WorldWideScience

Sample records for environment uv-shielding properties

  1. Transparent cellulose/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposites with enhanced UV-shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Zhang, Jinming; He, Jiasong; Zhang, Jun

    2016-08-20

    The solubility of eight types of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) derivatives in an ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) and the dispersion of POSS in cellulose matrix were examined. Only a special POSS containing both aminophenyl and nitrophenyl groups (POSS-AN, NH2:NO2=2:6) was selected to prepare nanocomposites, because of its good solubility in AmimCl and high stability during the preparation process. POSS-AN nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in a cellulose matrix with a size of 30-40nm, and so the resultant cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films were transparent. The mechanical properties of the films achieved a maximum tensile strength of 190MPa after addition of 2wt% POSS-AN. Interestingly, all of the cellulose/POSS-AN films exhibited high UV-absorbing capability. For the 15wt% cellulose/POSS-AN film, the transmittance of UVA (315-400nm) and UVB (280-315nm) was only 9.1% and nearly 0, respectively. The UV aging and shielding experiments showed that the transparent cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films possessed anti-UV aging and UV shielding properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A simple way to an ultra-robust superhydrophobic fabric with mechanical stability, UV durability, and UV shielding property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guina; Song, Yuanming; Li, Xiangming; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Yanli; Wang, Yuyan; Ge, Bo; Zhu, Xiaotao

    2018-07-15

    Development of an ultra-robust superhydrophobic fabric with mechanical stability, UV durability, and UV shielding by a simple method is highly desirable, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Herein, the original fabric is immersed into the solution containing ZnO nanoparticle and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and the fiber surfaces are uniformly covered by a ZnO-PDMS layer after thermal treatment at 110 °C for 30 min. Droplets of water and corrosive liquids including strong acid, strong alkali, and saturated salt solution display sphere shape on the ZnO-PDMS coated fabric surface. The stable binding of ZnO-PDMS layer onto the fibers allows for the fabric coating with robust superhydrophobicity, and the coated fabric still displays superhydrophobicity after hand twisting, knife scratching, finger touching, and even cycles of sandpaper abrasion. The ZnO-PDMS coated fabric can also keep its superhydrophobic property when exposed to long term UV illumination, demonstrating its UV resistance. Moreover, the uniformly distribution of ZnO nanoparticles on fibers allows the ZnO-PDMS coated fabric to display UV shielding property. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. UV shielding with visible transparency based properties of poly (styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/Ag doped ZnO nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajender; Verma, Karan; Singh, Tejbir; Barman, P. B.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2018-02-01

    Development of ultraviolet (UV) shielding with visible transparency based thermoplastic polymer nanocomposite (PNs) presents an important requisite in terms of their efficiency and cost. Present study contributed for the same approach by dispersion of Ag doped ZnO nanoparticles upto 10 wt% in poly (styrene-co-acrylonitrile) matrix by insitu emulsion polymerization method. The crystal and chemical structure of PNs has been analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and fourier infrared spectrometer (FTIR) techniques. The morphological and elemental information of synthesized nanomaterial has been studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) technique. The optical properties of PNs has been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy technique. The incorporation of nanoparticles in polymer matrix absorb the complete UV light with visible transparency. The present reported polymer nanocomposite (PNs) have tuned refractive index with UV blocking and visible transparency based properties which can serve as a viable alternative as compared to related conventional materials.

  4. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  5. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Caputo, Fanny

    2015-08-20

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  6. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Caputo, Fanny; De Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which

  7. Effect of adjustable molecular chain structure and pure silica zeolite nanoparticles on thermal, mechanical, dielectric, UV-shielding and hydrophobic properties of fluorinated copolyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Liao, Guangfu; Zhang, Shulai; Pang, Long; Tong, Hao; Zhao, Wenzhe; Xu, Zushun

    2018-01-01

    A series of polyimide (PI) films, polyimide/pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (PSZN) blend films and polyimide/amine-functionalized pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (APSZN) composite films were successfully prepared by random copolycondensation. Thereinto, PSZN were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The polyimides were derived from 4,4‧-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA), and three adjustable molar ratios (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) of 2,2-bis[4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy)phenyl] propane dianhydride (BPADA) and 4,4‧-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA). The effects of PSZN, APSZN and different chain structure on PI films were specifically evaluated in terms of morphology, thermal, mechanical, dielectric and UV-shielding properties, etc. Comparison was given among pure PI flims, PI/PSZN blend films and PI/APSZN composite flims. The results showed that the thermal and mechanical properties of PI films were drastically impaired after adding PSZN. On the contrary, the strength, toughness and thermal stability were improved after adding APSZN. Moreover, the dielectric constants of the PI/APSZN composite flims were lowered but UV-shielding properties were enhanced. Interestingly, we found that the greatest effects were obtained through introducing APSZN in PI derived by the 1:1 ratio of BPADA:6FDA. The corresponding PI/APSZN composite flim exhibited the most reinforced and toughened properties, the largest decrement of dielectric constant and the best UV-shielding efficiency, which made the composite flim be used as ultraviolet shielding material in outer space filled with high temperature and intensive ultraviolet light. Meanwhile, this work also provided a facile way to synthesize composite materials with adjustable performance.

  8. UV-durable superhydrophobic textiles with UV-shielding properties by coating fibers with ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Yin, Wei; Jia, Shun-Tian; Ma, Jian-Zhong

    2011-10-01

    ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles were fabricated by successive coating of multilayer polyelectrolytes and then a SiO2 shell onto ZnO particles. The as-prepared ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles were coated on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) textiles, followed by hydrophobization with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane, to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with UV-shielding properties. Transmission electron microscopy and ζ potential analysis were employed to evidence the fabrication of ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles. Scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were conducted to investigate the surface morphologies of the textile and the coating of the fibers. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and contact angle measurement indicated that the incorporation of ZnO onto fibers imparted UV-blocking properties to the textile surface, while the coating of SiO2 shell on ZnO prohibited the photocatalytic degradation of hexadecyltrimethoxysilane by ZnO, making the as-treated PET textile surface show stable superhydrophobicity with good UV-shielding properties.

  9. Thermal, Mechanical and UV-Shielding Properties of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate/Cerium Dioxide Hybrid Systems Obtained by Melt Compounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Reyes-Acosta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thick and homogeneous hybrid film systems based on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using the melt compounding method to improve thermal stability, mechanical and UV-shielding properties, as well as to propose them for use in the multifunctional materials industry. The effect of the inorganic phase on these properties was assessed by using two different weight percentages of synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles (0.5 and 1.0 wt % with the sol–gel method and thermal treatment at different temperatures (120, 235, 400, 600 and 800 °C. Thereafter, the nanoceria powders were added to the polymer matrix by single screw extrusion. The absorption in the UV region was increased with the crystallite size of the CeO2 nanoparticles and the PMMA/CeO2 weight ratio. Due to the crystallinity of CeO2 nanoparticles, the thermal, mechanical and UV-shielding properties of the PMMA matrix were improved. The presence of CeO2 nanostructures exerts an influence on the mobility of PMMA chain segments, leading to a different glass transition temperature.

  10. Highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites with boron nitride nanospheres as fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuqiao; Huang, Yan; Meng, Wenjun; Wang, Zifeng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-03-20

    Polymer composites with enhanced mechanical, thermal or optical performance usually suffer from poor ductility induced by confined mobility of polymer chains. Herein, highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites are successfully fabricated. Boron nitride (BN) materials, with a wide band gap of around ∼6.0 eV, are used as fillers to achieve the remarkably improved UV-shielding performance of a polymer matrix. In addition, it is found that spherical morphology BN as a filler can keep the excellent ductility of the composites. For a comparison, it is demonstrated that traditional fillers, including conventional BN powders can achieve the similar UV-shielding performance but dramatically decrease the composite ductility. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is believed to be lubricant effects of BN nanospheres for sliding of polymer chains, which is in consistent with the thermal analyses. This study provides a new design to fabricate UV-shielding composite films with well-preserved ductility.

  11. Superhydrophilic poly (styrene co acrylonitrile)-ZnO nanocomposite surfaces for UV shielding and self-cleaning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajender; Sharma, Ramesh; Barman, P. B.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2017-11-01

    UV shielding based super hydrophilic material is developed in the present formulation by in situ emulsion polymerization of poly (styrene-acrylonitrile) with ZnO nanoparticles. The ESI-MS technique confirms the structure of polymer nanocomposite by their mass fragments. The XRD study confirms the presence of ZnO phase in polymer matrix. PSAN/ZnO nanocomposite leads to give effective UV shielding (upto 375 nm) and visible luminescence with ZnO content in polymer matrix. The FESEM and TEM studies confirm the symmetrical, controlled growth of PNs. The incorporation of ZnO nanofillers into PSAN matrix lead to restructuring the PNs surfaces into superhydrophilic surfaces in water contact angle (WCA) from 70° to 10°. We believe our synthesized PSAN/ZnO nanocomposite could be potential as UV shielding, luminescent and super hydrophilic nature based materials in related commercial applications.

  12. Facile and Low-Temperature Fabrication of Thermochromic Cr2O3/VO2 Smart Coatings: Enhanced Solar Modulation Ability, High Luminous Transmittance and UV-Shielding Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tianci; Cao, Xun; Li, Ning; Long, Shiwei; Gao, Xiang; Dedon, Liv R; Sun, Guangyao; Luo, Hongjie; Jin, Ping

    2017-08-09

    In the pursuit of energy efficient materials, vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) based smart coatings have gained much attention in recent years. For smart window applications, VO 2 thin films should be fabricated at low temperature to reduce the cost in commercial fabrication and solve compatibility problems. Meanwhile, thermochromic performance with high luminous transmittance and solar modulation ability, as well as effective UV shielding function has become the most important developing strategy for ideal smart windows. In this work, facile Cr 2 O 3 /VO 2 bilayer coatings on quartz glasses were designed and fabricated by magnetron sputtering at low temperatures ranging from 250 to 350 °C as compared with typical high growth temperatures (>450 °C). The bottom Cr 2 O 3 layer not only provides a structural template for the growth of VO 2 (R), but also serves as an antireflection layer for improving the luminous transmittance. It was found that the deposition of Cr 2 O 3 layer resulted in a dramatic enhancement of the solar modulation ability (56.4%) and improvement of luminous transmittance (26.4%) when compared to single-layer VO 2 coating. According to optical measurements, the Cr 2 O 3 /VO 2 bilayer structure exhibits excellent optical performances with an enhanced solar modulation ability (ΔT sol = 12.2%) and a high luminous transmittance (T lum,lt = 46.0%), which makes a good balance between ΔT sol and T lum for smart windows applications. As for UV-shielding properties, more than 95.8% UV radiation (250-400 nm) can be blocked out by the Cr 2 O 3 /VO 2 structure. In addition, the visualized energy-efficient effect was modeled by heating a beaker of water using infrared imaging method with/without a Cr 2 O 3 /VO 2 coating glass.

  13. A Novel UV-Shielding and Transparent Polymer Film: When Bioinspired Dopamine-Melanin Hollow Nanoparticles Join Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Su, Jing; Li, Ting; Ma, Piming; Bai, Huiyu; Xie, Yi; Chen, Mingqing; Dong, Weifu

    2017-10-18

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is known to be harmful to human health and cause organic materials to undergo photodegradation. In this Research Article, bioinspired dopamine-melanin solid nanoparticles (Dpa-s NPs) and hollow nanoparticles (Dpa-h NPs) as UV-absorbers were introduced to enhance the UV-shielding performance of polymer. First, Dpa-s NPs were synthesized through autoxidation of dopamine in alkaline aqueous solution. Dpa-h NPs were prepared by the spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine solution onto polystyrene (PS) nanospheres template, followed by removal of the template. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/Dpa nanocomposite films were subsequently fabricated by a simple casting solvent. UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of Dpa-s versus Dpa-h NPs. In contrast to PVA/Dpa-s films, PVA/Dpa-h films exhibit stronger UV-shielding capabilities and can almost block the complete UV region (200-400 nm). The excellent UV-shielding performance of the PVA/Dpa-h films mainly arises from multiple absorption because of the hollow structure and large specific area of Dpa-h NPs. Moreover, the wall thickness of Dpa-h NPs can be simply controlled from 28 to 8 nm, depending on the ratio between PS and dopamine. The resulting films with Dpa-h NPs (wall thickness = ∼8 nm) maintained relatively high transparency to visible light because of the thinner wall thickness. The results indicate that the prepared Dpa-h NPs can be used as a novel UV absorber for next-generation transparent UV-shielding materials.

  14. Quantum dots/silica/polymer nanocomposite films with high visible light transmission and UV shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumin, Md Abdul; Xu, William Z; Charpentier, Paul A

    2015-08-07

    The dispersion of light-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials in transparent plastics such as poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (PEVA) is of enormous current interest in emerging solar materials, including photovoltaic (PV) modules and commercial greenhouse films. Nanocrystalline semiconductor or quantum dots (QDs) have the potential to absorb UV light and selectively emit visible light, which can control plant growth in greenhouses or enhance PV panel efficiencies. This work provides a new and simple approach for loading mesoporous silica-encapsulated QDs into PEVA. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm size were synthesized using a modified facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single-molecule precursors and capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS. To make both the bare and core-shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interactions. By careful experimental tuning, this encapsulation technique enhanced the quantum yield (∼65%) and photostability compared to the bare QDs. Both the encapsulated bare and core-shell QDs were then melt-mixed with EVA pellets using a mini twin-screw extruder and pressed into thin films with controlled thickness. The results demonstrated for the first time that mesoporous silica not only enhanced the quantum yield and photostability of the QDs but also improved the compatibility and dispersibility of QDs throughout the PEVA films. The novel light selective films show high visible light transmission (∼90%) and decreased UV transmission (∼75%).

  15. Property, care, and environment

    OpenAIRE

    John O'Neill

    2001-01-01

    One influential approach to environmental problems holds that their solution requires the definition of full liberal property rights over goods that will enable their value to be registered in actual or hypothetical markets. How adequate is that solution? In this paper I offer reasons to be sceptical, by placing recent liberal arguments in the context of older debates about property, in particular those concerned with the distribution of care. Although proposals for the extension of liberal p...

  16. LINER galaxy properties and the local environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Georgina V.; Alonso, Sol; Duplancic, Fernanda; Mesa, Valeria

    2018-05-01

    We analyse the properties of a sample of 5560 low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) galaxies selected from SDSS-DR12 at low red shift, for a complete range of local density environments. The host LINER galaxies were studied and compared with a well-defined control sample of 5553 non-LINER galaxies matched in red shift, luminosity, morphology and local density. By studying the distributions of galaxy colours and the stellar age population, we find that LINERs are redder and older than the control sample over a wide range of densities. In addition, LINERs are older than the control sample, at a given galaxy colour, indicating that some external process could have accelerated the evolution of the stellar population. The analysis of the host properties shows that the control sample exhibits a strong relation between colours, ages and the local density, while more than 90 per cent of the LINERs are redder and older than the mean values, independently of the neighbourhood density. Furthermore, a detailed study in three local density ranges shows that, while control sample galaxies are redder and older as a function of stellar mass and density, LINER galaxies mismatch the known morphology-density relation of galaxies without low-ionization features. The results support the contribution of hot and old stars to the low-ionization emission although the contribution of nuclear activity is not discarded.

  17. Intellectual Property and Copyright Issues in Online Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanto, Edit

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of intellectual property and copyright issues as they relate to online learning environments. Includes a historical perspective; laws and regulations; liability; Web-related issues; higher education; distance learning; compliance strategies; and policy recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  18. Analysis of anaerobic product properties in fluid and aggressive environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharov, A.; Tulinov, A.

    2008-01-01

    The article presents the results of experiments involved in investigation of properties of some domestic and foreign-made anaerobic materials in components and units operating in fluid and aggressive environments. These experiments determined the strength and swell values of anaerobic products in the sea water, fuel and oil, and confirmed their anticorrosion properties. The experiments demonstrated high resistance of anaerobic products to various fluids and aggressive environments, which make...

  19. Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Nakamura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR, germinated brown rice (GBR and partially-milled rice (PMR contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR. Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled, and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society.

  20. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H U [ed.

    1991-12-15

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) Specialists Meeting on Properties of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment was held during June 18 to June 20, 1991, at the Nuclear Research Centre (Kernforschungszentrum) in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Specialists Meeting was divided into five technical sessions which addressed topics as follows: Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environments under Off-Normal Conditions;Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium; and Conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. A facile approach to fabrication of novel CeO2–TiO2 core–shell nanocomposite leads to excellent UV-shielding ability and lower catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahadur, Newaz Mohammed; Kurayama, Fumio; Furusawa, Takeshi; Sato, Masahide; Siddiquey, Iqbal Ahmed; Hossain, Md. Mufazzal; Suzuki, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the development of a fast and facile route for the synthesis of novel CeO 2 –TiO 2 core–shell nanocomposite particles using microwave (MW) irradiation of the mixture of commercial CeO 2 , titanium-tetra-n-butoxide (TBOT) and aqueous ammonia. Solutions of TBOT in ethanol and ammonia were mixed with dispersed CeO 2 nanoparticles in ethanol, and the mixture was rapidly MW irradiated at 70 °C for 2 min. The resulting nanocomposite particles were characterized in terms of phase, shell thickness, composition, surface charge, morphology, and chemical state of the elements by XRD, TEM, XPS, SEM, Zeta potential analyzer, XRF, and FT-IR. Conventional methods of the synthesis of CeO 2 –TiO 2 nanocomposite require a long time, and TiO 2 is rarely found as a coated material. In contrast, the MW method was able to synthesize CeO 2 –TiO 2 core–shell nanocompsite particles within a very short time. CeO 2 –TiO 2 nanocomposite particles were fairly unaggregated with an average titania layer thickness of 2–5 nm. The obtained nanocomposites retained the crystalline cubic phase of CeO 2 , and the phase of coated TiO 2 was amorphous. The catalytic activities of uncoated and TiO 2 -coated CeO 2 nanoparticles for the oxidation of organic compounds were evaluated by the degradation study of methylene blue in air atmosphere at 403 K. The enhanced UV-shielding ability and visible transparency of the nanocomposite obtained by UV visible spectroscopic measurements suggested that the core–shell material has novel characteristics for using as a sunscreen material.

  2. A facile approach to fabrication of novel CeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} core-shell nanocomposite leads to excellent UV-shielding ability and lower catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadur, Newaz Mohammed, E-mail: nmbahadur@yahoo.com [Utsunomiya University, Laboratory of Powder Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Venture Business Laboratry (Japan); Kurayama, Fumio [Utsunomiya University, Center for Optical Research and Education (Japan); Furusawa, Takeshi; Sato, Masahide [Utsunomiya University, Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Siddiquey, Iqbal Ahmed [Utsunomiya University, Laboratory of Powder Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Venture Business Laboratry (Japan); Hossain, Md. Mufazzal [University of Dhaka, Department of Chemistry (Bangladesh); Suzuki, Noboru [Utsunomiya University, Laboratory of Powder Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Venture Business Laboratry (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    This study reports the development of a fast and facile route for the synthesis of novel CeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} core-shell nanocomposite particles using microwave (MW) irradiation of the mixture of commercial CeO{sub 2}, titanium-tetra-n-butoxide (TBOT) and aqueous ammonia. Solutions of TBOT in ethanol and ammonia were mixed with dispersed CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles in ethanol, and the mixture was rapidly MW irradiated at 70 Degree-Sign C for 2 min. The resulting nanocomposite particles were characterized in terms of phase, shell thickness, composition, surface charge, morphology, and chemical state of the elements by XRD, TEM, XPS, SEM, Zeta potential analyzer, XRF, and FT-IR. Conventional methods of the synthesis of CeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite require a long time, and TiO{sub 2} is rarely found as a coated material. In contrast, the MW method was able to synthesize CeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} core-shell nanocompsite particles within a very short time. CeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite particles were fairly unaggregated with an average titania layer thickness of 2-5 nm. The obtained nanocomposites retained the crystalline cubic phase of CeO{sub 2}, and the phase of coated TiO{sub 2} was amorphous. The catalytic activities of uncoated and TiO{sub 2}-coated CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles for the oxidation of organic compounds were evaluated by the degradation study of methylene blue in air atmosphere at 403 K. The enhanced UV-shielding ability and visible transparency of the nanocomposite obtained by UV visible spectroscopic measurements suggested that the core-shell material has novel characteristics for using as a sunscreen material.

  3. Environment and economy: Property rights and public policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    For much of its history, environmental economics has sought to modify public policy in order to achieve efficient use and management of environmental resources. The results of this attempt, however, have been dismaying for the most part, and environment public policy continues to differ from the course of action prescribed by economic analysis. Some economists have begun to acknowledge that the reasons for this gap between economic theory and public policy may lie in environmental economics itself rather than in poor policy choices. That is the message sent in this book by Daniel Bromley, who joins S.V. Ciriacy-Wantrup, Allan Schmid, and others in a strong internal critique of the discipline and, in particular, of the 'property rights school' of Coase, Demsetz, and other advocates of the market. Property rights are the common thread of this critique, which blames much of the failure of environmental economics to influence environmental policy on several fundamental misconceptions regarding property

  4. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Huang, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaotian; Wu, Pengcheng; Guo, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    Experimental work was carried out to develop information about mechanical properties of recycled concrete (RC) in marine environment. By using the seawater and dry-wet circulation to simulate the marine environment, specimens of RC were tested with different replacement percentages of 0%, 30%, and 60% after immersing in seawater for 4, 8, 12, and 16 months, respectively. Based on the analysis of the stress-strain curves (SSCs) and compressive strength, it is revealed that RC' peak value and elastic modulus decreased with the increase of replacement percentage and corroding time in marine environment. And the failure of recycled concrete was speeded up with more obvious cracks and larger angles of 65° to 85° in the surface when compared with normal concrete. Finally, the grey model (GM) with equal time intervals was constructed to investigate the law of compressive strength of recycled concrete in marine environment, and it is found that the GM is accurate and feasible for the prediction of RC compressive strength in marine environment.

  5. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods-it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100's of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for laser

  6. Tensile properties of ADI material in water and gaseous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnovic, Dragan, E-mail: draganr@uns.ac.rs [Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Balos, Sebastian; Sidjanin, Leposava [Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Eric Cekic, Olivera [Innovation Centre, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Grbovic Novakovic, Jasmina [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-03-15

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) is an advanced type of heat treated ductile iron, having comparable mechanical properties as forged steels. However, it was found that in contact with water the mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons decrease, especially their ductility. Despite considerable scientific attention, the cause of this phenomenon remains unclear. Some authors suggested that hydrogen or small atom chemisorption causes the weakening of the surface atomic bonds. To get additional reliable data of that phenomenon, in this paper, two different types of austempered ductile irons were tensile tested in various environments, such as: argon, helium, hydrogen gas and water. It was found that only the hydrogen gas and water gave a statistically significant decrease in mechanical properties, i.e. cause embrittlement. Furthermore, the fracture surface analysis revealed that the morphology of the embrittled zone near the specimen surface shares similarities to the fatigue micro-containing striation-like lines, which indicates that the morphology of the brittle zone may be caused by cyclic local-chemisorption, micro-embrittlement and local-fracture. - Highlights: • In contact with water and other liquids the ADI suddenly exhibits embrittlement. • The embrittlement is more pronounced in water than in the gaseous hydrogen. • The hydrogen chemisorption into ADI surface causes the formation of a brittle zone. • The ADI austempered at lower temperatures (300 °C) is more resistant to embrittlement.

  7. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1991-12-01

    The proceedings contain 16 contributions to the following topics: 1. Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; 2. Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environment under Off-Normal Conditions; 3. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; and 4. Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium. (MM)

  8. Fatigue properties of Zircaloy-2 in a PWR water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The continuing trend of operation of light water reactors is towards power cycling as a means of operating the systems more efficiently. Depending upon the reactor design and mode of power cycling this could lead to significant fatigue usage in Zircaloy structural components. In order to design against the possibility of gross yielding or fast fracture of such components as a result of this it is obviously necessary to be able to predict conservatively the fatigue properties of Zircaloy under the reactor operating conditions

  9. Environment-related properties of polyhydroxylated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jia-Qi; Qu, Rui-juan; Flamm, Alison; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Ying; Wang, Zun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    Polyhydroxylated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PHODDs) are important metabolic and synthetic products of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs). Two types of hydrogen bonds exist in PHODD molecules: one between a hydroxyl group (HO) and an oxygen atom of the ether bond, and the other between two ortho hydroxyls of a benzene ring. By fully optimized calculation with density functional theory (DFT), their bond energies were ascertained to be approximately 9–14 kJ/mol and 15–19 kJ/mol respectively by the comparison of standard Gibbs energy of formation (Δ f G θ ) between different molecules, which was experimentally verified. The two types of hydrogen bonds affect the hydrophilicity and stability of the molecules. The torsional potential of hydroxyls and the orientation making the congener most stable were obtained. The octanol-water partition coefficients (logK ow s) were calculated based on the group contribution method, and the standard state entropy (S θ ), standard enthalpy (Δ f H θ ) of formation and Δ f G θ were obtained from the combination of DFT calculation and isodesmic reaction for the stable PHODD congeners. The number and position of hydroxyl substitution (N PHOS ) were employed as descriptors to establish quantitative structure–property relationship (QSPR) models. Although the hydrophilicity of PHODDs increases with the number of hydroxyl groups, it is impaired by the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The logK ow s of PHODDs are much smaller than those of PCDDs, and the variation trend with the number of substituents is different. In addition, the relative stability order of PHODD congeners was theoretically proposed, which is quite different from that of PCDDs. Considering the ionization in water, first-order ionization constants of PHODDs were calculated according to the results of SMD method of Self-Consistent Reaction Field Theory (SCRF), and they were influenced by the hydrogen bonds. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyl torsional potential and hydrogen

  10. Environment-related properties of polyhydroxylated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jia-Qi; Qu, Rui-juan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of the Environment, Xianlin Campus, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Flamm, Alison [U.S. Fulbright Student Grantee, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Hong-Xia [School of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001 (China); Xu, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of the Environment, Xianlin Campus, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Wang, Zun-Yao, E-mail: wangzun315cn@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of the Environment, Xianlin Campus, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2012-01-01

    Polyhydroxylated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PHODDs) are important metabolic and synthetic products of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs). Two types of hydrogen bonds exist in PHODD molecules: one between a hydroxyl group (HO) and an oxygen atom of the ether bond, and the other between two ortho hydroxyls of a benzene ring. By fully optimized calculation with density functional theory (DFT), their bond energies were ascertained to be approximately 9-14 kJ/mol and 15-19 kJ/mol respectively by the comparison of standard Gibbs energy of formation ({Delta}{sub f}G{sup {theta}}) between different molecules, which was experimentally verified. The two types of hydrogen bonds affect the hydrophilicity and stability of the molecules. The torsional potential of hydroxyls and the orientation making the congener most stable were obtained. The octanol-water partition coefficients (logK{sub ow}s) were calculated based on the group contribution method, and the standard state entropy (S{sup {theta}}), standard enthalpy ({Delta}{sub f}H{sup {theta}}) of formation and {Delta}{sub f}G{sup {theta}} were obtained from the combination of DFT calculation and isodesmic reaction for the stable PHODD congeners. The number and position of hydroxyl substitution (N{sub PHOS}) were employed as descriptors to establish quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models. Although the hydrophilicity of PHODDs increases with the number of hydroxyl groups, it is impaired by the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The logK{sub ow}s of PHODDs are much smaller than those of PCDDs, and the variation trend with the number of substituents is different. In addition, the relative stability order of PHODD congeners was theoretically proposed, which is quite different from that of PCDDs. Considering the ionization in water, first-order ionization constants of PHODDs were calculated according to the results of SMD method of Self-Consistent Reaction Field Theory (SCRF), and they were influenced by the hydrogen

  11. Capturing value from Intellectual Property (IP) in a global environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcácer, Juan; Beukel, Karin; Cassiman, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Globalization should provide firms with an opportunity to leverage their know-how and reputation across countries to create value. However, it remains challenging for them to actually capture that value using traditional Intellectual Property (IP) tools. In this paper, we document the strong growth...... in patents, trademarks, and industrial designs used by firms to protect their IP globally. We then show that IP protection remains fragmented; the quality of IP applications might be questionable; and developing a comprehensive IP footprint worldwide is very costly. Growing numbers of applications...

  12. Creep properties of Hastelloy X in a carburizing helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.; Kawakami, H.

    1982-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the environmental effect on the creep behavior of Hastelloy X at 900 0 C in helium and air. Since helium coolant in HTGR is expected to be carburizing and very weakly oxidizing for most metals, testings were focused on the effect of carburizing and slight oxidation. Carburization decreases secondary creep strain rate and delays tertiary creep initiation. On the other hand, the crack growth rate on the specimen surface is enhanced due to very weak oxidation in helium, therefore the tertiary creep strain rate becomes larger than that in air. The rupture time of Hastelloy X was shorter in helium when compared with in air. Stress versus rupture time curves for both environments do not deviate with each other during up to 5000 hours test, and a ratio of rupture stress in helium to that in air was about 0.9

  13. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... Performance Standards § 250.107 What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1) Performing all operations in a...

  14. A Hybrid Density Functional Theory/Molecular Mechanics Approach for Linear Response Properties in Heterogeneous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Li, Xin; Sandberg, Jaime A R; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Ågren, Hans

    2014-03-11

    We introduce a density functional theory/molecular mechanical approach for computation of linear response properties of molecules in heterogeneous environments, such as metal surfaces or nanoparticles embedded in solvents. The heterogeneous embedding environment, consisting from metallic and nonmetallic parts, is described by combined force fields, where conventional force fields are used for the nonmetallic part and capacitance-polarization-based force fields are used for the metallic part. The presented approach enables studies of properties and spectra of systems embedded in or placed at arbitrary shaped metallic surfaces, clusters, or nanoparticles. The capability and performance of the proposed approach is illustrated by sample calculations of optical absorption spectra of thymidine absorbed on gold surfaces in an aqueous environment, where we study how different organizations of the gold surface and how the combined, nonadditive effect of the two environments is reflected in the optical absorption spectrum.

  15. As polar ozone mends, UV shield closer to equator thins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, April

    2018-02-01

    Thirty years after nations banded together to phase out chemicals that destroy stratospheric ozone, the gaping hole in Earth's ultraviolet radiation shield above Antarctica is shrinking. But new findings suggest that at midlatitudes, where most people live, the ozone layer in the lower stratosphere is growing more tenuous—for reasons that scientists are struggling to fathom. In an analysis published this week, researchers found that from 1998 to 2016, ozone in the lower stratosphere ebbed by 2.2 Dobson units—a measure of ozone thickness—even as concentrations in the upper stratosphere rose by about 0.8 Dobson units. The culprit may be ozone-eating chemicals such as dichloromethane that break down within 6 months after escaping into the air.

  16. Low cycle corrosion fatigue properties of F316Ti in simulated LWR primary environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xuelian; Ding Yaping; Katada, Y.; Sato, S.

    1998-11-01

    Environment effect on fatigue performance of materials used for Pressurized boundary, including fatigue life and crack growth rate, are of importance to nuclear safety. To predict the fatigue life of nuclear materials and to improve the design of nuclear materials, it is necessary to investigated the material fatigue performances in corrosive environment and to get the fatigue data under its environment to be used in. Low cycle corrosion fatigue (CF) performance investigation of domestic F316Ti in simulated BWR and PWR primary environment was carried out. The result shows that the high temperature water environment is one of the most important factors on CF properties. For the same material, the low cycle fatigue life in high temperature air is longer than that in simulated BWR and PWR primary environments. In high temperature water, domestic F316Ti has almost the same low cycle corrosion fatigue performance as F316 (made in Japan). All of the fatigue data are scattered within ASME best-fit curve and ASME design fatigue curve. In high strain range, there is no significant difference of the CF performance for F316Ti in both of BWR and PWR primary environments. With the decrease of strain amplitude, the difference appears gradually. The data is located at the short life side of the fatigue data in simulated BWR primary environment. Titanium is distributed uniformly in F316Ti manufactured in Fushun Steel Factory. Ni, Cr, Mo in this material are located at the high side of the alloy chemical composition range. So, F316Ti has a better CF property in high temperature water

  17. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  18. An investigation into environment dependent nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) exoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas, E-mail: tomar@purdue.edu

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation focuses on understanding the influence of change from wet to dry environment on nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp exoskeleton. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based measurements suggest that the shrimp exoskeleton has Bouligand structure, a key characteristic of the crustaceans. As expected, wet samples are found to be softer than dry samples. Reduced modulus values of dry samples are found to be 24.90 ± 1.14 GPa as compared to the corresponding values of 3.79 ± 0.69 GPa in the case of wet samples. Hardness values are found to be 0.86 ± 0.06 GPa in the case of dry samples as compared to the corresponding values of 0.17 ± 0.02 GPa in the case of wet samples. In order to simulate the influence of underwater pressure on the exoskeleton strength, constant load creep experiments as a function of wet and dry environments are performed. The switch in deformation mechanism as a function of environment is explained based on the role played by water molecules in assisting interface slip and increased ductility of matrix material in wet environment in comparison to the dry environment. - Highlights: • Environment dependent (dry-wet) properties of shrimp exoskeleton are analyzed. • Mechanical properties are correlated with the structure and composition. • Presence of water leads to lower reduced modulus and hardness. • SEM images shows the Bouligand pattern based structure. • Creep-relaxation of polymer chains, interface slip is high in presence of water.

  19. An investigation into environment dependent nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) exoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation focuses on understanding the influence of change from wet to dry environment on nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp exoskeleton. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based measurements suggest that the shrimp exoskeleton has Bouligand structure, a key characteristic of the crustaceans. As expected, wet samples are found to be softer than dry samples. Reduced modulus values of dry samples are found to be 24.90 ± 1.14 GPa as compared to the corresponding values of 3.79 ± 0.69 GPa in the case of wet samples. Hardness values are found to be 0.86 ± 0.06 GPa in the case of dry samples as compared to the corresponding values of 0.17 ± 0.02 GPa in the case of wet samples. In order to simulate the influence of underwater pressure on the exoskeleton strength, constant load creep experiments as a function of wet and dry environments are performed. The switch in deformation mechanism as a function of environment is explained based on the role played by water molecules in assisting interface slip and increased ductility of matrix material in wet environment in comparison to the dry environment. - Highlights: • Environment dependent (dry-wet) properties of shrimp exoskeleton are analyzed. • Mechanical properties are correlated with the structure and composition. • Presence of water leads to lower reduced modulus and hardness. • SEM images shows the Bouligand pattern based structure. • Creep-relaxation of polymer chains, interface slip is high in presence of water

  20. Tensile properties of aluminized V-5Cr-5Ti alloy after exposure in air environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) develop procedures to modify surface regions of V-Cr-Ti alloys in order to minimize oxygen uptake by the alloys when exposed to environments that contain oxygen, (b) evaluate the oxygen uptake of the surface-modified V-Cr-Ti alloys as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure in the exposure environment, (c) characterize the microstructures of oxide scales and oxygen trapped at the grain boundaries of the substrate alloys, and (d) evaluate the influence of oxygen uptake on the tensile properties of the modified alloys at room and elevated temperatures.

  1. Influence of gaseous annealing environment on the properties of indium-tin-oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R.X.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.; Djurisic, A.B.; Ling, C.C.; Li, S.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of postannealing in different gaseous environments on the optical properties of indiu-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films deposited on glass substrates using e-beam evaporation has been systematically investigated. It is found that the annealing conditions affect the optical and electrical properties of the films. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to obtain information on the chemical state and crystallization of the films. These data suggest that the chemical states and surface morphology of the ITO film are strongly influenced by the gaseous environment during the annealing process. The XPS data indicate that the observed variations in the optical transmittance can be explained by oxygen incorporation into the film, decomposition of the indium oxide phases, as well as the removal of metallic In

  2. Elemental mercury: Its unique properties affect its behavior and fate in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Raymat, Hansell; Liu, Guangliang; Liriano, Carolina; Li, Yanbin; Yin, Yongguang; Shi, Jianbo; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) has different behavior in the environment compared to other pollutants due to its unique properties. It can remain in the atmosphere for long periods of time and so can travel long distances. Through air-surface (e.g., vegetation or ocean) exchange (dry deposition), Hg 0 can enter terrestrial and aquatic systems where it can be converted into other Hg species. Despite being ubiquitous and playing a key role in Hg biogeochemical cycling, Hg 0 behavior in the environment is not well understood. The objective of this review is to provide a better understanding of how the unique physicochemical properties of Hg 0 affects its cycling and chemical transformations in different environmental compartments. The first part focuses on the fundamental chemistry of Hg 0 , addressing why Hg 0 is liquid at room temperature and the formation of amalgam, Hg halide, and Hg chalcogenides. The following sections discuss the long-range transport of Hg 0 as well as its redistribution in the atmosphere, aquatic and terrestrial systems, in particular, on the sorption/desorption processes that occur in each environmental compartment as well as the involvement of Hg 0 in chemical transformation processes driven by photochemical, abiotic, and biotic reactions. - Highlights: • Unique property of Hg 0 make it to behave differently with other toxic metals. • Hg 0 is considered the only global metal pollutant due to its uniqueness. • Hg 0 can be easily transformed and efficiently redistributed in the environments. - A better understanding of the properties and behavior of Hg 0 is the key to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of mercury, a global pollutant in the environment.

  3. Psychometric properties of the postgraduate hospital educational environment measure in an Iranian hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokoohi, Shahrzad; Hossein Emami, Amir; Mohammadi, Aeen; Ahmadi, Soleiman; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the educational environment are an important construct in assessing and enhancing the quality of medical training programs. Reliable and valid measurement, however, can be problematic - especially as instruments developed and tested in one culture are translated for use in another. This study sought to explore the psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) for use in an Iranian hospital training setting. We translated the instrument into Persian and ensured its content validity by back translation and expert review prior to administering it to 127 residents of Urmia University of Medical Science. Overall internal consistency of the translated measure was good (a=0.94). Principal components analysis revealed five factors accounting for 52.8% of the variance. The Persian version of the PHEEM appears to be a reliable and potentially valid instrument for use in Iranian medical schools and may find favor in evaluating the educational environments of residency programs nationwide.

  4. Mapping out the regulatory environment and its interaction with land and property markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, David

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain how the regulatory environment created by planning and building regulations interacts with land and property markets. Since this regulatory environment operates as a form of intervention within property markets in general and the development process in particular, it is essential first to understand the nature, structure and operation of land and property markets. These are covered in the first section. The second section identifies the aims and components of the planning system and building regulations. From this basis, four broad types of policy intervention are reviewed in the third section. These cover policies that seek to shape, regulate or stimulate market activity, and those that aim to build state or market capacity to produce desired outcomes. The final section uses the private residential development process as a case study to explore the extent to which state intervention can influence producer-consumer relationships in one important market sector. The paper argues that effective intervention in land and property markets requires the creation of a broad range of policy tools and their appropriate deployment to suit particular market circumstances. (author)

  5. Studies on aerosol optical properties over urban and semi-urban environments of Hyderabad and Anantapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lata, K.M.; Badarinath, K.V.S.; Rao, T.V. Ramakrishna; Reddy, R.R.; Ahammed, Y. Nazeer; Gopal, K. Rama; Azeem, P. Abdul

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols in the troposphere exert an important influence on global climate and the environment through scattering, transmission and absorption of radiation as well as acting as nuclei for cloud formation. Atmospheric aerosol particles influence the earth's radiation balance directly by scattering of infrared energy and indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes. The present study addresses visibility, radiative forcing, size distribution and attenuation of aerosols over the period from January to May, 2001 for urban and semi-urban regions of Hyderabad and Anantapur. High aerosol loading has been observed over urban environment compared to semi-urban environment. Aerosol optical depth values increased from January to April and then decreased during May over both urban and semi-urban regions. Over urban region, visibility decreased from January to April and increased during May. Similar trend has been observed over semi-urban region with relatively higher values of visibility. Radiative forcing estimated using aerosol optical depth values increased from January to April and then decreased during the month of May over urban and semi-urban areas. High visibility and low radiative forcing has been noticed over semi-urban area due to less aerosol loading. Wavelength exponent and turbidity coefficient registered high values over urban environment compared to semi-urban environment. Attenuation coefficient showed high values over urban region compared to semi-urban region. It reveals that semi-urban environment receives high solar flux than urban environment. Using 10 channel quartz crystal microbalance, measurements of total mass concentration and mass size distribution of near surface aerosols has been made over semi-urban environment and compared with size distribution derived from inversion methods based on aerosol optical depth variation with wavelength. The sensitivity of constrained linear inversions for inferring columnar

  6. Decarburization behavior and mechanical properties of Inconel 617 during high temperature oxidation in He environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Do; Kim, Dae Gun; Jo, Tae Sun; Kim, Hoon Sup; Lim, Jeong Hun

    2010-04-01

    Among Generation IV reactor concepts, high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are high-efficiency systems designed for the economical production of hydrogen and electricity. Inconel 617 is a solid-solution strengthening Ni-based superalloy that shows excellent strength, creep-rupture strength, and oxidation resistance at high temperatures. Thus, it is a desirable candidate for tube material of IHX and HGD in HTGRs. In spite of these excellent properties, aging degradation by long time exposure at high temperature induced to deterioration of mechanical properties and furthermore alloys' lifetime because of Cr-depleted zone and carbide free zone below external scale. Also, machinability of Inconel 617 is a important property for system design. In this study, oxidation and decarbrization behavior were evaluated at various aging temperature and environment. Also, cold rolling was carried out for the machinability evaluation of Inconel 617 and then microstructure change was evaluated

  7. Mechanical properties of Ni-base superalloys in high temperature steam environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Changheui; Kim, Donghoon; Sah, Injin; Lee, Ho Jung

    2015-01-01

    The effects of environmental damages on the mechanical properties of Ni-base superalloys, Alloy 617 and Haynes 230, were evaluated for VHTR-HTSE applications. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature after ageing at 900 deg. C in vacuum, steam, and steam + 20 vol.% H2 environments up to 3 000 h. Also, creep rupture test were performed in air, steam, and steam + 20 vol.% H2 environments. The degradations such as oxidation, decarburization, and redistribution of carbides were studied in view of the interaction of materials with the environment. During the long-term ageing at 900 deg. C in vacuum, secondary phases such as M23C6 and M6C were precipitated and coarsened, which caused increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility. For the specimens aged in steam environments, surface and internal oxides acted as preferential sites for crack initiation and consequently, decreased the tensile and creep strength. Also, the formation of decarburization region resulted in glide plane failure during tensile test and reduction in creep rupture life due to grain boundary migration and recrystallisation. During creep tests, tensile stress caused the crack and void formation in oxide layer. Consequently, fast diffusion of oxidant occurred and environmental damage were accelerated. Among the test conditions, such environmental damage was much severe in steam environments. (authors)

  8. The effects of test environment and cyclic stretching on the failure properties of human patellar tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haut, R.C.; Powlison, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    There is a need to document the mechanical properties of patellar tendon allografts used for reconstructive surgery of the damaged anterior cruciate ligament, especially the effects of irradiation sterilization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of in vitro test environment and low-level cyclic stretching prior to failure tests on nonirradiated and irradiated human graft tissues. Bilateral patellar tendons were split and each half processed accordingly. Some graft tissues were stretched cyclically at 2.5 mm deformation before failure. Experiments were performed in a 37 degrees C saline bath or with tissues moistened with a drip of the same. The irradiated grafts relaxed less and generated less slack length in the drip environment than the nonirradiated controls. Cyclic stretching did not alter failure characteristics of either graft tissue. While no significant differences in the tensile responses or failure characteristics were noted for irradiated and nonirradiated grafts in the drip, in the bath environment the nonirradiated tissues had greater strength and modulus. This resulted in there being a significant difference between irradiated and nonirradiated tissue responses in a heated saline bath environment. These experimental results exemplify the need to control in vitro test environments in the evaluation of various sterilization and preservation protocols for soft tissue allografts

  9. Effects of soil properties on natural radio-nuclides concentration in arid environment: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A.F.M.; Al-Sewaidan, H.A.I.; Al-Saif, A.S.; Diab, H.I.

    2008-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from an arid environment in the central region of Saudi Arabia, 28 samples from selected 14 locations in an agricultural farm. Two samples, one from cultivated land and the second from uncultivated land, of the same origin were collected from each location. This work aims at investigating the changes of soil properties due to dry-land use and its effects on naturally occurring radio-nuclides (NOR) concentration and distribution. The specific activity, in Bq/kg, of 226 Ra ( 238 U series), 228 gRa ( 232 Th series), 40 K and 137 Cs were measured using calibrated gamma-ray spectrometer. The soil physical and chemical properties [e.g. pH, EC, particle size distribution (clay, silt and sand percentages), CaCO 3 %, soluble cations (Ca, Mg, Na and K) and soluble anions (CO 3 , HCO 3 , Cl and SO 4 )] were determined. The radium equivalent activity, in Bq/kg, and absorbed dose rate one meter above the ground, in nGy/y, were calculated. Generally, there are not noticeable changes in soil properties due to agricultural activities or strong correlations between soil properties and NOR specific activities. That could be due to the sandy nature of the soil and the effects of adsorption-filtration processes on the behavior and the distribution pattern of NOR in arid environment. Therefore, the environmental impacts of different man-made activities on underground resources should be carefully considered due to the possible filtration behavior of different pollutants in dry-land environment. (author)(tk)

  10. Effects of a Pseudophysiological Environment on the Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Couet, Frédéric; Chevallier, Pascale; Mantovani, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Vascular tissue engineering focuses on the replacement of diseased small-diameter blood vessels with a diameter less than 6 mm for which adequate substitutes still do not exist. One approach to vascular tissue engineering is to culture vascular cells on a scaffold in a bioreactor. The bioreactor establishes pseudophysiological conditions for culture (medium culture, 37°C, mechanical stimulation). Collagen gels are widely used as scaffolds for tissue regeneration due to their biological properties; however, they exhibit low mechanical properties. Mechanical characterization of these scaffolds requires establishing the conditions of testing in regard to the conditions set in the bioreactor. The effects of different parameters used during mechanical testing on the collagen gels were evaluated in terms of mechanical and viscoelastic properties. Thus, a factorial experiment was adopted, and three relevant factors were considered: temperature (23°C or 37°C), hydration (aqueous saline solution or air), and mechanical preconditioning (with or without). Statistical analyses showed significant effects of these factors on the mechanical properties which were assessed by tensile tests as well as stress relaxation tests. The last tests provide a more consistent understanding of the gels' viscoelastic properties. Therefore, performing mechanical analyses on hydrogels requires setting an adequate environment in terms of temperature and aqueous saline solution as well as choosing the adequate test. PMID:22844285

  11. The Degradation of Mechanical Properties in Halloysite Nanoclay-Polyester Nanocomposites Exposed in Seawater Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shahneel Saharudin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyester based polymers are extensively used in aggressive marine environments; however, inadequate data is available on the effects of the seawater on the polyester based nanocomposites mechanical properties. This paper reports the effect of seawater absorption on the mechanical properties degradation of halloysite nanoclay-polyester nanocomposites. Results confirmed that the addition of halloysite nanoclay into polyester matrix was found to increase seawater uptake and reduce mechanical properties compared to monolithic polyester. The maximum decreases in microhardness, tensile and flexural properties, and impact toughness were observed in case of 1 wt% nanoclay. The microhardness decreased from 107 HV to 41.7 HV (61% decrease. Young’s modulus decreased from 0.6 GPa to 0.4 GPa (33% decrease. The flexural modulus decreased from 0.6 GPa to 0.34 GPa (43% decrease. The impact toughness dropped from 0.71 kJ/m2 to 0.48 kJ/m2 (32% decrease. Interestingly, the fracture toughness KIC increased with the addition of halloysite nanoclay due to the plasticization effect of the resin matrix. SEM images revealed the significant reduction in mechanical properties in case of 1 wt% reinforcement which is attributed to the degradation of the nanoclay-matrix interface influenced by seawater absorption and agglomeration of halloysite nanoclay.

  12. Synergistic effect of functionally active methacrylate polymer and ZnO nanoparticles on optical and dielectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilangovan, Pugazhenthi; Sakvai, Mohammed Safiullah; Kottur, Anver Basha

    2017-01-01

    A crucial need to design a functionally active polymer hybrid for the protection of material structure that are exposing to harmful Ultra Violet radiation (UV). In this paper a poly(pyridine-4-yl-methyl) methacrylate ZnO nanocomposite (PPyMMA/ZnO) was developed by in-situ solution polymerization. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed that the nanocomposite is homogeneous with good compatibility between the two counterparts. The morphological variation arises owing to the incorporation of OA-ZnO in the PPyMMA were observed by using electron microscope techniques. The thermal behaviour of PPyMMA and its ZnO nanocomposites were analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The dielectric properties of the polymer and its ZnO nanocomposites were studied over a wide range of temperature (30–300 °C) at frequency 100 KHz. An optical study was carried out to test the optical properties of PPyMMA/ZnO (2, 5 and 5%), which reveals that 2% ZnONPs loading exhibits an excellent UV shielding properties. - Highlights: • The PPyMMA/ZnO was prepared by in-situ solution polymerization. • The OA-ZnO were incorporated during the solution polymerization of PPyMMA. • The PPyMMA/ZnO nanocomposite exhibit an improved dielectric property. • The PPyMMA with OA-ZnO nanocomposite show an excellent UV-shielding.

  13. Synergistic effect of functionally active methacrylate polymer and ZnO nanoparticles on optical and dielectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilangovan, Pugazhenthi; Sakvai, Mohammed Safiullah; Kottur, Anver Basha, E-mail: kanverbasha@gmail.com

    2017-06-01

    A crucial need to design a functionally active polymer hybrid for the protection of material structure that are exposing to harmful Ultra Violet radiation (UV). In this paper a poly(pyridine-4-yl-methyl) methacrylate ZnO nanocomposite (PPyMMA/ZnO) was developed by in-situ solution polymerization. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed that the nanocomposite is homogeneous with good compatibility between the two counterparts. The morphological variation arises owing to the incorporation of OA-ZnO in the PPyMMA were observed by using electron microscope techniques. The thermal behaviour of PPyMMA and its ZnO nanocomposites were analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The dielectric properties of the polymer and its ZnO nanocomposites were studied over a wide range of temperature (30–300 °C) at frequency 100 KHz. An optical study was carried out to test the optical properties of PPyMMA/ZnO (2, 5 and 5%), which reveals that 2% ZnONPs loading exhibits an excellent UV shielding properties. - Highlights: • The PPyMMA/ZnO was prepared by in-situ solution polymerization. • The OA-ZnO were incorporated during the solution polymerization of PPyMMA. • The PPyMMA/ZnO nanocomposite exhibit an improved dielectric property. • The PPyMMA with OA-ZnO nanocomposite show an excellent UV-shielding.

  14. A parametric study of influence of material properties on car cabin environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokorny Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently the author presented the paper describing a car cabin heat load model for the prediction of the car cabin environment. The model allowed to simulate a transient behavior of the car cabin, i.e. radiant temperature of surfaces, air temperature and relative humidity. The model was developed in Dymola and was built on the basic principles of thermodynamics and heat balance equations. The model was validated by experiments performed on the Škoda Felicia during various operational conditions. In this paper the authors present a parametric study investigating influence of material properties on a car cabin environment. The Matlab version of the car cabin heat load model has been developed and used. The model was extended by simple graphical user interface and it was deployed into the stand alone executable application. The aim of this parametric study is to identify most important material properties and its effect on the cabin environment during specific operational conditions of car. By means of a sensitive analysis it can identified which material parameters have to be defined precisely and which parameters are not so important for the prediction of the air temperature inside cabin.

  15. Thermal Properties of Starch From New Corn Lines as Impacted by Environment and During Line Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenihan, Elizabeth M [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to further characterize exotic by adapted corn inbreds by studying the impact of environment on their starch thermal properties, and investigating the development of starch thermal properties during kernel maturation by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A method to expedite identification of unusual starch thermal traits was investigated by examining five corn kernels at a time, instead of one kernel, which the previous screening methods used. Corn lines with known thermal functions were blended with background starch (control) in ratios of unique starch to control starch, and analyzed by using DSC. Control starch was representative of typical corn starch. The values for each ratio within a mutant type were unique (α < 0.01) for most DSC measurements. These results supported the five-kernel method for rapidly screening large amounts of corn germplasm to identify unusual starch traits. The effects of 5 growing locations on starch thermal properties from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines were studied using DSC. The warmest location, Missouri, generally produced starch with greater gelatinization onset temperature (ToG), narrower range of gelatinization (RG), and greater enthalpy of gelatinization (ΔHG). The coolest location, Illinois, generally resulted in starch with lower ToG, wider RG, and lower ΔHG. Starch from the Ames 1 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Illinois, whereas starch from the Ames 2 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Missouri. The temperature at Ames 2 may have been warmer since it was located near a river; however, soil type and quality also were different. Final corn starch structure and function change during development and maturity. Thus, the changes in starch thermal properties during 5 stages of endosperm development from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines at two locations were

  16. Hygrothermal effect of salt water environments on mechanical properties of carbon/epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Young Eun; Yoon, Sung Ho [Kumoh Nat' l Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In this study, salt water immersion tests were experimentally performed for up to 12 months to investigate the hygrothermal effect of salt water environments on the mechanical properties of carbon/epoxy composites. The composites were manufactured by laminating prepregs composed of carbon plain woven fabric and epoxy resin. The specimens were subjected to temperatures of 35, 55, and 75 .deg. C while being exposed to the salt water environments. Mechanical test results showed that the tensile modulus and tensile strength decreased at a small rate, and the compressive modulus and compressive strength decreased at a relatively larger rate, as the exposure temperature and time increased. The rate of decrease in compressive strength became larger as the exposure temperature became higher. This is because a higher environmental temperature accelerates the salt water uptake; this, in turn, reduces the compressive strength more rapidly.

  17. Hygrothermal effect of salt water environments on mechanical properties of carbon/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Young Eun; Yoon, Sung Ho

    2012-01-01

    In this study, salt water immersion tests were experimentally performed for up to 12 months to investigate the hygrothermal effect of salt water environments on the mechanical properties of carbon/epoxy composites. The composites were manufactured by laminating prepregs composed of carbon plain woven fabric and epoxy resin. The specimens were subjected to temperatures of 35, 55, and 75 .deg. C while being exposed to the salt water environments. Mechanical test results showed that the tensile modulus and tensile strength decreased at a small rate, and the compressive modulus and compressive strength decreased at a relatively larger rate, as the exposure temperature and time increased. The rate of decrease in compressive strength became larger as the exposure temperature became higher. This is because a higher environmental temperature accelerates the salt water uptake; this, in turn, reduces the compressive strength more rapidly

  18. Effects of lithium environment on the fatigue properties of ferritic and austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Low-cycle fatigue data have been obtained on HT-9 alloy and Type 304 stainless steel at 755 K in a flowing lithium environment of controlled purity. The results show that the fatigue properties of these materials are strongly influenced by the concentration of nitrogen in lithium. For HT-9 alloy, the fatigue life in lithium containing 1000-1500 wppm nitrogen is a factor of 2 to 5 lower than that in lithium with 100-200 wppm nitrogen. The reduction in fatigue life in high-nitrogen lithium can be attributed to internal corrosive attack of the material. The specimens tested in high-nitrogen lithium show considerable surface corrosion, internal corrosive attack, secondary cracks, and partial intergranular fracture mode. This behavior is not observed in specimens tested either in low-nitrogen lithium or a sodium environment. (orig.)

  19. The effect of thermal treatment on the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, R.; Elliott, C.S.; Hwang, I.S.; Prybylowski, J.

    1993-05-01

    Alloy X-750 is a high strength, age hardenable nickel-base alloy used in light water nuclear reactors. The excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature strength of alloy X-750 make it suitable for use in a variety of structure components in both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. These applications involve exposure of highly stressed material to aqueous media. Operational stresses are subject to low frequency thermally induced fluctuations and high frequency flow induced fluctuations. In general, alloy X-750 has performed well in light water reactors. However, an economically significant number of components have failed unexpectedly due to localized forms of attack such as corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Thermal processing history is known to play a significant role in the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments. While thermal treatments have been developed recently to improve performance, in many cases the reason for improved performance remains unclear. Therefore, identification of the mechanisms responsible for the degradation of fracture properties in aqueous environments is necessary. As a corollary it is necessary to achieve an understanding of how thermal treatment influences microstructure and, in turn, how microstructure influences fracture properties in aqueous environments. This report discusses five thermal treatments which were studied: (1) SA-1 hr at 1093 degree C, (2) AH - 24 hr at 885 degree C + 20 hr at 704 degree C, (3) HTH - 1 hr at 1093 degree C + 20 hr at 704 degree C, (4) AHTH - 1 hr at 1093 degree C + 24 hr at 885 degree C + 20 hr at 704 degree C, and (5) HOA - 1 hr at 1093 degree C + 100 hrs at 760 degree C. Microstructural characterization of these materials was accomplished through the use of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy,scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffractometry

  20. Work environment impact scale: testing the psychometric properties of the Swedish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekbladh, Elin; Fan, Chia-Wei; Sandqvist, Jan; Hemmingsson, Helena; Taylor, Renée

    2014-01-01

    The Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS) is an assessment that focuses on the fit between a person and his or her work environment. It is based on Kielhofner's Model of Human Occupation and designed to gather information on how clients experience their work environment. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the WEIS assessment instrument. In total, 95 ratings on the 17-item WEIS were obtained from a sample of clients with experience of sick leave due to different medical conditions. Rasch analysis was used to analyze the data. Overall, the WEIS items together cohered to form a single construct of increasingly challenging work environmental factors. The hierarchical ordering of the items along the continuum followed a logical and expected pattern, and the participants were validly measured by the scale. The three occupational therapists serving as raters validly used the scale, but demonstrated a relatively high rater separation index, indicating differences in rater severity. The findings provide evidence that the Swedish version of the WEIS is a psychometrically sound assessment across diagnoses and occupations, which can provide valuable information about experiences of work environment challenges.

  1. Virtual Property Manager: Providing a Simulated Learning Environment in a New University Program of Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Carswell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates the experience that students have while accessing Virtual Property Manager (VPM, a Web-based simulation learning tool designed to introduce students to a new discipline being offered at the university – Residential Property Management. The VPM simulation was designed in part to develop student interest in the new program. Results indicate that this simple simulation device did make a notable impact on student interest. Additionally, student acceptance and self-reported impact differed significantly based upon the delivery context. Adding a competitive reward element to the simulation experience improved student's evaluation of the software and self-reported interest in the field. Results indicate that educational simulation evaluation, acceptance, and performance may often be substantially influenced by the delivery context, rather than simply the program itself. Developers may do well to focus "outside the box" of program content to promote audience-specific delivery environments.

  2. FY 2017-Influence of Sodium Environment on the Tensile Properties of Advanced Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on the understanding of the effects of sodium exposures on tensile properties of advanced alloy 709 in support of the design and operation of structural components in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). The report is a Level 3 deliverable in FY17 (M3AT-17AN1602093), under the Work Package AT-17AN160209, “Sodium Compatibility” performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Reactor Technologies Program. Three laboratory-size heats of Alloy 709 austenitic steel were investigated in liquid sodium environments at 550-650°C to understand its corrosion behaviour, microstructural evolution, and tensile properties. In addition, a commercial scale heat has been produced and hot-rolled into plates.

  3. Mechanical properties test program on structural materials in a sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1979-10-01

    This document describes in detail the ongoing and planned US Test program on the mechanical properties of sodium-exposed Type 316 austenitic stainless and Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steels. The test program is based on the Development Requirement Specifications (DRS) established by the DOE/Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) Program Office, the general need for the development of LMFBR structural-design criteria established by the Nuclear Systems Materials Handbook, and the need for a fundamental understanding of materials behavior in a sodium environment, which is generic to LMFBR systems. The planned test program is an extension of work based on current knowledge of sodium chemistry and the influence of sodium purity on the mechanical properties of structural materials

  4. Study The Properties and Weight Loss Degradation of The Blend LDPE/Cellulose in Soil Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair Jabbar Abdul Ameer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wider applications of polyethylene (PE in packaging and agriculture have raised serious issue of waste disposal and pollution. Therefore, it is necessary to raise its biodegradability by additives.In this study, we will add cellulose to low density polyethylene to prepare polymer blend have ability to degradation in soil environment.The samples were prepared by using twin screw extruder.LDPE and CELL have been mixing with different weight proportions, and studied their properties in order to determine its compliance with the required specifications to be able to be used biodegradable polymers. To improve the viability of decomposition PEG has been added to the resulting blend. Several tests were applied to identify those properties such as tensile,hardness, density and creep test. FTIR, digital microscope and SEM test acheved in order to determine the miscibility and blend morphology befor and after degradation.The results show that,the blend weight loss increase with increasing CELL percent.

  5. Tensile properties of V-Cr-Ti alloys after exposure in hydrogen-containing environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study has been initiated at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the performance of several V-Cr-Ti alloys after exposure to environments containing hydrogen at various partial pressures. The goal is to correlate the chemistry of the exposure environment with hydrogen uptake in the samples and its influence on the microstructure and tensile properties of the alloys. At present, the principal effort has focused on the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy of heat identified as BL-71; however other alloys (V-5Cr-5Ti alloy of heats BL-63, and T87, plus V-4Cr-4Ti alloy from General Atomics [GA]) are also being evaluated. Other variables of interest are the effect of initial grain size on the tensile behavior of the alloys. Experiments conducted on specimens of various V-Cr-Ti alloys exposed to pH 2 levels of 0.01 and 3 x 10 -6 torr showed negligible effect of H 2 on either maximum engineering stress or uniform and total elongation. However, uniform and total elongation decreased substantially when the alloys were exposed to 1.0 torr H 2 pressure. Preliminary data from sequential exposures of the materials to low-pO 2 and several low-pH 2 environments did not reveal an adverse effect on the maximum engineering stress or on uniform and total elongation. Further, tests in H 2 environments on specimens annealed at different temperatures showed that grain-size variation by a factor of ∼2 had little or no effect on tensile properties

  6. Sporulation environment influences spore properties in Bacillus: evidence and insights on underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressuire-Isoard, Christelle; Broussolle, Véronique; Carlin, Frédéric

    2018-05-17

    Bacterial spores are resistant to physical and chemical insults, which make them a major concern for public health and for industry. Spores help bacteria to survive extreme environmental conditions that vegetative cells cannot tolerate. Spore resistance and dormancy are important properties for applications in medicine, veterinary health, food safety, crop protection, and other domains. The resistance of bacterial spores results from a protective multilayered structure and from the unique composition of the spore core. The mechanisms of sporulation and germination, the first stage after breaking of dormancy, and organization of spore structure have been extensively studied in Bacillus species. This review aims to illustrate how far the structure, composition and properties of spores are shaped by the environmental conditions in which spores form. We look at the physiological and molecular mechanisms underpinning how sporulation media and environment deeply affect spore yield, spore properties like resistance to wet heat and physical and chemical agents, germination, and further growth. For example, spore core water content decreases as sporulation temperature increases, and resistance to wet heat increases. Controlling the fate of Bacillus spores is pivotal to controlling bacterial risks and process efficiencies in, for example, the food industry, and better control hinges on better understanding how sporulation conditions influence spore properties.

  7. Properties of protective oxide scales containing cerium on Incoloy 800H in oxidizing and sulfidizing environments. I. Constant-extension-rate study of mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Fransen, T.; Geerdink, Bert; Gellings, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of ceramic coatings containing cerium oxide, prepared by the sol-gel method and used to protect Incoloy 800H against aggressive environments, are reported. Deformation and cracking behavior in oxidizing and sulfidizing environments has been investigated by

  8. Estimation of Environment-Related Properties of Chemicals for Design of Sustainable Processes: Development of Group-Contribution+ (GC+) Property Models and Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this work is to develop group-contribution+ (GC+) method (combined group-contribution (GC) method and atom connectivity index (CI) method) based property models to provide reliable estimations of environment-related properties of organic chemicals together with uncert...

  9. COMBINED EFFECTS OF GALAXY INTERACTIONS AND LARGE-SCALE ENVIRONMENT ON GALAXY PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young

    2009-01-01

    We inspect the coupled dependence of physical parameters of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies on the small-scale (distance to and morphology of the nearest neighbor galaxy) and the large-scale (background density smoothed over 20 nearby galaxies) environments. The impacts of interaction on galaxy properties are detected at least out to the neighbor separation corresponding to the virial radius of galaxies, which is typically between 200 and 400 h -1 kpc for the galaxies in our sample. To detect these long-range interaction effects, it is crucial to divide galaxy interactions into four cases dividing the morphology of target and neighbor galaxies into early and late types. We show that there are two characteristic neighbor-separation scales where the galaxy interactions cause abrupt changes in the properties of galaxies. The first scale is the virial radius of the nearest neighbor galaxy r vir,nei . Many physical parameters start to deviate from those of extremely isolated galaxies at the projected neighbor separation r p of about r vir,nei . The second scale is at r p ∼ 0.05r vir,nei = 10-20 h -1 kpc, and is the scale at which the galaxies in pairs start to merge. We find that late-type neighbors enhance the star formation activity of galaxies while early-type neighbors reduce it, and that these effects occur within r vir,nei . The hot halo gas and cold disk gas must be participating in the interactions at separations less than the virial radius of the galaxy plus dark halo system. Our results also show that the role of the large-scale density in determining galaxy properties is minimal once luminosity and morphology are fixed. We propose that the weak residual dependence of galaxy properties on the large-scale density is due to the dependence of the halo gas property on the large-scale density.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure in an Iranian hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shokoohi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students’ perceptions of the educational environment are an important construct in assessing and enhancing the quality of medical training programs. Reliable and valid measurement, however, can be problematic – especially as instruments developed and tested in one culture are translated for use in another. Materials and method: This study sought to explore the psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM for use in an Iranian hospital training setting. We translated the instrument into Persian and ensured its content validity by back translation and expert review prior to administering it to 127 residents of Urmia University of Medical Science. Results: Overall internal consistency of the translated measure was good (a=0.94. Principal components analysis revealed five factors accounting for 52.8% of the variance. Conclusion: The Persian version of the PHEEM appears to be a reliable and potentially valid instrument for use in Iranian medical schools and may find favor in evaluating the educational environments of residency programs nationwide.

  11. Meteorological and Land Surface Properties Impacting Sea Breeze Extent and Aerosol Distribution in a Dry Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, Adele L.; van den Heever, Susan C.; Johnson, Jill S.

    2018-01-01

    The properties of sea breeze circulations are influenced by a variety of meteorological and geophysical factors that interact with one another. These circulations can redistribute aerosol particles and pollution and therefore can play an important role in local air quality, as well as impact remote sensing. In this study, we select 11 factors that have the potential to impact either the sea breeze circulation properties and/or the spatial distribution of aerosols. Simulations are run to identify which of the 11 factors have the largest influence on the sea breeze properties and aerosol concentrations and to subsequently understand the mean response of these variables to the selected factors. All simulations are designed to be representative of conditions in coastal sub tropical environments and are thus relatively dry, as such they do not support deep convection associated with the sea breeze front. For this dry sea breeze regime, we find that the background wind speed was the most influential factor for the sea breeze propagation, with the soil saturation fraction also being important. For the spatial aerosol distribution, the most important factors were the soil moisture, sea-air temperature difference, and the initial boundary layer height. The importance of these factors seems to be strongly tied to the development of the surface-based mixed layer both ahead of and behind the sea breeze front. This study highlights potential avenues for further research regarding sea breeze dynamics and the impact of sea breeze circulations on pollution dispersion and remote sensing algorithms.

  12. Frames as visual links between paintings and the museum environment: An analysis of statistical image properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eRedies

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Frames provide a visual link between artworks and their surround. We asked how image properties change as an observer zooms out from viewing a painting alone, to viewing the painting with its frame and, finally, the framed painting in its museum environment (museum scene. To address this question, we determined three higher-order image properties that are based on histograms of oriented luminance gradients. First, complexity was measured as the sum of the strengths of all gradients in the image. Second, we determined the self-similarity of histograms of the orientated gradients at different levels of spatial analysis. Third, we analyzed how much gradient strength varied across orientations (anisotropy. Results were obtained for three art museums that exhibited paintings from three major periods of Western art. In all three museums, the mean complexity of the frames was higher than that of the paintings or the museum scenes. Frames thus provide a barrier of complexity between the paintings and their exterior. By contrast, self-similarity and anisotropy values of images of framed paintings were intermediate between the images of the paintings and the museum scenes, i.e., the frames provided a transition between the paintings and their surround. We also observed differences between the three museums that may reflect modified frame usage in different art periods. For example, frames in the museum for 20th century art tended to be smaller and less complex than in the two other two museums that exhibit paintings from earlier art periods (13th-18th century and 19th century, respectively. Finally, we found that the three properties did not depend on the type of reproduction of the paintings (photographs in museums, scans from books or images from the Google Art Project. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the relation between frames and paintings by measuring physically defined, higher-order image properties.

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Perceived Wellness Culture and Environment Support Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Szalacha, Laura A; Amaya, Megan

    2018-05-01

    This study reports on the psychometric properties of the 11-item Perceived Wellness Culture and Environment Support Scale (PWCESS) and its relationship with employee healthy lifestyle beliefs and behaviors. Faculty and staff (N = 3959) at a large public university in the United States mid-west completed the PWCESS along with healthy lifestyle beliefs and behaviors scales. Data were randomly split into 2 halves to explore the PWCESS' validity and reliability and the second half to confirm findings. Principal components analysis indicated a unidimensional construct. The PWCESS was positively related to healthy lifestyle beliefs and behaviors supporting the scale's validity. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the unidimensional construct (Cronbach's α = .92). Strong evidence supports the validity and reliability of the PWCESS. Future use of this scale could guide workplace intervention strategies to improve organizational wellness culture and employee health outcomes.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of water in confined environments: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladovic, Martin; Bren, Urban; Urbic, Tomaž

    2018-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of Mercedes-Benz water in a crowded environment were performed. The simulated systems are representative of both composite, porous or sintered materials and living cells with typical matrix packings. We studied the influence of overall temperature as well as the density and size of matrix particles on water density, particle distributions, hydrogen bond formation and thermodynamic quantities. Interestingly, temperature and space occupancy of matrix exhibit a similar effect on water properties following the competition between the kinetic and the potential energy of the system, whereby temperature increases the kinetic and matrix packing decreases the potential contribution. A novel thermodynamic decomposition approach was applied to gain insight into individual contributions of different types of inter-particle interactions. This decomposition proved to be useful and in good agreement with the total thermodynamic quantities especially at higher temperatures and matrix packings, where higher-order potential-energy mixing terms lose their importance.

  15. Estimation of environment-related properties of chemicals for design of sustainable processes: development of group-contribution+ (GC+) property models and uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao; Kalakul, Sawitree; Sarup, Bent; Young, Douglas M; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-11-26

    The aim of this work is to develop group-contribution(+) (GC(+)) method (combined group-contribution (GC) method and atom connectivity index (CI) method) based property models to provide reliable estimations of environment-related properties of organic chemicals together with uncertainties of estimated property values. For this purpose, a systematic methodology for property modeling and uncertainty analysis is used. The methodology includes a parameter estimation step to determine parameters of property models and an uncertainty analysis step to establish statistical information about the quality of parameter estimation, such as the parameter covariance, the standard errors in predicted properties, and the confidence intervals. For parameter estimation, large data sets of experimentally measured property values of a wide range of chemicals (hydrocarbons, oxygenated chemicals, nitrogenated chemicals, poly functional chemicals, etc.) taken from the database of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and from the database of USEtox is used. For property modeling and uncertainty analysis, the Marrero and Gani GC method and atom connectivity index method have been considered. In total, 22 environment-related properties, which include the fathead minnow 96-h LC(50), Daphnia magna 48-h LC(50), oral rat LD(50), aqueous solubility, bioconcentration factor, permissible exposure limit (OSHA-TWA), photochemical oxidation potential, global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, acidification potential, emission to urban air (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental rural air (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental fresh water (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental seawater (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental natural soil (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), and emission to continental agricultural soil (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) have been modeled and analyzed. The application

  16. Ultrasonic techniques for measuring physical properties of fluids in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantea, Cristian

    Ultrasonic-based measurement techniques, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain, include a wide range of experimental methods for investigating physical properties of materials. This discussion is specifically focused on ultrasonic methods and instrumentation development for the determination of liquid properties at conditions typically found in subsurface environments (in the U.S., more than 80% of total energy needs are provided by subsurface energy sources). Such sensors require materials that can withstand harsh conditions of high pressure, high temperature and corrosiveness. These include the piezoelectric material, electrically conductive adhesives, sensor housings/enclosures, and the signal carrying cables, to name a few. A complete sensor package was developed for operation at high temperatures and pressures characteristic to geothermal/oil-industry reservoirs. This package is designed to provide real-time, simultaneous measurements of multiple physical parameters, such as temperature, pressure, salinity and sound speed. The basic principle for this sensor's operation is an ultrasonic frequency domain technique, combined with transducer resonance tracking. This multipurpose acoustic sensor can be used at depths of several thousand meters, temperatures up to 250 °C, and in a very corrosive environment. In the context of high precision measurement of sound speed, the determination of acoustic nonlinearity of liquids will also be discussed, using two different approaches: (i) the thermodynamic method, in which precise and accurate frequency domain sound speed measurements are performed at high pressure and high temperature, and (ii) a modified finite amplitude method, requiring time domain measurements of the second harmonic at room temperature. Efforts toward the development of an acoustic source of collimated low-frequency (10-150 kHz) beam, with applications in imaging, will also be presented.

  17. Anchoring ceria nanoparticles on graphene oxide and their radical scavenge properties under gamma irradiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Tao; Song, Li; Gong, Hao; Guo, Hu; Gao, Bing; Fan, Xiaoli; He, Jianping

    2017-06-28

    Polymer networks such as those of epoxy resin, as common protection materials, possess radiolytic oxidation degradation effects under gamma irradiation environment, which have a great accelerating effect on the ageing rate and severely limit their potential applications for metal protection in the nuclear industry. To overcome this, we report a simple scheme of anchoring crystalline ceria nanoparticles onto graphene sheets (CG) and incorporate it into the epoxy resin, followed by thermal polymerization to obtain CeO 2 /graphene-epoxy nanocomposite coating (CGNS). We had proven that graphene might act as "interwalls" in the epoxy matrix, which will result in space location-obstruct effect as well as absorb the radicals induced by γ-ray irradiation. Moreover, owing to the interconversion of cerium ions between their +3 and +4 states coupled with the formation of oxygen vacancy defects, electron spin resonance (ESR) detection shows that CeO 2 /graphene (CG) could act as a preferable radical scavenger and achieve better performance in trapping radicals than single graphene based composite. Electrochemical data strongly demonstrate that CeO 2 /graphene is capable of maintaining the anti-corrosion properties under gamma irradiation environment. Therefore, the designed hybrid CeO 2 /graphene-epoxy composite can be considered as potential candidates for protective coatings in nuclear industry.

  18. Prediction of the Fate of Organic Compounds in the Environment From Their Molecular Properties: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamy, Laure; Patureau, Dominique; Barriuso, Enrique; Bedos, Carole; Bessac, Fabienne; Louchart, Xavier; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Miege, Cecile; Benoit, Pierre

    2015-06-18

    A comprehensive review of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) allowing the prediction of the fate of organic compounds in the environment from their molecular properties was done. The considered processes were water dissolution, dissociation, volatilization, retention on soils and sediments (mainly adsorption and desorption), degradation (biotic and abiotic), and absorption by plants. A total of 790 equations involving 686 structural molecular descriptors are reported to estimate 90 environmental parameters related to these processes. A significant number of equations was found for dissociation process (pK a ), water dissolution or hydrophobic behavior (especially through the K OW parameter), adsorption to soils and biodegradation. A lack of QSAR was observed to estimate desorption or potential of transfer to water. Among the 686 molecular descriptors, five were found to be dominant in the 790 collected equations and the most generic ones: four quantum-chemical descriptors, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E HOMO ) and the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ), polarizability (α) and dipole moment (μ), and one constitutional descriptor, the molecular weight. Keeping in mind that the combination of descriptors belonging to different categories (constitutional, topological, quantum-chemical) led to improve QSAR performances, these descriptors should be considered for the development of new QSAR, for further predictions of environmental parameters. This review also allows finding of the relevant QSAR equations to predict the fate of a wide diversity of compounds in the environment.

  19. Antimicrobial properties and the influence of temperature on secondary metabolite production in cold environment soil fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogabaanu, U.; Weber, Jean-Frederic Faizal; Convey, Peter; Rizman-Idid, Mohammed; Alias, Siti Aisyah

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic and Antarctic share environmental extremes. To survive in such environments, microbes such as soil fungi need to compete with or protect themselves effectively from other soil microbiota and to obtain the often scarce nutrients available, and many use secondary metabolites to facilitate this. We therefore (i) screened for antimicrobial properties of cold-environment Arctic and Antarctic soil fungi, and (ii) identified changes in the secreted secondary metabolite profiles of a subset of these strains in response to temperature variation. A total of 40 polar soil fungal strains from King George Island, maritime Antarctic and Hornsund, Svalbard, High Arctic, were obtained from the Malaysian National Antarctic Research Centre culture collections. The plug assay technique was used to screen for antimicrobial potential against Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli). About 45% of the tested fungal strains showed antimicrobial activity against at least one tested microorganism. Three fungal isolates showed good bioactivity and were subjected to secondary metabolite profiling at different temperatures (4, 10, 15 and 28 °C). We observed a range of responses in fungal metabolite production when incubated at varying temperatures, confirming an influence of environmental conditions such as temperature on the production of secondary metabolites.

  20. Modeling of non-additive mixture properties using the Online CHEmical database and Modeling environment (OCHEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprisiu Ioana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu is a web-based platform that provides tools for automation of typical steps necessary to create a predictive QSAR/QSPR model. The platform consists of two major subsystems: a database of experimental measurements and a modeling framework. So far, OCHEM has been limited to the processing of individual compounds. In this work, we extended OCHEM with a new ability to store and model properties of binary non-additive mixtures. The developed system is publicly accessible, meaning that any user on the Web can store new data for binary mixtures and develop models to predict their non-additive properties. The database already contains almost 10,000 data points for the density, bubble point, and azeotropic behavior of binary mixtures. For these data, we developed models for both qualitative (azeotrope/zeotrope and quantitative endpoints (density and bubble points using different learning methods and specially developed descriptors for mixtures. The prediction performance of the models was similar to or more accurate than results reported in previous studies. Thus, we have developed and made publicly available a powerful system for modeling mixtures of chemical compounds on the Web.

  1. Investigation on the electrochemical properties and crack growth rates of stainless steels in BWR alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.; Hsu, T.Y.; Huang, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing pH of reactor water to mildly alkaline is considered as one of the mitigating water chemistry strategies to reduce the activity release of radioactive oxides and suppress the growth rate of stress corrosion cracking. However, only limited experimental data are currently available in the published literature, it is imperative to perform additional tests to verify the effectiveness of slightly alkaline reactor water. Because the electrochemical behavior and SCC are intricately related, this study will attempt to investigates the electrochemical properties and measures the crack growth rates (CGRs) of type 304 stainless steel (SS) in both normal water chemistry (200 ppb O 2 , neutral pH 25 ) and alkaline chemistry (200 ppb O 2 , pH 25 = 8.0). The additive for pH control is potassium hydroxide (KOH). The crack growth rate was monitored by reversing DC potential drop technique. The electrochemical measurements include AC impedance measurement and potential pulsing test to measure the repassivation behavior. The characteristics of electrochemical properties and its effect on stress corrosion crocking in BWR alkaline environments have been further examined. (author)

  2. Laboratory Studies of Charging Properties of Dust Grains in Astrophysical/Planetary Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper we focus on charging of individual micron/submicron dust grains by processes that include: (a) UV photoelectric emissions involving incident photon energies higher than the work function of the material and b) electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). It is well accepted that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. However, no viable models for calculation of the charging properties of individual micron size dust grains are available at the present time. Therefore, the photoelectric yields, and secondary electron emission yields of micron-size dust grains have to be obtained by experimental methods. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains. Our experimental results, obtained on individual, micron-size dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC), show that: (1) The measured photoelectric yields are substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a particle size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains; (2) dust charging by low energy electron impact is a complex process. Also, our measurements indicate that

  3. Investigation of creep rupture properties in air and He environments of alloy 617 at 800 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo-Gon, E-mail: wgkim@kaeri.re.k [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ekaputra, I.M.W.; Park, Jae-Young [Pukyong National University, Busan 608-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Creep rupture properties for Alloy 617 were investigated by a series of creep tests under different applied stresses in air and He environments at 800 °C. The creep rupture time in air and He environments exhibited almost similar life in a short rupture time. However, when the creep rupture time reaches above 3000 h, the creep life in the He environment reduced compared with those of the air environment. The creep strain rate in the He environment was a little faster than that in the air environment above 3000 h. The reduction of creep life in the He environment was due to the difference of various microstructure features such as the carbide depleted zone, oxidation structures, surface cracking, voids below the surface, and voids in the matrix in air and He environments. Alloy 617 followed Norton’s power law and the Monkman–Grant relationship well. As the stress decreased, the creep ductility decreased slightly. The thickness of the outer and internal oxide layers presented the trend of a parabolic increase with an increase in creep rupture time in both the air and He environments. The thickness in the He environment was found to be thicker than in the air environment, although pure helium gas of 99.999% was used in the present investigation. The differences in the oxide-layer thickness caused detrimental effects on the creep resistance, even in a low oxygen-containing He agent.

  4. Investigation of creep rupture properties in air and He environments of alloy 617 at 800 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Gon; Ekaputra, I.M.W.; Park, Jae-Young; Kim, Min-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Creep rupture properties for Alloy 617 were investigated by a series of creep tests under different applied stresses in air and He environments at 800 °C. The creep rupture time in air and He environments exhibited almost similar life in a short rupture time. However, when the creep rupture time reaches above 3000 h, the creep life in the He environment reduced compared with those of the air environment. The creep strain rate in the He environment was a little faster than that in the air environment above 3000 h. The reduction of creep life in the He environment was due to the difference of various microstructure features such as the carbide depleted zone, oxidation structures, surface cracking, voids below the surface, and voids in the matrix in air and He environments. Alloy 617 followed Norton’s power law and the Monkman–Grant relationship well. As the stress decreased, the creep ductility decreased slightly. The thickness of the outer and internal oxide layers presented the trend of a parabolic increase with an increase in creep rupture time in both the air and He environments. The thickness in the He environment was found to be thicker than in the air environment, although pure helium gas of 99.999% was used in the present investigation. The differences in the oxide-layer thickness caused detrimental effects on the creep resistance, even in a low oxygen-containing He agent.

  5. Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, A.D.; Turnbull, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the hydrocarbon resources of the North Sea has resulted in both offshore and onshore environmental repercussions, involving the existing physical attributes of the sea and seabed, the coastline and adjoining land. The social and economic repercussions of the industry were equally widespread. The dramatic and speedy impact of the exploration and exploitation of the northern North Sea resources in the early 1970s, on the physical resources of Scotland was quickly realised together with the concern that any environmental and social damage to the physical and social fabric should be kept to a minimum. To this end, a wide range of research and other activities by central and local government, and other interested agencies was undertaken to extend existing knowledge on the marine and terrestrial environments that might be affected by the oil and gas industry. The outcome of these activities is summarized in this paper. The topics covered include a survey of the marine ecosystems of the North Sea, the fishing industry, the impact of oil pollution on seabirds and fish stocks, the ecology of the Scottish coastline and the impact of the petroleum industry on a selection of particular sites. (author)

  6. Tensile properties of V-Cr-Ti alloys after exposure in helium and low-partial-pressure oxygen environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1997-01-01

    A test program is in progress to evaluate the effect of oxygen at low pO 2 on the tensile properties of V-(4-5)wt% Cr-(4-5)wt% Ti alloys. Some of the tensile specimens were precharged with oxygen at low pO 2 at 500 degrees C and reannealed in vacuum at 500 degrees C in environments with various pO 2 levels and subsequently tensile tested at room temperature. The preliminary results indicate that both approaches are appropriate for evaluating the effect of oxygen uptake on the tensile properties of the alloys. The data showed that in the relatively short-time tests conducted thus far, the maximum engineering stress slightly increased after oxygen exposure but the uniform and total elongation values exhibited significant decrease after exposure in oxygen-containing environments. The data for a specimen exposed to a helium environment were similar to those obtained in low pO 2 environments

  7. Effect of oxidizing environment on mechanical properties of molybdenum and TZM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.; Anderson, S.H.; Inouye, H.

    1978-10-01

    The effect of environment on mechanical properties of molybdenum and TZM was investigated in low-pressure (1.3-mPa) oxygen at 1150 0 C. Specimens of TZM picked up oxygen and lost carbon. The oxygen concentration increases linearly with exposure time, indicating that the chemisorption of oxygen molecules at the specimen surface, rather than bulk diffusion, controls the kinetics of oxygen absorption at 1150 0 C. Specimens of TZM increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility with increasing oxygen content. Exposed TZM loses its ductility at elevated temperatures at an oxygen level of 500 ppM. The embrittlement is due to the formation of zones or oxide precipitates, which harden the alloy and promote the brittle fracture associated with cleavage and grain-boundary separation. Unalloyed molybdenum responds to the oxidizing environment quite differently from TZM. The molybdenum (containing no active element such as Ti and Zr) showed no internal oxidation at 1150 0 C. Instead, our results indicate that a trace of oxygen penetrated into molybdenum through its grain boundaries. This penetration raises the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of molybdenum by 200 0 C lowers the ductility above 900 0 C. The ductility of oxygen-exposed molybdenum is virtually unaffected in the temperature range from 400 to 900 0 C. A ductility minimum (10%) is observed at 1350 0 C because of dynamic embrittlement effects; that is, diffusion of oxygen to grain boundaries or crack tips where high triaxial states of stress are generated during plastic deformation. This embrittlement can be totally eliminated by an increase in strain rate

  8. Relationships between the Raindrop Size Distribution and Properties of the Environment and Clouds Inferred from TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, Stephen Joseph; Kummerow, Christian; Elsaesser, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Variability in the raindrop sized distribution (DSD) has long been recognized as a source of uncertainty in relationships between radar reflectivity Z and rain rate R. In this study, we analyze DSD retrievals from two years of data gathered by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and processed with a combined radar-radiometer retrieval algorithm over the global oceans equatorward of 35?. Numerous variables describing properties of each reflectivity profile, large-scale organization, and the background environment are examined for relationships to the reflectivity-normalized median drop diameter, epsilonDSD. In general, we find that higher freezing levels and relative humidities are associated with smaller epsilonDSD. Within a given environment, the mesoscale organization of precipitation and the vertical profile of reflectivity are associated with DSD characteristics. In the tropics, the smallest epsilonDSD values are found in large but shallow convective systems, where warm rain formation processes are thought to be predominant, whereas larger sizes are found in the stratiform regions of organized deep convection. In the extratropics, the largest epsilonDSD values are found in the scattered convection that occurs when cold, dry continental air moves over the much warmer ocean after the passage of a cold front. The geographical distribution of the retrieved DSDs is consistent with many of the observed regional Z-R relationships found in the literature as well as discrepancies between the TRMM radar-only and radiometer-only precipitation products. In particular, mid-latitude and tropical regions near land tend to have larger drops for a given reflectivity, whereas the smallest drops are found in the eastern Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  9. The flow properties of axoplasm in a defined chemical environment: influence of anions and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinson, K A; Baker, P F

    1979-08-31

    The flow properties of axoplasm have been studied in a defined chemical environment. Axoplasm extruded from squid giant axons was introduced into porous cellulose acetate tubes of diameter roughly equal to that of the original axon. Passage of axoplasm along the tube rapidly coated the tube walls with a layer of protein. By measuring the rate of low back and forth along the tube, the rheological properties of the axoplasm plug were investigated at a range of pressures and in a variety of media. Axoplasm behaves as a classical Bingham body the motion of which can be characterized by a yield stress (theta) and a plastic viscosity (eta p). In a potassium methanesulphonate medium containing 65 nM free Ca2+, theta averaged 109 +/- 46 dyn/cm2 and eta p1 146 +/- 83 P. These values were little affected by ATP, COLCHICINE, CYTOCHOLASIN B or by replacing K by Na but were sensitive to the anion composition of the medium. The effectiveness of different anions at reducing theta and eta p1 was in the order SCN greater than I greater then Br greater than Cl greater than methanesulphonate. Theta and eta p1 were also drastically reduced by increasing the ionized Ca. This effect required millimolar amounts of Ca, was unaffected by the presence of ATP and was irreversible. It could be blocked by the protease inhibitor TLCK. E.p.r. measurements showed that within the matrix of the axoplasm gel there is a watery space that is largely unaffected by anions or calcium.

  10. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  11. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Swanston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Produced from incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel in the absence of oxygen, black carbon (BC is the collective term for a range of carbonaceous substances encompassing partly charred plant residues to highly graphitized soot. Depending on its form, condition of origin and storage (from the atmosphere to the geosphere, and surrounding environmental conditions, BC can influence the environment at local, regional and global scales in different ways. In this paper, we review and synthesize recent findings and discussions on the nature of these different forms of BC and their impacts, particularly in relation to pollution and climate change. We start by describing the different types of BCs and their mechanisms of formation. To elucidate their pollutant sorption properties, we present some models involving polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic carbon. Subsequently, we discuss the stability of BC in the environment, summarizing the results of studies that showed a lack of chemical degradation of BC in soil and those that exposed BC to severe oxidative reactions to degrade it. After a brief overview of BC extraction and measurement methods and BC use for source attribution studies, we reflect upon its significance in the environment, first by going over a theory that it could represent parts of what is called the ‘missing sink’ of carbon in global carbon cycle models. Elaborating upon the relationship of BC with polycyclic hydrocarbons, we show its significance for the sorption and transport of pollutants. A description of pulmonary-respiratory health effects of soot BC inhalation is followed by a discussion on its impact on climate and climate change. We explain how soot BC acts as a global warming agent through light (and heat absorption and how it reduces the snow’s albedo and promotes its uncharacteristic thawing. On a more positive note, we conclude this review by illustrating recent observations and simulations of how

  12. Assessment of Mechanical Properties and Damage of High Performance Concrete Subjected to Magnesium Sulfate Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Cang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate attack is one of the most important problems affecting concrete structures, especially magnesium sulfate attack. This paper presents an investigation on the mechanical properties and damage evolution of high performance concrete (HPC with different contents of fly ash exposure to magnesium sulfate environment. The microstructure, porosity, mass loss, dimensional variation, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength of HPC were investigated at various erosion times up to 392 days. The ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV propagation in HPC at different erosion time was determined by using ultrasonic testing technique. A relationship between damage and UPV of HPC was derived according to damage mechanics, and a correlation between the damage of HPC and erosion time was obtained eventually. The results indicated that (1 the average increasing amplitude of porosity for HPCs was 34.01% before and after exposure to magnesium sulfate solution; (2 the damage evolution of HPCs under sulfate attack could be described by an exponential fitting; (3 HPC containing 20% fly ash had the strongest resistance to magnesium sulfate attack.

  13. Fogs: Physical Basis, Characteristic Properties, and Impacts on the Environment and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pérez-Díaz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a selective overview of natural fogs in terms of fog types, forms and states of occurrence, physical, micro-physical, chemical and dynamic properties, basic characterizing parameters, etc. In focus are related achievements and contributions reported mainly during the last decade and a half, as a result of both laboratory studies and field observations. Processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation are analyzed in the aspects of condensation, nuclei diversity and specifics, as related to the activation, growth and deposition of fog droplets. The effect is highlighted of the water vapor’s partial pressure on the surface tension of the liquid water–air interface and the freezing point of the water droplets. Some problems and aspects of fog modeling, parameterization, and forecasting are outlined and discussed on the examples of newly developed relevant 1D/3D theoretical models. Important issues of fog impacts on the air quality, ecosystems, water basins, societal life, and human health are also addressed and discussed, particularly in cases of anthropogenically modified (chemical, radioactive, etc. fogs. In view of reducing the possible negative effects of fogs, conclusions are drawn concerning the new demands and challenges to fog characterization imposed by the changing natural and social environment and the needs for new data on and approaches to more adequate observations of fog-related events.

  14. Cancer: an emergent property of disturbed resource-rich environments? Ecology meets personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, Hugo; Arnal, Audrey; Vittecoq, Marion; Daoust, Simon P; Ujvari, Beata; Jacqueline, Camille; Tissot, Tazzio; Ewald, Paul; Gatenby, Robert A; King, Kayla C; Bonhomme, François; Brodeur, Jacques; Renaud, François; Solary, Eric; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    For an increasing number of biologists, cancer is viewed as a dynamic system governed by evolutionary and ecological principles. Throughout most of human history, cancer was an uncommon cause of death and it is generally accepted that common components of modern culture, including increased physiological stresses and caloric intake, favor cancer development. However, the precise mechanisms for this linkage are not well understood. Here, we examine the roles of ecological and physiological disturbances and resource availability on the emergence of cancer in multicellular organisms. We argue that proliferation of 'profiteering phenotypes' is often an emergent property of disturbed, resource-rich environments at all scales of biological organization. We review the evidence for this phenomenon, explore it within the context of malignancy, and discuss how this ecological framework may offer a theoretical background for novel strategies of cancer prevention. This work provides a compelling argument that the traditional separation between medicine and evolutionary ecology remains a fundamental limitation that needs to be overcome if complex processes, such as oncogenesis, are to be completely understood.

  15. Instruments evaluating the quality of the clinical learning environment in nursing education: A systematic review of psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansutti, Irene; Saiani, Luisa; Grassetti, Luca; Palese, Alvisa

    2017-03-01

    The clinical learning environment is fundamental to nursing education paths, capable of affecting learning processes and outcomes. Several instruments have been developed in nursing education, aimed at evaluating the quality of the clinical learning environments; however, no systematic review of the psychometric properties and methodological quality of these studies has been performed to date. The aims of the study were: 1) to identify validated instruments evaluating the clinical learning environments in nursing education; 2) to evaluate critically the methodological quality of the psychometric property estimation used; and 3) to compare psychometric properties across the instruments available. A systematic review of the literature (using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines) and an evaluation of the methodological quality of psychometric properties (using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments guidelines). The Medline and CINAHL databases were searched. Eligible studies were those that satisfied the following criteria: a) validation studies of instruments evaluating the quality of clinical learning environments; b) in nursing education; c) published in English or Italian; d) before April 2016. The included studies were evaluated for the methodological quality of the psychometric properties measured and then compared in terms of both the psychometric properties and the methodological quality of the processes used. The search strategy yielded a total of 26 studies and eight clinical learning environment evaluation instruments. A variety of psychometric properties have been estimated for each instrument, with differing qualities in the methodology used. Concept and construct validity were poorly assessed in terms of their significance and rarely judged by the target population (nursing students). Some properties were rarely considered (e.g., reliability, measurement error

  16. Anomalies in the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of correlated ions in complex molecular environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2017-11-01

    Emergent statistical attributes, and therefore the equations of state, of an assembly of interacting charge carriers embedded within a complex molecular environment frequently exhibit a variety of anomalies, particularly in the high-density (equivalently, the concentration) regime, which are not well understood, because they do not fall under the low-concentration phenomenologies of Debye-Hückel-Onsager and Poisson-Nernst-Planck, including their variants. To go beyond, we here use physical concepts and mathematical tools from quantum scattering theory, transport theory with the Stosszahlansatz of Boltzmann, and classical electrodynamics (Lorentz gauge) and obtain analytical expressions both for the average and the frequency-wave vector-dependent longitudinal and transverse current densities, diffusion coefficient, and the charge density, and therefore the analytical expressions for (a) the chemical potential, activity coefficient, and the equivalent conductivity for strong electrolytes and (b) the current-voltage characteristics for ion-transport processes in complex molecular environments. Using a method analogous to the notion of Debye length and thence the electrical double layer, we here identify a pair of characteristic length scales (longitudinal and the transverse), which, being wave vector and frequency dependent, manifestly exhibit nontrivial fluctuations in space-time. As a unifying theme, we advance a quantity (inverse length dimension), gscat(a ), which embodies all dynamical interactions, through various quantum scattering lengths, relevant to molecular species a, and the analytical behavior which helps us to rationalize the properties of strong electrolytes, including anomalies, in all concentration regimes. As an example, the behavior of gscat(a ) in the high-concentration regime explains the anomalous increase of the Debye length with concentration, as seen in a recent experiment on electrolyte solutions. We also put forth an extension of the

  17. On thermal properties of hard rocks as a host environment of an underground thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, L.; Hladky, R.; Broz, M.; Novak, P.; Lachman, V.; Sosna, K.; Zaruba, J.; Metelkova, Z.; Najser, J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing focus on environmentally friendly technologies waste heat recycling became an important issue. Under certain circumstances subsurface environment could be utilized to accommodate relatively large quantity of heat. Industrial waste heat produced during warm months can be stored in an underground thermal energy storage (UTES) and used when needed. It is however a complex task to set up a sustainable UTES for industrial scale. Number of parameters has to be studied and evaluated by means of thermohydromechanical and chemical coupling (THMC) before any UTES construction. Thermal characteristics of various rocks and its stability under thermal loading are amongst the most essential. In the Czech Republic study two complementary projects THMC processes during an UTES operation. The RESEN project (www.resen.cz) employs laboratory tests and experiments to characterise thermal properties of hard rocks in the Bohemian Massif. Aim of the project is to point out the most suitable rock environment in the Bohemian Massif for moderate to ultra-high temperature UTES construction (Sanyal, 2005). The VITA project (www.geology.cz/mokrsko) studies THM coupling in non-electrical temperature UTES using long term in-situ experiment. In both projects thermal properties of rocks were studied. Thermal conductivity and capacity were measured on rock samples. In addition an influence of increasing temperature and moisture content was considered. Ten hard rocks were investigated. The set included two sandstones, two ignibrites, a melaphyr, a syenite, two granites, a gneiss and a serpentinite. For each rock there were measured thermal conductivity and capacity of at least 54 dried samples. Subsequently, the samples were heated up to 380°C in 8 hours and left to cool down. Thermal characteristics were measured during the heating period and after the sample reached room temperature. Heating and cooling cycle was repeated 7 to 10 times to evaluate possible UTES-like degradation of

  18. Creep and fatigue properties of Incoloy 800H in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Epel, L.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanical test program to assess the effects of a simulated HTGR helium environment on the fatigue and creep properties of Incoloy 800H and other primary-circuit metals is described. The emphasis and the objectives of this work are directed toward obtaining information to assess the integrity and safety of an HTGR throughout its service life. The helium test environment selected for study contained 40 μ atm H 2 O, 200 μ atm H 2 , 40 μ atm CO, 10 μ atm CO 2 , and 20 μ atm CH 4 . It is believed that this ''wet'' environment simulates that which could exist in a steam-cycle HTGR containing some leaking steam-generator tubes. A recirculating helium loop operating at about 4 psi in which impurities can be maintained at a constant level, has been constructed to supply the desired environment for fatigue and creep testing

  19. Large-Scale Environment Properties of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies at z < 0.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvelä, Emilia [Metsähovi Radio Observatory, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Department of Electronics and Nanoengineering, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Lähteenmäki, A. [Metsähovi Radio Observatory, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Department of Electronics and Nanoengineering, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Tartu Observatory, Tõravere (Estonia); Lietzen, H., E-mail: emilia.jarvela@aalto.fi [Tartu Observatory, Tõravere (Estonia)

    2017-11-30

    The large-scale environment is believed to affect the evolution and intrinsic properties of galaxies. It offers a new perspective on narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) which have not been extensively studied in this context before. We study a large and diverse sample of 960 NLS1 galaxies using a luminosity-density field constructed using Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We investigate how the large-scale environment is connected to the properties of NLS1 galaxies, especially their radio loudness. Furthermore, we compare the large-scale environment properties of NLS1 galaxies with other active galactic nuclei (AGN) classes, for example, other jetted AGN and broad-line Seyfert 1 (BLS1) galaxies, to shed light on their possible relations. In general NLS1 galaxies reside in less dense large-scale environments than any of our comparison samples, thus supporting their young age. The average luminosity-density and distribution to different luminosity-density regions of NLS1 sources is significantly different compared to BLS1 galaxies. This contradicts the simple orientation-based unification of NLS1 and BLS1 galaxies, and weakens the hypothesis that BLS1 galaxies are the parent population of NLS1 galaxies. The large-scale environment density also has an impact on the intrinsic properties of NLS1 galaxies; the radio loudness increases with the increasing luminosity-density. However, our results suggest that the NLS1 population is indeed heterogeneous, and that a considerable fraction of them are misclassified. We support a suggested description that the traditional classification based on the radio loudness should be replaced with the division to jetted and non-jetted sources.

  20. Properties of fly ashes in wet environment; Flygaskors egenskaper i vaat miljoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemssen, M. von; Lindstroem, N.; Hedman, K.; Svensson, M.

    2009-03-15

    This report describes how inorganic elements are mobilised from fly ashes that are placed under water, i.e. what are the properties and processes that governs the mobilisation. This knowledge may serve as basic data for decision making when fly ashes from e.g. bio-, industrial- and municipal solid wastes are to be used in civil engineering applications in wet environments. The composition of ashes varies in a vide range of concentrations and depends on the fuel and the type of incinerator. The main contents of fly ashes are calcium oxide, silicic acid and aluminium compounds. Several environmental hazardous elements are also present in varying concentrations. The pH of fishily is often very high. A number of chemical processes occur when flyashes is mixed with water. When the pH-value increases, mainly due to hydratisation of calcium oxide (CaO), many metals will precipitate as metal hydroxides. The objective of this study was to, within a rather short time period (8 month), describe the processes governing mobilisation of different elements from fly ashes placed under water. The work included chemical equilibrium modelling with PHREEQC, the model was used to determine what minerals may control solubility of different elements. Three fly ashes were used for the study, one flyash from industrial- and municipal waste with no CaO or ammonia added, one flyash from municipal waste with CaO and ammonia added and one fly ash from solid biofuels with chalk added. The fly ashes, ca 300 kg, was mixed with water in 1000 l plastic containers and filled with water. Two batches per flyash were used; i) in the first batch surplus water were not replaced, ii) in the second batch the surplus water was replaced with fresh water five times during the test. Measured pH-values in the batches with industrial and municipal waste were stabilised at a pH-value around 9.5 indicating carbonation is complete. The pH-values in the bio flyash were higher. Four categories of elements were

  1. Effects of sodium environment on the mechanical properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    Mechanical property data on isothermally annealed, thermally aged, and sodium-exposed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel are analyzed to evaluate the influence of the sodium environment as well as the effects of the microstructural and compositional changes that occur in the steel during long-term exposure to sodium. Correlations are developed to predict the environmental effects on tensile, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. The results indicate that at temperatures <823 K (550 deg. C), degradation of mechanical properties is essentially due to thermal aging. Loss of carbon from the steel reduces both the tensile and creep-rupture strength, but has little or no effect on the fatigue properties. The cyclic properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium are superior to those in air. The creep-fatigue behaviour in sodium is significantly different from that in an air environment. The creep-fatigue data are analyzed using the interactive damage rate equations to predict the time-dependent fatigue bahaviour of isothermally annealed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. (author)

  2. Effects of sodium environment on the mechanical properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    1983-09-01

    Mechanical property data on isothermally annealed, thermally aged, and sodium-exposed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel are analyzed to evaluate the influence of the sodium environment as well as the effects of the microstructural and compositional changes that occur in the steel during long-term exposure to sodium. Correlations are developed to predict the environmental effects on tensile, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. The results indicate that at temperatures 0 C), degradation of mechanical properties is essentially due to thermal aging. Loss of carbon from the steel reduces both the tensile and creep-rupture strength, but has little or no effect on the fatigue properties. The cyclic properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium are superior to those in air. The creep-fatigue behavior in sodium is significantly different from that in an air environment. The creep-fatigue data are analyzed using the interactive damage rate equations to predict the time-dependent fatigue behavior of isothermally annealed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. 15 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  3. Effect of operating conditions and environment on properties of materials of PWR type nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.

    1987-01-01

    Operating reliability and service life of PWR type nuclear power plants are discussed with respect to the material properties of the plant components. The effects of the operating environment on the material properties and the methods of their determination are characterized. Discussed are core materials, such as fuel, its cladding and regulating rod materials, and the materials of pipes, steam generators and condensers. The advances in the production of pressure vessel materials and their degradation during operation are treated in great detail. (Z.M.)

  4. Tensile properties of V-Cr-Ti alloys after exposure in helium and low-partial-pressure oxygen environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A test program is in progress to evaluate the effect of oxygen at low pO{sub 2} on the tensile properties of V-(4-5)wt% Cr-(4-5)wt% Ti alloys. Some of the tensile specimens were precharged with oxygen at low pO{sub 2} at 500{degrees}C and reannealed in vacuum at 500{degrees}C in environments with various pO{sub 2} levels and subsequently tensile tested at room temperature. The preliminary results indicate that both approaches are appropriate for evaluating the effect of oxygen uptake on the tensile properties of the alloys. The data showed that in the relatively short-time tests conducted thus far, the maximum engineering stress slightly increased after oxygen exposure but the uniform and total elongation values exhibited significant decrease after exposure in oxygen-containing environments. The data for a specimen exposed to a helium environment were similar to those obtained in low pO{sub 2} environments.

  5. Effects of electron irradiation in space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qi; Chen, Ping; Gao, Yu; Ma, Keming; Lu, Chun; Xiong, Xuhai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Electron irradiation decreased the storage modulus finally. •T g decreased first and then increased and finally decreased. •The thermal stability was reduced and then improved and finally decreased. •The changing trend of flexural strength and ILSS are consistent. -- Abstract: The effects of electron irradiation in simulated space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of high performance carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites were investigated. The dynamic mechanical properties of the composites exposed to different fluences of electron irradiation were evaluated by Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermogravimetric analysis was applied to investigate the changes in thermal stability of the resin matrix after exposure to electron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). The results indicated that electron irradiation in high vacuum had an impact on thermal and mechanical properties of CF/BMI composites, which depends on irradiation fluence. At lower irradiation fluences less than 5 × 10 15 cm −2 , the dynamic storage modulus, cross-linking degree, thermal stability and mechanical properties that were determined by a competing effect between chain scission and cross-linking process, decreased firstly and then increased. While at higher fluences beyond 5 × 10 15 cm −2 , the chain scission process was dominant and thus led to the degradation in thermal and mechanical properties of the composites

  6. INTEGRATIVE PROPERTIES OF LIBRARY FUNCTIONS: IMPLEMENTATION IN THE EDUCATIONAL ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Л. Бірюкова

    2017-02-01

    In our opinion, the use of distance education programs primarily to build interaction of educational and library establishments in the electronic environment. To achieve this goal, through the interaction of the system Library Education created and signed to the practice of teaching subjects at the Documentation and information activities department Odessa National Polytechnic University methodological development, there are student groups whose work promotes the assimilation of theoretical material in practice, just in the information institution, adapting to the professional environment, provided the possibility of passing the full production and pre-diploma practice.

  7. Disentangling above- and below-ground facilitation drivers in arid environments: the role of soil microorganisms, soil properties and microhabitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Yudi M; Armas, Cristina; Hortal, Sara; Casanoves, Fernando; Pugnaire, Francisco I

    2017-12-01

    Nurse plants promote establishment of other plant species by buffering climate extremes and improving soil properties. Soil biota plays an important role, but an analysis to disentangle the effects of soil microorganisms, soil properties and microclimate on facilitation is lacking. In three microhabitats (gaps, small and large Retama shrubs), we placed six microcosms with sterilized soil, two per soil origin (i.e. from each microhabitat). One in every pair received an alive, and the other a sterile, inoculum from its own soil. Seeds of annual plants were sown into the microcosms. Germination, survival and biomass were monitored. Soil bacterial communities were characterized by pyrosequencing. Germination in living Retama inoculum was nearly double that of germination in sterile inoculum. Germination was greater under Retama canopies than in gaps. Biomass was up to three times higher in nurse than in gap soils. Soil microorganisms, soil properties and microclimate showed a range of positive to negative effects on understory plants depending on species identity and life stage. Nurse soil microorganisms promoted germination, but the effect was smaller than the positive effects of soil properties and microclimate under nurses. Nurse below-ground environment (soil properties and microorganisms) promoted plant growth and survival more than nurse microhabitat. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. The Degradation of Mechanical Properties in Halloysite Nano clay-Polyester Nano composites Exposed in Seawater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharudin, M.S.; Saharudin, M. Sh.; Wei, J.; Shyha, I.; Inam, F.

    2016-01-01

    Polyester based polymers are extensively used in aggressive marine environments; however, inadequate data is available on the effects of the seawater on the polyester based nano composites mechanical properties. This paper reports the effect of seawater absorption on the mechanical properties degradation of halloysite nano clay-polyester nano composites. Results confirmed that the addition of halloysite nano clay into polyester matrix was found to increase seawater uptake and reduce mechanical properties compared to monolithic polyester. The maximum decreases in microhardness, tensile and flexural properties, and impact toughness were observed in case of 1 wt% nano clay. The microhardness decreased from 107 HV to 41.7 HV (61% decrease). Young s modulus decreased from 0.6 GPa to 0.4 GPa (33% decrease). The flexural modulus decreased from 0.6 GPa to 0.34 GPa (43% decrease). The impact toughness dropped from 0.71 kJ/m"2 to 0.48 kJ/m"2 (32% decrease). Interestingly, the fracture toughnessκ_1C increased with the addition of halloysite nano clay due to the plasticization effect of the resin matrix. SEM images revealed the significant reduction in mechanical properties in case of 1 wt% reinforcement which is attributed to the degradation of the nano clay-matrix interface influenced by seawater absorption and agglomeration of halloysite nano clay.

  9. E. coli Surface Properties Differ between Stream Water and Sediment Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Liao, Chunyu; Thompson, Michael L; Soupir, Michelle L; Jarboe, Laura R; Dixon, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism in fresh water has led to numerous studies focusing on cell properties and transport behavior. However, previous studies have been unable to assess if differences in E. coli cell surface properties and genomic variation are associated with different environmental habitats. In this study, we investigated the variation in characteristics of E. coli obtained from stream water and stream bottom sediments. Cell properties were measured for 77 genomically different E. coli strains (44 strains isolated from sediments and 33 strains isolated from water) under common stream conditions in the Upper Midwestern United States: pH 8.0, ionic strength 10 mM and 22°C. Measured cell properties include hydrophobicity, zeta potential, net charge, total acidity, and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition. Our results indicate that stream sediment E. coli had significantly greater hydrophobicity, greater EPS protein content and EPS sugar content, less negative net charge, and higher point of zero charge than stream water E. coli . A significant positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and EPS protein for stream sediment E. coli but not for stream water E. coli . Additionally, E. coli surviving in the same habitat tended to have significantly larger (GTG) 5 genome similarity. After accounting for the intrinsic impact from the genome, environmental habitat was determined to be a factor influencing some cell surface properties, such as hydrophobicity. The diversity of cell properties and its resulting impact on particle interactions should be considered for environmental fate and transport modeling of aquatic indicator organisms such as E. coli .

  10. E. coli Surface Properties Differ between Stream Water and Sediment Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism in fresh water has led to numerous studies focusing on cell properties and transport behavior. However, previous studies have been unable to assess if differences in E. coli cell surface properties and genomic variation are associated with different environmental habitats. In this study, we investigated the variation in characteristics of E. coli obtained from stream water and stream bottom sediments. Cell properties were measured for 77 genomically different E. coli strains (44 strains isolated from sediments and 33 strains isolated from water under common stream conditions in the Upper Midwestern United States: pH 8.0, ionic strength 10mM and 22˚C. Measured cell properties include hydrophobicity, zeta potential, net charge, total acidity and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS composition. Our results indicate that stream sediment E. coli had significantly greater hydrophobicity, greater EPS protein content and EPS sugar content, less negative net charge, and higher point of zero charge than stream water E. coli. A significant positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and EPS protein for stream sediment E. coli but not for stream water E. coli. Additionally, E. coli surviving in the same habitat tended to have significantly larger (GTG5 genome similarity. After accounting for the intrinsic impact from the genome, environmental habitat was determined to be a factor influencing some cell surface properties, such as hydrophobicity. The diversity of cell properties and its resulting impact on particle interactions should be considered for environmental fate and transport modeling of aquatic indicator organisms such as E. coli.

  11. Creep properties of superalloys for the HTGR in impure helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, H.; Nakanishi, T.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes creep behaviors of two heat resistant alloys, Hastelloy X and Incoloy 800, in helium environments of the HTGR. In impure helium environments, these alloys are susceptible to carburization and oxidization. We have investigated these effects separately, and related them to the creep behaviors of the alloys. Experiments were carried out at 900 0 C both in helium and in air. Carburization results in decrease of secondary creep strain rate and delay of tertiary creep initiation. Oxidization caused decrease in tertiary creep strain rate of Hastelloy X, but did not that of Incoloy 800. Enhancement in tertiary creep strain rate of Hastelloy X in a very weakly oxidizing environment was confirmed in creep crack growth experiment using notched plate specimens. The rupture time of Hastelloy X in helium was short when compared with in air. Stress versus rupture time curves for both environments were parallel up to 5000 hours test, and a ratio of rupture stress in helium to that in air was about 0.9. In case of Incoloy 800, rupture time in helium was markedly prolonged as compared with that in air. (orig.)

  12. System and method of self-properties for an autonomous and automatic computer environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments self health/urgency data and environment health/urgency data may be transmitted externally from an autonomic element. Other embodiments may include transmitting the self health/urgency data and environment health/urgency data together on a regular basis similar to the lub-dub of a heartbeat. Yet other embodiments may include a method for managing a system based on the functioning state and operating status of the system, wherein the method may include processing received signals from the system indicative of the functioning state and the operating status to obtain an analysis of the condition of the system, generating one or more stay alive signals based on the functioning status and the operating state of the system, transmitting the stay-alive signal, transmitting self health/urgency data, and transmitting environment health/urgency data. Still other embodiments may include an autonomic element that includes a self monitor, a self adjuster, an environment monitor, and an autonomic manager.

  13. The Psychometric Properties and the Development of the Indicators of Quality Nursing Work Environments in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Huang, Hsiu-Ying

    2016-03-01

    The nursing shortage in medical institutions in Taiwan averaged 9% in 2012, considerably higher than the 5% indicated in the literature. As a result, many hospitals have been forced to close wards or reduce beds. Despite the acute need, the percentage of registered nurses who are employed as nurses in Taiwan (60.4%) is considerably lower than those in Canada or the United States. This low rate may be because of the poor working environment for nurses in Taiwan. This study aimed to develop a set of nursing work environment quality indicators for Taiwan and to test the reliability and validity of the resulting survey tool. Multiple methods were used in this study. In Phase 1, we organized an expert panel, reviewed the literature, and conducted seven rounds of expert panel discussion and six focus group discussions with nursing directors. The goal was to draft indicators representing a quality nursing work environment to fit current conditions in Taiwan. In Phase 2, we conducted an expert review for content validity, held three public hearings, and conducted a survey. Four hundred twenty-seven questionnaires were sent out, with 381 returned. The goal was to test the content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency reliability. The study produced a set of indicators of a quality nursing work environment with eight dimensions and 65 items. The content validity index for importance and suitability dimensions were 1.0, whereas the internal consistency was 0.91. The eight dimensions were safe practice environment (16 items), quality and quantity of staff (four items), salary and welfare (seven items), professional specialization and teamwork (seven items), work simplification (five items), informatics (five items), career development (nine items), and support and caring (12 items). The overall load for the indicators was 77.57%. The developed indicators may be used to evaluate the quality of nursing work environments. Furthermore, the indicators may be used

  14. Evaluation of biological properties and fate in the environment of a new class of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Olejnik, Dorota; Delbeke, Elisabeth I P; Van Geem, Kevin M; Stevens, Christian V

    2018-06-01

    Selected sophorolipid quaternary ammonium salts (SQAS), being a new class of modified biosurfactants, were studied in this work for the first time with regard to their biodegradability and fate in the environment. It was made to find whether environment-friendly bioproducts like biosurfactants are still safe to the environment after their chemical modification. The susceptibility of these SQAS for biodegradation was estimated together with the evaluation of their influence on activated sludge microorganisms. Additionally, the mechanisms of removal of the SQAS from wastewater and from the aquatic environment, were analysed. The evaluated SQAS were potentially biodegradable, although none of them could be classified as readily biodegradable. The biodegradation degrees after 28 days ranged from 4 to 42%, dependent on the SQAS tested, i.e. below the required OECD 301D Closed Bottle Test level of 60%. Simultaneously, the analysis of the mass spectra revealed the presence of the breakdown products of each SQAS studied. Biodegradation was preceded by sorption of the SQAS on sludge particles, which occurred to be a main mechanism of the removal of these newly synthesized biosurfactants from wastewater. The mean degree of sorption calculated on the basis of SQAS determination was from 75 to 96%, dependent on the studied SQAS. The presence of SQAS in wastewater did not deteriorate the operation of the activated sludge system, although the products of the SQAS biodegradation remained in the liquid phase and might contribute to the increase of COD of the effluent to be introduced to the environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical, Mechanical, and Durability Properties of Concrete with Local Mineral Admixtures under Sulfate Environment in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qingke; Zhou, Changjun; Shu, Xiang; He, Qiang; Huang, Baoshan

    2014-05-13

    Over the vast Northwest China, arid desert contains high concentrations of sulfate, chloride, and other chemicals in the ground water, which poses serious challenges to infrastructure construction that routinely utilizes portland cement concrete. Rapid industrialization in the region has been generating huge amounts of mineral admixtures, such as fly ash and slags from energy and metallurgical industries. These industrial by-products would turn into waste materials if not utilized in time. The present study evaluated the suitability of utilizing local mineral admixtures in significant quantities for producing quality concrete mixtures that can withstand the harsh chemical environment without compromising the essential mechanical properties. Comprehensive chemical, mechanical, and durability tests were conducted in the laboratory to characterize the properties of the local cementitious mineral admixtures, cement mortar and portland cement concrete mixtures containing these admixtures. The results from this study indicated that the sulfate resistance of concrete was effectively improved by adding local class F fly ash and slag, or by applying sulfate resistance cement to the mixtures. It is noteworthy that concrete containing local mineral admixtures exhibited much lower permeability (in terms of chloride ion penetration) than ordinary portland cement concrete while retaining the same mechanical properties; whereas concrete mixtures made with sulfate resistance cement had significantly reduced strength and much increased chloride penetration comparing to the other mixtures. Hence, the use of local mineral admixtures in Northwest China in concrete mixtures would be beneficial to the performance of concrete, as well as to the protection of environment.

  16. Radioprotection of the environment: on the context of biodiversity and evolutionary theory. A reference organism has no genetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedervall, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    The recent efforts to define a basis for radioprotection of the environment include some concepts and ideas related to various endpoints which need a clarification. This paper focuses on the biodiversity concept and the context of individuals of a species as well as that of the species as a gene pool. A major problem with the ambition to radioprotect biodiversity is the concept 'reference organism' which has no genetic properties and therefore is in contradiction with a real biological species. Biodiversity and the species (gene pool) concept are, just as any other areas of biology, integral parts of evolutionary theory. With the reference organism as a basis no meaningful reasoning can take place which relates data on radioactivity levels or mutations to potential effects on populations or biodiversity. It is therefore suggested that the national and international bodies involved in radioprotection of the environment take advantage of evolutionary theory as a reference frame. (author)

  17. Magnetic properties of different grain-sized particles of sediments from the Okinawa Trough and their relationships to sedimentary environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; LI Peiying; ZHANG Xiaolong; CAO Chengxiao; XU Xingyong; DU Jun; LIU Lejun

    2005-01-01

    Multiple magnetic parameters were measured for nine different grain-sized fractions separated from the sediment samples that are representatives of four different sedimentary environments of the Okinawa Trough. Based on the measured results, the contributions of different grain-sized particles to total magnetic susceptibility of bulk sediments, the magnetic mineral assemblage and magnetic domain state as well as their relationships to sedimentary environment were discussed. Our research shows that the magnetic mineral is dominated by magnetite with a small amount of hematite and is primarily in pseudo-single-domain state. That indicates that the different sedimentary environments in the Okinawa Trough have certain correlation in material provenance. The magnetic minerals enrich in different grain-sized particles in response to different sedimentary environments. The contribution of the grain sizes from coarse to fine to coarse and fine to the magnetic susceptibility from the west to the east is in accordance with terrigenous material transportation from continental shelf of the East China Sea to the Okinawa Trough. It also shows difference in magnetic properties as a result of some environmental factors.

  18. Influence of the field humiture environment on the mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel repaired with Fe314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianzhong; Li, Dichen; Yan, Shenping; Xie, Ruidong; Qu, Hongliang

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel repaired with Fe314 under different temperatures and humidities without inert gas protection were studied. Results indicated favorable compatibility between Fe314 and 316L stainless steel. The average yield strength, tensile strength, and sectional contraction percentage were higher in repaired samples than in 316L stainless steel, whereas the elongation rate was slightly lower. The different conditions of humiture environment on the repair sample exerted minimal influence on tensile and yield strengths. The Fe314 cladding layer was mainly composed of equiaxed grains and mixed with randomly oriented columnar crystal and tiny pores or impurities in the tissue. Results indicated that the hardness value of Fe314 cladding layer under different humiture environments ranged within 419-451.1 HV0.2. The field humiture environment also showed minimal impact on the average hardness of Fe314 cladding layers. Furthermore, 316L stainless steel can be repaired through laser cladding by using Fe314 powder without inert gas protection under different temperatures and humidity environments.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of recycled aggregate concrete in seawater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Pengjun; Tan, Zhuoying; Guo, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to conduct research about the microstructure and basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete under seawater corrosion. Concrete specimens were fabricated and tested with different replacement percentages of 0%, 30%, and 60% after immersing in seawater for 4, 8, 12, and 16 months, respectively. The basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) including the compressive strength, the elastic modulus, and chloride penetration depth were explicitly investigated. And the microstructure of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was revealed to find the seawater corrosion by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that higher amount of the RCA means more porosity and less strength, which could lower both the compressive strength and resistance to chloride penetration. This research could be a guide in theoretical and numerical analysis for the design of RAC structures.

  20. Systematic review on measurement properties of questionnaires assessing the neighbourhood environment in the context of youth physical activity behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Anne K; Mess, Filip; Bucksch, Jens; Jekauc, Darko; Woll, Alexander

    2013-05-11

    High-quality measurement instruments for assessing the neighbourhood environment are a prerequisite for identifying associations between the neighbourhood environment and a person's physical activity. The aim of this systematic review was to identify reliable and valid questionnaires assessing neighbourhood environmental attributes in the context of physical activity behaviours in children and adolescents. In addition, current gaps and best practice models in instrumentation and their evaluation are discussed. We conducted a systematic literature search using six databases (Web of Science, Medline, TRID, SportDISCUS, PsycARTICLES and PsycINFO). Two independent reviewers screened the identified English-language peer-reviewed journal articles. Only studies examining the measurement properties of self- or proxy-report questionnaires on any aspects of the neighbourhood environment in children and adolescents aged 3 to 18 years were included. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the COSMIN checklists. We identified 13 questionnaires on attributes of the neighbourhood environment. Most of these studies were conducted in the United States (n = 7). Eight studies evaluated self-report measures, two studies evaluated parent-report measures and three studies included both administration types. While eight studies had poor methodological quality, we identified three questionnaires with substantial test-retest reliability and two questionnaires with acceptable convergent validity based on sufficient evidential basis. Based on the results of this review, we recommend that cross-culturally adapted questionnaires should be used and that existing questionnaires should be evaluated especially in diverse samples and in countries other than the United States. Further, high-quality studies on measurement properties should be promoted and measurement models (formative vs. reflexive) should be specified to ensure that appropriate methods for psychometric

  1. Experimental Investigations of the Physical and Optical Properties of Individual Micron/Submicron-Size Dust Grains in Astrophysical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains constitute a significant component of matter in the universe, and play an important and crucial role in the formation and evolution of the stellar/planetary systems in interstellar dust clouds. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of dust grains is required for understanding of a variety of processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. The currently available and generally employed data on the properties of dust grains is based on bulk materials, with analytical models employed to deduce the corresponding values for individual small micron/submicron-size dust grains. However, it has been well-recognized over a long period, that the properties of individual smallsize dust grains may be very different from those deduced from bulk materials. This has been validated by a series of experimental investigations carried out over the last few years, on a laboratory facility based on an Electrodynamic Balance at NASA, which permits levitation of single small-size dust grains of desired composition and size, in vacuum, in simulated space environments. In this paper, we present a brief review of the results of a series of selected investigations carried out on the analogs of interstellar and planetary dust grains, as well as dust grains obtained by Apollo-l1-17 lunar missions. The selected investigations, with analytical results and discussions, include: (a) Direct measurements of radiation on individual dust grains (b) Rotation and alignments of dust grains by radiative torque (c) Charging properties of dust grains by: (i) UV Photo-electric emissions (ii) Electron Impact. The results from these experiments are examined in the light of the current theories of the processes involved.

  2. Effects of Fluid Environment Properties on the Nonlinear Vibrations of AFM Piezoelectric Microcantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ahmadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, atomic-force microscopy plays a significant role in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and is widely used for direct measurement at atomic scale and scanning the sample surfaces. In tapping mode, the microcantilever of atomic-force microscope is excited at resonance frequency. Therefore, it is important to study its resonance. Moreover, atomic-force microscopes can be operated in fluid environments such as their applications in chemical and biological sensors. Additionally, piezoelectric microcantilevers are used to enhance atomic-force microscope scanning. Motivated by these considerations, presented herein is a finite element investigation into the nonlinear vibration behavior of piezoelectric microcantilever of atomic-force microscopes in fluid environment. For this purpose, a 3D finite element model coupled with a computational fluid dynamics model is introduced based upon a fluid-solid interaction analysis. First, the reliability of present fluid-solid interaction analysis is revealed by comparison with experimental data available in the literature. Then, numerical results are presented to study the influences of fluid dynamic viscosity and density on the resonance frequency, resonance amplitude and time response of piezoelectric microcantilever. It was shown that increasing the fluid density and dynamic viscosity results in the decrease of resonance frequency. For example, for density equal to 1000 kg/m3 , increasing the viscosity of fluid environment from 0.1 to 1, 10 and 20 mPa.s leads to decrease of resonance frequency about 3%, 29% and 42%, respectively. Also, the resonance amplitude of microcantilever increases as the density increases, while increasing dynamic viscosity has a decreasing effect on the resonance amplitude.

  3. Characterizing Economic and Social Properties of Trust and Reputation Systems in P2P Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Feng Wang; Yoshiaki Hori; Kouichi Sakurai

    2008-01-01

    Considering the fact that P2P (Peer-to-Peer) systems are self-organized and autonomous, social-control mechanism (like trust and reputation) is essential to evaluate the trustworthiness of participating peers and to combat the selfish, dishonest and malicious peer behaviors. So, naturally, we advocate that P2P systems that gradually act as an important information infrastructure should be multi-disciplinary research topic, and reflect certain features of our society. So, from economic and social perspective, this paper designs the incentive-compatible reputation feedback scheme based on well-known economic model, and characterizes the social features of trust network in terms of efficiency and cost. Specifically, our framework has two distinctive purposes: first, from high-level perspective, we argue trust system is a special kind of social network, and an accurate characterization of the structural properties of the network can be of fundamental importance to understand the dynamics of the system. Thus, inspired by the concept of weighted small-world, this paper proposes new measurements to characterize the social properties of trust system, that is, highg lobal and local efficiency, and low cost; then, from relative low-level perspective, we argue that reputation feedback is a special kind of information, and it is not free. So, based on economic model, VCG (Vickrey-Clarke-Grove)-like reputation remuneration mechanism is proposed to stimulate rational peers not only to provide reputation feedback, but truthfully offer feedback. Furthermore, considering that trust and reputation is subjective, we classify the trust into functional trust and referral trust, and extend the referral trust to include two factors: similarity and truthfulness, which can efficiently reduce the trust inference error. The preliminary simulation results show the benefits of our proposal and the emergence of certain social properties in trust network.

  4. Development of functional ceramics for nuclear fusion devices and their property measurements in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Hideo; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1989-01-01

    The research and development of high performance ceramics related to nuclear energy increase their importance. Especially innovation and application of ceramics are needed in fusion reactors. Necessity of the selection of composite elements for low activation ceramics and transmutation effects with high energy neutron are summarized in general requirements. The development of new materials such as Si 3 N 4 with good dielectric properties and the application of zirconia for high temperature electrolysis of tritiated water in tritium recycling system are summarized as topical issues. (author)

  5. Local electric fields and molecular properties in heterogeneous environments through polarizable embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    chemical reference calculations. For the lowest π → π∗ transition in DsRed, inclusion of effective external field effects gives rise to a 1.9- and 3.5-fold reduction in the 1PA and 2PA cross-sections, respectively. The effective external field is, however, strongly influenced by the heterogeneity...... (1PA and 2PA, respectively) properties of PRODAN-methanol clusters as well as the fluorescent protein DsRed. Our results demonstrate the necessity of accounting for both the dynamical reaction field and effective external field contributions to the local field in order to reproduce full quantum...

  6. Properties of aerosol floating in the air in a nuclear power plant workplace environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, H.; Funabashi, M.; Ito, M.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on properties of radioactive aerosol floating in the air at several workplaces in nuclear power plant. The principal results are as follows: the aerosol particle size distributions consisted of two particle groups, whose aerodynamic diameters ranged from 4 to 7 microns and from 0.4 to 0.6 microns; the radioactive aerosol particle size distribution were unimodal. The mean activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was 6 microns, with geometric standard deviation microns; and, the average density of the aerosol was about 2.2g/cm 3 . (author)

  7. Effect of a helium environment on the mechanical properties of HTGR primary system metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Sabatini, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Creep and high cycle fatigue tests have been carried out on Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy X in a helium environment containing 40 μ atm of H 2 O, 200 μ atm H 2 , 40 μ atm CO, 20 μ atm CH 4 and 10 μ atm CO 2 . The creep behavior of Incoloy 800H does not appear to show significant differences from that measured in air. However, the Hastelloy X at the maximum test temperature studied (871 0 C, 1600 0 F) shows behavior which is inferior. With respect to high cycle fatigue, the Incoloy 800H is weaker in the helium environment at a test temperature of 649 0 C (1200 0 F). At 760 0 C (1400 0 F) the strength in helium is higher but there is a tendency to lose strength more rapidly than for the air tests as the test time increases. Hastelloy X tested at 871 0 C (1600 0 F) also shows higher strength in helium for short test times but for extended tests the strengths in air and helium become similar. Scanning electron microprobe analyses have been carried out to correlate the strength measurements with surface oxidation characteristics and internal structural changes

  8. Physical properties of glasses exposed to Earth-facing and trailing-side environments on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Kinser, Donald L.; Weller, Robert A.; Weeks, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.

    1993-01-01

    The exposure of 108 glass samples and 12 glass-ceramic samples to Earth-orbit environments permitted measurements which establish the effects of each environment. Examination of five glass types and one glass ceramic located on both the Earth-facing side and the trailing edge revealed no reduction in strength within experimental limits. Strength measurements subjected less than 5 percent of the sample surface area to stresses above 90 percent of the glass's failure strength. Seven micrometeorite or space debris impacts occurred on trailing edge samples. One of those impacts occurred in a location which was subjected to 50 percent of the applied stress at failure. Micrometeorite or space debris impacts were not observed on Earth-facing samples. The physical shape and structure of the impact sites were carefully examined using stereographic scanning electron microscopy. These impacts induce a stress concentration at the damaged region which influences mechanical strength. The flaw size produced by such damage was examined to determine the magnitude of strength degradation in micrometeorite or space-debris impacted glasses. Scanning electron microscopy revealed topographical details of impact sites which included central melt zones and glass fiber production. The overall crater structure is similar to much larger impacts of large meteorite on the Moon in that the melt crater is surrounded by shocked regions of material which fracture zones and spall areas. Residual stresses arising from shock compression and cooling of the fused zone cannot currently be included in fracture mechanics analyses based on simple flaw size examination.

  9. Different properties exhibited on the two typical crystal faces of hydroxyapatite in a simulated body environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagio, T; Iwai, K; Tanase, T; Akiyama, J; Asai, S

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a main mineral constituent of hard tissues and is extensively used as a biomaterial in the medical field. Hydroxyapatite exhibits anisotropic chemical properties on its two typical crystal faces, the a-face and c-face, due to its hexagonal crystal structure. In polycrystalline bodies, such anisotropy can be enhanced by controlling the crystal orientation. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals that constitute long bones also form a crystal oriented structure. Therefore, clarification of the difference between the properties of a-face and c-face in hydroxyapatite using in vitro experiments is useful to understand the structure and function of actual hard tissues. Hydroxyapatite ceramics with controlled crystal orientation were prepared by a slip casting method under application of a magnetic field. The fabricated hydroxyapatite ceramics had surfaces consisting mainly of a-face, or otherwise c-face hydroxyapatite. These hydroxyapatite ceramics were immersed into simulated body fluids to investigate the difference in bioactivity. The precipitation behavior observed on the surface of each hydroxyapatite ceramic was different. The thickness of the precipitate was increased and formed earlier on the HAp c-face compared to that on the a-face.

  10. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Fly Ash Based Concrete Exposed to Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagadgar, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Saha, Suman; Rajasekaran, C.

    2017-06-01

    Efforts over the past few years for improving the performance of concrete suggest that cement replacement with mineral admixtures can enhance the strength and durability of concrete. Feasibility of producing good quality concrete by using alccofine and fly ash replacements is investigated and also the potential benefits from their incorporation were looked into. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the performance of concrete in severe marine conditions exposed upto a period of 150 days. This work investigates the influence of alccofine and fly ash as partial replacement of cement in various percentages (Alccofine - 5% replacement to cement content) and (fly ash - 0%, 15%, 30%, 50% & 60% to total cementitious content) on mechanical and durability properties (Permit ion permeability test and corrosion current density) of concrete. Usage of alccofine and high quantity of fly ash as additional cementitious materials in concrete has resulted in higher workability of concrete. Inclusion of alccofine shows an early strength gaining property whereas fly ash results in gaining strength at later stage. Concrete mixes containing 5% alccofine with 15% fly ash replacement reported greater compressive strength than the other concrete mixes cured in both curing conditions. Durability test conducted at 56 and 150 days indicated that concrete containing higher percentages of fly ash resulted in lower permeability as well lesser corrosion density.

  11. Different properties exhibited on the two typical crystal faces of hydroxyapatite in a simulated body environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagio, T; Iwai, K [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Tanase, T [Toho Gas Corporation, 19-18 Sakurada-cho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, 456-8511 (Japan); Akiyama, J [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institute of Natural Sciences, 38 Nishigonaka, Myodaiji, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); Asai, S [Innovation Plaza Tokai Japan Science and Technology Agency, 23-1 Ahara-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya, 457-0063 (Japan)], E-mail: hagio.takeshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a main mineral constituent of hard tissues and is extensively used as a biomaterial in the medical field. Hydroxyapatite exhibits anisotropic chemical properties on its two typical crystal faces, the a-face and c-face, due to its hexagonal crystal structure. In polycrystalline bodies, such anisotropy can be enhanced by controlling the crystal orientation. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals that constitute long bones also form a crystal oriented structure. Therefore, clarification of the difference between the properties of a-face and c-face in hydroxyapatite using in vitro experiments is useful to understand the structure and function of actual hard tissues. Hydroxyapatite ceramics with controlled crystal orientation were prepared by a slip casting method under application of a magnetic field. The fabricated hydroxyapatite ceramics had surfaces consisting mainly of a-face, or otherwise c-face hydroxyapatite. These hydroxyapatite ceramics were immersed into simulated body fluids to investigate the difference in bioactivity. The precipitation behavior observed on the surface of each hydroxyapatite ceramic was different. The thickness of the precipitate was increased and formed earlier on the HAp c-face compared to that on the a-face.

  12. Static flexural properties of hedgehog spines conditioned in coupled temperature and relative humidity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emily B; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Swift, Nathan B; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2017-11-01

    Hedgehogs are agile climbers, scaling trees and plants to heights exceeding 10m while foraging insects. Hedgehog spines (a.k.a. quills) provide fall protection by absorbing shock and could offer insights for the design of lightweight, material-efficient, impact-resistant structures. There has been some study of flexural properties of hedgehog spines, but an understanding of how this keratinous biological material is affected by various temperature and relative humidity treatments, or how spine color (multicolored vs. white) affects mechanics, is lacking. To bridge this gap in the literature, we use three-point bending to analyze the effect of temperature, humidity, spine color, and their interactions on flexural strength and modulus of hedgehog spines. We also compare specific strength and stiffness of hedgehog spines to conventional engineered materials. We find hedgehog spine flexural properties can be finely tuned by modifying environmental conditioning parameters. White spines tend to be stronger and stiffer than multicolored spines. Finally, for most temperature and humidity conditioning parameters, hedgehog spines are ounce for ounce stronger than 201 stainless steel rods of the same diameter but as pliable as styrene rods with a slightly larger diameter. This unique combination of strength and elasticity makes hedgehog spines exemplary shock absorbers, and a suitable reference model for biomimicry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of annealing temperature and environment on the properties of indium tin oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R X; Beling, C D; Fung, S; Djurisic, A B; Ling, C C; Kwong, C; Li, S

    2005-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates using the e-beam evaporating technique. The influence of deposition rate and post-deposition annealing on the optical properties of the films was investigated in detail. It is found that the deposition rate and annealing conditions strongly affect the optical properties of the films. The transmittance of films greatly increases with increasing annealing temperature below 300 deg. C but drastically drops at 400 deg. C when they are annealed in forming gas (mixed N 2 and H 2 gas). An interesting phenomenon observed is that the transmittance of the darkened film can recover under further 400 deg. C annealing in air. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy were employed to obtain information on the chemical state and crystallization of the films. Analysis of these data suggests that the loss and re-incorporating of oxygen are responsible for the reversible behaviour of the ITO thin films

  14. Degradability of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a model of intracellular environment: follow-up of magnetic, structural and chemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Michael; Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, UMR 7057, CNRS and Universite Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Lagarde, Florence [Universite de Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques, UMR 5180 CNRS-UCBL, bat CPE, 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Maraloiu, Valentin-Adrian; Blanchin, Marie-Genevieve [Universite de Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN UMR 5586 CNRS-UCBL, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Gendron, Francois, E-mail: florence.gazeau@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris (INSP) UMR 7588, CNRS and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie 110 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)

    2010-10-01

    The unique magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have paved the way for various biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance cellular imaging or magnetically induced therapeutic hyperthermia. Living cells interact with nanoparticles by internalizing them within intracellular acidic compartments. Although no acute toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles has been reported up to now, the mechanisms of nanoparticle degradation by the cellular environment are still unknown. In the organism, the long term integrity and physical state of iron-based nanoparticles are challenged by iron homeostasis. In this study, we monitored the degradation of 7 nm sized maghemite nanoparticles in a medium mimicking the intracellular environment. Magnetic nanoparticles with three distinct surface coatings, currently evaluated as MRI contrast agents, were shown to exhibit different kinetics of dissolution at an acidic pH in the presence of a citrate chelating agent. Our assessment of the physical state of the nanoparticles during degradation revealed that the magnetic properties, size distribution and structure of the remaining nanocrystals were identical to those of the initial suspension. This result suggests a model for nanoparticle degradation with rapidly dissolved nanocrystals and a reservoir of intact nanoparticles.

  15. PROPERTIES OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS AT DIFFERENT PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kos, J.; Zwitter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) can trace different conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) along the sightline toward the observed stars. A small survey was made in optical wavelengths, producing high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra. We present measurements of 19 DIBs' properties in 50 sightlines toward hot stars, distributed at a variety of galactic coordinates and interstellar reddening. Equivalent widths were obtained by fitting asymmetric Gaussian and variable continua to DIBs. Conditions of the ISM were calculated from eight atomic and molecular interstellar lines. Two distinctly different types of DIBs were identified by carefully comparing correlation coefficients between DIBs and reddening and by different behavior in UV-shielded (ζ) and nonshielded (σ) sightlines. A ratio of DIBs at 5780 Å and 5797 Å proved to be reliable enough to distinguish between two different sightline types. Based on the linear relations between DIB equivalent width and reddening for σ and ζ sightlines, we divide DIBs into type I (where both linear relations are similar) and type II (where they are significantly different). The linear relation for ζ type sightlines always shows a higher slope and larger x-intercept parameter than the relation for σ sightlines. Scatter around the linear relation is reduced after the separation, but it does not vanish completely. This means that UV shielding is the dominant factor of the DIB equivalent width versus reddening relation shape for ζ sightlines, but in σ sightlines other physical parameters play a major role. No similar dependency on gas density, electron density, or turbulence was observed. A catalog of all observed interstellar lines is made public

  16. Tensile properties of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy after exposure in air environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Oxidation studies were conducted on V-5Cr-5Ti alloy specimens in an air environment to evaluate the oxygen uptake behavior of the alloy as a function of temperature and exposure time. The oxidation rates, calculated from parabolic kinetic measurements of thermogravimetric testing and confirmed by microscopic analysis of cross sections of exposed specimens, were 5, 17, and 27 {mu}m per year after exposure at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C, respectively. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at room temperature and at 500{degrees}C on preoxidized specimens of the alloy to examine the effects of oxidation and oxygen migration on tensile strength and ductility. Correlations were developed between tensile strength and ductility of the oxidized alloy and microstructural characteristics such as oxide thickness, depth of hardened layer, depth of intergranular fracture zone, and transverse crack length.

  17. Electrochemical and corrosion properties of carbon steel in simulated geological disposal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews electrochemical and corrosion studies on the application of carbon steel to an overpack container, which is used for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Deaerated alkaline Na 2 SO 4 -NaHCO 3 - NaCl solutions and bentonite soaked with the solutions are used as simulated geological disposal environments. Electrochemical studies show the corrosion of the steel in an early stage is the activation control. Corrosion rates are controlled by the composition of the solutions, alloying elements, and the structure of the steel. The rates decrease with time due to the formation of FeCO 3 (siderite) film on the steel. Immersion corrosion tests show general corrosion morphology. Average corrosion rates of long duration have been evaluated. Clear proofs of the initiation of localized corrosion, such as pitting, crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking, have not been reported. (author)

  18. Psychometric properties of the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire with Chinese talented athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiao; Martindale, Russell; Wu, Yandan; Si, Gangyan

    2018-01-01

    The development of talented athletes is a priority for many countries across the world, including China. A validated Chinese 5-factor Talent Development Environment Questionnaire (TDEQ-5) would go some way in helping researchers and practitioners investigate talent development systems within China from an evidence-based perspective. For this purpose, the 25-item English TDEQ-5 was translated to Chinese through a standardised process. The translated scale was then administered to 538 talented Chinese youth athletes. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed adequate model fit of the scale. The internal reliability, concurrent and discriminant validity, and test-retest reliability of the scale were adequately supported. The scale was also invariant across gender. It is recommended that the Chinese TDEQ-5 can be used with confidence in both applied and research settings.

  19. Tensile properties of V-Cr-Ti alloys after exposure in oxygen-containing environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study was conducted to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of V-4Cr-4Ti (44 alloy) and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys (55 alloy) and to establish the role of oxygen ingress on the tensile behavior of the alloys at room temperature and at 500 C. The oxidation rate of the 44 alloy is slightly higher than that of the 55 alloy. The oxidation process followed parabolic kinetics. Maximum engineering stress for 55 alloy increased with an increase in oxidation time at 500 C. The maximum stress values for 55 alloy were higher at room temperature than ta 500 C for the same oxidation treatment. Maximum engineering stresses for 44 alloy were substantially lower than those for 55 alloy in the same oxidation ∼500 h exposure in air at 500 C; the same values were 4.8 and 6.1%, respectively, at 500 C after ∼2060 h oxidation in air at 500 C. Maximum engineering stress for 44 alloy at room temperature was 421.6--440.6 MPa after ∼250 h exposure at 500 C in environments with a pO 2 range of 1 x 10 -6 to 760 torr. The corresponding uniform and total elongation values were 11--14.4% and 14.5--21.7%, respectively. Measurements of crack depths in various specimens showed that depth is independent of pO 2 in the preexposure environment and was of 70--95 microm after 250--275 h exposure at 500 C

  20. Corrosion properties of HLW and spent fuel overpacks in highly alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kursten, B.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, deep geological disposal in stable rocks with low groundwater flow is considered for the long-term management of long-lived radioactive waste (vitrified high-level waste - VHLW - and spent fuel - SF).The main advantage of the SC design, with respect to corrosion, is that under the predicted conditions (i.e. highly alkaline concrete buffer), the carbon steel overpack is expected to undergo uniform corrosion (passive dissolution). The key objective of this study is to demonstrate that the carbon steel overpack will be able to ensure complete containment of the radioactivity at least during the thermal phase, this is the period during which the temperature of the host rock is expected to lie above the range of temperatures within which nominal radionuclide migration properties can be relied upon

  1. One–pot synthesis and electrochemical properties of polyaniline nanofibers through simply tuning acid–base environment of reaction medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Zhou, Yi; Liang, Banglei; Jin, Dandan; Liu, Na; Qin, Zongyi; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Presenting a facile one–pot approach to prepare polyaniline nanofibers through simply tuning acid–base environment of reaction medium. •Determining the role of aniline oligomers play in the formation of polyaniline nanofibers. •Demonstrating the feasibility of polyaniline nanofibers as high–performance electrode materials for supercapacitors. -- Abstract: A facile and efficient one–pot approach was presented to prepare polyaniline (PANi) nanofibers through simply tuning acid–base environment of reaction medium without the assistance of templates or use of organic solvents, in which aniline oligomers formed in the alkaline solution were used as “seeds” for the oriented growth of PANi chains under acidic conditions. The as–prepared PANi nanofibers were investigated by field–emission scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction technology. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. More attentions were paid to the influence of aniline concentrations in alkaline and acidic reaction medium on the morphology, microstructure and properties of PANi nanofibers. It can be found that aniline concentration in alkaline medium has a stronger impact on the electrical and electrochemical properties of final products, however, their morphologies obviously depend on aniline concentration in acidic solution. Moreover, PANi nanofibers prepared at aniline concentrations of 48 mM in alkaline medium and 0.2 M in acidic medium exhibits the largest specific capacitance of 857.2 F g −1 at the scan rate of 5 mV s −1 , and capacitance retention of 63.8% after 500 cycles. It is demonstrated that such one–pot approach can present a low cost and environmental friendly route to fabricate PANi nanofibers in fully aqueous solution as high

  2. The selection and properties of epoxide resins used for the insulation of magnet systems in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.C.; Scott, J.M.; Goebel, K.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory tests have been carried out on five types of epoxy resins - four based on bisphenol A, one on hydantoin-bisphenol A - applicable in the construction of large magnet coils. Two of the resin compositions have already been used in large quantities as insulating material for magnets at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN); the others were selected for comparison according to their good radiation resistance, good initial mechanical properties, and optimal properties for vacuum impregnation. Three types of tests are discussed in detail: creep, crack propagation (as a measure of toughness), and radiation resistance. The results show that the resin composition with hydantoin exhibits the best resistance to crack propagation but, on the other hand, the lowest resistance to ionizing radiation, and can therefore not be recommended for use in a radiation environment. Among the other materials based on biosphenol A, better toughness values were obtained with lower-cross-linked resin systems, whereas the radiation resistance is better for highly-cross-linked materials. It is concluded that a reasonable compromise combining good processing and operational properties with sufficiently high radiation resistance is obtained with a standard epoxy-resin-type bisphenol A with a specially formulated anhydride hardener and an amine-substituted phenol-type accelerator. (orig.)

  3. LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Wesson, Roger [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Andrews, Jennifer E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Gallagher, Joseph S. [Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Science, Raymond Walters College, 9555 Plain field Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45236 (United States); Sugerman, Ben E. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Goucher College, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Baltimore, MD 21204 (United States); Ercolano, Barbara [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Welch, Douglas, E-mail: otsuka@stsci.edu, E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days {approx}300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate {sup 56}Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }) from the bolometric light curve of each of days {approx}150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm{sup -3}) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium ({approx}1 cm{sup -3}). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The {sup 56}Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0

  4. Multiscaling properties of tropical rainfall: Analysis of rain gauge datasets in Lesser Antilles island environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Didier C.; Pasquier, Raphaël; Cécé, Raphaël; Dorville, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Changes in rainfall seem to be the main impact of climate change in the Caribbean area. The last conclusions of IPCC (2013), indicate that the end of this century will be marked by a rise of extreme rainfalls in tropical areas, linked with increase of the mean surface temperature. Moreover, most of the Lesser Antilles islands are characterized by a complex topography which tends to enhance the rainfall from synoptic disturbances by orographic effects. In the past five years, out of hurricanes passage, several extreme rainy events (approx. 16 mm in 6 minutes), including fatal cases, occurred in the Lesser Antilles Arc: in Guadeloupe (January 2011, May 2012 and 2013), in Martinique (May 2009, April 2011 and 2013), in Saint-Lucia (December 2013). These phenomena inducing floods, loss of life and material damages (agriculture sector and public infrastructures), inhibit the development of the islands. At this time, numerical weather prediction models as WRF, which are based on the equations of the atmospheric physics, do not show great results in the focused area (Bernard et al., 2013). Statistical methods may be used to examine explicitly local rainy updrafts, thermally and orographically induced at micro-scale. The main goal of the present insular tropical study is to characterize the multifractal symmetries occurring in the 6-min rainfall time series, registered since 2006 by the French Met. Office network weather stations. The universal multifractal model (Schertzer and Lovejoy, 1991) is used to define the statistical properties of measured rainfalls at meso-scale and micro-scale. This model is parametrized by a fundamental exponents set (H,a,C1,q) which are determined and compared with values found in the literature. The first three parameters characterize the mean pattern and the last parameter q, the extreme pattern. The occurrence ranges of multifractal regime are examined. The suggested links between the internal variability of the tropical rainy events and the

  5. Effect of Simulated High Hydrogen Content Combustion Environments on Abradable Properties of Ceramic Turbine Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu Majumder, Madhura

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) abradable coatings are used in the turbine hot section to reduce the stator-rotor gap, minimizing gas leakage. These coatings are designed to exhibit controlled removal of material in thin layers when the turbine blades sweep through the coating, which protects the mechanical integrity of the turbine blade. In an effort to lower CO2 emissions, high H2 content fuel is being explored. This change in chemical composition of the fuel may affect the microstructure, abradability and durability of the coatings at turbine operational temperatures. The presence of high water vapor in the combustion chamber leads to accelerated degradation of the sacrificial coating materials. In this work, zirconia based composite materials with a machinable phase and varied porosity have been used to study microstructural evolution, thermal and chemical stability of the phases and abradable characteristics of baseline coating systems in both humid and dry environments. Investigation of the mechanisms that control the removal of materials and performance of abradable coatings through thermo-mechanical tests will be discussed.

  6. Membrane binding properties of EBV gp110 C-terminal domain; evidences for structural transition in the membrane environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Jean; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Suk Kyeong; Lee, Bong Jin

    2008-01-01

    Gp110 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mainly localizes on nuclear/ER membranes and plays a role in the assembly of EBV nucleocapsid. The C-terminal tail domain (gp110 CTD) is essential for the function of gp110 and the nuclear/ER membranes localization of gp110 is ruled by its C-terminal unique nuclear localization signal (NLS), consecutive four arginines. In the present study, the structural properties of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics were investigated using CD, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR, to elucidate the effect of membrane environment on the structural transition and to compare the structural feature of the protein in the solution state with that of the membrane-bound form. CD and NMR analysis showed that gp110 CTD in a buffer solution appears to adopt a stable folding intermediate which lacks compactness, and a highly helical structure is formed only in membrane environments. The helical content of gp110 CTD was significantly affected by the negative charge as well as the size of membrane mimics. Based on the elution profiles of the size-exclusion chromatography, we found that gp110 CTD intrinsically forms a trimer, revealing that a trimerization region may exist in the C-terminal domain of gp110 like the ectodomain of gp110. The mutation of NLS (RRRR) to RTTR does not affect the overall structure of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics, while the helical propensity in a buffer solution was slightly different between the wild-type and the mutant proteins. This result suggests that not only the helicity induced in membrane environment but also the local structure around NLS may be related to trafficking to the nuclear membrane. More detailed structural difference between the wild-type and the mutant in membrane environment was examined using synthetic two peptides including the wild-type NLS and the mutant NLS

  7. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  8. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  9. The Properties Of And Transport Phenomena In Oxide Films On Iron, Nickel, Chromium And Their Alloys In Aqueous Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.

    1998-07-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown, pitting, stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more dense structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  10. Effect on the properties of ITO thin films in Gamma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi, A. H.; Shah, M. A.; Asokan, K.

    2018-04-01

    The present study reports the effect of gamma irradiation of varying doses (0-200 kGy) on the physical properties of the indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films. The films were fabricated by thermal evaporation method using indium-tin (InSn) ingots followed by an oxidation in atmosphere at a temperature of 550 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the body-centered cubic (BCC) structure corresponds to the ITO thin films, high phase purity and a variation in crystallite size between 30-44 nm. While the optical studies revealed an increase in transmission as well as variation in optical band gap, the electrical studies confirmed n-type semiconductive behavior of the thin films, increase in mobility and a decrease in resistivity from 2.33×10-2 - 9.31×10-4 Ωcm with the increase in gamma dose from 0-200 kGy. The gamma irradiation caused totally electronic excitation and resulted in this modifications. The degenerate electron gas model was considered when attempting to understand the prevalent scattering mechanism in gamma irradiated ITO thin films.

  11. Sensitivity of long-term bare soil infiltration simulations to hydraulic properties in an arid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stothoff, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    The suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste geologic repository is currently being evaluated. Assessments of the repository performance suggest that the uncertainty in infiltration rates strongly affects predicted repository performance. Most of the ground surface over the potential repository footprint is characterized by shallow to deep colluvium/alluvium overlying densely fractured, welded tuffs. In order to identify characteristic behavior of infiltration that might be expected at the site, two idealizations of this situation are examined: an effectively semi-infinite column of alluvium and a two-layer column of alluvium over a fractured impermeable matrix. For each idealization the impact of hydraulic properties is assessed. Examining the sensitivity of bare soil simulator predictions for an effectively semi-infinite column, it is found that decreasing the air entry pressure while holding all other parameters at a fixed level tends to increase both the long-term average moisture content and the long-term average net infiltration flux for homogeneous media. In contrast, increasing the van Genuchten scale parameter (m = 1 - 1/n) or decreasing the porosity tends to decrease the average soil moisture but increase the infiltration. Most interestingly, three regimes are found for permeability. For relatively high permeabilities, there is a trend toward increasing average infiltration and increasing average moisture content with decreasing permeability. For relatively low permeabilities, vapor transport dominates over liquid transport, runoff and evaporation overwhelm infiltration, and the soil becomes very dry with essentially no infiltration flux Between the extreme cases of high and low permeability, there is a zone where decreasing permeability results in decreased infiltration but increased moisture content

  12. The evaluation of properties of coal mass from the viewpoint of environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foniok, R.; Lukes, M. [Research Mining Inst., Ostrava-Radvanice (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of several various coal kinds from the Czech coalfields from the viewpoint of the development of thermal processes in coal mass due to their tendency towards self- ignition during storing. In such a case that no self-ignition during storing occurs, gaseous products are liberated into air, the quantity and composition of which depend upon fuel type and its temperature as well. From the environmental viewpoint, substances washed from stored coal are of a certain interest, too. In accordance with this fact, the importance of measures against self-heating of stored coal mass and the importance of a detailed observation of coal quality are concluded. The tables, which compare various coal kinds from the viewpoint of their behavior at self-ignition processes, are the integral part of this presented paper. Our greatest attention is paid to both the quantity and composition of gases being liberated in dependence upon the temperature of coal mass, and at its crushing with regard to selected methods and means of milling circuits before and explosion. Oxygen sorption by means of coal mass is also observed, being of a great importance for self-inertization of closed tanks. All the above-mentioned processes are demonstrated in form of graphic plots. Qualitative signs of coal mass are the basic means for its assessment from the viewpoint of emissions at burning/combustion, and the evaluation of explosive properties. A great attention is paid to explosion-proof means being produced in the Czech Republic. These means can be used for protection of milling circuits of power plants and heating plants or for safety systems of combustion chamber by means of insulation to secondary air main. Explosion-proof quci-acting valves, a special type of safety membrane and device for explosion suppression nip in the bud do represent the latest explosion-proof means.

  13. Squeezed Interstitial Water and Soil Properties in Pleistocene Blue Clays under Different Natural Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Fidelibus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies dating almost a century relate clay properties with the structure of the diffuse double layer (DDL, where the charged surfaces of clay crystal behave like an electric capacitor, whose dielectric is the interstitial fluid. The intensity of the inner electric field relates to the concentration and type of ions in the DDL. Other important implications of the model are less stressed: this part of the clay soil system, energetically speaking, is conservative. External contribution of energy, work of overburden or sun driven capillarity and long exposure to border low salinity waters can modify the concentration of pore-waters, thus affecting the DDL geometry, with electric field and energy storage variations. The study of clay soils coming from various natural geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, determining a different salinity of interacting groundwater, shows how the clay interaction with freely circulating waters at the boundaries produces alterations in the native pore water salinity, and, at the nano-scale, variations of electric field and stored energy from external work. The swelling and the shrinkage of clay soil with their volumetric and geotechnical implications should be regarded as variations of the electrostatic and mechanical energy of the system. The study is based on tests on natural clay soil samples coming from a formation of stiff blue clays, widespread in southern Italy. Geotechnical identification and oedometer tests have been performed, and pore waters squeezed out from the specimens have been analyzed. Tested samples have similar grain size, clay fraction and plasticity; sorted according to the classified geomorphological/hydrogeological contexts, they highlight good correlations among dry density, mechanical work performed in selected stages of the oedometric test, swelling and non-swelling behaviour, and electrical conductivity of the squeezed pore waters. The work performed for swelling and non

  14. Nanomaterials under extreme environments: A study of structural and dynamic properties using reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Adarsh

    nanoporous silica are different from that of bulk water, and insight into the properties of confined water is important for our understanding of many geological and biological processes. Nanoporous silica has a wide range of technological applications because it is easy to tune the size of pores and their morphologies and to functionalize pore surfaces with a variety of molecular moieties. Nanoporous silica is used in catalysis, chromatography, anticorrosion coatings, desalination membranes, and as drug delivery vehicles. We use reactive molecular dynamics to study the structure and dynamics of nanoconfined water between 100 and 300 K

  15. Effect of calcination environments and plasma treatment on structural, optical and electrical properties of FTO transparent thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Kafle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the structural, optical and electrical properties of the FTO thin films on the film thickness (276 nm - 546 nm, calcination environment, and low temperature plasma treatment were examined. The FTO thin films, prepared by spray pyrolysis, were calcinated under air followed by either further heat treatment under N2 gas or treatment in low temperature atmospheric plasma. The samples before and after calcination under N2, and plasma treatment will be represented by Sair, SN2 and SPl, respectively, hereafter. The thin films were characterized by measuring the XRD spectra, SEM images, optical transmittance and reflectance, and sheet resistance of the films before and after calcination in N2 environment or plasma treatment. The presence of sharp and narrow multiple peaks in XRD spectra hint us that the films were highly crystalline (polycrystalline. The samples Sair with the thickness of 471 nm showed as high as 92 % transmittance in the visible range. Moreover, from the tauc plot, the optical bandgap Eg values of the Sair found to be noticeably lower than that of the samples SN2. Very surprisingly, the electrical sheet resistance (Rsh found to decrease following the trend as Rshair > RshN2 > RshPl. The samples exposed to plasma found to possess the lowest RshPl (for film with thickness 546 nm, the RshPl was 17 Ω/sq..

  16. Environment effects on the optical properties of some fluorinated poly(oxadiazole ether)s in binary solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homocianu, Mihaela; Ipate, Alina Mirela; Hamciuc, Corneliu; Airinei, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of some fluorinated poly(oxadiazole ether)s was studied using UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy in neat solvents and in their solvent mixtures at several ratios of cosolvents. Quantitative investigations of the spectral changes caused by solvent polarity were discussed using the Lippert‐Mataga, Bakhshiev and Kawski–Chamma–Viallet polarity functions. Repartitioning of cosolvent between local (solvation shell) and bulk phase was investigated by means of a solvatochromic shift method in chloroform–N,N-dimethylformamide (CHCl 3 /DMF) and chloroform–dimethyl sulfoxide (CHCl 3 /DMSO) solvent mixtures. Solvatochromic properties in the binary solvent environments were predominantly influenced by the acidity and basicity of the solvent systems. The fluorescence quenching process by nitrobenzene was characterized by Stern–Volmer plots which display a positive deviation from linearity. This was explained by static and dynamic quenching mechanisms. - Highlights: • Solvatochromic behavior in solvent mixtures was studied. • Stokes shift and local environments in binary mixed solvent were discussed. • Repartitioning of cosolvent between local and bulk phase in solvent mixture has been investigated. • Fluorescence intensity was quenched in presence of nitrobenzene

  17. Changes in the composition, structure and friction property of sputtered MoS2 films by LEO environment exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Hu, Ming; Sun, Jiayi; Fu, Yanlong; Yang, Jun; Liu, Weimin; Weng, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sputtered MoS 2 films were exposed in real low earth orbit (LEO) environment. • LEO exposure resulted in the oxidation and S loss of MoS 2 film surface. • Depth affected by the LEO exposure was limited within 10 nm. • The exposed MoS 2 film exhibited a slight increase in friction coefficient at initial sliding stage. - Abstract: Radio frequency-sputtered MoS 2 films had been exposed for 43.5 h in real low earth orbit (LEO) space environment by a space environment exposure device (SEED) aboard China Shenzhou-7 manned spaceship. The composition, morphology, phase structure and friction property of the exposed films were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and ball-on-disk tribometer. XRD and EDS results revealed that the as-deposited MoS 2 films were characterized by a MoS x O y phase structure, in which x and y values were determined to be ∼0.65 and 1.24, respectively. XPS analysis revealed that due to space atomic oxygen attack, the film surface was oxidized to MoO 3 and MoS x O y with higher O concentration, while the partial S was lost. However, the affected depth was restricted within the surface layer because of protective function of the oxidation layer. As a result, the friction coefficient only exhibited a slight increase at initial stage of sliding friction

  18. Effect of laser fluence on surface, structural and mechanical properties of Zr after irradiation in the ambient environment of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelani, M.; Bashir, S.; Khaleeq-ur Rehman, M.; Ahamad, R.; Ul-Haq, F.; Yousaf, D.; Akram, M.; Afzal, N.; Umer Chaudhry, M.; Mahmood, K.; Hayat, A.; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2013-01-01

    The laser irradiation effects on surface, structural and mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) have been investigated. For this purpose, Zr samples were irradiated with Excimer (KrF) laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 18 ns, repetition rate ∼ 30 Hz). The irradiation was performed under the ambient environment of oxygen gas at filling pressure of 20 torr by varying laser fluences ranging from 3.8 to 5.1 cm -2 . The surface and structural modification of irradiated targets was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). In order to explore the mechanical properties of irradiated Zr, the tensile testing and Vickers micro hardness testing techniques were employed. SEM analysis reveals the grain growth on the irradiated Zr surfaces for all fluences. However, the largest sized grains are grown for the lowest fluence of 3.8 J/cm 2 . With increasing fluence from 4.3 to 5.1 J cm -2 , the compactness and density of grains increase whereas their size decreases. XRD analysis reveals the appearance of new phases of ZrO 2 and Zr 3 O. The variation in the peak intensity is observed to be anomalous whereas decreasing trend in the crystallite size and residual stresses has been observed with increasing fluence. Micro hardness analysis reveals the increasing trend in surface hardness with increasing fluence. The tensile testing exhibits the increasing trend of yield stress (YS), decreasing trend of percentage elongation and anomalous behaviour of ultimate tensile strength with increasing fluence. (authors)

  19. Substrate-Versatile Approach to Robust Antireflective and Superhydrophobic Coatings with Excellent Self-Cleaning Property in Varied Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tingting; He, Junhui

    2017-10-04

    Robust antireflective and superhydrophobic coatings are highly desired in wide applications, such as optical devices, solar cell panels, architectural and automotive glasses, lab-on chip systems, and windows for electronic devices. Meanwhile, simple, low-cost, and substrate-versatile fabrication is also essential toward real applications of such coatings. Herein, we developed a substrate-versatile strategy to fabricate robust antireflective and superhydrophobic coatings with excellent self-cleaning property in varied environments, including air and oil and after oil contamination. A mixed ethanol suspension, which consists of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane modified dual-sized silica nanoparticles and acid-catalyzed silica precursor, was first synthesized. The acid-catalyzed silica precursor could help to form a highly cross-linked silica network by connecting the silica nanoparticles, thus significantly enhancing the robustness of coatings. The as-prepared coatings were able to withstand a water drop impact test, sand abrasion test, tape adhesion test, and knife and pencil scratching tests. More importantly, it was also found that the wettability and self-cleaning property of coatings after oil contamination were surprisingly different from those in air and oil. These observations are explainable by the alteration of interface; i.e., the alteration of interface has significant effects on the functional properties of coatings. Additionally, the mixed suspension could be sprayed onto various hard and soft substrates including glass, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polycarbonate (PC), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), opening up a feasible route toward varied practical applications in solar cell panels, optical devices, architectural and automotive glasses, droplet manipulators, and fluid control.

  20. Study of the environment and optical properties of Ti3+ ions formed under ionizing irradiations in oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    We studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), by EPR simulation, by Raman spectroscopy and by photoluminescence the Ti 3+ ions formed under β-irradiation from 3, 37 * 10 5 to 1, 68 * 10 9 Gy in SiO 2 - Na 2 O - TiO 2 and SiO 2 - Al 2 0 3 - B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O - TiO 2 glasses. We demonstrate the existence of three different Ti 3+ sites in silicate glasses and three other Ti 3+ sites in alumino-borosilicate glasses. One of theses sites is common to both kind of glasses. Moreover, we associate theses sites to three different titanium environment: (VI)Ti 3+ (octahedral), (V)Ti 3+ square pyramid and may be (V)Ti 3+ trigonal bi - pyramid. The existence of theses sites is determined by the total integrated dose and by the [Na]/[Ti] ratio. We propose a definition of this ratio in the special case of SiO 2 - Al 2 O 3 - B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O - TiO 2 glasses. Last, under 266 nm excitation, we observe at room temperature an emission band at 500 nm attributed to Ti 4+ ions. Under a 532 nm excitation, we observe an emission band at 590 nm with a short lifetime (hundred of ns) attributed either to Ti 3+ ions or to an irradiation defect formed near a Ti 4+ ion. Our study demonstrate that is possible to control by the chemical composition and the integrated dose the Ti 3+ environment and the emission properties of this ion in an oxide glass. (author)

  1. Is optimality in stomatal conductance an endogenous process or an emergent property arising from interactions with the environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco de Dios, Victor; Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Bahn, Michael; Milcu, Alexandru; Tissue, David; Voltas, Jordi; Roy, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Plants are sessile and poikilothermic organisms that need to respond and adjust promptly to an ever-changing environment. Over a single 24 h period, a plant may experience the same level of variation in radiation as in its entire life-time and, in some climates, the oscillation in day-night temperature and vapor pressure deficit might be of similar magnitude to that experienced across a full year. Plants need to maintain a positive C balance without depleting soil water reserves in the face of such a diverse environment, and feedbacks between assimilation (A) and water losses (E) are thought to have evolved to optimize stomatal conductance (gs). In short, the optimal conductance hypothesis proposes that cross-talks between A and stomatal conductance gs lead to a constant marginal water use (λ) during a day, such that A is maximized and E minimized. The biological mechanism by which biochemical processes would feedback gs remains unknown, but multiple studies have shown empirical support for this hypothesis, leading to its current consideration of theory by many. Here we test whether optimal stomatal conductance is an endogenous property, that is, driven solely by factors internal to the plant, and in the absence of environmental fluctuations. After 5 days of entrainment, where monoculture canopies of bean and of cotton were subjected to the average environmental conditions of an August sunny day in Montpellier (at the CNRS European Ecotron, FR), we kept temperature, relative humidity and photosynthetically active radiation constant for 48 h at the values observed at noon. During this period, we monitored leaf gas exchange continuously every two minutes, and canopy gas exchange every 15 minutes. We observed a periodic oscillation in λ, showing a 24 h period, and consistent with a circadian regulation of water use efficiency. Hourly variations in λ could thus not be explained by the optimal stomatal hypothesis. Moreover, the pattern of variation (of maximal water

  2. Estimation of environment-related properties of chemicals for design of sustainable processes: Development of group-contribution+ (GC+) models and uncertainty analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hukkerikar, Amol; Kalakul, Sawitree; Sarup, Bent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop group-3 contribution+ (GC+)method (combined group-contribution (GC) method and atom connectivity index (CI)) based 15 property models to provide reliable estimations of environment-related properties of organic chemicals together with uncertainties of estimated...... property values. For this purpose, a systematic methodology for property modeling and uncertainty analysis is used. The methodology includes a parameter estimation step to determine parameters of property models and an uncertainty analysis step to establish statistical information about the quality......, poly functional chemicals, etc.) taken from the database of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and from the database of USEtox is used. For property modeling and uncertainty analysis, the Marrero and Gani GC method and atom connectivity index method have been considered. In total, 22...

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Croatian Language Version of the Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire on Dental Medicine Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laktić, Martina; Kuftinec, Krešimir; Čelebić, Asja; Kovačić, Ines; Alhajj, Mohamed Nasser; Kiršić, Sanja Peršić

    2017-09-01

    To develop the Croatian version of the 41-item Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) for stress assessment of dental students in both, preclinical and clinical years of study and to test its psychometric properties in Croatian dental student population. The English version of the 41-Item DES questionnaire was first translated into the Croatian language. Subsequently, it was set on the google drive and filled out by a total of 202 students from the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 30 additional students from other Faculties. Students also assessed their overall level of stress on the Likert scale (1=no stress, 5=highest level of stress). Internal consistency was tested on 202 dental students; test-retest reliability on 30 dental students who filled out the same questionnaire twice; convergent validity on 202 dental students; and divergent validity on 202 dental students and 30 students from faculties not belonging to the biomedicine group. Internal consistency showed high Cronbach alpha coefficient (0.9) and test-retest reliability showed no significant difference (P>0.05) within the period of 14 days when stress level had not changed (vacation). Convergent validity was confirmed by the significant association between the DES summary scores and the self- perceived level of stress (Spearman's rho=0.881; P <0.001). Divergent validity was confirmed by significantly lower DES summary scores in students not belonging to the Biomedicine group (t=7.5, P<0.001). Excellent psychometric properties of the Croatian version of the DES questionnaire enable its utilization for assessment of stress level in Croatian dental students.

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Croatian Language Version of the Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire on Dental Medicine Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Laktić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop the Croatian version of the 41-item Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES for stress assessment of dental students in both, preclinical and clinical years of study and to test its psychometric properties in Croatian dental student population. Materials and Methods: The English version of the 41-Item DES questionnaire was first translated into the Croatian language. Subsequently, it was set on the google drive and filled out by a total of 202 students from the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 30 additional students from other Faculties. Students also assessed their overall level of stress on the Likert scale (1=no stress, 5=highest level of stress. Internal consistency was tested on 202 dental students; test-retest reliability on 30 dental students who filled out the same questionnaire twice; convergent validity on 202 dental students; and divergent validity on 202 dental students and 30 students from faculties not belonging to the biomedicine group. Results: Internal consistency showed high Cronbach alpha coefficient (0.9 and test-retest reliability showed no significant difference (P>0.05 within the period of 14 days when stress level had not changed (vacation. Convergent validity was confirmed by the significant association between the DES summary scores and the self- perceived level of stress (Spearman’s rho=0.881; P<0.001. Divergent validity was confirmed by significantly lower DES summary scores in students not belonging to the Biomedicine group (t=7.5, P<0.001. Conclusion: Excellent psychometric properties of the Croatian version of the DES questionnaire enable its utilization for assessment of stress level in Croatian dental students.

  5. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOLMBERG IX X-1 AND ITS STELLAR ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grise, F.; Kaaret, P.; Pakull, M. W.; Motch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Holmberg IX X-1 is an archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). Here we study the properties of the optical counterpart and of its stellar environment using optical data from SUBARU/Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph, GEMINI/GMOS-N and Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys, as well as simultaneous Chandra X-ray data. The V ∼ 22.6 spectroscopically identified optical counterpart is part of a loose cluster with an age ∼ sun . The counterpart is more luminous than the other stars of the association, suggesting a non-negligible optical contribution from the accretion disk. An observed UV excess also points to non-stellar light similar to X-ray active low-mass X-ray binaries. A broad He II λ4686 emission line identified in the optical spectrum of the ULX further suggests optical light from X-ray reprocessing in the accretion disk. Using stellar evolutionary tracks, we have constrained the mass of the counterpart to be ∼> 10 M sun , even if the accretion disk contributes significantly to the optical luminosity. Comparison of the photometric properties of the counterpart with binary models show that the donor may be more massive, ∼> 25 M sun , with the ULX system likely undergoing case AB mass transfer. Finally, the counterpart exhibits photometric variability of 0.14 mag between two HST observations separated by 50 days which could be due to ellipsoidal variations and/or disk reprocessing of variable X-ray emission.

  6. Fabrication of transparent cellulose acetate/graphene oxide nanocomposite film for UV shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahan, Nusrat; Khan, Wasi, E-mail: wasiamu@gmail.com; Azam, Ameer; Naqvi, A. H. [Department of Applied Physics, Z.H. College of Engineering & Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh - 202002 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In this work, we have fabricated transparent cellulose acetate/graphene oxide nanocomposite (CAGONC) films for ultraviolet radiations (UVR) shielding. Graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized by modified Hummer’s method and CAGONC films were fabricated by solvent casting method. The films were analyzed using characterization techniques like x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) equipped scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy. Four films were prepared by varying the wt% of GO (0.1wt%, 0.2wt% and 0.3wt%) with respect to cellulose acetate (CA). UV-vis measurements exhibit optical transparency in the range of 76-99% for visible light while ultra-violet radiation was substantially shielded.

  7. Properties and local environment of p-type and photoluminescent rare earths implanted into ZnO single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Rita, EMC; Wahl, U; Soares, JC

    This thesis presents an experimental study of the local environment of p-type and Rare- Earth dopants implanted in ZnO single-crystals (SCs). Various nuclear and bulk property techniques were combined in the following evaluations: Implantation damage annealing was evaluated in ZnO SCs implanted with Fe, Sr and Ca. P-type dopants Cu and Ag implanted ZnO SCs were studied revealing that the solubility of Cu in substituting Zn is considerably higher than that of Ag. These results are discussed within the scope of the ZnO p-type doping problematic with these elements. Experimental proofs of the As “anti-site” behavior in ZnO were for the first time attained, i.e., the majority of As atoms are substitutional at the Zn site (SZn), possibly surrounded by two Zn vacancies (VZn). This reinforces the theoretical prediction that As acts as an acceptor in ZnO via the AsZn-2VZn complex formation. The co-doping of ZnO SC with In (donor) and As (acceptor) was addressed. The most striking result is the possible In-As “p...

  8. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate sensitizing effect on the photophysical properties of environment friendly fluorescent films containing europium complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chaolong, E-mail: yclzjun@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Zhang, Pan; Zhou, Hualin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Xu, Jing [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Azaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan); Li, Youbing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Lu, Mangeng [Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials for Electronics, Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Lei, Lei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Shaopeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2016-10-15

    A series of environment friendly Eu/PHB fluorescent films through doped the Eu-complex precursor Eu(TTA){sub 2}(Tpy-OCH{sub 3})(2H{sub 2}O) into polymer matrices poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) with doping percentage at 1, 3, 5, and 7 (mass) were designed, fabricated and characterized. TGA and PL results indicated the Eu-complex precursor was immobilized in PHB matrix through the interaction between the Eu-complex. DSC results indicated the crystallinity of Eu/PHB films decreased with the increase of Eu-complex doping percentage. The emission spectra of the Eu-complex and Eu/PHB films recorded at room temperature exhibited the characteristic bands arising from the {sup 5}D{sub 0}/{sup 7}F{sub J}. The fact that the quantum efficiencies (η) of the doped film increased significantly revealed that the PHB matrix acts as an efficient co-sensitizer for Eu{sup 3+} ions luminescent center and therefore enhances the quantum efficiency of the emitter {sup 5}D{sub 0} level. In particular, all Eu/PHB films can be excited by visible light (410 nm), and also showed good photoluminescent properties. So the new Eu/PHB fluorescent films showed considerable promise for polymer light-emitting diode, active polymer optical fiber and biomedical analysis applications.

  9. Establishment of database for Japan Sea parameters on marine environment and radioactivity (JASPER). Volume 2. Radiocarbon and oceanographic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Toshimichi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kawamura, Hideyuki; Togawa, Orihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Minakawa, Masayuki; Aramaki, Takafumi; Senjyu, Tomoharu

    2010-02-01

    The database for the Japan Sea Parameters on Marine Environment and Radionuclides (JASPER) has been established by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency as a product of the Japan Sea Expeditions. By the previous volume of the database, data for representative anthropogenic radionuclides (strontium-90, cesium-137, and plutonium-239, 240) were opened to public. And now, data for radiocarbon and fundamental oceanographic properties (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen) including nutrients (silicate, phosphate, nitrate and nitrite) are released as the second volume of the database. At the beginning of this report (chapter 1), backgrounds, objectives and brief overview of this report are given as an introduction. Then, specifications of this database and methodology in obtaining the concentration data are described in chapter 2. The data stored in the database are presented in tabular and figure forms in chapter 3. Finally, chapter 4 is assigned concluding remarks. In the second version of database, 20,292 data records are stored in the database including 2,695 data for temperature, 2,883 data for salinity, 2,109 data for dissolved oxygen, 11,051 data for the nutrients, and 1,660 data for radiocarbon. The database will be a strong tool for the continuous monitoring for contamination by anthropogenic radionuclides, studies on biogeochemical cycle, and development/validation of models for numerical simulations in the sea. (author)

  10. Alteration of isolating properties of dense smectite clay in repository environment as exemplified by seven pre-quaternary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Erlstroem, M.

    1987-12-01

    Seven pre-quaternary clays with a smectite content ranging between zero and about 25% were taken as possible reaction products resulting from chemical alteration of dense sodium bentonite. They were characterized with respect to the mineral composition and microstructural constitution and tested with reference to their hydraulic conductivity, swelling ability and creep properties. It was found that since they were all less permeable than a typical large granitic rock mass they would serve as flow barriers in a repository. Thus, even rather extreme chemical attack is not expected to eliminate the most important barrier function of Na bentonite in repository environment. However, slight mechanical disturbance of a heterogeneously altered smectite clay buffer or seal, may be critical. Thus, the investigated, less smectitic clays experienced a rather dramatic increase in hydraulic conductivity on expansion and remolding. This is explained by the inability of a microstructurally discontinuous smectite component - particularly in the Ca-form - to swell and fill voids. The minimum content of Na smectite to preserve the self-healing capacity is estimated at 15-25%. Slight or moderate cementation was indicated by two of the clays by the creep tests. At a smectite content of 15-25% it is probable that self-healing will take place after a mechanically induced breakage of the cementing bonds. The tests gave a good basis for future development of rational, routine tests as well as for a relevant characterization of buffer material candidates. (orig.)

  11. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate sensitizing effect on the photophysical properties of environment friendly fluorescent films containing europium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chaolong; Zhang, Pan; Zhou, Hualin; Xu, Jing; Li, Youbing; Lu, Mangeng; Lei, Lei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Shaopeng

    2016-01-01

    A series of environment friendly Eu/PHB fluorescent films through doped the Eu-complex precursor Eu(TTA) 2 (Tpy-OCH 3 )(2H 2 O) into polymer matrices poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) with doping percentage at 1, 3, 5, and 7 (mass) were designed, fabricated and characterized. TGA and PL results indicated the Eu-complex precursor was immobilized in PHB matrix through the interaction between the Eu-complex. DSC results indicated the crystallinity of Eu/PHB films decreased with the increase of Eu-complex doping percentage. The emission spectra of the Eu-complex and Eu/PHB films recorded at room temperature exhibited the characteristic bands arising from the 5 D 0 / 7 F J . The fact that the quantum efficiencies (η) of the doped film increased significantly revealed that the PHB matrix acts as an efficient co-sensitizer for Eu 3+ ions luminescent center and therefore enhances the quantum efficiency of the emitter 5 D 0 level. In particular, all Eu/PHB films can be excited by visible light (410 nm), and also showed good photoluminescent properties. So the new Eu/PHB fluorescent films showed considerable promise for polymer light-emitting diode, active polymer optical fiber and biomedical analysis applications.

  12. Effect of relative humidity on the tribological properties of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films in a nitrogen environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongxuan; Xu Tao; Wang Chengbing; Chen Jianmin; Zhou Huidi; Liu Huiwen

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (100) wafers by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique using CH 4 plus Ar as the feedstock. The friction and wear properties of the resulting films under different relative humidities, ranging from 5% to 100%, in a nitrogen environment, were measured using a ball-on-disc tribometer, with Si 3 N 4 balls as the counterparts. The friction surfaces of the films and Si 3 N 4 balls were observed on a scanning electron microscope, and investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the friction coefficient increased continuously from 0.025 to 0.09 with increase in relative humidity from 5% to 100%, while the wear rate of the films sharply decreased and reached a minimum at a relative humidity of 40%, then it increased with further increase of the relative humidity. The interruption of the transferred carbon-rich layer on the Si 3 N 4 ball, and the friction-induced oxidation of the films at higher relative humidity were proposed as the main reasons for the increase in the friction coefficient. Moreover, the oxidation and hydrolysis of the Si 3 N 4 ball at higher relative humidity, leading to the formation of a tribochemical film, which mainly consists of silica gel, on the friction surface, are also thought to influence the friction and wear behaviour of the hydrogenated DLC films

  13. Evaluation of the vibration attenuation properties of an air-inflated cushion with two different heavy machinery seats in multi-axis vibration environments including jolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoxu; Eger, Tammy R; Dickey, James P

    2017-03-01

    Seats and cushions can attenuate whole-body vibration (WBV) exposures and minimize health risks for heavy machine operators. We successfully developed neural network (NN) algorithms to identify the vibration attenuation properties for four different seating conditions (seat/cushion combinations), and implemented each of the NN models to predict the equivalent daily exposure A(8) values for various vehicles in the forestry and mining environments. We also evaluated the performance of the new prototype No-Jolt™ air-inflated cushion and the original cushion of each seat with jolt exposures. We observed that the air cushion significantly improved the vibration attenuation properties of the seat that initially had good performance, but not for the seat that had relatively poor vibration attenuation properties. In addition, operator's anthropometrics and sex influenced the performance of the air-inflated cushion when the vibration environment included jolt exposures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deriving movement properties and the effect of the environment from the Brownian bridge movement model in monkeys and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchin, Kevin; Sijben, Stef; van Loon, E Emiel; Sapir, Nir; Mercier, Stéphanie; Marie Arseneau, T Jean; Willems, Erik P

    2015-01-01

    The Brownian bridge movement model (BBMM) provides a biologically sound approximation of the movement path of an animal based on discrete location data, and is a powerful method to quantify utilization distributions. Computing the utilization distribution based on the BBMM while calculating movement parameters directly from the location data, may result in inconsistent and misleading results. We show how the BBMM can be extended to also calculate derived movement parameters. Furthermore we demonstrate how to integrate environmental context into a BBMM-based analysis. We develop a computational framework to analyze animal movement based on the BBMM. In particular, we demonstrate how a derived movement parameter (relative speed) and its spatial distribution can be calculated in the BBMM. We show how to integrate our framework with the conceptual framework of the movement ecology paradigm in two related but acutely different ways, focusing on the influence that the environment has on animal movement. First, we demonstrate an a posteriori approach, in which the spatial distribution of average relative movement speed as obtained from a "contextually naïve" model is related to the local vegetation structure within the monthly ranging area of a group of wild vervet monkeys. Without a model like the BBMM it would not be possible to estimate such a spatial distribution of a parameter in a sound way. Second, we introduce an a priori approach in which atmospheric information is used to calculate a crucial parameter of the BBMM to investigate flight properties of migrating bee-eaters. This analysis shows significant differences in the characteristics of flight modes, which would have not been detected without using the BBMM. Our algorithm is the first of its kind to allow BBMM-based computation of movement parameters beyond the utilization distribution, and we present two case studies that demonstrate two fundamentally different ways in which our algorithm can be applied to

  15. Analysis of the Pseudoalteromonas tunicata genome reveals properties of a surface-associated life style in the marine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colonisation of sessile eukaryotic host surfaces (e.g. invertebrates and seaweeds by bacteria is common in the marine environment and is expected to create significant inter-species competition and other interactions. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata is a successful competitor on marine surfaces owing primarily to its ability to produce a number of inhibitory molecules. As such P. tunicata has become a model organism for the studies into processes of surface colonisation and eukaryotic host-bacteria interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain a broader understanding into the adaptation to a surface-associated life-style, we have sequenced and analysed the genome of P. tunicata and compared it to the genomes of closely related strains. We found that the P. tunicata genome contains several genes and gene clusters that are involved in the production of inhibitory compounds against surface competitors and secondary colonisers. Features of P. tunicata's oxidative stress response, iron scavenging and nutrient acquisition show that the organism is well adapted to high-density communities on surfaces. Variation of the P. tunicata genome is suggested by several landmarks of genetic rearrangements and mobile genetic elements (e.g. transposons, CRISPRs, phage. Surface attachment is likely to be mediated by curli, novel pili, a number of extracellular polymers and potentially other unexpected cell surface proteins. The P. tunicata genome also shows a utilisation pattern of extracellular polymers that would avoid a degradation of its recognised hosts, while potentially causing detrimental effects on other host types. In addition, the prevalence of recognised virulence genes suggests that P. tunicata has the potential for pathogenic interactions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genome analysis has revealed several physiological features that would provide P. tunciata with competitive advantage against other members of the surface

  16. Analysis of the Pseudoalteromonas tunicata genome reveals properties of a surface-associated life style in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Torsten; Evans, Flavia F; Schleheck, David; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Burke, Catherine; Penesyan, Anahit; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Saunders, Neil; Johnson, Justin; Ferriera, Steve; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Egan, Suhelen

    2008-09-24

    Colonisation of sessile eukaryotic host surfaces (e.g. invertebrates and seaweeds) by bacteria is common in the marine environment and is expected to create significant inter-species competition and other interactions. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata is a successful competitor on marine surfaces owing primarily to its ability to produce a number of inhibitory molecules. As such P. tunicata has become a model organism for the studies into processes of surface colonisation and eukaryotic host-bacteria interactions. To gain a broader understanding into the adaptation to a surface-associated life-style, we have sequenced and analysed the genome of P. tunicata and compared it to the genomes of closely related strains. We found that the P. tunicata genome contains several genes and gene clusters that are involved in the production of inhibitory compounds against surface competitors and secondary colonisers. Features of P. tunicata's oxidative stress response, iron scavenging and nutrient acquisition show that the organism is well adapted to high-density communities on surfaces. Variation of the P. tunicata genome is suggested by several landmarks of genetic rearrangements and mobile genetic elements (e.g. transposons, CRISPRs, phage). Surface attachment is likely to be mediated by curli, novel pili, a number of extracellular polymers and potentially other unexpected cell surface proteins. The P. tunicata genome also shows a utilisation pattern of extracellular polymers that would avoid a degradation of its recognised hosts, while potentially causing detrimental effects on other host types. In addition, the prevalence of recognised virulence genes suggests that P. tunicata has the potential for pathogenic interactions. The genome analysis has revealed several physiological features that would provide P. tunciata with competitive advantage against other members of the surface-associated community. We have also identified properties that could mediate interactions

  17. Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piele, Philip K.

    Numerous cases in this year's chapter dealt with the same topics of previous years--contracts and bids for building construction, and detachment and annexation of a portion of a school district. The courts continued to attribute board discretionary authority to school boards in school property matters. Intergovernmental disputes over ownership or…

  18. Evaluation of the Thermophysical Properties of Poly(MethylMethacrylate): A Reference Material for the Development of a flammability Test for Micro-Gravity Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhaus, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    A study has been conducted using PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) as a reference material in the development process of the Forced Flow and flame Spread Test (FIST). This test attempts to establish different criteria for material flammability for micro-gravity environments. The FIST consists of two tests, ignition and flame spread tests, that provide a series of material “fire” properties that jointly provide important information on the flammability of a material. This work de...

  19. Intellectual property rights and research disclosure in the university environment: preserving the commercialization option and optimizing market interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Clinical and basic scientists at academic medical and biomedical research institutions often form ideas that could have both monetary and human health benefits if developed and applied to improvement of human wellbeing. However, such ideas lose much of their potential value in both regards if they are disclosed in traditional knowledge-sharing forums such as abstracts, posters, and oral presentations at research meetings. Learning the basics about intellectual property protection and obtaining professional guidance in the management of intellectual property from a knowledgeable technology management professional or intellectual property attorney can avoid such losses yet pose a minimal burden of confidentiality on the investigator. Knowing how to successfully navigate the early stages of intellectual property protection can greatly increase the likelihood that discoveries and knowledge will become available for the public good without diminishing the important mandate of disseminating knowledge through traditional knowledge-sharing forums.

  20. The Application of Intentional Subjective Properties and Mediated Communication Tools to Software Agents in Online Disputes Resolution Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Gobbin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the use of subjective properties in modeling an architecture for cooperative agents using Agent Communication Language (ACL that is used as a mediating tool for cooperative communication activities between and within software agents. The role that subjective and objective properties have in explaining and modeling agent internalization and externalization of ACL messages is investigated and related to Vygotsky’s developmental learning theories such as Mediated Activity Theory. A novel agent architecture ALMA (Agent Language Mediated Activity based on the integration of agents’ subjective and objective properties within an agent communication activity framework will be presented. The relevance of software agents subjective properties in modeling applications such as e-Law Online Dispute Resolution for e-business contractual arrangements using natural language subject/object relation in their communication patterns will be discussed.

  1. Lacustrine Environment Reservoir Properties on Sandstone Minerals and Hydrocarbon Content: A Case Study on Doba Basin, Southern Chad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumery, N. F. Mohd; Lo, S. Z.; Salim, A. M. A.

    2017-10-01

    The contribution of lacustrine environment as the hydrocarbon reservoir has been widely known. However, despite its growing importance, the lacustrine petroleum geology has received far less attention than marine due to its sedimentological complexity. This study therefore aims in developing an understanding of the unique aspects of lacustrine reservoirs which eventually impacts the future exploration decisions. Hydrocarbon production in Doba Basin, particularly the northern boundary, for instance, has not yet succeeded due to the unawareness of its depositional environment. The drilling results show that the problems were due to the: radioactive sand and waxy oil/formation damage, which all are related to the lacustrine depositional environment. Detailed study of geological and petrophysical integration on wireline logs and petrographic thin sections analysis of this environment helps in distinguishing reservoir and non-reservoir areas and determining the possible mechanism causing the failed DST results. The interpretations show that the correlation of all types> of logs and rho matrix analysis are capable in identifying sand and shale bed despite of the radioactive sand present. The failure of DST results were due to the presence of arkose in sand and waxy oil in reservoir bed. This had been confirmed by the petrographic thin section analysis where the arkose has mineral twinning effect indicate feldspar and waxy oil showing bright colour under fluorescent light. Understanding these special lacustrine environment characteristics and features will lead to a better interpretation of hydrocarbon prospectivity for future exploration.

  2. Oxyhydroxide of metallic nanowires in a molecular H2O and H2O2 environment and their effects on mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Gurcan; Islam, Md Mahbubul; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Duin, Adri C T van

    2018-06-14

    To avoid unexpected environmental mechanical failure, there is a strong need to fully understand the details of the oxidation process and intrinsic mechanical properties of reactive metallic iron (Fe) nanowires (NWs) under various aqueous reactive environmental conditions. Herein, we employed ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to elucidate the oxidation of Fe NWs exposed to molecular water (H2O) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) environment, and the influence of the oxide shell layer on the tensile mechanical deformation properties of Fe NWs. Our structural analysis shows that oxidation of Fe NWs occurs with the formation of different iron oxide and hydroxide phases in the aqueous molecular H2O and H2O2 oxidizing environments. We observe that the resulting microstructure due to pre-oxide shell layer formation reduces the mechanical stress via increasing the initial defect sites in the vicinity of the oxide region to facilitate the onset of plastic deformation during tensile loading. Specifically, the oxide layer of Fe NWs formed in the H2O2 environment has a relatively significant effect on the deterioration of the mechanical properties of Fe NWs. The weakening of the yield stress and Young modulus of H2O2 oxidized Fe NWs indicates the important role of local oxide microstructures on mechanical deformation properties of individual Fe NWs. Notably, deformation twinning is found as the primary mechanical plastic deformation mechanism of all Fe NWs, but it is initially observed at low strain and stress level for the oxidized Fe NWs.

  3. Experimental investigation on the effect of process environment on the mechanical properties of AA5083/Al2O3 nanocomposite fabricated via friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashjari, M.; Mostafapour Asl, A.; Rouhi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir processing, a lately devised grain refining and also microstructure homogenizing technique, has extensively been used on aluminum alloys. Significance of limiting the grain growth during the process, has made lots of researchers make endeavor to keep, as one of the ways of controlling grain growth, the process temperature low; one way of doing so, is performing the friction stir process under water, which keeps the peak temperature low and increases the cooling rate as well. In the present work, research has been done to make known the effects of doing submerged friction stir processing on mechanical properties of AA5083/Al 2 O 3p composite. The process was completed on each sample without changing the rotation and traverse speed of the tool. The pin of the tool was a threaded cylindrical one. Tensile and micro-hardness tests were used to evaluate the effect of the process on these properties of the samples. Also to study the microstructure of the samples, optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs were used. The results show that, underwater friction stir process is capable of producing defect-free AA5083/Al 2 O 3p nanocomposite. Analyzing the properties of the processed samples showed that, by significantly reducing the grain size, water environment has positive impact on the mechanical properties of the alloy; And that, Hall–Petch effect is more powerful than Orowan mechanism in enhancing the mechanical properties of the samples

  4. The properties of protective oxide scales containing cerium on alloy 800H in oxidizing and oxidizing/sulphidizing environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Fransen, T.; Geerdink, Bert; Gellings, P.J.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion protection of oxide scales formed by electrophoretic deposition in a cerium-containing sol on Alloy 800H, a 32Ni-20Cr steel, followed by firing in air at 1123 K was studied in oxidizing and mixed oxidizing/sulphidizing environments at elevated temperatures. In particular, the influence

  5. Can the job content questionnaire be used to assess structural and organizational properties of the work environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Roger; Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, Anne Helene

    2012-01-01

    The theory behind the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) presumes that the "objective" social environment is measurable via self-report inventories such as the JCQ. Hence, it is expected that workers in identical work will respond highly similar. However, since no studies have evaluated this basic...... assumption, we decided to investigate whether workers performing highly similar work also responded similarly to the JCQ....

  6. Monitoring the degradation of physical properties and fire hazards of high-impact polystyrene composite with different ageing time in natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bibo; Zhang, Yan; Tao, Youji; Zhou, Xia; Song, Lei; Jie, Ganxin; Hu, Yuan

    2018-06-15

    The current study aims at monitoring the role of the different natural environments on the physical properties and fire hazards of HIPS composites ageing in Turpan and Qionghai. The results indicated that the chromatic aberration and degradation of surface appearance intensified with the increasing ageing time. More flame retardants migrated and were eroded for HIPS composites ageing in Qionghai than those ageing in Turpan, which was caused by the combination of sunlight, high temperature and rainwater in Qionghai. After degradation in the natural environments, the HIPS composites possessed the lower thermal stability and char residues, more toxic gases release, higher peak heat release rate and fire hazard. For example, the peak heat release rate in Qionghai increased by 88.9%, which is much higher than that of in Turpan (55.6%). Moreover, the tensile strength and elongation at break decreased by 46% and 59% for HIPS composites ageing in Turpan and reduced by 53% and 67% for HIPS composites aged in Qionghai, respectively. The results demonstrate that more serious degradation of physical properties and higher fire hazard for HIPS composites ageing in Qionghai than those in Turpan due to the different natural ageing environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units using matrix properties and depositional history in a complex volcanic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Buesch, David C.; Flint, Alan L.

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of the physical and unsaturated hydrologic properties of subsurface materials is necessary to calculate flow and transport for land use practices and to evaluate subsurface processes such as perched water or lateral diversion of water, which are influenced by features such as faults, fractures, and abrupt changes in lithology. Input for numerical flow models typically includes parameters that describe hydrologic properties and the initial and boundary conditions for all materials in the unsaturated zone, such as bulk density, porosity, and particle density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture-retention characteristics, and field water content. We describe an approach for systematically evaluating the site features that contribute to water flow, using physical and hydraulic data collected at the laboratory scale, to provide a representative set of physical and hydraulic parameters for numerically calculating flow of water through the materials at a site. An example case study from analyses done for the heterogeneous, layered, volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain is presented, but the general approach for parameterization could be applied at any site where depositional processes follow deterministic patterns. Hydrogeologic units at this site were defined using (i) a database developed from 5320 rock samples collected from the coring of 23 shallow (deep (500–1000 m) boreholes, (ii) lithostratigraphic boundaries and corresponding relations to porosity, (iii) transition zones with pronounced changes in properties over short vertical distances, (iv) characterization of the influence of mineral alteration on hydrologic properties such as permeability and moisture-retention characteristics, and (v) a statistical analysis to evaluate where boundaries should be adjusted to minimize the variance within layers. Model parameters developed in this study, and the relation of flow properties to porosity, can be used to produce detailed and accurate

  8. Effects of chemical and gamma irradiation environments on the mechanical properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.

    1988-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) is currently being used as a high-integrity container material for low-level wastes. Potential failure/degration modes must be determined for realistic environmental conditions. These include consideration of mechanical stress, gaseous/liquid environments within and external to the container, and the gamma radiation field. A combination of simple inexpensive tests (stressed U-bend samples) and more sophisticated longer-term uniaxial creep tests are being used to define the ranges of conditions for which mechanical failure/degradation is important. Test environments include Igepal CO-630, turbine oil and liquid scintillation fluid as well as air and deionized water, the control environments. Igepal CO-630 is a surfactant specified in standard ASTM tests for environmental stress cracking. Turbine oil is a possible constituent of low-level waste generated at reactor power plants, and is used in the current tests because of its known detrimental behavior to many types of plastic. Liquid scintillation fluids are being evaluated here because they are representative of the class of organiz solvents containing toluene and xylene. As such they will give valuable insights regarding a type of potential failure or degradation mode for HDPE. The effect of gamma irradiation on crack initiation and propagation is also being studied. A description of the work and results are presented. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  9. The effect of micro-environment on luminescence of aequorin: the role of amino acids and explicit water molecules on spectroscopic properties of coelenteramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuo-Sheng; Zou, Lu-Yi; Min, Chun-Gang; Ren, Ai-Min

    2013-10-05

    Despite the fact that the luminescence reaction mechanism of aequorin has been intensively investigated, details in luminescence such as the effect of important amino acids residues and explicit water molecules on spectroscopic properties of coelenteramide remain unclear. In this work, the effect of amino acids residues His16, Tyr82, Trp86, Phe113, Trp129, Tyr132, explicit water molecules Wat505 and Wat405 on the spectral properties of CLM(-) has been studied by CAM-B3LYP, TD M06L and TD CAM-B3LYP methods in hydrophobic environment and aqueous solution. In hydrophobic environment, the amino acids or water molecules have no significant effect on the absorption. Tyr82 and Trp86 move close to CLM(-) changes the hydrogen bond network, and thus, the spectral properties is significantly affected by the hydrogen bonds between His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86 and CLM(-). Tyr82, Trp86 hydrogen bonding to CLM(-) upshifts the excited energy and helps emission spectra shift to blue region. Therefore, it is concluded that His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86 modify the emission spectra. The molecular electrostatic potential indicated that the greater electron density is located at the oxygen atom of 6-p-hydroxyphenyl group of CLM(-), and it facilitates the formation of hydrogen bond with His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86. It is a critical condition for the modification of emission spectra. It is expected to help to understand the interactions between emitter and amino acids in the micro environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multicarboxylic acids as environment-friendly solvents and in situ crosslinkers for chitosan/PVA nanofibers with tunable physicochemical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangon, Autchara; Saesoo, Somsak; Saengkrit, Nattika; Ruktanonchai, Uracha; Intasanta, Varol

    2016-03-15

    Monocarboxylic acids are common solvents for chitosan to fabricate nanofibers however the unpleasant odor and the additional step of fiber stabilization using crosslinkers, which might cause toxicity, are always the points to be aware of. The present work demonstrates the potential use of multicarboxylic acids as environment-friendly solvents and in situ crosslinking agents for chitosan electrospinning. The use of these solvents leads to the tunable physicochemical properties, cellular compatibility, and cost effective production. By changing di-, to tri-, and tetracarboxylic acids combining with the simple thermal treatment, the stability and mechanical properties of the nanofibrous mats, especially the elastic modulus and elongation at break, can be altered. The resulting nanofibers exhibit biocompatibility favorable for proliferation and adhesion of the osteoblast cells. The multicarboxylic acids allow us lab-scale reproducibility and possibility to semi-production of nanofibrous chitosan using Nanospider™. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling the hydrophysical soil properties as a part of self-regulated flood dams projection in gis-environment for sustainable urban development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorov, Aleksandr; Terleev, Vitaly; Badenko, Vladimir; Mirschel, Wilfried; Abakumov, Evgeny; Ginevsky, Roman; Lazarev, Viktor; Togo, Issa; Volkova, Yulia; Melnichuk, Aleksandr; Dunaieva, Ielizaveta; Akimov, Luka

    2017-10-01

    The problem of flood protection measures are considered in the paper. The regulation of river flow by the system of Self-Regulated Flood Dams (SRFD) is analyzed. The method of SRFD modeling in GIS environment is proposed. The question of the ecological aspect of the SRFD management is considered based on the hydrophysical properties of the soil. The improved Mualem-Van Genuchted method is proposed for the evaluation of the possible SRFD location influence on the soil of flooded territory - the temporary reservoirs. The importance and utility of the proposed complex method is stated.

  12. Physics of Failure Analysis of Xilinx Flip Chip CCGA Packages: Effects of Mission Environments on Properties of LP2 Underfill and ATI Lid Adhesive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jong-ook

    2013-01-01

    The Xilinx Virtex 4QV and 5QV (V4 and V5) are next-generation field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) for space applications. However, there have been concerns within the space community regarding the non-hermeticity of V4/V5 packages; polymeric materials such as the underfill and lid adhesive will be directly exposed to the space environment. In this study, reliability concerns associated with the non-hermeticity of V4/V5 packages were investigated by studying properties and behavior of the underfill and the lid adhesvie materials used in V4/V5 packages.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM) questionnaire, Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Mohammad Mahdi; Amini, Mitra; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Peyman; Parvizi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation is the main component in design and implementation of educational activities and rapid growth of educational institution programs. Outpatient medical education and clinical training environment is one of the most important parts of training of medical residents. This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM) questionnaire, as an instrument for assessment of educational environments in residency medical clinics. This study was performed on 180 residents in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2014-2015. The questionnaire designers' electronic permission (by email) and the residents' verbal consent were obtained before distributing the questionnaires. The study data were gathered using ACLEEM questionnaire developed by Arnoldo Riquelme in 2013. The data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software, version 14, and MedCalc ® software. Then, the construct validity, including convergent and discriminant validities, of the Persian version of ACLEEM questionnaire was assessed. Its internal consistency was also checked by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Five team members who were experts in medical education were consulted to test the cultural adaptation, linguistic equivalency, and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire. Content validity indexes were >0.9 in all items. In factor analysis of the instrument, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index was 0.928 and Barlett's sphericity test yielded the following results: X 2 =6,717.551, df =1,225, and P ≤0.001. Besides, Cronbach's alpha coefficient of ACLEEM questionnaire was 0.964. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were also >0.80 in all the three domains of the questionnaire. Overall, the Persian version of ACLEEM showed excellent convergent validity and acceptable discriminant validity, except for the clinical training domain. According to the results, the Persian version of

  14. Poultry litter and the environment: Physiochemical properties of litter and soil during successive flock rotations and after remote site deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Tawni L; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Byrd, J Allen; Esquivel, Jesus F; Beier, Ross C; Yeater, Kathleen

    2016-05-15

    The U.S. broiler meat market has grown over the past 16 years and destinations for U.S. broiler meat exports expanded to over 150 countries. This market opportunity has spurred a corresponding increase in industrialized poultry production, which due to the confined space in which high numbers of animals are housed, risks accumulating nutrients and pollutants. The purpose of this research was to determine the level of pollutants within poultry litter and the underlying soil within a production facility; and to explore the impact of spent litter deposition into the environment. The study follows a production facility for the first 2.5 years of production. It monitors the effects of successive flocks and management practices on 15 physiochemical parameters: Ca, Cu, electrical conductivity, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, moisture, Na, NO3(-)/N, organic matter, P, pH, S, and Zn. Litter samples were collected in-house, after clean-outs and during stockpiling. The soil before house placement, after the clean-outs and following litter stockpiling was monitored. Management practices markedly altered the physiochemical profiles of the litter in-house. A canonical discriminant analysis was used to describe the relationship between the parameters and sampling times. The litter profiles grouped into five clusters corresponding to time and management practices. The soil in-house exhibited mean increases in all physiochemical parameters (2-297 fold) except Fe, Mg, %M, and pH. The spent litter was followed after deposition onto a field for use as fertilizer. After 20 weeks, the soil beneath the litter exhibited increases in EC, Cu, K, Na, NO3(-)/N, %OM, P, S and Zn; while %M decreased. Understanding the impacts of industrialized poultry farms on the environment is vital as the cumulative ecological impact of this land usage could be substantial if not properly managed to reduce the risk of potential pollutant infiltration into the environment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. An investigation on changes in chemical properties of pure ethylene-propylene-diene rubber in aqueous acidic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, S.; Ghanbari-Siahkali, Afshin; Kingshott, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The influence of two aqueous acidic environments on two types of pure ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) rubber (i.e., elastomer) thin films is studied. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) results revealed the formation of several oxygenated species...... formation on the surface of EPDM rubbers compared to 20% H2SO4 under identical conditions. Complex formation on the surface of EPDM samples exposed to 20% Cr(VI)/H2SO4 through reactions of carboxylic groups (generated due to EPDM degradation) with Cr(III) (formed due to reduction of Cr(VI)) was also evident...

  16. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM questionnaire, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvizi MM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Mahdi Parvizi,1,2 Mitra Amini,2 Mohammad Reza Dehghani,2 Peyman Jafari,3 Zahra Parvizi,1 1Health Policy Research Center, 2Quality Improvement in Clinical Education Research Center, 3Department of Biostatistics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Fars, Iran Purpose: Evaluation is the main component in design and implementation of educational activities and rapid growth of educational institution programs. Outpatient medical education and clinical training environment is one of the most important parts of training of medical residents. This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM questionnaire, as an instrument for assessment of educational environments in residency medical clinics. Materials and methods: This study was performed on 180 residents in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2014–2015. The questionnaire designers’ electronic permission (by email and the residents’ verbal consent were obtained before distributing the questionnaires. The study data were gathered using ACLEEM questionnaire developed by Arnoldo Riquelme in 2013. The data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software, version 14, and MedCalc® software. Then, the construct validity, including convergent and discriminant validities, of the Persian version of ACLEEM questionnaire was assessed. Its internal consistency was also checked by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Results: Five team members who were experts in medical education were consulted to test the cultural adaptation, linguistic equivalency, and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire. Content validity indexes were >0.9 in all items. In factor analysis of the instrument, the ­Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin index was 0.928 and Barlett’s sphericity test yielded the following results: X 2=6,717.551, df =1,225, and P ≤0.001. Besides, Cronbach

  17. Subsurface structure and physical properties; interim report for fiscal 2001 on frontiers in monitoring science and technology for earthquake environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    This report includes a final comment made and released by the advisory committee set up for fiscal 2001 by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) for inquiry into research progress in subsurface structure and physical properties at Tono Geoscience Center. The appendices contain the membership of the committee, the investigation procedure of the committee, the research subjects and objectives, the experimental results obtained and data included in the interim report including earthquake prediction study and its application for rock mechanics, geochemical and hydrological measurements and monitoring groundwater behaviors, and other materials submitted at the committee for the investigation. (S. Ohno)

  18. A study of hydrogen environment effects on microstructure property behavior of NASA-23 alloy and related alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwan, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the tensile properties and ductility behavior of NASA-23 alloy were analyzed. NASA-23 and other referenced alloys in cast and hipped conditions were solution treated and aged under selected conditions and characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis techniques. The yield strength of NASA-23 is not affected much by hydrogen under tensile tests carried at 5000 psig conditions; however, the ultimate strength and ductility properties are degraded. This implies that the physical mechanisms operating would be related to the plastic deformation process. The fracture surfaces characteristics of NASA-23 specimens tensile tested in hydrogen, helium, and air were also analyzed. These revealed surface cracks around specimen periphery with the fracture surface showing a combination of intergranular and transgranular modes of fracture. It is seen that the specimens charged in hydrogen seem to favor a more brittle fracture mode in comparison to air and helium charged specimens. The AMCC casting characterization program is to be analyzed for their hydrogen behavior. As a result of this program, the basic microstructural factors and fracture characteristics in some cases were analyzed

  19. A study of hydrogen environment effects on microstructure property behavior of NASA-23 alloy and related alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is part of the overall advanced main combustion chamber (AMCC) casting characterization program of the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The influence of hydrogen on the tensile properties and ductility behavior of NASA-23 alloy were analyzed. NASA-23 and other referenced alloys in cast and hipped conditions were solution treated and aged under selected conditions and characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis techniques. The yield strength of NASA-23 is not affected much by hydrogen under tensile tests carried at 5000 psig conditions; however, the ultimate strength and ductility properties are degraded. This implies that the physical mechanisms operating would be related to the plastic deformation process. The fracture surfaces characteristics of NASA-23 specimens tensile tested in hydrogen, helium, and air were also analyzed. These revealed surface cracks around specimen periphery with the fracture surface showing a combination of intergranular and transgranular modes of fracture. It is seen that the specimens charged in hydrogen seem to favor a more brittle fracture mode in comparison to air and helium charged specimens. The AMCC casting characterization program is to be analyzed for their hydrogen behavior. As a result of this program, the basic microstructural factors and fracture characteristics in some cases were analyzed.

  20. Comprehensive study of the influence of different environments on degradation processes in F8BT: Correlating optoelectronic properties with Raman measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, Sivan; Shikler, Rafi

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing interest in conjugated polymers from both industrial and academic points of views. The reasons are their tunable optoelectronic properties, ease of production, and excellent mechanical properties. However, the ease with which their optoelectronic properties are tunable make devices based on them prone to fast degradation and therefore, short life time. The issue of degradation of organic based optoelectronic devices is the topic of many ongoing researches. However, much less attention is given to degradation processes of the individual components of the devices and their dependence on the environmental conditions. In this work, we report on the degradation of a film of a polyfluorene block copolymer F8BT that is used in a variety of optoelectronic devices under different environments: Sun exposure, heating, and UV exposure in inert and ambient conditions. Degradation was observed in most of the optoelectronic properties of the film. Topographic measurements did not show observable changes of the film morphology following degradation. However, Raman spectroscopy measurements show changes that indicate degradation in one of the building blocks of the copolymer that is associated with electron's conduction. The absolute value of the correlation coefficient between the decrease in the Raman signal and the decrease in the optoelectronic properties is larger than 0.95 under sun exposure it is larger than 0.8 under all other ambient exposures and smaller than 0.65 under inert conditions. These results support the assumption that Oxygen, not necessarily through photo-oxidation, and also water play an important role in the degradation process and indicate the part of the polymer that is most susceptible to degradation

  1. Photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid in homogeneous solvents and micro-heterogeneous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India); Singh, T. Sanjoy [Department of Chemistry, Assam University, Silchar 788011, Assam (India); Baul, Tushar S. Basu [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India); Mitra, Sivaprasad, E-mail: smitra@nehu.ac.in [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India)

    2014-04-15

    A systematic study on the photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) behavior of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid, is reported using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in homogeneous solvents as well as in different micro-heterogeneous environments. Depending on the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB), the salicylic acid derivative may exist in two different ground state conformers (I and II). Structure I having IHB between the carbonyl oxygen and phenolic hydrogen can undergo ESIPT upon excitation as evidenced by largely Stokes-shifted fluorescence at ∼455 nm; whereas, normal fluorescence in the blue side of the spectrum (∼410 nm) is due to the spontaneous emission from conformer II. The results in homogeneous solvents were compared with those in bio-mimicking environments of β-cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactants. The intensity of the ESIPT fluorescence increases substantially upon encapsulation of the probe into the cyclodextrin as well as micellar nano-cavities. Detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data indicates that the probe forms 1:1 complex with CD in aqueous medium. Binding constant of the probe with the micelles as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of different surfactants in aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • Steady state and time resolved fluorescence study on ESIPT in HMBA. • Dual fluorescence corresponding to the pro- and non-ESIPT structures. • Modulation of ESIPT fluorescence in micro-heterogeneous environments. • 1:1 stoichiometry for interaction with cyclodextrin. • Calculation of binding constant and other physico-chemical properties from fluorescence titration data in surfactants.

  2. Photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid in homogeneous solvents and micro-heterogeneous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki; Singh, T. Sanjoy; Baul, Tushar S. Basu; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study on the photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) behavior of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid, is reported using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in homogeneous solvents as well as in different micro-heterogeneous environments. Depending on the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB), the salicylic acid derivative may exist in two different ground state conformers (I and II). Structure I having IHB between the carbonyl oxygen and phenolic hydrogen can undergo ESIPT upon excitation as evidenced by largely Stokes-shifted fluorescence at ∼455 nm; whereas, normal fluorescence in the blue side of the spectrum (∼410 nm) is due to the spontaneous emission from conformer II. The results in homogeneous solvents were compared with those in bio-mimicking environments of β-cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactants. The intensity of the ESIPT fluorescence increases substantially upon encapsulation of the probe into the cyclodextrin as well as micellar nano-cavities. Detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data indicates that the probe forms 1:1 complex with CD in aqueous medium. Binding constant of the probe with the micelles as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of different surfactants in aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • Steady state and time resolved fluorescence study on ESIPT in HMBA. • Dual fluorescence corresponding to the pro- and non-ESIPT structures. • Modulation of ESIPT fluorescence in micro-heterogeneous environments. • 1:1 stoichiometry for interaction with cyclodextrin. • Calculation of binding constant and other physico-chemical properties from fluorescence titration data in surfactants

  3. Study some mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete with nano silica under severe saline environment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habeeb Ghalib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to evaluate the performance of Nano silica self-compacting concrete which is subjected to severe saline conditions that contain sulfates and chlorides at concentrations similar to those existing in the soils and ground water of the middle and southern parts of Iraq. For this purpose, ordinary and sulfate resistant Portland cement without and with 3% Nano silica addition by weight of cementitious materials were used. Splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, static modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic pulse velocity were investigated for all exposure conditions and all types of mixes of self-compacting concrete at ages of 28, 60, 90, 120 and 180 days. Test results revealed that the inclusion of Nano Silica in concrete mixes improved clearly the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete compared with reference concrete.

  4. Electrochemical properties in a seawater environment of 5456-H116 aluminum alloy subjected to optimal friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Cheul; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of aluminum alloy may be enhanced by modifying the microstructure of the metal by friction stir processing (FSP). Previous studies have demonstrated that the mechanical characteristics of 5456-H116 Al alloy subjected to FSP, at 250 rpm and 15 mm min -1 using a full screw probe, are similar to those of the original alloy. In the present work, the same alloy was processed under these optimal conditions, and the range of favorable protection potentials with regard to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking was determined to lie between -1.3 and -0.7 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The electrochemical behavior of the specimens subjected to FSP was superior to that of the original 5456-H116 Al alloy.

  5. Electrochemical properties in a seawater environment of 5456-H116 aluminum alloy subjected to optimal friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Cheul; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of aluminum alloy may be enhanced by modifying the microstructure of the metal by friction stir processing (FSP). Previous studies have demonstrated that the mechanical characteristics of 5456-H116 Al alloy subjected to FSP, at 250 rpm and 15 mm min-1 using a full screw probe, are similar to those of the original alloy. In the present work, the same alloy was processed under these optimal conditions, and the range of favorable protection potentials with regard to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking was determined to lie between -1.3 and -0.7 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The electrochemical behavior of the specimens subjected to FSP was superior to that of the original 5456-H116 Al alloy.

  6. El derecho, la propiedad intelectual y el entorno digital The copyright, the intellectual property and the digital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Silberleib

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Ante el crecimiento acelerado y la expansión que se han manifestado en el campo de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, no se puede dejar de considerar que la problemática de la propiedad intelectual y la seguridad de las transmisiones representan una porción sustancial a analizar dentro de dicha temática. En el marco de los actuales roles que le toca desempeñar al bibliotecario como intermediario entre los autores o creadores, los editores y los usuarios finales de la información, este profesional deberá cumplir funciones semejantes a las de antes, pero afrontando el cambio de los medios con los que va a realizarlas. Si el bibliotecario acepta esta nueva obligación de facilitar el acceso a la información a través de soportes digitales, y en particular, de Internet, deberá conocer y respetar profundamente los principios jurídicos para establecer contratos de transferencia de la información. Este trabajo pretende realizar un esbozo de la amplia temática de la propiedad intelectual en el mundo digital para que el bibliotecario pueda, a través de él, incursionar en esta área del derecho y avanzar en su profundización.In light of the accelerated growth and expansion of the field of information technology and communication, it is impossible to ignore that the problematic notions of intellectual property and transmission safety are a substantial part of what has to be analyzed in this field. In the framework of the roles that librarians presently play as mediators between authors or creators, editors, and consumers of information, this professional will fulfill similar functions as before, having to confront, however, the change in the media with which s/he carries them out. If the librarian takes on this new task of facilitating access to information through digital media, especially the Internet, s/he will have to really know and deeply respect the juridical principles behind the establishing of contracts on

  7. El derecho, la propiedad intelectual y el entorno digital = The Copyright, The intellectual Property and the Digital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Silberleib

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Ante el crecimiento acelerado y la expansión que se han manifestado en el campo de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, no se puede dejar de considerar que la problemática de la propiedad intelectual y la seguridad de las transmisiones representan una porción sustancial a analizar dentro de dicha temática. En el marco de los actuales roles que le toca desempeñar al bibliotecario como intermediario entre los autores o creadores, los editores y los usuarios finales de la información, este profesional deberá cumplir funciones semejantes a las de antes, pero afrontando el cambio de los medios con los que va a realizarlas. Si el bibliotecario acepta esta nueva obligación de facilitar el acceso a la información a través de soportes digitales, y en particular, de Internet, deberá conocer y respetar profundamente los principios jurídicos para establecer contratos de transferencia de la información. Este trabajo pretende realizar un esbozo de la amplia temática de la propiedad intelectual en el mundo digital para que el bibliotecario pueda, a través de él, incursionar en esta área del derecho y avanzar en su profundización = In light of the accelerated growth and expansion of the field of information technology and communication, it is impossible to ignore that the problematic notions of intellectual property and transmission safety are a substantial part of what has to be analyzed in this field. In the framework of the roles that librarians presently play as mediators between authors or creators, editors, and consumers of information, this professional will fulfill similar functions as before, having to confront, however, the change in the media with which s/he carries them out. If the librarian takes on this new task of facilitating access to information through digital media, especially the Internet, s/he will have to really know and deeply respect the juridical principles behind the establishing of contracts on

  8. Short-term Changes of Apparent Optical Properties in a Shallow Water Environment: Observations from Repeated Airborne Hyperspectral Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; English, D. C.; Hu, C.; Carlson, P. R., Jr.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Toro-Farmer, G.; Herwitz, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    An atmospheric correction algorithm has been developed for AISA imagery over optically shallow waters in Sugarloaf Key of the Florida Keys. The AISA data were collected repeatedly during several days in May 2012, October 2012, and May 2013. A non-zero near-infrared (NIR) remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) was accounted for through iterations, based on the relationship of field-measured Rrs between the NIR and red wavelengths. Validation showed mean ratios of 0.94 to 1.002 between AISA-derived and field-measured Rrs in the blue to red wavelengths, with uncertainties generally turbidity (light attenuation) and bottom contributions. Some of these changes are larger than two times of the Rrs uncertainties from the AISA retrievals, therefore representing statistically significant changes that can be well observed from airborne measurements. The case study suggests that repeated airborne measurements may be used to study short-term changes in shallow water environments, and such a capacity may be enhanced with future geostationary satellite missions specifically designed to observe coastal ecosystems.

  9. Initial evaluation of psychometric properties of a structured work task application for the Assessment of Work Performance in a constructed environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Elin A; Liedberg, Gunilla M; Sandqvist, Jan L

    2017-06-22

    The Swedish Social Insurance Administration has developed a new assessment tool for sickness insurance. This study is a part of the initial evaluation of the application, called the Assessment of Work Performance, Structured Activities, and focuses on evaluation of the psychometric properties of social validity, content validity, and utility. This was a qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with occupational therapists. A convenience sample was used and participants who fulfilled inclusion criteria (n = 15) were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis with a directed approach. The results indicate that the application provides valuable information and that it is socially valid. Assessors found work tasks suitable for a diverse group of clients and reported that clients accepted the assessments. Improvements were suggested, for example, expanding the application with more work tasks. The instrument has benefits; however, further development is desired. The use of a constructed environment in assessments may be a necessary option to supplement a real environment. But depending on organizational factors such as time and other resources, the participants had different opportunities to do so. Further evaluations regarding ecological validity are essential to ensure that assessments are fair and realistic when using constructed environments. Implications for rehabilitation This study indicates that assessment in a constructed environment can provide a secure and protected context for clients being assessed. Psychometric evaluations are a never-ending process and this assessment instrument needs further development. However, this initial evaluation provides guidance in development of the instrument but also what studies to give priority to. It is important to evaluate social validity in order to ensure that clients and assessors perceive assessment methods fair and meaningful. In this study, participants found the work tasks

  10. Evolution of Multispectral Aerosol Absorption Properties in a Biogenically-Influenced Urban Environment during the CARES Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyawali, Madhu; Arnott, W.; Zaveri, Rahul; Song, Chen; Flowers, Bradley; Dubey, Manvendra; Setyan, Ari; Zhang, Qi; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Gorkowski, Kyle; Subramanian, R.; Moosmüller, Hans

    2017-11-01

    We present the evolution of multispectral optical properties as urban aerosols aged and interacted with biogenic emissions resulting in stronger short wavelength absorption and formation of moderately brown secondary organic aerosols. Ground-based aerosol measurements were made during June 2010 within the Sacramento urban area (site T0) and at a 40-km downwind location (site T1) in the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Data on black carbon and non-refractory aerosol mass and composition were collected at both sites. In addition, photoacoustic (PA) instruments with integrating nephelometers were used to measure spectral absorption and scattering coefficients for wavelengths ranging from 355 to 870 nm. The daytime absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) indicated a modest wavelength-dependent enhancement of absorption at both sites throughout the study. From the 22nd to the 28th of June, secondary organic aerosol mass increased significantly at both sites due to increased biogenic emissions coupled with intense photochemical activity and air mass recirculation in the area. During this period, the median BC mass-normalized absorption cross-section (MAC) values for 405 nm and 532 nm at T1 increased by ~23% and ~35%, respectively, compared to the relatively less aged urban emissions at the T0 site. In contrast, the average MAC values for the 870 nm wavelength were similar for both sites. These results suggest formation of moderately brown secondary organic aerosols in biogenically-influenced urban air.

  11. PROBING THE LOCAL BUBBLE WITH DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. II. THE DIB PROPERTIES IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; Molaeinezhad, Alireza; Tavasoli, Saeed; Habibi, Farhang; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Rezaei, Sara; Saberi, Maryam [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5746 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Bailey, Mandy [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Hardy, Liam, E-mail: a.farhang@ipm.ir [Isaac Newton Group, Apartado 321, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain)

    2015-02-10

    We present a new high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic survey of the Northern hemisphere to probe the Local Bubble and its surroundings using the λ5780 Å and λ5797 Å diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We observed 432 sightlines to a distance of 200 pc over a duration of three years. In this study, we establish the λ5780 and λ5797 correlations with Na I, Ca II and E {sub B-V}, for both inside and outside the Local Bubble. The correlations show that among all neutral and ionized atoms, the correlation between Ca II and λ5780 is stronger than its correlation with λ5797, suggesting that λ5780 is more associated with regions where Ca{sup +} is more abundant. We study the λ5780 correlation with λ5797, which shows a tight correlation within and outside the Local Bubble. In addition, we investigate the DIB properties in UV irradiated and UV shielded regions. We find that, within and beyond the Local Bubble, λ5797 is located in denser parts of clouds, protected from UV irradiation, while λ5780 is located in the low-density regions of clouds.

  12. Moral Intelligence in the Context of Its Questionnaire Psychometric Properties Verification and of Chosen Demographic Variables in the Slovak Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lada Kaliská

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The interest in intelligence construct operationalization is reflected in construction upon new intelligence concepts analyzing it in a wider social context. This scientific study offers the theoretical and empirical analysis of a newly created construct of moral intelligence. Moral intelligence concept was founded in the Multiple Intelligence Theory of H. Gardner (1985, being followed by L. Kuckovsky, A. Dobrin, V. Di Norcia and others in historical-philosophical-evolution-theological context, by D. Lennick, F. Kiel, C. Veach and others in successful management context and by A. Hass, M. Borba, R. Coles, J. Bradshaw and others in school-counselling context. Subsequently moral intelligence is defined as an individual's ability to solve ethical problems ethically right. The application of ethical principles in successful business management formed a theoretical base for moral intelligence characterized by D. Lennick a F. Kiel (2008. They created also a self-report questionnaire Moral Competence Inventory (MCI to assess personal moral competences as a base of moral intelligence. The study provides the results of psychometrical properties (factor structure and reliability in the sense of inner consistency and test-retest result stability of the Slovak, the only available, questionnaire for moral intelligence assessment at a chosen adolescent research sample (N=209. It also analyses the differences in total moral intelligence level and two newly extracted factors (personal and social moral competences in relation to gender, age and religious believes referring to the fact the MCI authors presupposed that there is no relation between moral competences and demographic factors (gender, age, nationality or religion, 2005. The findings prove the significant differences in the overall level of moral intelligence (p≤0,01 and in factors of personal (Standing up for what is right (Courage, p≤0,01 and social (Helping others (Service, p≤0,01 and Actively

  13. Phytochemical Screening and Antimicrobial Properties of a Common Brand of Black Tea (Camellia sinensis Marketed in Nigerian Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olosunde O. Funmilayo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study is aimed at determining chemical constituents and antimicrobial activities of a common brand of black tea (Lipton® in Nigeria. Methods: Standard methods were employed for testing carbohydrates, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, alkaloids, steroids and terpenes in the tea. Antimicrobial activities of methanolic and aqueous extracts of the tea on four standard strains of organisms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis were also determined by standard methods. Results: Results showed that the tea contains tannin and reducing sugar. Concentrations of 1%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% aqueous and methanolic extract of black tea were prepared and their zones of inhibition determined against the four test organisms using the cup plate method. This was compared with zones for standard disc Gentamicin (10 μg and Erythromycin (15 μg. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to 2% to 10% aqueous extracts and intermediate to 6%, 8% and 10% methanolic extracts. E. coli was intermediately sensitive to 6%, 8% and 10% aqueous extract and 2% to 10% methanolic extracts. B. subtilis was intermediately sensitive to 4%, 6% and 8% aqueous extract and 4% to 10% methanolic extract but sensitive to 10% aqueous extract. Staph.aureus was intermediately sensitive to 4% to 10% aqueous extracts and 2% to 10% methanolic extracts. B. subtilis had the lowest MIC values of both aqueous and methanolic extracts. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study has shown that Lipton® has antimicrobial properties on E.coli, Staph.aureus, B.subtilis and Ps.aeruginosa and contains tannin and reducing sugar.

  14. Influence of External Gaseous Environments on the Electrical Properties of ZnO Nanostructures Obtained by a Hydrothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Procek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with experimental investigations of ZnO nanostructures, consisting of a mixture of nanoparticles and nanowires, obtained by the chemical (hydrothermal method. The influences of both oxidizing (NO2 and reducing gases (H2, NH3, as well as relative humidity (RH on the physical and chemical properties of ZnO nanostructures were tested. Carrier gas effect on the structure interaction with gases was also tested; experiments were conducted in air and nitrogen (N2 atmospheres. The effect of investigated gases on the resistance of the ZnO nanostructures was tested over a wide range of concentrations at room temperature (RT and at 200 °C. The impact of near- ultraviolet (UV excitation (λ = 390 nm at RT was also studied. These investigations indicated a high response of ZnO nanostructures to small concentrations of NO2. The structure responses to 1 ppm of NO2 amounted to about: 600% in N2/230% in air at 200 °C (in dark conditions and 430% in N2/340% in air at RT (with UV excitation. The response of the structure to the effect of NO2 at 200 °C is more than 105 times greater than the response to NH3, and more than 106 times greater than that to H2 in the relation of 1 ppm. Thus the selectivity of the structure for NO2 is very good. What is more, the selectivity to NO2 at RT with UV excitation increases in comparison at elevated temperature. This paper presents a great potential for practical applications of ZnO nanostructures (including nanoparticles in resistive NO2 sensors.

  15. Effect of the annealing environment on the optical properties of ZnO/GaAs grown by MOCVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dangbegnon, J.K.; Talla, K.; Botha, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of ZnO grown on (1 0 0) GaAs substrate using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Postgrowth annealing in nitrogen and oxygen was performed for different times and temperatures in order to incorporate As from the substrate into the ZnO thin films. The PL spectra of the samples annealed in different ambients reveal that the effect of As diffusion into the ZnO thin films is more pronounced when the annealing is performed in oxygen at 550 o C. The 11 K PL spectra show the appearance of a transition at ∼3.35 eV after annealing in oxygen at 550 deg. C for 1 h. A further increase in the annealing temperature leads to the disappearance of this line, while for annealing times longer than 2 h at 550 o C, it is no longer prominent. The increase in intensity of this new transition is also accompanied by the enhancement of radiative centers related to structural defects, such as the stacking fault-related transition at 3.31 eV and the Y-line. Temperature dependent PL illustrates the excitonic nature of the new transition at ∼3.35 eV, which is therefore assigned to (A 0 , X) transition, where the acceptor is possibly the 2V Zn -As Zn complex, with an activation energy E A in the range of 160-240 meV. Furthermore, the enhancement of the radiative centers related to structural defects is regarded as evidence that As atoms tend to segregate in the vicinity of structural defects to relieve local strain. - Highlights: → (A 0 , X) and DAP transitions at 3.35 and 3.26 eV related to arsenic acceptor. → Oxygen annealing ambient promotes arsenic acceptor into ZnO films. → Increase in structural defect lines is related to arsenic incorporation. → Annealing at optimal temperature of around 550 deg. C is necessary for arsenic incorporation.

  16. Evolution of multispectral aerosol optical properties in a biogenically-influenced urban environment during the CARES campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Pekour, M.; Flowers, B.; Dubey, M. K.; Setyan, A.; Zhang, Q.; Harworth, J. W.; Radney, J. G.; Atkinson, D. B.; China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Gorkowski, K.; Subramanian, R.; Jobson, B. T.; Moosmüller, H.

    2013-03-01

    Ground-based aerosol measurements made in June 2010 within Sacramento urban area (site T0) and at a 40-km downwind location (site T1) in the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area are used to investigate the evolution of multispectral optical properties as the urban aerosols aged and interacted with biogenic emissions. Along with black carbon and non-refractory aerosol mass and composition observations, spectral absorptio (βabs), scattering (βsca), and extinction (βext) coefficients for wavelengths ranging from 355 to 1064 nm were measured at both sites using photoacoustic (PA) instruments with integrating nephelometers and using cavity ring-down (CRD) instruments. The daytime average Ångström exponent of absorption (AEA) was ~1.6 for the wavelength pair 405 and 870 nm at T0, while it was ~1.8 for the wavelength pair 355 and 870 nm at T1, indicating a modest wavelength-dependent enhancement of absorption at both sites throughout the study. The measured and Mie theory calculations of multispectral βsca showed good correlation (R2=0.85-0.94). The average contribution of supermicron aerosol (mainly composed of sea salt particles advected in from the Pacific Ocean) to the total scattering coefficient ranged from less than 20% at 405 nm to greater than 80% at 1064 nm. From 22 to 28 June, secondary organic aerosol mass increased significantly at both sites due to increased biogenic emissions coupled with intense photochemical activity and air mass recirculation in the area. During this period, the short wavelength scattering coefficients at both sites gradually increased due to increase in the size of submicron aerosols. At the same time, BC mass-normalized absorption cross-section (MAC) values for ultraviolet wavelengths at T1 increased by ~60% compared to the relatively less aged urban emissions at the T0 site. In contrast, the average MAC values for 870 nm wavelength were identical at both sites. These results suggest formation of moderately brown secondary

  17. Environment-Friendly Post-Treatment of PEDOT-Tos Films by Aqueous Vitamin C Solutions for Tuning of Thermoelectric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ezaz Hasan; Thota, Sammaiah; Wang, Yiwen; Li, Lian; Wilusz, Eugene; Osgood, Richard; Kumar, Jayant

    2018-04-01

    Aqueous vitamin C solution has been used as an environment-friendly reducing agent for tuning the thermoelectric properties of p-toluenesulfonate-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-Tos) films. The de-doping of the PEDOT-Tos films by aqueous vitamin C solutions led to a decrease in the electrical conductivity of the films. The measured ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectra clearly indicated the reduction in the oxidation level from 37 to 23% when the PEDOT-Tos films were treated with 5% (w/v) aqueous vitamin C solutions. An increase in the Seebeck coefficient was measured, resulting in an increase in the figure-of-merit (ZT). A 42% increase in ZT was determined for the 5% aqueous vitamin C solution-treated PEDOT-Tos films with respect to that of the untreated films.

  18. Combination of thermal and electric properties' measurement techniques in a single setup suitable for radioactive materials in controlled environments and based on the 3ω approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K.; Gofryk, K.

    2018-04-01

    We have designed and developed a new experimental setup, based on the 3ω method, to measure thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of a variety of samples in a broad temperature range (2-550 K) and under magnetic fields up to 9 T. The validity of this method is tested by measuring various types of metallic (copper, platinum, and constantan) and insulating (SiO2) materials, which have a wide range of thermal conductivity values (1-400 W m-1 K-1). We have successfully employed this technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of two actinide single crystals: uranium dioxide and uranium nitride. This new experimental approach for studying nuclear materials will help us to advance reactor fuel development and understanding. We have also shown that this experimental setup can be adapted to the Physical Property Measurement System (Quantum Design) environment and/or other cryocooler systems.

  19. Occurrence and distribution of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds in Singapore's marine environment: Influence of hydrodynamics and physical–chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayen, Stéphane; Zhang, Hui; Desai, Malan Manish; Ooi, Seng Keat; Kelly, Barry C.

    2013-01-01

    The fate and exposure risks of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in marine environments are not well-understood. In this study we developed a multi-residue analytical method for quantifying concentrations of forty target compounds in seawater from Singapore. Analyses of samples (n = 24) from eight sites showed the occurrence of several compounds, including gemfibrozil ( R ). Principal Components Analysis revealed a strong relationship between t R and contaminant concentrations. While source emissions are undoubtedly important, proximate distance to a wastewater treatment plant had little influence on concentrations. The site with the greatest t R , which exhibited the highest concentrations, is adjacent to Singapore's largest protected wetland reserve. The results highlight an important linkage between hydrodynamic behavior and contaminant exposure risks in complex coastal marine ecosystems. Highlights: •A field study of emerging contaminants in Singapore's coastal marine environment was conducted. •PhACs such as gemfibrozil, triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen were frequently detected. •Site proximity to WWTP had little influence on ambient concentrations. •Contaminant concentrations were highly correlated to hydrodynamic residence time. •Coastal hydrodynamic behaviour greatly influences contaminant exposure risks. -- A field study demonstrates the influence of hydrodynamic residence time and physical–chemical properties on exposure risks of PhACs and EDCs in coastal marine ecosystems

  20. Effects of testing and storage environments on mechanical properties of Ni-plated and bare U-3/4 wt% Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehr, S.W.; Johnson, H.R.; Smugeresky, J.E.; Pashman, K.A.; Nagelberg, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    It was found that storage environments with an adequate supply of oxygen can effectively minimize moisture corrosion of bare U-3/4 Ti. In particular, 0.75 cm 3 of dry air is calculated to protect 1 cm 2 of U-3/4 Ti for 20 years storage at room temperature. Consideration of the geometric details of U-3/4 Ti alloy specimens and the free volumes of air (and hence O 2 ) available can satisfactorily explain discrepancies in corrosion behavior between recent tests and previously reported data. The storage environment at 70 0 C produces a minor strength increase in bare samples with increasing time. Decreases in ductility are observed for testing conditions of low temperature, low strain rate, and/or high humidity. Surface cracks occur under the same conditions conducive to corrosion, i.e., moderate temperatures, low strain rates, and high humidity. Significant increases in strength result under low-temperature and high-strain-rate conditions of tensile testing. Residual chloride contamination may be responsible for the occasional and otherwise unexplained large scatter in ductility for nominally similar specimens and test conditions. Nickel plating is observed to cause a statistically significant decrease in tensile strength, but no effect on the yield strength or ductility was observed and the presence of high explosive during the aging of tensile bars was observed to have no effect on mechanical properties

  1. Effects of Environment in the Microstructure and Properties of Sustainable Mortars with Fly Ash and Slag after a 5-Year Exposure Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Ortega

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, getting a more environmentally sustainable cement production is one of the main goals of the cement industry. In this regard, the use of active additions, like fly ash and ground granulated blast-furnace slag, has become very popular. The behaviour, in the short-term, of cement-based materials with those additions is well-known when their hardening is produced under optimum conditions. However, real structures are exposed to different environments during long periods, which could affect the development of microstructures and the service properties of cementitious materials. The objective of this work is to analyse the effects in the long-term (up to 5 years approximately produced by the exposure to different non-optimum laboratory conditions in the microstructure, mechanical and durability properties of mortars made with slag and fly ash commercial cements. Their performance was compared to that observed for ordinary Portland cement (OPC mortars. The microstructure has been analysed using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effective porosity, the capillary suction coefficient, the chloride migration coefficient and mechanical strengths were analysed too. According to the results, mortars prepared using slag and fly ash sustainable commercial cements, exposed to non-optimum conditions, show a good performance after 5-years hardening period, similar or even better than OPC mortars.

  2. Effect of genotype and environment on the concentrations of starch and protein in, and the physicochemical properties of starch from, field pea and fababean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Niefer, Shannon D; Warkentin, Thomas D; Chibbar, Ravindra N; Vandenberg, Albert; Tyler, Robert T

    2012-01-15

    The effects of genotype and environment and their interaction on the concentrations of starch and protein in, and the amylose content and thermal and pasting properties of starch from, pea and fababean are not well known. Differences due to genotype were observed in the concentrations of starch and protein in pea and fababean, in the onset temperature (To) and peak temperature (Tp) of gelatinization of fababean starch, and in the pasting, trough, cooling and final viscosities of pea starch and fababean starch. Significant two-way interactions (location × genotype) were observed for the concentration of starch in fababean and the amylose content, To, endothermic enthalpy of gelatinization (ΔH) and trough viscosity of fababean starch. Significant three-way interactions (location × year × genotype) were observed for the concentration of starch in pea and the pasting, trough, cooling and final viscosities of pea starch. Differences observed in the concentrations of starch and protein in pea and fababean were sufficient to be of practical significance to end-users, but the relatively small differences in amylose content and physicochemical properties of starch from pea and fababean were not. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Outcrop analogue study of Permocarboniferous geothermal sandstone reservoir formations (northern Upper Rhine Graben, Germany): impact of mineral content, depositional environment and diagenesis on petrophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretz, Achim; Bär, Kristian; Götz, Annette E.; Sass, Ingo

    2016-07-01

    The Permocarboniferous siliciclastic formations represent the largest hydrothermal reservoir in the northern Upper Rhine Graben in SW Germany and have so far been investigated in large-scale studies only. The Cenozoic Upper Rhine Graben crosses the Permocarboniferous Saar-Nahe Basin, a Variscan intramontane molasse basin. Due to the subsidence in this graben structure, the top of the up to 2-km-thick Permocarboniferous is located at a depth of 600-2900 m and is overlain by Tertiary and Quaternary sediments. At this depth, the reservoir temperatures exceed 150 °C, which are sufficient for geothermal electricity generation with binary power plants. To further assess the potential of this geothermal reservoir, detailed information on thermophysical and hydraulic properties of the different lithostratigraphical units and their depositional environment is essential. Here, we present an integrated study of outcrop analogues and drill core material. In total, 850 outcrop samples were analyzed, measuring porosity, permeability, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. Furthermore, 62 plugs were taken from drillings that encountered or intersected the Permocarboniferous at depths between 1800 and 2900 m. Petrographic analysis of 155 thin sections of outcrop samples and samples taken from reservoir depth was conducted to quantify the mineral composition, sorting and rounding of grains and the kind of cementation. Its influence on porosity, permeability, the degree of compaction and illitization was quantified. Three parameters influencing the reservoir properties of the Permocarboniferous were detected. The strongest and most destructive influence on reservoir quality is related to late diagenetic processes. An illitic and kaolinitic cementation and impregnation of bitumina document CO2- and CH4-rich acidic pore water conditions, which are interpreted as fluids that migrated along a hydraulic contact from an underlying Carboniferous hydrocarbon source rock. Migrating

  4. Occurrence and distribution of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds in Singapore's marine environment: Influence of hydrodynamics and physical–chemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayen, Stéphane [Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Zhang, Hui [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Desai, Malan Manish [Tropical Marine Science Institute, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ooi, Seng Keat [Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Kelly, Barry C., E-mail: bckelly@nus.edu.sg [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-11-15

    The fate and exposure risks of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in marine environments are not well-understood. In this study we developed a multi-residue analytical method for quantifying concentrations of forty target compounds in seawater from Singapore. Analyses of samples (n = 24) from eight sites showed the occurrence of several compounds, including gemfibrozil (<0.09–19.8 ng/L), triclosan (<0.55–10.5 ng/L), carbamazepine (<0.28–10.9 ng/L) and ibuprofen (<2.2–9.1 ng/L). A 3D hydrodynamic model for Singapore was used to predict residence time (t{sub R}). Principal Components Analysis revealed a strong relationship between t{sub R} and contaminant concentrations. While source emissions are undoubtedly important, proximate distance to a wastewater treatment plant had little influence on concentrations. The site with the greatest t{sub R}, which exhibited the highest concentrations, is adjacent to Singapore's largest protected wetland reserve. The results highlight an important linkage between hydrodynamic behavior and contaminant exposure risks in complex coastal marine ecosystems. Highlights: •A field study of emerging contaminants in Singapore's coastal marine environment was conducted. •PhACs such as gemfibrozil, triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen were frequently detected. •Site proximity to WWTP had little influence on ambient concentrations. •Contaminant concentrations were highly correlated to hydrodynamic residence time. •Coastal hydrodynamic behaviour greatly influences contaminant exposure risks. -- A field study demonstrates the influence of hydrodynamic residence time and physical–chemical properties on exposure risks of PhACs and EDCs in coastal marine ecosystems.

  5. Electrochemical Behavior and Hydrophobic Properties of CrN and CrNiN Coatings in Simulated Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Jie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The CrN and CrNiN coatings were prepared on the surface of 304 stainless steel by closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering.X ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the coatings.The electrochemical corrosion properties under the simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell(PEMFC environment, interfacial contact resistance and hydrophobic properties of the two kinds of different coatings were investigated by electrochemical methods,contact resistance test and hydrophobic test,respectively.The results indicate that CrN coating mainly consists of CrN and Cr2N phase,CrN and Cr2N phases in the CrNiN coating are less compared to CrN film, and Ni exist as element in CrNiN coating; dynamic polarization tests show the coating is of better corrosion resistance,whereas the corrosion resistance of CrNiN coating is worse than that of CrN coating,constant potential polarization test shows the corrosion current density of CrN and CrNiN coatings are equivalent; CrN and CrNiN coatings significantly reduce the interfacial contact resistance of the 304 stainless steel,among which CrN coating has the smallest contact resistance; and CrNiN coating which has better hydrophobicity than that of CrN coating is more beneficial for the water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

  6. A study of the effect of non-spherical dust particles on Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) aerosol optical properties retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Choi, M.; Lim, H.

    2017-12-01

    Non-spherical assumption of particle shape has been used to replace the spherical assumption in the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) aerosol optical properties retrievals for dust particles. GEMS aerosol retrieval algorithms are based on optimal estimation method to provide aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) at 443nm, and aerosol loading height (ALH) simultaneously as products. Considering computing time efficiency, the algorithm takes Look-Up Table (LUT) approach using Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer code (VLIDORT), and aerosol optical properties for three aerosol types of absorbing fine aerosol (BC), dust and non-absorbing aerosol (NA) are integrated from AERONET inversion data, and fed into the LUT calculation. In this study, by applying the present algorithm to OMI top-of the atmosphere normalized radiance, retrieved AOD, SSA with both spherical and non-spherical assumptions have been compared to the surface AERONET observations at East Asia sites for 3 years from 2005 to 2007 to evaluate and quantify the effect of non-spherical dust particles on the satellite aerosol retrievals. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) in the satellite retrieved AOD have been slightly reduced as a result of adopting the non-spherical assumption in the GEMS aerosol retrieval algorithm. For SSA, algorithm tested with spheroid models on dust particle shows promising results for the improved SSA. In terms of ALH, the results are qualitatively compared with CALIOP products, and shows consistent variation. This result suggests the importance of taking into account the effects of non-sphericity in the retrieval of dust particles from GEMS measurements.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development inventory for use with Iranian children aged 18-42 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadi, Saeed; Gabbard, Carl; Arabameri, Elahe; Kashi, Ali; Ghasemi, Abdollah

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to translate the original English language version of the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development (AHEMD) inventory and test its psychometric properties for use with Iranian children aged 18-42 months. For this purpose, the tool was translated into Farsi (a Persian language) using the forward-backward translation method and some of its psychometric properties were examined. Multistage stratified-cluster sampling was used to study 1019 families having children aged 18-42 months from among the regional divisions of Tehran urban community health centers. The questionnaire evaluated five factors: outside space, inside space, variety of stimulation, fine motor toys and gross motor toys. Expert opinion was used for content-related validity evaluation and confirmatory factor analysis was used to determine construct validity. For test-retest reliability, parents completed identical questionnaires two weeks apart. Internal consistency was evaluated using inter-examiner reliability, Cronbach's alpha and construct reliability. Linear regression analysis was used to explain and predict the effects of toys on AHEMD total score. Results showed that content-related validity was 0.92. Data confirmatory factor analysis showed an acceptable fit to the original five factors. Reliability over time was 0.91 and internal consistency was 0.93. It was also found that fine- and gross-motor toys showed a significant 55% predictability of affordance provision in the home. The Farsi translation of the AHEMD is acceptable for use with Iranian children aged 18-42 month. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance of plants in naturally high UV environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Slusser, James R; Gao, Wei; Ryel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Studies were conducted on three herbaceous plant species growing in naturally high solar UV environments in the subalpine of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA, to determine if diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance (T(UV)) occur in these species, and to test whether manipulation of the solar radiation regime could alter these diurnal patterns. Additional field studies were conducted at Logan, Utah, USA, to determine if solar UV was causing diurnal T(UV) changes and to evaluate the relationship between diurnal changes in T(UV) and UV-absorbing pigments. Under clear skies, T(UV), as measured with a UV-A-pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer for leaves of Verbascum thapsus and Oenothera stricta growing in native soils and Vicia faba growing in pots, was highest at predawn and sunset and lowest at midday. These patterns in T(UV) closely tracked diurnal changes in solar radiation and were the result of correlated changes in fluorescence induced by UV-A and blue radiation but not photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) or initial fluorescence yield (F(o)). The magnitude of the midday reduction in T(UV) was greater for young leaves than for older leaves of Verbascum. Imposition of artificial shade eliminated the diurnal changes in T(UV) in Verbascum, but reduction in solar UV had no effect on diurnal T(UV) changes in Vicia. In Vicia, the diurnal changes in T(UV) occurred without detectable changes in the concentration of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds. Results suggest that plants actively control diurnal changes in UV shielding, and these changes occur in response to signals other than solar UV; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for rapid changes in T(UV) remain unclear.

  9. Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nortvedt Monica W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS. Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to hospitals in the United States, the Netherlands and Norway. Methods This survey included 575 surgical personnel in Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, an 1100-bed tertiary hospital in western Norway: surgeons, operating theatre nurses, anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists and ancillary personnel. Of these, 358 returned the HSOPS, resulting in a 62% response rate. We used factor analysis to examine the applicability of the HSOPS factor structure in operating theatre settings. We also performed psychometric analysis for internal consistency and construct validity. In addition, we compared the percent of average positive responds of the patient safety climate factors with results of the US HSOPS 2010 comparative data base report. Results The professions differed in their perception of patient safety climate, with anaesthesia personnel having the highest mean scores. Factor analysis using the original 12-factor model of the HSOPS resulted in low reliability scores (r = 0.6 for two factors: "adequate staffing" and "organizational learning and continuous improvement". For the remaining factors, reliability was ≥ 0.7. Reliability scores improved to r = 0.8 by combining the factors "organizational learning and continuous improvement" and "feedback and communication about error" into one six-item factor, supporting an 11-factor model. The inter-item correlations were found satisfactory. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the questionnaire need further investigations to be regarded as reliable in surgical environments. The operating

  10. Pollutant deposition in forest ecosystems and characteristics of chemical properties of soils in the environs of the Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochman, V.; Bucek, J.; Biba, M.

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes the results of investigations of the chemistry of precipitation water and soil water in 1991-1992 on research plots in the nearer and farther environs of the building site of the Temelin nuclear power plant (about 25 km north of Ceske Budejovice). Research plots lie in spruce and beech stands. When the installations on research plots were built (1990 and 1991), soil samples were taken to determine the supply of biogenic elements in humus and soil. The objective of the program was to determine the current level of element deposition in forest ecosystems, dynamics of soil elements and chemistry; the program is a part of more extensive research into forest environment and stand condition. The research of investigation provide data for a forecast of the effect of the projected operation of the nuclear power plant on forest environment, basic factor of growth and stabilization and for fulfilment of their functions. They can be a basis for evaluation of the rate of changes in forest ecosystems after the nuclear power plant has been launched into operation. The results of research are currently applied to supply data to the network of plots with monitoring of pollutant loads in the forest ecosystem in Southern Bohemia. Two research plots in spruce stand (Hnevkovice and Strouha) and a plot in beech stand (Vsetec) were laid out at a distance of several kilometers from the built-up premises of the Temelin nuclear power plant. The soils on these plots are medium deep brown forest soils (Cambisol) with a large amount of mother rock skeleton (biotitic paragneiss). Moder is a soil humus form in the spruce and beech stands. To monitor pollutant deposition in the forest ecosystems and their effect of the soil properties Vojirov plots were laid out which lie in spruce stand and in a mixed stand of beech and spruce in the Jindrichuv Hradec forest district, near the frontier with Austria. Humus podzols with moder and mor forms were developed on eolian sand between

  11. Changes in depositional environment for the past 35 years in the Thane Creek, central west coast of India: Inferences from REEs, metals and magnetic properties

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, L.L.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Parthiban, G.; Rao, V.P.

    The role of diagenetic processes in influencing the behaviour of metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Zn), rare earth elements (REEs) and environmental magnetic parameters in two sediment cores from a polluted creek environment (the Thane Creek, Mumbai...

  12. Development of a Database on the Changes in the Optical Properties of Materials used on the External Surfaces of Spacecraft Under the Action of the Space Environment Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khatipov, Sergey A

    2006-01-01

    .... The purpose of the project was a development of the Database (DB) in the electron format DBMS Access2000, including results of investigation of optical properties of external materials for space vehicles (SV...

  13. International environment, enterprise environment and energy environment giving different look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Shunsuke

    1987-04-01

    0he international environment, enterprise environment and energy environment surrounding Japan are changing their looks. In such situation, what Japan should do for the development of the world was discussed. Internationally, in the Western Pacific economical block including Japan and Asian NICs, Japan promotes the international exchange of materials, capital, technology, information and people, and creates various international public properties. Enterprisers should have global mind, and cope with the internationalization, technical innovation and information orientation which are in progress at present through international exchange, interindustrial exchange, industry-university-government exchange and so on. In the aspect of energy environment, Japan carries out the technical development of energy conservation, energy, creation and the exploration of energy resources, in this way, contributes to the stabilization of energy in the world. (3 figs, 1 tab)

  14. Self-Report Measures of the Home Learning Environment in Large Scale Research: Measurement Properties and Associations with Key Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Frank; Nguyen, Cuc; Cloney, Daniel S.; Tayler, Collette; Adams, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Favourable home learning environments (HLEs) support children's literacy, numeracy and social development. In large-scale research, HLE is typically measured by self-report survey, but there is little consistency between studies and many different items and latent constructs are observed. Little is known about the stability of these items and…

  15. Creep-Rupture Properties and Corrosion Behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo Steel and Hastelloy X-Alloys in Simulated HTGR Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystrup, Aage; Rittenhouse, P. L.; DiStefano, J. R.

    Hastelloy X and 2/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel are being considered as structural alloys for components of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) system. Among other mechanical properties, the creep behavior of these materials in HTGR primary coolant helium must be established to form part...

  16. Research into the behaviour and transport of radionuclides in waters. Methods of testing sorption properties of materials present in aqueous environment and evaluation of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, A.; Kortus, J.; Mayer, J.; Hanslik, E.

    1979-01-01

    The study deals with the occurrence of Ra-226, uranium, Cr-51, Co-60, Sr-89, J-131 and Cs-137 in the Czechoslovakian reach of the Danube and the accumulation of nuclides in bottom sediments in function of the various physico-mechanical properties and their adsorptive characteristics. (author)

  17. Stability characteristics and structural properties of single- and double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous environment using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Ameri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Structural properties and stability characteristics of single- and double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes functionalized with Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous environment are investigated employing molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Structural and buckling analysis of boron-nitride nanotubes under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN). • Gyration radius increases linearly as the weight percentage of FMN increases. • Presence of water molecules results in more expansion of FMN around BNNTs. • Critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs is higher than that of pure BNNTs. • The critical strain of functionalized BNNTs is found to be lower than that of pure ones. - Abstract: The non-cytotoxic properties of Boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and the ability of stable interaction with biomolecules make them so promising for biological applications. In this research, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structural properties and stability characteristics of single- and double-walled BNNTs under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in vacuum and aqueous environments. According to the simulation results, gyration radius increases by rising the weight percentage of FMN. Also, the results demonstrate that critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs increases in vacuum. Moreover, it is observed that by increasing the weight percentage of FMN, critical force of functionalized BNNTs rises. By contrast, critical strain reduces by functionalization of BNNTs in vacuum. Considering the aqueous environment, it is observed that gyration radius and critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs increase more considerably than those of functionalized BNNTs in vacuum, whereas the critical strains approximately remain unchanged.

  18. The study of the laser parameters and environment variables effect on mechanical properties of high compact parts elaborated by selective laser melting 316L powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Baicheng; Dembinski, Lucas; Coddet, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a systematic analysis of the main parameters for the selective laser melting (SLM) of a commercial stainless steel 316L powder was conducted to improve the mechanical properties and dimensional accuracy of the fabricated parts. First, the effects of the processing parameters, such as the laser beam scanning velocity, laser power, substrate condition and thickness of the powder layer, on the formation of single tracks for achieving a continuous melting and densification of the material were analysed. Then, the influence of the environmental conditions (gas nature) and of the preheating temperature on the density and dimensional accuracy of the parts was considered. The microstructural features of the SLM SS 316L parts were carefully observed to elucidate the melting-solidification mechanism and the thermal history, which are the basis of the manufacturing process. Finally, the mechanical properties of the corresponding material were also determined

  19. HTGR Base Technology Program. Task 2: concrete properties in nuclear environment. A review of concrete material systems for application to prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.

    1981-05-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are designed to serve as primary pressure containment structures. The safety of these structures depends on a correct assessment of the loadings and proper design of the vessels to accept these loadings. Proper vessel design requires a knowledge of the component (material) properties. Because concrete is one of the primary constituents of PCPVs, knowledge of its behavior is required to produce optimum PCPV designs. Concrete material systems are reviewed with respect to constituents, mix design, placing, curing, and strength evaluations, and typical concrete property data are presented. Effects of extreme loadings (elevated temperature, multiaxial, irradiation) on concrete behavior are described. Finally, specialty concrete material systems (high strength, fibrous, polymer, lightweight, refractory) are reviewed. 235 references

  20. Recovery of soil properties after seedlings Inoculation with AM fungi and addition of composted olive mill waste in the regeneration of a heavy metal polluted environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    curaqueo, Gustavo; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Borie, Fernando; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldan, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in order to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation and the use of composted olive waste (COW) on the establishment of Tetraclinis articulata and soil properties in a heavy metal polluted soil. The higher doses of COW in combination with AM fungi increased shoot and root biomass production of T. articulata by 96% and 60% respectively. These treatments trended to improve the soils properties evaluated, highlighting the C compounds and N as well as the microbiological activities. In relation to the metal translocation in T. articulata, doses of COW applied decreased the Cr, Ni and Pb contents in shoot, as well as Cr and As in root, although the most of them reached low levels and far from phytotoxic. The COW amendment aided G-mosseae-inoculated T. articulata plants to thrive in contaminated soil, mainly through an improvement in both nutrients uptake, mainly P and soil microbial function. In addition, the combined use of AM fungi plus COW could be a feasible strategy to be incorporated in phytoremediation programs; because it promotes soil properties, a better performance of plants for supporting the stress in heavy-metal contaminated soils derived from mining process, and also can be a good way for olive mill wastes disposal.

  1. Quantifying Subsurface Water and Heat Distribution and its Linkage with Landscape Properties in Terrestrial Environment using Hydro-Thermal-Geophysical Monitoring and Coupled Inverse Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Tran, A. P.; Wainwright, H. M.; Hubbard, S. S.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying water and heat fluxes in the subsurface is crucial for managing water resources and for understanding the terrestrial ecosystem where hydrological properties drive a variety of biogeochemical processes across a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Here, we present the development of an advanced monitoring strategy where hydro-thermal-geophysical datasets are continuously acquired and further involved in a novel inverse modeling framework to estimate the hydraulic and thermal parameter that control heat and water dynamics in the subsurface and further influence surface processes such as evapotranspiration and vegetation growth. The measured and estimated soil properties are also used to investigate co-interaction between subsurface and surface dynamics by using above-ground aerial imaging. The value of this approach is demonstrated at two different sites, one in the polygonal shaped Arctic tundra where water and heat dynamics have a strong impact on freeze-thaw processes, vegetation and biogeochemical processes, and one in a floodplain along the Colorado River where hydrological fluxes between compartments of the system (surface, vadose zone and groundwater) drive biogeochemical transformations. Results show that the developed strategy using geophysical, point-scale and aerial measurements is successful to delineate the spatial distribution of hydrostratigraphic units having distinct physicochemical properties, to monitor and quantify in high resolution water and heat distribution and its linkage with vegetation, geomorphology and weather conditions, and to estimate hydraulic and thermal parameters for enhanced predictions of water and heat fluxes as well as evapotranspiration. Further, in the Colorado floodplain, results document the potential presence of only periodic infiltration pulses as a key hot moment controlling soil hydro and biogeochemical functioning. In the arctic, results show the strong linkage between soil water content, thermal

  2. The characteristics of TiC and oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of TiC coated graphite under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Oku, Tatsuo; Ioka, Ikuo; Umekawa, Shokichi.

    1982-07-01

    Core region of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) consists mainly of polycrystalline graphite whose mechanical properties degradated by corrosion resulting from such impurities as O 2 , H 2 O, and CO 2 in coolant He gas. Mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of TiC coated graphite under corrosive condition were examined in order to evaluate the effects of TiC coating on preventing the graphite from its degradation in service condition of the VHTR. Characteristics of TiC coating was also examined using EPMA. Holding the specimen at 1373 K for 6 hr produced strong interface between TiC coating and the graphite, however, microcracks on TiC coating was observed, the origin of which is ascribed to mismatch in thermal expansion between TiC coating and the graphite. Oxidation rate of TiC coated graphite was one-thirds of that of uncoated graphite, which demonstrated that TiC coating on the graphite improved the oxidation resistance of the graphite. However, debonding of TiC coating layer at the interface was observed after heating for 3 to 4 hr in the oxidation condition. Changes in Young's modulus of TiC coated graphite were a half of that of uncoated graphite. Flexural strength of TiC coated graphite remained at the original value up to about 4 hr oxidation, therafter it decreased abruptly as was the trend of uncoated graphite. It is concluded that TiC coating on graphite materials is very effective in improving oxidation resistance and suppressing degradation of mechanical properties of the graphite. (author)

  3. Variations of aerosol size distribution, chemical composition and optical properties from roadside to ambient environment: A case study in Hong Kong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Ning, Zhi; Shen, Zhenxing; Li, Guoliang; Zhang, Junke; Lei, Yali; Xu, Hongmei; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Leiming; Westerdahl, Dane; Gali, Nirmal Kumar; Gong, Xuesong

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the ;roadside-to-ambient; evolution of particle physicochemical and optical properties in typical urban atmospheres of Hong Kong through collection of chemically-resolved PM2.5 data and PM2.5 size distribution at a roadside and an ambient site. Roadside particle size distribution showed typical peaks in the nuclei mode (30-40 nm) while ambient measurements peaked in the Aitken mode (50-70 nm), revealing possible condensation and coagulation growth of freshly emitted particles during aging processes. Much higher levels of anthropogenic chemical components, i.e. nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), but lower levels of OC/EC and secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA)/EC ratios appeared in roadside than ambient particles. The high OC/EC and SIA/EC ratios in ambient particles implied high contributions from secondary aerosols. Black carbon (BC), a strong light absorbing material, showed large variations in optical properties when mixed with other inorganic and organic components. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (p-PAHs), an indicator of brown carbon (BrC), showed significant UV-absorbing ability. The average BC and p-PAHs concentrations were 3.8 and 87.6 ng m-3, respectively, at the roadside, but were only 1.5 and 18.1 ng m-3 at the ambient site, suggesting BC and p-PAHs concentrations heavily driven by traffic emissions. In contrast, PM2.5 UV light absorption coefficients (babs-BrC,370nm) at the ambient site (4.2 Mm-1) and at the roadside site (4.1 Mm-1) were similar, emphasizing that particle aging processes enhanced UV light-absorbing properties, a conclusion that was also supported by the finding that the Absorption Ångström coefficient (AAC) value at UV wavelengths (AAC_UV band) at the ambient site were ∼1.7 times higher than that at the roadside. Both aqueous reaction and photochemically produced secondary organic aerosol (SOA) for ambient aerosols contributed to the peak values of babs

  4. Aluminium Toxicity to Plants as Influenced by the Properties of the Root Growth Environment Affected by Other Co-Stressors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siecińska, Joanna; Nosalewicz, Artur

    Aluminium toxicity to crops depends on the acidity of the soil and specific plant resistance. However, it is also strongly affected by other environmental factors that have to be considered to properly evaluate the resultant effects on plants. Observed weather perturbations and predicted climate changes will increase the probability of co-occurrence of aluminium toxicity and other abiotic stresses.In this review the mechanisms of plant-aluminium interactions are shown to be influenced by soil mineral nutrients, heavy metals, organic matter, oxidative stress and drought. Described effects of aluminium toxicity include: root growth inhibition, reduction in the uptake of mineral nutrients resulting from the inhibition of transport processes through ion channels; epigenetic changes to DNA resulting in gene silencing. Complex processes occurring in the rhizosphere are highlighted, including the role of soil organic matter and aluminium detoxification by mucilage.There is a considerable research gap in the understanding of root growth in the soil environment in the presence of toxic aluminium concentrations as affected by interactions with abiotic stressors. This knowledge is important for the selection of feasible methods aimed at the reduction of negative consequences of crop production in acidic soils affected by adverse growth environment.

  5. Consequences of cavity size and chemical environment on the adsorption properties of isoreticular metal-organic frameworks: an inverse gas chromatography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Inés; Díaz, Eva; Vega, Aurelio; Ordóñez, Salvador

    2013-01-25

    The role of the structure of three isoreticular metal-organic frameworks (IRMOFs) on their adsorption behavior has been studied in this work, selecting different kinds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as adsorbates (alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, aromatics and chlorinated). For this purpose, three samples (IRMOF-1, IRMOF-8 and IRMOF-10) with cubic structure and without functionalities on the organic linkers were synthesized. Adsorption capacities at infinite dilution were derived from the adsorption isotherms, whereas thermodynamic properties have been determined from chromatographic retention volume. The capacity and the strength of adsorption were strongly influenced by the adsorbate size. This effect is especially relevant for n-alkanes adsorption, indicating the key role of the cavity size on this phenomenon, and hence the importance of the IRMOF structural properties. A different behavior has been observed for the polar compounds, where an enhancement on the specificity of the adsorption with the π-electron rich regions was observed. This fact suggests the specific interaction of these molecules with the organic linkers of the IRMOFs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Territorial characterisation considering geo morphological properties of subsoil as well as climatic and meteorological conditions for the evaluation of the effects of radiological nature on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvicini, A.; Esposito, P.

    2002-01-01

    The composition and origin of the rocky substratum, the permeability of the ground, its degree of humidity and the particle size are the main factors that influence radon concentration in the subsoil and in the water stratums as well as its upward migration. The climatic and meteorological conditions, particularly the moisture, the barometric pressure and the temperature, can influence more or less directly the underground emanation and diffusion properties of radon and thoron giving rise to short-term modifications of radiological nature in the subsoil, closely related to the presence of these elements. The great concentration of some radioisotopes, in some particular areas, can also induce high dose rates caused by the radiation coming from emergent rocks, due for instance to activities related to building works, with consequent possible exposure of the personnel involved in underground excavations. In such situations it is possible to carry out systematical radiometric measurements, which provide instantaneous and time integrated data, using fixed or movable instrumentation. The stratigraphical structure of the subsoil and the related variations of lithological nature as well as the lack of homogeneity in the land, due also to the unevenness of the ground outline and to the presence of fault planes, increase considerably the complexity of analytical evaluations based upon the chemical and physical characteristics of the subsoil and upon the meteorological and climatic properties

  7. Effects of corrosion and precipitates on mechanical properties in the ferritic/martensitic steel cladding under ultra-long cycle fast reactor environment at 650 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This changes chemical compositions of inter-surface and effects on behavior of precipitations. NaCrO{sub 2} which is ternary sodium compound occurs intergranular corrosion resulting in thickness reduction. This change can cause a degradation of mechanical strength of structure material of UCFR. Therefore, we should consider longterm compatibility with sodium and study about life prediction. The research about ferritic/martensitic steel on effects of long term exposure in liquid sodium at 650 .deg. C, 20ppm oxygen includes weight loss of test material (Gr. 92) by corrosion and mechanism about nucleation and growth of precipitates like Laves-phase in bulk. There are many changes such as segregation of component to nucleate precipitates, affecting into microstructural evolution of the steel. Therefore, the thermochemical reaction research to predict behavior about precipitates should be performed. In a specific procedure, the micro-structure and the surface phenomenon of ferritic/martensitic steels (Gr. 92) that are exposed to liquid sodium at 650 .deg. C, 20 ppm oxygen and aged in high pure Argon gas environment to express bulk have been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At 10 ppm oxygen designed oxygen value for UCFR, there is 107μm thickness reduction for 30 years. Thus, if there is no degradation of mechanical strength caused by aging effect, the tolerance of load of initial cladding should be higher than real load at least 23.6 %. Compared to specimens exposed to Ar-gas environment, Specimen which solutions are leaded into sodium has degradation of strength by reduction of solution hardening.

  8. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in medical environment: Gaussian Derivative Frequency Modulation (GDFM) as a novel modulation technique with minimal interference properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieche, Marie; Komenský, Tomás; Husar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems in healthcare facilitate the possibility of contact-free identification and tracking of patients, medical equipment and medication. Thereby, patient safety will be improved and costs as well as medication errors will be reduced considerably. However, the application of RFID and other wireless communication systems has the potential to cause harmful electromagnetic disturbances on sensitive medical devices. This risk mainly depends on the transmission power and the method of data communication. In this contribution we point out the reasons for such incidents and give proposals to overcome these problems. Therefore a novel modulation and transmission technique called Gaussian Derivative Frequency Modulation (GDFM) is developed. Moreover, we carry out measurements to show the inteference properties of different modulation schemes in comparison to our GDFM.

  9. Dust in cosmic plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Cosmic dust is invariably immersed in a plasma and a radiative environment. Consequently, it is charged to some electrostatic potential which depends on the properties of the environment as well as the nature of the dust. This charging affects the physical and dynamical properties of the dust. In this paper the basic aspects of this dust-plasma interaction in several cosmic environments - including planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere and the interstellar medium - are discussed. The physical and dynamical consequences of the interaction, as well as the pertinent observational evidence, are reviewed. Finally, the importance of the surface charge during the condensation process in plasma environments is stressed. (Auth.)

  10. Leukocyte Inclusion within a Platelet Rich Plasma-Derived Fibrin Scaffold Stimulates a More Pro-Inflammatory Environment and Alters Fibrin Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mar; Troya, María; Padilla, Sabino; Orive, Gorka

    2015-01-01

    One of the main differences among platelet-rich plasma (PRP) products is the inclusion of leukocytes that may affect the biological efficacy of these autologous preparations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of leukocytes modified the morphological, biomechanical and biological properties of PRP under normal and inflammatory conditions. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) and leukocyte-platelet rich plasma (L-PRP) scaffolds was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and was significantly increased under an inflammatory condition when leukocytes were included in the PRP. Fibroblasts and osteoblasts treated with L-PRP, under an inflammatory situation, underwent a greater activation of NFĸB pathway, proliferated significantly less and secreted a higher concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cellular events were assessed through Western blot and fluorimetric and ELISA methods, respectively. Therefore, the inclusion of leukocytes induced significantly higher pro-inflammatory conditions. PMID:25823008

  11. Leukocyte inclusion within a platelet rich plasma-derived fibrin scaffold stimulates a more pro-inflammatory environment and alters fibrin properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Anitua

    Full Text Available One of the main differences among platelet-rich plasma (PRP products is the inclusion of leukocytes that may affect the biological efficacy of these autologous preparations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of leukocytes modified the morphological, biomechanical and biological properties of PRP under normal and inflammatory conditions. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF and leukocyte-platelet rich plasma (L-PRP scaffolds was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and was significantly increased under an inflammatory condition when leukocytes were included in the PRP. Fibroblasts and osteoblasts treated with L-PRP, under an inflammatory situation, underwent a greater activation of NFĸB pathway, proliferated significantly less and secreted a higher concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cellular events were assessed through Western blot and fluorimetric and ELISA methods, respectively. Therefore, the inclusion of leukocytes induced significantly higher pro-inflammatory conditions.

  12. Degradation of 2DEG transport properties in GaN-capped AlGaN/GaN heterostructures at 600 °C in oxidizing and inert environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Minmin; Jain, Sambhav R.; So, Hongyun; Heuser, Thomas A.; Xu, Xiaoqing; Suria, Ateeq J.; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the electron mobility and sheet density of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in both air and argon environments at 600 °C were measured intermittently over a 5 h duration using unpassivated and Al2O3-passivated AlGaN/GaN (with 3 nm GaN cap) van der Pauw test structures. The unpassivated AlGaN/GaN heterostructures annealed in air showed the smallest decrease (˜8%) in 2DEG electron mobility while Al2O3-passivated samples annealed in argon displayed the largest drop (˜70%) based on the Hall measurements. Photoluminescence and atomic force microscopy showed that minimal strain relaxation and surface roughness changes have occurred in the unpassivated samples annealed in air, while those with Al2O3 passivation annealed in argon showed significant microstructural degradations. This suggests that cracks developed in the samples annealed in air were healed by oxidation reactions. To further confirm this, Auger electron spectroscopy was conducted on the unpassivated samples after the anneal in air and results showed that extra surface oxides have been generated, which could act as a dislocation pinning layer to suppress the strain relaxation in AlGaN. On the other hand, similar 2DEG sheet densities were observed in passivated and unpassivated AlGaN/GaN samples at the end of the 5-h anneal in air or argon due to the combined impact of strain relaxation and changes in the ionized electronic states. The results support the use of unpassivated GaN-capped AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as the material platform for high-temperature electronics and sensors used in oxidizing environmental conditions.

  13. Aerosol optical properties in a rural environment near the mega-city Guangzhou, China: implications for regional air pollution, radiative forcing and remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Zhang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The scattering and absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key element of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however, highly variable and not well characterized, especially near newly emerging mega-cities. In this study, aerosol optical properties were measured at a rural site approximately 60 km northwest of the mega-city Guangzhou in southeast China. The measurements were part of the PRIDE-PRD2006 intensive campaign, covering the period of 1–30 July 2006. Scattering and absorption coefficients of dry aerosol particles with diameters up to 10 μm (PM10 were determined with a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer and with a photoacoustic spectrometer, respectively.

    Averaged over the measurement campaign (arithmetic mean ± standard deviation, the total scattering coefficients were 200±133 Mm−1 (450 nm, 151±103 Mm−1 (550 nm and 104±72 Mm−1 (700 nm and the absorption coefficient was 34.3±26.5 Mm−1 (532 nm. The average Ångström exponent was 1.46±0.21 (450 nm/700 nm and the average single scattering albedo was 0.82±0.07 (532 nm with minimum values as low as 0.5. The low single scattering albedo values indicate a high abundance, as well as strong sources, of light absorbing carbon (LAC. The ratio of LAC to CO concentration was highly variable throughout the campaign, indicating a complex mix of different combustion sources. The scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as the Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo, exhibited pronounced diurnal cycles, which can be attributed to boundary layer mixing effects and enhanced nighttime emissions of LAC (diesel soot from regulated truck traffic. The daytime average mid-visible single scattering albedo of 0.87 appears to be more suitable for climate modeling purposes than the 24-h average of 0.82, as the latter value is

  14. The relationship between environmental parameters of saline and underground karst - patients with different diseases in the course of speleotherapy - anthropogenic effect - keeping intact the underground environment and curative properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simionca, Iu.; Hoteteu, M.; Chonka, Ia.; Slavik, P.; Kubas, J.; Grudnicki, N.

    2009-04-01

    One of the non-pharmacological therapy in patients with bronchial asthma (AB) and other BPOC is speleotherapy (ST), recognized as a complementary therapy. The curative effect of ST depends on geophysic structure of massive salt or karst, of mine or cave cavities, lack of noxes and toxic gas, also on the lack of the plant and microbial allergen, on the microclimatic parameters, sanitary and other parameters of the underground environment, on the mechanism of curative factors in these specific environments, on the medical particularities and disease specific speleotherapeutic methodology. An essential role they have environmental studies of underground cavities that own speleotherapeutic properties and use in medical and balneoclimatic tourism purposes. Among these studies are: - Air temperature, soil and salt layer; - Atmospheric pressure and the difference from the outside; - Relative humidity of the air underground; - Velocity of air currents; - Concentration of positive and negative air ions; - Particle size and concentration of saline aerosol; - Concentration of microorganisms, including pathogens, conditioning-pathogenic and saprophytic in air, soil saline and salt walls in rooms designed for speleotherapy; - Concentration of allergens; - Concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide, the presence and concentration of ozone, the gaseous pollutants (NO2, SO2, hydrocarbons and derivatives of ozone); - Radioactivity (type, value), the presence and concentration of radon. Taking into consideration the possibility of anthropogenic effect on the underground salt or karst environment produced by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, respiratory or skin allergic diseases is needed to assess the underground environmental sanitary parameters in various main locations (the entrance in the underground, the artificial or natural air flow; the sanatory area " - the location where patients or tourists are keeped for a period of 1-3 or more hours, bathroom) and the

  15. In-plane conductance of thin films as a probe of surface chemical environment: Adsorbate effects on film electronic properties of indium tin oxide and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swint, Amy Lynn

    Changes in the in-plane conductance of conductive thin films are observed as a result of chemical adsorption at the surface. Reaction of the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface with Bronsted acids (bases) leads to increases (decreases) in its in-plane conductance as measured by a four-point probe configuration. The conductance varies monotonically with pH suggesting that the degree of surface protonation or hydroxylation controls the surface charge density, which in turn affects the width of the n-type depletion layer, and ultimately the in-plane conductance. Measurements at constant pH with a series of tetraalkylammonium hydroxide species of varying cation size indicate that surface dipoles also affect ITO conductance by modulating the magnitude of the surface polarization. Modulating the double layer with varying aqueous salt solutions also affects ITO conductance, though not to the same degree as strong Bronsted acids and bases. Solvents of varying dielectric constant and proton donating ability (ethanol, dimethylformamide) decrease ITO conductance relative to H2O. In addition, changing solvent gives rise to thermally-derived conductance transients, which result from exothermic solvent mixing. The self-assembly of alkanethiols at the surface increases the conductance of ITO films, most likely through carrier population effects. In all cases examined the combined effects of surface charge, adsorbed dipole layer magnitude and carrier injection are responsible for altering the ITO conductance. Besides being directly applicable to the control of electronic properties, these results also point to the use of four-point probe resistance measurements in condensed phase sensing applications. Ultrasensitive conductance-based gas phase sensing of organothiol adsorption to gold nanowires is accomplished with a limit of detection in the 105 molecule range. Further refinement of the inherently low noise resistance measurement may lead to observation of single adsorption events at

  16. Effect of coastline properties and wastewater on plankton composition and distribution in a stressed environment on the north coast of Olinda-PE (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luci Cajueiro Carneiro Pereira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of the structure of the plankton community along the coastal zone of the Casa Caiada-Rio Doce area (Pernambuco, Brazil is presented. The results obtained indicated that in the protected zones the water presented high turbidity, high temperature, low salinity and high nutrient and oxygen rates. All of these conditions were responsible for the reduction in plankton diversity and an increase in the biomass of the most opportunistic (r-strategist species e.g. Gyrosigma balticum and Bacillaria paxillifera (Phytoplankton and Euterpina acutifrons (Zooplankton. The differences found with respect to others area studies performed in pristine conditions indicated that plankton structure could be used as an environmental health indicator and that, in this specific area, it was indicative of a poor quality coastal environment.Foi realizado um estudo sobre a estrutura das comunidades planctônicas ao longo das praias de Casa Caiada e Rio Doce (Pernanbuco, Brasil. A área de estudo sofre grande influência antrópica onde as condições ambientais são controladas pela presença de estruturas costeiras, reduzindo a intensidade da circulação neste ambiente; e pelos efluentes clandestinos de esgoto que aportam águas poluídas para dentro do sistema protegido. Os resultados obtidos indicam que nas zonas protegidas as águas apresentam alta turbidez, temperaturas elevadas, salinidades reduzidas e altas concentrações de nutrientes e oxigênio. Estas condições são responsáveis pela redução da diversidade do plâncton e pelo aumento da biomassa das espécies mais resistentes. As diferenças registradas com respeito a áreas similares, porém não impactadas, parecem indicar que a estrutura planctônica pode ser usada como um indicador da qualidade ambiental, sugerindo uma baixa qualidade das praias em estudo.

  17. Encapsulated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, Tom M.; Daanen, Hein A M; Cheung, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  18. Encapsulated Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, T.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Cheung, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  19. Robotic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic architectural environments to be implemented and tested in the last decade in virtual and physical prototypes. These prototypes are incorporating sensing-actuating

  20. Performative Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo Stjerne

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores how performative architecture can act as a collective environment localizing urban flows and establishing public domains through the integration of pervasive computing and animation techniques. The NoRA project introduces the concept of ‘performative environments,' focusing on ...... of local interactions and network behaviour, building becomes social infrastructure and prompts an understanding of architectural structures as quasiobjects, which can retain both variation and recognisability in changing social constellations.......The paper explores how performative architecture can act as a collective environment localizing urban flows and establishing public domains through the integration of pervasive computing and animation techniques. The NoRA project introduces the concept of ‘performative environments,' focusing...

  1. Nanomaterials and the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Sonia; Rametta, Gabriella; Miglietta Maria Lucia; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology intend to engineer the material using the special properties that it exhibits in the nanoscale to create new products. These properties imply a greater chemical reactivity, a higher strength and electrical conductivity and, potentially, a more pronounced biological activity. This can have not only positive valence (antioxidant activity, penetration of cellular barriers to the release of drugs), but also negative (eg. Toxicity, induction of oxidative stress or cellular dysfunction). Therefore, in addition to the great practical interest, nanotechnology has attracted the attention of the scientific community and the legislative authority for the specific interactions that may occur with living beings and the environment [it

  2. Crystallography and environment development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Crystallography, the study of atomic and molecular structure, has given detailed information about the fine-structure of the inorganic and living world-i.e. about the environment (in the widest sense of the world)-. It has contributed to geology (at the atomic level), crystal chemistry, the structure of minerals, soils and clays. In the case of the living world it has contributed to structural studies of biological molecules; proteins, nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), and polysaccharides. knowing how the atoms in a material are arranged allows to understand the relationship between atomic structure and properties of these materials. Today we are entering a new age in crystallography-the age of genetic engineering in the living world, and inorganic crystallographic engineering, where we use crystallographic information from the structures nature has given us, to begin to design and build structure of our own, of specified properties, aiming at the welfare of man and the development of his environment

  3. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  4. Enacting Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Enacting Environments is an ethnography of the midst of the encounter between corporations, sustainable development and climate change. At this intersection 'environmental management' and 'carbon accounting' are put into practice. Purportedly, these practices green capitalism. Drawing on fieldwork...... of day-to-day practices of corporate environmental accountants and managers, Ingmar Lippert reconstructs their work as achieving to produce a reality of environment that is simultaneously stable and flexible enough for a particular corporate project: to stage the company, and in consequence capitalism......, as in control over its relations to an antecedent environment. Not confined to mere texts or meetings between shiny stakeholders co-governing the corporation – among them some of the world's biggest auditing firms, an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) and standards – control is found...

  5. Les hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques dans l'environnement. Première partie. Propriété, origines, devenir Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Environment. Part One. Properties, Origins, Fates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchez M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques (HAP sont des contaminants produits notamment dans les processus de combustion. Leur caractère ubiquiste et leur génotoxicité sont à l'origine d'une activité de recherche importante. Après avoir présenté les structures chimiques et les propriétés physico-chimiques et biologiques principales de ces composés, on résume les connaissances actuelles concernant leur présence dans l'environnement. Les critères géochimiques de leurs différentes origines pyrolytique, diagénétique ou pétrolière, sont exposés. On examine la contribution des différentes sources d'émission, le transport et la diffusion dans l'environnement de ces composés, ainsi que les modifications qu'ils subissent et leur sort ultime. La distribution qualitative et quantitative des HAP de combustion dans les sols d'environnements variés est présentée. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH are environmental contaminants produced in particular in combustion processes. As a consequence of their genotoxicity and ubiquity, they are the subject of an important research activity. After a presentation of the chemical structures and of the main physico-chemical and biological properties of these compounds, the current knowledge regarding their presence in the environment is summarized. The geochernical criteria of the different,origins, pyrolytic, diagenetic and petroleum of PAH are presented. The respective contributions of their various emission sources are discussed , as well as the transfer and diffusion in the environment, the modifications undergone and the ultimate fate of these compounds. The qualitative and quantitative distribution of combustion PAH in soils in different environmental situations is presented.

  6. Ionizing radiation in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandl, J.; Petr, I.

    1988-01-01

    The basic terms are explained such as the atom, radioactivity, nuclear reaction, interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, etc. The basic dosimetric variables and units and properties of radionuclides and ionizing radiation are given. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are discussed with regard to the environment and the propagation and migration of radionuclides is described in the environment to man. The impact is explained of ionizing radiation on the cell and the somatic and genetic effects of radiation on man are outlined. Attention is devoted to protection against ionizing radiation and to radiation limits, also to the detection, dosimetry and monitoring of ionizing radiation in the environment. (M.D.). 92 figs., 40 tabs. 74 refs

  7. Heuristic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Giunta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the identification of a paradigm which fixes the basic concepts and the type of logical relationships between them, whereby direct, govern and evaluate choises on new technologies. The contribution is based on the assumption that the complexity of knowledge is correlated with the complexity of the learning environment. From the existence of this correlation will descend a series of consequences that contribute to the definition of a theoretical construct in which the logical categories of learning become the guiding criteria on which to design learning environments and, consequently, also the indicators on by which to evaluate its effectiveness.

  8. African Environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental Studies and Regional Planning Bulletin African Environment is published in French and English, and for some issues, in Arabic. (only the issue below has been received by AJOL). Vol 10, No 3 (1999). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of ...

  9. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  10. Cooperative research with the Institute of Resources and Environment Technology. Estimation and investigation of estimation method on property change accompanied with excavation. Intermediate report in 1994 and 1995 fiscal year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PRNFDC) and the Institute of Resources and Environment Technology (IRET) of Agency of Industrial Science and Technology conducted a cooperative research on a testing study based on in-door fundamental examination on Acoustic emission (AE) original position measuring tester to catch property change due to micro elastic wave formed with generation and propagation of rock deformation and fracture and AE measurement and specific resistance tomography under 3 years plan from 1989 fiscal year. In 1994 fiscal year, survey on the specific resistance tomography for pre-research on tunnel excavation effect test and experiment on the specific resistance measurement at in-door scale for fundamental study of estimation method were conducted. And, in 1995 fiscal year, by laying a main point of the experiment at in-door scale, the estimation and investigation on the excavation effect estimation method on a base of the past study results on the fundamental experiment results were conducted. In this paper, these experiment results conducted at IRET and PRNFDC in 1994 and 1995 fiscal years were reported. (G.K.)

  11. Quantum Darwinism in hazy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Michael; Quan, H. T.; Zurek, Wojciech

    2010-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism provides an information-theoretic framework for the emergence of the classical world from the quantum substrate. It recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the ``systems of interest'' indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Objectivity, a key property of the classical world, arises via the proliferation of redundant information into the environment where many observers can then intercept it and independently determine the state of the system. After a general introduction to this framework, we demonstrate how non-ideal initial states of the environment (e.g., mixed states) affect its ability to act as a communication channel for information about the system. The environment's capacity for transmitting information is directly related to its ability to increase its entropy. Therefore, environments that remain nearly invariant under the Hamiltonian dynamics, such as very mixed states, have a diminished ability to transmit information. However, despite this, the environment almost always redundantly transmits information about the system.

  12. Nanomaterials in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowiec, Bozena

    2017-11-01

    This paper considers engineered nanomaterials, deliberately engineered and manufactured to have certain properties and have at least one primary dimension of less than 100 nm. Materials produced with the aid of nanotechnologies are used in many areas of everyday life. Researches with nanomaterials have shown that the physiochemical characteristic of particles can influence their effects in biological systems. The field of nanotechnology has created risk for environment and human health. The toxicity of nanoparticles may be affected by different physicochemical properties, including size, shape, chemistry, surface properties, agglomeration, solubility, and charge, as well as effects from attached functional groups and crystalline structure. The greater surface-area-to-mass ratio of nanoparticles makes them generally more reactive than their macro-sized counterparts. Exposure to nanomaterials can occur at different life-cycle stages of the materials and/or products. The knowledge gaps limiting the understanding of the human and environment hazard and risk of nanotechnology should be explained by the scientific investigations for help to protect human and environmental health and to ensure the benefits of the nanotechnology products without excessive risk of this new technology. In this review are presented the proposal measurement methods for NMs characteristic.

  13. Fetal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinare, Arun

    2008-01-01

    The intrauterine environment has a strong influence on pregnancy outcome. The placenta and the umbilical cord together form the main supply line of the fetus. Amniotic fluid also serves important functions. These three main components decide whether there will be an uneventful pregnancy and the successful birth of a healthy baby. An insult to the intrauterine environment has an impact on the programming of the fetus, which can become evident in later life, mainly in the form of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and certain learning disabilities. The past two decades have witnessed major contributions from researchers in this field, who have included ultrasonologists, epidemiologists, neonatologists, and pediatricians. Besides being responsible for these delayed postnatal effects, abnormalities of the placenta, umbilical cord, and amniotic fluid also have associations with structural and chromosomal disorders. Population and race also influence pregnancy outcomes to some extent in certain situations. USG is the most sensitive imaging tool currently available for evaluation of these factors and can offer considerable information in this area. This article aims at reviewing the USG-related developments in this area and the anatomy, physiology, and various pathologies of the placenta, umbilical cord, and the amniotic fluid

  14. Supportability Analysis in LCI Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Vasiljevic; Ana Horvat

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the basic pillars of the supportability analysis this paper queries its characteristics in LCI (Life Cycle Integration) environment. The research methodology contents a review of modern logistics engineering literature with the objective to collect and synthesize the knowledge relating to standards of supportability design in e-logistics environment. The results show that LCI framework has properties which are in fully compatibility with the requirement of s...

  15. Plastic pollutants in water environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mrowiec Bożena

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, wide applications of plastics result in plastic waste being present in the water environment in a wide variety of sizes. Plastic wastes are in water mainly as microplastics (the size range of 1 nm to < 5 mm). Microplastics have been recognized as an emerging threat, as well as ecotoxicological and ecological risk for water ecosystems. In this review are presented some of the physicochemical properties of plastic materials that determine their toxic effect on the aquatic environment....

  16. Enhanced linear and nonlinear optical properties of thermally stable ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeeju, P.P.; Jayalekshmi, S.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Sudheesh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highly transparent and thermally stable zinc oxide (ZnO)/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS–PMMA) nanocomposite films have been deposited on glass substrates, from the ZnO incorporated (PS–PMMA) solutions in toluene, using spin coating technique. A chemical route at room temperature is used to synthesize the ZnO nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the ZnO nanoparticles are of size around 10 nm. The composite films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Ultraviolet–visible–Near Infrared (UV–vis–NIR) spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Z-scan technique. From the UV–vis–NIR spectra it is observed that the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit excellent shielding property in the UV region and, high transparency in the visible region. The PL spectrum of the composite films is different from that of ZnO and PS–PMMA blend and exhibits an excitonic emission peak at ∼ 375 nm. The optical absorptive nonlinearity in the nanocomposite films is investigated using open aperture Z-scan technique. The results indicate optical limiting type nonlinearity in the films due to two photon absorption. A transmittance minimum of around 0.25 has been observed in the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films which is much lower compared to that in ZnO/PMMA and ZnO/PS nanocomposite films. The ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films also show a self-defocusing type negative nonlinear refraction in closed aperture Z-scan experiment. These nanocomposite films extend ample scope of applications as excellent optical limiters and efficient UV protectors. - Highlights: ► Transparent, ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) composite films are prepared. ► The nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit good UV-shielding property.

  17. Enhanced linear and nonlinear optical properties of thermally stable ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeeju, P.P., E-mail: jeejupp@gmail.com [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022, Kerala (India); Chandrasekharan, K.; Sudheesh, P. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala (India)

    2013-03-01

    Highly transparent and thermally stable zinc oxide (ZnO)/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS–PMMA) nanocomposite films have been deposited on glass substrates, from the ZnO incorporated (PS–PMMA) solutions in toluene, using spin coating technique. A chemical route at room temperature is used to synthesize the ZnO nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the ZnO nanoparticles are of size around 10 nm. The composite films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Ultraviolet–visible–Near Infrared (UV–vis–NIR) spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Z-scan technique. From the UV–vis–NIR spectra it is observed that the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit excellent shielding property in the UV region and, high transparency in the visible region. The PL spectrum of the composite films is different from that of ZnO and PS–PMMA blend and exhibits an excitonic emission peak at ∼ 375 nm. The optical absorptive nonlinearity in the nanocomposite films is investigated using open aperture Z-scan technique. The results indicate optical limiting type nonlinearity in the films due to two photon absorption. A transmittance minimum of around 0.25 has been observed in the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films which is much lower compared to that in ZnO/PMMA and ZnO/PS nanocomposite films. The ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films also show a self-defocusing type negative nonlinear refraction in closed aperture Z-scan experiment. These nanocomposite films extend ample scope of applications as excellent optical limiters and efficient UV protectors. - Highlights: ► Transparent, ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) composite films are prepared. ► The nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit good UV-shielding property.

  18. Intellectual property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Shpresa Ibrahimi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Montenue, a distinct French scholar of intellectual property, has suggested that IP is a “tool which surprisingly helps a lot”, and this definition on science, arts, culture, since the 16th century. Now, what would be the definition of intellectual property for the 21st century? Apparently not a “strange” tool, but a necessary tool, primary for enriching human knowledge, and for the new world order, especially in the global market sphere. Intellectual property is an integral part of international trade, and its importance keeps increasing, since effective use of knowledge is increasingly influencing the economic prosperity of peoples. One may say that there is little originality in the creative sphere. Naturally, this originality can only be reflected by individuality and human identity in intellectual creativity The author rights in the Kosovo legislation is a novelty, a necessity of developing a creative environment in the fields of science, arts and industrial property. First and foremost, the individual benefit, which is secured by the author as the creator of the work, is a moral and material right. Secondly, there is a need for harmonization, not only of values for the creator, but also for the development of science, culture, increased competitive advantage, and the public sphere, as a benefit for the public health and security, and the fiscal policy. The deficiency one must record is with the Office for Copy Rights, which is to play a strong role in implementing and protecting copy rights and other related rights by licensing collective management agencies, imposing administrative fines, awareness raising, provision of information, and other capacity building and educative measures. Naturally, the enactment of good legislation is a system without any meaning or sense if not associated with the court practice. Any establishment of a legal system not pursued with enforcement mechanisms remains only in legal frameworks.

  19. Environment, Health, and Safety | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Wide Environmental Assessment 2014 (DOE/EA-1914). Final EA and FONSI Appendices. Natural and Cultural property, and the environment. View the Environmental Stewardship, Health, Safety, and Quality Management Environmental Assessment 2014. Final EA and FONSI Appendices. Download the National Wind Technology Center Site

  20. Efecto del secado en ambiente de servicio en la evolución de las propiedades mecánicas de hormigones livianos estructurales Effect of drying under service environment on the mechanical properties of structural lightweight concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Videla

    2007-08-01

    humidity and curing at 90% relative humidity during the first seven days and then to 50% relative humidity until the age of testing. The samples were tested at 7, 28, 60 and 90 days of age. An important deterioration of the measured properties due to the effect of the drying conditions was observed; at 83 days of drying, the compressive and splitting strength losses were on average of 20% and 15%, respectively, and of the modulus of elasticity of 40% with respect to concretes at 90% relative humidity. It was concluded that there are two main variables that can explain the loss of strength of lightweight concrete due to the effect of a dry environment. The first of them is the water-cement ratio which controls, among others, the permeability of the mortar or resistant phase. The second one is the relative content of lightweight aggregate in the concrete

  1. The modern research environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    Information Technology, research environment, structured documents, networked information retrieval......Information Technology, research environment, structured documents, networked information retrieval...

  2. ENVIRONMENT AND PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yichen [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Tan, Jonathan C., E-mail: yczhang.astro@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of the resulting star and planetary systems. Here, we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focusing on low-mass Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster, to very high pressures that may be found in the densest infrared dark clouds or in the Galactic center. We present unified analytic and numerical models for the collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution, and bipolar outflows, coupled with radiative transfer calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas-phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high-pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting in higher luminosity protostars with more powerful outflows. The protostellar envelope is heated to warmer temperatures, affecting infrared morphologies (and thus classification) and astrochemical processes like CO depletion onto dust grain ice mantles (and thus CO morphologies). These results have general implications for star and planet formation, especially via their effect on astrochemical and dust grain evolution during infall to and through protostellar accretion disks.

  3. An Action Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Brand, Mark; Iversen, Jørgen; Mosses, Peter David

    2004-01-01

    constructs underlying Core ML. The paper also describes the Action Environment, a new environment supporting use and validation of ASDF descriptions. The Action Environment has been implemented on top of the ASF+SDF Meta-Environment, exploiting recent advances in techniques for integration of different...... formalisms, and inheriting all the main features of the Meta-Environment....

  4. Optical adhesive property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  5. Plastic pollutants in water environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrowiec Bożena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, wide applications of plastics result in plastic waste being present in the water environment in a wide variety of sizes. Plastic wastes are in water mainly as microplastics (the size range of 1 nm to < 5 mm. Microplastics have been recognized as an emerging threat, as well as ecotoxicological and ecological risk for water ecosystems. In this review are presented some of the physicochemical properties of plastic materials that determine their toxic effect on the aquatic environment. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs are mentioned as one of main sources of microplastics introduced into fresh water, and rivers are the pathways for the transportation of the pollutants to seas and oceans. But, effluents from tertiary wastewater treatment facilities can contain only minimally microplastic loads. The issue of discharge reduction of plastic pollutants into water environment needs activities in the scope of efficient wastewater treatment, waste disposal, recycling of plastic materials, education and public involvement.

  6. Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinson, John V.

    2000-01-01

    Intellectual property is a term that covers a number of different rights. Considers issues such as what are the basic forms of intellectual property; who owns the intellectual property created by a teacher; who owns intellectual property created by students; and use of downloaded materials from the internet. (Author/LM)

  7. Environment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Energy Environment Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us Environment Atmospheric and Climate Science Ecological

  8. Information Space, Information Field, Information Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ya. Tsvetkov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes information space, information field and information environment; shows that information space can be natural and artificial; information field is substantive and processual object and articulates the space property; information environment is concerned with some object and acts as the surrounding in relation to it and is considered with regard to it. It enables to define information environment as a subset of information space. It defines its passive description. Information environment can also be defined as a subset of information field. It corresponds to its active description.

  9. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and addition of composted olive-mill waste enhance plant establishment and soil properties in the regeneration of a heavy metal-polluted environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curaqueo, Gustavo; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Borie, Fernando; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in order to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation and the use of composted olive waste (COW) in the establishment of Tetraclinis articulata and soil properties in a heavy metal-polluted soil. The treatments assayed were as follows: AM + 0% COW, AM + 1% COW, and AM + 3% COW. The higher doses of COW in combination with AM fungi increased shoot and root biomass production of T. articulata by 96 and 60%, respectively. These treatments trended to improve the soil properties evaluated, highlighting the C compounds and N as well as the microbiological activities. In relation to the metal translocation in T. articulata, doses of COW applied decreased the Cr, Ni, and Pb contents in shoot, as well as Cr and As in root, although the most of them reached low levels and far from phytotoxic. The COW amendment aided Glomus mosseae-inoculated T. articulata plants to thrive in contaminated soil, mainly through an improvement in both nutrients uptake, mainly P and soil microbial function. In addition, the combined use of AM fungi plus COW could be a feasible strategy to be incorporated in phytoremediation programs because it promotes soil properties, a better performance of plants for supporting the stress in heavy metal-contaminated soils derived from the mining process, and also can be a good way for olive-mill waste disposal.

  10. 36 CFR 222.2 - Management of the range environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of the range environment. 222.2 Section 222.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... environment. (a) Allotments will be designated on the National Forest System and on other lands under Forest...

  11. Gas fuels and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Environment protection is one of the major concerns for public and local authorities worldwide. Automotive transports are in a large part responsible of the daily pollution of urban areas. Gaseous fuels can notably contribute to a reduction of this pollution. This paper is divided into three parts. The first part analyses the reasons and components of pollution in the transport sector: increasing use of private cars with respect to public transport systems for short distance travels, preponderance of road transport for long distance goods delivery, increase of air traffic for passengers and freight transports. For the air pollution itself, three levels are considered: the local CO, VOC (volatile organic compounds), SO 2 , NOx and particulates concentration, the regional pollution which corresponds to spatially diluted pollutants over a wider zone (acid rain and photochemical pollution), and the worldwide pollution with the greenhouse effect and the high altitude ozone problem. The vehicles noise in another important source of urban pollution. The second part of the paper analyses the environmental advantages of gaseous fuels and compares the combustion properties and the pollutants and noise emissions from natural gas for vehicles and LPG with respect to the classical liquid fuels used for private cars and trucks. The third part of the paper is devoted to the US Clean Air Act which regroups the actions developed since 1970 to fight against the photochemical pollution and the 'smog' phenomena. Its historical evolution is summarized: the creation of the Environment Protection Agency (EPA), the norms for air quality (NAAQS) and the 1990's eleven amendments about the classification of States pollution, the pollutants emission norms and the development of clean vehicles. (J.S.)

  12. The environment for development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, A

    1992-06-01

    This overview of the World Bank 1992 World Development Report reveals some of the means to close the gap between policy and practice in linking environmental and development policy. The nature of the problem is defined and win-win policies which show mutual support for environment and development concerns are differentiated from negative links. Sound environmental management can be achieved with improved information, enhancing institutional arrangements, and involving local people. The rapid implementation of policies and programs will involve both political and financial costs and a shift in policies and priorities. The challenges ahead are tremendous and include overcoming poverty and turning population growth and environmental pollution around. World consumption of energy and manufactured goods is expected to triple; without curbs on emissions, mortality increases, water shortages, and forest and natural habitat loss will ensue. It is not entirely true that economic activity hurts the environment when positive forces of substitution, technological innovation, and structural change outweigh the negative consequences. Environmental consequences change with income levels. Some problems decline with income increases. Some problems deteriorate temporarily and then improve as incomes rise, i.e., air and water pollution and some types of deforestation and habitat dislocation. Some problems continue to grow with income increases, such as carbon and nitrogen oxide emissions. Win-win policies are ones that foster and end to excessive resource use, clarify property rights and stop open access to land, accelerate education and family planning programs, accelerate agricultural extension and research, and invest in sanitation and water supply. These policies will not sacrifice economic growth. Tradeoffs must be identified and costs and benefits of alternative policies assessed; priorities and standards must be established in consort with costs and benefits. Behavior change

  13. Quasars in galaxy cluster environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, E.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of radio loud quasars is found to be strongly dependent upon their galaxy cluster environment. Previous studies have shown that bright quasars are found in rich clusters, while high luminosity quasars are found only in poorer environments. The analysis of low luminosity radio quiet quasars indicate that they are never found in rich environments, suggesting that they are a physically different class of objects. Properties of the quasar environment are investigated to determine constraints on the physical mechanisms of quasar formation and evolution. The optical cluster morphology indicates that the cluster cores have smaller radii and higher galaxy densities than are typical for low redshift clusters of similar richness. Radio morphologies may indicate that the formation of a dense intra-cluster medium is associated with the quasars' fading at these epochs. Galaxy colors appear to be normal, but there may be a tendency for clusters associated with high luminosity quasars to contain a higher fraction of gas-rich galaxies than those associated with low luminosity quasars. Multislit spectroscopic observations of galaxies associated with high luminosity quasars indicate that quasars are preferentially located in regions of low relative velocity dispersion, either in rich clusters of abnormally low dispersion, or in poor groups which are dynamically normal. This suggests that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play a role in quasar formation and sustenanace. Virialization of rich clusters and the subsequent increase in galaxy velocities may therefore be responsible for the fading of quasars in rich environments

  14. Pesticides and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ; Environment Human Health Animal Health Safe Use Practices Food Safety Environment Air Water Soil Wildlife Home Page Pesticides and the Environment Related Topics: What Happens to Pesticides Released into the Environment? Pesticide Storage Pesticide Disposal Pesticide Products Integrated Pest Management (IPM) How Safe

  15. Global Environment Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Ringtail lemur mom with two of paradise Nations rally to protect global environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Stockholm, Sweden birds-eye view Events GEF-7 Replenishment Trung Truong Son Landscapes

  16. Fluid Mechanics of Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra J.

    2008-11-01

    The rapid urbanization of the Earth has led to highly populated cities that act as concentrated centers of anthropogenic stressors on the natural environment. The degradation of environmental quality due to such stressors, in turn, greatly impacts human behavior. Anthropogenic stressors largely originate as a result of coupling between man-made urban elements (i.e., networks of engineering and socio-economic infrastructures) and the environment, for which surrounding fluid motions play a key role. In recent years, research efforts have been directed at the understanding and modeling of fluid motions in urban areas, infrastructure dynamics and interactions thereof, with the hope of identifying environmental impacts of urbanization and complex outcomes (or ``emergent properties'') of nominally simple interactions between infrastructures and environment. Such consequences play an important role in determining the ``resilience'' of cities under anthropogenic stressors, defined as maintaining the structure and essential functions of an urbanity without regime shifts. Holistic integrated models that meld the dynamics of infrastructures and environment as well as ``quality of life'' attributes are becoming powerful decision-making tools with regard to sustainability of urban areas (continuance or even enhancement of socio-economic activities in harmony with the environment). The rudimentary forms of integrated models are beginning to take shape, augmented by comprehensive field studies and advanced measurement platforms to validate them. This presentation deals with the challenges of modeling urban atmosphere, subject to anthropogenic forcing. An important emergent property, the Urban Heat Island, and its role in determining resilience and sustainability of cities will be discussed based on the prediction of a coupled model.

  17. Influence of the liquid or gazeous nature of the grape berries environment on rheological properties and on colour and nitrogen extractabilities during conditions simulating the Beaujolais wine-making process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Abbal

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the evolutions of some physicochemical characteristics of berries during conditions simulating the beaujolais wine-making process. In this process, a large number of intact berries is kept in a CO2 atmosphere which is produced by ethanolic fermentation of the must in the bottom of the tank. To simulate this, two equivalent samples of ripe Gamay or Carignane berries were placed in the same jar and subjected to carbonic anaerobiosis. One sample was maintained in the gaseous atmosphere and the other submerged in the liquid which was either an aqueous solution of 6 p. cent ethanol (v/v, the same solution with 1 M sorbitol, or grape must obtained from crushed berries. The aim of these experiments was to study, in both submerged and non-submerged samples, the effects of ethanol on rheological properties of berries and on potential extractabilities of colour and soluble nitrogen from skin and berry flesh. Whatever the model, ethanol had a deleterious effect on berries, especially on those which were immersed. For those, the development of anaerobic metabolism was drastically reduced, but nitrogeneous and colouring compounds extractabilities were significantly increased. The anthocyanins and their copigments seem to be preferentially extracted when berries were immersed. The rheological properties were related to the osmotical strength of the submerging liquid. It was assumed that hydratation or dehydratation phenomenons of cell-wall polysaccharides could explained the differences observed in the rheological behaviour of berries and in particular the modifications of their pellicular elasticity.

  18. Physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities into the physical properties of metals and ceramics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are reported. Topics covered include: high field superconductivity; microstructure and mechanical behavior of ceramics, glass-metal, and ceramic-metal systems; high temperature reactions; relation of microstructure to properties in ceramics; and structure and properties of carbon materials and composite materials

  19. Geotechnical properties of rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R.; Gorski, B.; Gyenge, M.

    1995-12-31

    The manual is a compilation of the geotechnical properties of many types of rock that are typical of Canadian mining environments. Included are values for density, porosity, compressive and shear wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, Young`s modulus, and Poisson`s ratio. The data base contains material constants that were determined using the Hoek and Brown failure criteria for both before and after failure conditions. 76 data sheets of rock properties in Canadian mines are included. 7 refs., 85 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Ahmed, Nafees

    2011-01-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet 'hydrogel'. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris. (topical review)

  1. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Murosaki, Nafees Ahmed and Jian Ping Gong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet 'hydrogel'. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris.

  2. Physical chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Garrett, B.C.; Kolb, C.E. Jr.; Shaw, R.W.; Choppin, G.R.; Wagner, A.F.

    1994-08-01

    From the ozone hole and the greenhouse effect to plastics recycling and hazardous waste disposal, society faces a number of issues, the solutions to which require an unprecedented understanding of the properties of molecules. We are coming to realize that the environment is a coupled set of chemical systems, its dynamics determining the welfare of the biosphere and of humans in particular. These chemical systems are governed by fundamental molecular interactions, and they present chemists with an unparalleled challenge. The application of current concepts of molecular behavior and of up-to-date experimental and computational techniques can provide us with insights into the environment that are needed to mitigate past damage, to anticipate the impact of current human activity, and to avoid future insults to the environment. Environmental chemistry encompasses a number of separate, yet interlocking, areas of research. In all of these areas progress is limited by an inadequate understanding of the underlying chemical processes involved. Participation of all chemical approaches -- experimental, theoretical and computational -- and of all disciplines of chemistry -- organic, inorganic, physical, analytical and biochemistry -- will be required to provide the necessary fundamental understanding. The Symposium on ''Physical Chemistry and the Environment'' was designed to bring the many exciting and challenging physical chemistry problems involved in environmental chemistry to the attention of a larger segment of the physical chemistry community

  3. The KMOS Cluster Survey (KCS). II. The Effect of Environment on the Structural Properties of Massive Cluster Galaxies at Redshift 1.39 < z < 1.61

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Stott, John P.; Bender, Ralf; Galametz, Audrey; Wilman, David J.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Prichard, Laura J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Wegner, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present results on the structural properties of massive passive galaxies in three clusters at 1.39 R-band sizes of these galaxies are a factor of ∼2–3 smaller than their local counterparts. The slopes of the relation between the stellar mass and the light-weighted size are consistent with recent studies in clusters and the field. Their mass-weighted sizes are smaller than the rest-frame R-band sizes, with an average mass-weighted to light-weighted size ratio that varies between ∼0.45 and 0.8 among the clusters. We find that the median light-weighted size of the passive galaxies in the two more evolved clusters is ∼24% larger than that for field galaxies, independent of the use of circularized effective radii or semimajor axes. These two clusters also show a smaller size ratio than the less evolved cluster, which we investigate using color gradients to probe the underlying {M}* /{L}{{{H}}160} gradients. The median color gradients are ∇z ‑ H ∼ ‑0.4 mag dex‑1, twice the local value. Using stellar populations models, these gradients are best reproduced by a combination of age and metallicity gradients. Our results favor the minor merger scenario as the dominant process responsible for the observed galaxy properties and the environmental differences at this redshift. The environmental differences support that clusters experience accelerated structural evolution compared to the field, likely via an epoch of enhanced minor merger activity during cluster assembly. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; program IDs: 092.A-0210; 093.A-0051; 094.A-0578; 095.A-0137(A); 096.A-0189(A); 097.A-0332(A)). This work is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA HST, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 13687, as well as with the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury

  4. Influence of pH on the chemical and structural properties of the oxide films formed on 316L stainless steel, alloy 600 and alloy 690 in high temperature aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, M.; Gosser, P.; Walls, M.G.; Rondot, B.; Pastol, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The oxide films formed on 316L stainless steel, alloy 600 and alloy 690 at 320 deg C in high temperature aqueous environments of different pH have been examined by glow discharge optical spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and capacitance measurements. The analytical study reveals that the films formed at pH 5 are mainly composed of chromium oxides. When the pH increases the chromium concentration decreases and those of the other two elements (Ni and Fe) tend to increase. The films formed at pH 5 on 316L stainless steel and alloy 600 are thick and powder-like. The film formed at the same pH on alloy 690 is thin and is composed of a compact protective inner layer and a less-compact outer layer formed by crystals of mixed iron-nickel-chromium oxides. The morphological appearance of the thick films and that of the thin films is very different. However, equivalent morphologies can be observed for the relatively thin duplex films formed at pH 8 and pH 9.5 on the 316L stainless steel and nickel-base alloys. The evolution of the chemical composition of the films is accompanied by important changes from the point of view of their semi-conductivity. (authors)

  5. Simulation of mechanical shock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalanne, Christian.

    1975-07-01

    Shocks can produce a severe mechanical environment which must be taken into account when designing and developing new equipments. After some mathematical (Laplace and Fourier transforms) and mechanical recalls (response of a one degree freedom system to a sinusoidal excitation), different analysis methods are compared, these methods being the most used now to compare relative severities of tests and establish specifications. A few chapter deal with the different properties of simple, easy to produce, shock shapes. Then some now-in-use programmators or shock-machines specifications are shown. A final chapter concerns acceleration transducers [fr

  6. Environment, Trade, and Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environment, trade, and investment are fundamentally linked as the environment provides many basic inputs of economic activity – forests, fisheries, metals, minerals – as well as the energy used to process those materials.

  7. Molds in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Molds in the Environment What are molds? What are some of the ... molds found? Molds are found in virtually every environment and can be detected, both indoors and outdoors, ...

  8. BISEN: Biochemical simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlier, J.; Wu, F.; Qi, F.; Vinnakota, K.C.; Han, Y.; Dash, R.K.; Yang, F.; Beard, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB® computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for

  9. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  10. Elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates the following five aspects of engineering-material solid-state elastic constants: general properties, interrelationships, relationships to other physical properties, changes during cooling from ambient to near-zero temperature, and near-zero-temperature behavior. Topics considered include compressibility, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Hooke's law, elastic-constant measuring methods, thermodynamic potentials, higher-order energy terms, specific heat, thermal expansivity, magnetic materials, structural phase transitions, polymers, composites, textured aggregates, and other-phenomena correlations. Some of the conclusions concerning polycrystalline elastic properties and their temperature dependence are: elastic constants are physical, not mechanical, properties which relate thermodynamically to other physical properties such as specific heat and thermal expansivity; elastic constants at low temperatures are nearly temperature independent, as required by the third law of thermodynamics; and elastic constants can be used to study directional properties of materials, such as textured aggregates and composites

  11. Hacking the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne Bank; Thomsen, Stine Legarth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. METHODS: We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon...

  12. The PSIM environment architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossenaerts, J.B.M.; Reyneri, C.; van den Berg, R.J.; Eijnatten, van F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. This chapter describes the architecture of the PSIM environment. It briefly presents the PSIM objectives and the role the PSIM environment plays in meeting these objectives. It then states the role and place of each of technological components of the environment: the ontology, the

  13. Computing environment logbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  14. EVALUATION OF MICROBIAL SURVIVAL IN EXTRATERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül BULUÇ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the space environments where microbial terrestrial life could form and evolve in, were evaluted with the base of the physical and chemical properties. In addition, Earthial microbial life formation conditions in the interstellar medium and the other planets are investigated and the survival of microorganisms in the space environments are questioned. As a result, considering the aspects of terrestrial microbial life, we suggest that the space environment and other planets could not be a habitat for Earthial microorganisms.

  15. Physics in Screening Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certik, Ondrej

    In the current study, we investigated atoms in screening environments like plasmas. It is common practice to extract physical data, such as temperature and electron densities, from plasma experiments. We present results that address inherent computational difficulties that arise when the screening approach is extended to include the interaction between the atomic electrons. We show that there may arise an ambiguity in the interpretation of physical properties, such as temperature and charge density, from experimental data due to the opposing effects of electron-nucleus screening and electron-electron screening. The focus of the work, however, is on the resolution of inherent computational challenges that appear in the computation of two-particle matrix elements. Those enter already at the Hartree-Fock level. Furthermore, as examples of post Hartree-Fock calculations, we show second-order Green's function results and many body perturbation theory results of second order. A self-contained derivation of all necessary equations has been included. The accuracy of the implementation of the method is established by comparing standard unscreened results for various atoms and molecules against literature for Hartree-Fock as well as Green's function and many body perturbation theory. The main results of the thesis are presented in the chapter called Screened Results, where the behavior of several atomic systems depending on electron-electron and electron-nucleus Debye screening was studied. The computer code that we have developed has been made available for anybody to use. Finally, we present and discuss results obtained for screened interactions. We also examine thoroughly the computational details of the calculations and particular implementations of the method.

  16. Surface properties of beached plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2015-07-01

    Studying plastic characteristics in the marine environment is important to better understand interaction between plastics and the environment. In the present study, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephalate (PET), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) samples were collected from the coastal environment in order to study their surface properties. Surface properties such as surface functional groups, surface topography, point of zero charge, and color change are important factors that change during degradation. Eroded HDPE demonstrated an altered surface topography and color and new functional groups. Eroded PET surface was uneven, yellow, and occasionally, colonized by microbes. A decrease in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) peaks was observed for eroded PET suggesting that degradation had occurred. For eroded PVC, its surface became more lamellar and a new FTIR peak was observed. These surface properties were obtained due to degradation and could be used to explain the interaction between plastics, microbes, and pollutants.

  17. Simulations of embodied evolving semiosis: Emergent semantics in artificial environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, L.M.; Joslyn, C.

    1998-02-01

    As we enter this amazing new world of artificial and virtual systems and environments in the context of human communities, we are interested in the development of systems and environments which have the capacity to grow and evolve their own meanings in the context of this community of interaction. In this paper the authors analyze the necessary conditions to achieve systems and environments with these properties: (1) a coupled interaction between a system and its environment; (2) an environment with sufficient initial richness and structure to allow for; (3) embodied emergent classification of that environment system coupling; and (4) which is subject to pragmatic selection.

  18. Electronic ceramics in high-temperature environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searcy, A.W.; Meschi, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Simple thermodynamic means are described for understanding and predicting the influence of temperature changes, in various environments, on electronic properties of ceramics. Thermal gradients, thermal cycling, and vacuum annealing are discussed, as well as the variations of ctivities and solubilities with temperature. 7 refs

  19. Environment-quality demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfini, M.G.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    In the framework of the Environment Quality Requirements (MKE) project a model has been designed in which environment-quality demands have been defined and quantified, and a measuring strategy has been developed. In the model it is required for the quality of the environment that the radionuclide concentration in the various environment compartiments remains limited in order to keep the effective dose equivalence for the 'reference man' under a certain reference level. In order to be able to determine the maximum nuclide concentration it is necessary to quantify the relation between the concentration in the environment and the dose for the people. The quantitative relation between concentration and dose has been established on the base of parameters (Derived Activity Limits (DAL's) which have to be calculated for each environment compartiment, each nuclide and each exposure pathway. This model has been described and, as example, the DAL's have been calculated for the compartiment air (for which the two exposure pathways inhalation and direct radiation were considered). For the other environment compartiments a similar elaboration is needed. The feasibility of application of the MKE-model in the actual practice of measurements in the environment and examination of dose for the population depends upon the possibility for performing nuclide specific measurements in all environment compartiments, the level of the dose resulting from the contamination of the environment and the related accurateness of the measurements

  20. Fermi UNIX trademark environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    The introduction of UNIX at Fermilab involves multiple platforms and multiple vendors. Additionally, a single user may have to use more than one platform. This heterogeneity and multiplicity makes it necessary to define a Fermilab environment for UNIX so that as much as possible the systems ''look and feel'' the same. We describe our environment, including both the commercial products and the local tools used to support it. Other products designed for the UNIX environment are also described. 19 refs

  1. The marketing environment

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Mark Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The tourism marketing environment consists of internal and external forces which could impact the organisations’ performance. To be successful, companies must adapt to ongoing trends and developments in their macro and micro environments. When organisations scan their marketing environment they will be in a position to deal with any possible threats from the market and to capitalise on any available opportunities. Therefore, this chapter explains the external environmental factors, including;...

  2. Environment, safety and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzianovich, L.Ch.; Fardeau, J.C.; Darras, M.

    2000-01-01

    Environment, safety and health were the three topics discussed by the WOC 8 working group of the worldwide gas congress. Environment protection has become a major preoccupation and constraint for natural gas industry at the dawn of the new millennium. It is closely linked with the safety of installation and with the health of workmen who exploit or use natural gas energy: methane emissions, health and safety in gas industry, environment management and evaluation. (J.S.)

  3. Energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives and the proceedings are presented of the conference ''Energy and the environment'' held in Pardubice, Czechoslovakia, on 9-10 June, 1987. A total of 31 papers were presented; 4 papers were centred on nuclear power: an assessment of the impact of ionizing radiation from power generation on the health of the population and on the environment; an assessment of the impact of the nuclear power plant complex in the Jaslovske Bohunice locality on the environment; an assessment of the impact of the Vychodni Cechy (Eastern Bohemia) plant on the environment; and a paper on the ecological optimization of the landscape during the development of the uranium industry. (J.B.)

  4. Parliamentarians and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, D.

    2004-01-01

    The data presented in this report come from an inquiry carried out by Sofres between March 5 and April 23, 2003, with a sample of 200 parliamentarians (122 deputies and 78 senators) who explained their attitude with respect to the question of environment. The questionnaire comprises 5 main dimensions dealing with: the relative importance of the environment stake, the attitudes with respect to past, present and future environment policies, the attitude with respect to specific stakes (energy, wastes), the attitude with respect to some problems of conservation of the natural heritage, and the attitude with respect to the participation of the public to some environment-related decisions. (J.S.)

  5. Virtual interface environment workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, S. S.; Wenzel, E. M.; Coler, C.; Mcgreevy, M. W.

    1988-01-01

    A head-mounted, wide-angle, stereoscopic display system controlled by operator position, voice and gesture has been developed at NASA's Ames Research Center for use as a multipurpose interface environment. This Virtual Interface Environment Workstation (VIEW) system provides a multisensory, interactive display environment in which a user can virtually explore a 360-degree synthesized or remotely sensed environment and can viscerally interact with its components. Primary applications of the system are in telerobotics, management of large-scale integrated information systems, and human factors research. System configuration, research scenarios, and research directions are described.

  6. Virtual Environments for Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stiles, R

    1998-01-01

    .... Progress on productization of the VET Training Studio software includes increased robustness for Vista virtual environment display and interaction services, a new capability to use the STEVE visual...

  7. Mining the Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J.; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25506128

  8. Mining the Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-12-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area.

  9. Thermochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, L.; Lamoreaux, R.H.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1980-01-01

    A critical review of thermodynamic properties of Mo-compounds is presented. Binary Mo-compounds, elemental Mo and binary Mo-alloys are considered. The thermodynamic properties include heat capacity enthalpy, gibbs free energy, entropy, vapor pressure, partial free energy of solution. Many values are given in the table form and some values are given in the text. The data used and the procedures applied to test the data are indicated in the text

  10. Environment stakes and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronquoy, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    This document devoted to the environment discusses on the following topics: the environmental policies, the threats for the environment (climatic change, water management and risks), the deforestation, the sustainable development of cities, the safety first principle, the energy challenge, the international cooperation, the North-South relations. (A.L.B.)

  11. Precision in harsh environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    French, P.; Krijnen, G.; Roozeboom, F.

    2016-01-01

    Microsystems are increasingly being applied in harsh and/or inaccessible environments, but many markets expect the same level of functionality for long periods of time. Harsh environments cover areas that can be subjected to high temperature, (bio)-chemical and mechanical disturbances,

  12. Designing Creative Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cochrane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing creative learning environments involves not only facilitating student creativity, but also modeling creative pedagogical practice. In this paper we explore the implementation of a framework for designing creative learning environments using mobile social media as a catalyst for redefining both lecturer pedagogical practice, as well as redesigning the curriculum around student generated m-portfolios.

  13. Environment annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the 1993 Environment Annual Report for BNFL, data are presented for radioactive discharges to the environment and their associated doses to the criteria group members of the public in the vicinity of Sellafield, Drigg, Chapelcross, Springfields and Capenhurst. Similarly, data are also presented for non-radioactive discharges to water and air for each site. (UK)

  14. Environment control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammarone, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere

  15. Environment and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paavola, Jouni; Røpke, Inge

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews socio-economic research on the environment and sustainability. The chapter first explores core aspects of socio-economics, examines how socio-economics has related to the agenda of research on the environment, and assesses how socio-economic research on the environment became...... institutionalized. We consider that the environment has not been high on the agenda of the socio-economic research community but that there is a substantial amount of socio-economic research on the environment in the ecological economics and other research communities. The chapter then examines the research...... on institutional sources of environmental problems on monetary valuation and environmental decision-making as two areas where socio-economics has had a particularly strong influence. The chapter concludes that the acknowledgement in these areas of research of ecological and social embeddedness has given rise...

  16. Perennial Environment Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plas, Frederic

    2014-07-01

    The Perennial Environment Observatory [Observatoire Perenne de l'Environnement - OPE] is a unique approach and infrastructure developed and implemented by ANDRA, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, as part of its overall project of deep geological disposal for radioactive waste. Its current mission is to assess the initial state of the rural (forest, pasture, open-field and aquatic) environment, prior to repository construction. This will be followed in 2017 (pending construction authorizations) and for a period exceeding a century, by monitoring of any impact the repository may have on the environment. In addition to serving its own industrial purpose of environmental monitoring, ANDRA also opens the OPE approach, infrastructure and acquired knowledge (database...) to the scientific community to support further research on long term evolution of the environment subjected to natural and anthropogenic stresses, and to contribute to a better understanding of the interaction between the various compartments of the environment

  17. INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caescu Stefan Claudiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Theme The situation analysis, as a separate component of the strategic planning, involves collecting and analysing relevant types of information on the components of the marketing environment and their evolution on the one hand and also on the organization’s resources and capabilities on the other. Objectives of the Research The main purpose of the study of the analysis techniques of the internal environment is to provide insight on those aspects that are of strategic importance to the organization. Literature Review The marketing environment consists of two distinct components, the internal environment that is made from specific variables within the organization and the external environment that is made from variables external to the organization. Although analysing the external environment is essential for corporate success, it is not enough unless it is backed by a detailed analysis of the internal environment of the organization. The internal environment includes all elements that are endogenous to the organization, which are influenced to a great extent and totally controlled by it. The study of the internal environment must answer all resource related questions, solve all resource management issues and represents the first step in drawing up the marketing strategy. Research Methodology The present paper accomplished a documentary study of the main techniques used for the analysis of the internal environment. Results The special literature emphasizes that the differences in performance from one organization to another is primarily dependant not on the differences between the fields of activity, but especially on the differences between the resources and capabilities and the ways these are capitalized on. The main methods of analysing the internal environment addressed in this paper are: the analysis of the organizational resources, the performance analysis, the value chain analysis and the functional analysis. Implications Basically such

  18. DCE. Future IHEP's computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Guorui; Liu Xiaoling

    1995-01-01

    IHEP'S computing environment consists of several different computing environments established on IHEP computer networks. In which, the BES environment supported HEP computing is the main part of IHEP computing environment. Combining with the procedure of improvement and extension of BES environment, the authors describe development of computing environments in outline as viewed from high energy physics (HEP) environment establishment. The direction of developing to distributed computing of the IHEP computing environment based on the developing trend of present distributed computing is presented

  19. Global environment and cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Atsushi

    1992-01-01

    The environment problems on global scale have been highlighted in addition to the local problems due to the rapid increase of population, the increase of energy demand and so on. The global environment summit was held in Brazil. Now, global environment problems are the problems for mankind, and their importance seems to increase toward 21st century. In such circumstances, cogeneration can reduce carbon dioxide emission in addition to energy conservation, therefore, attention has been paid as the countermeasure for global environment. The background of global environment problems is explained. As to the effectiveness of cogeneration for global environment, the suitability of city gas to environment, energy conservation, the reduction of carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides emission are discussed. As for the state of spread of cogeneration, as of March, 1992, those of 2250 MW in terms of power generation capacity have been installed in Japan. It is forecast that cogeneration will increase hereafter. As the future systems of cogeneration, city and industry energy center conception, industrial repowering, multiple house cogeneration and fuel cells are described. (K.I.)

  20. Veterinary medicines in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, A B A; Fogg, L A; Blackwell, P A; Kay, P; Pemberton, E J; Croxford, A

    2004-01-01

    The impact of veterinary medicines on the environment will depend on a number of factors including physicochemical properties, amount used and method of administration, treatment type and dose, animal husbandry practices, manure storage and handling practices, metabolism within the animal, and degradation rates in manure and slurry. Once released to the environment, other factors such as soil type, climate, and ecotoxicity also determine the environmental impact of the compound. The importance of individual routes into the environment for different types of veterinary medicines varies according to the type of treatment and livestock category. Treatments used in aquaculture have a high potential to reach the aquatic environment. The main routes of entry to the terrestrial environment are from the use of veterinary medicines in intensively reared livestock, via the application of slurry and manure to land, and by the use of veterinary medicines in pasture-reared animals where pharmaceutical residues are excreted directly into the environment. Veterinary medicines applied to land via spreading of slurry may also enter the aquatic environment indirectly via surface runoff or leaching to groundwater. It is likely that topical treatments have greater potential to be released to the environment than treatments administered orally or by injection. Inputs from the manufacturing process, companion animal treatments, and disposal are likely to be minimal in comparison. Monitoring studies demonstrate that veterinary medicines do enter the environment, with sheep dip chemicals, antibiotics, sealice treatments, and anthelmintics being measured in soils, groundwater, surface waters, sediment, or biota. Maximum concentrations vary across chemical classes, with very high concentrations being reported for the sheep dip chemicals. The degree to which veterinary medicines may adsorb to particulates varies widely. Partition coefficients (K(d)) range from low (0.61 L kg(-1)) to high

  1. Rock properties data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R.; Gorski, B.; Gyenge, M.

    1991-03-01

    As mining companies proceed deeper and into areas whose stability is threatened by high and complex stress fields, the science of rock mechanics becomes invaluable in designing underground mine strata control programs. CANMET's Mining Research Laboratories division has compiled a summary of pre- and post-failure mechanical properties of rock types which were tested to provide design data. The 'Rock Properties Data Base' presents the results of these tests, and includes many rock types typical of Canadian mine environments. The data base also contains 'm' and 's' values determined using Hoek and Brown's failure criteria for both pre- and post-failure conditions. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs., 1 append.

  2. Thermophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous fluids have been identified as promising alternative refrigerants, but much of the information needed to predict their behavior as pure fluids and as components in mixtures does not exist. In particular, reliable thermophysical properties data and models are needed to predict the performance of the new refrigerants in heating and cooling equipment and to design and optimize equipment to be reliable and energy efficient. The objective of this project is to provide highly accurate, selected thermophysical properties data for Refrigerants 32, 123, 124, and 125, and to use these data to fit simple and complex equations of state and detailed transport property models. The new data will fill gaps in the existing data sets and resolve the problems and uncertainties that exist in and between the data sets. This report describes the progress made during the fourth quarter of this fifteen-month project, which was initiated in late January, 1992.

  3. Virtual interface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1986-01-01

    A head-mounted, wide-angle, stereoscopic display system controlled by operator position, voice and gesture has been developed for use as a multipurpose interface environment. The system provides a multisensory, interactive display environment in which a user can virtually explore a 360-degree synthesized or remotely sensed environment and can viscerally interact with its components. Primary applications of the system are in telerobotics, management of large-scale integrated information systems, and human factors research. System configuration, application scenarios, and research directions are described.

  4. Actions for the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Colloca, C

    2003-01-01

    As an International Organization, one the most important issues that CERN has to respect and guarantee is the protection of the environment. Several of ST activities and operations have a direct impact on the environment: civil engineering works, electrical (transformers) and air-cooling operation, chemical products storage, various waste disposal etc.... Important measures, taken in the past, have to be kept and new ones should be applied in order to insure the conformity of the infrastructure with existing legislation, the correct operation of equipment and systems, the constant monitoring of the different situations and the traceability of the events. Moreover good management of the environment would bring large savings to CERN.

  5. Work environment quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman; Busck, Ole Gunni; Lind, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how employee participation influences the quality of the work environment and workers’ well-being at 11 Danish workplaces from within six different industries. Both direct participation and representative forms of participation at the workplace level were studied. Statistical...... as well as qualitative comparative analyses reveal that work environment quality and high levels of participation go hand in hand. Within a typology of participation models the highest level of participation, including strong elements of collective participation, and also the best work environment...

  6. ENVIRONMENTS and EOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Schnetzer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    are needed to facilitate large-scale analyses. Therefore, we developed ENVIRONMENTS, a fast dictionary-based tagger capable of identifying Environment Ontology (ENVO) terms in text. We evaluate the accuracy of the tagger on a new manually curated corpus of 600 Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) species pages. We use...... the tagger to associate taxa with environments by tagging EOL text content monthly, and integrate the results into the EOL to disseminate them to a broad audience of users. Availability and implementation: The software and the corpus are available under the open-source BSD and the CC-BY-NC-SA 3.0 licenses...

  7. A palliative environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    The findings show a tension between clinical and technical sensory impressions and more aesthetic ones in the hospital environment. Aesthetic elements in an environment dominated by many clinical impressions proved important for the patients’ positive thoughts and feelings. Aesthetic sensory...... impressions caused a sense of homeliness and familiarity in the hospital environment that was perceived by the patients as carrying a positive meaning. Clinical impressions, on the other hand, were generally associated with unfamiliarity and insecurity and were experienced as creating a negative mood....

  8. Environment and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horii, Ryo; Ikefuji, Masako

    . In a less developed country, this link, which we call “limits to growth,” emerges as the “poverty-environment trap,” which explains the persistent international inequality both in terms of income and environment. This link also threatens the sustainability of the world’s economic growth, particularly when...... the emission of greenhouse gases raises the risk of natural disasters. Stronger environmental policies are required to overcome this link. While there is a trade-off between the environment and growth in the short run, we show that an appropriate policy can improve both in the long run....

  9. Atmospheric pollution in our environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanvir, G.

    1986-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with all the activities of humans. It is becoming a serious problem in coming years so it is relevant to find out how seriously our atmosphere is being polluted and how this pollution affects human and plant life in our environment. Not only the human activities are the source of our pollution but nature causes more pollution. Air pollution that is due to the pressure of foreign substances in air, effects the quality and concentration of air substances. It is not only injurious to property, but also to vegetation and animal life. Air pollution is one of our most serious environmental problems. The sources vary from smoke-stacks and automobiles to noise and foreon containing aerosols. (orig./A.B.)

  10. Quantum communication in noisy environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschauer, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate how protocols in quantum communication theory are influenced by noise. Specifically, we take into account noise during the transmission of quantum information and noise during the processing of quantum information. We describe three novel quantum communication protocols which can be accomplished efficiently in a noisy environment: (1) Factorization of Eve: We show that it is possible to disentangle transmitted qubits a posteriori from the quantum channel's degrees of freedom. (2) Cluster state purification: We give multi-partite entanglement purification protocols for a large class of entangled quantum states. (3) Entanglement purification protocols from quantum codes: We describe a constructive method to create bipartite entanglement purification protocols form quantum error correcting codes, and investigate the properties of these protocols, which can be operated in two different modes, which are related to quantum communication and quantum computation protocols, respectively

  11. Optimizing Electrodynamics Sensor Properties for High-AO Fluence Environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To investigate the oxidation of sensor coatings in order to develop more robust sensors that can be used not only for Atmosphere-Space Transition Region Explorer...

  12. Variability of Optical Properties within the Littoral Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaneveld, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    The goals of the proposed research are to: (1) determine the regions within the water column that have the highest variability in optical and hydrographic parameters as a function of total water depth, (2...

  13. Environment compendium 1999. The environment in figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The detailed information in this compendium forms the basis for the condition of the environment in the Netherlands and for measures to be taken to stabilize or improve the environmental quality. First, an overview is given of the social developments, e.g. economic and volume developments within target sectors (section A), the use of natural resources (section B) and the resulting environmental pressure (section C). The environmental load is described according to the environmental themes and the target groups as formulated and distinguished in the Dutch environmental policy. Next, the environmental quality is described (section D), effected by the continuous emission of materials into the air, surface water, ground water and soil. Also attention is paid to noise pollution and odor pollution, the impacts on the external safety and ionizing radiation of radioactive materials. The final effects on nature and public health are dealt with in section E. The costs of environmental measures to be taken by the Dutch government and businesses to stabilize or improve the environmental quality are dealt with in section F. Finally, in section G, attention is paid to the relation and integration of environment and economy, based on the system of National Accounts (so-called NAMEA). refs

  14. Environment compendium 2001. The environment in figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The detailed information in this compendium forms the basis for the condition of the environment in the Netherlands and for measures to be taken to stabilize or improve the environmental quality. First, an overview is given of the social developments, e.g. economic and volume developments within target sectors (section A), the use of natural resources (section B) and the resulting environmental pressure (section C). The environmental load is described according to the environmental themes and the target groups as formulated and distinguished in the Dutch environmental policy (section D). Next, the environmental quality is described (section E), effected by the continuous emission of materials into the air, surface water, ground water and soil. Also attention is paid to noise pollution and odor pollution, the impacts on the external safety and ionizing radiation of radioactive materials. The final effects on nature and public health are dealt with in section F. The costs of environmental measures to be taken by the Dutch government and businesses to stabilize or improve the environmental quality are dealt with in section G. Finally, in section H, attention is paid to the relation and integration of environment and economy, based on the system of National Accounts (so-called NAMEA). refs

  15. Environment and World Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larre, Dominique

    1979-01-01

    Tourism can create significant impacts on both the social and natural environment; however, many nations have avoided the negative impacts. Consideration of the effects of tourism should be part of national policy toward the tourist industry. (RE)

  16. Learning Networks Distributed Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Harrie; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter; Van Bruggen, Jan; Spoelstra, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Learning Networks Distributed Environment is a prototype of an architecture that allows the sharing and modification of learning materials through a number of transport protocols. The prototype implements a p2p protcol using JXTA.

  17. Space radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    Coupled with the increasing concern over trapped radiation effects on microelectronics, the availability of new data, long term changes in the Earth's magnetic field, and observed variations in the trapped radiation fluxes have generated the need for better, more comprehensive tools for modeling and predicting the Earth's trapped radiation environment and its effects on space systems. The objective of this report is to describe the current status of those efforts and review methods for attacking the issues associated with modeling the trapped radiation environment in a systematic, practical fashion. The ultimate goal will be to point the way to increasingly better methods of testing, designing, and flying reliable microelectronic systems in the Earth's radiation environment. The review will include a description of the principal models of the trapped radiation environment currently available--the AE8 and AP8 models. Recent results rom radiation experiments on spacecraft such as CRRES, SAMPEX, and CLEMENTINE will then be described. (author)

  18. Wheel inspection system environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-18

    International Electronic Machines Corporation (IEM) has developed and is now marketing a state-of-the-art Wheel Inspection System Environment (WISE). WISE provides wheel profile and dimensional measurements, i.e. rim thickness, flange height, flange ...

  19. Connected vehicle applications : environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation has developed a number of connected vehicle environmental applications, including the Applications for the Environment Real-Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) research program applications and road weather applic...

  20. CERN and the environment

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    New webpages answer common questions about CERN and the environment.   One of the new public webpages dedicated to CERN and the environment. Do your neighbours ever ask you about CERN’s environmental impact? And about radiation in particular? If so, the answers to those questions can now be found online on a new set of public webpages dedicated to CERN and the environment. These pages, put together by the Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Protection (HSE) unit and the groups responsible for CERN's site maintenance, contain a wealth of information on topics linked to the environment, such as biodiversity at CERN, waste management, ionising radiation, and water and electricity consumption. “CERN forms part of the local landscape, with its numerous sites and scientific activities. It’s understandable that people living nearby have questions about the impact of these activities and it’s important that we respond with complete transp...

  1. Environment, epigenetics and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Michael K

    2017-07-01

    A conference summary of the third biannual Kenya Africa Conference "Environment, Epigenetics and Reproduction" is provided. A partial special Environmental Epigenetics issue containing a number of papers in Volume 3, Issue 3 and 4 are discussed.

  2. Visualization Design Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomplun, A.R.; Templet, G.J.; Jortner, J.N.; Friesen, J.A.; Schwegel, J.; Hughes, K.R.

    1999-02-01

    Improvements in the performance and capabilities of computer software and hardware system, combined with advances in Internet technologies, have spurred innovative developments in the area of modeling, simulation and visualization. These developments combine to make it possible to create an environment where engineers can design, prototype, analyze, and visualize components in virtual space, saving the time and expenses incurred during numerous design and prototyping iterations. The Visualization Design Centers located at Sandia National Laboratories are facilities built specifically to promote the ''design by team'' concept. This report focuses on designing, developing and deploying this environment by detailing the design of the facility, software infrastructure and hardware systems that comprise this new visualization design environment and describes case studies that document successful application of this environment.

  3. Environment, 1980-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Environment issued during the period 1980-1993. It gives a short abstract and contents of these issues along with their costs in Austrian Schillings

  4. Transformers For Extreme Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Imagine a revolutionary way to remotely control the environment surrounding one or more roving vehicles exploring remote and unexplored areas of the Solar System,...

  5. Controlled Environment Specimen Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2014-01-01

    an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3...... transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ......Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking...

  6. Space Environment Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes presentation materials and outputs from operational space environment models produced by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) and...

  7. Built environment and diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, ‘the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution.’ Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. PMID:20535308

  8. Assessing Educational Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Directions for Testing and Measurement, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Educational environment data derived from classroom settings strongly suggest the positive contribution that climate variables can make in accounting for learning performance. Such measures are not only related to productivity but may constitute criterion variables in and of themselves. (Author)

  9. Trade, Environment & Animal Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Peter; Nielsen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of animal welfare and the environment under the WTO GATT and GATS Agreements - including introduction of the innovative idea of limiting consumption abroad (mode 2) for e.g. bull fights.......Regulation of animal welfare and the environment under the WTO GATT and GATS Agreements - including introduction of the innovative idea of limiting consumption abroad (mode 2) for e.g. bull fights....

  10. Indoor Environment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides

  11. Precision in harsh environments

    OpenAIRE

    French, P.; Krijnen, G.; Roozeboom, F.

    2016-01-01

    Microsystems are increasingly being applied in harsh and/or inaccessible environments, but many markets expect the same level of functionality for long periods of time. Harsh environments cover areas that can be subjected to high temperature, (bio)-chemical and mechanical disturbances, electromagnetic noise, radiation, or high vacuum. In the field of actuators, the devices must maintain stringent accuracy specifications for displacement, force, and response times, among others. These new requ...

  12. Individually Controlled Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and inhaled air quality in buildings to which occupants are exposed has an effect on their health, comfort, performance and productivity. Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform environment. However, large...... individual differences in physiological and psychological response, clothing insulation, activity, preference for air temperature and movement, etc., exist between people. Environmental conditions acceptable for most of the occupants in buildings may be achieved by providing each occupant...

  13. Elephant logging and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Aung-Hla

    1995-01-01

    The natural environment comprises non-biological elements such as air, water, light, heat and biological elements of animal and plant life; all interact with each other to create an ecosystem. Human activities like over-exploitation of forest results in deforestation and desertification. This consequently changes ecological balance. Topics on: (1) history of elephants utilization; (2) elephant logging; (3) classification of elephants; (4) dragging gear; (5) elephant power; (6) elephant logging and environment, are discussed

  14. Components of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Ministry of the Environment of the Slovak Republic deals with the components of the environment. The results of monitoring of air (emission situation), ambient air quality, atmospheric precipitation, tropospheric ozone, water (surface water, groundwater resources, waste water and drinking water), geological factors (geothermal energy, fuel deposits, ore deposits, non-metallic ore deposits), soil (area statistics, soil contamination. soil reaction and active extractable aluminium, soil erosion), flora and fauna (national strategy of biodiversity protection) are presented

  15. Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Gloriana

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues of copyright and the transfer or use of intellectual property as they relate to librarians. Topics addressed include the purpose of copyright laws, financial losses to publishers from pirating, cultural views of pirating, the fair use doctrine, concerns of authors of scholarly materials, impact of increasing library automation and…

  16. luminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Bozok University, Yozgat 66900, Turkey. 2Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Erciyes ... synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction method, their crystal structures and luminescence properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) ...

  17. School Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    The 1973 court cases relating to school property continued a trend toward litigating constitutional issues. For instance, a larger number of cases dealt with the relationship between the location and construction of school buildings and school desegregation plans. This chapter reviews the status and development of case law relating to school…

  18. Polymers in nuclear environment - long term behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouin, Laurent; Colin, Xavier; Fayolle, Bruno; Richaud, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    This bibliographical note presents a book which addresses original theoretical tools which are required for the prediction of polymer life time in a nuclear environment, and notably the kinetic modelling of low dose rate radiation-induced oxidation and the consequences of irradiation on thermo-mechanical properties. The authors discuss the anaerobic radiochemical ageing, the general aspects of radio-oxidation, the radio-thermo-oxidation, and the effects of radiochemical ageing on mechanical properties of industrial polymers. They identify research fields for the radiochemical ageing of polymers

  19. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Park, Hyun Soo

    2003-04-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. This project is composed of 6 subjects such as data production required for safety assessments, sorption properties and mechanisms, nuclide migration in the fractured rock, colloid formation and migration, nuclide speciation in deep geological environments, and total evaluation of geochemical behaviors considering multi-factors. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  20. Reference waste package environment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassley, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    One of three candidate repository sites for high-level radioactive waste packages is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in rhyolitic tuff 700 to 1400 ft above the static water table. Calculations indicate that the package environment will experience a maximum temperature of ∼230 0 C at 9 years after emplacement. For the next 300 years the rock within 1 m of the waste packages will remain dehydrated. Preliminary results suggest that the waste package radiation field will have very little effect on the mechanical properties of the rock. Radiolysis products will have a negligible effect on the rock even after rehydration. Unfractured specimens of repository rock show no change in hydrologic characteristics during repeated dehydration-rehydration cycles. Fractured samples with initially high permeabilities show a striking permeability decrease during dehydration-rehydration cycling, which may be due to fracture healing via deposition of silica. Rock-water interaction studies demonstrate low and benign levels of anions and most cations. The development of sorptive secondary phases such as zeolites and clays suggests that anticipated rock-water interaction may produce beneficial changes in the package environment

  1. Production and antimicrobial property of glycolipid biosurfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial glycolipids such as rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL) are an important class of biosurfactants with excellent surface tension-lowering activity. Besides their surfactant- and environment-friendly properties, however, additional value-added property such as bacteriocidal activity is n...

  2. Financial development, property rights, and growth

    OpenAIRE

    Claessens, Stijn; Laeven, Luc

    2002-01-01

    The authors analyze how property rights affect the allocation of firms' available resources among different types of assets. In particular, they investigate empirically for a large number of countries whether firms in environments with more secure property rights allocate available resources more toward intangible assets and consequentially grow faster. The authors find that improved asset...

  3. Macnuclide nuclear data environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.A.; Vera, O.; Howard, J.; Mumaw, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have created a novel software application to access, manipulate and visualize nuclear properties. A graphical chart of nuclides provides an intuitive database manager and visualization tool for the data base. Detailed properties can be retrieved by selecting a nuclide in the chart. A window appears with an interactive level scheme and a tabular listing of properties. Results from data base searches (e.g., half life or Q-value) are displayed in the chart as a set of colored nuclides. Charts can be constructed with nuclides colored on the basis of a single or a complex set of data base searches. Other features tools to create interactive systematics from any collection of nuclides; and functions to import and export properties, graphics, or other materials. The authors demonstrate MacNuclide and discuss future directions for this project

  4. Localized environment characterization device

    KAUST Repository

    Alzain, Hashim; Shahin, Tamer; Aljohani, Ahmed; Wafai, Husam

    2016-01-01

    Various apparatuses and methods are provided for measuring the likely environmental impact of a particular geographic location on power generation properties of potential solar installations at the particular location. In an example embodiment

  5. Transactions Concurrency Control in Web Service Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrifai, Mohammad; Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    an engineering point of view as it does not change the way consumers or clients of web services have to be programmed. Furthermore, it avoids direct communication between transaction coordinators which preserves security by keeping the information about business transactions restricted to the coordinators which......Business transactions in web service environments run with relaxed isolation and atomicity property. In such environments, transactions can commit and roll back independently on each other. Transaction management has to reflect this issue and address the problems which result for example from...... concurrent access to web service resources and data. In this paper we propose an extension to the WS-Transaction Protocol which ensures the consistency of the data when independent business transactions access the data concurrently under the relaxed transaction properties. Our extension is based...

  6. Future gripper needs in nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, A.C. van der; Holweg, E.G.M.; Jongkind, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the requirements of teleoperated grippers for work in hazardous situations and nuclear environments. A survey among users in the nuclear industry was performed by means of questionnaires of the present grippers in use and the future gripper needs. The survey covers reliability, tasks to be done, object properties, accuracy, environmental requirements, required grasps, mechanical and sensorial requirements. The paper will present the proposal for a future gripper. (author)

  7. Bluetooth helper environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junbiao

    2001-10-01

    Handheld devices are gaining great popularity and becoming a common commodity on the market primarily due to their small sizes and mobile nature. However, these devices are all limited in capabilities, especially in terms of screen display, processing power, storage space and network access. Some of these limitations, such as the small screen sizes, are inherently difficult to improve given the usage model of these devices. In this paper, we propose a framework in which small handheld devices can use their environment, the devices around them, to expand their limited capabilities. Such an environment can be deployed in the office, at home for user convenience or in a public access area as a revenue generating service. A handheld device interacts with the helper environment through several essential steps including device discovery, service query, request transfer and remote control. In order to ensure the proper operation of such an environment, the framework provides essential system components for admission control, resource allocation, task scheduling and device coordination. We refer to such a framework as the device helper environment and discuss its system architecture and usage scenarios in this paper.

  8. FEMME, a flexible environment for mathematically modelling the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; DeClippele, V.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new, FORTRAN-based, simulation environment called FEMME (Flexible Environment for Mathematically Modelling the Environment), designed for implementing, solving and analysing mathematical models in ecology is presented. Three separate phases in ecological modelling are distinguished: (1) the model

  9. The hovercraft environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, E J

    1970-06-01

    In just over a decade the hovercraft has progressed from first prototype to a successful commercial form of transport which also has the ability to penetrate many environments hitherto virtually inaccessible to manned vehicles. Comparison with rival short range vehicles such as the helicopter and hydrofoil show that the hovercraft has become one of the most versatile forms of transport available. This versatility and ability to operate in unusual or extreme environments has been accompanied by the problems of control and of protection of the occupants of the hovercraft from the hazards associated with these environments. Several of these problems are discussed, together with their possible solutions. This article is based on a paper given to the Nederlands Vereniging Voor Ergonomie/Ergonomics Research Society joint conference at Noordwijk in Holland, 11-13 June, 1969.

  10. Appropriating the Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Jan-Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Environmental policy has become an important area of European Union (EU) policy making, even though it had not originally been foreseen in the Treaty of Rome. Its emergence in the early 1970s can be understood as a result of a transfer of the novel policy idea of the environment to the European...... of the environment as a political concept emerging in the context of international organizations at the time. Secondly, an analysis of the first Environmental Action Programme of 1973 will be used to show how the EC conceptualized the environment, including the definition of problems and potential remedies. Thirdly...... level. This paper thus inquires into the emergence of a European environmental policy from a diffusion of ideas perspective. Rather than focusing on multi-level policy making it seeks to trace the diffusion of environmental ideas from the level of international organizations to the European Communities...

  11. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to examine the nature of students’ digital learning environments to understand the interplay of institutional systems and tools that are managed by the students themselves. The paper is based on a study of 128 students’ digital learning environments. The objectives...... used tools in the students’ digital learning environments are Facebook, Google Drive, tools for taking notes, and institutional systems. Additionally, the study shows that the tools meet some very basic demands of the students in relation to collaboration, communication, and feedback. Finally...... of the study are 1) to provide an overview of tools for students’ study activities, 2) to identify the most used and most important tools for students and 3) to discover which activities the tools are used for. The empirical study reveals that the students have a varied use of digital media. Some of the most...

  12. Radioactivity and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, R N [Fertilizer Association of India, New Delhi

    1977-12-01

    Power generation from radioisotopes is one of the major applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and is in practice in over twenty countries including India. Other well-known applications of radioactive substances are in medicine, industry, scientific and industrial research programs, and nuclear weapons. The only serious disadvantage with the radioisotopes and their waste products is the constant release of radiation energy which contaminates the environment and endangers the life. An attempt has been made to identify the major sources of radioactivity in the environment and assess its potential impact on the environment. Recent developments in safety measures for prevention of contamination and control of radioactivity and in radioactive wastes management are also discussed.

  13. Radiation environment at Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, M.A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear facilities located at Kalpakkam in Tamil Nadu State of India include at present nuclear power reactors, a fast breeder reactor, a nuclear research centre and a waste management facility. Active wastes generated at the site are collected, treated and safely disposed. High-level wastes are stored underground in RCC trenches and tile hole and low-level wastes in the from of liquid effluents are discharged into the sea. Off-gases are dispersed through stacks in the atmosphere. Environmental survey laboratory established at the site in 1974 carries out radiation surveillance of the environment, evaluates radiological impacts on environment and public, and assesses radiation exposure of the population. It is observed that even after five years of operation of the nuclear power station, radioactivity and radiation levels in the environment have virtually remained at the pre-operational levels. (M.G.B.). 14 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Tourism in Rural Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAI IELENICZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rural tourism is now determined by limited economic opportunities, poor infrastructure, low motivation to possible offers, lack of proper service guarantees. Nearly 500 Romanian villages are already tourist locations, with certain characteristics determined by a heritage item, or complex ones when multiple components lead to various activities. This paper includes a typology of tourist villages in Romania according to the types of practiced tourist activities, insisting on the use of a more comprehensive terminology: tourism in rural environment, participative and creative tourism in rural areas. Tourism becomes a system accepted in the rural environment as a real opportunity for economic development with multiple social consequences. By multiplying tourism potential to meet tourists’ demands, many villages will get tourism valences with various activities in this filed, including environment protection.

  15. Children's Environment in ECEC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anette Boye; Laursen, Hanne; Jørgensen, Hanne Hede

    2017-01-01

    such as play and artwork when they asked to describe the best child environmental practice. Children’s perspectives on their environment still are to be investigated. The study offers knowledge regarding children as active participants in a Nordic ECE culture with educated staff and a long tradition......Danish Legislation prescribes that children’s environment in Early Childhood Education (ECE) is evaluated and enhanced as an integrated part of curriculum work. Children’s perspectives must be included in the efforts. During the last 10 years, pedagogues have endeavoured to include children...... in evaluations of physical, psychological and aesthetic environmental dimensions of education. The present study aims to elucidate how professionals and children co-operate in order to develop children’s environments and study the impact of children’s perspectives on pedagogy and children’s processes of ‘bildung...

  16. Radioruthenium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashima, Kiyoshi; Morita, Shigeki.

    1979-01-01

    A change in the amount of radioruthenium in the environment (due to nuclear tests and drainage from atomic energy plants) and the exposure dose are discussed. The level of 106 Ru in the environment due to radioactive fallout, changes in the level, and the characteristics of these changes are reported. Pollution caused by 106 Ru in drainage from atomic energy plants, especially from the Windscale reprocessing factory in the United Kingdom (which release Ru in the greatest amount), changes in the amount of Ru released and in the levels of environmental pollution, and the movement of Ru in the environment are considered. The intake of Ru into the human body by consumption of food produced in polluted areas and by inspiration of Ru present in the air is estimated. (Tsunoda, M.)

  17. Energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrere, M.

    1978-01-01

    Energy problems will play a fundamental role in the near future and researchers, engineers, economists and ecologists must work together to increase existing non-fossil energy sources and to develop new sources or techniques using less energy without pollution of the environment. Four aspects of future activities in this field are considered. First, energy sources, ie solar, fossil, nuclear, geothermal, and others such as wind energy or wave energy are considered in relation to the environment. Secondly the use of these sources by industry and by transportation, domestic, and agricultural sectors are examined. The problem of energy conservation in all fields is then considered. Finally the overall optimisation is analysed. This is the search for a compromise between the cost of usable energy and that of a degradation function taking into account the effect on the environment. (U.K.)

  18. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous sources of ionizing radiation can lead to human exposure: natural sources, nuclear explosions, nuclear power generation, use of radiation in medical, industrial and research purposes, and radiation emitting consumer products. Before assessing the radiation dose to a population one requires a precise knowledge of the activity of a number of radionuclides. The basis for the assessment of the dose to a population from a release of radioactivity to the environment, the estimation of the potential clinical heath effects due to the dose received and, ultimately, the implementation of countermeasures to protect the population, is the measurement of radioactive contamination in the environment after the release. It is the purpose of this book to present the facts about the presence of radionuclides in the environment, natural and man made. There is no aspect of radioactivity, which has marked the passing century, not mentioned or discussed in this book. refs

  19. Evolving Robot Controllers for Structured Environments Through Environment Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Rodrigo; Faiña, Andres; Støy, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we aim to develop a controller that allows a robot to traverse an structured environment. The approach we use is to decompose the environment into simple sub-environments that we use as basis for evolving the controller. Specifically, we decompose a narrow corridor environment...... environments and that the order in which the decomposed sub-environments are presented in sequence impacts the performance of the evolutionary algorithm....

  20. Evolutionary stability concepts in a stochastic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiu-Deng; Li, Cong; Lessard, Sabin; Tao, Yi

    2017-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, evolutionary game theory and the concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy have been not only extensively developed and successfully applied to explain the evolution of animal behaviors, but also widely used in economics and social sciences. Nonetheless, the stochastic dynamical properties of evolutionary games in randomly fluctuating environments are still unclear. In this study, we investigate conditions for stochastic local stability of fixation states and constant interior equilibria in a two-phenotype model with random payoffs following pairwise interactions. Based on this model, we develop the concepts of stochastic evolutionary stability (SES) and stochastic convergence stability (SCS). We show that the condition for a pure strategy to be SES and SCS is more stringent than in a constant environment, while the condition for a constant mixed strategy to be SES is less stringent than the condition to be SCS, which is less stringent than the condition in a constant environment.

  1. Jupiter Environment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Erick J.; Monahue, Kenneth M.; Biehl, James P.; Kokorowski, Michael; Ngalande, Cedrick,; Boedeker, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter Environment Tool (JET) is a custom UI plug-in for STK that provides an interface to Jupiter environment models for visualization and analysis. Users can visualize the different magnetic field models of Jupiter through various rendering methods, which are fully integrated within STK s 3D Window. This allows users to take snapshots and make animations of their scenarios with magnetic field visualizations. Analytical data can be accessed in the form of custom vectors. Given these custom vectors, users have access to magnetic field data in custom reports, graphs, access constraints, coverage analysis, and anywhere else vectors are used within STK.

  2. Natural radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.; Mishra, U.C.; Pillai, K.C.; Sadasivan, S.

    1982-01-01

    The volume presented contains papers presented at the Second Special Symposium on Natural Radiation Environment held at Bombay, India, during January 1981. The papers deal with such topics as : 1)high natural radiation background areas; 2)environmental natural radioactivity; 3)measurement techniques; 4)technologically enhanced radioactivity; 5)indoor radiation environment; 6)radon and daughters in ambient air, and 7)applications in Geosciences. Each of the 87 papers presented has been abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Information Center's Energy Data Base

  3. Energy, Environment and IMCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the important role that the ionic and mixed conducting ceramics (IMCC) type of materials will play in the R&D of energy and environment technologies of the - presumably - near future. IMCC materials based technologies for energy harvesting, conversion...... and storage as well as for monitoring and protection of our environment are exemplified. The strong impact of the international IMCC research on development of devices based on such materials is illustrated, and some recent trends in the scientific exploration of IMCC are highlighted. Important groups...

  4. Environment as datascape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    as configuring carbon-as-dataspace, I argue, allows grasping adequately the contingency and constraints of managing carbon as a particular mate- rial-discursive form of environment. In conclusion I generalise the environmental management office as a space that can be configured to stage, beyond carbon, other......Ecological modernist approaches to climate change are premised upon knowing carbon emissions. I ask how corporate environmental managers know and do carbon, i.e., shape the reality of emissions. I argue that for managers’ practical purposes carbon exists as malleable data. Based on ethnographic...... global environments as well....

  5. Pervasive Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The potentials of pervasive communication in learning within industry and education are right now being explored through different R&D projects. This paper outlines the background for and the possible learning potentials in what we describe as pervasive learning environments (PLE). PLE?s differ...... from virtual learning environments (VLE) primarily because in PLE?s the learning content is very much related to the actual context in which the learner finds himself. Two local (Denmark) cases illustrate various aspects of pervasive learning. One is the eBag, a pervasive digital portfolio used...

  6. The environment and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Jim; Kenis, Gunter; Rutten, Bart P F

    2010-11-11

    Psychotic syndromes can be understood as disorders of adaptation to social context. Although heritability is often emphasized, onset is associated with environmental factors such as early life adversity, growing up in an urban environment, minority group position and cannabis use, suggesting that exposure may have an impact on the developing 'social' brain during sensitive periods. Therefore heritability, as an index of genetic influence, may be of limited explanatory power unless viewed in the context of interaction with social effects. Longitudinal research is needed to uncover gene-environment interplay that determines how expression of vulnerability in the general population may give rise to more severe psychopathology.

  7. LHCb Dockerized Build Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemencic, M.; Belin, M.; Closier, J.; Couturier, B.

    2017-10-01

    Used as lightweight virtual machines or as enhanced chroot environments, Linux containers, and in particular the Docker abstraction over them, are more and more popular in the virtualization communities. The LHCb Core Software team decided to investigate how to use Docker containers to provide stable and reliable build environments for the different supported platforms, including the obsolete ones which cannot be installed on modern hardware, to be used in integration builds, releases and by any developer. We present here the techniques and procedures set up to define and maintain the Docker images and how these images can be used to develop on modern Linux distributions for platforms otherwise not accessible.

  8. America's Children and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Labs and Research Centers America's Children and the Environment (ACE) Contact Us Share ACE presents key information ... of updates to ACE . America's Children and the Environment (ACE) America's Children and the Environment (ACE) is ...

  9. Path planning in changeable environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuisen, D.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses path planning in changeable environments. In contrast to traditional path planning that deals with static environments, in changeable environments objects are allowed to change their configurations over time. In many cases, path planning algorithms must facilitate quick

  10. Chemistry of complexing molecules and environment. Report of the working group of the Cea ''mission environment''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Working group 'Chemistry of Complexing Molecules and Environment' of the Mission Environment (AG/ENV) identified themes for an original positioning of CEA on important issues of environmental research if a sufficiently strong demand appears. The research of CEA on the environment should be complementary to actions undertaken by other partners (official institutions, research organizations and industrial firms). The themes suggested are: the synthesis of new chelating molecules and new materials having specific properties, with the support of theoretical chemistry and modeling, analytical physical chemistry and speciation of species in relation to their eco-toxicity and their biogeochemical mobility in the natural environment. These themes, illustrated by examples of actions in progress at CEA or likely to be launched quickly, draw largely from recognized competences of the teams, generally developed for finalized nuclear applications: experimental, theoretical and instrumental competences. (author)

  11. The VREST learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, E E; Geelkerken, R H; Sanders, A J B

    2005-01-01

    The VREST learning environment is an integrated architecture to improve the education of health care professionals. It is a combination of a learning, content and assessment management system based on virtual reality. The generic architecture is now being build and tested around the Lichtenstein protocol for hernia inguinalis repair.

  12. Dead-ice environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Johannes; Kjær, Kurt H.; Schomacker, Anders

    2010-01-01

    glacier environment. The scientific challenges are to answer the key questions. What are the conditions for dead-ice formation? From which sources does the sediment cover originate? Which melting and reworking processes act in the ice-cored moraines? What is the rate of de-icing in the ice-cored moraines...

  13. Environment and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandiga, S.O.; Abuodha, N.L.; Abuodha, N.L.; Beigutt, K.S.A.

    1996-01-01

    It contains research papers presented at Kenya Academy of Sciecnes on the theme 'Envoronment and Development' whose objectives are: to highlight levels of achievement and endeavour in scientific research in environment, it's management and related areas, provide a forum debate and exchange of ideas between researchers, policy makers, and the general public on environmental issues and their effect on society, identify gaps in environmental knowledge as a basis for further research. The following titles of the following papers summarizes the details of the presentations; Kenya Eco-systems and global climate change, Integrated Coastal Zone Management related to the Kenyan Coast, Global Climate Change:Implications of the low lying area coastal parts of Kenya, Organochlorine Pesticides:Curse or blessings of the Tropical Environment, Environmental Degradation and Health in Kenya, Urban Environment and City Health Crisis in Kenya: The planning and Resource Allocation Question, Women and Food Security, Food Production and Village based Food Processing Industries of selected plants, Impact of Earthquakes, volcanic Eruptions on the Environment and Human Induced Climate Changes,Myth or reality and The Practice and Principles in Environmental Law for Kenya. this an 'Analytic' record describing research paper presented at the proceedings and published on page 157-168

  14. Designing Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this working paper is to present a conceptual model for media integrated communication in virtual learning environments. The model for media integrated communication is very simple and identifies the necessary building blocks for virtual place making in a synthesis of methods...

  15. Improving the workplace environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop...

  16. Propagation environments [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of all factors influencing plant growth in a nursery environment is needed for the successful growth and production of high-quality container plants. Propagation structures modify the atmospheric conditions of temperature, light, and relative humidity. Native plant nurseries are different from typical horticultural nurseries because plants must be...

  17. Environment: Readings for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivany, J. W. George, Ed.

    Twenty-six articles or extracts from scholarly literature and one article written for this collection are contained in this anthology intended for teachers. The articles present the viewpoints of writers in a number of scientific and sociological fields concerning human interactions with their environment. Articles are arranged in the following…

  18. Hanford site environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A synopsis is given of the detailed characterization of the existing environment at Hanford. The following aspects are covered: demography, land use, meteorology, geology, hydrology, and seismology. It is concluded that Hanford is one of the most extensively characterized nuclear sites

  19. Virtual Environments 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains the proceedings of the joint 9th International Immersive Projection Technologies Workshop and the 11th EUROGRAPHICS Virtual Environments Workshop (IPTEGVE). The event was held in Aalborg, Denmark the 6. and 7. October 2005. It was organized at the VR Media Lab, Aalborg University...

  20. [Healthy school environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Corzo, Josefina; Munévar-Molina, Raúl A; Munévar-Quintero, Fabio I

    2015-04-01

    Objective To determine factors that characterizes school environments and their relationship with student learning, welfare and health. Method This is a case study supported by a comprehensive qualitative paradigm applied to classroom ecology. The fieldwork was carried out in six public schools for students in economic strata one and two that use computers in virtual classrooms. The information was collected through field journals, film recordings, observation, and recordings of interviews. The information was analyzed by categories in open general and focused cycles. Results The virtual era has enriched the debate about the importance of the environment in pedagogical processes. Nonetheless, the emergence of new diseases is a risk which students are exposed to. Pollution and overcrowding factors prevail in traditional classroom activities, while in the computer rooms the environment is healthier. Hence the need to incorporate these issues into the curriculum reforms and action plans to guide healthy living of schoolchildren and their families. Despite budget constraints, innovative ideas and projects were found. Schools have developed free preventive and corrective strategies such as workshops, talks and lectures by invited specialists, trainees, and students writing theses. They have also introduced controlled Internet access. Conclusion The educational community understands that the concept of health is at the heart of a comprehensive concept of education. In addition, classroom ecology has determining implications for learning and living together in pleasant and healthy environments that are incorporated into institutional educational projects.

  1. Transportation and the environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banister, D.; Anderton, K.; Bonilla, D.; Givoni, M.; Schwanen, T.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of CO2-intensive transport, mobility and the impact of transport on the environment are reviewed. The recent global exponential growth in transport is unsustainable and must end unless the transport sector can decarbonize. The paper examines solutions for low-carbon transport systems; the

  2. Electromagnetic Environments Simulator (EMES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.

    1975-11-01

    A multipurpose electromagnetic environments simulator has been designed to provide a capability for performing EMR, EMP, and lightning near stroke testing of systems, subsystems and components in a single facility. This report describes the final facility design and presents the analytical and experimental verification of the design

  3. Multiprocessor programming environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  4. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity

  5. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 57 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978 at Houston, Texas. This symposium provided a common forum for scientists in several disciplines that deal with natural radiation because there is an increasing interest in the environment as it pertains to human health and the competition for scarce energy and material resources

  6. Mercury in Your Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about mercury, how it gets in the air, how people are exposed to it and health effects associated with exposure; what EPA and other organizations are doing to limit exposures; what citizens should know to minimize exposures and to reduce mercury in the environment; and information about products that contain mercury.

  7. Working environment committees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller, Vibeke Kristine; Hansen, Agnete Meldgaard; Nielsen, Klaus T.

    In Denmark, a new Working Environment Act was passed in 2010. The assumptions behind the act are that increased flexibility in the organization of OHS work will: 1) enable a more systematic approach, 2) elevate OHS issues to a strategic level within the company, and 3) integrate these concerns...

  8. Communication Analysis of Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. F.; Thwaites, H. M.

    This textbook was developed for use in a Concordia University (Quebec) course entitled "Communication Analysis of Environment." Designed as a practical application of information theory and cybernetics in the field of communication studies, the course is intended to be a self-instructional process, whereby each student chooses one…

  9. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    used tools in the students’ digital learning environments are Facebook, Google Drive, tools for taking notes, and institutional systems. Additionally, the study shows that the tools meet some very basic demands of the students in relation to collaboration, communication, and feedback. Finally...

  10. IMPROVING THE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETERS, JON S.; SCHNEIDER, RAYMOND C.

    GUIDELINES FOR CREATING IMPROVED EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS ARE PRESENTED WITH SUPPLEMENTARY DRAWINGS, DIAGRAMS, AND PHOTOGRAPHS. POLICY DECISIONS ARE RELATED TO--(1) THE SCHOOL'S RESPONSIBILITY TO THE FUTURE, (2) INDUSTRY'S RULE IN EDUCATION, AND (3) BUILDING PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES. EDUCATIONAL PLANNING IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF--(1) ART…

  11. The Greenfoot Programming Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Greenfoot is an educational integrated development environment aimed at learning and teaching programming. It is aimed at a target audience of students from about 14 years old upwards, and is also suitable for college- and university-level education. Greenfoot combines graphical, interactive output with programming in Java, a standard, text-based…

  12. The redefined environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermelin, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Although it seems an audacity to try to redefine the environment, the current interpretation of the concept of natural environment in Colombia makes necessary that task, with the purpose of arriving at the same time to a focus but realist and useful for those who should keep it in mind in the planning and in the taking of decisions. The definition of effective environment for most of the Colombians and diffused by entities like the Inderena it corresponds to a partial vision of the national reality. It is necessary to show to the country that that version is no-alone incomplete but dangerous, just as they have checked it the catastrophes of the last years that caused many kill and lost, fortunately the tendency of the last years on the part of some planners has been the one of conferring to the threats and the mineral resources the importance that it deserve. God willing that tendency be returns the denominator common of the whole studies dedicated to the ordination of the territory, so much urban as rural. This work recaptures and wide concepts that were presented previously by the author in several conferences and publications. The work understands a revision of the evolution of the environment concept in the first place in Colombia. They are made some observations next about the necessity of keeping in mind the geosciences in the use of the natural environment and are it finishes with the way to integrate those in the process of physical planning that it receives the name of environmental planning universally

  13. The farrier's work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfqvist, Lotta; Pinzke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The horse industry in Sweden has rapidly expanded in recent years. This increasing number of horses implies a greater need for more farriers. Shoeing a horse is hard physical work, and includes awkward work postures and repetitive movements. It is well known that hard physical work increases the risk of injuries and musculoskeletal problems. The risk is especially high for musculoskeletal disorders when certain movements are constantly repeated. Heavy or repeated unilateral loads lead to considerable stress on the muscles, which can lead to rupture and fatigue that can cause long term problems. A case study showed that farriers worked 75% of their work time with their backs in bent positions (often more than 70 degrees). Farriers are also exposed to risk factors in their physical environment like dust, noise and poor lighting. Risk of kicks and bites, eye injuries and burns are other factors that make their work environment hazardous. There are only a few studies available that have documented the farriers' working environment and these are not of recent date. A US study from 1984 described kicks and bites from horses, metal splinters in the eyes, heat exhaustion and problematic postures to be perceived as the greatest risks in their work. The back, knees and wrists were the most exposed body regions. There is a need for more current and in-depth studies investigating the farriers' working conditions in order to gain more knowledge of their health and work environment. The aim of the present study is to investigate the physical health and work environment of farriers. The investigation will use questionnaires, work load measurements and workplace analysis. The results will serve as a base for improvements concerning the design of the workplace, equipment, tools and aids as well as supplying recommendations about physical exercise and the correct work technique, etc. The results are planned to be incorporated in the education of farriers.

  14. The Plasma Environment at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, James M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gloeckler, George; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menalos; hide

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is the least explored terrestrial planet, and the one subjected to the highest flux of solar radiation in the heliosphere. Its highly dynamic, miniature magnetosphere contains ions from the exosphere and solar wind, and at times may allow solar wind ions to directly impact the planet's surface. Together these features create a plasma environment that shares many features with, but is nonetheless very different from, that of Earth. The first in situ measurements of plasma ions in the Mercury space environment were made only recently, by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) during the MESSENGER spacecraft's three flybys of the planet in 2008-2009 as the probe was en route to insertion into orbit about Mercury earlier this year. Here. we present analysis of flyby and early orbital mission data with novel techniques that address the particular challenges inherent in these measurements. First. spacecraft structures and sensor orientation limit the FIPS field of view and allow only partial sampling of velocity distribution functions. We use a software model of FIPS sampling in velocity space to explore these effects and recover bulk parameters under certain assumptions. Second, the low densities found in the Mercury magnetosphere result in a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio for many ions. To address this issue, we apply a kernel density spread function to guide removal of background counts according to a background-signature probability map. We then assign individual counts to particular ion species with a time-of-flight forward model, taking into account energy losses in the carbon foil and other physical behavior of ions within the instrument. Using these methods, we have derived bulk plasma properties and heavy ion composition and evaluated them in the context of the Mercury magnetosphere.

  15. Selected Approaches to the Business Environment Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Chládková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains views of managers on the quality of business environment and also reflects the results of the World Bank, which annually assesses the conditions for doing business in different countries, including the Czech Republic. The business environment of the Czech Republic was evaluated based upon the results of the World Bank, which assesses conditions for doing business in various parts of the world. Secondly, views of SME managers on the quality of the business environment were presented. The World Bank’s „Doing Business 2011“ report puts the Czech Republic in the 63rd place (out of 183 examined countries when it comes to the quality of the business environment. The Czech Republic improved its score in two categories (Property Registration and Ending a Business compared to the same evaluation conducted in 2010. SME managers evaluated the business environment with SWOT Analysis. „Technical and technological development along with increase in demand for innovated products made by new technologies“ was perceived as the most significant opportunity (82% while „Competition and rivalry in the industry“ was identified as the most significant threat by almost all respondents (92% in their 2010 evaluation.

  16. Environment and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paert, P. (and others)

    2005-07-01

    Public concerns, evidence from research and increasing scientific knowledge are all driving widespread discussions on environment and health problems. The issue of environment and health is characterised by multi-causality with different strengths of association. This means that the links between exposures and their health consequences depend on the environmental pollutants and diseases being considered, but are also influenced by factors such as genetic constitution, age, nutrition and lifestyle, and socioeconomic factors such as poverty and level of education. Chapter headings are: Introduction; Environmental burden of disease; Respiratory disease, asthma and allergies; Cancer; Neurodevelopmental disorders; Endocrine disruption; Body burden of chemicals; Wildlife as early warning signals for human impacts; and Climate change and health. 35 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Pervasive Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper; Helms, Niels Henrik

    in schools. The other is moreover related to work based learning in that it foresees a community of practitioners accessing, sharing and adding to knowledge and learning objects held within a pervasive business intelligence system. Limitations and needed developments of these and other systems are discussed......Abstract: The potentials of pervasive communication in learning within industry and education are right know being explored through different R&D projects. This paper outlines the background for and the possible learning potentials in what we describe as pervasive learning environments (PLE). PLE......'s differ from virtual learning environments (VLE) primarily because in PLE's the learning content is very much related to the actual context in which the learner finds himself. Two local (Denmark) cases illustrate various aspects of pervasive learning. One is the eBag, a pervasive digital portfolio used...

  18. The power of environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Becky

    2015-06-01

    In Ten tips for normal birth, the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) (2014) advocates the building of nests; creating an environment that helps women to feel safe and secure during birth, as this can improve women's experiences and likelihood of normal birth. Furthermore, a private, undisturbed and dark environment, where women feel calm and safe can promote the release of oxytocin, the hormone responsible for uterine contractions and thought to promote the release of the pain relieving hormones endorphins (Uvnas Moberg 2003). When this is not achieved, women can experience fear-tension-pain syndrome, impeding labour progress and causing increased levels of pain (Dick-Read 2013). In addition, birth space has the potential to encourage the promotion of normality through providing space to mobilise, and alternative furniture to enable upright birth positions. Midwives should help women to create a birth space in which they feel safe, calm and secure, to promote normality and increase the incidence of normal birth (RCM 2014).

  19. Energy, environment and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Hinnawi, E

    1977-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important prerequisites of life. The growing socio-economic activities and the rising standard of living have led to a rapid increase in energy consumption. The limited resources of fossil fuels and the recent geopolitical developments activated the exploration of ways and means for energy conservation and exploitation of unconventional renewable sources of energy. Of the renewable energy sources (geothermal, solar, tidal, hydropower, etc), hydro-power production has some potential environmental effects. Man-made lakes have several physical, biological, geochemical and biogeochemical impacts on the environment both in the area of the lake and downstream. From the socio-economic point of view, the harnessing of renewable sources of energy will not only lead to the enhancement of the human environment, particularly in remote rural areas in developing countries, but will also lead to substantial savings in the use of non-renewable sources of energy.

  20. Securing collaborative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-16

    The diverse set of organizations and software components involved in a typical collaboratory make providing a seamless security solution difficult. In addition, the users need support for a broad range of frequency and locations for access to the collaboratory. A collaboratory security solution needs to be robust enough to ensure that valid participants are not denied access because of its failure. There are many tools that can be applied to the task of securing collaborative environments and these include public key infrastructure, secure sockets layer, Kerberos, virtual and real private networks, grid security infrastructure, and username/password. A combination of these mechanisms can provide effective secure collaboration capabilities. In this paper, we discuss the requirements of typical collaboratories and some proposals for applying various security mechanisms to collaborative environments.

  1. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    of the study are 1) to provide an overview of tools for students’ study activities, 2) to identify the most used and most important tools for students and 3) to discover which activities the tools are used for. The empirical study reveals that the students have a varied use of digital media. Some of the most......, the study shows that most of the important tools are not related to the systems provided by the educational institutions. Based on the study, the paper concludes with a discussion of how institutional systems connect to the other tools in the students’ practices, and how we can qualify students’ digital......The objective of the paper is to examine the nature of students’ digital learning environments to understand the interplay of institutional systems and tools that are managed by the students themselves. The paper is based on a study of 128 students’ digital learning environments. The objectives...

  2. Preservation of Built Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marie Kirstine

    When built environments and recently also cultural environments are to be preserved, the historic and architectural values are identified as the key motivations. In Denmark the SAVE system is used as a tool to identify architectural values, but in recent years it has been criticized for having...... architectural value in preservation work as a matter of maintaining the buildings -as keeping them "alive" and allowing this to continue in the future. The predominantly aesthetic preservation approach will stop the buildings' life process, which is the same as - "letting them die". Finnebyen in Aarhus...... is an example of a residential area, where the planning authority currently has presented a preservational district plan, following guidelines from the SAVE method. The purpose is to protect the area's architectural values in the future. The predominantly aesthetic approach is here used coupled to the concept...

  3. Pervasive Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Hundebøl, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The potentials of pervasive communication in learning within industry and education are right know being explored through different R&D projects. This paper outlines the background for and the possible learning potentials in what we describe as pervasive learning environments (PLE). PLE's differ...... from virtual learning environments (VLE) primarily because in PLE's the learning content is very much related to the actual context in which the learner finds himself. Two local (Denmark) cases illustrate various aspects of pervasive learning. One is the eBag, a pervasive digital portfolio used...... in schools. The other is moreover related to work based learning in that it foresees a community of practitioners accessing, sharing and adding to knowledge and learning objects held within a pervasive business intelligence system. Limitations and needed developments of these and other systems are discussed...

  4. Balancing media environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mogens

    The paper examines how students in Danish upper secondary schools experience the uses and effects of the digital environment in relation to their school activities. Theoretically a media ecological perspective (Strate 2006) is applied which understands teaching and learning practices as shaped...... by the interrelation between teacher, student and the media technologies. According to this perspective, media creates an environment that shapes our possibilities for acting and communicating. In a basic sense, teaching and learning is a communicative situation where, traditionally, the teacher sends information...... to the receiving students through a medium (e.g. speech, blackboard, book or online learning platform). Digital media challenge this situation due to their affordances (Gibson 1979) for interactivity. Affordance has become an increasingly popular term within media studies for describing a complementary...

  5. Environment report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A brief account of activities in environment protection carried out by the Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s. in 1999 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Address; (2) Electricity generation and consumption in the Slovak Republic; (3) Air protection; (4) Water management; (5) Waste management; (6) Environmental management system at Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s.; (7) Environmental protection funds; (8) Structure of SE, a.s., power installations

  6. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The book summarizes general concepts on radiation, nuclear structure, radioactivity and the interaction of the nuclear radiation with matter. It describes also the basic principles of radio dosimetry. Natural and artificial sources of radiation are reviewed as well as the effects of radiation in man. Medical and industrial applications of ionizing radiation and the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive materials are outlined. A short review is made of the safety rules and the regulations concerning the protection of the environment [es

  7. Population vs. the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    In anticipation of UN Conference on Environment and Development scheduled for June in Brazil, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) recently televised a hard-hitting documentary focusing on the impact of rapid population growth on resources and the environment. Entitled "Population Explosion and the Looming Crisis: Can Humankind Determine a Better Future?" the documentary aired on January 5, featuring interviews with experts from the population field such as Dr. Nafis Sadik of the UNFPA and Dr. Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University. The program, made with the cooperation of UNFPA and JOICFP, compared the current global demograhic and environmental situation with the one expected to exist in 2025, when the world population is expected to reach 10 billion. The documentary depicted a future fraught with food shortages, depleted energe resources, refugees, and a devastated environment. In order to illustrate the effect of population growth in developing countries, the documentary featured reports from countries in Asia and Africa. And to show the heavy burden that industrialized countries place on the global environment, the documentary examined Japan's own pattern of consumption and waste. As the UNFPA's Sadik pointed out, the luxurious lifestyle of developed countries comes at the expense of the developing world. Stressing that everyone in the world should be able to enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Sadik called for "sustainable patterns of development," which can be achieved through the following: improved technology, reduced consumption patterns, and changed lifestyles. A critical element in changing lifestyles includes reducing global fertility to 3.2 children/woman by the year 2000. Otherwise, a world population will not double but triple by the year 2025.

  8. Working for the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This video looks at the work of the UKAEA which is concerned with environmental protection and covers 4 projects, the routine monitoring which ensures a constant check on the safe operation of nuclear plant, research into the ways radioactivity released routinely into the Irish Sea from Sellafield returns to land. Computer modelling of the large scale behaviour of radioactive releases to the environment and research into the behaviour of released chemicals and heavy metals into the food chain. (author)

  9. Environment and environmental impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Rejane de Fátima Victor Vasconcelos

    2009-01-01

    The article shows what can be environmental impacts and how those happen, both by the actions made by human kind and by natural disasters. Another concern of the research is the unstoppable incident of the natural resources destruction, result f the globalization actions and the economy, and that the environment impacts have happen in every direction, independently of the geographic scale, harming the life in earth, without giving importance who is the target. The article made reference to in...

  10. Monitoring of environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsudera, M

    1974-09-01

    The amount of pollutants discharged has now exceeded the environment's natural ability to purify itself. The effect of urbanization is traced especially the degeneration of plants and animals in Tokyo. One of the methods of monitoring plants is remote sensing with multi-band photography and multi-spectroscanning. There is a correlation between the sulfur content of tree leaves and multi-band photograms on red pine trees with a correlation coefficient of -0.862.

  11. 2001 Industry Studies: Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Internet . 8 March 2001. xliii Henry Kelly, “ Information Technology and the Environment: Choices and Opportunities,” CISP.org (October 1999) pp 8...development. Despite only a small percentage of U.S. environmental businesses participating in the world market , the U.S. industry has the best technology ...businesses participating in the world market , the U.S. industry has the best technology in the world and already generates a trade surplus. With the world

  12. Environment and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    As part of its contribution to the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992, the IAEA produced a booklet entitled ''Nuclear Power, Nuclear Techniques and Sustainable Development''. The second half of this dealt with the relevance of the IAEA's work to ''Agenda 21'', an agenda of environmental conservation and sustainable development for the twenty-first century. This article briefly summarizes the text

  13. Nuclear and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frot, J.

    2002-06-01

    After having discussed the evolution of energy needs in relationship with economic and demographic evolutions, the evolution of energy resources and of the energy mix in different part of the world, the evolution of energy costs, the author comments the different impacts of the different energies, and more particularly nuclear energy, on the environment. He identifies six major impacts: energy congestion management, greenhouse effect, wastes, radioactivity, accidents, and nuclear proliferation

  14. Intrauterine Environment and PCOS

    OpenAIRE

    Dumesic, Daniel A.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D.; Abbott, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The maternal-fetal environment plays an important role in developmental programming of adult disease. Metabolic and hormonal dysfunction during human fetal development accompanies gestational diabetes as a common occurrence in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) mothers, while human fetal androgen excess from congenital adrenal hyperplasia or virilizing tumors precedes PCOS-like symptoms after birth. To date, clinical studies of infant blood levels at term have yet to confirm that human fetal an...

  15. Environment Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, Geoffrey.

    1986-01-01

    The findings of the House of Commons Environment Committee (March 1986) on radioactive waste are examined. The report includes 43 recommendations and conclusions, many of which are directed at improving public acceptance of nuclear power, rather than constituting an attack on the nuclear industry. Some of the major topics considered in the report include: waste disposal, waste classification, waste disposal policy, discharges, reprocessing, and public acceptance. (UK)

  16. ECONOMY AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg BOGOMOLOV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Market reforms in the post-socialist countries have brought into sharp focus the problem of interconnection and interaction between the economy and the social environment. The economy is inseparable from politics and the operation of the political system, from the state of the social consciousness, the moral and cultural level of the population and from many other aspects of human life and behavior, in short, from everything that can be described by the concept of social environment. Society in every country is a single organism with closely interconnected and interacting parts and systems. Their conjugation and mutual influence are not always apparent and are often overlooked. It is quite easy to see how changes in policy affect the economy and then trace the feedback effect of the economy on policy. It is more difficult to discern the direct and feedback relationship of the economy with administrative relations, with the state of culture, science, morals and public opinion. Meanwhile, an underestimation of these mutual influences is a frequent cause of failures in socio-economic transformation. It is to be regretted that the reforms in Russia were accompanied by a dangerous disruption not only of the economy, but also of the entire system of social relations. What was primary here and what was secondary? In order to answer this question the paper takes a theoretical look at the problem of interaction between the economy and the social environment.

  17. Greening the built environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Maf; Whitelegg, John; Williams, Nick J.

    1998-07-15

    The built environment incorporates our homes, our workplaces and places of leisure. Under the influence of a complex web of social and economic processes, it is where many issues of human and environmental well-being come to a head - whether of space, mobility, energy consumption, pollution, health or security. All too often, concerns such as cost are put before the things we value for a fulfilling life, including peace and quiet and health and happiness. Getting the built environment right is fundamental to a sustainable society and requires an integrated approach. This important new book, published in association with the World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF-UK), provides us with a firm understanding of the interrelationships of many of the issues and problems of the built environment and describes the holistic models of development, management and planning necessary for urban sustainability. It draws attention to the major challenges and policy implications and offers analysis, approaches and vision for moving towards sustainable towns and cities that in turn will facilitate sustainable lifestyles. (Author)

  18. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In this report different aspects of the radioactivity in the environment of the Slovak Republic for the period of 2004 - 2006 years are reported. This report is published only on the Enviroportal.sk. The following aspects of the radioactivity in the environment are reviewed there: Electricity production in nuclear power plants and their consumption; Natural sources of ionisation radiation; Man-made sources of ionisation radiation; Safety of exploitation of the nuclear power plants on the territory of the Slovak Republic; International Nuclear Event Scale; Basic information about influence of radiation on health of population and about evaluation methods; Influence of physical risk factors (including of ionisation radiation) in the working environment on formation of occupation diseases; Collective doses of occupation in NPPs; Health state of population in the locality of the NPP Mochovce; Food contamination by ionisation radiation; Radiation monitoring network; Legislative directives about population health protection against ionisation radiation action; Decommissioning of the NPP Jaslovske Bohunice (EBO V-1); Conception of the back fuel cycle and treatment of spent fuels and high-level radioactive wastes; Project of territorial-economic development of the Trnava region after decommissioning of the Jaslovske Bohunice NPP

  19. The aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-10-15

    The rapid increase in technological development and the broad societal benefit it has brought has been accompanied by a corresponding increase in environmental and societal problems. This has established a need to asses the impacts of new technologies, including nuclear industries. We are now entering an age which will see a rapid proliferation of nuclear power plants all over the world. As long as man continues to utilize nuclear energy, some releases of radioactive materials to the environment seem to be inescapable consequences. The problem therefore is to limit and control such releases, so that adverse effects on man and his environment can be reduced to acceptable levels. We can now draw on three decades of experience of the environmental impact of radioactive materials. To review this experience and to survey recent results of studies related to the safety of releases of nuclear facilities into fresh water, estuaries and sea water, the International Symposium on 'Radiological Impacts of Releases from Nuclear Facilities into Aquatic Environments' was held at Otaniemi, near Helsinki, Finland. (author)

  20. Cooling tower and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.; Ederhof, A.; Gosdowski, J.; Harms, A.; Ide, G.; Klotz, B.; Kowalczyk, R.; Necker, P.; Tesche, W.

    The influence of a cooling tower on the environment, or rather the influence of the environment on the cooling tower stands presently -along with the cooling water supply - in the middle of much discussion. The literature on these questions can hardly be overlooked by the experts concerned, especially not by the power station designers and operators. The document 'Cooling Tower and Environment' is intented to give a general idea of the important publications in this field, and to inform of the present state of technology. In this, the explanations on every section make it easier to get to know the specific subject area. In addition to older standard literature, this publication contains the best-known literature of recent years up to spring 1975, including some articles written in English. Further English literature has been collected by the ZAED (KFK) and is available at the VGB-Geschaefsstelle. Furthermore, The Bundesumweltamt compiles the literature on the subject of 'Environmental protection'. On top of that, further documentation centres are listed at the end of this text. (orig.) [de

  1. Environment monitoring from space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental problems such as acid rain, ozone depletion, deforestation, erosion, and the greenhouse effect are of increasing concern, and continuous earth observation from artificial satellites has been contributing significant information on the environment since the 1960s. Earth observation from space has the advantages of wide area coverage at potentially high resolutions, periodic and long-term observation capability, data acquisition with uniform quality and repeatability, and ability to observe using different types of sensors. Problems to be solved in earth observation include the need for preprocessing of satellite data, understanding the relationship between observed physical parameters and objects, and the high volume of data for processing. In Japan, a research project on the higher-order utilization of remote sensing data from space was organized in 1985, and the results led to recognition of the importance of satellite observation. It was then decided to undertake a program to improve the understanding of the earth environment by satellite. Five research plans were selected: a basic study on earth observation by microwaves; global change analysis of the biosphere; a study of the physical process of the water cycle over land; a study of air-sea interaction; and higher-order processing of earth observation information. In recognition of the international nature of satellite data, as well as the capabilities of Canada and Japan in computer, communication, and multimedia technologies, bilateral cooperation is proposed in the area of earth environment information systems based on satellite observation

  2. Altered Perspectives: Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Immersive environments provide an exciting experiential technology to visualize the natural world. Given the increasing accessibility of 360o cameras and virtual reality headsets we are now able to visualize artistic principles and scientific concepts in a fully immersive environment. The technology has become popular for photographers as well as designers, industry, educational groups, and museums. Here we show a sci-art perspective on the use of optics and light in the capture and manipulation of 360o images and video of geologic phenomena and cultural heritage sites in Alaska, England, and France. Additionally, we will generate intentionally altered perspectives to lend a surrealistic quality to the landscapes. Locations include the Catacombs of Paris, the Palace of Versailles, and the Northern Lights over Fairbanks, Alaska. Some 360o view cameras now use small portable dual lens technology extending beyond the 180o fish eye lens previously used, providing better coverage and image quality. Virtual reality headsets range in level of sophistication and cost, with the most affordable versions using smart phones and Google Cardboard viewers. The equipment used in this presentation includes a Ricoh Theta S spherical imaging camera. Here we will demonstrate the use of 360o imaging with attendees being able to be part of the immersive environment and experience our locations as if they were visiting themselves.

  3. Mycotoxins in the soil environment

    OpenAIRE

    Elmholt, S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper outlines the current knowledge concerning fate of mycotoxins in the soil environment, including - outline of mycotoxins addressed (trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin) - routes by which the mycotoxins enter the soil environment - routes by which they are immobilised or removed from the soil environment - mycotoxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in the soil environment

  4. Influence of Municipal Solid Waste Compost on Soil Properties and Plant Reestablishment in Peri-Urban Environments Efecto de la Aplicación de Compost de Residuos Sólidos Municipales sobre las Propiedades de los Suelos y el Establecimiento de Plantas en Ambientes Peri-Urbanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Civeira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Soils in urban areas often present characteristics that might submit these environments to erosion processes. Applying municipal solid wastes (MSW composts to soils have been suggested as a means to improve physical and chemical properties. A field experiment with a completely randomized design was conducted in a Typic Argiudoll from a degraded area in Buenos Aires City. The objective was to evaluate the effect of MSW compost application on soil properties, residue decomposition and Poa (Poa pratensis L. reestablishment. At the beginning of the trial, compost was prepared and applied in a bare soil on 0.25 m² square plots afterwards litterbags were incorporated and Poa was sown. Compost amounts were: 0 (control; 2 (low; 4 (medium and 7 kg m-2 (high on fresh matter basis. During the trial residue decomposition and aerial dry matter (DM: g treatment-1 were evaluated, at the end soil physical and chemical parameters were measured. Medium and high compost rates increased organic C, total N and extractable P. Addition of 2 kg m-2 affected soil organic C as well, but in a minor fee. Soil physical properties were improved after MSW compost addition. In medium and high doses, augmentations in organic matter reduced bulk densities and enhanced water infiltration. Aerial DM was significantly affected by treatments (p Los suelos de las áreas urbanas presentan características que pueden someter estos ambientes a procesos erosivos. La aplicación de composts de residuos sólidos urbanos (MSW a los suelos es una práctica que mejora sus propiedades. El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar el efecto del compost de MSW sobre las propiedades, la descomposición de residuos y el restablecimiento de la especie Poa (Poa pratensis L. en estos suelos. En un Argiudol típico degradado de la ciudad de Buenos Aires se realizó un ensayo con diseño completamente aleatorizado. Se preparó e incorporó compost en parcelas de 0,25 m² en las siguientes cantidades: 0

  5. 40 CFR 716.50 - Reporting physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical properties. Studies of physical and chemical properties must be reported under this subpart if... they investigated one or more of the following properties: (a) Water solubility. (b) Adsorption... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting physical and chemical...

  6. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Exposure of many metals to gaseous hydrogen causes losses in elongation, reduction of area, and fracture toughness, and causes increases in slow crack growth rate or fatigue life compared with values obtained in air or vacuum. Hydrogen pressure, temperature, and purity significantly influence deleterious effects. The strength and structural characteristics of the metal influence the degradation of its properties by hydrogen. Several theories have been proposed to explain the loss of properties in hydrogen, but none has gained wide acceptance. The embrittlement mechanism and the role of diffusion are, therefore, open questions and need more quantitative experimental data both to test the proposed theories and to allow the development of realistic preventive measures. (U.S.)

  7. FASCODE for the environment (FASE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, H.E.; Moncet, J.L. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Anderson, G.P.; Chetwynd, J.H. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFM, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The Optical Physics Division of the Phillips Laboratory, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, is developing a state-of-the-art line-by-line atmospheric radiative transfer model as the successor to FASCODE. The goal of this project is to create a computationally efficient model which contains the most up-to-date atmospheric physics. The new model, known as FASCODE for the Environment, or {open_quotes}FASE{close_quotes}, will combine the best features of FASCODE and LBLRTM, the DOE`s standard radiative transfer model. FASE will also contain new features such as new cross-sections for heavy molecules, and improved solar irradiance model, and improvements to the Schumann-Runge bands and continuum. The code will be optimized for vectorized and/or parallel processing. put under configuration control for easy maintenance, and structured into separate modules for each function: atmospheric profiles, layer optical properties, radiative transfer, multiple-scattering, etc. This modular structure will allow for increased flexibility and easy customization of the code for specialized applications, such as a forward model for iterative inversion algorithms. Ease-of-use will be enhanced with improved input control structures and documentation to accommodate the needs of novice and advanced users. This paper addresses changes which have been made to FASCODE and LBLRTM to create FASE, and gives an overview of the modular structure and its capabilities.

  8. Radionuclides in an underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    In the 100 years since Becquerel recognized radioactivity, mankind has been very successful in producing large amounts of radioactive materials. We have been less successful in reaching a consensus on how to dispose of the billions of curies of fission products and transuranics resulting from nuclear weapons testing, electrical power generation, medical research, and a variety of other human endeavors. Many countries, including the United States, favor underground burial as a means of disposing of radioactive wastes. There are, however, serious questions about how such buried wastes may behave in the underground environment and particularly how they might eventually contaminate water, air and soil resources on which we are dependent. This paper describes research done in the United States in the state of Nevada on the behavior of radioactive materials placed underground. During the last thirty years, a series of ''experiments'' conducted for other purposes (testing of nuclear weapons) have resulted in a wide variety of fission products and actinides being injected in rock strata both above and below the water table. Variables which seem to control the movement of these radionuclides include the physical form (occlusion versus surface deposition), the chemical oxidation state, sorption by mineral phases of the host rock, and the hydrologic properties of the medium. The information gained from these studies should be relevant to planning for remediation of nuclear facilities elsewhere in the world and for long-term storage of nuclear wastes

  9. Bovine reproduction in tropical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Lopez, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this document it has met relating data to the reproduction of bovine and their handling for the man that it can serve as norms to judge reproductive efficiency but always view in the aspect of the nutritious, climatic circumstances and of handling under which met. Under the previous description one can say that the fertility is the resultant of the interaction among the inheritance, the means and the handling, they vary in particular for each region and property. The fertility can be good, regulate or bad in the measure in that the factors that intervene. The environmental effect on the reproductive processes of the cow represents 80 percent of the variation factors and they include climate, effect of the light, effect of the temperature, effect of the nutritious contribution, effect of psychological factors: the loss of the tendency to the seasonal reproduction is in fact an answer from the animals to its association with the man. The influence of the environment and the feeding of the animals are more intense in the females than in the males, being evidenced that the reproduction control is under the influence hormonal joint with the nutrition. An appropriate nutrition is prerequisite for the beginning of the sexual maturation with an appropriate weight and corporal condition. It is also described the effect and the relationship of the energy contribution about the fertility, the restart of the ovarian activity, its cause of the continuation of the interval childbirth-conception, silent ovulation, organic ancestry and interval among childbirths

  10. Effect of biofuel on environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalam, M.A; Masjuki, H.H.; Maleque, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Biofuels are alcohols, esters, and other chemical made from cellulosic biomass such as herbaceous and woody plants, agricultural and forestry residues, and a large portion of municipal solid and industrial waste. Biofuels are renewable and mostly suitable for diesel engines due to their similar physiochemical properties as traditional diesel oil. Demand of biofuel is increasing and some European countries have started using biofuel in diesel engine. This interest has been grown in many countries mainly due to fluctuating oil prices because of diminishing availability of conventional sources and polluted environment. However, the use of biofuel for diesel engine would be more beneficial to oil importing countries by saving foreign exchange, because biofuel is domestic renewable fuels. This paper presents the evaluation results of a multi-cylinder diesel engine operated on blends of ten, twenty, thirty, forty and fifty percent of ordinary coconut oil (COCO) with ordinary diesel (OD). The test results from all the COCO blends were compared with OD. The fuels were compared based on the emissions results including, exhaust temperature, NO x , smoke, CO, HC, benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Carbon deposit on injector nozzles was also monitored. Exhaust emissions results showed that increasing coconut oil in blend decreases all the exhaust emissions. Carbon deposited on injector nozzles was observed where no hard carbon was found on injector tip when the engine was running on COCO blends. (Author)

  11. Plasma properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1991-06-01

    The Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division continues to study a broad range of problems originating in plasma physics. Its principal focus is fusion plasma physics, and most particularly topics of particular significance for the world magnetic fusion program. During the calendar year 1990 we explored a wide range of topics including RF-induced transport as a plasma control mechanism, edge plasma modelling, further statistical analysis of L and H mode tokamak plasmas, antenna design, simulation of the edge of a tokamak plasma and the L-H transition, interpretation of the CCT experimental results at UCLA, turbulent transport, studies in chaos, the validity of moment approximations to kinetic equations and improved neoclassical modelling. In more basic studies we examined the statistical mechanisms of Coulomb systems and applied plasma ballooning mode theory to conventional fluids in order to obtain novel fluid dynamics stability results. In space plasma physics we examined the problem of reconnection, the effect of Alfven waves in space environments, and correct formulation of boundary conditions of the Earth for waves in the ionosphere

  12. 32 CFR 643.28 - Policy-Historic and cultural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Policy-Historic and cultural environment. 643.28... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.28 Policy—Historic and cultural environment. (a) Executive Order 11593... leadership in preserving, restoring and maintaining the historic and cultural environment of the Nation; that...

  13. The MacNuclide nuclear data environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Advance in technology have produced intriguing tools that can be applied to problems in nuclear science. Information management in nuclear science is an example of how technology is not quickly exploited. The U.S. Department of Energy supports an extensive program to evaluate published nuclear properties and store them in an electronic data base. Much of the evaluation effort has focused on producing the journal Nuclear Data Sheets and the publication Table of Isotopes. Although the electronic data base can itself be a valuable source of information, the software used to access is was designed using decades-old technologies. The authors of this paper have developed a novel data-base management system for nuclear properties. The application is known as MacNuclide. It is a nuclear data-base environment that uses the highly interactive and intuitive windowing environmentsof desk-top computers. The environment is designed around that image of the chart of nuclides. Questions are posed to the data base by placing constraints on properties and defining collections of nuclides to be used in data-base seraches. Results are displayed either as a simple list of nuclides that meet the imposed constraints or as a color chart of nuclides

  14. Food environment and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Richard; Foster, Gary D

    2014-12-01

    The food environment plays an important and often dominant role in food choice, eating patterns, and ultimately, energy intake. The Obesity Society and the American Society for Nutrition jointly sponsored a series of reviews on topics of interest to both memberships. The goal was to consider the state of understanding on selected issues related to the food environment and obesity and to identify key knowledge gaps. The first article (not necessarily of importance) targeted energy density (ED) and focuses on the role of ED in the regulation of energy intake and body weight. It offers recommendations for prioritizing research. The second article addresses economic factors and examines food and beverage purchases as a function of price changes. It concludes that targeted food taxes and subsidies alone are unlikely to substantially affect obesity. The third article concerns sweetened beverages and points out the difficulty in establishing the strength of the association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain and obesity. In the fourth article, the contributions of palatability and variety to eating behavior and weight are reviewed. Article five explores the influence of portion size on energy intake and weight management. It finds that consumers generally tend to eat proportionally more as portion size increases. The sixth article focuses on the efficacy and effectiveness of eating frequency manipulations for body weight management and finds that such manipulations have consistently yielded null results. Finally, article seven identifies several limitations of the existing literature regarding neighborhood access to healthy foods. This series of reviews addresses important questions regarding the contribution of the food environment to obesity. Independent of physiological/genetic determinants, factors such as ED, cost, food form, palatability, variety, portion size, eating frequency, and access to healthy food are each evaluated for their role in

  15. Intellectual property rights in nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastani, Behfar; Fernandez, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Intellectual property (IP) rights are essential in today's technology-driven age. Building a strategic IP portfolio is economically important from both an offensive and defensive standpoint. After an introduction to intellectual property rights and acquisitions, we provide an overview of current efforts in nanotechnology. Research into nano-scale materials and devices and requirements for their efficient mass production are outlined, with focus on the applicable IP rights and strategies. We present current and future applications of nanotechnology to such fields as electronics, sensors, aerospace, medicine, environment and sanitation, together with the IP rights that can be brought to bear in each. Finally, some challenging issues surrounding the acquisition of intellectual property rights in nanotechnology are presented

  16. Creativity in Organizational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szobiová Eva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is focused on the conditions which allow the application of creativity in the context of an organization. The aim of the article is to reveal the work environment factors influencing the creativity of the employees. Another aim is to demonstrate how management style of an organization can affect the creativity of employees in order to successfully exploit their creative potential. The contribution also presents the manner how a manager can influence creativity of one’s own employees. Moreover, the article deals with the process of innovation and transmission of creative ideas and solutions into practice.

  17. Securing the Vista Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Peter

    2007-01-01

    "Securing the Vista Environment" takes you on a quick tour of the most significant security features in Vista, Microsoft's first revision of Windows in almost six years. You'll get background on threats and vulnerabilities that will make you think differently about security. Security is more than just the technology and configurations--it's about how we use the system that makes it secure or not. Then we'll cover Vista's security features, from user privileges to Windows Defender, User Account Control, and BitLocker, as well as strategies for protecting your information from unwanted disclo

  18. Energy - environment - nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The special edition contains contributions made by different authors on the array of problems presented by the environment, energy, and nutrition, biosphere and man, economic growth and energy supplies for future security, new environmental awareness, - the end of market economy., power plant safety, conditions for the evolution of mankind, policy and criminal law demonstrated by means of environmental protection. The concept of ecology and the development of world energy supplies are documented. The bibliography report goes into detail as far as studies are concerned which deal with the hazards of nuclear power plants, related pros and cons, with the energy crisis in general, and with nuclear weapons. (HSCH) [de

  19. Photovoltaics and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of photovoltaics on the environment and its application and role in the energy supply sector. It discusses the environmental and health impacts associated with photovoltaics by using Life Cycle Analysis as an instrument to determine its environmental effects. Recent Life Cycle studies have shown that PV can be considered an environmentally low risk technology, with its major environmental impacts occurring at the module manufacturing and waste disposal stages. The employment of environmental control mechanisms and statutory health and safety regulations at PV production facilities have helped to further reduce occupational and public health hazards. (author)

  20. Teleobservation in hostile environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porteau, M.

    1983-01-01

    For maintenance operations in radiation environment, French nuclear industry uses television cameras operating in closed circuit, specially designed to penetrate in reactor cores and in active cells of reprocessing plants. The nuclear cameras, used by VISIONIC are the product of 20 years of experience. They are tight, submersible, and equipped with objectives which are not affected by radiations and are characterized by their miniaturization. This equipment complies with international television standards C.C.I.R. 625 intertwined lines. In order to facilitate the approach of cameras, VISIONIC uses remote handling equipment such as remotely operated caterpillar trolleys

  1. Radiation environment in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goka, Tateo; Koga, Kiyokazu; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Komiyama, Tatsuo; Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Japanese Experiment Module (Kibo) had been build into the International Space Station (ISS), which is a multipurpose manned facility and laboratory and is operated in orbit at about 400 km in altitude. Two Japanese astronauts stayed in the ISS for long time (4.5 and 5.5 months) for the first time. Space radiation exposure is one of the biggest safety issues for astronauts to stay for such a long duration in space. This special paper is presenting commentary on space radiation environment in ISS, neutrons measurements and light particles (protons and electrons) measurements, the instruments, radiation exposure management for Japanese astronauts and some comments in view of health physics. (author)

  2. Environment and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirkner, H.; Kneller, P.

    1981-01-01

    FACIT is a periodical intended to provide the reader with a survey of outstanding publications on topical subjects. At the same time, it offers a first insight into the subject field, enabling the reader to select among the literature cited the publications he may need to enhance his knowledge and information. The periodical is aimed at serving as a guide to the complex variety of publications in a subject field, and to offer information in brief. Vol. 1, Environment and Energy, cites representative statements and samples from the German-language literature in this field and gives hints for further reading. (orig./HSCH) [de

  3. Soil property variability in a humid natural Mediterranean environment: La Rioja, Spain Varibilidad de las propiedades del suelo en ambiente mediterráneo húmedo: La Rioja, España Variabilidade espacial das propriedades do solo em ambiente úmido Mediterrâneo: La Rioja, Espanha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Jiménez-Ballesta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Estimating the spatial variability of soil properties is significant for evaluating environmental impacts. For example, many soil properties are directly used in the modelling of environmental processes such as global climate change. These aspects have not previously been studied at this level in La Rioja (a region of Spain with a humid Mediterranean environment. The intention of this study was to provide quantitative information on soil assessment and mapping methods for natural soils in a humid Mediterranean environment. The properties considered included: pH and organic matter, calcium carbonate and clay contents. For testing, samples were selected from several different soil types which, in theory, were only affected by pedogenetic processes and had developed on different parent materials. More than half of the samples did not contain any CaCO3, while the rest of the samples presented a variety of CaCO3, forms, with high percentages being present in certain cases (up to 65% on the surface. It was possible to establish two different areas: one predominantly acidic and the other principally basic. The predominately basic samples were due to the high percentage of carbonate in the parent materials. The clay content on the surface was similar to that in the subsurface layers. Finally, the organic matter contents in the uppermost layers presented average values of 3.9%,with a range of from 0.3 to 17.5%. The major variations in soils were determined by soil type (therefore by soil forming processes, parent material composition, and vegetation type. This study reveals that these methods are useful to determine the spatial distribution of some soil properties in undisturbed soils. The contour maps of soil property variability could be used to improve future sampling designs and management

  4. Green valley galaxies as a transition population in different environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenda, Valeria; Martínez, Héctor J.; Muriel, Hernán

    2018-02-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the properties of passive, star-forming and transition (green valley) galaxies in four discrete environments: field, groups, the outskirts and the core of X-ray clusters. We construct samples of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in these environments so that they are bound to have similar redshift distributions. The classification of galaxies into the three sequences is based on the UV-optical colour NUV - r. We study a number of galaxy properties: stellar mass, morphology, specific star formation rate and the history of star formation. The analysis of green valley (GV) galaxies reveals that the physical mechanisms responsible for external quenching become more efficient moving from the field to denser environments. We confirm previous findings that GV galaxies have intermediate morphologies; moreover, we find that this appears to be independent of the environment. Regarding the stellar mass of GV galaxies, we find that they tend to be more massive in the field than in denser environments. On average, GV galaxies account for ∼ 20 per cent of all galaxies in groups and X-ray clusters. We find evidence that the field environment is inefficient in transforming low-mass galaxies. GV galaxies have average star formation histories intermediate between passive and star-forming galaxies, and have a clear and consistent dependence on the environment: both, the quenching time and the amplitude of the star formation rate, decrease towards higher density environments.

  5. Pervasive wireless environments

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jie; Trappe, Wade; Cheng, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief provides a new approach to prevent user spoofing by using the physical properties associated with wireless transmissions to detect the presence of user spoofing. The most common method, applying cryptographic authentication, requires additional management and computational power that cannot be deployed consistently. The authors present the new approach by offering a summary of the recent research and exploring the benefits and potential challenges of this method. This brief discusses the feasibility of launching user spoofing attacks and their impact on the wireless and sen

  6. Focusing on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdin, C.M. du; Lacroix, D.

    2004-01-01

    Safety of our packages and operations is our first concern to ensure protection for people and the environment. Environmental impact generated by COGEMA LOGISTICS activities is also covered by an environmental management approach. This systematical environmental management approach starts with the design phase of new products and processes and meets several objectives: -to reduce the environmental impact of our direct activities by optimizing the maintenance, management and storage of our fleet, -to inform and develop awareness among our suppliers and incite them to join us in this approach. We favor the development of partnerships with our suppliers so as to work together to improve our products and services. As part of AREVA's policy of sustainable development, COGEMA LOGISTICS has decided to expand the management system at the environment using the ISO 14001 model. The associated ISO certification was obtained in February 2003 for all our activities and locations. In this context and beyond the compliance with regulations, COGEMA LOGISTICS undertakes to prevent all types of pollution and continuously improve environmental performance, together with customers, authorities, suppliers and local partners

  7. Focusing on the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jourdin, C.M. du; Lacroix, D. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France)

    2004-07-01

    Safety of our packages and operations is our first concern to ensure protection for people and the environment. Environmental impact generated by COGEMA LOGISTICS activities is also covered by an environmental management approach. This systematical environmental management approach starts with the design phase of new products and processes and meets several objectives: -to reduce the environmental impact of our direct activities by optimizing the maintenance, management and storage of our fleet, -to inform and develop awareness among our suppliers and incite them to join us in this approach. We favor the development of partnerships with our suppliers so as to work together to improve our products and services. As part of AREVA's policy of sustainable development, COGEMA LOGISTICS has decided to expand the management system at the environment using the ISO 14001 model. The associated ISO certification was obtained in February 2003 for all our activities and locations. In this context and beyond the compliance with regulations, COGEMA LOGISTICS undertakes to prevent all types of pollution and continuously improve environmental performance, together with customers, authorities, suppliers and local partners.

  8. Environment, employment and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalla, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    It is generally recognised that the question of sustainable development is a global problem, emphasizing the increasingly interdependent nature of relationships among nations. Solutions to the problem are as much political as they are economic and technological. Notwithstanding the deepening and widening of the debate on sustainable development, its implications for employment - a major concern of the ILO under its World Employment Programme - have remained largely unexplored. This volume, therefore, has a very modest objective, namely to place the employment question on the policy agenda in the context of the current debate on environment and development. The design of environmental policies should allow for the differences that exist between countries with a high level of development and technological dynamism and those with a low level of development and low technological capability. One must also recognize the costs imposed by adjustment and the consequent distributional impact. In the long term, technology choice plays a crucial role in promoting sustainable development in both industrialized and developing countries. It is not only environment-friendly technologies that need to be developed and diffused; in the case of the least developed countries, technological transformation needs to be accelerated in order to minimise their dependence on natural resources for economic growth. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    'Radiation in the environment' includes the natural background, the release and transport of radionuclides within the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and marine environments, understanding the pathways through which radionuclides gain access to humans, and the development of methods for measuring, assessing, and controlling the resulting exposures. Contributions of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to these subjects include early studies of the behaviour of radionuclides in the Columbia River and in the atmosphere and soil in the vicinity of the Hanford site, the development of methods for assessing the accompanying doses to members of the public, and the preparation of guides for the conduct of environmental surveillance activities as well as the clean-up of decommissioned facilities. An integral part of these activities has been the maintenance of close working relationships with the public, prime examples being the landmark Tri-Party Agreement and the designation of a portion of the Hanford site as the Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. Through these efforts scientists at PNL have provided leadership in environmental activities at both the national and the international level. (author)

  10. Adaptation in stochastic environments

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Colib

    1993-01-01

    The classical theory of natural selection, as developed by Fisher, Haldane, and 'Wright, and their followers, is in a sense a statistical theory. By and large the classical theory assumes that the underlying environment in which evolution transpires is both constant and stable - the theory is in this sense deterministic. In reality, on the other hand, nature is almost always changing and unstable. We do not yet possess a complete theory of natural selection in stochastic environ­ ments. Perhaps it has been thought that such a theory is unimportant, or that it would be too difficult. Our own view is that the time is now ripe for the development of a probabilistic theory of natural selection. The present volume is an attempt to provide an elementary introduction to this probabilistic theory. Each author was asked to con­ tribute a simple, basic introduction to his or her specialty, including lively discussions and speculation. We hope that the book contributes further to the understanding of the roles of "Cha...

  11. Communication in hazardous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Herold, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radios were investigated for use in hazardous environments where protective breathing equipment such as plastic suits and respirators interfere with communication. A radio system, manufactured by Communications-Applied technology (C-AT), was identified that was designed specifically for hazardous environment communications. This equipment had been used successfully by the US Army and NASA for several years. C-AT equipment was evaluated in plantwide applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) using temporary frequencies obtained by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR). Radios performed well in all applications, which included a tritium facility, high-level caves, a nuclear reactor building, tank farm, and a canyon building interior. Permanent frequencies were obtained by DOE-SR for two complete six-man C-AT systems at SRP. Because of the relatively short range of these systems, replicates will cover all applications of this type of equipment plantwide. Twelve radio systems are currently being used successfully in plantwide applications

  12. Plutonium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The first volume of the new series, Radioactivity in the Environment, focuses on the environmental occurrence, the speciation, the behaviour, the fate, the applications and the health consequences of that much-feared and much-publicised element, plutonium. Featuring a collection of selected, peer-reviewed, up-to-date papers by leading researchers in the field, this work provides a state-of-the-art description of plutonium in the environment. This title helps to explain where present frontiers are drawn in our continuing efforts to understand the science of environmental plutonium and will help to place widespread concerns into perspective. As a whole this new book series on environmental radioactivity addresses, at academic research level, the key aspects of this socially important and complex interdisciplinary subject. Presented objectively and with the ultimate authority gained from the many contributions by the world's leading experts, the negative and positive consequences of having a radioactive world around us will be documented and given perspective. refs

  13. Obesity and economic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Roland; An, Ruopeng

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes current understanding of economic factors during the obesity epidemic and dispels some widely held, but incorrect, beliefs. Rising obesity rates coincided with increases in leisure time (rather than increased work hours), increased fruit and vegetable availability (rather than a decline in healthier foods), and increased exercise uptake. As a share of disposable income, Americans now have the cheapest food available in history, which fueled the obesity epidemic. Weight gain was surprisingly similar across sociodemographic groups or geographic areas, rather than specific to some groups (at every point in time; however, there are clear disparities). It suggests that if one wants to understand the role of the environment in the obesity epidemic, one needs to understand changes over time affecting all groups, not differences between subgroups at a given time. Although economic and technological changes in the environment drove the obesity epidemic, the evidence for effective economic policies to prevent obesity remains limited. Taxes on foods with low nutritional value could nudge behavior toward healthier diets, as could subsidies/discounts for healthier foods. However, even a large price change for healthy foods could close only part of the gap between dietary guidelines and actual food consumption. Political support has been lacking for even moderate price interventions in the United States and this may continue until the role of environmental factors is accepted more widely. As opinion leaders, clinicians play an important role in shaping the understanding of the causes of obesity. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  14. Radiation in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, R.

    1991-01-01

    Aside from the atomic bomb attacks in 1945, the experience of radioactive contamination of human environment was the exposure of a tuna fishing boat to the radioactive fallout of a hydrogen bomb test explosion at Bikini atoll in March, 1954. Thereafter, radioactivity was frequently detected in fishes in central Pacific Ocean. Radioactivity was also detected in rain, which resulted in the contamination of agricultural products. Due to the great concern of general public for the radioactivity in food materials, the government initiated the national program of radioactivity surveillance. Since then, the fallout radioactivity due to nuclear test explosions was the main object surveillance in 1950s and 1960s, but the program was gradually expanded to include natural radiation, the artificial radioactivity due to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and other special programs. The history of the radioactive contamination of environment, natural radiation, medical exposure, the radioactive fallout due to nuclear tests, nuclear power generation and the Chernobyl accident are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Review on phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueli; Wang Erqi

    2008-01-01

    Phytoremediation, a promising technology using plants to remove radioactive contaminants from the environment or to render them harmless, has become a hot topic in current research. Studies on phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated environment are reviewed with special focuses on several subsets including types of phytoremediation of uranium (such as phytoextraction, rhizofiltration and phytostabilization), influencing factors (such as plant species, soil properties, microorganism, soil amendments, fertilization and uranium speciation) of uranium accumulation by plants, cases studies and trend in phytoremediation of uranium. (authors)

  16. Working Environment and Technological Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Nielsen, Klaus T.; Jensen, Per Langaa

    1997-01-01

    and their and their concept of working environment2) Technology renewal, which considers the role of the working environment in connection with the development and use of concrete technologies3) Working environment planning, which considers the existing efforts to place the working environment in a planning process.......The paper describes the purpose, themes, overarching research questions and specific projects of the programme: Working Environment and Technological Development. The major research themes are:1) Management concepts and the working environment, which considers the visions...

  17. Wood fuel and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try and demonstrate the role that the use of Wood as a Fuel can play in our environment. The term ''Wood Fuel'', for the purposes of these proceedings, refers to the use of wood obtained from the forest or the farm. It does not refer to waste wood from for example buildings. The role of wood fuel in the environment can be assessed at many different levels. In this paper three different scales of ''Environment'' and the role of wood fuel in each, will be considered. These three scales are namely the global environment, the local environment, and the National (community) environment. (Author)

  18. Charging in the environment of large spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses some potential problems of spacecraft charging as a result of interactions between a large spacecraft, such as the Space Station, and its environment. Induced electric field, due to VXB effect, may be important for large spacecraft at low earth orbits. Differential charging, due to different properties of surface materials, may be significant when the spacecraft is partly in sunshine and partly in shadow. Triple-root potential jump condition may occur because of differential charging. Sudden onset of severe differential charging may occur when an electron or ion beam is emitted from the spacecraft. The beam may partially return to the ''hot spots'' on the spacecraft. Wake effects, due to blocking of ambient ion trajectories, may result in an undesirable negative potential region in the vicinity of a large spacecraft. Outgassing and exhaust may form a significant spacecraft induced environment; ionization may occur. Spacecraft charging and discharging may affect the electronic components on board

  19. Tritium in the environment. Knowledge synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report first presents the nuclear and physical-chemical properties of tritium and addresses the notions of bioaccumulation, bio-magnification and remanence. It describes and comments the natural and anthropic origins of tritium (natural production, quantities released in the environment in France by nuclear tests, nuclear plants, nuclear fuel processing plants, research centres). It describes how tritium is measured as a free element (sampling, liquid scintillation, proportional counting, enrichment method) or linked to organic matter (combustion, oxidation, helium-3-based measurement). It discusses tritium concentrations noticed in different parts of the environment (soils, continental waters, sea). It describes how tritium is transferred to ecosystems (transfer of atmospheric tritium to ground ecosystems, and to soft water ecosystems). It discusses existing models which describe the behaviour of tritium in ecosystems. It finally describes and comments toxic effects of tritium on living ground and aquatic organisms

  20. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXIES: THE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, M. E. [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria–Universidad de La Laguna, CIE Canarias: Tri-Continental Atlantic Campus, Canary Islands (Spain); Almeida, J. Sánchez; Muñoz-Tuñón, C. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nuza, S. E.; Kitaura, F.; Heß, S., E-mail: mfilho@astro.up.pt [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed bibliographical observational data and theoretical predictions, in order to probe the environment in which extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies (XMPs) reside. We have assessed the H i component and its relation to the optical galaxy, the cosmic web type (voids, sheets, filaments and knots), the overdensity parameter and analyzed the nearest galaxy neighbors. The aim is to understand the role of interactions and cosmological accretion flows in the XMP observational properties, particularly the triggering and feeding of the star formation. We find that XMPs behave similarly to Blue Compact Dwarfs; they preferably populate low-density environments in the local universe: ∼60% occupy underdense regions, and ∼75% reside in voids and sheets. This is more extreme than the distribution of irregular galaxies, and in contrast to those regions preferred by elliptical galaxies (knots and filaments). We further find results consistent with previous observations; while the environment does determine the fraction of a certain galaxy type, it does not determine the overall observational properties. With the exception of five documented cases (four sources with companions and one recent merger), XMPs do not generally show signatures of major mergers and interactions; we find only one XMP with a companion galaxy within a distance of 100 kpc, and the H i gas in XMPs is typically well-behaved, demonstrating asymmetries mostly in the outskirts. We conclude that metal-poor accretion flows may be driving the XMP evolution. Such cosmological accretion could explain all the major XMP observational properties: isolation, lack of interaction/merger signatures, asymmetric optical morphology, large amounts of unsettled, metal-poor H i gas, metallicity inhomogeneities, and large specific star formation.