (CRMs) for environmental samples. Thus, quality assurance (QA), or verification of the accuracy of the OBT measurement, is not possible. Alternatively, quality control (QC), or verification of the precision of the OBT measurement, can be achieved. In the past, there have been differences in OBT analysis results between environmental laboratories. A possible reason for the discrepancies may be differences in analytical methods. Therefore, inter-laboratory OBT comparisons among the environmental laboratories are important and would provide a good opportunity for adopting a reference OBT analytical procedure. Due to the analytical issues, only limited information is available on OBT measurement. Previously conducted OBT inter-laboratory practices are reviewed and the findings are described. Based on our experiences, a few considerations were suggested for the international OBT inter-laboratory comparison exercise to be completed in the near future. -- Highlights: ► Inter-laboratory OBT comparisons would provide a good opportunity for developing reference OBT analytical procedures. ► The measurement of environmental OBT concentrations has a higher associated uncertainty. ► Certified reference materials for OBT in environmental samples are required

  18. Tritium concentrations in environmental water and food samples collected around the vicinity of the PNPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, T.Y.; Enriquez, S.O.; Duran, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    The natural radioactivity levels of tritium in environmental samples collected around the vicinity and more distant environment of the first Philippine Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP-1) in Bataan were assessed. The samples analyzed consisted of water samples such as seawater, freshwater, drinking water, groundwater and rainwater; and food samples such as cereals, vegetables, fruits; meat, milk fish and crustaceans. Tritium concentrations in water samples were determined by distillation and liquid scintillation counting techniques. The food samples were analyzed for tissue-free water tritium by the freezing-drying method followed by liquid scintillation counting techniques. (Auth.) 13 refs

  19. Rapid filtration separation-based sample preparation method for Bacillus spores in powdery and environmental matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabel, Sandra; Boissinot, Maurice; Charlebois, Isabelle; Fauvel, Chantal M; Shi, Lu-E; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Paquin, Amélie T; Bastien, Martine; Stewart, Gale; Leblanc, Eric; Sato, Sachiko; Bergeron, Michel G

    2012-03-01

    Authorities frequently need to analyze suspicious powders and other samples for biothreat agents in order to assess environmental safety. Numerous nucleic acid detection technologies have been developed to detect and identify biowarfare agents in a timely fashion. The extraction of microbial nucleic acids from a wide variety of powdery and environmental samples to obtain a quality level adequate for these technologies still remains a technical challenge. We aimed to develop a rapid and versatile method of separating bacteria from these samples and then extracting their microbial DNA. Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii was used as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. We studied the effects of a broad variety of powdery and environmental samples on PCR detection and the steps required to alleviate their interference. With a benchmark DNA extraction procedure, 17 of the 23 samples investigated interfered with bacterial lysis and/or PCR-based detection. Therefore, we developed the dual-filter method for applied recovery of microbial particles from environmental and powdery samples (DARE). The DARE procedure allows the separation of bacteria from contaminating matrices that interfere with PCR detection. This procedure required only 2 min, while the DNA extraction process lasted 7 min, for a total of sample preparation procedure allowed the recovery of cleaned bacterial spores and relieved detection interference caused by a wide variety of samples. Our procedure was easily completed in a laboratory facility and is amenable to field application and automation.

  20. Methodology of testing environmental samples from the area surrounding radioactive waste deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropikova, S.; Pastuchova, D.

    1979-01-01

    Methods are described of environmental sample investigation in the area surrounding radioactive waste deposits, namely monitoring ground water, surface water, sediments, water flows and catchments, vegetation and soil. Methods of sample preparation, and methods of radionuclides determination in mixtures are also discussed, as are spot activity measurement methods. (author)

  1. Report for Detection of Biothreat Agents and Environmental Samples using the LLNL Virulence Array for DHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, Crystal [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gardner, Shea [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McLoughlin, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thissen, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jackson, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-18

    The objective of this project is to provide DHS a comprehensive evaluation of the current genomic technologies including genotyping, Taqman PCR, multiple locus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing in the analysis of biothreat agents from complex environmental samples. This report focuses on the design, testing and results of samples on the Virulence Array.

  2. Demonstration and determination of submicroscopic particles of uranium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihelska, K.; Lorincik, J.; Sus, F.; Vesela, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this work laboratories of the Centrum vyzkumu Rez, Ltd are presented. Fission track analysis (FTA) is used for analysis of uranium in environmental samples. Treatment of samples for FTA is described and some results ar presented. The method of SIMS is used, too.

  3. Least-squares resolution of gamma-ray spectra in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanipe, L.G.; Seale, S.K.; Liggett, W.S.

    1977-08-01

    The use of ALPHA-M, a least squares computer program for analyzing NaI (Tl) gamma spectra of environmental samples, is evaluated. Included is a comprehensive set of program instructions, listings, and flowcharts. Two other programs, GEN4 and SIMSPEC, are also described. GEN4 is used to create standard libraries for ALPHA-M, and SIMSPEC is used to simulate spectra for ALPHA-M analysis. Tests to evaluate the standard libraries selected for use in analyzing environmental samples are provided. An evaluation of the results of sample analyses is discussed

  4. Evaluation of environmental sampling methods for detection of Salmonella enterica in a large animal veterinary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Valerie R; Tinkler, Stacy H; Hammac, G Kenitra; Ruple, Audrey

    2018-04-01

    Environmental surveillance for Salmonella enterica can be used for early detection of contamination; thus routine sampling is an integral component of infection control programs in hospital environments. At the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (PUVTH), the technique regularly employed in the large animal hospital for sample collection uses sterile gauze sponges for environmental sampling, which has proven labor-intensive and time-consuming. Alternative sampling methods use Swiffer brand electrostatic wipes for environmental sample collection, which are reportedly effective and efficient. It was hypothesized that use of Swiffer wipes for sample collection would be more efficient and less costly than the use of gauze sponges. A head-to-head comparison between the 2 sampling methods was conducted in the PUVTH large animal hospital and relative agreement, cost-effectiveness, and sampling efficiency were compared. There was fair agreement in culture results between the 2 sampling methods, but Swiffer wipes required less time and less physical effort to collect samples and were more cost-effective.

  5. Elemental cycling response of an Adirondack subalpine spruce-fir forest to atmospheric and environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Friedland; Eric K. Miller

    1996-01-01

    Patterns and trends in forest elemental cycling can become more apparent in the presence of atmospheric perturbations. High-elevation forests of the northeastern United States have received large amounts of atmospheric deposition of pollutants, which have altered natural elemental cycling and retention rates in a variety of ways. This study examined atmospheric...

  6. Measurements of atmospheric mercury with high time resolution: recent applications in environmental research and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinghaus, R; Kock, H H; Schmolke, S R

    2001-11-01

    In the past five years automated high time-resolution measurements of mercury species in ambient air have promoted remarkable progress in the understanding of the spatial distribution, short-term variability, and fate of this priority pollutant in the lower troposphere. Examples show the wide range of possible applications of these techniques in environmental research and monitoring. Presented applications of measurement methods for total gaseous mercury (TGM) include long-term monitoring of atmospheric mercury at a coastal station, simultaneous measurements during a south-to-north transect measurement campaign covering a distance of approximately 800 km, the operation on board of a research aircraft, and the quantification of mercury emissions from naturally enriched surface soils. First results obtained with a new method for the determination of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) are presented. Typical background concentrations of TGM are between 1.5 and 2 ng m(-3) in the lower troposphere. Concentrations of RGM have been determined at a rural site in Germany between 2 and 35 pg m(-3). Flux measurements over naturally enriched surface soils in the Western U.S.A. have revealed emission fluxes of up to 200 ng Hg m(-1) h(-1) under dry conditions.

  7. Atmospheric environment measurement 3. Environmental pollution monitoring system using PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keizo

    2009-01-01

    The PIXE(Proton Induced X-ray Emission) method is used in various fields owing to its high sensitivity. This method can be used to analyze multiple elements in a short time and therefore is suitable for the analysis of large quantities of environmental samples. We researched the effect of removing footwear in a room on indoor aerosol pollution. The concentration of aerosol particles in the case that footwear was not removed was 5 times larger than in the case when footwear was removed. We were able to identify a source of air pollution using both the results of PIXE analysis and information on wind direction. We applied PIXE analysis to investigate airborne yellow sand, which originals from the Gobi desert. By analyzing each yellow sand particle, hazardous yellow sand could be detected. We also applied PIXE analysis to river water pollution. River water samples were collected at a number of points along a river. The dilution of metallic elements by the river water was observed. Thus, it was shown that monitoring systems using the PIXE method are very useful for monitoring environmental pollution. (author)

  8. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Gemycircularvirus from Environmental Samples in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Assis, Matheus Ribeiro; Vieira, Carmen Baur; Fioretti, Julia Monassa; Rocha, Mônica Simões; de Almeida, Pedro Ivo Neves; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Fumian, Tulio Machado

    2016-12-01

    Gemycircularvirus (GemyCV) is a group of viruses which has been recently proposed as a new viral genus detected in fecal and environmental samples around the world. GemyCVs have been detected in human blood, brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and stool sample. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time, through molecular detection and characterization, the presence of GemyCVs in environmental samples from Brazil. Our results show a percentage of positivity ranging from 69 (25/36) to 97 % (35/36) in river water samples collected in Manaus, Amazon region, and wastewater from a wastewater treatment plant located in Rio de Janeiro, respectively, revealing GemyCVs as an important environmental contaminant.

  9. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David; Ross, Shane; Lin, Binbin

    2014-05-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. Members of this genus are important pathogens and mycotoxin producers. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. Spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2,200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. Some of the species of Fusarium identified from our collections have not been previously reported in the state of Virginia. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season. This work extends previous studies showing an association between atmospheric transport barriers (Lagrangian coherent structures or LCSs) and the movement of Fusarium in the lower atmosphere. An increased understanding of the aerobiology of Fusarium may contribute to new and improved control strategies for diseases causes by fusaria in the future.

  10. Pb-210 behaviour in environmental samples from the Cuban east in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Tamayo, L.; Suarez Pina, W.

    1996-01-01

    A method based in alpha and beta gross counting, is applied to research behaviour, during 1993, of Pb-210 in atmospheric depositional samples of six sites of the Cuban east. In five of these points, located distant from Cuban centers, the average Pb-210 aport to measured beta activity is predominant (80 +- 20 %) and maximum (> 50 % annual) is observed in coincidence with the first rain full peak. Such regularity may be explained, if assumption is made that principal source of Pb-210 are the continental air masses penetrating the insular atmosphere in winter and that mentioned radionuclide is deposit later with the spring rainfalls. In the sixth point, located at industrial zone, the alpha-beta activities rates are abnormally high, with maximums of 1.5 and 2.4 faced with peak raining and wet months respectively and probably originated by the input atmosphere of rich s in alpha emisors particles from industrial processes

  11. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid microvolume samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, J Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Shelley, Jacob T; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-11-06

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed "drop-on-demand" (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (∼17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 μg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained.

  12. Radiochemical separation of actinides for their determination in environmental samples and waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, B [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The determination of low level activities of actinides in environmental samples and waste products makes high demands on radiochemical separation methods. Artificial and natural actinides were analyzed in samples form the surrounding areas of NPP and of uranium mines, incorporation samples, solutions containing radioactive fuel, solutions and solids resutling from the process, and in wastes. The activities are measured by {alpha}-spectrometry and {gamma}-spectrometry. (DG)

  13. Multielement fingerprinting for characterization: Earthworm samples from the environmental specimen bank of the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossbach, M.; Stoeppler, M.

    1988-01-01

    Earthworm samples (Lumbricidae) from three different sampling sites in the Federal Republic of Germany were collected for the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB). Subsamples of the cryohomogenized material from two annual samplings were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and mean values are presented in the logarithmic fingerprint mode. The 'identical matrix reference material concept' of the ESB has been applied and proved to be of particular value for multielement determinations. (orig.)

  14. Improvements to sample processing and measurement to enable more widespread environmental application of tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James; Alexander, Thomas; Aalseth, Craig; Back, Henning; Mace, Emily; Overman, Cory; Seifert, Allen; Freeburg, Wilcox

    2017-08-01

    Previous measurements have demonstrated the wealth of information that tritium (T) can provide on environmentally relevant processes. We present modifications to sample preparation approaches that enable T measurement by proportional counting on small sample sizes equivalent to 120 mg of water and demonstrate the accuracy of these methods on a suite of standardized water samples. This enhanced method should provide the analytical flexibility needed to address persistent knowledge gaps in our understanding of T behavior in the environment.

  15. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Velayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65% studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30% studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5% article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23% was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM species in both clinical (28% and environmental (19% isolated samples (P < 0.05. Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM, M. simiae (103/494; 21% demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%. These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  16. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65%) studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30%) studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5%) article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23%) was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM) species in both clinical (28%) and environmental (19%) isolated samples (P < 0.05). Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM), M. simiae (103/494; 21%) demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%). These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  17. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 7: Sample and Data Tracking subject area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Sample and Data Tracking subject area allows insertion of tracking information into a central repository where the data is immediately available for viewing. For example, a technical coordinator is able to view the current status of a particular sampling effort, from sample collection to data package validation dates. Four major types of data comprise the Sample and Data Tracking subject area: data about the mechanisms that groups a set of samples for a particular sampling effort; data about how constituents are grouped and assigned to a sample; data about when, where, and how samples are sent to a laboratory for analysis; and data bout the status of a sample's constituent analysis requirements, i.e., whether the analysis results have been returned from the laboratory

  19. The analysis study of plutonium in the environmental sample by mass spectrum combined with isotopic dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jun; Fu Zhonghua; Mao Xingen; Meng Fanben

    2004-01-01

    The technology of the rhenium filament carbonization was used to increase the ionization efficiency in this paper. The plutonium in the environmental sample was analyzed by Mass Spectrum combined with isotope dilution. Analysis of the 239 Pu blank in the process: The analysis of 239 Pu from the chemical process was carried out in order to establish the influence of the 239 Pu introduced from the process. The analysis results were shown in Table 1 sample 1 was not gone through the process, sample 2 and sample 3 were gone through the process. It was clear that there was no influence of the 239 Pu from the process within the deviation. Results and Discussions: The environmental samples which were dealed with the chemical method were prepared the sample of mass spectrum, The atomic ratio of the 239 Pu and 242 Pu in the environmental samples was measured by Mass Spectrum. The atomic ratio in the tracer 242 Pu was 0.01476±0.00007.The results for nuclide content in environment were given in Table 2. The content of 239 Pu in the tracer was high, so the existing of 239 Pu in the environmental samples can be determined by the changing of the atomic ratio of 242 Pu to 239 Pu. It was clear that there was 239 Pu in the environmental samples except the cypress leaves-2 and the pine leaves-3 within the deviation, and the content of 239 Pu were given in Table 2. Conclusion: a. Plutonium was separated and purified from the impurity by the anion-exchange and the electrodeposition, it was possible to provide the eligible mass spectrum sample. b. The measurement of plutonium in the environmental samples was not influenced by the flow of the background in the experiment. c. As the technology of the rhenium carbonization was used to increase the ionization efficiency, the content of plutonium which was about 10 -13 g in the environmental sample could be quantitatively analyzed by Mass Spectrum combined with isotope dilution. (authors)

  20. Radionuclide analysis of environmental field trial samples at STUK. Report on Task FIN A 847 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.; Klemola, S.; Saxen, R.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Moring, M.

    1994-12-01

    Radionuclide determinations on seventeen field trial test samples were carried out for the International Atomic Energy Agency by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). All the samples, i.e., samples of sea water, grass and biota were analysed for gamma emitting nuclides. 3 H was determined in water, 90 Sr in grass and 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu and 241 Am in biota samples. To avoid losses of radionuclides before gamma activity measurements, the sequence of treatments was adjusted considering the unknown radionuclide composition. The radionuclide contents found in the samples were roughly the same or lower than contents in same types of environmental samples in the Northern hemisphere. The ratios of Pu and Am nuclides in two of the biota samples referred to an origin other than the global atmospheric fallout. The work was carried out under Task FIN A 847 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards. (orig.) (21 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.)

  1. Composition of atmospheric precipitation. I. Sampling technique. Use of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egner, H; Eriksson, E; Emanuelsson, A

    1947-01-01

    In order to investigate the composition of atmospheric precipitations in Sweden, a technique using ion exchange resins has been developed. The possibilities of nitrate reduction, and ammonia losses, when the precipitation is collected in zinc gauges is stressed. Glass funnels are used, and they are effectively protected from bird droppings. The ion exchange resins so far available are quite serviceable but show some deficiencies as to stability, and activity in alkaline solutions. New resins, which are not yet available, seem to offer definite advantages.

  2. Wet-digestion of environmental sample using silver-mediated electrochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Jun

    2010-01-01

    An application of silver-mediated electrochemical method to environmental samples as the effective digestion method for iodine analysis was tried. Usual digestion method for 129 I in many type of environmental sample is combustion method using quartz glass tube. Chemical yield of iodine on the combustion method reduce depending on the type of sample. The silver-mediated electrochemical method is expected to achieve very low loss of iodine. In this study, dried kombu (Laminaria) sample was tried to digest with electrochemical cell. At the case of 1g of sample, digestion was completed for about 24 hours under the electric condition of <10V and <2A. After the digestion, oxidized species of iodine was reduced to iodide by adding sodium sulfite. And then the precipitate of silver iodide was obtained. (author)

  3. Study on auto-plating process time versus recovery for polonium, Po-210 in environmental sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalal Sharib; Zaharudin Ahmad; Abdul Kadir Ishak; Norfaizal Mohamed; Ahmad Sanadi Abu Bakar; Yii Mei Wo; Kamarozaman Ishak; Siti Aminah Yusoff

    2008-08-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate time effectiveness and recovery 16 samples of 4 Kuala Muda stations during auto-plating process procedures for determination Polonium, Po 210 activity concentration in environmental sample. The study was performed using Kuala Muda sediment as sample in the same methodology. The auto-plating process runs for 4, 12, 24 and 30 hours on a silver disc for 4 samples each station, and then counted for one (1) day using an alpha spectrometry counting system. The objectives for this study is to justify on time duration for auto-plating process effecting a chemical yield of Po-209.The results showed recovery are increasing versus time and constantly at 24 hour auto-plating. Its mean, 24 hour is an optimum time for auto-plating process for determination of Polonium, Po 210 activity concentration in environmental sample. (Author)

  4. Evaluation of oxidation techniques for preparing bioassay and environmental samples for liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.H.

    1979-10-01

    In environmental and biological monitoring for carbon-14 and tritium, the presence of color and chemical quenching agents in the samples can degrade the efficiency of liquid scintillation counting. A series of experiments was performed to evaluate the usefulness, under routine conditions, of first oxidizing the samples to improve the counting by removing the color and quenching agents. The scintillation counter was calibrated for the effects of quenching agents on its counting efficiency. Oxidizing apparatus was tested for its ability to accurately recover the 14 C and 3 H in the samples. Scintillation counting efficiences were compared for a variety of oxidized and unoxidized environmental and bioassay samples. The overall conclusion was that, for routine counting, oxidation of such samples is advantageous when they are highly quenched or in solid form

  5. Use of immunomagnetic separation for the detection of Desulfovibrio vulgaris from environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Joyner, D.C.; Kusel, K.; Singer, M.E.; Sitte, J.; Torok, T.

    2011-04-15

    Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) has proved highly efficient for recovering microorganisms from heterogeneous samples. Current investigation targeted the separation of viable cells of the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Streptavidin-coupled paramagnetic beads and biotin labeled antibodies raised against surface antigens of this microorganism were used to capture D. vulgaris cells in both bioreactor grown laboratory samples and from extremely low-biomass environmental soil and subsurface drilling samples. Initial studies on detection, recovery efficiency and viability for IMS were performed with laboratory grown D. vulgaris cells using various cell densities. Efficiency of cell isolation and recovery (i.e., release of the microbial cells from the beads following separation) was followed by microscopic imaging and acridine orange direct counts (AODC). Excellent recovery efficiency encouraged the use of IMS to capture Desulfovibrio spp. cells from low-biomass environmental samples. The environmental samples were obtained from a radionuclide-contaminated site in Germany and the chromium (VI)-contaminated Hanford site, an ongoing bioremediation project of the U.S. Department of Energy. Field deployable IMS technology may greatly facilitate environmental sampling and bioremediation process monitoring and enable transcriptomics and proteomics/metabolomics-based studies directly on cells collected from the field.

  6. Tritium analysis in environmental samples around Nuclear Power Plants and nationwide surveillance of radionuclides in some environmental samples(meat and drinking water)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Woo; Han, Man Jung; Cho, Seong Won; Cho, Hong Jun; Oh, Hyeon Kyun; Lee, Jeong Min; Chang, Jae Sook [KORTIC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    12 kind of environmental samples such as soil, underground water, seawater, etc. around the Nuclear Power Plants(NPP) and surface seawater around the Korea peninsula were sampled, For the samples of rain, pine-needle, air, seawater, underground water, chinese cabbage, grain of rice and milk sampled around NPP, and surface seawater and rain sampled all around country, tritium concentration was measured, The tritium concentration in the tap water and the gamma activity in the domestic and imported beef that were sampled at ward in the large city in Korea(Seoul, Pusan, Taegu, Taejun, Inchun, Kwangju) were analyzed for the meat and drinking waters. As the results of analyzing, tritium concentration in rain and tap water were very low all around country, but a little higher around the NPP than general surrounding. At the Wolsung NPP, tritium concentration was descend according to distance from the stack. Tritium activity of surface seawater around the Korea peninsula was also, very low. The measured radioactive elements in the beef is the same as the radioactive elements on the earth surface.

  7. Isotope techniques in the study of past and current environmental changes in the hydrosphere and the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Expanding economic and technological activities of mankind are contributing to rapid and potentially stressful changes in the global ecosystem. These changes may have harmful, far-reaching consequences in the near future. The current changes in the global ecosystem are also affecting the hydrological cycle. Environmental isotopes, whose distribution in natural compounds is governed by environmental conditions, are among the most powerful tools for investigating past and current environmental changes. Thorough understanding of the past environment is a prerequisite for any meaningful prediction of the Earth's ecosystem behaviour. Important conclusions on past environment conditions can be derived from the analysis of isotope ratios preserved in various environmental archives. The present worked covers both the 'present' and the 'past' of the global atmosphere/hydrosphere system. The presentations were organized in five major topics: (i) isotopes in atmospheric studies; (ii) isotopes in the soil-plants-atmosphere system; (iii) degradation of water resources; (iv) palaeohydrology and palaeowaters; and (v) isotope indicators of climatic changes. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Rapid and Automated Determination of Plutonium and Neptunium in Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development...... and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SIextraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples...... for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including...

  9. Determination of 237Np in environmental and nuclear samples: A review of the analytical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.; Mulholland, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    A number of analytical methods has been developed and used for the determination of neptunium in environmental and nuclear fuel samples using alpha, ICP–MS spectrometry, and other analytical techniques. This review summarizes and discusses development of the radiochemical procedures for separation of neptunium (Np), since the beginning of the nuclear industry, followed by a more detailed discussion on recent trends in the separation of neptunium. This article also highlights the progress in analytical methods and issues associated with the determination of neptunium in environmental samples. - Highlights: ► Determination of Np in environmental and nuclear samples is reviewed. ► Various analytical methods used for the determination of Np are listed. ► Progress and issues associated with the determination of Np are discussed.

  10. Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere 1996: An Assessment Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Kaye, J. A.; Decola, P. L.; Friedl, R. R.; Peterson, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    This document is issued in response to the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990, Public Law 101-549, which mandates that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other key agencies submit triennial report to congress and the Environmental Protection Agency. NASA is charged with the responsibility to report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the Stratosphere. Part 1 of this report summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program for the period of 1994-1996. Part 2 (this document) presents summaries of several scientific assessments, reviews, and summaries. These include the executive summaries of two scientific assessments: (Section B) 'Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 1994'; (Section C) 'l995 Scientific Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft); end of mission/series statements for three stratospherically-focused measurement campaigns: (Section D) 'ATLAS End-of-Series Statement'; (Section E) 'ASHOE/MAESA End-of-Mission Statement'; (Section F) 'TOTE/VOTE End-of-Mission Statement'; a summary of NASA's latest biennial review of fundamental photochemical processes important to atmospheric chemistry 'Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Stratospheric Modeling'; and (Section H) the section 'Atmospheric Ozone Research" from the Mission to Planet Earth Science Research Plan, which describes NASA's current and future research activities related to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry.

  11. Analytical laboratory quality assurance guidance in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This document introduces QA guidance pertaining to design and implementation of laboratory procedures and processes for collecting DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) ESAA (environmental sampling and analysis activities) data. It addresses several goals: identifying key laboratory issues and program elements to EM HQ and field office managers; providing non-prescriptive guidance; and introducing environmental data collection program elements for EM-263 assessment documents and programs. The guidance describes the implementation of laboratory QA elements within a functional QA program (development of the QA program and data quality objectives are not covered here)

  12. Rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, J.

    2011-03-01

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SI-extraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples (Paper IV); (4) Investigation of the suitability and applicability of 242 Pu as a tracer for rapid neptunium determination using anion exchange chromatography in an SI-network coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper V); (5) Exploration of macro-porous anion exchange chromatography for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including environmental risk monitoring and assessment, emergency preparedness and surveillance of contaminated areas. (Author)

  13. Rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, J.

    2011-03-15

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SI-extraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples (Paper IV); (4) Investigation of the suitability and applicability of 242Pu as a tracer for rapid neptunium determination using anion exchange chromatography in an SI-network coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper V); (5) Exploration of macro-porous anion exchange chromatography for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including environmental risk monitoring and assessment, emergency preparedness and surveillance of contaminated areas. (Author)

  14. Multi-element composition of historical lichen collections and bark samples, indicators of changing atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, O. W.; Chimonides, P. D. J.; Jeffries, T. E.; Jones, G. C.; Rusu, A.-M.; Read, H.

    Thirty six element signatures were compared in historical Parmelia sulcata samples from the Natural History Museum herbarium collected over the period 1797-1967 with those recorded in the same species and tree bark sampled in 2000 from Burnham Beeches, lying 40 km west of London. Nineteen elements reached highest concentrations in herbarium samples, consistent with a pollution legacy and dust contamination in the herbarium. Healthy Parmelia sampled east and down-wind of London at a farm during peak SO 2 emissions in 1967 contained highest V, Ni, Zn, Cd, Se, Ge contents, supporting derivation from fuel combustion; the same sample was previously determined as having a low δ34S and high S and N contents. Lowest V, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sn, Ba, Pb, Mo, Sb, Li, B, Cs, U, Th, Ga contents were recorded in a sample with a high δ34S and low S content collected in 1887 from a remote region from Ross-shire, Scotland. Se and Cd enrichment, never-the-less suggest a transboundary pollution influence. Lichen Pb concentrations from Burnham Beeches were amongst the lowest recorded in spite of lichens being collected close to roads. Herbarium samples help interpret changes in element deposition where few data exist, in spite of dust contamination.

  15. The effect of sampling scheme in the survey of atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Albania by using moss biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qarri, Flora; Lazo, Pranvera; Bekteshi, Lirim; Stafilov, Trajce; Frontasyeva, Marina; Harmens, Harry

    2015-02-01

    The atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Albania was investigated by using a carpet-forming moss species (Hypnum cupressiforme) as bioindicator. Sampling was done in the dry seasons of autumn 2010 and summer 2011. Two different sampling schemes are discussed in this paper: a random sampling scheme with 62 sampling sites distributed over the whole territory of Albania and systematic sampling scheme with 44 sampling sites distributed over the same territory. Unwashed, dried samples were totally digested by using microwave digestion, and the concentrations of metal elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and AAS (Cd and As). Twelve elements, such as conservative and trace elements (Al and Fe and As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, V, Zn, and Li), were measured in moss samples. Li as typical lithogenic element is also included. The results reflect local emission points. The median concentrations and statistical parameters of elements were discussed by comparing two sampling schemes. The results of both sampling schemes are compared with the results of other European countries. Different levels of the contamination valuated by the respective contamination factor (CF) of each element are obtained for both sampling schemes, while the local emitters identified like iron-chromium metallurgy and cement industry, oil refinery, mining industry, and transport have been the same for both sampling schemes. In addition, the natural sources, from the accumulation of these metals in mosses caused by metal-enriched soil, associated with wind blowing soils were pointed as another possibility of local emitting factors.

  16. Some analytical aspects about determination of Sr89 and Sr90 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Alvarez Garcia, A.

    1988-01-01

    Some problems about determination of Sr 89 and Sr 90 in environmental samples have been studied. The main difficulties are due to the wide range in the concentration of their components and the contents of chemical and radiochemical interferent elements. The behaviour of strontium on ion exchange resin has been described by some experiments in various media: aqueous media, calcium concentration and matrix variable. The differences of alkaline-earth nitrate and carbonate solubilities have been analyzed in nitric acid. The chemical recovery in environmental samples has been determined. (Author)

  17. Metagenomic analyses of novel viruses and plasmids from a cultured environmental sample of hyperthermophilic neutrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili, David; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2010-01-01

    Two novel viral genomes and four plasmids were assembled from an environmental sample collected from a hot spring at Yellowstone National Park, USA, and maintained anaerobically in a bioreactor at 85°C and pH 6. The double-stranded DNA viral genomes are linear (22.7 kb) and circular (17.7 kb...... respectively. Strategies are considered for assembling genomes of smaller genetic elements from complex environmental samples, and for establishing possible host identities on the basis of sequence similarity to host CRISPR immune systems....

  18. Helium-3 mass spectrometry for low-level tritium analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surano, K.A.; Hudson, G.B.; Failor, R.A.; Sims, J.M.; Holland, R.C.; MacLean, S.C.; Garrison, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    Helium-3 ( 3 He) mass spectrometry for the analysis of low-level tritium ( 3 H) concentrations in environmental sample matrices was compared with conventional low-level β-decay counting methods. The mass-spectrometry method compared favorably, equaling or surpassing conventional decay-counting methods with respect to most criteria. Additional research and method refinements may make 3 He mass spectrometry the method of choice for routine, low-level to very-low-level 3 H measurements in a wide variety of environmental samples in the future

  19. Atmospheric aerosol characterization by means of impactor samples analyzed by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, C.M.Q.; Boueres, L.C.S.

    1979-01-01

    Continuous size-distribution functions are generally considered as the dominant physical properties of the atmospheric aerosol (AA). The complexity of this physico-chemical system is manifest in the large number of investigative methods, the results of which are often difficult to compare. The cascade impactor and PIXE method, among these supplies th mass concentrations m sub(K,Z) of elements, with Z>13, detected in the K-stage of the impactor. In this paper we examine the AA characteristics which can be directly inferred from the data set (m sub(K,Z)) and elaborate a scheme that, under approximate conditions, allows for the interrelation of (m sub(K,Z)) and the size-distributions more commonly used in the mathematical treatment of aerosols, e.g., n(D) and n sub(ν) (D) of Friedlander. (Author) [pt

  20. The role of NAA in the environmental studies. Quantitative determination of heavy metals pollutant on environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutisna; Yusuf, Saeful; Fisli, Adel; Rukihati; Wardhani, Sri; Th Rina M

    2003-01-01

    The neutron activation analysis technique was applied in the elemental analysis of environmental samples to solve an environmental pollution problem. We focused our study in the analysis of heavy metal which has potentially become a pollutant. The environmental samples analyzed were some water, sediment and an air particulate matter. The tap water sample was collected from five samplings points located at region of Serpong and Muria. Meanwhile the river water samples were taken from five samplings points of Ciliwung River. Eight samplings points of Cisadane river estuary located at Tanjung Burung were selected to collect sediment samples. Air particulate samples were collected from Jakarta Metropolitan and Serpong using high volume air sampler. Trace elements analyses of water samples were done using a combination of INAA and pre-concentration stage prior irradiation. All samples were irradiated at GA. Siwabessy reactor located at Serpong using a thermal neutron flux of about 10 12 n.cm -2 .sec -1 . After cooling time, the samples irradiated were counted by a high resolution HPGe detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer. The quantitative analyses have been done using a comparative method to a fresh laboratory standard and we used some standard references materials to validate our analytical result. The obtained result from the tap water analysis show that the elements of As, Cr, Co, Cd, Mn, Sb and Zn could be determine quantitatively and they have a concentration range from about 0.02 μg/L to 103.9 μg/L. The analysis result of Ciliwung river water samples show that elements of Ag, As, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, V and Zn are present in the range of 2.4 μg/L to about 1365.8 μg/L. Meanwhile some important elements were obtained in the sediments samples taken from Cisadane River estuary such as Ce (40.4 - 63.6 mg/kg), Co (15.2 - 40.2 mg/kg), Cr (21.6 - 57.8 mg/kg), Eu (1.2 - 1.8 mg/kg), Fe (7.0 - 16.8 mg/kg), Mn (887 - 1810 mg/kg) and V (160 - 558 mg/kg). Finally the

  1. The role of NAA in the environmental studies. Quantitative determination of heavy metals pollutant on environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutisna; Yusuf, Saeful; Fisli, Adel; Rukihati; Wardhani, Sri; Th Rina M [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2003-03-01

    The neutron activation analysis technique was applied in the elemental analysis of environmental samples to solve an environmental pollution problem. We focused our study in the analysis of heavy metal which has potentially become a pollutant. The environmental samples analyzed were some water, sediment and an air particulate matter. The tap water sample was collected from five samplings points located at region of Serpong and Muria. Meanwhile the river water samples were taken from five samplings points of Ciliwung River. Eight samplings points of Cisadane river estuary located at Tanjung Burung were selected to collect sediment samples. Air particulate samples were collected from Jakarta Metropolitan and Serpong using high volume air sampler. Trace elements analyses of water samples were done using a combination of INAA and pre-concentration stage prior irradiation. All samples were irradiated at GA. Siwabessy reactor located at Serpong using a thermal neutron flux of about 10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2}.sec{sup -1}. After cooling time, the samples irradiated were counted by a high resolution HPGe detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer. The quantitative analyses have been done using a comparative method to a fresh laboratory standard and we used some standard references materials to validate our analytical result. The obtained result from the tap water analysis show that the elements of As, Cr, Co, Cd, Mn, Sb and Zn could be determine quantitatively and they have a concentration range from about 0.02 {mu}g/L to 103.9 {mu}g/L. The analysis result of Ciliwung river water samples show that elements of Ag, As, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, V and Zn are present in the range of 2.4 {mu}g/L to about 1365.8 {mu}g/L. Meanwhile some important elements were obtained in the sediments samples taken from Cisadane River estuary such as Ce (40.4 - 63.6 mg/kg), Co (15.2 - 40.2 mg/kg), Cr (21.6 - 57.8 mg/kg), Eu (1.2 - 1.8 mg/kg), Fe (7.0 - 16.8 mg/kg), Mn (887 - 1810 mg/kg) and V (160 - 558

  2. Beyond Naphthenic Acids: Environmental Screening of Water from Natural Sources and the Athabasca Oil Sands Industry Using Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P; Peru, Kerry M; Fahlman, Brian; Hewitt, L Mark; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing need for environmental screening of natural waters in the Athabasca region of Alberta, Canada, particularly in the differentiation between anthropogenic and naturally-derived organic compounds associated with weathered bitumen deposits. Previous research has focused primarily upon characterization of naphthenic acids in water samples by negative-ion electrospray ionization methods. Atmospheric pressure photoionization is a much less widely used ionization method, but one that affords the possibility of observing low polarity compounds that cannot be readily observed by electrospray ionization. This study describes the first usage of atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes) to characterize and compare extracts of oil sands process water, river water, and groundwater samples from areas associated with oil sands mining activities. When comparing mass spectra previously obtained by electrospray ionization and data acquired by atmospheric pressure photoionization, there can be a doubling of the number of components detected. In addition to polar compounds that have previously been observed, low-polarity, sulfur-containing compounds and hydrocarbons that do not incorporate a heteroatom were detected. These latter components, which are not amenable to electrospray ionization, have potential for screening efforts within monitoring programs of the oil sands.

  3. Determination of 90Sr in environmental samples by microwave assisted digestion - chromatographic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.M.; Llaurado, M.; Rauret, G.

    1998-01-01

    The stages involved in the determination of 90 Sr in environmental samples are: sample attack, radiochemical separation (of both 90 Sr and its progeny 90 Y) and measurement. For the determination of 90 Sr, the introduction of microwave-assisted digestion methods has improved acid attack by drastically decreasing both digestion time and the volume of acidic reagents. Recent studies describe many applications of microwave-assisted methods for the determination of inorganic and organometallic compounds in several matrices. We have recently studied the microwave-assisted digestion of soils for the 90 Sr determination. The presented work extends the application of microwaves for the 90 Sr determination to other environmental samples such as sediments, vegetation and milk. An open-focused microwave system, which accepts large samples intakes usually required for radioanalytical chemistry due to the low level content of radionuclides in environmental samples, was used. This system can handle up to 10 g of sample intake which, in many cases, is enough to have acceptable limits of detection. Different digestion procedures are optimised for each matrix studied, paying special attention to the microwave power, the time of digestion and the volume of acidic reagents. Once the sample is in solution a new separation procedure using a specific resin -Sr.Spec- is applied and the measurement is performed by liquid scintillation. The results obtained are compared with a previously optimised method based on liquid-liquid extraction of 90 Y and Cerenkov radiation measurement

  4. Study of Efficiency Calibrations of HPGe Detectors for Radioactivity Measurements of Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, S.; Salahel Din, K.; Abbady, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of calibrating of efficiency of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry of bulk environmental samples (Tea, crops, water, and soil) is a significant part of the environmental radioactivity measurements. Here we will discuss the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of three HPGe detectors it as a consequence, it is essential that the efficiency is determined for each set-up employed. Besides to take full advantage at gamma-ray spectrometry, a set of efficiency at several energies which covers the wide the range in energy, the large the number of radionuclides whose concentration can be determined to measure the main natural gamma-ray emitters, the efficiency should be known at least from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y). Radioactive sources were prepared from two different standards, a first mixed standard QC Y 40 containing 210 Pb, 241 Am, 109 Cd, and Co 57 , and the second QC Y 48 containing 241 Am, 109 Cd, 57 Co, 139 Ce, 113 Sn, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 88 Y, and 60 Co is necessary in order to calculate the activity of the different radionuclides contained in a sample. In this work, we will study the efficiency calibration as a function of different parameters as:- Energy of gamma ray from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y), three different detectors A, B, and C, geometry of containers (point source, marinelli beaker, and cylindrical bottle 1 L), height of standard soil samples in bottle 250 ml, and density of standard environmental samples. These standard environmental sample must be measured before added standard solution because we will use the same environmental samples in order to consider the self absorption especially and composition in the case of volume samples.

  5. Prospects for the introduction of Wide Area Monitoring Using Environmental Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear proliferation signatures released to the environment must be collected and distinguished from primordial and man-made backgrounds in soils, sediments, air, and surface and underground water. The delay time between the nuclear proliferation emissions and the date of the Wide-Area Environmental Sampling (WAES) analysis will determine which radionuclides would be analyzed based upon their half-lives. Various sampling and analysis technologies have been considered here for application to a WAES. Sampling procedures and equipment discussed are aimed at aquatic, airborne particulate, gas, vegetation, sediment and/or soil, and fauna media. Specific procedures must be selected based upon the application scenario; for example, sampling in the northern latitudes under freezing conditions, sampling at the equator under tropical rain-forest conditions, sampling in the mid-latitudes under desert conditions, and sampling in the marine environment require different equipment and procedures. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  6. Determination of short-lived trace elements in environmental samples by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardani, S.; Sihombing, E.; Hamzah, A.; Rochidi; Hery, P.S.; Hartaman, S.; Iman, J.

    1998-01-01

    Concentration of a short-lived trace elements in environmental samples were determined by neutron activation analysis, a counting loss often occur due to the high counting rate. A Pile-Up Rejecter (PUR) electric circuit was installed in counting a short-lived trace elements by a γ-ray spectrometer in order to correct a counting loss. The samples were irradiated for 30∼60 seconds at neutron flux of 3.5 x 10 12 n.cm -2 .s -1 , then the samples cooled for 120 second and counted for 180 second using this system. The nuclides concentration in the varieties environmental samples have a difference analysis result, was more accurate and precise, which the measured result would be 30 % more higher by PUR system than the result would be counted using a conventional γ-ray spectrometry method

  7. A semi-empirical approach to calculate gamma activities in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, D.; Barros, H.; Alfonso, J.; Perez, K.; Trujillo, M.; Losada, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a semi-empirical method to calculate radionuclide concentrations in environmental samples without the use of reference material and avoiding the typical complexity of Monte-Carlo codes. The calculation of total efficiencies was carried out from a relative efficiency curve (obtained from the gamma spectra data), and the geometric (simulated by Monte-Carlo), absorption, sample and intrinsic efficiencies at energies between 130 and 3000 keV. The absorption and sample efficiencies were determined from the mass absorption coefficients, obtained by the web program XCOM. Deviations between computed results and measured efficiencies for the RGTh-1 reference material are mostly within 10%. Radionuclide activities in marine sediment samples calculated by the proposed method and by the experimental relative method were in satisfactory agreement. The developed method can be used for routine environmental monitoring when efficiency uncertainties of 10% can be sufficient.(Author)

  8. Potential Use of Passive Sampling for Environmental Monitoring of Petroleum E&P Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional environmental monitoring relies on water or soil samples being taken at various time increments and sent to offsite laboratories for analysis. Reliance on grab samples generally captures limited “snapshots” of environmental contaminant concentrations, is time intensive, costly, and generates residual waste from excess sample and/or reagents used in the analysis procedures. As an alternative, we are evaluating swellable organosilica sorbents to create passive sampling systems for monitoring applications. Previous work has focused on absorption and detection of fuels, chlorinated solvents, endocrine disruptors, explosives, pesticides, fluorinated chemicals, and metals including Ba, Sr, Hg, Pb, Fe, Cu, and Zn. The advantages of swellable organosilica are that the material cancapture target compounds for an extended periods of time, does not absorb natural organic matter, and resists biofilm formation since the sorbent possesses an animated surface morphology.

  9. An improved combustion apparatus for the determination of organically bound tritium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Lin; Shan, Jian; Ma, Yu-Hua; Wang, Ling; Qin, Lai-Lai; Pi, Li; Zeng, You-Shi; Xia, Zheng-Hai; Wang, Guang-Hua; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an improved combustion apparatus for the determination of organically bound tritium in environmental samples. The performance of this apparatus including the recovery rate and reproducibility was investigated by combusting lettuce and pork samples. To determine the factors for the different recovery rates of lettuce and pork and investigate whether the samples were completely oxidized, the ashes and exhaust gases produced by the combustion were analyzed. The results indicate that the apparatus showed an excellent performance in the combustion of environmental samples. Thus, the improvements conducted in this study were effective. - Highlights: • Three major improvements were made to develop the combustion apparatus for OBT. • The recovery is higher and more stable than that of current equipment. • Little hydrogen was present in the ashes and exhaust after combustion.

  10. The determination of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and tin in complex environmental samples by hydride generation AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.; Beach, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hydride generation techniques are used routinely for the determination of As, Se, Sb and Sn in water samples. Advantages include high sensitivity, simplicity, and relative freedom from interferences. Continuous-flow designs greatly reduce analysis time as well as improve precision and allow for automation. However the accurate analysis of more complex environmental samples such as industrial sludges, soil samples, river sediments, and fly ash remains difficult. Numerous contributing factors influence the accuracy of the hydride technique. Sample digestion methods and sample preparation procedures are of critical importance. The digestion must adequately solubilize the elements of interest without loss by volatilization. Sample preparation procedures that guarantee the proper analyte oxidation state and eliminate the nitric acid and inter-element interferences are needed. In this study, difficult environmental samples were analyzed for As, Se, Sb, and Sn by continuous flow hydride generation. Sample preparation methods were optimized to eliminate interferences. The results of spike recovery studies will be presented. Data from the analysis of the same samples by graphite furnace AAS will be presented for comparison of accuracy, precision, and analysis time

  11. Comparison of Antemortem and Environmental Samples for Zebrafish Health Monitoring and Quarantine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crim, Marcus J; Lawrence, Christian; Livingston, Robert S; Rakitin, Andrei; Hurley, Shane J; Riley, Lela K

    2017-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays offer both exquisite sensitivity and the ability to test a wide variety of sample types. Various types of environmental sample, such as detritus and concentrated water, might provide a useful adjunct to sentinels in routine zebrafish health monitoring. Similarly, antemortem sampling would be advantageous for expediting zebrafish quarantine, without euthanasia of valuable fish. We evaluated the detection of Mycobacterium chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, Pseudocapillaria tomentosa, and Pseudoloma neurophilia in zebrafish, detritus, pooled feces, and filter membranes after filtration of 1000-, 500-, and 150-mL water samples by real-time PCR analysis. Sensitivity varied according to sample type and pathogen, and environmental sampling was significantly more sensitive than zebrafish sampling for detecting Mycobacterium spp. but not for Pseudocapillaria neurophilia or Pseudoloma tomentosa. The results of these experiments provide strong evidence of the utility of multiple sample types for detecting pathogens according to each pathogen's life cycle and ecological niche within zebrafish systems. In a separate experiment, zebrafish subclinically infected with M. chelonae, M. marinum, Pleistophora hyphessobryconis, Pseudocapillaria tomentosa, or Pseudoloma neurophilia were pair-spawned and individually tested with subsets of embryos from each clutch that received no rinse, a fluidizing rinse, or were surface-disinfected with sodium hypochlorite. Frequently, one or both parents were subclinically infected with pathogen(s) that were not detected in any embryo subset. Therefore, negative results from embryo samples may not reflect the health status of the parent zebrafish. PMID:28724491

  12. The environmental impact of coal technology: Politics and methods of achieving an international convention to protect the earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Particular attention will be paid to the following points during the international Round Table discussions: Technology transfer and political opportunities for the environmentally-compatible use of coal in developing and transitional countries who rely on coal to meet their energy needs. Supporting this challenge for the international community of coal-based energy conservation in these countries, particularly through development aid. To increasingly accept our collective responsibility for energy considerations and environmental effects, based on a better understanding of the countries' differing limits and obligations in achieving the goal of a convention to protect the earth's atmosphere. (orig.) [de

  13. Atmospheric chemistry and environmental impact of the use of amines in carbon capture and storage (CCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Claus J; Herrmann, Hartmut; Weller, Christian

    2012-10-07

    This critical review addresses the atmospheric gas phase and aqueous phase amine chemistry that is relevant to potential emissions from amine-based carbon capture and storage (CCS). The focus is on amine, nitrosamine and nitramine degradation, and nitrosamine and nitramine formation processes. A comparison between the relative importance of the various atmospheric sinks for amines, nitrosamines and nitramines is presented.

  14. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs

  15. Determination of Sr-90 in environmental samples using solid phase extraction disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zal U'yun Wan Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    A method is described for determination of Sr-90 in environmental samples using solid phase extraction disk (Empore TM Strontium Rad Disk) and GM counter. To determine the optimum condition for capacity of Empore TM Strontium Rad Disk, its characterization studies such as the effects Sr content, acidity (molarity) of acids, presence of Ca 2+ and other major ions (Na + , Mg 2+ etc), influence of interference (Pb and Bi) and others were carried out. An optimized the using of Empore TM Strontium Rad Disk for determination of Sr-90 was validated by application to environmental samples. Quantitative recoveries above 95%for Sr (stable) were recorded in 6M HCl condition. Typical environmental samples may contain an assortment of anionic and cationic species, but in general, Empore TM Strontium Rad Disk has enough capacity to effectively separate Sr for wide variety of aqueous solutions. Sr recovery in a matrix-free or the content of matrix less than 300 mg/sample is typically greater than 99% is reported in this research work. In particular, sample, which may contain interference such as Pb and Bi would require an addition separation step before processing to ensure an accurate measurement of Sr. In this research work, radiotracer 85 Sr was used to monitor the behavior of Sr and calculation its recovery. For analytical methods that can count Y-90, the Sr-90 activity/concentration in environmental sample was calculated. The concentration of Sr-90 in ash sample (Quality Controled Sample) of 276 ± 18 Bq/kg ash was determined from Y-90 activity. The relative percent difference of 1.1% was achievable for Empore TM Sr-Rad Disk methods when compared to the conventional method (fumed-HNO 3 method) - 279 ± 11 Bq/kg ash. (Author)

  16. Description of work for routine groundwater sampling at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, B.H.

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a description of work and field implementation guidance for routine (post-baseline) groundwater monitoring sampling program at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The purpose of this program is to (1) meet the intent of the applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements; (2) document baseline groundwater conditions; (3) monitor those conditions for change; and (4) allow for modifications to groundwater sampling if required by the leachate management program

  17. Determination of artificial and natural radionuclides and others trace elements in environmental samples form Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, L.A.; Godoy, J.M.; Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the radioactive elements concentrations, determined by gamma spectrometry and the others trace elements determined by neutron activation analysis of several environmental samples (soils, marine sediments, algae mosses and lichens) in Comandante Ferraz Antartica Station are presented. The high concentrations of Cs-137 were found in lichens and mosses samples and the soils and sediments showed concentrations of natural radionuclides. (C.G.C.). 8 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  18. Master schedule for CY-1984 Hanford environmental surveillance routine sampling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, P.J.; Price, K.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Carlile, J.M.V.

    1983-12-01

    This report provides the current schedule of data collection for the routine Hanford environmental surveillance and ground-water Monitoring Programs at the Hanford Site. The purpose is to evaluate and report the levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs. The routine sampling schedule provided herein does not include samples that are planned to be collected during FY-1984 in support of special studies, special contractor support programs, or for quality control purposes

  19. Contamination of the air and other environmental samples of the Ulm region by radioactive fission products after the accident of the Chernobyl reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivan, V.; Egger, K.P.; Hausbeck, R.; Schmid, W.

    1986-01-01

    Since April 30, 1986, the radioactivity of the fission products released by the accident of the Chernobyl reactor has been measured in the air of the city of Ulm. The airborne dust samples were collected with flow calibrated samplers on cellulose acetate membrane filters and counted with a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. Later on, the radioactivity measurements were expanded to other relevant environmental samples contaminated by radioactive atmospheric precipitates including grass, spruce needles, mosses, lichens, various kinds of food, drinking water, asphalt and concrete surface layers, municipal sewage sludge and sewage sludge ash. This paper reports the obtained results. (orig.) [de

  20. Systematic review and consensus guidelines for environmental sampling of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Direk Limmathurotsakul

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Tier 1 Select Agent and the cause of melioidosis, is a Gram-negative bacillus present in the environment in many tropical countries. Defining the global pattern of B. pseudomallei distribution underpins efforts to prevent infection, and is dependent upon robust environmental sampling methodology. Our objective was to review the literature on the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei, update the risk map for melioidosis, and propose international consensus guidelines for soil sampling.An international working party (Detection of Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Working Party (DEBWorP was formed during the VIth World Melioidosis Congress in 2010. PubMed (January 1912 to December 2011 was searched using the following MeSH terms: pseudomallei or melioidosis. Bibliographies were hand-searched for secondary references. The reported geographical distribution of B. pseudomallei in the environment was mapped and categorized as definite, probable, or possible. The methodology used for detecting environmental B. pseudomallei was extracted and collated. We found that global coverage was patchy, with a lack of studies in many areas where melioidosis is suspected to occur. The sampling strategies and bacterial identification methods used were highly variable, and not all were robust. We developed consensus guidelines with the goals of reducing the probability of false-negative results, and the provision of affordable and 'low-tech' methodology that is applicable in both developed and developing countries.The proposed consensus guidelines provide the basis for the development of an accurate and comprehensive global map of environmental B. pseudomallei.

  1. Empirical insights and considerations for the OBT inter-laboratory comparison of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Bog; Roche, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Organically bound tritium (OBT) is an important tritium species that can be measured in most environmental samples, but has only recently been recognized as a species of tritium in these samples. Currently, OBT is not routinely measured by environmental monitoring laboratories around the world. There are no certified reference materials (CRMs) for environmental samples. Thus, quality assurance (QA), or verification of the accuracy of the OBT measurement, is not possible. Alternatively, quality control (QC), or verification of the precision of the OBT measurement, can be achieved. In the past, there have been differences in OBT analysis results between environmental laboratories. A possible reason for the discrepancies may be differences in analytical methods. Therefore, inter-laboratory OBT comparisons among the environmental laboratories are important and would provide a good opportunity for adopting a reference OBT analytical procedure. Due to the analytical issues, only limited information is available on OBT measurement. Previously conducted OBT inter-laboratory practices are reviewed and the findings are described. Based on our experiences, a few considerations were suggested for the international OBT inter-laboratory comparison exercise to be completed in the near future. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Methods for simultaneous detection of the cyanotoxins BMAA, DABA, and anatoxin-a in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Hoagland, Kyle D; Snow, Daniel D; Cassada, David

    2013-12-15

    Blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, can produce several different groups of toxins in the environment including hepatotoxins (microcystins), neurotoxic non-protein amino acids β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), and 2,4-diaminobutyric (DABA), as well as the bicyclic amine alkaloid anatoxin-a. Few studies have addressed the methods necessary for an accurate determination of cyanotoxins in environmental samples, and none have been published that can detect these cyanotoxins together in a single sample. Cyanotoxins occur in a wide range of environmental samples including water, fish, and aquatic plant samples. Using polymeric cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD), and liquid chromatography ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), these compounds can for the first time be simultaneously quantified in a variety of environmental sample types. The extraction method for biological samples can distinguish bound and free cyanotoxins. Detection limits for water ranged from 5 to 7 μg/L using HPLC/FD, while detection limits for and LC/MS were in the range of 0.8-3.2 μg/L. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Detection of Cryptospordium spp. in environmental water samples by FTA-PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Zhu, Qian; He, Yan-Yan; Jiang, Li; Jiang, Shou-Fu

    2011-02-01

    To establish a FTA-polymeras chain reaction (FTA-PCR) method in detection of Cryptospordium spp. in different sources of water. The semi automated immunomagnetic separation (IMS) of Cryptospordium oocysts in environmental water samples was performed firstly, and then genomic DNA of Cryptospordium oocysts was extracted by FTA filters disk. Oligonucleotide primers were designed based on the DNA fragment of the 18 S rRNA gene from C. parvum. Plate DNA was amplified with primers in PCR. The control DNA samples from Toxoplasma gondii,Sarcocystis suihominis, Echinococcus granulosus, and Clonorchis sinensis were amplified simultaneously. All PCR products were detected by agar electrophoresis dyed with ethidium bromide. The 446 bp fragment of DNA was detected in all samples of C. parvum, C. andersoni, and C. baileyi, while it was not detected in control groups in laboratory. No positive samples were found from 10 samples collected from tape water in 5 districts of Shanghai City by FTA-PCR. Nine positive samples were detected totally from 70 different environmental water samples, there were 0 out of 15 samples from the source of tape water, 2 out of 25 from the Huangpu River, 5 out of 15 from rivers around the animal farmers, 1 out of 9 from output water of contaminating water treatment factory, 1 out of 6 from the out gate of living contaminating water. The 446 bp fragment was detected from all the amplified positive water samples. FTA-PCR is an efficient method for gene detection of Cryptospordium oocysts, which could be used in detection of environmental water samples. The contamination degree of Cryptospordium oocysts in the river water around animal farms is high.

  4. Estimation of the sensitivity of various environmental sampling methods for detection of Salmonella in duck flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mark E; Mueller-Doblies, Doris; Gosling, Rebecca J; Martelli, Francesca; Davies, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Reports of Salmonella in ducks in the UK currently rely upon voluntary submissions from the industry, and as there is no harmonized statutory monitoring and control programme, it is difficult to compare data from different years in order to evaluate any trends in Salmonella prevalence in relation to sampling methodology. Therefore, the aim of this project was to assess the sensitivity of a selection of environmental sampling methods, including the sampling of faeces, dust and water troughs or bowls for the detection of Salmonella in duck flocks, and a range of sampling methods were applied to 67 duck flocks. Bayesian methods in the absence of a gold standard were used to provide estimates of the sensitivity of each of the sampling methods relative to the within-flock prevalence. There was a large influence of the within-flock prevalence on the sensitivity of all sample types, with sensitivity reducing as the within-flock prevalence reduced. Boot swabs (individual and pool of four), swabs of faecally contaminated areas and whole house hand-held fabric swabs showed the overall highest sensitivity for low-prevalence flocks and are recommended for use to detect Salmonella in duck flocks. The sample type with the highest proportion positive was a pool of four hair nets used as boot swabs, but this was not the most sensitive sample for low-prevalence flocks. All the environmental sampling types (faeces swabs, litter pinches, drag swabs, water trough samples and dust) had higher sensitivity than individual faeces sampling. None of the methods consistently identified all the positive flocks, and at least 10 samples would be required for even the most sensitive method (pool of four boot swabs) to detect a 5% prevalence. The sampling of dust had a low sensitivity and is not recommended for ducks.

  5. Analytical Methodology for the Determination of Radium Isotopes in Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Reliable, comparable and 'fit for purpose' results are an essential requirement for any decision based on analytical measurements. For the analyst, the availability of tested and validated analytical procedures is an extremely important tool for production of such analytical measurements. For maximum utility, such procedures should be comprehensive, clearly formulated, and readily available to both the analyst and the customer for reference. Since 2004, the environment programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at the development of a set of procedures for the determination of radionuclides in terrestrial environmental samples. Measurements of radium isotopes are important for radiological and environmental protection, geochemical and geochronological investigations, hydrology, etc. The suite of isotopes creates and stimulates continuing interest in the development of new methods for determination of radium in various media. In this publication, the four most routinely used analytical methods for radium determination in biological and environmental samples, i.e. alpha spectrometry, gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation spectrometry and mass spectrometry, are reviewed

  6. Computer system for environmental sample analysis and data storage and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, F.P.; Fager, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A mini-computer based environmental sample analysis and data storage system has been developed. The system is used for analytical data acquisition, computation, storage of analytical results, and tabulation of selected or derived results for data analysis, interpretation and reporting. This paper discussed the structure, performance and applications of the system

  7. Reproducibility of measurement of the environmental carbon-14 samples prepared by the gel suspension method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohura, Hirotaka; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nakamura, Kouji; Okai, Tomio; Matoba, Masaru; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Hidehisa.

    1997-01-01

    Simple liquid scintillation counting technique for the assay of 14 C in the environment was developed. This technique was done by using gel suspension method, in which sample preparation is very simple and requires no special equipments. The reproducibility of this technique was considered and it was shown that the gel suspension method had enough reproducibility to monitor the environmental 14 C. (author)

  8. Analysis of trace uranium and plutonium in environmental water sample by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuemei

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of trace Uranium and Plutonium in environmental water is very important in the environment inspect. The preparation method of water samples are introduced and several common used method are compared. The analysis process and the calibration method with ICP-MS are discussed in detail considering present conditions. (author)

  9. Controlled dehydration of a biological sample using an alternative form of environmental SEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 237, č. 1 (2010), s. 7-11 ISSN 0022-2720 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : biological sample * dehydration * environmental SEM * AQUASEM II * hydration system Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.872, year: 2010

  10. Determination of Technetium-99 in Environmental Samples by Solvent Extraction at Controlled Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of technetium and ruthenium are determined under different conditions with CCl4, cyclohexanone, and 5% tri-isooctylamine (TIOA)/xylene. A method for analyzing 99Tc in environmental samples has been developed by solvent extraction in which the valences of technetium...

  11. Validation of dipslides as a tool for environmental sampling in a real-life hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, T; Foged, Charlotte Bernhardt Laiho; Andersen, L P

    2014-01-01

    Environmental sampling in hospitals is becoming increasingly important because of the rise in nosocomial infections. In order to monitor and track these infections and optimize cleaning and disinfection, we need to be able to locate the fomites with the highest amount of microorganisms, but the o...

  12. A review of electro analytical determinations of some important elements (Zn, Se, As) in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichiang; James, B.D.; Magee, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This review covers electro analytical methods reported in the literature for the determination of zinc, cadmium, selenium and arsenic in environmental and biological samples. A comprehensive survey of electro analytical techniques used for the determination of four important elements, i.e. zinc, cadmium, selenium and arsenic is reported herein with 322 references up to 1990. (Orig./A.B.)

  13. Self-absorption corrections for gamma ray spectral measurements of 210Pb in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and experimental data are used to demonstrate the basic behaviour of the self-absorption effect of a sample matrix in gamma ray spectrometry, particularly as it relates to the analysis of 210 Pb in environmental media. The results indicate that it may not be appropriate to apply the commonly used self-absorption function in all cases. (orig.)

  14. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239,240Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially...

  15. Measuring environmental change in forest ecosystems by repeated soil sampling: A North American perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory B. Lawrence; Ivan J. Fernandez; Daniel D. Richter; Donald S. Ross; Paul W. Hazlett; Scott W. Bailey; Rock Ouimet; Richard A. F. Warby; Arthur H. Johnson; Henry Lin; James M. Kaste; Andrew G. Lapenis; Timothy J. Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Environmental change is monitored in North America through repeated measurements of weather, stream and river flow, air and water quality, and most recently, soil properties. Some skepticism remains, however, about whether repeated soil sampling can effectively distinguish between temporal and spatial variability, and efforts to document soil change in forest...

  16. Improved optimum condition for recovery and measurement of 210Po in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zal Uyun Wan Mahmood; Norfaizal Mohamed; Nik Azlin Nik Ariffin; Abdul Kadir Ishak

    2012-01-01

    An improved laboratory technique for measurement of polonium-210( 210 Po) in environmental samples has been developed in Radiochemistry and Environmental Laboratory (RAS), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. To further improve this technique, a study with the objectives to determine the optimum conditions for 210 Po deposition and; evaluate the accuracy and precision results for the determination of 210 Po in environmental samples was carried-out. Polonium-210 which is an alpha emitter obtained in acidic solution through total digestion and dissolution of samples has been efficiently plated onto one side of the silver disc in the spontaneous plating process for measurement of its alpha activity. The optimum conditions for deposition of 210 Po were achieved using hydrochloric acid (HCl) media at acidity of 0.5 M with the presence of 1.0 gram hydroxyl ammonium chloride and the plating temperature at 90 degree Celsius. The plating was carried out in 80 ml HCl solution (0.5 M) for 4 hours. The recorded recoveries obtained using 209 Po tracers in the CRM IAEA-385 and environmental samples were 85 % - 98% whereby the efficiency of the new technique is a distinct advantage over the existing techniques. Therefore, optimization of deposition parameters is a prime importance to achieve accuracy and precision results as well as economy and time saving. (author)

  17. A simple and rapid cultural method for detection of Enterobacter sakazakii in environmental samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillaume-Gentil, O.; Sonnard, V.; Kandhai, M.C.; Marugg, J.; Joosten, H.

    2005-01-01

    A method was developed to detect and identify Enterobacter sakazakii in environmental samples. The method is based on selective enrichment at 45 ± 0.5°C in lauryl sulfate tryptose broth supplemented with 0.5 M NaCl and 10 mg/liter vancomycin (mLST) for 22 to 24 h followed by streaking on tryptone

  18. Repurposing environmental DNA samples: Detecting the western pearlshell (Margaritifera falcata) as a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph C. Dysthe; Torrey Rodgers; Thomas W. Franklin; Kellie J. Carim; Michael K. Young; Kevin S. McKelvey; Karen E. Mock; Michael K. Schwartz

    2018-01-01

    Information on the distribution of multiple species in a common landscape is fundamental to effective conservation and management. However, distribution data are expensive to obtain and often limited to high-profile species in a system. A recently developed technique, environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling, has been shown to be more sensitive than traditional detection...

  19. Ultrasensitive and Fast Voltammetric Determination of Iron in Seawater by Atmospheric Oxygen Catalysis in 500 μL Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Salvatore; Laglera, Luis M; Monticelli, Damiano

    2015-06-16

    A new method based on adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry with catalytic enhancement for the determination of total dissolved iron in seawater is reported. It was demonstrated that iron detection at the ultratrace level (0.1 nM) may be achieved in small samples (500 μL) with high sensitivity, no need for purging, no added oxidant, and a limit of detection of 5 pM. The proposed method is based on the adsorption of the complex Fe/2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) exploiting the catalytic effect of atmospheric oxygen. As opposite to the original method (Obata, H.; van den Berg, C. M. Anal. Chem. 2001, 73, 2522-2528), atmospheric oxygen dissolved in solution replaced bromate ions in the oxidation of the iron complex: removing bromate reduces the blank level and avoids the use of a carcinogenic species. Moreover, the new method is based on a recently introduced hardware that enables the determinations to be performed in 500 μL samples. The analyses were carried out on buffered samples (pH 8.15, HEPPS 0.01 M), 10 μM DHN and iron quantified by the standard addition method. The sensitivity is 49 nA nM(-1) min(-1) with 30 s deposition time and the LOD is equal to 5 pM. As a result, the whole procedure for the quantification of iron in one sample requires around 7.5 min. The new method was validated via analysis on two reference samples (SAFe S and SAFe D2) with low iron content collected in the North Pacific Ocean.

  20. Distribution of Heavy Metal Content Hg and Cr of Environmental Samples at Surabaya Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus Taftazani

    2007-01-01

    Determination of Hg and Cr content of Surabaya river and coastal environmental samples using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) have been done. The environmental samples were water, sediment, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solmms, Rhizophora stylosa, Johnius (Johnieops) borneensis fish, and Moolgarda delicate fish at 12 locations selected of Surabaya area. Dry powder of sediment and biotic samples and concentrate water samples was irradiated by neutron flux 1.05 x 10 11 n.cm -2 .det -1 during 12 hours. The analytical result showed that the concentration of the heavy metals of river water are smaller than Perda Surabaya City No. 02/2004 for the 4 th level water which are Hg (0.005 ppm) and Cr (1.000 ppm). All locations coastal water samples have Hg and Cr concentrations are higher than Kepmen LH No.51/2004 Hg (0.001 ppm) and Cr (0.005 ppm). The Hg concentration of fish samples have exceeded the threshold according to Kep. Dirjen POM No.03725/B/SK/VII/89 about the maximum concentration of metal pollution in food. The concentration of heavy metals in sediment, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solmms and Rhizophora stylosa are not regulated, so then heavy metals pollution can not be referred to. The concentration of Hg and Cr elements of water samples are smaller than that of biotic and sediment samples. The distribution factor (F d ) is bigger than bioaccumulation factor (F b ). (author)

  1. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamic, M.L., E-mail: Mary.Adamic@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Vockenhuber, C. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Watrous, M.G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for {sup 129}I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  2. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamic, M.L.; Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for "1"2"9I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  3. Adaption and use of a quadcopter for targeted sampling of gaseous mercury in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Oscar; Chen, Jingjing; Scircle, Austin; Zhou, Ying; Cizdziel, James V

    2018-03-22

    We modified a popular and inexpensive quadcopter to collect gaseous mercury (Hg) on gold-coated quartz cartridges, and analyzed the traps using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Flight times averaged 16 min, limited by battery life, and yielded > 5 pg of Hg, well above the limit of detection (quadcopter, we measured atmospheric Hg near anthropogenic emission sources in the mid-south USA, including a municipal landfill, coal-fired power plant (CFPP), and a petroleum refinery. Average concentrations (± standard deviation) immediately downwind of the landfill were higher at ground level and 30 m compared to 60 and 120 m (5.3 ± 0.5 ng m -3 , 5.4 ± 0.7 ng m -3 , 4.2 ± 0.7 ng m -3 , and 2.5 ± 0.3 ng m -3 , respectively). Concentrations were also higher at an urban/industrial area (Memphis) (3.3 ± 0.9 ng m -3 ) compared with a rural/background area (1.5 ± 0.2 ng m -3 ). Due to airspace flight restrictions near the CFPP and refinery, we were unable to access near-field (stack) plumes and did not observe differences between upwind and downwind locations. Overall, this study demonstrates that highly maneuverable multicopters can be used to probe Hg concentrations aloft, which may be particularly useful for evaluating Hg emissions from remote landscapes and transient sources that are inadequately characterized and leading to uncertainties in ecosystem budgets.

  4. Sampling system of atmospheric water vapour for analysis of the γ sub(D) relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foloni, L.L.; Villa Nova, N.A.; Salati, E.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a system to water vapour air, for natural isotopic composition analysis of hydrogen is presented. The system uses molecular sieve, type '4A', without cooling agent and permits the choice of a sampling time, variyng from a few minutes to many hours, through the control of the admission of vapour flux. The system has good performance in field conditions, with errors of the order of + -3,0 0 /00 in the γ sub(D)( 0 /00) measurements [pt

  5. Metagenomic survey of bacterial diversity in the atmosphere of Mexico City using different sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Silva, N; Calderón-Ezquerro, M C

    2018-04-01

    The identification of airborne bacteria has traditionally been performed by retrieval in culture media, but the bacterial diversity in the air is underestimated using this method because many bacteria are not readily cultured. Advances in DNA sequencing technology have produced a broad knowledge of genomics and metagenomics, which can greatly improve our ability to identify and study the diversity of airborne bacteria. However, researchers are facing several challenges, particularly the efficient retrieval of low-density microorganisms from the air and the lack of standardized protocols for sample collection and processing. In this study, we tested three methods for sampling bioaerosols - a Durham-type spore trap (Durham), a seven-day recording volumetric spore trap (HST), and a high-throughput 'Jet' spore and particle sampler (Jet) - and recovered metagenomic DNA for 16S rDNA sequencing. Samples were simultaneously collected with the three devices during one week, and the sequencing libraries were analyzed. A simple and efficient method for collecting bioaerosols and extracting good quality DNA for high-throughput sequencing was standardized. The Durham sampler collected preferentially Cyanobacteria, the HST Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, and the Jet mainly Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The HST sampler collected the largest amount of airborne bacterial diversity. More experiments are necessary to select the right sampler, depending on study objectives, which may require monitoring and collecting specific airborne bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 135Cs/137Cs isotopic composition of environmental samples across Europe: Environmental transport and source term emission applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.

    2016-01-01

    135 Cs/ 137 Cs isotopic analyses represent an important tool for studying the fate and transport of radiocesium in the environment; in this work the 135 Cs/ 137 Cs isotopic composition in environmental samples taken from across Europe is reported. Surface soil and vegetation samples from western Russia, Ukraine, Austria, and Hungary show consistent aged thermal fission product 135 Cs/ 137 Cs isotope ratios of 0.58 ± 0.01 (age corrected to 1/1/15), with the exception of one sample of soil-moss from Hungary which shows an elevated 135 Cs/ 137 Cs ratio of 1.78 ± 0.12. With the exception of the outlier sample from Hungary, surface soil/vegetation data are in quantitative agreement with values previously reported for soils within the Chernobyl exclusion zone, suggesting that radiocesium at these locations is primarily composed of homogenous airborne deposition from Chernobyl. Seawater samples taken from the Irish Sea show 135 Cs/ 137 Cs isotope ratios of 1.22 ± 0.11 (age corrected to 1/1/15), suggesting aged thermal fission product Cs discharged from Sellafield. The differences in 135 Cs/ 137 Cs isotope ratios between Sellafield, Chernobyl, and global nuclear weapons testing fallout indicate that 135 Cs/ 137 Cs isotope ratios can be utilized to discriminate between and track radiocesium transport from different nuclear production source terms, including major emission sources in Europe. - Highlights: • 135 Cs/ 137 Cs useful for tracking anthropogenic environmental radiocesium releases. • European surface soils/vegetation have uniform ratio consistent with Chernobyl. • 135 Cs/ 137 Cs in Irish sea represents thermal fission ratio distinct from Chernobyl. • Can distinguish between major source terms in Europe based on 135 Cs/ 137 Cs.

  7. Determination of radiocesium in environmental water samples using copper ferro(II)cyanide and sodium tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, L.; Kuleff, I.; Djingova, R.

    2006-01-01

    A procedure for the radiochemical separation and radiochemical purification of radiocesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in bulk environmental water samples is proposed. Radiocesium was removed from the water by cation-exchange with copper ferro(II)cyanide and was purified by precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate. The influence of the concentration of potassium in the water sample on the chemical yield was investigated. The validation of the proposed method was carried out by analyzing reference materials. The application of the method was demonstrated with the determination of the concentration of radiocesium in water samples from rivers around NPP 'Kozloduy', Bulgaria, Danube and Ogosta. (author)

  8. Hanford Environmental Monitoring Program schedule for samples, analyses, and measurements for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, P.J.; Price, K.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Carlile, J.M.V.

    1984-12-01

    This report provides the CY 1985 schedule of data collection for the routine Hanford Surface Environmental Monitoring and Ground-Water Monitoring Programs at the Hanford Site. The purpose is to evaluate and report the levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5484.1. The routine sampling schedule provided herein does not include samples scheduled to be collected during FY 1985 in support of special studies, special contractor support programs, or for quality control purposes. In addition, the routine program outlined in this schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in site operations, program requirements, or unusual sample results

  9. Quantification of uncertainty in gamma spectrometric analysis of food and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yii Mei Wo; Zaharudin Ahmad; Norfaizal Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    Gamma Spectrometry is widely used to determine the activity of gamma-ray emitter radionuclide inside a sample. Reporting the activity of the measurement for a sample should not be a single value only but it shall be associated with a reasonable uncertainty value since disintegration of radionuclide is a random/spontaneous process. This paper will focus on how the uncertainty was estimated, quantified and calculated, when measuring the activity of Cs-134 and Cs-137 in food and Ra-226, Ra-228 and K-40 in the environmental samples. (Author)

  10. Design of a Clean Room for Quality Control of an Environmental Sampling in KINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jongho; Ahn, Gil Hoon; Seo, Hana; Han, Kitek; Park, Il Jin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of environmental sampling and analysis for safeguards is to characterize the nuclear materials handled and the activities conducted at the specific locations. The KINAC is responsible for the conclusions drawn from the analytical results provided by the analytical laboratories. To assure the KINAC of the continuity of the quality of the analytical results provided by the laboratories, the KINAC will implement a quality control(QC) programme. One of the QC programme is to prepare QC samples. The establishment of a clean room is needed to handle QC samples due to stringent control of contamination. The KINAC designed a clean facility with cleanliness of ISO Class 6, the Clean Room for Estimation and Assay of trace Nuclear materials(CREAN) to meet conflicting requirements of a clean room and for handling of nuclear materials according to Korean laws. The clean room will be expected to acquire of a radiation safety license under these conditions in this year and continue to improve it. The construction of the CREAN facility will be completed by the middle of 2015. In terms of QC programme, the establishment of a clean room is essential and will be not only very helpful for setting of quality control system for the national environmental sampling programme but also be applied for the environmental sample analysis techniques to the nuclear forensics

  11. Isolation of Arcobacter butzleri in environmental and food samples collected in industrial and artisanal dairy plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Giacometti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of Arcobacter species in two cheese factories; a total of 22 environmental samples and 10 food samples were collected from an artisanal and an industrial cheese factory; Arcobacter species were isolated after enrichment, and isolates were identified at species level by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. In the artisanal cheese factory, Arcobacter spp. were isolated from several environmental samples, cow and water buffalo raw milk and ricotta cheese. In the industrial plant, Arcobacter spp. were isolated from surfaces not in contact with food and from a cleaned surface in contact with food; no Arcobacter spp. was isolated from food. All isolates were identified as A. butzleri. We report of the presence of A. butzleri in a ready-to-eat cheese produced for retail. In addition, the isolation of A. butzleri in food processing surfaces in the two cheese factories could be assessed as a source of potential contamination for cheeses

  12. Determination of 36Cl in environmental samples collected in the JCO by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.; Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki; Arai, D.; Nagashima, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Matsuhiro, T.; Imanaka, T.

    2003-01-01

    Long-lived chlorine, 36 Cl (T 1/2 = 301,000 y) in environmental samples has been measured by the AMS system installed in Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. A tri-carbon-molecular 12 C 3 - pilot beam method is used to stabilize the terminal voltage of the tandem. A small amount of pure carbon graphite is well mixed into a AgCl target material for creating Cl - and 12 C 3 - in the ion source. A 36 S isobaric interference in the system is eliminated to determine 36 Cl in environmental samples by chemical procedure. Some samples containing chlorine such as soil, chemical reagents and table salt have been collected in the JCO criticality accident site and analyzed to detect neutron-induced 36 Cl. The experimental result has been compared with a theoretical calculation. (author)

  13. Identification of market bags composition for biodegradable and oxo-biodegradable samples through thermal analysis in inert and oxidizer atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finzi-Quintao, Cristiane M.; Novack, Katia M.

    2015-01-01

    Plastic films used to make market bags are based on polymers such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polypropylene, these materials require a long time to degrade in the environment. The alternative technologies of polymers have been developed to reduce the degradation time and the impact on the environment caused by the conventional materials, using pro-degrading additives or by the development biodegradable polymers. In Brazil, the laws of some municipalities require the use of biodegradable material in the production of market bags but the absence of specific surveillance policies makes its chemical composition unknown. In this paper, we analyzed 7 samples that was obtained from a a trading company and commercial market of Belo Horizonte . The samples were characterized by TGA / DTA , XRF , FTIR and MEV which allowed the identification and evaluation of the thermal behavior of the material in inert and oxidizing atmosphere. (author)

  14. Removal of impurities from environmental water samples for tritium measurement by means of liquid scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Yoichi; Noda, Mitsuyasu

    2000-01-01

    Tritium concentration in environmental water samples is usually measured by means of liquid scintillation counting. Before the counting distillation operation is necessarily required to remove impurities, which have possibility of bad influence on the measurement, from the samples. But the operation usually takes long time and it is also troublesome. If you could simplify the purification process, you would be much easily able to measure it. Then, we have studied the probability of replacement the process by filtration aiming to simplify the procedure. We prepared several environmental water samples and also several water samples added quenching materials. These samples were purified by means of the distillation and the filtration and the impurities in them were examined. The purified samples were mixed with scintillation cocktail and the tritium concentration was measured. We added small amount of tritium in the same samples and investigated their scintillation spectra and their ESCR values in order to compare the two purification methods. Two kinds of filters were used for the filtration: 0.45 μm and 0.1 μm pore sized membrane filters. The liquid scintillation counter was LB-3 produced by Aloka Co. and Ltd. The scintillation cocktail was Ultima Gold LLT made by Packard Instrument Co and Ltd. The vial was Polyvial 145 LSD made by Zinsser Analytic Co. and Ltd. As the result, there was no significant difference between the two purification methods then the filtration method is feasible instead of the distillation. (author)

  15. Intact preservation of environmental samples by freezing under an alternating magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Xiao, Nan; Hirose, Takehiro; Sugeno, Masaya; Ohwada, Norio; Inagaki, Fumio

    2015-04-01

    The study of environmental samples requires a preservation system that stabilizes the sample structure, including cells and biomolecules. To address this fundamental issue, we tested the cell alive system (CAS)-freezing technique for subseafloor sediment core samples. In the CAS-freezing technique, an alternating magnetic field is applied during the freezing process to produce vibration of water molecules and achieve a stable, super-cooled liquid phase. Upon further cooling, the temperature decreases further, achieving a uniform freezing of sample with minimal ice crystal formation. In this study, samples were preserved using the CAS and conventional freezing techniques at 4, -20, -80 and -196 (liquid nitrogen) °C. After 6 months of storage, microbial cell counts by conventional freezing significantly decreased (down to 10.7% of initial), whereas that by CAS-freezing resulted in minimal. When Escherichia coli cells were tested under the same freezing conditions and storage for 2.5 months, CAS-frozen E. coli cells showed higher viability than the other conditions. In addition, an alternating magnetic field does not impact on the direction of remanent magnetization in sediment core samples, although slight partial demagnetization in intensity due to freezing was observed. Consequently, our data indicate that the CAS technique is highly useful for the preservation of environmental samples. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Influence of short-term sampling parameters on the uncertainty of the Lden environmental noise indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateus, M; Carrilho, J Dias; Da Silva, M Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the influence of the sampling parameters on the uncertainty of noise equivalent level in environmental noise measurements. The study has been carried out through the test of different sampling strategies doing resampling trials over continuous monitoring noise files obtained previously in an urban location in the city of Coimbra, in Portugal. On short term measurements, not only the duration of the sampling episodes but also its number have influence on the uncertainty of the result. This influence is higher for the time periods where sound levels suffer a greater variation, such as during the night period. In this period, in case both parameters (duration and number of sampling episodes) are not carefully selected, the uncertainty level can reach too high values contributing to a loss of precision of the measurements. With the obtained data it was investigated the sampling parameters influence on the long term noise indicator uncertainty, calculated according the Draft 1st CD ISO 1996-2:2012 proposed method. It has been verified that this method allows the possibility of defining a general methodology which enables the setting of the parameters once the precision level is fixed. For the three reference periods defined for environmental noise (day, evening and night), it was possible to derive a two variable power law representing the uncertainty of the determined values as a function of the two sampling parameters: duration of sampling episode and number of episodes

  17. A Portable Immunoassay Platform for Multiplexed Detection of Biotoxins in Clinical and Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chung-Yan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Piccini, Matthew Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Schaff, Ulrich Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandstone Diagnostics, Livermore, CA (United States); Stanker, Larry H. [US Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States). Western Regional Research Center, Foodborne Contaminants Research Unit; Cheng, Luisa W. [US Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States). Western Regional Research Center, Foodborne Contaminants Research Unit; Ravichandran, Easwaran [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); Singh, Bal-Ram [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); Sommer, Greg J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandstone Diagnostics, Livermore, CA (United States); Singh, Anup K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cases of attempted bioterrorism events using biotoxins have highlighted the urgent need for tools capable of rapid screening of suspect samples in the field (e.g., mailroom and public events). We present a portable microfluidic device capable of analyzing environmental (e.g., white powder), food (e.g., milk) and clinical (e.g., blood) samples for multiplexed detection of biotoxins. The device is rapid (<15-30 min sample-to-answer), sensitive (< 0.08 pg/mL detection limit for botulinum toxin), multiplexed (up to 64 parallel assays) and capable of analyzing small volume samples (< 20 μL total sample input). The immunoassay approach (SpinDx) is based on binding of toxins in a sample to antibody-laden capture particles followed by sedimentation of particles through a density-media in a microfluidic disk and quantification using a laser-induced fluorescence detector. A direct, blinded comparison with a gold standard ELISA revealed a 5-fold more sensitive detection limit for botulinum toxin while requiring 250-fold less sample volume and a 30 minute assay time with a near unity correlation. A key advantage of the technique is its compatibility with a variety of sample matrices with no additional sample preparation required. Ultrasensitive quantification has been demonstrated from direct analysis of multiple clinical, environmental and food samples, including white powder, whole blood, saliva, salad dressing, whole milk, peanut butter, half and half, honey, and canned meat. We believe that this device can met an urgent need in screening both potentially exposed people as well as suspicious samples in mail-rooms, airports, public sporting venues and emergency rooms. The general-purpose immunodiagnostics device can also find applications in screening of infectious and systemic diseases or serve as a lab device for conducting rapid immunoassays.

  18. An Optimized Method for Quantification of Pathogenic Leptospira in Environmental Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riediger, Irina N; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Biondo, Alexander W; Ko, Albert I; Stoddard, Robyn A

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease usually acquired by contact with water contaminated with urine of infected animals. However, few molecular methods have been used to monitor or quantify pathogenic Leptospira in environmental water samples. Here we optimized a DNA extraction method for the quantification of leptospires using a previously described Taqman-based qPCR method targeting lipL32, a gene unique to and highly conserved in pathogenic Leptospira. QIAamp DNA mini, MO BIO PowerWater DNA and PowerSoil DNA Isolation kits were evaluated to extract DNA from sewage, pond, river and ultrapure water samples spiked with leptospires. Performance of each kit varied with sample type. Sample processing methods were further evaluated and optimized using the PowerSoil DNA kit due to its performance on turbid water samples and reproducibility. Centrifugation speeds, water volumes and use of Escherichia coli as a carrier were compared to improve DNA recovery. All matrices showed a strong linearity in a range of concentrations from 106 to 10° leptospires/mL and lower limits of detection ranging from Leptospira in environmental waters (river, pond and sewage) which consists of the concentration of 40 mL samples by centrifugation at 15,000×g for 20 minutes at 4°C, followed by DNA extraction with the PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit. Although the method described herein needs to be validated in environmental studies, it potentially provides the opportunity for effective, timely and sensitive assessment of environmental leptospiral burden.

  19. Automated image analysis for quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization with environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Pons, Marie Noëlle; Raskin, Lutgarde; Zilles, Julie L

    2007-05-01

    When fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses are performed with complex environmental samples, difficulties related to the presence of microbial cell aggregates and nonuniform background fluorescence are often encountered. The objective of this study was to develop a robust and automated quantitative FISH method for complex environmental samples, such as manure and soil. The method and duration of sample dispersion were optimized to reduce the interference of cell aggregates. An automated image analysis program that detects cells from 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) micrographs and extracts the maximum and mean fluorescence intensities for each cell from corresponding FISH images was developed with the software Visilog. Intensity thresholds were not consistent even for duplicate analyses, so alternative ways of classifying signals were investigated. In the resulting method, the intensity data were divided into clusters using fuzzy c-means clustering, and the resulting clusters were classified as target (positive) or nontarget (negative). A manual quality control confirmed this classification. With this method, 50.4, 72.1, and 64.9% of the cells in two swine manure samples and one soil sample, respectively, were positive as determined with a 16S rRNA-targeted bacterial probe (S-D-Bact-0338-a-A-18). Manual counting resulted in corresponding values of 52.3, 70.6, and 61.5%, respectively. In two swine manure samples and one soil sample 21.6, 12.3, and 2.5% of the cells were positive with an archaeal probe (S-D-Arch-0915-a-A-20), respectively. Manual counting resulted in corresponding values of 22.4, 14.0, and 2.9%, respectively. This automated method should facilitate quantitative analysis of FISH images for a variety of complex environmental samples.

  20. Characterization of atmospheric trace elements in the Puruogangri ice core: a preliminary account of Tibetan Plateau environmental and contamination histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudon, E.; Gabrielli, P.; Sierra Hernandez, R.; Wegner, A.; Thompson, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    Asia is facing enormous challenges including large-scale environmental changes, rapid population growth and industrialization. The inherent generated pollution contributes to half of all Earth's anthropogenic trace metals emissions that, when deposited to glaciers of the surrounding mountains of the Third Pole region, leave a characteristic chemical fingerprint. Records of past atmospheric deposition preserved in snow and ice from Third Pole glaciers provide unique insights into changes of the chemical composition of the atmosphere and into the nature and intensity of the regional atmospheric circulation systems. The determination of the elemental composition of aeolian dust stored in Himalayan and Tibetan Plateau glaciers can help to qualify the potential contamination of glacial meltwater as a part of the greater fresh Asian water source. The 215 m long Puruogangri ice core retrieved in 2000 at 6500 m a.s.l. in central Tibetan Plateau (Western Tanggula Shan, China) provides one of the first multi-millennium-long environmental archives (spanning the last 7000 years and annually resolved for the last 400 years) obtained from the Tibetan Plateau region. The Puruogangri's area is climatologically of particular interest because of its location at the boundary between the monsoon (wet) and the westerly (dry) dominated atmospheric circulation. The major objective of this study is to determine the concentration of trace and ultra-trace elements in the Puruogangri ice core between 1600 and 2000 AD in order to characterize the atmospheric aerosols entrapped in the ice. Particular attention is given to assess the amount of trace elements originating from anthropogenic sources during both the pre-industrial and industrial periods. The distinction between the anthropogenic contribution and the crustal background may rely on the precise decoupling of the dry and wet seasons signals, the former being largely influenced by dust contribution.

  1. A software for radioactivity measurement of Ra, Th and K in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Zhengqiang; Bao Min; Chang Yongfu

    2004-01-01

    Radio nuclides of soil, rock, construction material, and almost everything around us. There is growing concern about environmental radioactivity from both scientists and public from an institutional or a common point of view. The regulation and standard on evaluating radioactivity of environmental samples have been issued recently by the authorities. We have developed special purpose Gamma spectra analysis software named ErSpec. The software can effectively process and analyze Gamma spectra measured by a NaI(T1) spectrometry, and can give a relatively precise results of radioactivity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in environmental samples. The main functions of ErSpec include, processing and analyzing Gamma spectra, displaying some useful information for users, generating report, managing user's priority, logging user's manipulation, etc. Because environmental samples usually have low radioactivity and have complex measurement conditions, relative method is employed in ErSpec, and Channel-by-Channel Least-Squared Estimation is adopted as spectra analyzing method. The arithmetic make use of information extracted from data of hundreds of channels, then give a rather good result. In ErSpec, by using external call of MatLAB Math Lib in Visual C++, accuracy and speed of calculation and robustness of software are improved distinctly. Object-Oriented Programming Method and ActiveX techniques are also employed in software designing and coding stage. (authors)

  2. Radiochemistry methods in DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples: Addressing new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Goheen, S.C.; Riley, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Radiochemistry methods in Department of Energy Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) add to the repertoire of other standard methods in support of U.S. Department of Energy environmental restoration and waste management (DOE/EM) radiochemical characterization activities. Current standard sources of radiochemistry methods are not always applicable for evaluating DOE/EM samples. Examples of current sources include those provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the American Society for Testing and Materials, Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, and Environmental Measurements Laboratory Procedures Manual (HASL-300). The applicability of these methods is generally limited to specific matrices (usually water), low-level radioactive samples, and a limited number of analytes. DOE Methods complements these current standard methods by addressing the complexities of EM characterization needs. The process for determining DOE/EM radiochemistry characterization needs is discussed. In this context of DOE/EM needs, the applicability of other sources of standard radiochemistry methods is defined, and gaps in methodology are identified. Current methods in DOE Methods and the EM characterization needs they address are discussed. Sources of new methods and the methods incorporation process are discussed. The means for individuals to participate in (1) identification of DOE/EM needs, (2) the methods incorporation process, and (3) submission of new methods are identified

  3. Kinetic Study of Cotton Stalk and Rice Husk Samples under an Inert and Oxy Combustion Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulamullah Mailto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass materials such as CS (Cotton Stalks and RH (Rice Husk are a renewable source of energy. As biomass resources have potential to offer a uninterpted supply of biofuels through thermal decomposition processes. Nevertheless, an appropriate understanding of reaction kinetics and thermal properties of biomasses play a vital role in designing of the commercial plants using biomass as a raw material for energy generation. The kinetic characteristics of the CS and RH samples under pure nitrogen 99.9% and pure oxygen 99.9% was performed. The temperature was raised from ambient to 900oC maintaining the heating rate of 10oC/min. CS and RH decomposition was noticed in three dissimilar regions. The kinetic characteristics such as (pre-exponential factor, the order of reaction and activation energy were calculated for both selected materials. The activation energies calculated under nitrogen environment for CS and RH was 68.77 and 72.31 kJ/mole, whereas the regression coefficient (R2 was 0.9877 and 0.9731 respectively. The activation energies under oxygen environment were higher, it was 106 and 118 kJ/mole. The regression coefficient (R2 under oxygen environment was 0.9987 and 0.99883 for above sample sequence.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of heavy metals in environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisbrun, Richard W.; Schechter, Israel; Niessner, Reinhard; Schroeder, Hartmut

    1993-03-01

    The application of LIBS technology as a sensor for heavy metals in solid environmental samples has been studied. This specific application introduces some new problems in the LIBS analysis. Some of them are related to the particular distribution of contaminants in the grained samples. Other problems are related to mechanical properties of the samples and to general matrix effects, like the water and organic fibers content of the sample. An attempt has been made to optimize the experimental set-up for the various involved parameters. The understanding of these factors has enabled the adjustment of the technique to the substrates of interest. The special importance of the grain size and of the laser-induced aerosol production is pointed out. Calibration plots for the analysis of heavy metals in diverse sand and soil samples have been carried out. The detection limits are shown to be usually below the recent regulation restricted concentrations.

  5. A radiochemical procedure for the determination of Po-210 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, J.M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1980-07-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the determination of Po-210 in environmental samples was developed. Soil, sediments, filter materials, plants, water and food samples can be analyzed for Po-210. Wet ashing is achieved with HNO 3 + H 2 O 2 or HCl + HNO 3 . To separate disturbing substances, a coprecipitation with Te is used for sample materials containing silica. Po-210 deposition from HCl solution on Ag platelets with other sample materials is possible directly. Deposited Po-210 is counted by α-spectrometry. For chemical yield determination Po-208 is added, yields range between 60% and 100%. A lower detection limit of about 0,002 pCi Po-210/sample is achievable. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Effects of holding time and measurement error on culturing Legionella in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, W Dana; Kirkland, Kimberly H; Shelton, Brian G

    2014-10-01

    Outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease require environmental testing of water samples from potentially implicated building water systems to identify the source of exposure. A previous study reports a large impact on Legionella sample results due to shipping and delays in sample processing. Specifically, this same study, without accounting for measurement error, reports more than half of shipped samples tested had Legionella levels that arbitrarily changed up or down by one or more logs, and the authors attribute this result to shipping time. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine the effects of sample holding/shipping time on Legionella sample results while taking into account measurement error, which has previously not been addressed. We analyzed 159 samples, each split into 16 aliquots, of which one-half (8) were processed promptly after collection. The remaining half (8) were processed the following day to assess impact of holding/shipping time. A total of 2544 samples were analyzed including replicates. After accounting for inherent measurement error, we found that the effect of holding time on observed Legionella counts was small and should have no practical impact on interpretation of results. Holding samples increased the root mean squared error by only about 3-8%. Notably, for only one of 159 samples, did the average of the 8 replicate counts change by 1 log. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis of frequent, significant (≥= 1 log10 unit) Legionella colony count changes due to holding. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Contributions for the application of a phoswich detector on the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalaqua Junior, L.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of a phoswich detector and the parameters of the pulse shape descrimination system are evaluated aiming the application on environmental analysis by direct low level gamma ray spectrometry. The calibration curves and adjustments for the pulse discrimination, detector resolution and homogeneity measurements are presented. Background reduction and the 210 Pb detection eficiency on evaporated sources are evaluated. The results obtained demonstrates the application potentiality on the analysis of environmental samples due to a high detection eficiency and good geometry conditions to the measurements. (author) [pt

  8. Radionuclides concentration in marine environmental samples along the coast of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Ngo; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Nguyen Van Phuc; Le Nhu Sieu; Truong Y; Mai Thi Huong; Nguyen Thi Linh; Nguyen Mong Sinh; Phan Son Hai; Le Ngoc Chung; Dang Duc Nhan; Nguyen Quang Long; Nguyen Hao Quang; Tran Tuyet Mai

    2009-01-01

    Studies on radioactivity inventories in environmental samples are necessary as they will serve as baseline data for assessing any environmental impact usage of nuclear-based activities. Approximately 700 data on 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu activity concentrations in 150 samples i.e. sea water, sediment, fish, mollusc, crustaceans, oyster and weeds samples collected from 7 various locations in Vietnam (Hai Phong, Nghe An, Khanh Hoa, Ninh Thuan, Binh Thuan, Vung Tau, Tien Giang) throughout 1999-2008 are summarised and presented in this paper. Generally, the levels of artificial radionuclides in the studied marine environmental samples are lower as compared to other Asia-Pacific countries while naturally occurred radionuclides activity concentrations obtained were found to be in accordance with respective data from other studies within Pacific region. The radionuclides bioaccumulation factors studied in Red laver and oyster were mostly found to be high; therefore, further reinvestigation should be done for these biota that will be used as bio-fingerprint indicators in monitoring the marine environment from nuclear-based pollutions. The data set obtained from this study is available to the Asia-Pacific Marine Radioactivity Database. (author)

  9. X-ray and nuclear methods for comparative analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, V.I.; Gundorina, S.F.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Saidmuradov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and instrumental neutron activation methods, and in some cases methods of photon activation (X-ray spectral analysis with proton activation and analysis on the basis of (p, n) reaction) were used to obtain elementary content of different water samples. The possibility of getting space-time dependences of trace elementary concentrations in water (and under certain conditions in atmosphere) is shown. These data are to be used at a complex investigation of sanitary norms of water systems. The advantages of abovementined methods are discussed for obtaining different elementary content in water in different ways

  10. A DOE manual: DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Riley, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Waste Management inherently requires knowledge of the waste's chemical composition. The waste can often be analyzed by established methods; however, if the samples are radioactive, or are plagued by other complications, established methods may not be feasible. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been faced with managing some waste types that are not amenable to standard or available methods, so new or modified sampling and analysis methods are required. These methods are incorporated into DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), which is a guidance/methods document for sampling and analysis activities in support of DOE sites. It is a document generated by consensus of the DOE laboratory staff and is intended to fill the gap within existing guidance documents (e. g., the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, SW-846), which apply to low-level or non-radioactive samples. DOE Methods fills the gap by including methods that take into account the complexities of DOE site matrices. The most recent update, distributed in October 1993, contained quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), safety, sampling, organic analysis, inorganic analysis, and radioanalytical guidance as well as 29 methods. The next update, which will be distributed in April 1994, will contain 40 methods and will therefore have greater applicability. All new methods are either peer reviewed or labeled ''draft'' methods. Draft methods were added to speed the release of methods to field personnel

  11. Fluorimetric determination of uranium in certain refractory minerals, environmental samples and industrial waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premadas, A.; Saravanakumar, G.

    2005-01-01

    A simple sample decomposition and laser fluorimetric determination of uranium at trace level is reported in certain refractory minerals, like ilmenite, rutile, zircon and monazite; environmental samples viz. soil and sediments; industrial waste materials, such as, coal fly ash and red mud. Ilmenite sample is decomposed by heating with ammonium fluoride. Rutile, zircon and monazite minerals are decomposed by fusion using a mixture of potassium bifluoride and sodium fluoride. Environmental and industrial waste materials are brought into solution by treating with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids. The laser induced fluorimetric determination of uranium is carried out directly in rutile, zircon and in monazite minerals and after separation in other samples. The determination limit was 1 μg x g -1 for ilmenite, soil, sediment, coal fly ash and red mud samples, and it is 5 μg x g -1 for rutile, zircon and monazite. The method is also developed for the optical fluorimetric determination of uranium (determination limit 10 μg x g -1 ) in ilmenite, rutile, zircon and monazite minerals. The methods are simple, accurate, and precise and they require small quantity of sample and can be applied for the routine analysis. (author)

  12. Detection of Chlamydophila psittaci from feral pigeons in environmental samples: problems with currently available techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geigenfeind, Ila; Haag-Wackernagel, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci (Lillie, 1930) Everett et al., 1999, the pathogenic agent of human ornithosis, is widespread in feral pigeon populations and many cases of transmission from feral pigeons to humans have been reported. The aim of the present study was to detect C. psittaci in environmental samples to find out more about possible transmission routes and, therefore, to assess the zoonotic risk for humans. Fecal samples were collected from nest boxes in a feral pigeon loft. Additionally, samples were taken from the feather dust film covering the water surface of public fountains where pigeons regularly bathe. The samples were tested for the presence of chlamydial antigen using an antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to prove shedding of C. psittaci by feral pigeons. This test detects a genus specific lipopolysaccharide in the outer membrane of the chlamydial bacteria. Samples were tested using the IDEIA PCE Chlamydia Test kit (DakoCytomation) and positive results were verified with IDEIA Chlamydia Blocking Reagents (DakoCytomation). The IDEIA PCE Chlamydia Test yields a high proportion of positive results. However, when IDEIA Chlamydia Blocking was performed, most of the positive results turned out to be negative or could not be interpreted. We conclude that antigen-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests are not suitable for detecting C. psittaci in environmental samples. Previous publications where no blocking test was used should be reconsidered critically. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  13. Direct Analysis of Amphetamine Stimulants in a Whole Urine Sample by Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevelin, Eduardo J.; Salami, Fernanda H.; Alves, Marcela N. R.; De Martinis, Bruno S.; Crotti, Antônio E. M.; Moraes, Luiz A. B.

    2016-05-01

    Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are among illicit stimulant drugs that are most often used worldwide. A major challenge is to develop a fast and efficient methodology involving minimal sample preparation to analyze ATS in biological fluids. In this study, a urine pool solution containing amphetamine, methamphetamine, ephedrine, sibutramine, and fenfluramine at concentrations ranging from 0.5 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL was prepared and analyzed by atmospheric solids analysis probe tandem mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS/MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). A urine sample and saliva collected from a volunteer contributor (V1) were also analyzed. The limit of detection of the tested compounds ranged between 0.002 and 0.4 ng/mL in urine samples; the signal-to-noise ratio was 5. These results demonstrated that the ASAP-MS/MS methodology is applicable for the fast detection of ATS in urine samples with great sensitivity and specificity, without the need for cleanup, preconcentration, or chromatographic separation. Thus ASAP-MS/MS could potentially be used in clinical and forensic toxicology applications.

  14. Dynamic Flow-through Methods for Metal Fractionation in Environmental Solid Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Petersen, Roongrat

    occurring processes always take place under dynamic conditions, recent trends have been focused on the development of alternative flow-through dynamic methods aimed at mimicking environmental events more correctly than their classical extraction counterparts. In this lecture particular emphasis is paid......Accummulation of metal ions in different compartments of the biosphere and their possible mobilization under changing environmental conditions induce a pertubation of the ecosystem and may cause adverse health effects. Nowadays, it is widely recognized that the information on total content...... the ecotoxicological significance of metal ions in solid environmental samples. The background of end-over-end fractionation for releasing metal species bound to particular soil phases is initially discussed, its relevant features and limitations being thoroughly described. However, taking into account that naturally...

  15. Materials and Methods for Streamlined Laboratory Analysis of Environmental Samples, FY 2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addleman, Raymond S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Naes, Benjamin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olsen, Khris B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chouyyok, Wilaiwan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willingham, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spigner, Angel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies upon laboratory analysis of environmental samples (typically referred to as “swipes”) collected during on-site inspections of safeguarded facilities to support the detection and deterrence of undeclared activities. Unfortunately, chemical processing and assay of the samples is slow and expensive. A rapid, effective, and simple extraction process and analysis method is needed to provide certified results with improved timeliness at reduced costs (principally in the form of reduced labor), while maintaining or improving sensitivity and efficacy. To address these safeguard needs the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) explored and demonstrated improved methods for environmental sample (ES) analysis. Improvements for both bulk and particle analysis were explored. To facilitate continuity and adoption, the new sampling materials and processing methods will be compatible with existing IAEA protocols for ES analysis. PNNL collaborated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which performed independent validation of the new bulk analysis methods and compared performance to traditional IAEA’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) protocol. ORNL efforts are reported separately. This report describes PNNL’s FY 2016 progress, which was focused on analytical application supporting environmental monitoring of uranium enrichment plants and nuclear fuel processing. In the future the technology could be applied to other safeguard applications and analytes related to fuel manufacturing, reprocessing, etc. PNNL’s FY 2016 efforts were broken into two tasks and a summary of progress, accomplishments and highlights are provided below. Principal progress and accomplishments on Task 1, Optimize Materials and Methods for ICP-MS Environmental Sample Analysis, are listed below. • Completed initial procedure for rapid uranium extraction from ES swipes based upon carbonate-peroxide chemistry (delivered to ORNL for

  16. Veterinary antibiotic resistance, residues, and ecological risks in environmental samples obtained from poultry farms, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahshan, Hesham; Abd-Elall, Amr Mohamed Mohamed; Megahed, Ayman Mohamed; Abd-El-Kader, Mahdy A; Nabawy, Ehab Elsayed

    2015-02-01

    In Egypt, poultry production constitutes one of the main sources of pollution with veterinary antibiotics (VAs) into the environment. About 80 % of meat production in Egypt is of poultry origin, and the potential environmental risks associated with the use of VAs in these farms have not yet been properly evaluated. Thus, the main purpose of this research was to evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant enteric key bacteria and the incidence of residual antibiotics in poultry farm environmental samples and to determine whether fertilizing soils with poultry litter from farms potentially brings ecological risks. From December 2011 to September 2012, a total of 225 litter, bird dropping, and water samples were collected from 75 randomly selected boiler poultry farms. A high prevalence of Escherichia coli (n = 179; 79.5 %) in contrast to the low prevalence of Salmonella spp. (n = 7; 3.1 %) was detected. Amongst E. coli isolates, serotypes O142:K86, O125:K70, O91:K, and O119:K69 were the most common. Meanwhile, Salmonella enterica serotypes emek and enteritidis were recovered. The antibiograms using the disc diffusion method revealed significantly more common resistant and multi-resistant isolates in broiler poultry farms. Residues of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were detected at 2.125 and 1.401 mg kg(-1) mean levels, respectively, in environmental samples contaminated with E. coli-resistant strains by HPLC. The risk evaluations highlighted that tetracycline residues in poultry litter significantly display environmental risks with a hazard quotient value above 1 (1.64). Our study implies that ineffective implementation of veterinary laws which guide and guard against incorrect VA usage may potentially bring health and environmental risks.

  17. Middlesex Sampling Plant annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the-Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of MSP began in 1980 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at MSP includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment,, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater, surface water, and sediment. Results of environmental monitoring during 1991 indicate that most concentrations were well below applicable guidelines. The potential radiation dose calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual, based on a conservative but realistic exposure scenario, is 2.3 mrem (milliroentgen equivalent man) per year, which is less than an individual would receive while traveling in an airplane at 12,000 meters for five hours. During 1991, there were no nonroutine releases from the site; MSP was in compliance with applicable regulations for releases from the site. Site activities included environmental monitoring, site maintenance, onsite characterization for the MSP remedial investigation, and additional sediment sampling at the plant outfall to determine the source of the elevated levels of radium-226 and thorium-232

  18. Atmospheric parameters and magnesium and calcium NLTE abundances for a sample of 16 ultra metal-poor stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnova, Tatyana; Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Ezzeddine, Rana; Frebel, Anna

    2018-06-01

    The most metal-poor stars provide important observational clues to the astrophysical objects that enriched the primordial gas with heavy elements. Accurate atmospheric parameters is a prerequisite of determination of accurate abundances. We present atmospheric parameters and abundances of calcium and magnesium for a sample of 16 ultra-metal poor (UMP) stars. In spectra of UMP stars, iron is represented only by lines of Fe I, while calcium is represented with lines of Ca I and Ca II, which can be used for determination/checking of effective temperature and surface gravity. Accurate calculations of synthetic spectra of UMP stars require non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) treatment of line formation, since deviations from LTE grow with metallicity decreasing. The method of atmospheric parameter determination is based on NLTE analysis of lines of Ca I and Ca II, multi-band photometry, and isochrones. The method was tested in advance with the ultra metal-poor giant CD-38 245, where, in addition, trigonometric parallax measurements from Gaia DR1 and lines of Fe I and Fe II are available. Using photometric Teff = 4900 K and distance based log g = 2.0 for CD-38 245, we derived consistent within error bars NLTE abundances from Fe I and Fe II and Ca I and Ca II, while LTE leads to a discrepancy of 0.6 dex between Ca I and Ca II. We determined NLTE and LTE abundances of magnesium and calcium in 16 stars of the sample. For the majority of stars, as expected, [Ca/Mg] NLTE abundance ratios are close to 0, while LTE leads to systematically higher [Ca/Mg], by up to 0.3 dex, and larger spread of [Ca/Mg] for different stars. Three stars of our sample are strongly enhanced in magnesium, with [Mg/Ca] of 1.3 dex. It is worth noting that, for these three stars, we got very similar [Mg/Ca] of 1.30, 1.45, and 1.29, in contrast to the data from the literature, where, for the same stars, [Mg/Ca] vary from 0.7 to 1.4. Very similar [Mg/Ca] abundance ratios of these stars argue that

  19. Specific calibration problems for gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, D [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Wershofen, H [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples are always done in a close source detector geometry. This geometry causes coincidence-summing effects for measurements of multi-photon emitting nuclides. The measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples are also influenced by the absorption of photons in the materials which have to be analysed. Both effects must be taken into account by correction factors with respect to an energy-specific calibration of the detector system for a given geometry and a given composition of the calibration source. The importance of these corrections is emphasized. It is the aim of the present paper to compare different experimental and theoretical methods for the determination of these correction factors published by various authors and to report about efforts to refine them. (orig.)

  20. Determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by anion exchange in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, L.

    2016-01-01

    Method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The major advantages of the method are the low cost of the analysis, high radiochemical yields and good decontamination factors from the matrix elements, natural and man-made radionuclides. The separation and purification of uranium is attained by adsorption with strong base anion exchange resin in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media. Uranium is electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been applied for the determination of concentrations of uranium isotopes in mineral, spring and tap waters from Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials. - Highlights: • The method allows cost-effective determination of U isotopes. • High amounts of environmental samples can be analyzed. • High chemical yields, energy resolution and decontamination factors were achieved. • Uranium isotope concentrations in mineral waters from Bulgaria are presented.

  1. Validated methodology for quantifying infestation levels of dreissenid mussels in environmental DNA (eDNA) samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrubia, Luis; Alcaraz, Carles; Vaate, Abraham Bij de; Sanz, Nuria; Pla, Carles; Vidal, Oriol; Viñas, Jordi

    2016-12-14

    The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha Pallas, 1771) and the quagga mussel (D. rostriformis Deshayes, 1838) are successful invasive bivalves with substantial ecological and economic impacts in freshwater systems once they become established. Since their eradication is extremely difficult, their detection at an early stage is crucial to prevent spread. In this study, we optimized and validated a qPCR detection method based on the histone H2B gene to quantify combined infestation levels of zebra and quagga mussels in environmental DNA samples. Our results show specific dreissenid DNA present in filtered water samples for which microscopic diagnostic identification for larvae failed. Monitoring a large number of locations for invasive dreissenid species based on a highly specific environmental DNA qPCR assay may prove to be an essential tool for management and control plans focused on prevention of establishment of dreissenid mussels in new locations.

  2. Prevalence of L. monocytogenes in environmental samples collected in dairy plants of Sassari Province, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Terrosu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria (L. monocytogenes is frequently isolated from food production environment and often persists in dairy plants despite vigorous sanitation regimes. In recent years several alert notifications were sent to Rapid Alert System for Food Products system as a consequence of Listeria monocytogenes contamination of ricotta cheese. After the alert of 2012, competent authority (Local Health Unit of Sassari Province organised an environmental monitoring plan with the partnership of the Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Sardinia to verify analysis of dairy plants own-check according to Regulation (EC N° 2073/05 and further modifications. In 2014 n. 665 processing areas samples of n. 50 dairy plants of Sassari Province were examined. UNI EN ISO 11290-1:2005 for detection of L. monocytogenes was used. Non-compliance in n. 5 diary plants are observed (n. 8 positive samples. Post-non-compliance environmental sanitisation was efficient and own-check plans included appropriate corrective actions.

  3. Middlesex Sampling Plant: Annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and surrounding area began in 1980. MSP is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at MSP includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters were measured in groundwater, surface water, and sediment. 14 refs., 17 figs., 29 tabs

  4. Revisiting the environmental Kuznets curve and pollution haven hypotheses: MIKTA sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirtas, Ibrahim; Cetin, Mumin Atalay

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to examine the validity of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) and pollution haven hypotheses in Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea, Turkey, and Australia (MIKTA) countries from 1982 to 2011 by using a panel vector auto regressive (PVAR) model. Empirical findings imply that the EKC hypothesis is rejected by the MIKTA sample. However, PVAR estimations reveal Granger causality from income level, foreign direct investment (FDI) inward, and energy consumption to CO 2 emissions. Orthogonalized impulse-response functions are derived from PVAR estimations. According to the analysis results, the response of CO 2 emissions to a shock on FDI is positive. These results assert that FDI has a detrimental effect on environmental quality in MIKTA countries which means the pollution haven hypothesis is confirmed by the MIKTA sample. Therefore, MIKTA countries should revise their current economic growth plans to provide sustainable development and also re-organize their legal infrastructure to induce usage of renewable energy sources.

  5. Atmospheric vs. anaerobic processing of metabolome samples for the metabolite profiling of a strict anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sooah; Kwon, Min-A; Jung, Young Hoon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-12-01

    Well-established metabolome sample preparation is a prerequisite for reliable metabolomic data. For metabolome sampling of a Gram-positive strict anaerobe, Clostridium acetobutylicum, fast filtration and metabolite extraction with acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v) at -20°C under anaerobic conditions has been commonly used. This anaerobic metabolite processing method is laborious and time-consuming since it is conducted in an anaerobic chamber. Also, there have not been any systematic method evaluation and development of metabolome sample preparation for strict anaerobes and Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, metabolome sampling and extraction methods were rigorously evaluated and optimized for C. acetobutylicum by using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, in which a total of 116 metabolites were identified. When comparing the atmospheric (i.e., in air) and anaerobic (i.e., in an anaerobic chamber) processing of metabolome sample preparation, there was no significant difference in the quality and quantity of the metabolomic data. For metabolite extraction, pure methanol at -20°C was a better solvent than acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v/v) at -20°C that is frequently used for C. acetobutylicum, and metabolite profiles were significantly different depending on extraction solvents. This is the first evaluation of metabolite sample preparation under aerobic processing conditions for an anaerobe. This method could be applied conveniently, efficiently, and reliably to metabolome analysis for strict anaerobes in air. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Atmospheric aerosol sampling campaign in Budapest and K-puszta. Part 1. Elemental concentrations and size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, E.; Borbely-Kiss, I.; Kertesz, Zs.; Szabo, Gy.; Salma, I.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected in a sampling campaign from 24 July to 1 Au- gust, 2003 in Hungary. The sampling were performed in two places simultaneously: in Budapest (urban site) and K-puszta (remote area). Two PIXE International 7-stage cascade impactors were used for aerosol sampling with 24 hours duration. These impactors separate the aerosol into 7 size ranges. The elemental concentrations of the samples were obtained by proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis. Size distributions of S, Si, Ca, W, Zn, Pb and Fe elements were investigated in K-puszta and in Budapest. Average rates (shown in Table 1) of the elemental concentrations was calculated for each stage (in %) from the obtained distributions. The elements can be grouped into two parts on the basis of these data. The majority of the particle containing Fe, Si, Ca, (Ti) are in the 2-8 μm size range (first group). These soil origin elements were found usually in higher concentration in Budapest than in K-puszta (Fig.1.). The second group consisted of S, Pb and (W). The majority of these elements was found in the 0.25-1 μm size range and was much higher in Budapest than in K-puszta. W was measured only in samples collected in Budapest. Zn has uniform distribution in Budapest and does not belong to the above mentioned groups. This work was supported by the National Research and Development Program (NRDP 3/005/2001). (author)

  7. Establishment of a clean laboratory for ultra trace analysis of nuclear materials in safeguards environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has established a cleanroom facility with cleanliness of ISO Class 5: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). It was designed to be used for the analysis of nuclear materials in environmental samples mainly for the safeguards, in addition to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification and research on environmental sciences. The CLEAR facility was designed to meet conflicting requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials according to Japanese regulations, i.e., to avoid contamination from outside and to contain nuclear materials inside the facility. This facility has been intended to be used for wet chemical treatment, instrumental analysis and particle handling. A fume-hood to provide a clean work surface for handling of nuclear materials was specially designed. Much attention was paid to the selection of construction materials for use to corrosive acids. The performance of the cleanroom and analytical background in the laboratory are discussed. This facility has satisfactory specification required for joining the International Atomic Energy Agency Network of Analytical Laboratories. It can be concluded that the CLEAR facility enables analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials at sub-pictogram level in environmental samples. (author)

  8. Estimation of the environmental impact of emissions from the La Reina NEC, by atmospheric dispersion modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante C, Paula M.; Ortiz R, Marcela A.

    1996-01-01

    Based on a dispersion model, an accidental release of radioactive material to the atmosphere was simulated. To evaluate the consequences of the accidental release it was used the P C COSYMA program (KfK and NRPB). The atmospheric dispersion model was MUSEMET, a segmented Gaussian plume model which requires information on meteorological conditions for a period of one year. This study was carried out to determine the plume's behavior and path, and to define protective actions. The meteorological analysis shows an airflow from the WSW and a channeling flow from the S E at night, due to topographical influences. (author)

  9. Measurements of 222Rn and 226Ra Levels in environmental samples by using liquid scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    The advantageous of liquid scintillation counting technique for 6 Ra determination compared with other methods are the high counting efficiency and the easier sample preparation, with no need for sample pre-concentration. In this work, liquid scintillation counting system was used to measure 222 Rn and 226 Ra levels in environmental samples. The liquid scintillation cocktail was prepared in the laboratory and was found efficient for measuring 222 Rn. Soil, sediment and TENORM samples were dried, grind, sieved and added to hydrochloric acid, in a standard scintillation vial, preloaded with the liquid scintillation cocktail. By measuring 222 Rn levels in the prepared vials, at different intervals of time after preparation, 222 Rn and 226 Ra levels were determined

  10. Determination of 90Sr in environmental samples with resonance ionization spectroscopy in collinear geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, K.; Stenner, J.; Kluge, H.J.; Lantzsch, J.; Monz, L.; Otten, E.W.; Passler, G.; Schwalbach, R.; Schwarz, M.; Stevens, H.; Wendt, K.; Herrmann, G.; Niess, S.; Trautmann, N.; Walter, K.; Bushaw, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    A new, fast technique for trace analysis of the radioactive isotopes 89 Sr and 90 Sr in environmental samples has been developed. Conventional mass separation is combined with resonance ionization spectroscopy in collinear geometry, which provides high selectivity and sensitivity. In addition, a chemical separation procedure for sample preparation has been developed. The described technique was used to determine the 90 Sr content in ∼ 870 m 3 air samples collected near Munich during and shortly after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. The content of 90 Sr was measured to be 1.4 mBq per m 3 , corresponding to 1.6 x 10 9 atoms of 90 Sr per sample. This value is in good agreement with the results of radiochemical measurements. (orig.)

  11. Determination of [sup 90]Sr in environmental samples with resonance ionization spectroscopy in collinear geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, K. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Stenner, J. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Kluge, H.J. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Lantzsch, J. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Monz, L. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Otten, E.W. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Passler, G. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Schwalbach, R. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Schwarz, M. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Stevens, H. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Wendt, K. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Herrmann, G. (Inst. fuer Kernchemie, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Niess, S. (Inst. fuer Kernchemie, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Trautmann, N. (Inst. fuer Kernchemie, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Walter, K. (Inst. fuer Kernchemie, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Bushaw, B.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    A new, fast technique for trace analysis of the radioactive isotopes [sup 89]Sr and [sup 90]Sr in environmental samples has been developed. Conventional mass separation is combined with resonance ionization spectroscopy in collinear geometry, which provides high selectivity and sensitivity. In addition, a chemical separation procedure for sample preparation has been developed. The described technique was used to determine the [sup 90]Sr content in [approx] 870 m[sup 3] air samples collected near Munich during and shortly after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. The content of [sup 90]Sr was measured to be 1.4 mBq per m[sup 3], corresponding to 1.6 x 10[sup 9] atoms of [sup 90]Sr per sample. This value is in good agreement with the results of radiochemical measurements. (orig.)

  12. Aspects of cleaning environmental materials for multi-element analysis, e.g. plant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, B.

    1992-01-01

    Cleaning of samples is often the first step in the entire procedure of sample preparation in environmental trace element research. The question must generally be raised of whether cleaning is meaningful before chemical investigations with plant material (e.g. for the determination of transfer factors in the soil/plant system) or not (e.g. for food chain analysis in the plant/animal system). The most varied cleaning procedures for plant samples are currently available ranging from dry and wet wiping of the leaf or needle surface up to the complete removal of the cuticule with the aid of chlorofom. There is at present no standardized cleaning procedure for plant samples so that it is frequently not possible to compare analytical data from different working groups studying the same plant species. (orig.)

  13. Modern Trends in Neutron Activation Analysis. Applications to some African Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This review covers the results of several published articles which deal with the modern trends in neutron activation analysis techniques using some of African research reactors for some environmental samples. The samples used have been collected from different areas in Egypt, South Africa, Ghana, Morocco, Nigeria, and Algeria. The neutron irradiation facilities and the advanced detection systems in each country are outlined. The prompt and delayed gamma-rays emitted due to neutron capture have been applied for investigation of the elemental constituents of such samples. Covered applications include exploration, mining, industrial environment, pollution of air, foodstuffs, soils and irrigation water samples. Some of the developed software programmes as well as the modern methods of data analysis are presented. The thermal and epithermal neutron activation analysis techniques have been applied for estimation of major, minor and trace elements in each material. Some of these data are presented with several comments.

  14. Improvements to sample processing and measurement to enable more widespread environmental application of tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James; Alexander, Thomas; Aalseth, Craig; Back, Henning; Mace, Emily; Overman, Cory; Seifert, Allen; Freeburg, Wilcox

    2017-08-01

    Previous measurements have demonstrated the wealth of information that tritium (T) can provide on environmentally relevant processes. We present modifications to sample preparation approaches that enable T measurement by proportional counting on small sample sizes equivalent to 120mg of water and demonstrate the accuracy of these methods on a suite of standardized water samples. We identify a current quantification limit of 92.2 TU which, combined with our small sample sizes, correlates to as little as 0.00133Bq of total T activity. This enhanced method should provide the analytical flexibility needed to address persistent knowledge gaps in our understanding of both natural and artificial T behavior in the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Basic distribution free identification tests for small size samples of environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federico, A.G.; Musmeci, F.

    1998-01-01

    Testing two or more data sets for the hypothesis that they are sampled form the same population is often required in environmental data analysis. Typically the available samples have a small number of data and often then assumption of normal distributions is not realistic. On the other hand the diffusion of the days powerful Personal Computers opens new possible opportunities based on a massive use of the CPU resources. The paper reviews the problem introducing the feasibility of two non parametric approaches based on intrinsic equi probability properties of the data samples. The first one is based on a full re sampling while the second is based on a bootstrap approach. A easy to use program is presented. A case study is given based on the Chernobyl children contamination data [it

  16. The analysis of uranium in environmental sample by mass spectrometer combined with isotopic dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhonghua; Jia Baoting; Han Jun

    2003-01-01

    Uranium in the environmental sample was analyzed by mass spectrometer combined with isotopic dilution. Before mass spectrometer analysis, samples were dissolved in a concentrated acidic solution containing HNO 3 , HF and HClO 4 and chemically processed to suit the analysis requirement. Analysis results indicated that the uranium content was 0.08 μg/g in river water, 0.1 μg/g in evergreen foliage, and 5-11 μg/g in surface soil respectively. (authors)

  17. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of trace amounts of lead in environmental water samples with complicated matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabarczyk M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, simple and fast adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure for trace determination of lead in environmental water samples has been developed. The method is based on adsorptive accumulation of the Pb(II-cupferron complex onto a hanging mercury drop electrode, followed by the reduction of the adsorbed species by a voltammetric scan using differential pulse modulation. The interference from surface active substances was eliminated by adsorption of interferents onto an Amberlite XAD-16 resin. Optimumconditions for removing the surfactants by mixing the analysed sample with resin were evaluated. The accuracy of the method was tested by analyzing certified reference material (SPS-WW1 Waste Water.

  18. Simultaneous analysis of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium in environmental samples using hydride generation ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, L.M.; Breidenbach, R.; Bakker, I.J.I.; Epema, O.J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: A quantitative method for simultaneous analysis of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium in environmental samples is being developed using hydride generation ICPMS. These elements must be first transformed into hydride-forming oxidation states. This is particularly challenging for selenium and antimony because selenium is susceptible to reduction to the non-hydride-forming elemental state and antimony requires strong reducing conditions. The effectiveness of three reducing agents (KI, thiourea, cysteine) is studied. A comparison is made between addition of reducing agent to the sample and addition of KI to the NaBH 4 solution. Best results were obtained with the latter approach. (author)

  19. Application of semiempirical expressions to the alpha and beta radiometry of environmental depositions samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Tamayo, L.

    1996-01-01

    Were applied two semiempirical equations exponential beta absorption and Bragg-Kleeman approximation complementary to experimental corrections for beta backscattering and auto absorption of beta and alpha radiations in measurements of environmental depositions samples In the first case was verified the validity of mentioned corrections with an application boundary to mass greater than 300 Pb-210 (0.015 mg/cm 2 ) In the second case, the Bragg-Kleeman approximation combined with the experimental beta corrections, bring a judgment to determine the fundamental alpha and beta emisors samples which results the Pb-210 group

  20. Solid-phase extraction and determination of trace elements in environmental samples using naphthalene adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourreza, N.

    2004-01-01

    Naphthalene co-precipitated with quaternary ammonium salt such as tetraoctyl ammonium bromide and methyltrioctyl ammonium chloride have been used as adsorbent for solid phase extraction of metal ions such as Hg, Cd and Fe. The metal ions are retained on the adsorbent in a column as their complexes with suitable ligands and eluted by an eluent before instrumental measurements. The optimization of the procedures for solid phase extraction and consequent determination of trace elements and application to environmental samples especially water samples will be discussed. (author)

  1. Trace element analysis of environmental samples by multiple prompt gamma-ray analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Masumi; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Shozugawa, Katsumi

    2011-01-01

    The multiple γ-ray detection method has been proved to be a high-resolution and high-sensitivity method in application to nuclide quantification. The neutron prompt γ-ray analysis method is successfully extended by combining it with the γ-ray detection method, which is called Multiple prompt γ-ray analysis, MPGA. In this review we show the principle of this method and its characteristics. Several examples of its application to environmental samples, especially river sediments in the urban area and sea sediment samples are also described. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the readsorption of plutonium and americium in dynamic fractionations of environmental solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Roongrat; Hou, Xiaolin; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic extraction system exploiting sequential injection (SI) for sequential extractions incorporating a specially designed extraction column is developed to fractionate radionuclides in environmental solid samples such as soils and sediments. The extraction column can contain a large amount...... of soil sample (up to 5 g), and under optimal operational conditions it does not give rise to creation of back pressure. Attention has been placed on studies of the readsorption problems during sequential extraction using a modified Standards, Measurements and Testing (SM&T) scheme with 4-step sequential...

  3. Practice and experience in traceability of radioactivity measurements of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhijian

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects on radioactivity measurement traceability and summarizes the work on quality assurance of radioactivity measurements of environmental samples in the laboratory, including transfer of standards, preparation of reference materials, and calibration of efficiency for volumse surces with Ge(Li) spectrometer. Some practical activitis regarding intercomparison of radioactivity measurements and other traceabillity-related activities are also described. Some sugestions relating to performing quality assurance are made

  4. High efficiency environmental sampling with UV-cured peelable coatings (aka NuGoo project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Junghans, Sylvia Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    This report presents slides on CA Related Project (FY13-17); Environmental sampling by IAEA (not only) during CA; Decontamination gels; Cotton swipes vs. decon gel (FY15); Contamination removal study; The origins of the NuGoo; NuGoo – proof of concept; NuGoo – FY17 project ($250K); LED lamp – which one works and why; Selecting photoinitiator; Monomers and oligomers; Results.

  5. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Daniel A; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Hung, Alice L; Blazer, Vicki S; Halpern, Marnie E

    2014-04-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  6. A very sensitive LSC procedure to determine Ni-63 in environmental samples, steel and concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerer, C.; Schupfner, R.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure to determine Ni-63 contributes to a safe and economically reasonable decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Co-60, Fe-55 and Ni-63 are the most abundant long-lived radionuclides associated with contaminated piping, hardware and concrete for a period of several decades of years after shutdown. Samples are carefully ashed leached, or dissolved by suitable mixtures of acids. The analysis starts with the absorption Ni 2+ on the chelating resin CHELEX 100. The next purification steps include an anionic exchange column and a precipitation as Ni-dimethyl-glyoxime, which is extracted into chloroform. After reextraction with sulfuric acid the solution containing Ni 2+ is mixed with a scintillation cocktail and counted in an anticoincidence shielded LSC. The decontamination factors are determined for all important artificially and naturally occurring radionuclides ranging form above 10 4 to 10 9 . The chemical yield adopts a value of (95±5)%. Up to maximum sample amounts of 0.4 g steel, 5 g concrete and about 100 g of environmental samples the detection limits are about 5 mBq per sample or 12 mBq/g steel, 1 mBq/g concrete and 0.05 mBq/g environmental sample at a counting time of 1000 minutes. (author) 16 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Evaluation of the Environmental Supports Scale with a Community Sample of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, Cristina M; Collado, Anahi D; Reynolds, Elizabeth K; Lejuez, Carl W; MacPherson, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Environmental sources of psychosocial support have been found to modulate or protect against the development of psychopathology and risk behavior among adolescents. Capturing sources of environmental support across multiple developmental contexts requires the availability of well-validated, concise assessments-of which there are few in the existing literature. In order to address this need, the current study explored the factor structure, concurrent and convergent validity of the Environmental Supports Scale (ESS; Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs, 117; 395-417, 1991) with a community sample of adolescents. An unconstrained exploratory factor analysis revealed a separate factor for home, school, and neighborhood settings. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated for each factor. Concurrent and predictive validity analyses revealed that the ESS was associated in the expected directions across a range of constructs relevant to adolescent development including internalizing symptoms, well-being, external influences, and engagement in risk behavior. Convergent validity for the neighborhood context was established with an assessment of neighborhood environmental adversity. A brief assessment of perceived environmental support across key developmental contexts provides an important tool for research on resilience processes during adolescence and may help illuminate key protective factors and inform intervention and prevention efforts.

  8. New developments in the extraction and determination of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocaña-González, Juan Antonio; Villar-Navarro, Mercedes; Ramos-Payán, María; Fernández-Torres, Rut; Bello-López, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples is reviewed. • Literature in this field from 1980 to 2003 is briefly discussed. • Determination and extraction methods in the last decade are discussed in-depth. - Abstract: Parabens are a family of synthetic esters of p-hydroxibenzoic acid widely used as preservatives in cosmetics and health-care products, among other daily-use commodities. Recently, their potential endocrine disrupting effects have raised concerns about their safety and their potential effects as emerging pollutants, leading to the regulation of the presence of parabens in commercial products by national and trans-national organizations. Also, this has led to an interest in developing sensible and reliable methods for their determination in environmental samples, cosmetics and health-care products. This paper is a comprehensive up-to-date review of the literature concerning the determination of parabens in environmental samples and cosmetic and health-care products. A brief revision of the literature concerning the traditional determination of parabens (1980–2003) is included, followed by an in-depth revision of the recent developments in both measurement and extraction methods for parabens in the last years (2003–2013). Finally, possible future perspectives in this field are proposed

  9. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O; McDonnell, Martin C; Hughes, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system.

  10. New developments in the extraction and determination of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaña-González, Juan Antonio; Villar-Navarro, Mercedes [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain); Ramos-Payán, María [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Lineberguer Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Fernández-Torres, Rut [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain); Research Centre of Health and Environment (CYSMA), University of Huelva (Spain); Bello-López, Miguel Angel, E-mail: mabello@us.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2015-02-09

    Highlights: • The analysis of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples is reviewed. • Literature in this field from 1980 to 2003 is briefly discussed. • Determination and extraction methods in the last decade are discussed in-depth. - Abstract: Parabens are a family of synthetic esters of p-hydroxibenzoic acid widely used as preservatives in cosmetics and health-care products, among other daily-use commodities. Recently, their potential endocrine disrupting effects have raised concerns about their safety and their potential effects as emerging pollutants, leading to the regulation of the presence of parabens in commercial products by national and trans-national organizations. Also, this has led to an interest in developing sensible and reliable methods for their determination in environmental samples, cosmetics and health-care products. This paper is a comprehensive up-to-date review of the literature concerning the determination of parabens in environmental samples and cosmetic and health-care products. A brief revision of the literature concerning the traditional determination of parabens (1980–2003) is included, followed by an in-depth revision of the recent developments in both measurement and extraction methods for parabens in the last years (2003–2013). Finally, possible future perspectives in this field are proposed.

  11. Application of ICP-MS in Environmental Sampling Analysis for Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eko Pudjadi; Petrus Zacharias; Budi Prayitno

    2004-01-01

    Environmental samples measured by ICP-MS were analyzed for safeguards. There are two isotopes in environmental sampling that is used to find out the origin of nuclear materials and verify undeclared nuclear activities. Uranium isotopes are 234 U, 235 U, 236 U and 238 U and Plutonium isotopes are 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu and 242 Pu. Uranium isotopes are used to verify an existing of nuclear power plants, enrichment plants or reprocessing plants. Plutonium isotopes are used to clarify global fallout from nuclear weapon testing and accident of nuclear facility or military purposes. The high sensitivity of ICP-MS can detect the isotopic fingerprint and trace elements in ppb concentration; ICP-MS has been applied to measure 235 U isotopic ratio and 240 Pu/ 239 Pu isotopic ratios. The sensitivity of ICP-MS is high precision and low operational cost in environmental sampling and can be considered in nuclear power design based on safeguards for development countries. (author)

  12. Onondaga Lake: A Forsaken Superfund Site, or a Sampling Playground for Environmental Geochemistry Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmosky, C. C.; Harpp, K. S.

    2004-05-01

    Onondaga Lake, in Syracuse, NY, is described by the EPA as one of the most polluted lakes in the US. High levels of heavy metal and semi-volatile organic contamination provide an excellent case study that serves as the cornerstone for an environmental geochemistry course at Colgate University. Our course is designed to teach students basic environmental analysis skills including experimental design, sample preparation, analytical instrumentation operation, data processing and statistical analysis, and preparation of a collaborative scientific paper. Participating students generally have some background in environmental geology, but rarely more than one semester of chemistry. The Onondaga Lake project is the focus of the course for approximately half the semester. At the outset of the project, students are presented with a driving question that is answered through a series of guided field and lab investigations, such as an assessment of the environmental consequences of a proposed marina along the lakefront. The students' first task is to delve into the lake's environmental history, including identification of contaminants, location of point and non-point pollution sources, and clean-up efforts. Students then participate in 2 field trips to the site. First, students learn the geography of the lake system, collect sediment and water samples, and observe mitigation efforts at the wastewater treatment plant. The second trip is 2-3 weeks later, after students have assessed further sampling needs. Identification and quantification of organic compounds are accomplished by GC-MS, and heavy metal contents are determined by ICP-MS. Students compile their results, perform statistical analyses, and collaboratively draw their conclusions regarding the impact of the proposed project. The final product is a single report written by the entire class, an exercise in organization, cooperation, and planning that is usually the most challenging, but ultimately the most rewarding

  13. Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Environmental Consequences for the Feed Market: a Consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed...

  14. Future atmospheric CO2 concentration and environmental consequences for the feed market: a consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed...

  15. "Holes" in Student Understanding: Addressing Prevalent Misconceptions regarding Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Sara C.; Walz, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a misconception among undergraduate students that global warming is caused by holes in the ozone layer. In this study, we evaluated the presence of this and other misconceptions surrounding atmospheric chemistry that are responsible for the entanglement of the greenhouse effect and the ozone hole in students' conceptual frameworks. We…

  16. Salmonella isolated from individual reptiles and environmental samples from terraria in private households in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Veronica O; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Melin, Lennart; Boqvist, Sofia

    2014-01-24

    This study investigates Salmonella spp. isolated from privately kept reptiles and from environmental samples such as bedding materials or water from the floor of the enclosures (terraria). It also compares isolation of Salmonella using Modified Semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) medium or selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis-Soya (RVS) pepton broth. Cloacal swabs or swabs from the cloacal area were collected from 63 individual reptiles belonging to 14 households. All reptiles were from different terraria and from 62 of these, environmental samples were also collected. Sampling were done by the reptile owners according to written instructions and sent by mail immediately after sampling. All but three samples were analyzed within 24 h after collection. Colonies suspected for Salmonella were tested for agglutination and serotyped using the White-Kauffmann-Le Minor scheme. The relative sensitivity (se) and specificity (sp) for MSRV compared with RVS, and the agreement coefficient kappa (κ) were calculated. Salmonella was isolated from 50/63 (80%) terraria, either from the reptiles (31/63; 49%) or from bedding material (39/62; 63%). The most common subspecies was Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica followed by S. enterica subspecies diarizonae. In reptiles, the most common S. enterica subspecies enterica serovars were Java (n = 4) and Fluntern (n = 4), compared with the serovars Tennessee (n = 10) and Fluntern (n = 10) in the environmental samples. The exact same set of Salmonella subspecies and serovars were not isolated from the individual reptiles and the environmental samples from any of the households. Isolation using MSRV yielded more Salmonella isolates 61/113 (54%) than enrichment in RVS 57/125 (46%). The se was 97.9% (95% Confidence Interval 93.9-100), the sp 78.5% (95% CI 68.5-88.5) and the κ 0.74, indicating substantial agreement between the tests. Salmonella can be expected to be present in environments where reptiles are

  17. 210Pb and 210Po determination in environmental samples using liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Sanchez, D.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2003-01-01

    A simple radiochemical procedure has been developed to determine 210 Pb and 210 Po in environmental samples from the same matrix. Sediment samples are decomposed by leaching with mineral acids or by microwave digestion, while water samples are pre-concentrated. One part of the resulting solution, spiked with 209 Po, is used for 210 Po determination by spontaneous deposition onto nickel disks (a-spectrometry). The other part is assayed for 210 Pb, separating the Pb either by anion-exchange (sediment samples), or by solvent extraction (water samples). The 210 Pb source is finally prepared by precipitation as oxalate and the chemical recovery determined by gravimetry. The 210 Pb activity concentration is determined by liquid scintillation. A standard sediment sample supplied by IAEA and spiked water samples were analysed to check the procedure. The 210 Pb and 210 Po measurements agreed well with the certifications, deviations being less than 10%. The mean recoveries for Pb and Po were (70±12)% and (77±8)% for sediments, and (70±10)% and (81±7)% for waters, respectively. (author)

  18. Preparation Of Deposited Sediment Sample By Casting Method For Environmental Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutabarat, Tommy; Ristin PI, Evarista

    2000-01-01

    The preparation of deposited sediment sample by c asting m ethod for environmental study has been carried out. This method comprises separation of size fraction and casting process. The deposited sediment samples were wet sieved to separate the size fraction of >500 mum, (250-500) mum, (125-250) mum and (63-125) mum and settling procedures were followed for the separation of (40-63) mum, (20-40) mum, (10-20) mum and o C, ashed at 450 o C, respectively. In the casting process of sample, it was used polyester rapid cure resin and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) hardener. The moulded sediment sample was poured onto caster, allow for 60 hours long. The aim of this method is to get the casted sample which can be used effectively, efficiently and to be avoided from contamination of each other samples. Before casting, samples were grinded up to be fine. The result shows that casting product is ready to be used for natural radionuclide analysis

  19. Measuring environmental change in forest ecosystems by repeated soil sampling: a North American perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Fernandez, Ivan J.; Richter, Daniel D.; Ross, Donald S.; Hazlett, Paul W.; Bailey, Scott W.; Oiumet, Rock; Warby, Richard A.F.; Johnson, Arthur H.; Lin, Henry; Kaste, James M.; Lapenis, Andrew G.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental change is monitored in North America through repeated measurements of weather, stream and river flow, air and water quality, and most recently, soil properties. Some skepticism remains, however, about whether repeated soil sampling can effectively distinguish between temporal and spatial variability, and efforts to document soil change in forest ecosystems through repeated measurements are largely nascent and uncoordinated. In eastern North America, repeated soil sampling has begun to provide valuable information on environmental problems such as air pollution. This review synthesizes the current state of the science to further the development and use of soil resampling as an integral method for recording and understanding environmental change in forested settings. The origins of soil resampling reach back to the 19th century in England and Russia. The concepts and methodologies involved in forest soil resampling are reviewed and evaluated through a discussion of how temporal and spatial variability can be addressed with a variety of sampling approaches. Key resampling studies demonstrate the type of results that can be obtained through differing approaches. Ongoing, large-scale issues such as recovery from acidification, long-term N deposition, C sequestration, effects of climate change, impacts from invasive species, and the increasing intensification of soil management all warrant the use of soil resampling as an essential tool for environmental monitoring and assessment. Furthermore, with better awareness of the value of soil resampling, studies can be designed with a long-term perspective so that information can be efficiently obtained well into the future to address problems that have not yet surfaced.

  20. Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains of Pandemic Serotypes Identified from Clinical and Environmental Samples from Jiangsu, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjiao eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus has emerged as a major foodborne pathogen in China, Japan, Thailand and other Asian countries. In this study, 72 strains of V. parahaemolyticus were isolated from clinical and environmental samples between 2006 and 2014 in Jiangsu, China. The serotypes and six virulence genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDR and TDR-related hemolysin (TRH genes were assessed among the isolates. Twenty five serotypes were identified and O3:K6 was one of the dominant serotypes. The genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis, and 48 sequence types (STs were found, suggesting this V. parahaemolyticus group is widely dispersed and undergoing rapid evolution. A total of 25 strains of pandemic serotypes such as O3:K6, O5:K17 and O1:KUT were identified. It is worth noting that the pandemic serotypes were not exclusively identified from clinical samples, rather, nine strains were also isolated from environmental samples; and some of these strains harbored several virulence genes, which may render those strains pathogenicity potential. Therefore, the emergence of these environmental pandemic V. parahaemolyticus strains may poses a new threat to the public health in China. Furthermore, six novel serotypes and 34 novel STs were identified among the 72 isolates, indicating that V. parahaemolyticus were widely distributed and fast evolving in the environment in Jiangsu, China. The findings of this study provide new insight into the phylogenic relationship between V. parahaemolyticus strains of pandemic serotypes from clinical and environmental sources and enhance the MLST database; and our proposed possible O- and K- antigen evolving paths of V. parahaemolyticus may help understand how the serotypes of this dispersed bacterial population evolve.

  1. Dehalococcoides as a Potential Biomarker Evidence for Uncharacterized Organohalides in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihong Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The massive production and improper disposal of organohalides resulted in worldwide contamination in soil and water. However, their environmental survey based on chromatographic methods was hindered by challenges in testing the extremely wide variety of organohalides. Dehalococcoides as obligate organohalide-respiring bacteria exclusively use organohalides as electron acceptors to support their growth, of which the presence could be coupled with organohalides and, therefore, could be employed as a biomarker of the organohalide pollution. In this study, Dehalococcoides was screened in various samples of bioreactors and subsurface environments, showing the wide distribution of Dehalococcoides in sludge and sediment. Further laboratory cultivation confirmed the dechlorination activities of those Dehalococcoides. Among those samples, Dehalococcoides accounting for 1.8% of the total microbial community was found in an anaerobic granular sludge sample collected from a full-scale bioreactor treating petroleum wastewater. Experimental evidence suggested that the influent wastewater in the bioreactor contained bromomethane which support the growth of Dehalococcoides. This study demonstrated that Dehalococcoides could be employed as a promising biomarker to test the present of organohalides in wastestreams or other environmental samples.

  2. Three-phase double-arc plasma for spectrochemical analysis of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, M M; Ghatass, Z F; Shalaby, E A; Kotb, M M; El-Raey, M

    2000-12-01

    A new instrument, which uses a three-phase current to support a double-arc argon plasma torch for evaporation, atomization and excitation of solid or powder samples, is described. The sampling arc is ignited between the first and second electrode while the excitation arc is ignited between the second and third electrode. Aerosol generated from the sample (first electrode) is swept by argon gas, through a hole in the second electrode (carbon tubing electrode), into the excitation plasma. A tangential stream of argon gas is introduced through an inlet orifice as a coolant gas for the second electrode. This gas stream forces the excitation arc discharge to rotate reproducibly around the electrode surface. Discharge rotation increases the stability of the excitation plasma. Spectroscopic measurements are made directly in the current-carrying region of the excitation arc. An evaluation of each parameter influencing the device performance was performed. Analytical calibration curves were obtained for Fe, Al, K, and Pb. Finally, the present technique was applied for the analysis of environmental samples. The present method appears to have significant, low cost analytical utility for environmental measurements.

  3. Maintenance of stability in γ spectrometric system of low active and environmental samples - a practical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravishankar, R.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Particle Accelerators are becoming part of the society with more and more medical and Industrial types are added every year in addition to research type of accelerators. The outflow of materials to the public domain from such accelerator facilities need to checked carefully and must be released after ensuring the activities of such materials should not exceed the regulatory limits. Health Physics Unit, VECC is involved in analyzing food product samples, seized samples which are suspected to contain Uranium etc and other environmental samples in addition to analyzing radioactive materials evolved from Operational Health Physics work. Most of these analyses involve γ Spectrometric Systems of high efficiency and high resolution types. The efficacy of the analysis and results depends on various parameters of the spectrometric system. The electrical noise from the power supply system and other noises picked up, even in the range of a few milli volts range, have been found to affect the stability of the system. These effects may not be present initially during installation but may creep in due course due to various reasons including weather conditions, wear and tear etc. Unless these problems are attended in regular intervals, the stability of the spectrometric systems and hence the results of analysis of the low active and environmental samples, will not be satisfactory. The work describes the practical problems faced by Health Physics Unit, the methods employed in identifying the problems, the necessary remedial measures taken, the final outcome in the stability and the procedures framed in order to avoid in future. (author)

  4. Using Environmental Variables for Studying of the Quality of Sampling in Soil Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jafari

    2016-02-01

    profiles, which were then described, sampled, analyzed and classified according to the USDA soil classification system (16. The basic rationale is to set up a hypercube, the axes of which are the quantiles of rasters of environmental covariates, e.g., digital elevation model. Sampling evaluation was made using the HELS algorithm. This algorithm was written based on the study of Carre et al., 2007 (3 and run in R. Results and Discussion: The covariate dataset is represented by elevation, slope and wetness index (Table 2. All data layers were interpolated to a common grid of 30 m resolution. The size of the raster layer is 421 by 711 grid cells. Each of the three covariates is divided into four quantiles (Table 2. The hypercube character space has 43, i.e. 64 strata (Figure 5. The average number of grid cells within each stratum is therefore 4677 grid cells. The map of the covariate index (Figure 6 shows some patterns representative of the covariate variability. The values of the covariate index range between 0.0045 and 5.95. This means that some strata are very dense compared to others. This index allows us to explain if high or low relative weight of the sampling units (see below is due to soil sampling or covariate density. The strata with the highest density are in the areas with high geomorphology diversity. It means that geomorphology processes can cause the diversity and variability and it is in line with the geomorphology map (Figure 2. Of the 64 strata, 30.4% represent under-sampling, 60.2% represent adequate sampling and 9.4% represent over-sampling. Regarding the covariate index, most of the under-sampling appears in the high covariate index, where soil covariates are then highly variable. Actually, it is difficult to collect field samples in these highly variable areas (Figure 7. Also, most of the over-sampling was observed in areas with alow covariate index (Figure 7. We calculated the weights of all the sampling units and showed the results in Figure 8. One 64

  5. Environmental DNA from seawater samples correlate with trawl catches of Subarctic, deepwater fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Møller, Peter Rask; Sigsgaard, Eva Egelyng

    2016-01-01

    such as bottom trawling, and on official reporting of global catches, which can be unreliable. Thus, there is need for alternative and non-invasive techniques for qualitative and quantitative oceanic fish surveys. Here we report environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding of seawater samples from continental slope...... depths in Southwest Greenland. We collected seawater samples at depths of 188-918 m and compared seawater eDNA to catch data from trawling. We used Illumina sequencing of PCR products to demonstrate that eDNA reads show equivalence to fishing catch data obtained from trawling. Twenty-six families were...... found with both trawling and eDNA, while three families were found only with eDNA and two families were found only with trawling. Key commercial fish species for Greenland were the most abundant species in both eDNA reads and biomass catch, and interpolation of eDNA abundances between sampling sites...

  6. A data acquisition system for indentification of 90Sr/ 90Y in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, G.; Brajnik, D.; Starcic, M.; Stanovnik, A.

    1996-01-01

    Often, in the stage of research and development of new techniques for detection of ionizing radiation, elaborate electronic systems are required. In this paper, we describe the relatively complex detector and electronic system used for a relatively simple but nevertheless demanding measurement of the beta emitting radionuclides 90 Sr/ 90 Y in environmental samples. The detection limit of 1 Bq in a thin, disc-shaped sample, was obtained by careful elimination of background. Contribution of other radionuclides in the sample, were eliminated or at least considerably reduced by using a silica aerogel as Cherenkov radiator and thin multiwire chamber in coincidence. Cosmic ray signals were reduced by large scintillation counters in anticoincidence. Finally, persisting RF pick-up signals were eliminated by using the signal from a wire antenna and identical MWPC preamplifier and discriminator for a veto to the master coincidence. For each accepted event, both timing and pulse height information was recorded with a personal computer

  7. Determination of uranium in clinical and environmental samples by FIAS-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Z.; Lorber, A.; Halicz, L.; Gavrieli, I.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium may enter the human body through ingestion or inhalation. Ingestion of uranium compounds through the diet, mainly drinking water, is a common occurrence, as these compounds are present in the biosphere. Inhalation of uranium-containing particles is mainly an occupational safety problem, but may also take place in areas where uranium compounds are abundant. The uranium concentration in urine samples may serve as an indication of the total uranium body content. A method based on flow injection and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FIAS-ICPMS) was found to be most suitable for determination of uranium in clinical samples (urine and serum), environmental samples (seawater, wells and carbonate rocks) and in liquids consumed by humans (drinking water and commercial beverages). Some examples of the application of the FIAS-ICPMS method are reviewed and presented here

  8. Determination of the self-attenuation correction factor for environmental samples analysis in gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Talita O.; Rocha, Zildete; Knupp, Eliana A.N.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Oliveira, Arno H. de; Oliveira, Arno H. de

    2015-01-01

    Gamma spectrometry technique has been used in order to obtain the activity concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides in environmental samples of different origins, compositions and densities. These samples characteristics may influence the calibration condition by the self-attenuation effect. The sample density has been considered the most important factor. For reliable results, it is necessary to determine self-attenuation correction factor which has been subject of great interest due to its effect on activity concentration. In this context, the aim of this work is to show the calibration process considering the correction by self-attenuation in the evaluation of the concentration of each radionuclide to a gamma HPGEe detector spectrometry system. (author)

  9. Biomass fueled fluidized bed combustion: atmospheric emissions, emission control devices and environmental regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, S.W.; Jenkins, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustors have become the technological choice for power generation from biomass fuels in California. Atmospheric emission data obtained during compliance tests are compared for five operating 18 to 32 MW fluidized bed combustion power plants. The discussion focuses on the impact of fuel properties and boiler design criteria on the emission of pollutants, the efficiency of pollution control devices, and regulations affecting atmospheric emissions. Stack NO x emission factors are shown not to vary substantially among the five plants which burn fuels with nitrogen concentrations between 0.3 and 1.1% dry weight. All facilities use at least one particular control device, but not all use limestone injection or other control techniques for sulfur and chlorine. The lack of control for chlorine suggests the potential for emission of toxic species due to favorable temperature conditions existing in the particulate control devices, particularly when burning fuels containing high concentrations of chlorine. (Author)

  10. Identification of eukaryotic open reading frames in metagenomic cDNA libraries made from environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Susan; Grant, William D; Cowan, Don A; Jones, Brian E; Ma, Yanhe; Ventosa, Antonio; Heaphy, Shaun

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe the application of metagenomic technologies to construct cDNA libraries from RNA isolated from environmental samples. RNAlater (Ambion) was shown to stabilize RNA in environmental samples for periods of at least 3 months at -20 degrees C. Protocols for library construction were established on total RNA extracted from Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites. The methodology was then used on algal mats from geothermal hot springs in Tengchong county, Yunnan Province, People's Republic of China, and activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant in Leicestershire, United Kingdom. The Tenchong libraries were dominated by RNA from prokaryotes, reflecting the mainly prokaryote microbial composition. The majority of these clones resulted from rRNA; only a few appeared to be derived from mRNA. In contrast, many clones from the activated sludge library had significant similarity to eukaryote mRNA-encoded protein sequences. A library was also made using polyadenylated RNA isolated from total RNA from activated sludge; many more clones in this library were related to eukaryotic mRNA sequences and proteins. Open reading frames (ORFs) up to 378 amino acids in size could be identified. Some resembled known proteins over their full length, e.g., 36% match to cystatin, 49% match to ribosomal protein L32, 63% match to ribosomal protein S16, 70% to CPC2 protein. The methodology described here permits the polyadenylated transcriptome to be isolated from environmental samples with no knowledge of the identity of the microorganisms in the sample or the necessity to culture them. It has many uses, including the identification of novel eukaryotic ORFs encoding proteins and enzymes.

  11. A whole-cell bioreporter assay for quantitative genotoxicity evaluation of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Li, Guanghe; Xing, Yi; Zhang, Dayi; Jia, Jianli; Cui, Zhisong; Luan, Xiao; Tang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Whole-cell bioreporters have emerged as promising tools for genotoxicity evaluation, due to their rapidity, cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and selectivity. In this study, a method for detecting genotoxicity in environmental samples was developed using the bioluminescent whole-cell bioreporter Escherichia coli recA::luxCDABE. To further test its performance in a real world scenario, the E. coli bioreporter was applied in two cases: i) soil samples collected from chromium(VI) contaminated sites; ii) crude oil contaminated seawater collected after the Jiaozhou Bay oil spill which occurred in 2013. The chromium(VI) contaminated soils were pretreated by water extraction, and directly exposed to the bioreporter in two phases: aqueous soil extraction (water phase) and soil supernatant (solid phase). The results indicated that both extractable and soil particle fixed chromium(VI) were bioavailable to the bioreporter, and the solid-phase contact bioreporter assay provided a more precise evaluation of soil genotoxicity. For crude oil contaminated seawater, the response of the bioreporter clearly illustrated the spatial and time change in genotoxicity surrounding the spill site, suggesting that the crude oil degradation process decreased the genotoxic risk to ecosystem. In addition, the performance of the bioreporter was simulated by a modified cross-regulation gene expression model, which quantitatively described the DNA damage response of the E. coli bioreporter. Accordingly, the bioluminescent response of the bioreporter was calculated as the mitomycin C equivalent, enabling quantitative comparison of genotoxicities between different environmental samples. This bioreporter assay provides a rapid and sensitive screening tool for direct genotoxicity assessment of environmental samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Middlesex Sampling Plant environmental report for calendar year 1992, 239 Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and provides the results for 1992. The site, in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey, is a fenced area and includes four buildings and two storage piles that contain 50,800 m 3 of radioactive and mixed hazardous waste. More than 70 percent of the MSP site is paved with asphalt. The MSP facility was established in 1943 by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) to sample, store, and/or ship uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores. In 1955 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), successor to MED, terminated the operation and later used the site for storage and limited sampling of thorium residues. In 1967 AEC activities ceased, onsite structures were decontaminated, and the site was certified for unrestricted use under criteria applicable at that time. In 1980 the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a multiphase remedial action project to clean up several vicinity properties onto which contamination from the plant had migrated. Material from these properties was consolidated into the storage piles onsite. Environmental surveillance of MSP began in 1980 when Congress added the site to DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The environmental surveillance program at MSP includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analyses are performed to detect metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling th DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses

  13. Investigation of hydrophobic substrates for solution residue analysis utilizing an ambient desorption liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge microplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paing, Htoo W; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2018-03-12

    A practical method for preparation of solution residue samples for analysis utilizing the ambient desorption liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (AD-LS-APGD-OES) microplasma is described. Initial efforts involving placement of solution aliquots in wells drilled into copper substrates, proved unsuccessful. A design-of-experiment (DOE) approach was carried out to determine influential factors during sample deposition including solution volume, solute concentration, number of droplets deposited, and the solution matrix. These various aspects are manifested in the mass of analyte deposited as well as the size/shape of the product residue. Statistical analysis demonstrated that only those initial attributes were significant factors towards the emission response of the analyte. Various approaches were investigated to better control the location/uniformity of the deposited sample. Three alternative substrates, a glass slide, a poly(tetrafluoro)ethylene (PTFE) sheet, and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated glass slide, were evaluated towards the microplasma analytical performance. Co-deposition with simple organic dyes provided an accurate means of determining the location of the analyte with only minor influence on emission responses. The PDMS-coated glass provided the best performance by virtue of its providing a uniform spatial distribution of the residue material. This uniformity yielded an improved limits of detection by approximately 22× for 20 μL and 4 x for 2 μL over the other two substrates. While they operate by fundamentally different processes, this choice of substrate is not restricted to the LS-APGD, but may also be applicable to other AD methods such as DESI, DART, or LIBS. Further developments will be directed towards a field-deployable ambient desorption OES source for quantitative analysis of microvolume solution residues of nuclear forensics importance.

  14. 210Pb and 210Po determination in environmental samples using liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, D.P.; Sanchez, A.M.; Vargas, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    A simple radiochemical procedure has been developed to determine 210 Pb and 210 Po in environmental samples. After adding 209 Po tracer and Pb carrier, an aliquot of the sample is decomposed by microwave digestion or by evaporation with mineral acids (depending on the expected activity of the sample). Part of the leaching solution must be used for 210 Po determination, preparing a polonium source by spontaneous deposition onto a nickel disk. The quantitative recoveries are determined using a standard 209 Po tracer, and the activity concentration is determined by isotopic dilution alpha spectrometry. The remaining part of the leaching solution is used for 210 Pb determination by means of two alternative methods: lead can be retained from 1.5 M HCl by the DOWEX 1 X 8, Cl - form resin in a chromatographic column, and stripped with deionised water, or it can be separated by solvent extraction as a lead bromide complex with the organic compound ALIQUAT-336 in toluene (this second method is used preferably in water samples). The Pb source for measurement is prepared by precipitation as oxalate and the chemical recovery determined by gravimetry. The activity concentration of 210 Pb is calculated from the spectra measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer. Several certified material samples supplied by IAEA were analysed to check the procedure. The measured values for 210 Pb and 210 Po were in good agreement with the certified values presenting deviations lower than 5%. Several environmental samples (river and well waters and also sediments) from zones impacted by Uranium mine exploitation were analysed using the described procedure. The mean yields of Pb and Po were (70 ± 10)% and (81 ± 7)% for waters and (70 ± 12)% and (77 ± 8)% for sediments. (author)

  15. Quality assurance and reference material requirements and considerations for environmental sample analysis in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Perrin, R.E.; Goldberg, S.A.; Cappis, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High-sensitivity nuclear environmental sampling and analysis techniques have been proven in their ability to verify declared nuclear activities, as well as to assist in the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and facilities. Following the Gulf War, the capability and revealing power of environmental sampling and analysis techniques to support international safeguards was demonstrated and subsequently adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as routine safeguards measures in safeguards inspections and verifications. In addition to having been proved useful in international safeguards, environmental sampling and analysis techniques have demonstrated their utility in identifying the origins of 'orphaned' nuclear material, as well as the origin of intercepted smuggled nuclear material. Today, environmental sampling and analysis techniques are now being applied in six broad areas to support nonproliferation, disarmament treaty verification, national and international nuclear security, and environmental stewardship of weapons production activities. Consequently, more and more laboratories around the world are establishing capabilities or expanding capabilities to meet these growing applications, and as such requirements for quality assurance and control are increasing. The six areas are: 1) Nuclear safeguards; 2) Nuclear forensics/illicit trafficking; 3) Ongoing monitoring and verification (OMV); 4) Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT); 5) Weapons dismantlement/materials disposition; and 6) Research and development (R and D)/environmental stewardship/safety. Application of environmental sampling and analysis techniques and resources to illicit nuclear material trafficking, while embodying the same basic techniques and resources, does have unique requirements for sample management, handling, protocols, chain of custody, archiving, and data interpretation. These requirements are derived from needs of how data from nuclear forensics

  16. Dental microwear of sympatric rodent species sampled across habitats in southern Africa: Implications for environmental influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgman, Jenny H E; Leichliter, Jennifer; Avenant, Nico L; Ungar, Peter S

    2016-03-01

    Dental microwear textures have proven to be a valuable tool for reconstructing the diets of a wide assortment of fossil vertebrates. Nevertheless, some studies have recently questioned the efficacy of this approach, suggesting that aspects of habitat unrelated to food preference, especially environmental grit load, might have a confounding effect on microwear patterning that obscures the diet signal. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by examining microwear textures of 3 extant sympatric rodent species that vary in diet breadth and are found in a variety of habitat types: Mastomys coucha, Micaelamys namaquensis and Rhabdomys pumilio. We sample each of these species from 3 distinct environmental settings in southern Africa that differ in rainfall and vegetative cover: Nama-Karoo shrublands (semi-desert) and Dry Highveld grasslands in the Free State Province of South Africa, and Afromontane (wet) grasslands in the highlands of Lesotho. While differences between habitat types are evident for some of the species, inconsistency in the pattern suggests that the microwear signal is driven by variation in foods eaten rather than grit-level per se. It is clear that, at least for species and habitats sampled in the current study, environmental grit load does not swamp diet-related microwear signatures. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Radiochemistry methods in DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-08-01

    Current standard sources of radiochemistry methods are often inappropriate for use in evaluating US Department of Energy environmental and waste management (DOE/EW) samples. Examples of current sources include EPA, ASTM, Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater and HASL-300. Applicability of these methods is limited to specific matrices (usually water), radiation levels (usually environmental levels), and analytes (limited number). Radiochemistry methods in DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) attempt to fill the applicability gap that exists between standard methods and those needed for DOE/EM activities. The Radiochemistry chapter in DOE Methods includes an ''analysis and reporting'' guidance section as well as radiochemistry methods. A basis for identifying the DOE/EM radiochemistry needs is discussed. Within this needs framework, the applicability of standard methods and targeted new methods is identified. Sources of new methods (consolidated methods from DOE laboratories and submissions from individuals) and the methods review process will be discussed. The processes involved in generating consolidated methods add editing individually submitted methods will be compared. DOE Methods is a living document and continues to expand by adding various kinds of methods. Radiochemistry methods are highlighted in this paper. DOE Methods is intended to be a resource for methods applicable to DOE/EM problems. Although it is intended to support DOE, the guidance and methods are not necessarily exclusive to DOE. The document is available at no cost through the Laboratory Management Division of DOE, Office of Technology Development

  18. Metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Luke R; Williams, Gareth J; Haroon, Mohamed F; Shibl, Ahmed; Larsen, Peter; Shorenstein, Joshua; Knight, Rob; Stingl, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic microbial diversity covaries with physicochemical parameters. Temperature, for example, explains approximately half of global variation in surface taxonomic abundance. It is unknown, however, whether covariation patterns hold over narrower parameter gradients and spatial scales, and extending to mesopelagic depths. We collected and sequenced 45 epipelagic and mesopelagic microbial metagenomes on a meridional transect through the eastern Red Sea. We asked which environmental parameters explain the most variation in relative abundances of taxonomic groups, gene ortholog groups, and pathways—at a spatial scale of water mass with different physicochemical properties. Temperature explained the most variation in each metric, followed by nitrate, chlorophyll, phosphate, and salinity. That nitrate explained more variation than phosphate suggested nitrogen limitation, consistent with low surface N:P ratios. Covariation of gene ortholog groups with environmental parameters revealed patterns of functional adaptation to the challenging Red Sea environment: high irradiance, temperature, salinity, and low nutrients. Nutrient-acquisition gene ortholog groups were anti-correlated with concentrations of their respective nutrient species, recapturing trends previously observed across much larger distances and environmental gradients. This dataset of metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients includes online data exploration supplements, serving as a community resource for marine microbial ecology. PMID:27420030

  19. Storing and accessing radioactivity data in environmental samples: the resources of GEORAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tadeu A. de A.; Gonzalez, Sergio de A.; Reis, Rocio G. dos; Vasconcellos, Luiza M. de H. e; Lauria, Dejanira de C., E-mail: tedsilva@ird.gov.br, E-mail: gonzalez@ird.gov.br, E-mail: rocio@ird.gov.br, E-mail: luiza@ird.gov.br, E-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br [Isntituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A georeferenced information system of radioactivity in environmental samples, named GEORAD, was created with the goal of aggregating, storing and promoting the preservation of the data produced by Brazilian researches, and sharing with the research community a database on radioactivity in Brazil. The system provides information on concentrations of the natural series, cosmogenic and fall out radionuclides in samples of soil, water and food, among others, along with the geographical location of the samples. By this way, the location of the sample can be visualized on Brazilian map. A spreadsheet containing all the data and information about the sample can be also obtained. As a result, the database system can enable the available data to be exploited to the maximum potential for further research and allows new research on existing information. The system also provides reference information on where the data information were obtained, that enables data citation and linking data with publications to increase visibility and accessibility of data and the research itself. The GEORAD system has been continuously fed and updated, containing, currently, data from more than 2,000 samples. This paper presents the latest system updates and discusses its resources. (author)

  20. Long-term survival of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in stored environmental samples from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escandón, Patricia; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Both Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii have been isolated from a variety of environmental sources in Colombia. To determine the viability of C. neoformans/C. gattii isolates in stored soil samples, filtrates and bird droppings from which these yeasts were previously recovered. A total of 964 samples collected between 2003 and 2009, and kept at room temperature were processed. From them, 653 samples were from trees decaying wood, 274 from soil filtrates and 37 from bird droppings. When C. neoformans or C. gattii were recovered, the molecular type of each isolate was established by PCR fingerprinting using the single primer (GTG)5. Among the processed samples, 161 isolates were recovered. From those, 81 (50.3%) corresponded to C. gattii recovered from decaying wood of Eucalyptus spp., Corymbia ficifolia, Terminalia catappa and Ficus spp. trees, and 80 (49.7%) corresponded to C. neoformans recovered from Ficus spp. and eucalyptus trees, as well as from bird droppings. The most prevalent molecular type among the C. gattii and C. neoformans isolates was VGII and VNI, respectively. The re-isolation of C. neoformans/C. gattii from 10-year stored samples suggests that these yeasts are able to keep viable in naturally colonized samples. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.