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Sample records for entropic dynamics time

  1. A covariant approach to entropic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Selman; Abedi, Mohammad; Caticha, Ariel

    2017-06-01

    Entropic Dynamics (ED) is a framework for constructing dynamical theories of inference using the tools of inductive reasoning. A central feature of the ED framework is the special focus placed on time. In [2] a global entropic time was used to derive a quantum theory of relativistic scalar fields. This theory, however, suffered from a lack of explicit or manifest Lorentz symmetry. In this paper we explore an alternative formulation in which the relativistic aspects of the theory are manifest. The approach we pursue here is inspired by the methods of Dirac, Kuchař, and Teitelboim in their development of covariant Hamiltonian approaches. The key ingredient here is the adoption of a local notion of entropic time, which allows compatibility with an arbitrary notion of simultaneity. However, in order to ensure that the evolution does not depend on the particular sequence of hypersurfaces, we must impose a set of constraints that guarantee a consistent evolution.

  2. Entropic Forces in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Holloway

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Theories and numerical models of atmospheres and oceans are based on classical mechanics with added parameterizations to represent subgrid variability. Reformulated in terms of derivatives of information entropy with respect to large scale configurations, we find systematic forces very different from those usually assumed. Two examples are given. We see that entropic forcing by ocean eddies systematically drives, rather than retards, large scale circulation. Additionally we find that small scale turbulence systematically drives up gradient (“un-mixing” fluxes. Such results confront usual understanding and modeling practice.

  3. The Entropic Linkage between Equity and Bond Market Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Parker

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative derivation of the yield curve based on entropy or the loss of information as it is communicated through time is introduced. Given this focus on entropy growth in communication the Shannon entropy will be utilized. Additionally, Shannon entropy’s close relationship to the Kullback–Leibler divergence is used to provide a more precise understanding of this new yield curve. The derivation of the entropic yield curve is completed with the use of the Burnashev reliability function which serves as a weighting between the true and error distributions. The deep connections between the entropic yield curve and the popular Nelson–Siegel specification are also examined. Finally, this entropically derived yield curve is used to provide an estimate of the economy’s implied information processing ratio. This information theoretic ratio offers a new causal link between bond and equity markets, and is a valuable new tool for the modeling and prediction of stock market behavior.

  4. Entropic information of dynamical AdS/QCD holographic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardini, Alex E., E-mail: alexeb@ufscar.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, PO Box 676, 13565-905, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Roldão da, E-mail: roldao.rocha@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, 09210-580, Santo André (Brazil)

    2016-11-10

    The Shannon based conditional entropy that underlies five-dimensional Einstein–Hilbert gravity coupled to a dilaton field is investigated in the context of dynamical holographic AdS/QCD models. Considering the UV and IR dominance limits of such AdS/QCD models, the conditional entropy is shown to shed some light onto the meson classification schemes, which corroborate with the existence of light-flavor mesons of lower spins in Nature. Our analysis is supported by a correspondence between statistical mechanics and information entropy which establishes the physical grounds to the Shannon information entropy, also in the context of statistical mechanics, and provides some specificities for accurately extending the entropic discussion to continuous modes of physical systems. From entropic informational grounds, the conditional entropy allows one to identify the lower experimental/phenomenological occurrence of higher spin mesons in Nature. Moreover, it introduces a quantitative theoretical apparatus for studying the instability of high spin light-flavor mesons.

  5. Entropic Dynamics: from Entropy and Information Geometry to Hamiltonians and Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Caticha, Ariel; Bartolomeo, Daniel; Reginatto, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Entropic Dynamics is a framework in which quantum theory is derived as an application of entropic methods of inference. There is no underlying action principle. Instead, the dynamics is driven by entropy subject to the appropriate constraints. In this paper we show how a Hamiltonian dynamics arises as a type of non-dissipative entropic dynamics. We also show that the particular form of the "quantum potential" that leads to the Schroedinger equation follows naturally from information geometry.

  6. An entropic approach to the analysis of time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Statistical analysis of time series. With compelling arguments we show that the Diffusion Entropy Analysis (DEA) is the only method of the literature of the Science of Complexity that correctly determines the scaling hidden within a time series reflecting a Complex Process. The time series is thought of as a source of fluctuations, and the DEA is based on the Shannon entropy of the diffusion process generated by these fluctuations. All traditional methods of scaling analysis, instead, are based on the variance of this diffusion process. The variance methods detect the real scaling only if the Gaussian assumption holds true. We call H the scaling exponent detected by the variance methods and delta the real scaling exponent. If the time series is characterized by Fractional Brownian Motion, we have H = delta and the scaling can be safely determined, in this case, by using the variance methods. If, on the contrary, the time series is characterized, for example, by Levy statistics, H ≠ delta and the variance methods cannot be used to detect the true scaling. Levy walk yields the relation delta = 1/(3 - 2H). In the case of Levy flights, the variance diverges and the exponent H cannot be determined, whereas the scaling delta exists and can be established by using the DEA. Therefore, only the joint use of two different scaling analysis methods, the variance scaling analysis and the DEA, can assess the real nature, Gauss or Levy or something else, of a time series. Moreover, the DEA determines the information content, under the form of Shannon entropy, or of any other convenient entropic indicator, at each time step of the process that, given a sufficiently large number of data, is expected to become diffusion with scaling. This makes it possible to study the regime of transition from dynamics to thermodynamics, non-stationary regimes, and the saturation regime as well. First of all, the efficiency of the DEA is proved with theoretical arguments and with numerical work

  7. Entropic force, holography and thermodynamics for static space-times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoplya, R.A. [Eberhard-Karls University of Tuebingen, Theoretical Astrophysics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Recently Verlinde has suggested a new approach to gravity which interprets gravitational interaction as a kind of entropic force. The new approach uses the holographic principle by stating that the information is kept on the holographic screens which coincide with equipotential surfaces. Motivated by this new interpretation of gravity (but not being limited by it) we study equipotential surfaces, the Unruh-Verlinde temperature, energy and acceleration for various static space-times: generic spherically symmetric solutions, axially symmetric black holes immersed in a magnetic field, traversable spherically symmetric wormholes of an arbitrary shape function, system of two and more extremely charged black holes in equilibrium. In particular, we have shown that the Unruh-Verlinde temperature of the holographic screen reaches absolute zero on the wormhole throat independently of the particular form of the wormhole solution. (orig.)

  8. Knotted Vortices: Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulation of Vortex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam; Karlin, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Knotted and interlinked vortex structures in real fluids are conjectured to play a major role in hydrodynamic flow dissipation. Much interest lies in determining their temporal stability and the mechanism through which knots dissolve. Kleckner and Irvine recently have shown the existence of such knotted vortices experimentally by accelerating hydrofoils in water. In the present work we employ the entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) to perform DNS simulations of the creation and dynamics of knotted vortex rings inspired by the experimental setup in. ELBM renders LBM scheme unconditionally stable by restoring the second law of thermodynamics (the Boltzmann H-theorem), and thus enables simulations of large domains and high Reynolds numbers with DNS quality. The results presented in this talk provide an in-depth study of the dynamics of knotted vortices and vortex reconnection events and confirm the existence of trefoil knots in silicio for the first time. This work was supported by a grant from the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) under project ID s347.

  9. Entropic Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    1860s it was pointed out that, as a consequence of the heat death scenario, the universe can have existed only for a finite period of time. According to the 'entropic creation argument', thermodynamics warrants the conclusion that the world once begun or was created. It is these two scenarios......Entropic Creation is the first English-language book to consider the cultural and religious responses to the second law of thermodynamics, from around 1860 to 1920. According to the second law of thermodynamics, as formulated by the German physicist Rudolf Clausius, the entropy of any closed system...... will inevitably increase in time, meaning that the system will decay and eventually end in a dead state of equilibrium. Application of the law to the entire universe, first proposed in the 1850s, led to the prediction of a future 'heat death', where all life has ceased and all organization dissolved. In the late...

  10. Segment-scale, force-level theory of mesoscopic dynamic localization and entropic elasticity in entangled chain polymer liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Zachary E.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2017-04-01

    We develop a segment-scale, force-based theory for the breakdown of the unentangled Rouse model and subsequent emergence of isotropic mesoscopic localization and entropic elasticity in chain polymer liquids in the absence of ergodicity-restoring anisotropic reptation or activated hopping motion. The theory is formulated in terms of a conformational N-dynamic-order-parameter generalized Langevin equation approach. It is implemented using a universal field-theoretic Gaussian thread model of polymer structure and closed at the level of the chain dynamic second moment matrix. The physical idea is that the isotropic Rouse model fails due to the dynamical emergence, with increasing chain length, of time-persistent intermolecular contacts determined by the combined influence of local uncrossability, long range polymer connectivity, and a self-consistent treatment of chain motion and the dynamic forces that hinder it. For long chain melts, the mesoscopic localization length (identified as the tube diameter) and emergent entropic elasticity predictions are in near quantitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, the onset chain length scales with the semi-dilute crossover concentration with a realistic numerical prefactor. Distinctive novel predictions are made for various off-diagonal correlation functions that quantify the full spatial structure of the dynamically localized polymer conformation. As the local excluded volume constraint and/or intrachain bonding spring are softened to allow chain crossability, the tube diameter is predicted to swell until it reaches the radius-of-gyration at which point mesoscopic localization vanishes in a discontinuous manner. A dynamic phase diagram for such a delocalization transition is constructed, which is qualitatively consistent with simulations and the classical concept of a critical entanglement degree of polymerization.

  11. Entropic calibration revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.brody@imperial.ac.uk; Buckley, Ian R.C. [Centre for Quantitative Finance, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Constantinou, Irene C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Meister, Bernhard K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-11

    The entropic calibration of the risk-neutral density function is effective in recovering the strike dependence of options, but encounters difficulties in determining the relevant greeks. By use of put-call reversal we apply the entropic method to the time reversed economy, which allows us to obtain the spot price dependence of options and the relevant greeks.

  12. Shannon entropic temperature and its lower and upper bounds for non-Markovian stochastic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-09-01

    In this article we have studied Shannon entropic nonequilibrium temperature (NET) extensively for a system which is coupled to a thermal bath that may be Markovian or non-Markovian in nature. Using the phase-space distribution function, i.e., the solution of the generalized Fokker Planck equation, we have calculated the entropy production, NET, and their bounds. Other thermodynamic properties like internal energy of the system, heat, and work, etc. are also measured to study their relations with NET. The present study reveals that the heat flux is proportional to the difference between the temperature of the thermal bath and the nonequilibrium temperature of the system. It also reveals that heat capacity at nonequilibrium state is independent of both NET and time. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the time variations of the above-mentioned and related quantities to differentiate between the equilibration processes for the coupling of the system with the Markovian and the non-Markovian thermal baths, respectively. It implies that in contrast to the Markovian case, a certain time is required to develop maximum interaction between the system and the non-Markovian thermal bath (NMTB). It also implies that longer relaxation time is needed for a NMTB compared to a Markovian one. Quasidynamical behavior of the NMTB introduces an oscillation in the variation of properties with time. Finally, we have demonstrated how the nonequilibrium state is affected by the memory time of the thermal bath.

  13. Entropic elasticity and dynamics of the bacterial chromosome: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M. C. F.; Brackley, C. A.; Lintuvuori, J. S.; Marenduzzo, D.; Orlandini, E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the compression and extension dynamics of a DNA-like polymer interacting with non-DNA binding and DNA-binding proteins, by means of computer simulations. The geometry we consider is inspired by recent experiments probing the compressional elasticity of the bacterial nucleoid (DNA plus associated proteins), where DNA is confined into a cylindrical container and subjected to the action of a "piston"—a spherical bead to which an external force is applied. We quantify the effect of steric interactions (excluded volume) on the force-extension curves as the polymer is compressed. We find that non-DNA-binding proteins, even at low densities, exert an osmotic force which can be a lot larger than the entropic force exerted by the compressed DNA. The trends we observe are qualitatively robust with respect to changes in protein sizes and are similar for neutral and charged proteins (and DNA). We also quantify the dynamics of DNA expansion following removal of the "piston": while the expansion is well fitted by power laws, the apparent exponent depends on protein concentration and protein-DNA interaction in a significant way. We further highlight an interesting kinetic process which we observe during the expansion of DNA interacting with DNA-binding proteins when the interaction strength is intermediate: the proteins bind while the DNA is packaged by the compression force, but they "pop-off" one-by-one as the force is removed, leading to a slow unzipping kinetics. Finally, we quantify the importance of supercoiling, which is an important feature of bacterial DNA in vivo.

  14. Entropic multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for moving and deforming geometries in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschner, B.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2017-06-01

    Entropic lattice Boltzmann methods have been developed to alleviate intrinsic stability issues of lattice Boltzmann models for under-resolved simulations. Its reliability in combination with moving objects was established for various laminar benchmark flows in two dimensions in our previous work [B. Dorschner, S. Chikatamarla, F. Bösch, and I. Karlin, J. Comput. Phys. 295, 340 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.04.017] as well as for three-dimensional one-way coupled simulations of engine-type geometries in B . Dorschner, F. Bösch, S. Chikatamarla, K. Boulouchos, and I. Karlin [J. Fluid Mech. 801, 623 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.448] for flat moving walls. The present contribution aims to fully exploit the advantages of entropic lattice Boltzmann models in terms of stability and accuracy and extends the methodology to three-dimensional cases, including two-way coupling between fluid and structure and then turbulence and deforming geometries. To cover this wide range of applications, the classical benchmark of a sedimenting sphere is chosen first to validate the general two-way coupling algorithm. Increasing the complexity, we subsequently consider the simulation of a plunging SD7003 airfoil in the transitional regime at a Reynolds number of Re =40 000 and, finally, to access the model's performance for deforming geometries, we conduct a two-way coupled simulation of a self-propelled anguilliform swimmer. These simulations confirm the viability of the new fluid-structure interaction lattice Boltzmann algorithm to simulate flows of engineering relevance.

  15. First principles analysis of lattice dynamics for Fe-based superconductors and entropically-stabilized phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Steven [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Modern calculations are becoming an essential, complementary tool to inelastic x-ray scattering studies, where x-rays are scattered inelastically to resolve meV phonons. Calculations of the inelastic structure factor for any value of Q assist in both planning the experiment and analyzing the results. Moreover, differences between the measured data and theoretical calculations help identify important new physics driving the properties of novel correlated systems. We have used such calculations to better and more e ciently measure the phonon dispersion and elastic constants of several iron pnictide superconductors. This dissertation describes calculations and measurements at room temperature in the tetragonal phase of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and LaFeAsO. In both cases, spin-polarized calculations imposing the antiferromagnetic order present in the low-temperature orthorhombic phase dramatically improves the agreement between theory and experiment. This is discussed in terms of the strong antiferromagnetic correlations that are known to persist in the tetragonal phase. In addition, we discuss a relatively new approach called self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics (SCAILD), which goes beyond the harmonic approximation to include phonon-phonon interactions and produce a temperature-dependent phonon dispersion. We used this technique to study the HCP to BCC transition in beryllium.

  16. Shape change as entropic phase transition: A study using Jarzynski ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A Brownian particle in a confined space with varying cross-section, experiences an effective entropic potential in reduced dimension. We modulate the shape of the confinement and examine the nature of dynamical transition between two distinct thermalized entropic states corresponding to different shapes of the.

  17. Is Gravity Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjia Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available If we assume that the source of thermodynamic system, ρ and p, are also the source of gravity, then either thermal quantities, such as entropy, temperature, and chemical potential, can induce gravitational effects, or gravity can induce thermal effects. We find that gravity can be seen as entropic force only for systems with constant temperature and zero chemical potential. The case for Newtonian approximation is discussed.

  18. Essentially Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Mohammad; Kolluru, Praveen Kumar; Thantanapally, Chakradhar; Ansumali, Santosh

    2017-12-01

    The entropic lattice Boltzmann model (ELBM), a discrete space-time kinetic theory for hydrodynamics, ensures nonlinear stability via the discrete time version of the second law of thermodynamics (the H theorem). Compliance with the H theorem is numerically enforced in this methodology and involves a search for the maximal discrete path length corresponding to the zero dissipation state by iteratively solving a nonlinear equation. We demonstrate that an exact solution for the path length can be obtained by assuming a natural criterion of negative entropy change, thereby reducing the problem to solving an inequality. This inequality is solved by creating a new framework for construction of Padé approximants via quadrature on appropriate convex function. This exact solution also resolves the issue of indeterminacy in case of nonexistence of the entropic involution step. Since our formulation is devoid of complex mathematical library functions, the computational cost is drastically reduced. To illustrate this, we have simulated a model setup of flow over the NACA-0012 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 2.88 ×106.

  19. Causal Entropic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  20. Is Gravity an Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable connections between gravity and thermodynamics seem to imply that gravity is not fundamental but emergent, and in particular, as Verlinde suggested, gravity is probably an entropic force. In this paper, we will argue that the idea of gravity as an entropic force is debatable. It is shown that there is no convincing analogy between gravity and entropic force in Verlinde’s example. Neither holographic screen nor test particle satisfies all requirements for the existence of entropic force in a thermodynamics system. Furthermore, we show that the entropy increase of the screen is not caused by its statistical tendency to increase entropy as required by the existence of entropic force, but in fact caused by gravity. Therefore, Verlinde’s argument for the entropic origin of gravity is problematic. In addition, we argue that the existence of a minimum size of spacetime, together with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in quantum theory, may imply the fundamental existence of gravity as a geometric property of spacetime. This may provide a further support for the conclusion that gravity is not an entropic force.

  1. Rotational Dynamics of Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane in Isomorphous Halogen-Bonded Co-crystals: Entropic and Enthalpic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Luca; Perez-Estrada, Salvador; Wang, Hsin-Hua; Ayitou, Anoklase J-L; Khan, Saeed I; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Brown, Stuart; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A

    2017-01-18

    Based on rotational dynamics measurements carried out with isomorphic co-crystals formed by halogen-bonding (XB) between tritylacetylene halides (TrX) and diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (dabco), we were able to distinguish the sources of the enthalpic and entropic components in the rotational free energy barrier. We describe the formation of the 1:1 co-crystals (TrX···N(R)3N) obtained from 1 equiv of dabco and 1 equiv of either TrI or TrBr, respectively, to give 4a and 4b instead of the potential 2:1 complexes. The co-crystals were prepared by solvent evaporation and mechanochemical synthesis. No co-crystal with TrCl was obtained, reflecting the weaker nature of the TrCl···NR3 interaction. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirmed structures that resemble a spinning top on a tripod and revealed that the two XB co-crystals are isomorphous, with slightly different C-X···NR3 (X = I, Br) distances and packing interactions. Quadrupolar-echo 2H NMR experiments with 2H-labeled samples showed that fast rotation of dabco in these co-crystals follows a six-fold potential energy surface with three lowest energy minima. Variable-temperature 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation (VT 1H T1) data revealed rotational dynamics with indistinguishable pre-exponential factors and small but distinguishable activation energies. The activation energy of 4b (Ea = 0.71 kcal mol-1) is the lowest reported in the field of amphidynamic crystals. Using the Eyring equation, we established that their activation entropy for rotation is small but negative (ΔS⧧ = -3.0 cal mol-1 K-1), while there is almost a 2-fold difference in activation enthalpies, with 4a having a higher barrier (ΔH⧧ = 0.95 kcal mol-1) than 4b (ΔH⧧ = 0.54 kcal mol-1). Analysis of the rotator cavity in the two co-crystals revealed subtle differences in steric interactions that account for their different activation energies.

  2. Intelligence by design in an entropic power grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete-Pincetic, Matias Alejandro

    In this work, the term Entropic Grid is coined to describe a power grid with increased levels of uncertainty and dynamics. These new features will require the reconsideration of well-established paradigms in the way of planning and operating the grid and its associated markets. New tools and models able to handle uncertainty and dynamics will form the required scaffolding to properly capture the behavior of the physical system, along with the value of new technologies and policies. The leverage of this knowledge will facilitate the design of new architectures to organize power and energy systems and their associated markets. This work presents several results, tools and models with the goal of contributing to that design objective. A central idea of this thesis is that the definition of products is critical in electricity markets. When markets are constructed with appropriate product definitions in mind, the interference between the physical and the market/financial systems seen in today's markets can be reduced. A key element of evaluating market designs is understanding the impact that salient features of an entropic grid---uncertainty, dynamics, constraints---can have on the electricity markets. Dynamic electricity market models tailored to capture such features are developed in this work. Using a multi-settlement dynamic electricity market, the impact of volatility is investigated. The results show the need to implement policies and technologies able to cope with the volatility of renewable sources. Similarly, using a dynamic electricity market model in which ramping costs are considered, the impacts of those costs on electricity markets are investigated. The key conclusion is that those additional ramping costs, in average terms, are not reflected in electricity prices. These results reveal several difficulties with today's real-time markets. Elements of an alternative architecture to organize these markets are also discussed.

  3. Hyperdynamics for entropic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Xin; Jiang, Yi; Kremer, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    We develop a generalized hyperdynamics method, which is able to simulate slow dynamics in atomistic general (both energy and entropy-dominated) systems. We show that a few functionals of the pair correlation function, involving two-body entropy, form a low-dimensional collective space, which...... is a good approximation that is able to distinguish stable and transitional conformations. A bias potential, which raises the energy in stable regions, is constructed on the fly. We examine the slowly nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones gas and show that our new method can generate correct long time...

  4. Entropic error-disturbance relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Patrick; Furrer, Fabian

    2014-03-01

    We derive an entropic error-disturbance relation for a sequential measurement scenario as originally considered by Heisenberg, and we discuss how our relation could be tested using existing experimental setups. Our relation is valid for discrete observables, such as spin, as well as continuous observables, such as position and momentum. The novel aspect of our relation compared to earlier versions is its clear operational interpretation and the quantification of error and disturbance using entropic quantities. This directly relates the measurement uncertainty, a fundamental property of quantum mechanics, to information theoretical limitations and offers potential applications in for instance quantum cryptography. PC is funded by National Research Foundation Singapore and Ministry of Education Tier 3 Grant ``Random numbers from quantum processes'' (MOE2012-T3-1-009). FF is funded by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, KAKENHI grant No. 24-02793.

  5. Steering quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty under unital and nonunital noises via filtering operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Jun; Shi, Jia-Dong; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamic features of the entropic uncertainty for two incompatible measurements under local unital and nonunital channels. Herein, we choose Pauli operators σ _x and σ _z as a pair of observables of interest measuring on particle A, and the uncertainty can be predicted when particle A is entangled with quantum memory B. We explore the dynamics of the uncertainty for the measurement under local unitary (phase-damping) and nonunitary (amplitude-damping) channels, respectively. Remarkably, we derive the entropic uncertainty relation under three different kinds of measurements of Pauli-observable pair under various realistic noisy environments; it has been found that the entropic uncertainty has the same tendency of its evolution during the AD and PD channel when we choose σ _x and σ _y measurement. Besides, we find out that the entropic uncertainty will have an optimal value if one chooses σ _x and σ _z as the measurement incompatibility, comparing with others. Furthermore, in order to reduce the entropic uncertainty in noisy environment, we propose an effective strategy to steer the amount by means of implementing a filtering operation on the particle under the two types of channels, respectively. It turns out that this operation can greatly reduce the entropic uncertainty by modulation of the operation strength. Thus, our investigations might offer an insight into the dynamics and steering of the entropic uncertainty in an open system.

  6. An entropic model of Gaia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, R; Nicholson, A

    2017-10-07

    We modify the Tangled Nature Model of Christensen et. al. (2002) so that the agents affect the carrying capacity. This leads to a model of species-environment co-evolution where the system tends to have a larger carrying capacity with life than without. We discuss the model as an example of an entropic hierarchy and some implications for Gaia theory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Action-Amplitude Approach to Controlled Entropic Self-Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivancevic

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the notion of perceptual error, as a core concept of the perceptual control theory, we propose an action-amplitude model for controlled entropic self-organization (CESO. We present several aspects of this development that illustrate its explanatory power: (i a physical view of partition functions and path integrals, as well as entropy and phase transitions; (ii a global view of functional compositions and commutative diagrams; (iii a local geometric view of the Kähler–Ricci flow and time-evolution of entropic action; and (iv a computational view using various path-integral approximations.

  8. Approach of Complexity in Nature: Entropic Nonuniqueness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino Tsallis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Boltzmann introduced in the 1870s a logarithmic measure for the connection between the thermodynamical entropy and the probabilities of the microscopic configurations of the system. His celebrated entropic functional for classical systems was then extended by Gibbs to the entire phase space of a many-body system and by von Neumann in order to cover quantum systems, as well. Finally, it was used by Shannon within the theory of information. The simplest expression of this functional corresponds to a discrete set of W microscopic possibilities and is given by S B G = − k ∑ i = 1 W p i ln p i (k is a positive universal constant; BG stands for Boltzmann–Gibbs. This relation enables the construction of BGstatistical mechanics, which, together with the Maxwell equations and classical, quantum and relativistic mechanics, constitutes one of the pillars of contemporary physics. The BG theory has provided uncountable important applications in physics, chemistry, computational sciences, economics, biology, networks and others. As argued in the textbooks, its application in physical systems is legitimate whenever the hypothesis of ergodicity is satisfied, i.e., when ensemble and time averages coincide. However, what can we do when ergodicity and similar simple hypotheses are violated, which indeed happens in very many natural, artificial and social complex systems. The possibility of generalizing BG statistical mechanics through a family of non-additive entropies was advanced in 1988, namely S q = k 1 − ∑ i = 1 W p i q q − 1 , which recovers the additive S B G entropy in the q→ 1 limit. The index q is to be determined from mechanical first principles, corresponding to complexity universality classes. Along three decades, this idea intensively evolved world-wide (see the Bibliography in http://tsallis.cat.cbpf.br/biblio.htm and led to a plethora of predictions, verifications and applications in physical systems and elsewhere. As expected

  9. Entropic Forms and Related Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Maria Scarfone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a very general trace-form entropy, we introduce a pair of algebraic structures endowed by a generalized sum and a generalized product. These algebras form, respectively, two Abelian fields in the realm of the complex numbers isomorphic each other. We specify our results to several entropic forms related to distributions recurrently observed in social, economical, biological and physical systems including the stretched exponential, the power-law and the interpolating Bosons-Fermions distributions. Some potential applications in the study of complex systems are advanced.

  10. Entropic Phase Maps in Discrete Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F. Dribus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Path summation offers a flexible general approach to quantum theory, including quantum gravity. In the latter setting, summation is performed over a space of evolutionary pathways in a history configuration space. Discrete causal histories called acyclic directed sets offer certain advantages over similar models appearing in the literature, such as causal sets. Path summation defined in terms of these histories enables derivation of discrete Schrödinger-type equations describing quantum spacetime dynamics for any suitable choice of algebraic quantities associated with each evolutionary pathway. These quantities, called phases, collectively define a phase map from the space of evolutionary pathways to a target object, such as the unit circle S 1 ⊂ C , or an analogue such as S 3 or S 7 . This paper explores the problem of identifying suitable phase maps for discrete quantum gravity, focusing on a class of S 1 -valued maps defined in terms of “structural increments” of histories, called terminal states. Invariants such as state automorphism groups determine multiplicities of states, and induce families of natural entropy functions. A phase map defined in terms of such a function is called an entropic phase map. The associated dynamical law may be viewed as an abstract combination of Schrödinger’s equation and the second law of thermodynamics.

  11. Ambiguities in Bandt-Pompe’s methodology for local entropic quantifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Felipe; Plastino, Angelo; Rosso, Osvaldo A.

    2012-04-01

    The Bandt-Pompe (BP) prescription for building up probability densities [C. Bandt, B. Pompe, Permutation entropy: a natural complexity measure for time series, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 174102] constituted a significant advance in the treatment of time-series. However, as we show here, ambiguities arise in applying the BP technique with reference to the permutation of ordinal patterns. This happens if one wishes to employ the BP-probability density to construct local entropic quantifiers that would characterize time-series generated by nonlinear dynamical systems. Explicit evidence of this fact is presented by comparing two different procedures, frequently found in the literature, that generate sequences of ordinal patterns. In opposition to the case of global quantifiers in the orthodox Shannon fashion, the proper order of the pertinent symbols turns out to be not uniquely predetermined for local entropic indicators. We advance the idea of employing the Fisher-Shannon information plane as a tool to resolve the ambiguity and give illustrative examples.

  12. Optimal entropic uncertainty relation for successive measurements ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 60; Issue 6. Optimal entropic uncertainty relation for successive measurements in quantum information theory ... Keywords. Uncertainty relations; information-theoretic entropy; optimum bounds; successive measurements; influence of measurements on uncertainties.

  13. A testable prediction from entropic gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Süzen, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    I have shown conceptually that quantum state has a direct relationship to gravitational constant due to entropic force posed by Verlinde's argument and part of the Newton-Schr\\"odinger equation (N-S) in the context of gravity induced collapse of the wavefunction via Di\\'osi-Penrose proposal. This direct relationship can be used to measure gravitational constant using state-of-the-art mater-wave interferometry to test the entropic gravity argument.

  14. Entropic cages for trapping DNA near a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Skanata, Mirna Mihovilovic; Stein, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Nanopores can probe the structure of biopolymers in solution; however, diffusion makes it difficult to study the same molecule for extended periods. Here we report devices that entropically trap single DNA molecules in a 6.2-femtolitre cage near a solid-state nanopore. We electrophoretically inject DNA molecules into the cage through the nanopore, pause for preset times and then drive the DNA back out through the nanopore. The saturating recapture time and high recapture probability after long pauses, their agreement with a convection-diffusion model and the observation of trapped DNA under fluorescence microscopy all confirm that the cage stably traps DNA. Meanwhile, the cages have 200 nm openings that make them permeable to small molecules, like the restriction endonuclease we use to sequence-specifically cut trapped DNA into fragments whose number and sizes are analysed upon exiting through the nanopore. Entropic cages thus serve as reactors for chemically modifying single DNA molecules.

  15. Time Integrators for Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Bou-Rabee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper invites the reader to learn more about time integrators for Molecular Dynamics simulation through a simple MATLAB implementation. An overview of methods is provided from an algorithmic viewpoint that emphasizes long-time stability and finite-time dynamic accuracy. The given software simulates Langevin dynamics using an explicit, second-order (weakly accurate integrator that exactly reproduces the Boltzmann-Gibbs density. This latter feature comes from adding a Metropolis acceptance-rejection step to the integrator. The paper discusses in detail the properties of the integrator. Since these properties do not rely on a specific form of a heat or pressure bath model, the given algorithm can be used to simulate other bath models including, e.g., the widely used v-rescale thermostat.

  16. Decoherence effect on quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Fei; Wang, Dong; Huang, Ai-Jun; Sun, Wen-Yang; Ye, Liu

    2018-01-01

    Uncertainty principle significantly provides a bound to predict precision of measurement with regard to any two incompatible observables, and thereby plays a nontrivial role in quantum precision measurement. In this work, we observe the dynamical features of the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations (EUR) for a pair of incompatible measurements in an open system characterized by local generalized amplitude damping (GAD) noises. Herein, we derive the dynamical evolution of the entropic uncertainty with respect to the measurement affecting by the canonical GAD noises when particle A is initially entangled with quantum memory B. Specifically, we examine the dynamics of EUR in the frame of three realistic scenarios: one case is that particle A is affected by environmental noise (GAD) while particle B as quantum memory is free from any noises, another case is that particle B is affected by the external noise while particle A is not, and the last case is that both of the particles suffer from the noises. By analytical methods, it turns out that the uncertainty is not full dependent of quantum correlation evolution of the composite system consisting of A and B, but the minimal conditional entropy of the measured subsystem. Furthermore, we present a possible physical interpretation for the behavior of the uncertainty evolution by means of the mixedness of the observed system; we argue that the uncertainty might be dramatically correlated with the systematic mixedness. Furthermore, we put forward a simple and effective strategy to reduce the measuring uncertainty of interest upon quantum partially collapsed measurement. Therefore, our explorations might offer an insight into the dynamics of the entropic uncertainty relation in a realistic system, and be of importance to quantum precision measurement during quantum information processing.

  17. Time as a dynamical variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thron, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Since the time of Galileo, the equations of physics have expressed dynamical variables such as particle position or electromagnetic field strength as functions of time. In this paper, we argue that this assumption reflects observational bias, and that there are many good reasons for viewing time also as a dynamical variable. We hypothesize that the spacetime universe is an outcome of a process, rather than a process unfolding in time. This new viewpoint gives rise to a physical interpretation of the wavefunction as a complex vibrational amplitude in a non-spacetime independent variable. It resolves quantum mechanical paradoxes involving wavefunction entanglement, and gives a much simpler solution to the problem of wavefunction collapse than the many-worlds interpretation. The Born rule is also shown to be a natural consequence. We also show that small deviations from conventional quantum probabilities are predicted.

  18. Exploration of quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations in a noninertial frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Ming, Fei; Huang, Ai-Jun; Sun, Wen-Yang; Shi, Jia-Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-05-01

    The uncertainty principle offers a bound to show accuracy of the simultaneous measurement outcome for two incompatible observables. In this letter, we investigate quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation (QMA-EUR) when the particle to be measured stays at an open system, and another particle is treated as quantum memory under a noninertial frame. In such a scenario, the collective influence of the unital and nonunital noise environment, and of the relativistic motion of the system, on the QMA-EUR is examined. By numerical analysis, we conclude that, firstly, the noises and the Unruh effect can both increase the uncertainty, due to the decoherence of the bipartite system induced by the noise or Unruh effect; secondly, the uncertainty is more affected by the noises than by the Unruh effect from the acceleration; thirdly, unital noises can reduce the uncertainty in long-time regime. We give a possible physical interpretation for those results: that the information of interest is redistributed among the bipartite, the noisy environment and the physically inaccessible region in the noninertial frame. Therefore, we claim that our observations provide an insight into dynamics of the entropic uncertainty in a noninertial frame, and might be important to quantum precision measurement under relativistic motion.

  19. Chloroform alters interleaflet coupling in lipid bilayers: an entropic mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Ramon; Sagués, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of the two leaflets of the plasmatic cell membrane is conjectured to play an important role in many cell processes. Experimental and computational studies have investigated the mechanisms that modulate the interaction between the two membrane leaflets. Here, by means of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the addition of a small and polar compound such as chloroform alters interleaflet coupling by promoting domain registration. This is interpreted in terms of an entropic gain that would favour frequent chloroform commuting between the two leaflets. The implication of this effect is discussed in relation to the general anaesthetic action. PMID:25833246

  20. MOdified Newtonian Dynamics as an entropic force

    CERN Document Server

    Carranza, D A

    2014-01-01

    Under natural assumptions on the thermodynamical properties of space and using the holographic principle we reproduce a MOND-like behaviour of gravity on particular scales of mass and length, where Newtonian gravity requires modification or extension if no dark matter component is introduced in the description of gravitational phenomena. The result is directly obtained with the assumption that a fundamental constant of nature needs to be introduced into the problem. This calculation extends the one by Verlinde (2010) in which Newtonian gravity is shown to be an emergent phenomenon and together with it, suggests that gravity at all scales is emergent.

  1. The simulation of entropic phase transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews recent (numerical) progress in the understanding of entropic phase transitions in complex fluids. In particular, I discuss (liquid-)crystal formation and demixing in binary mixtures. In some cases it appears that lessons learnt in the study of complex fluids may have an unexpected

  2. Observation of quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation under open systems, and its steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Fei; Sun, Wen-Yang; Ming, Fei; Huang, Ai-Jun; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2018-01-01

    Quantum objects are susceptible to noise from their surrounding environments, interaction with which inevitably gives rise to quantum decoherence or dissipation effects. In this work, we examine how different types of local noise under an open system affect entropic uncertainty relations for two incompatible measurements. Explicitly, we observe the dynamics of the entropic uncertainty in the presence of quantum memory under two canonical categories of noisy environments: unital (phase flip) and nonunital (amplitude damping). Our study shows that the measurement uncertainty exhibits a non-monotonic dynamical behavior—that is, the amount of the uncertainty will first inflate, and subsequently decrease, with the growth of decoherence strengths in the two channels. In contrast, the uncertainty decreases monotonically with the growth of the purity of the initial state shared in prior. In order to reduce the measurement uncertainty in noisy environments, we put forward a remarkably effective strategy to steer the magnitude of uncertainty by means of a local non-unitary operation (i.e. weak measurement) on the qubit of interest. It turns out that this non-unitary operation can greatly reduce the entropic uncertainty, upon tuning the operation strength. Our investigations might thereby offer an insight into the dynamics and steering of entropic uncertainty in open systems.

  3. Entropic multirelaxation lattice Boltzmann models for turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam S; Karlin, Ilya V

    2015-10-01

    We present three-dimensional realizations of a class of lattice Boltzmann models introduced recently by the authors [I. V. Karlin, F. Bösch, and S. S. Chikatamarla, Phys. Rev. E 90, 031302(R) (2014)] and review the role of the entropic stabilizer. Both coarse- and fine-grid simulations are addressed for the Kida vortex flow benchmark. We show that the outstanding numerical stability and performance is independent of a particular choice of the moment representation for high-Reynolds-number flows. We report accurate results for low-order moments for homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence and second-order grid convergence for most assessed statistical quantities. It is demonstrated that all the three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann realizations considered herein converge to the familiar lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model when the resolution is increased. Moreover, thanks to the dynamic nature of the entropic stabilizer, the present model features less compressibility effects and maintains correct energy and enstrophy dissipation. The explicit and efficient nature of the present lattice Boltzmann method renders it a promising candidate for both engineering and scientific purposes for highly turbulent flows.

  4. Entropic uncertainty relations and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Patrick J.; Berta, Mario; Tomamichel, Marco; Wehner, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle forms a fundamental element of quantum mechanics. Uncertainty relations in terms of entropies were initially proposed to deal with conceptual shortcomings in the original formulation of the uncertainty principle and, hence, play an important role in quantum foundations. More recently, entropic uncertainty relations have emerged as the central ingredient in the security analysis of almost all quantum cryptographic protocols, such as quantum key distribution and two-party quantum cryptography. This review surveys entropic uncertainty relations that capture Heisenberg's idea that the results of incompatible measurements are impossible to predict, covering both finite- and infinite-dimensional measurements. These ideas are then extended to incorporate quantum correlations between the observed object and its environment, allowing for a variety of recent, more general formulations of the uncertainty principle. Finally, various applications are discussed, ranging from entanglement witnessing to wave-particle duality to quantum cryptography.

  5. Quantum channels and their entropic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.; Giovannetti, V.

    2012-04-01

    One of the major achievements of the recently emerged quantum information theory is the introduction and thorough investigation of the notion of a quantum channel which is a basic building block of any data-transmitting or data-processing system. This development resulted in an elaborated structural theory and was accompanied by the discovery of a whole spectrum of entropic quantities, notably the channel capacities, characterizing information-processing performance of the channels. This paper gives a survey of the main properties of quantum channels and of their entropic characterization, with a variety of examples for finite-dimensional quantum systems. We also touch upon the 'continuous-variables' case, which provides an arena for quantum Gaussian systems. Most of the practical realizations of quantum information processing were implemented in such systems, in particular based on principles of quantum optics. Several important entropic quantities are introduced and used to describe the basic channel capacity formulae. The remarkable role of specific quantum correlations—entanglement—as a novel communication resource is stressed.

  6. Entropic Entanglement: Information Prison Break

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Y. Yosifov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We argue that certain nonviolent local quantum field theory (LQFT modification considered at the global horizon (r=2M of a static spherically symmetric black hole can lead to adiabatic leakage of quantum information in the form of Hawking particles. The source of the modification is (i smooth at r=2M and (ii rapidly vanishing at r≫2M. Furthermore, we restore the unitary evolution by introducing extra quanta which departs slightly from the generic Hawking emission without changing the experience of an infalling observer (no drama. Also, we suggest that a possible interpretation of the Bekenstein-Hawking bound as entanglement entropy may yield a nonsingular dynamical horizon behavior described by black hole thermodynamics. Hence, by treating gravity as a field theory and considering its coupling to the matter fields in the Minkowski vacuum, we derive the conjectured fluctuations of the background geometry of a black hole.

  7. Directionality Theory and the Entropic Principle of Natural Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd A. Demetrius

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Darwinian fitness describes the capacity of an organism to appropriate resources from the environment and to convert these resources into net-offspring production. Studies of competition between related types indicate that fitness is analytically described by entropy, a statistical measure which is positively correlated with population stability, and describes the number of accessible pathways of energy flow between the individuals in the population. Directionality theory is a mathematical model of the evolutionary process based on the concept evolutionary entropy as the measure of fitness. The theory predicts that the changes which occur as a population evolves from one non-equilibrium steady state to another are described by the following directionality principle–fundamental theorem of evolution: (a an increase in evolutionary entropy when resource composition is diverse, and resource abundance constant; (b a decrease in evolutionary entropy when resource composition is singular, and resource abundance variable. Evolutionary entropy characterizes the dynamics of energy flow between the individual elements in various classes of biological networks: (a where the units are individuals parameterized by age, and their age-specific fecundity and mortality; where the units are metabolites, and the transitions are the biochemical reactions that convert substrates to products; (c where the units are social groups, and the forces are the cooperative and competitive interactions between the individual groups. % This article reviews the analytical basis of the evolutionary entropic principle, and describes applications of directionality theory to the study of evolutionary dynamics in two biological systems; (i social networks–the evolution of cooperation; (ii metabolic networks–the evolution of body size. Statistical thermodynamics is a mathematical model of macroscopic behavior in inanimate matter based on entropy, a statistical measure which

  8. Evolution of entropic dark energy and its phantom nature

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Titus K; J, Shejeelammal

    2015-01-01

    Assuming the form of the entropic dark energy as arises form the surface term in the Einstein-Hilbert's action, it's evolution were analyzed in an expanding flat universe. The model parameters were evaluated by constraining model using the Union data on Type Ia supernovae. We found that the model predicts an early decelerated phase and a later accelerated phase at the background level. The evolution of the Hubble parameter, dark energy density, equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter were obtained. The model is diagnosed with $Om$ parameter. The model is hardly seems to be supporting the linear perturbation growth for the structure formation. We also found that the entropic dark energy shows phantom nature for redshifts $z<0.257.$ During the phantom epoch, the model predicts big-rip effect at which both the scale factor of expansion and the dark energy density become infinitely large and the big rip time is found to be around 36 Giga Years from now.

  9. Brane Bounce from logarithmic entropic corrections in the bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We calculate new corrections to the Brane-world dynamics, lying in a 5D Schwarzschild-De Sitter black hole, generalizing the result of Nojiri, Odintsov and Ogushi (NOO) in Ref.\\cite{Nojiri:2002vu}, The NOO entropy effect is based on the Logharitmic correction to the bulk entropy firstly calculated by Mukherji and Pal in Ref.\\cite{Mukherji:2002de}. We calculate higher order contributions to the brane worldsheet. The extra terms obtained lead to interesting implications in brane-cosmology. In particular, new entropic terms rapidly disappear in the late Universe while exploding in the very Early Universe. In particular, we show that they may trigger a cosmological bounce in the very early Universe. On the other hand, they contribute to the cosmological expansion in the Late Universe. We also discuss a scenario in which the BLK anisotropies are washed-out, toward a new Ekpyrotic Brane Cosmology.

  10. Brane bounce from logarithmic entropic corrections in the bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    We calculate new corrections to the braneworld dynamics, lying in a 5D Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole, generalizing the result of Nojiri, Odintsov and Ogushi (NOO). The NOO entropy effect is based on the logarithmic correction to the bulk entropy firstly calculated by Mukherji and Pal. We calculate higher order contributions to the brane worldsheet. The extra terms obtained lead to interesting implications in brane cosmology. In particular, new entropic terms rapidly disappear in the late Universe while exploding in the very early Universe. In particular, we show that they may trigger a cosmological bounce in the very early Universe. On the other hand, they contribute to the cosmological expansion in the late Universe. We also discuss a scenario in which the BLK anisotropies are washed out, toward a new ekpyrotic brane cosmology.

  11. Entropic origin of allometry relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bruce J.; West, Damien

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical allometry relation (AR) between the size of a network Y and a property of the network X is of the form X = aYb and has been known for nearly two centuries. The allometry coefficient a and allometry exponent b have been fit by various data sets over that time. The ubiquity of ARs in biology, sociology, ecology and indeed in virtually all the other science disciplines entreats science to find the origin of ARs. Data analysis indicates that the empirical AR is obtained with the replacements X → and Y → and the brackets denote an average over an ensemble of realizations of the network. It has been shown that the empirical AR cannot usually be derived from the theoretical one by simple averaging due to the fractal statistics of the fluctuations. Consequently we hypothesize that a possible origin of AR is the Principle of Minimum Entropy Generation (PMEG). We establish in support of this hypothesis that if the fluctuations in the allometry variables have fractal statistics then the PMEG entails the AR between a complex host network and a subnetwork strongly coupled to it.

  12. Capturing the Landauer bound through the application of a detailed Jarzynski equality for entropic memory erasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moupriya

    2014-12-01

    The states of an overdamped Brownian particle confined in a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure are considered to correspond to two binary values: 0 (left lobe) and 1 (right lobe). An ensemble of such particles represents bits of entropic information. An external bias is applied on the particles, equally distributed in two lobes, to drive them to a particular lobe erasing one kind of bit of information. It has been shown that the average work done for the entropic memory erasure process approaches the Landauer bound for a very slow erasure cycle. Furthermore, the detailed Jarzynski equality holds to a very good extent for the erasure protocol, so that the Landauer bound may be calculated irrespective of the time period of the erasure cycle in terms of the effective free-energy change for the process. The detailed Jarzynski equality applied to two subprocesses, namely the transition from entropic memory state 0 to state 1 and the transition from entropic memory state 1 to state 1, connects the work done on the system to the probability to occupy the two states under a time-reversed process. In the entire treatment, the work appears as a boundary effect of the physical confinement of the system not having a conventional potential energy barrier. Finally, an analytical derivation of the detailed and classical Jarzynski equality for Brownian movement in confined space with varying width has been proposed. Our analytical scheme supports the numerical simulations presented in this paper.

  13. Surface gravity and Hawking temperature from entropic force viewpoint

    CERN Document Server

    Chang-Young, Ee; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Lee, Daeho

    2010-01-01

    We consider a freely falling holographic screen for the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes and evaluate the entropic force \\`a la Verlinde. When the screen crosses the event horizon, the temperature of the screen agrees to the Hawking temperature and the entropic force gives rise to the surface gravity for both of the black holes.

  14. Entropic uncertainty measures for large dimensional hydrogenic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Puertas-Centeno; N.M. Temme (Nico); I.V. Toranzo; J.S. Dehesa

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe entropic moments of the probability density of a quantum system in position and momentum spaces describe not only some fundamental and/or experimentally accessible quantities of the system but also the entropic uncertainty measures of Rényi type, which allow one to find the most

  15. Shape change as entropic phase transition: A study using Jarzynski ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Shape change as entropic phase transition: A study using ... Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jcsc/124/01/0021-0028. Keywords. Fick-Jacobs equation; entropic potental; Jarzynski equality; phase transition.

  16. Entropic stabilization of proteins and its proteomic consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor N Berezovsky

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary traces of thermophilic adaptation are manifest, on the whole-genome level, in compositional biases toward certain types of amino acids. However, it is sometimes difficult to discern their causes without a clear understanding of underlying physical mechanisms of thermal stabilization of proteins. For example, it is well-known that hyperthermophiles feature a greater proportion of charged residues, but, surprisingly, the excess of positively charged residues is almost entirely due to lysines but not arginines in the majority of hyperthermophilic genomes. All-atom simulations show that lysines have a much greater number of accessible rotamers than arginines of similar degree of burial in folded states of proteins. This finding suggests that lysines would preferentially entropically stabilize the native state. Indeed, we show in computational experiments that arginine-to-lysine amino acid substitutions result in noticeable stabilization of proteins. We then hypothesize that if evolution uses this physical mechanism as a complement to electrostatic stabilization in its strategies of thermophilic adaptation, then hyperthermostable organisms would have much greater content of lysines in their proteomes than comparably sized and similarly charged arginines. Consistent with that, high-throughput comparative analysis of complete proteomes shows extremely strong bias toward arginine-to-lysine replacement in hyperthermophilic organisms and overall much greater content of lysines than arginines in hyperthermophiles. This finding cannot be explained by genomic GC compositional biases or by the universal trend of amino acid gain and loss in protein evolution. We discovered here a novel entropic mechanism of protein thermostability due to residual dynamics of rotamer isomerization in native state and demonstrated its immediate proteomic implications. Our study provides an example of how analysis of a fundamental physical mechanism of

  17. Implications of short time scale dynamics on long time processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystel El Hage

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a comprehensive overview of the structural dynamics in topical gas- and condensed-phase systems on multiple length and time scales. Starting from vibrationally induced dissociation of small molecules in the gas phase, the question of vibrational and internal energy redistribution through conformational dynamics is further developed by considering coupled electron/proton transfer in a model peptide over many orders of magnitude. The influence of the surrounding solvent is probed for electron transfer to the solvent in hydrated I−. Next, the dynamics of a modified PDZ domain over many time scales is analyzed following activation of a photoswitch. The hydration dynamics around halogenated amino acid side chains and their structural dynamics in proteins are relevant for iodinated TyrB26 insulin. Binding of nitric oxide to myoglobin is a process for which experimental and computational analyses have converged to a common view which connects rebinding time scales and the underlying dynamics. Finally, rhodopsin is a paradigmatic system for multiple length- and time-scale processes for which experimental and computational methods provide valuable insights into the functional dynamics. The systems discussed here highlight that for a comprehensive understanding of how structure, flexibility, energetics, and dynamics contribute to functional dynamics, experimental studies in multiple wavelength regions and computational studies including quantum, classical, and more coarse grained levels are required.

  18. Entropic penalties in circular DNA assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoli, Marco, E-mail: marco.zoli@unicam.it [School of Science and Technology - CNISM, University of Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2014-11-07

    The thermodynamic properties of DNA circular molecules are investigated by a new path integral computational method which treats in the real space the fundamental forces stabilizing the molecule. The base pair and stacking contributions to the classical action are evaluated separately by simulating a broad ensemble of twisted conformations. We obtain, for two short sequences, a free energy landscape with multiple wells corresponding to the most convenient values of helical repeat. Our results point to a intrinsic flexibility of the circular structures in which the base pair fluctuations move the system from one well to the next thus causing the local unwinding of the helix. The latter is more pronounced in the shorter sequence whose cyclization causes a higher bending stress. The entropic reductions associated to the formation of the ordered helicoidal structure are estimated.

  19. Multiplicative semiclassical dynamics and the quantization time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We study smooth, caustic-free, chaotic semiclassical dynamics on two-dimensional phase space and find that the dynamics can be approached by an iterative procedure which constructs an approximation to the exact long-time semiclassical propagator. Semiclassical propagation all the way to the Heisenberg time, where individual eigenstates are resolved, can be computed in polynomial time, obviating the need to sum over an exponentially large number of classical paths. At long times, the dynamics becomes quantum-like, given by a matrix of the same dimension as the quantum propagator. This matrix, however, differs both from the quantum and the one-step semiclassical propagators, allowing for the study of the breakdown of the semiclassical approximation. The results shed light on the accuracy of the Gutzwiller trace formula in two dimensions, and on the source of long-time periodic orbit correlations.

  20. Three entropic classes of side chain in a globular protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Dennis C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Krishnan, Marimuthu [International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderbad (India); Smith, Jeremy C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baudry, Jerome Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-02-19

    The relationship between the NMR methyl group axial order parameter and the side chain conformational entropy is investigated in inhibitor-bound and apo human HIV protease using molecular dynamics simulation. Three distinct entropic classes of methyl-bearing side chains, determined by the topological distance of the methyl group from the protein backbone (i.e., the number of -bonds between the C and the carbon of the CH3 group), are revealed by atomistic trajectory analyses performed in the local frame of reference of individual methyl probes. The results demonstrate that topologically equivalent methyl groups experience similar nonbonded microenvironments regardless of the type of residues to which they are attached. Similarly, methyl groups that belong to the same side chain but that are not topologically equivalent exhibit different thermodynamic and dynamic properties. As a result, the two-parameter classification (based upon entropy and methyl axial order parameter) of side chains described here permits improved estimates of the conformational entropies of proteins from NMR motional parameters.

  1. Dynamics of Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshmanan, Muthusamy

    2010-01-01

    Synchronization of chaotic systems, a patently nonlinear phenomenon, has emerged as a highly active interdisciplinary research topic at the interface of physics, biology, applied mathematics and engineering sciences. In this connection, time-delay systems described by delay differential equations have developed as particularly suitable tools for modeling specific dynamical systems. Indeed, time-delay is ubiquitous in many physical systems, for example due to finite switching speeds of amplifiers in electronic circuits, finite lengths of vehicles in traffic flows, finite signal propagation times in biological networks and circuits, and quite generally whenever memory effects are relevant. This monograph presents the basics of chaotic time-delay systems and their synchronization with an emphasis on the effects of time-delay feedback which give rise to new collective dynamics. Special attention is devoted to scalar chaotic/hyperchaotic time-delay systems, and some higher order models, occurring in different bran...

  2. On entropic, distributional, and differential pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.

    2007-12-01

    Product probability property, known in the literature as statistical independence, is examined first. Then generalized entropies are introduced, all of which give generalizations to Shannon entropy. It is shown that the nature of the recursivity postulate automatically determines the logarithmic functional form for Shannon entropy. Due to the logarithmic nature, Shannon entropy naturally gives rise to additivity, when applied to situations having product probability property. It is argued that the natural process is non-additivity even in product probability property situations and additivity can hold due to the involvement of a recursivity postulate leading to a logarithmic function. Generalized entropies are introduced and some of their properties are examined. Particularly, situations are examined where a generalized entropy of order α leads to entropic pathway models, exhibiting exponential and power law behavior. Subsequently it is shown that these models link to distributional and differential pathways. Connection of the generalized entropy of order α to Kerridge's measure to create ``inaccuracy'' is also explored. Further for each of the three pathways their relevance to Tsallis statistics and Beck-Cohen superstatistics is emphasized.

  3. An entropic framework for modeling economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caticha, Ariel; Golan, Amos

    2014-08-01

    We develop an information-theoretic framework for economic modeling. This framework is based on principles of entropic inference that are designed for reasoning on the basis of incomplete information. We take the point of view of an external observer who has access to limited information about broad macroscopic economic features. We view this framework as complementary to more traditional methods. The economy is modeled as a collection of agents about whom we make no assumptions of rationality (in the sense of maximizing utility or profit). States of statistical equilibrium are introduced as those macrostates that maximize entropy subject to the relevant information codified into constraints. The basic assumption is that this information refers to supply and demand and is expressed in the form of the expected values of certain quantities (such as inputs, resources, goods, production functions, utility functions and budgets). The notion of economic entropy is introduced. It provides a measure of the uniformity of the distribution of goods and resources. It captures both the welfare state of the economy as well as the characteristics of the market (say, monopolistic, concentrated or competitive). Prices, which turn out to be the Lagrange multipliers, are endogenously generated by the economy. Further studies include the equilibrium between two economies and the conditions for stability. As an example, the case of the nonlinear economy that arises from linear production and utility functions is treated in some detail.

  4. Entropic-Skins Geometry to Describe Wall Turbulence Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Queiros-Conde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the phenomenon of intermittency in wall turbulence and, more particularly, the behaviour of moments  and and intermittency exponents ζP with the order p and distance to the wall, we developed a new geometrical framework called “entropic-skins geometry” based on the notion of scale-entropy which is here applied to an experimental database of boundary layer flows. Each moment has its own spatial multi-scale support Ωp (“skin”. The model assumes the existence of a hierarchy of multi-scale sets Ωp ranged from the “bulk” to the “crest”. The crest noted characterizes the geometrical support where the most intermittent (the highest fluctuations in energy dissipation occur; the bulk is the geometrical support for the whole range of fluctuations. The model assumes then the existence of a dynamical flux through the hierarchy of skins. The specific case where skins display a fractal structure is investigated. Bulk fractal dimension  and crest dimension  are linked by a scale-entropy flux defining a reversibility efficiency  (d is the embedding dimension. The model, initially developed for homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, is applied here to wall bounded turbulence where intermittency exponents are measured by extended self-similarity. We obtained for intermittency exponents the analytical expression with γ ≈ 0.36 in agreement with experimental results.

  5. Abstraction of Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    To enable formal verification of a dynamical system, given by a set of differential equations, it is abstracted by a finite state model. This allows for application of methods for model checking. Consequently, it opens the possibility of carrying out the verification of reachability and timing re...

  6. Dynamic time warping of spectroscopic BATCH data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaker, H.J.; van Sprang, E.N.M.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Smilde, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for warping spectral batch data. This method is a modification of a procedure proposed by Kassidas et al. [AIChE Journal 44 (1998) 864; Journal of Process Control 8 (1998) 381]. This iterative procedure is based on the dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm. The symmetric

  7. Dynamic time warping of spectroscopic BATCH data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaker, H. J.; van Sprang, E. N. M.; Westerhuis, J. A.; Smilde, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for warping spectral batch data. This method is a modification of a procedure proposed by Kassidas et al. [AlChE Journal 44 (1998) 864; Journal of Process Control 8 (1998) 381]. This iterative procedure is based on the dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm. The symmetric

  8. Dynamical Space-Time and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    van Holten, J W

    2016-01-01

    According to General Relativity gravity is the result of the interaction between matter and space-time geometry. In this interaction space-time geometry itself is dynamical: it can store and transport energy and momentum in the form of gravitational waves. We give an introductory account of this phenomenon and discuss how the observation of gravitational waves may open up a fundamentally new window on the universe.

  9. On time, memory and dynamic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Stephen E

    2004-12-01

    A common approach to explaining the perception of form is through the use of static features. The weakness of this approach points naturally to dynamic definitions of form. Considering dynamical form, however, leads inevitably to the need to explain how events are perceived as time-extended--a problem with primacy over that even of qualia. Optic flow models, energy models, models reliant on a rigidity constraint are examined. The reliance of these models on the instantaneous specification of form at an instant, t, or across a series of such instants forces the consideration of the primary memory supporting both the perception of time-extended events and the time-extension of consciousness. This cannot be reduced to an integration over space and time. The difficulty of defining the basis for this memory is highlighted in considerations of dynamic form in relation to scales of time. Ultimately, the possibility is raised that psychology must follow physics in a more profound approach to time and motion.

  10. Continuous Time Group Discovery in Dynamic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2010-11-04

    With the rise in availability and importance of graphs and networks, it has become increasingly important to have good models to describe their behavior. While much work has focused on modeling static graphs, we focus on group discovery in dynamic graphs. We adapt a dynamic extension of Latent Dirichlet Allocation to this task and demonstrate good performance on two datasets. Modeling relational data has become increasingly important in recent years. Much work has focused on static graphs - that is fixed graphs at a single point in time. Here we focus on the problem of modeling dynamic (i.e. time-evolving) graphs. We propose a scalable Bayesian approach for community discovery in dynamic graphs. Our approach is based on extensions of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). LDA is a latent variable model for topic modeling in text corpora. It was extended to deal with topic changes in discrete time and later in continuous time. These models were referred to as the discrete Dynamic Topic Model (dDTM) and the continuous Dynamic Topic Model (cDTM), respectively. When adapting these models to graphs, we take our inspiration from LDA-G and SSN-LDA, applications of LDA to static graphs that have been shown to effectively factor out community structure to explain link patterns in graphs. In this paper, we demonstrate how to adapt and apply the cDTM to the task of finding communities in dynamic networks. We use link prediction to measure the quality of the discovered community structure and apply it to two different relational datasets - DBLP author-keyword and CAIDA autonomous systems relationships. We also discuss a parallel implementation of this approach using Hadoop. In Section 2, we review LDA and LDA-G. In Section 3, we review the cDTM and introduce cDTMG, its adaptation to modeling dynamic graphs. We discuss inference for the cDTM-G and details of our parallel implementation in Section 4 and present its performance on two datasets in Section 5 before concluding in

  11. Entropic measures of individual mobility patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Bazzani, Armando; Degli Esposti, Mirko; Rambaldi, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    Understanding human mobility from a microscopic point of view may represent a fundamental breakthrough for the development of a statistical physics for cognitive systems and it can shed light on the applicability of macroscopic statistical laws for social systems. Even if the complexity of individual behaviors prevents a true microscopic approach, the introduction of mesoscopic models allows the study of the dynamical properties for the non-stationary states of the considered system. We propose to compute various entropy measures of the individual mobility patterns obtained from GPS data that record the movements of private vehicles in the Florence district, in order to point out new features of human mobility related to the use of time and space and to define the dynamical properties of a stochastic model that could generate similar patterns. Moreover, we can relate the predictability properties of human mobility to the distribution of time passed between two successive trips. Our analysis suggests the existence of a hierarchical structure in the mobility patterns which divides the performed activities into three different categories, according to the time cost, with different information contents. We show that a Markov process defined by using the individual mobility network is not able to reproduce this hierarchy, which seems the consequence of different strategies in the activity choice. Our results could contribute to the development of governance policies for a sustainable mobility in modern cities.

  12. Abstraction of Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Wisniewski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To enable formal verification of a dynamical system, given by a set of differential equations, it is abstracted by a finite state model. This allows for application of methods for model checking. Consequently, it opens the possibility of carrying out the verification of reachability and timing requirements, which by classical control methods is impossible. We put forward a method for abstracting dynamical systems, where level sets of Lyapunov functions are used to generate the partitioning of the state space. We propose to partition the state space using an entire family of functions. The properties of these functions ensure that the discrete model captures the behaviors of a dynamical system by generating appropriate equivalence classes of the states. These equivalence classes make up the partition of the state space.

  13. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Noack, J.; Vogel, A. [Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  14. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J. [Meizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck (Germany); Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  15. Modeling biological pathway dynamics with timed automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivo, Stefano; Scholma, Jetse; Wanders, Brend; Urquidi Camacho, Ricardo A; van der Vet, Paul E; Karperien, Marcel; Langerak, Rom; van de Pol, Jaco; Post, Janine N

    2014-05-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to a plethora of environmental stimuli that require integration into an appropriate cellular response. This integration takes place through signal transduction events that form tightly interconnected networks. The understanding of these networks requires capturing their dynamics through computational support and models. ANIMO (analysis of Networks with Interactive Modeling) is a tool that enables the construction and exploration of executable models of biological networks, helping to derive hypotheses and to plan wet-lab experiments. The tool is based on the formalism of Timed Automata, which can be analyzed via the UPPAAL model checker. Thanks to Timed Automata, we can provide a formal semantics for the domain-specific language used to represent signaling networks. This enforces precision and uniformity in the definition of signaling pathways, contributing to the integration of isolated signaling events into complex network models. We propose an approach to discretization of reaction kinetics that allows us to efficiently use UPPAAL as the computational engine to explore the dynamic behavior of the network of interest. A user-friendly interface hides the use of Timed Automata from the user, while keeping the expressive power intact. Abstraction to single-parameter kinetics speeds up construction of models that remain faithful enough to provide meaningful insight. The resulting dynamic behavior of the network components is displayed graphically, allowing for an intuitive and interactive modeling experience.

  16. Non-Extensive Entropic Distance Based on Diffusion: Restrictions on Parameters in Entropy Formulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Sándor Biró

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a diffusion-like master equation we propose a formula using the Bregman divergence for measuring entropic distance in terms of different non-extensive entropy expressions. We obtain the non-extensivity parameter range for a universal approach to the stationary distribution by simple diffusive dynamics for the Tsallis and the Kaniadakis entropies, for the Hanel–Thurner generalization, and finally for a recently suggested log-log type entropy formula which belongs to diverging variance in the inverse temperature superstatistics.

  17. Multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Bohner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales, taking readers beyond the traditional calculus texts. Covering topics from parameter-dependent integrals to partial differentiation on time scales, the book’s nine pedagogically oriented chapters provide a pathway to this active area of research that will appeal to students and researchers in mathematics and the physical sciences. The authors present a clear and well-organized treatment of the concept behind the mathematics and solution techniques, including many practical examples and exercises.

  18. Exhibition of Monogamy Relations between Entropic Non-contextuality Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yi-Dong

    2017-06-01

    We exhibit the monogamy relation between two entropic non-contextuality inequalities in the scenario where compatible projectors are orthogonal. We show the monogamy relation can be exhibited by decomposing the orthogonality graph into perfect induced subgraphs. Then we find two entropic non-contextuality inequalities are monogamous while the KCBS-type non-contextuality inequalities are not if the orthogonality graphs of the observable sets are two odd cycles with two shared vertices. Supported by 973 Programs of China under Grant Nos. 2011CBA00303 and 2013CB328700, Basic Research Foundation of Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology (TNList)

  19. uncertain dynamic systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lakshmikantham

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A basic feedback control problem is that of obtaining some desired stability property from a system which contains uncertainties due to unknown inputs into the system. Despite such imperfect knowledge in the selected mathematical model, we often seek to devise controllers that will steer the system in a certain required fashion. Various classes of controllers whose design is based on the method of Lyapunov are known for both discrete [4], [10], [15], and continuous [3–9], [11] models described by difference and differential equations, respectively. Recently, a theory for what is known as dynamic systems on time scales has been built which incorporates both continuous and discrete times, namely, time as an arbitrary closed sets of reals, and allows us to handle both systems simultaneously [1], [2], [12], [13]. This theory permits one to get some insight into and better understanding of the subtle differences between discrete and continuous systems. We shall, in this paper, utilize the framework of the theory of dynamic systems on time scales to investigate the stability properties of conditionally invariant sets which are then applied to discuss controlled systems with uncertain elements. For the notion of conditionally invariant set and its stability properties, see [14]. Our results offer a new approach to the problem in question.

  20. Recurrence time statistics in chaotic dynamics. I. Discrete time maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, V.; Nicolis, G.; Nicolis, C.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of transitions between the cells of a finite-phase-space partition in a variety of systems giving rise to chaotic behavior is analyzed, with special emphasis on the statistics of recurrence times. In the case of one-dimensional piecewise Markow maps the recurrence problem is cast into a-renewal process. In the presence of intermittency, transitions between cells define a non-Markovian, non-renewal process reflected in the presence of power-law probability distributions and of divergent variances and mean values.

  1. Entropic Damping of the Motion of a Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an "entropic force" can be introduced by considering a familiar setup, namely a horizontal cylinder enclosing an ideal monatomic gas by a piston of cross-sectional area "A" and mass "m" that can slide without friction. The surrounding atmospheric pressure P[subscript atm] keeps the piston from flying…

  2. New entropic uncertainty relations for prime power dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Jakob Løvstad

    2011-01-01

    We consider the question of entropic uncertainty relations for prime power dimensions. In order to improve upon such uncertainty relations for higher dimensional quantum systems, we derive a tight lower bound amount of entropy for multiple probability distributions under the constraint that the sum...

  3. Spike-timing dynamics of neuronal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M; Gally, Joseph A; Edelman, Gerald M

    2004-08-01

    A neuronal network inspired by the anatomy of the cerebral cortex was simulated to study the self-organization of spiking neurons into neuronal groups. The network consisted of 100 000 reentrantly interconnected neurons exhibiting known types of cortical firing patterns, receptor kinetics, short-term plasticity and long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), as well as a distribution of axonal conduction delays. The dynamics of the network allowed us to study the fine temporal structure of emerging firing patterns with millisecond resolution. We found that the interplay between STDP and conduction delays gave rise to the spontaneous formation of neuronal groups--sets of strongly connected neurons capable of firing time-locked, although not necessarily synchronous, spikes. Despite the noise present in the model, such groups repeatedly generated patterns of activity with millisecond spike-timing precision. Exploration of the model allowed us to characterize various group properties, including spatial distribution, size, growth, rate of birth, lifespan, and persistence in the presence of synaptic turnover. Localized coherent input resulted in shifts of receptive and projective fields in the model similar to those observed in vivo.

  4. Exact Mean Computation in Dynamic Time Warping Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brill, Markus; Fluschnik, Till; Froese, Vincent; Jain, Brijnesh; Niedermeier, Rolf; Schultz, David

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic time warping constitutes a major tool for analyzing time series. In particular, computing a mean series of a given sample of series in dynamic time warping spaces (by minimizing the Fr\\'echet function) is a challenging computational problem, so far solved by several heuristic, inexact strategies. We spot several inaccuracies in the literature on exact mean computation in dynamic time warping spaces. Our contributions comprise an exact dynamic program computing a mean (useful for bench...

  5. CDT: an entropic theory of quantum gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjorn, J.; Goerlich, A.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2010-01-01

    In these lectures we describe how a theory of quantum gravity may be constructed in terms of a lattice formulation based on so-called causal dynamical triangulations (CDT). We discuss how the continuum limit can be obtained and how to define and measure diffeomorphism-invariant correlators. In four

  6. Transitional Intermittency Exponents Through Deterministic Boundary-Layer Structures and Empirical Entropic Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaVar King Isaacson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A computational procedure is developed to determine initial instabilities within a three-dimensional laminar boundary layer and to follow these instabilities in the streamwise direction through to the resulting intermittency exponents within a fully developed turbulent flow. The fluctuating velocity wave vector component equations are arranged into a Lorenz-type system of equations. The nonlinear time series solution of these equations at the fifth station downstream of the initial instabilities indicates a sequential outward burst process, while the results for the eleventh station predict a strong sequential inward sweep process. The results for the thirteenth station indicate a return to the original instability autogeneration process. The nonlinear time series solutions indicate regions of order and disorder within the solutions. Empirical entropies are defined from decomposition modes obtained from singular value decomposition techniques applied to the nonlinear time series solutions. Empirical entropic indices are obtained from the empirical entropies for two streamwise stations. The intermittency exponents are then obtained from the entropic indices for these streamwise stations that indicate the burst and autogeneration processes.

  7. What comes after the Prestige disaster? An entropic approach to modeling the recurrence of major oil tanker spills in Galicia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana-Ortega, Alberto; Solana, Vicente

    2007-08-01

    A methodology is presented to investigate the recurrence of extraordinary events. The approach is fully general and complies with a canon of inference establishing a set of basic rationality requirements scientific reasoning should satisfy. In particular, we apply it to model the interarrival time between disastrous oil spills in the Galician coast in the northwest of Spain, one of the greatest risk areas in the world, as confirmed by the Prestige accident of November 2002. We formulate the problem within the logical probability framework, using plausible logic languages with observations to allow the appropriate expression of evidences. Therein, inference is regarded as the joint selection of a pair of reference and inferred probability distributions, which better encode the knowledge about potential times between incidents provided by the available evidences and other higher-order information at hand. To solve it, we employ the REF relative entropy method with fractile constraints. Next, we analyze the variability of the joint entropic solution, as knowledge that a time has elapsed since the last recorded spill is added, by conditioning the evidences. Attention is paid to the variability of two representative parameters: the average reference recurrence time and an inferred characteristic probability fractile for the time to an event. In contrast with classical results, the salient consequence is their nonconstancy with the elapsed time and the appearance of a variability pattern indicating an observational memory, even under the assumption of one-parameter exponential models, traditionally regarded as memoryless. Tanker accidentality is therefore dynamic, changing as time goes on with no further accidents. Generality of the methodology entails that identical conclusions would apply to hazard modeling of any other kind of extraordinary phenomena. This should be considered in risk assessment and management.

  8. Excessive maps, "arrival times" and perturbation of dynamical semigroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.

    1995-12-01

    The notion of excessive map for dynamical semigroup is introduced, and it is shown that an excessive map defines an operation-valued measure describing the measurement of an "arrival time" related to the irreversible dynamics described by the semigroup. Any such arrival time determines a positive perturbation of the dynamical semigroup describing the dynamics after "arrivals". Generators of the relevant perturbations are characterized, and several examples, both commutative and a non-commutative, are discussed, elucidating the problem of standard representation.

  9. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kalescky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2 in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery.

  10. Entropic cosmology through non-gaussian statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, Rafael C; Abreu, Everton M C; Neto, Jorge Ananias

    2015-01-01

    Based on the relationship between thermodynamics and gravity, and with the aid of Verlinde's formalism, we propose an alternative interpretation of the dynamical evolution of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, which takes into account the entropy and temperature intrinsic to the horizon of the universe due to the information holographically stored there through non-gaussian statistical theories proposed by Tsallis and Kaniadakis. We use the most recent data of type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the Hubble expansion rate function to constrain the free parameters on the $\\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM models modified by the non-gaussian statistics. We evaluate the problem of age and we note that such modifications solve the problem at 1$\\sigma$ level confidence. Also we analyze the effects on the linear growth of matter density perturbations.

  11. The Effects of Minimal Length, Maximal Momentum, and Minimal Momentum in Entropic Force

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-Wen Feng; Shu-Zheng Yang; Hui-Ling Li; Xiao-Tao Zu

    2016-01-01

    The modified entropic force law is studied by using a new kind of generalized uncertainty principle which contains a minimal length, a minimal momentum, and a maximal momentum. Firstly, the quantum corrections to the thermodynamics of a black hole are investigated. Then, according to Verlinde’s theory, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) corrected entropic force is obtained. The result shows that the GUP corrected entropic force is related not only to the properties of the black holes...

  12. Entropic Movement Complexity Reflects Subjective Creativity Rankings of Visualized Hand Motion Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhen; Braun, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate 55 novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated 10 times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity. PMID:26733896

  13. Entropic movement complexity reflects subjective creativity rankings of visualized hand motion trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen ePeng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate fifty-five novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated ten times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity.

  14. Characterization of autoregressive processes using entropic quantifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversaro, Francisco; Redelico, Francisco O.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the contribution is to introduce a novel information plane, the causal-amplitude informational plane. As previous works seems to indicate, Bandt and Pompe methodology for estimating entropy does not allow to distinguish between probability distributions which could be fundamental for simulation or for probability analysis purposes. Once a time series is identified as stochastic by the causal complexity-entropy informational plane, the novel causal-amplitude gives a deeper understanding of the time series, quantifying both, the autocorrelation strength and the probability distribution of the data extracted from the generating processes. Two examples are presented, one from climate change model and the other from financial markets.

  15. A Dynamic Travel Time Estimation Model Based on Connected Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in connected vehicle technology, dynamic vehicle route guidance models gradually become indispensable equipment for drivers. Traditional route guidance models are designed to direct a vehicle along the shortest path from the origin to the destination without considering the dynamic traffic information. In this paper a dynamic travel time estimation model is presented which can collect and distribute traffic data based on the connected vehicles. To estimate the real-time travel time more accurately, a road link dynamic dividing algorithm is proposed. The efficiency of the model is confirmed by simulations, and the experiment results prove the effectiveness of the travel time estimation method.

  16. Dynamic travel time estimation using regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a methodology for travel time estimation by using regression trees. The dissemination of travel time information has become crucial for effective traffic management, especially under congested road conditions. In the absence of c...

  17. Entropic uncertainty relation based on generalized uncertainty principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yi; Kawamoto, Shoichi; Wen, Wen-Yu

    2017-09-01

    We explore the modification of the entropic formulation of uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics which measures the incompatibility of measurements in terms of Shannon entropy. The deformation in question is the type so-called generalized uncertainty principle that is motivated by thought experiments in quantum gravity and string theory and is characterized by a parameter of Planck scale. The corrections are evaluated for small deformation parameters by use of the Gaussian wave function and numerical calculation. As the generalized uncertainty principle has proven to be useful in the study of the quantum nature of black holes, this study would be a step toward introducing an information theory viewpoint to black hole physics.

  18. Entropic Fluctuations in Thermally Driven Harmonic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, V.; Pillet, C.-A.; Shirikyan, A.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a general network of harmonic oscillators driven out of thermal equilibrium by coupling to several heat reservoirs at different temperatures. The action of the reservoirs is implemented by Langevin forces. Assuming the existence and uniqueness of the steady state of the resulting process, we construct a canonical entropy production functional S^t which satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. More precisely, we prove that there exists κ _c>1/2 such that the cumulant generating function of S^t has a large-time limit e(α ) which is finite on a closed interval [1/2-κ _c,1/2+κ _c], infinite on its complement and satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry e(1-α )=e(α ) for all α in R. Moreover, we show that e(α ) is essentially smooth, i.e., that e'(α )→ ∓ ∞ as α → 1/2 ∓ κ _c. It follows from the Gärtner-Ellis theorem that S^t satisfies a global large deviation principle with a rate function I( s) obeying the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation I(-s)-I(s)=s for all sin R. We also consider perturbations of S^t by quadratic boundary terms and prove that they satisfy extended fluctuation relations, i.e., a global large deviation principle with a rate function that typically differs from I( s) outside a finite interval. This applies to various physically relevant functionals and, in particular, to the heat dissipation rate of the network. Our approach relies on the properties of the maximal solution of a one-parameter family of algebraic matrix Riccati equations. It turns out that the limiting cumulant generating functions of S^t and its perturbations can be computed in terms of spectral data of a Hamiltonian matrix depending on the harmonic potential of the network and the parameters of the Langevin reservoirs. This approach is well adapted to both analytical and numerical investigations.

  19. Bounds of Certain Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Pachpatte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study explicit bounds of certain dynamic integral inequalities on time scales. These estimates give the bounds on unknown functions which can be used in studying the qualitative aspects of certain dynamic equations. Using these inequalities we prove the uniqueness of some partial integro-differential equations on time scales.

  20. An all-but-one entropic uncertainty relation, and application to password-based identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, N.J.; Fehr, S.; González-Guillén, C.; Schaffner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Entropic uncertainty relations are quantitative characterizations of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, which make use of an entropy measure to quantify uncertainty. We propose a new entropic uncertainty relation. It is the first such uncertainty relation that lower bounds the uncertainty in the

  1. Temperature anisotropy at equilibrium reveals nonlocal entropic contributions to interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T.; Lervik, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Density gradient theory for fluids has played a key role in the study of interfacial phenomena for a century. In this work, we revisit its fundamentals by examining the vapor-liquid interface of argon, represented by the cut and shifted Lennard-Jones fluid. The starting point has traditionally been a Helmholtz energy functional using mass densities as arguments. By using rather the internal energy as starting point and including the entropy density as an additional argument, following thereby the phenomenological approach from classical thermodynamics, the extended theory suggests that the configurational part of the temperature has different contributions from the parallel and perpendicular directions at the interface, even at equilibrium. We find a similar anisotropy by examining the configurational temperature in molecular dynamics simulations and obtain a qualitative agreement between theory and simulations. The extended theory shows that the temperature anisotropy originates in nonlocal entropic contributions, which are currently missing from the classical theory. The nonlocal entropic contributions discussed in this work are likely to play a role in the description of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of interfaces. At equilibrium, they influence the temperature- and curvature-dependence of the surface tension. Across the vapor-liquid interface of the Lennard Jones fluid, we find that the maximum in the temperature anisotropy coincides precisely with the maximum in the thermal resistivity relative to the equimolar surface, where the integral of the thermal resistivity gives the Kapitza resistance. This links the temperature anisotropy at equilibrium to the Kapitza resistance of the vapor-liquid interface at nonequilibrium.

  2. The Role of Entropic Effects on DNA Loop Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Tkachenko, Alexei; Lillian, Todd; Perkins, Noel; Meiners, Jens Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of protein mediated DNA loops often regulates gene expression. Typically, a protein is simultaneously bound to two DNA operator sites. An example is the lactose repressor which binds to the Lac operon of E. coli. We characterize the mechanics of this system by calculating the free energy cost of loop formation. We construct a Hamiltonian that describes the change in DNA bending energy due to linear perturbations about the looped and open states, starting from a non-linear mechanical rod model that determines the shape and bending energy of the inter-operator DNA loop while capturing the intrinsic curvature and sequence-dependent elasticity of the DNA. The crystal structure of the LacI protein provides the boundary conditions for the DNA. We then calculate normal modes of the open and closed loops to account for the thermal fluctuations. The ratio of determinants of the two Hamiltonians yields the partition function, and the enthalphic and entropic cost of looping. This calculation goes beyond standard elastic energy models because it fully accounts for the substantial entropic differences between the two states. It also includes effects of sequence dependent curvature and stiffness and allows anisotropic variations in persistence length. From the free energy we then calculate the J-factor and ratio of loop lifetimes.

  3. Quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation in a Heisenberg XYZ chain with an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Huang, Aijun; Ming, Fei; Sun, Wenyang; Lu, Heping; Liu, Chengcheng; Ye, Liu

    2017-06-01

    The uncertainty principle provides a nontrivial bound to expose the precision for the outcome of the measurement on a pair of incompatible observables in a quantum system. Therefore, it is of essential importance for quantum precision measurement in the area of quantum information processing. Herein, we investigate quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation (QMA-EUR) in a two-qubit Heisenberg \\boldsymbol{X}\\boldsymbol{Y}\\boldsymbol{Z} spin chain. Specifically, we observe the dynamics of QMA-EUR in a realistic model there are two correlated sites linked by a thermal entanglement in the spin chain with an inhomogeneous magnetic field. It turns out that the temperature, the external inhomogeneous magnetic field and the field inhomogeneity can lift the uncertainty of the measurement due to the reduction of the thermal entanglement, and explicitly higher temperature, stronger magnetic field or larger inhomogeneity of the field can result in inflation of the uncertainty. Besides, it is found that there exists distinct dynamical behaviors of the uncertainty for ferromagnetism \\boldsymbol{}≤ft(\\boldsymbol{J}\\boldsymbol{0}\\right) chains. Moreover, we also verify that the measuring uncertainty is dramatically anti-correlated with the purity of the bipartite spin system, the greater purity can result in the reduction of the measuring uncertainty, vice versa. Therefore, our observations might provide a better understanding of the dynamics of the entropic uncertainty in the Heisenberg spin chain, and thus shed light on quantum precision measurement in the framework of versatile systems, particularly solid states.

  4. Unveiling the decoherence effect of noise on the entropic uncertainty relation and its control by partially collapsed operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Nan; Sun, Wen-Yang; Huang, Ai-Jun; Ming, Fei; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations under open systems, and how to steer the uncertainty under different types of decoherence. Specifically, we develop the dynamical behaviors of the uncertainty of interest under two typical categories of noise; bit flipping and depolarizing channels. It has been shown that the measurement uncertainty firstly increases and then decreases with the growth of the decoherence strength in bit flipping channels. In contrast, the uncertainty monotonically increases with the increase of the decoherence strength in depolarizing channels. Notably, and to a large degree, it is shown that the uncertainty depends on both the systematic quantum correlation and the minimal conditional entropy of the observed subsystem. Moreover, we present a possible physical interpretation for these distinctive behaviors of the uncertainty within such scenarios. Furthermore, we propose a simple and effective strategy to reduce the entropic uncertainty by means of a partially collapsed operation—quantum weak measurement. Therefore, our investigations might offer an insight into the dynamics of the measurment uncertainty under decoherence, and be of importance to quantum precision measurement in open systems.

  5. Stability theory for dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martynyuk, Anatoly A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a first in the world to present three approaches for stability analysis of solutions of dynamic equations. The first approach is based on the application of dynamic integral inequalities and the fundamental matrix of solutions of linear approximation of dynamic equations. The second is based on the generalization of the direct Lyapunovs method for equations on time scales, using scalar, vector and matrix-valued auxiliary functions. The third approach is the application of auxiliary functions (scalar, vector, or matrix-valued ones) in combination with differential dynamic inequalities. This is an alternative comparison method, developed for time continuous and time discrete systems. In recent decades, automatic control theory in the study of air- and spacecraft dynamics and in other areas of modern applied mathematics has encountered problems in the analysis of the behavior of solutions of time continuous-discrete linear and/or nonlinear equations of perturbed motion. In the book “Men of Ma...

  6. Super-entropic black holes and the Kerr-CFT correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinamuli, Musema [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo,200 University Ave., Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline St., Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Mann, Robert B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo,200 University Ave., Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-08-24

    We demonstrate that Kerr-CFT duality can be extended to super-entropic black holes, which have non-compact horizons with finite area. We demonstrate that this duality is robust insofar as the ultra-spinning limit of a Kerr-AdS black hole (which yields the super-entropic class) commutes with the near-horizon limit (which yields the Kerr-CFT duality). Consequently the Bekenstein-Hawking and the CFT entropies are equivalent. We show that the duality holds for both singly-spinning super-entropic black holes in 4 dimensions and for doubly-spinning super-entropic black holes of gauged supergravity in 5 dimensions. In both cases we obtain not only the expected left/right temperatures, but also temperatures associated with electric charge and with a new thermodynamic parameter specific to super-entropic black holes.

  7. Exploring entropic uncertainty relation in the Heisenberg XX model with inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Jun; Wang, Dong; Wang, Jia-Ming; Shi, Jia-Dong; Sun, Wen-Yang; Ye, Liu

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation in a two-qubit Heisenberg XX model with inhomogeneous magnetic field. It has been found that larger coupling strength J between the two spin-chain qubits can effectively reduce the entropic uncertainty. Besides, we observe the mechanics of how the inhomogeneous field influences the uncertainty, and find out that when the inhomogeneous field parameter b1. Intriguingly, the entropic uncertainty can shrink to zero when the coupling coefficients are relatively large, while the entropic uncertainty only reduces to 1 with the increase of the homogeneous magnetic field. Additionally, we observe the purity of the state and Bell non-locality and obtain that the entropic uncertainty is anticorrelated with both the purity and Bell non-locality of the evolution state.

  8. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elber, Ron [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  9. Stability of perturbed dynamic system on time scales with initial time difference

    OpenAIRE

    Yakar, Coşkun; OĞUR, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of solutions of a perturbed dynamic system with respect to an original unperturbed dynamic system, which have initial time difference, are investigated on arbitrary time scales. Notions of stability, asymptotic stability, and instability with initial time difference are introduced. Sufficient conditions of stability properties are given with the help of Lyapunov-like functions.

  10. Some nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In what follows, R denotes the set of real numbers, Z denotes the set of integers and C denotes the set of complex numbers. A time scale T is an ..... {[p − 1 + a(t)]e ¯A(t, t0) − (p − 1)}1/p for all t ∈ T0. The proof of Corollary 3.3 is complete. 4. An application. In this section, we present an example to illustrate our main results.

  11. Detection of dynamically varying interaural time differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlrausch, Armin; Le Goff, Nicolas; Breebaart, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Humans are highly sensitive to Interaural Time Differences (ITDs) in stimuli presented via headphones. For broadband noise stimuli of long durations, ITD detection thresholds can be as low as 10 to 15 ms. When the stimulus duration is shortened, thresholds increase by about a factor 2 for a tenfold...... to predict with a purely signal-driven model of perception and thus form an interesting challenge for modeling human localization....

  12. Nanoparticle induced miscibility in LCST polymer blends: critically assessing the enthalpic and entropic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Priti; Rao, Praveen; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-01-07

    The use of copolymer and polymer blends widened the possibility of creating materials with multilayered architectures. Hierarchical polymer systems with a wide array of micro and nanostructures are generated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) in partially miscible polymer blends. Various parameters like the interaction between the polymers, concentration, solvent/non-solvent ratio, and quenching temperature have to be optimized to obtain these micro/nanophase structures. Alternatively, the addition of nanoparticles is another strategy to design materials with desired hetero-phase structures. The dynamics of the polymer nanocomposite depends on the statistical ordering of polymers around the nanoparticle, which is dependent on the shape of the nanoparticle. The entropic loss due to deformation of polymer chains, like the repulsive interactions due to coiling and the attractive interactions in the case of swelling has been highlighted in this perspective article. The dissipative particle dynamics has been discussed and is correlated with the molecular dynamics simulation in the case of polymer blends. The Cahn-Hillard-Cook model on variedly shaped immobile fillers has shown difference in the propagation of the composition wave. The nanoparticle shape has a contributing effect on the polymer particle interaction, which can change the miscibility window in the case of these phase separating polymer blends. Quantitative information on the effect of spherical particles on the demixing temperature is well established and further modified to explain the percolation of rod shaped particles in the polymer blends. These models correlate well with the experimental observations in context to the dynamics induced by the nanoparticle in the demixing behavior of the polymer blend. The miscibility of the LCST polymer blend depends on the enthalpic factors like the specific interaction between the components, and the solubility product and the entropic losses occurring due

  13. Entropic lattice Boltzmann method for multiphase flows: Fluid-solid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloomi M, Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S; Karlin, Iliya V

    2015-08-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model (ELBM) for multiphase flows [A. Mazloomi M., S. S. Chikatamarla, and I. V. Karlin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 174502 (2015)] is extended to the simulation of dynamic fluid-solid interface problems. The thermodynamically consistent, nonlinearly stable ELBM together with a polynomial representation of the equation of state enables us to investigate the dynamics of the contact line in a wide range of applications, from capillary filling to liquid drop impact onto a flat surfaces with different wettability. The static interface behavior is tested by means of the liquid column in a channel to verify the Young-Laplace law. The numerical results of a capillary filling problem in a channel with wettability gradient show an excellent match with the existing analytical solution. Simulations of drop impact onto both wettable and nonwettable surfaces show that the ELBM reproduces the experimentally observed drop behavior in a quantitative manner. Results reported herein demonstrate that the present model is a promising alternative for studying the vapor-liquid-solid interface dynamics.

  14. Recurrence time statistics in low-dimensional dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, C.; Nicolis, G.; Balakrishnan, V.; Theunissen, M.

    The dynamics of transitions between the cells of a phase space partition in systems giving rise to quasi-periodic and to chaotic behavior is analyzed, with special emphasis on the statistics of recurrence times.

  15. Temporal Bias: Time-Encoded Dynamic GPCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, Manuel; Kostenis, Evi

    2017-12-01

    Evidence suggests that cells can time-encode signals for secure transport and perception of information, and it appears that this dynamic signaling is a common principle of nature to code information in time. G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling networks are no exception as their composition and signal transduction appear temporally flexible. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which GPCRs code biological information in time to create 'temporal bias.' We highlight dynamic signaling patterns from the second messenger to the receptor-ligand level and shed light on the dynamics of G-protein cycles, the kinetics of ligand-receptor interaction, and the occurrence of distinct signaling waves within the cell. A dynamic feature such as temporal bias adds to the complexity of GPCR signaling bias and gives rise to the question whether this trait could be exploited to gain control over time-encoded cell physiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arresting Strategy Based on Dynamic Criminal Networks Changing over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a sequence of dynamic criminal networks on a time series based on the dynamic network analysis (DNA. According to the change of networks’ structure, networks’ variation trend is analyzed to forecast its future structure. Finally, an optimal arresting time and priority list are designed based on our analysis. Better results can be expected than that based on social network analysis (SNA.

  17. Chemical dynamics in time and energy space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, James Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The development of a versatile picosecond ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet temporal spectrometer and its potential use for measuring internal energy redistribution in isolated molecules are described in detail. A detailed description of the double-pass Nd:YAG amplifier and the dye amplifiers is given with the pulse energies achieved in the visible, ultraviolet, and vacuum ultraviolet. The amplified visible pulses are shown to be of sub-picosecond duration and near transform limited. The instrument`s temporal response (≤10 ps) is derived from an instrument limited measurement of the dissociation lifetime of methyl iodide at 266 nm. The methyl iodide experiment is used to discuss the various sources of noise and background signals that are intrinsic to this type of experiment. Non-time-resolved experiments measuring the branching ratio and kinetic energy distributions of products from the 193 nm photodissociation of cyclopentadiene and thiophene are presented. These studies were done using the molecular beam Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy (PTS) technique. The results from the cyclopentadiene experiment confirm that H atom elimination to yield the cyclopentadienyl radical is the dominant dissociation channel. A barrier of ≥5 kcal/mol can be understood in terms of the delocalization of the radical electron of the cyclopentadienyl fragment. A concerted elimination yielding cyclopropene and acetylene was also observed and is proposed to occur via a bicyclo-[2.1.0]pent-2-ene intermediate. Two other channels, yielding acetylene plus the CH2CHCH triplet carbene, and CH2 plus 1-buten-3-yne, are postulated to occur via ring opening. The implications of the experimental results for bulk thermal oxidation and pyrolysis models are discussed. The thiophene experiment shows six competing dissociation channels. The postulated intermediates for the various thiophene dissociation channels include bicyclo, ring opened, and possibly ring contracted

  18. Analysis of Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition, as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties, such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamics simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics in terms of accuracy and stability. We further discuss the accuracy of TRBOMD beyond the linear response regime for non-equilibrium dynamics of nuclei. Our results are demonstrated through numerical experiments using a simplified one-dimensional model for Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  19. Predicting the Cosmological Constant from the Causal Entropic Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael; Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2007-05-01

    We compute the expected value of the cosmological constant in our universe from the Causal Entropic Principle. Since observers must obey the laws of thermodynamics and causality, the principle asserts that physical parameters are most likely to be found in the range of values for which the total entropy production within a causally connected region is maximized. Despite the absence of more explicit anthropic criteria, the resulting probability distribution turns out to be in excellent agreement with observation. In particular, we find that dust heated by stars dominates the entropy production, demonstrating the remarkable power of this thermodynamic selection criterion. The alternative approach-weighting by the number of"observers per baryon" -- is less well-defined, requires problematic assumptions about the nature of observers, and yet prefers values larger than present experimental bounds.

  20. Predicting the Cosmological Constant from the CausalEntropic Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousso, Raphael; Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2007-02-20

    We compute the expected value of the cosmological constant in our universe from the Causal Entropic Principle. Since observers must obey the laws of thermodynamics and causality, it asserts that physical parameters are most likely to be found in the range of values for which the total entropy production within a causally connected region is maximized. Despite the absence of more explicit anthropic criteria, the resulting probability distribution turns out to be in excellent agreement with observation. In particular, we find that dust heated by stars dominates the entropy production, demonstrating the remarkable power of this thermodynamic selection criterion. The alternative approach--weighting by the number of ''observers per baryon''--is less well-defined, requires problematic assumptions about the nature of observers, and yet prefers values larger than present experimental bounds.

  1. Entropic Profiler - detection of conservation in genomes using information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Francisco; Freitas, Ana T; Almeida, Jonas S; Vinga, Susana

    2009-05-05

    In the last decades, with the successive availability of whole genome sequences, many research efforts have been made to mathematically model DNA. Entropic Profiles (EP) were proposed recently as a new measure of continuous entropy of genome sequences. EP represent local information plots related to DNA randomness and are based on information theory and statistical concepts. They express the weighed relative abundance of motifs for each position in genomes. Their study is very relevant because under or over-representation segments are often associated with significant biological meaning. The Entropic Profiler application here presented is a new tool designed to detect and extract under and over-represented DNA segments in genomes by using EP. It allows its computation in a very efficient way by recurring to improved algorithms and data structures, which include modified suffix trees. Available through a web interface http://kdbio.inesc-id.pt/software/ep/ and as downloadable source code, it allows to study positions and to search for motifs inside the whole sequence or within a specified range. DNA sequences can be entered from different sources, including FASTA files, pre-loaded examples or resuming a previously saved work. Besides the EP value plots, p-values and z-scores for each motif are also computed, along with the Chaos Game Representation of the sequence. EP are directly related with the statistical significance of motifs and can be considered as a new method to extract and classify significant regions in genomes and estimate local scales in DNA. The present implementation establishes an efficient and useful tool for whole genome analysis.

  2. Tuning the entropic spring to dictate order and functionality in polymer conjugated peptide biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keten, Sinan

    Hybrid peptide-polymer conjugates have the potential to combine the advantages of natural proteins and synthetic polymers, resulting in biomaterials with improved stability, controlled assembly, and tailored functionalities. However, the effect of polymer conjugation on peptide structural organization and functionality, along with the behavior of polymers at the interface with biomolecules remain to be fully understood. This talk will summarize our recent efforts towards establishing a modeling framework to design entropic forces in helix-polymer conjugates and polymer-conjugated peptide nanotubes to achieve hierarchical self-assembling systems with predictable order. The first part of the talk will discuss how self-assembly principles found in biology, combined with polymer physics concepts can be used to create artificial membranes that mimic certain features of ion channels. Thermodynamics and kinetics aspects of self-assembly and how it governs the growth and stacking sequences of peptide nanotubes will be discussed, along with its implications for nanoscale transport. The second part of the talk will review advances related to modeling polymer conjugated coiled coils at relevant length and time scales. Atomistic simulations combined with sampling techniques will be presented to discuss the energy landscapes governing coiled-coil stability, revealing cascades of events governing disassembly. This will be followed by a discussion of mechanisms through which polymers can stabilize small proteins, such as shielding of solvents, and how specific peptide sequences can reciprocate by altering polymer conformations. Correlations between mechanical and thermal stability of peptides will be discussed. Finally, coarse-grained simulations will provide insight into how the location of polymer attachment changes entropic forces and higher-level organization in helix bundle assemblies. Our findings set the stage for a materials-by-design capability towards dictating complex

  3. Time perception and dynamics of facial expressions of emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L Fayolle

    Full Text Available Two experiments were run to examine the effects of dynamic displays of facial expressions of emotions on time judgments. The participants were given a temporal bisection task with emotional facial expressions presented in a dynamic or a static display. Two emotional facial expressions and a neutral expression were tested and compared. Each of the emotional expressions had the same affective valence (unpleasant, but one was high-arousing (expressing anger and the other low-arousing (expressing sadness. Our results showed that time judgments are highly sensitive to movements in facial expressions and the emotions expressed. Indeed, longer perceived durations were found in response to the dynamic faces and the high-arousing emotional expressions compared to the static faces and low-arousing expressions. In addition, the facial movements amplified the effect of emotions on time perception. Dynamic facial expressions are thus interesting tools for examining variations in temporal judgments in different social contexts.

  4. Time perception and dynamics of facial expressions of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Sophie L; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were run to examine the effects of dynamic displays of facial expressions of emotions on time judgments. The participants were given a temporal bisection task with emotional facial expressions presented in a dynamic or a static display. Two emotional facial expressions and a neutral expression were tested and compared. Each of the emotional expressions had the same affective valence (unpleasant), but one was high-arousing (expressing anger) and the other low-arousing (expressing sadness). Our results showed that time judgments are highly sensitive to movements in facial expressions and the emotions expressed. Indeed, longer perceived durations were found in response to the dynamic faces and the high-arousing emotional expressions compared to the static faces and low-arousing expressions. In addition, the facial movements amplified the effect of emotions on time perception. Dynamic facial expressions are thus interesting tools for examining variations in temporal judgments in different social contexts.

  5. Exposure Time Optimization for Highly Dynamic Star Trackers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguo Wei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers.

  6. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  7. Quantum UV/IR relations and holographic dark energy from entropic force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Wang, Yi

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the implications of the entropic force formalism proposed by Verlinde. We show that an UV/IR relation proposed by Cohen et al., as well as an uncertainty principle proposed by Hogan can be derived from the entropic force formalism. We show that applying the entropic force formalism to cosmology, there is an additional term in the Friedmann equation, which can be identified as holographic dark energy. We also propose an intuitive picture of holographic screen, which can be thought of as an improvement of Susskind's holographic screen.

  8. Neutron star dynamics under time-dependent external torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gügercinoǧlu, Erbil; Alpar, M. Ali

    2017-11-01

    The two-component model describes neutron star dynamics incorporating the response of the superfluid interior. Conventional solutions and applications involve constant external torques, as appropriate for radio pulsars on dynamical time-scales. We present the general solution of two-component dynamics under arbitrary time-dependent external torques, with internal torques that are linear in the rotation rates, or with the extremely non-linear internal torques due to vortex creep. The two-component model incorporating the response of linear or non-linear internal torques can now be applied not only to radio pulsars but also to magnetars and to neutron stars in binary systems, with strong observed variability and noise in the spin-down or spin-up rates. Our results allow the extraction of the time-dependent external torques from the observed spin-down (or spin-up) time series, \\dot{Ω }(t). Applications are discussed.

  9. Innovative Tools for Real-Time Simulation of Dynamic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palli, Gianluca; Carloni, Raffaella; Melchiorri, Claudio

    In this paper, we present a software architecture, based on RTAI-Linux, for the real-time simulation of dynamic systems and for the rapid prototyping of digital controllers. Our aim is to simplify the testing phase of digital controllers by providing the real-time simulation of the plant with the

  10. Dynamic vehicle routing with time windows in theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Osta, van J.P.; Veen, van B.; Krevelen, van R.; Stam, A.; Kok, J.N.; Bäck, T.H.W.; Michael, Emmerich T. M.

    2016-01-01

    The vehicle routing problem is a classical combinatorial optimization problem. This work is about a variant of the vehicle routing problem with dynamically changing orders and time windows. In real-world applications often the demands change during operation time. New orders occur and others are

  11. Modeling dynamic effects of promotion on interpurchase times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fok (Dennis); R. Paap (Richard); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we put forward a duration model to analyze the dynamic effects of marketing-mix variables on interpurchase times. We extend the accelerated failure-time model with an autoregressive structure. An important feature of our model is that it allows for different long-run and

  12. Innovative tools for real-time simulation of dynamic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palli, Gianluca; Carloni, Raffaella; Melchiorri, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a software architecture, based on RTAI-Linux, for the real-time simulation of dynamic systems and for the rapid prototyping of digital controllers. Our aim is to simplify the testing phase of digital controllers by providing the real-time simulation of the plant with the

  13. Metagenomics meets time series analysis: unraveling microbial community dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faust, K.; Lahti, L.M.; Gonze, D.; Vos, de W.M.; Raes, J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in the number of microbial time series studies offers new insights into the stability and dynamics of microbial communities, from the world's oceans to human microbiota. Dedicated time series analysis tools allow taking full advantage of these data. Such tools can reveal periodic

  14. Protein adsorption induced bridging flocculation: the dominant entropic pathway for nano-bio complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Necla Mine; Narsimhan, Ganesan; Campanella, Osvaldo H.

    2016-02-01

    Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic contribution compared to the second type. The observed favorable enthalpy gain in both modes is attributed to non-covalent complexation whereas the entropy gain is associated with the re-organization of the silica surface including not only the solvent and counter ion release, but also the protein's conformational changes. Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain non-covalent complexations for each binding mode by relating the changes in the zeta potential and hydrodynamic radius to the obtained adsorption isotherms and calorimetry profile. Based on all these findings, it is proposed that lysozyme adsorption on nano-silica is the result of protein-nanoparticle and protein-protein interactions that further leads to spontaneous, non-directional and random complexation of silica through bridging flocculation.Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic

  15. Incubation time approach to rock dynamic strength characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Y.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic characterization of rocks under intermediate and high strain rates is fundamental to understand the material behaviour in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive laws is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. These data are necessary and require experimental techniques able to induce on the rock materials state of loading reproducing the actual dynamic condition. Consider the work [1]. The dynamic characterization has been carried out by means of two special apparatus: the split Hopkinson tension bar and the hydro-pneumatic machine . These equipments are briefly described with a discussion on the results of dynamic tension tests at three different strain rates (0.1, 10, 100 strain/s on Onsernone Orthogneiss for loading directions 0∘, 45∘ and 90∘ with respect to the schistosity. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behaviour, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate, up to about two times with respect to the quasi-static conditions in the case of 0∘ and 45∘ orientation and more than three times in the case of 90 at high strain rates.

  16. Recovery time after localized perturbations in complex dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Chiranjit; Kittel, Tim; Choudhary, Anshul; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-10-01

    Maintaining the synchronous motion of dynamical systems interacting on complex networks is often critical to their functionality. However, real-world networked dynamical systems operating synchronously are prone to random perturbations driving the system to arbitrary states within the corresponding basin of attraction, thereby leading to epochs of desynchronized dynamics with a priori unknown durations. Thus, it is highly relevant to have an estimate of the duration of such transient phases before the system returns to synchrony, following a random perturbation to the dynamical state of any particular node of the network. We address this issue here by proposing the framework of single-node recovery time (SNRT) which provides an estimate of the relative time scales underlying the transient dynamics of the nodes of a network during its restoration to synchrony. We utilize this in differentiating the particularly slow nodes of the network from the relatively fast nodes, thus identifying the critical nodes which when perturbed lead to significantly enlarged recovery time of the system before resuming synchronized operation. Further, we reveal explicit relationships between the SNRT values of a network, and its global relaxation time when starting all the nodes from random initial conditions. Earlier work on relaxation time generally focused on investigating its dependence on macroscopic topological properties of the respective network. However, we employ the proposed concept for deducing microscopic relationships between topological features of nodes and their respective SNRT values. The framework of SNRT is further extended to a measure of resilience of the different nodes of a networked dynamical system. We demonstrate the potential of SNRT in networks of Rössler oscillators on paradigmatic topologies and a model of the power grid of the United Kingdom with second-order Kuramoto-type nodal dynamics illustrating the conceivable practical applicability of the proposed

  17. The Effects of Minimal Length, Maximal Momentum, and Minimal Momentum in Entropic Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Wen Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modified entropic force law is studied by using a new kind of generalized uncertainty principle which contains a minimal length, a minimal momentum, and a maximal momentum. Firstly, the quantum corrections to the thermodynamics of a black hole are investigated. Then, according to Verlinde’s theory, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP corrected entropic force is obtained. The result shows that the GUP corrected entropic force is related not only to the properties of the black holes but also to the Planck length and the dimensionless constants α0 and β0. Moreover, based on the GUP corrected entropic force, we also derive the modified Einstein’s field equation (EFE and the modified Friedmann equation.

  18. From the entropic force to the Friedmann equation in rainbow gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiedgar, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    In Verlinde's formalism, gravity is an emergent phenomenon which can be interpreted as an entropic force. Borrowing the modified entropy-area relation from rainbow gravity, one can derive the corrections to the gravitational force from the viewpoint of entropic force. The modified gravitational force can be used to find the Friedmann equation in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in the realm of high-energy physics.

  19. Unification of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in a Modified Entropic Force Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Xin

    2010-01-01

    In Verlinde's entropic force scenario of gravity, Newton's laws and Einstein equations can be obtained from the first pinciples and general assumptions. However, the equipartition law of energy is invalid at very low temperatures. We show clearly that the threshold of the equipartition law of energy is related with horizon of the universe. Thus, a one-dimension Debye (ODD) model in the direction of radius of the modified entropic force (MEF) maybe suitable in description of the accelerated ex...

  20. Internal dynamics of proteins: short time and long time motions of aromatic sidechains in PTI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karplus, M.; Gelin, B.R.; McCammon, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    Theoretical approaches to the internal dynamics of proteins are outlined and illustrated by application to the aromatic sidechain motions of tyrosines in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. High frequency torsional oscillations are obtained from a molecular dynamics simulation, while the longer time ring rotations are analyzed by use of adiabatic energy minimization and special transition-state trajectory techniques.

  1. Time course of dynamic range adaptation in the auditory nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Grace I.; Dean, Isabel; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Auditory adaptation to sound-level statistics occurs as early as in the auditory nerve (AN), the first stage of neural auditory processing. In addition to firing rate adaptation characterized by a rate decrement dependent on previous spike activity, AN fibers show dynamic range adaptation, which is characterized by a shift of the rate-level function or dynamic range toward the most frequently occurring levels in a dynamic stimulus, thereby improving the precision of coding of the most common sound levels (Wen B, Wang GI, Dean I, Delgutte B. J Neurosci 29: 13797–13808, 2009). We investigated the time course of dynamic range adaptation by recording from AN fibers with a stimulus in which the sound levels periodically switch from one nonuniform level distribution to another (Dean I, Robinson BL, Harper NS, McAlpine D. J Neurosci 28: 6430–6438, 2008). Dynamic range adaptation occurred rapidly, but its exact time course was difficult to determine directly from the data because of the concomitant firing rate adaptation. To characterize the time course of dynamic range adaptation without the confound of firing rate adaptation, we developed a phenomenological “dual adaptation” model that accounts for both forms of AN adaptation. When fitted to the data, the model predicts that dynamic range adaptation occurs as rapidly as firing rate adaptation, over 100–400 ms, and the time constants of the two forms of adaptation are correlated. These findings suggest that adaptive processing in the auditory periphery in response to changes in mean sound level occurs rapidly enough to have significant impact on the coding of natural sounds. PMID:22457465

  2. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Seonghwan, E-mail: Seonghwan.Yee@Beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  3. A look at dynamic time warping in seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikesell, T. D.; Malcolm, A. E.; Mordret, A.; Bozdag, E.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic time warping (DTW) is a method used to compare two time series. The idea is to search for a warping function that minimizes the misfit between the two time series. In seismology we can use DTW to measure arrival time differences in seismic traces or spatial differences in seismic images. Here we give an overview of the method and applications in seismology. We focus on a coda wave interferometry example and a waveform inversion example. We will cover the advantages of dynamic time warping; for example, DTW has been shown to outperform windowed-cross correlation when the signal-to-noise ratio is low. Finally, we will highlight new directions in which this method may find more application in seismology.

  4. A Novel Time Synchronization Method for Dynamic Reconfigurable Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weigong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UM-BUS is a novel dynamically reconfigurable high-speed serial bus for embedded systems. It can achieve fault tolerance by detecting the channel status in real time and reconfigure dynamically at run-time. The bus supports direct interconnections between up to eight master nodes and multiple slave nodes. In order to solve the time synchronization problem among master nodes, this paper proposes a novel time synchronization method, which can meet the requirement of time precision in UM-BUS. In this proposed method, time is firstly broadcasted through time broadcast packets. Then, the transmission delay and time deviations via three handshakes during link self-checking and channel detection can be worked out referring to the IEEE 1588 protocol. Thereby, each node calibrates its own time according to the broadcasted time. The proposed method has been proved to meet the requirement of real-time time synchronization. The experimental results show that the synchronous precision can achieve a bias less than 20 ns.

  5. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, Dan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL; Xu, Tingting [ORNL; Ripp, Steven Anthony [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  6. Real-time bioluminescent tracking of cellular population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  7. Verification of Continuous Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Wisniewski, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    to enable formal verification of temporal properties of dynamical systems without simulating any system trajectory, which is currently not possible. Therefore, conditions for obtaining sound, complete, and refinable abstractions are set up. The novelty of the method is the partitioning of the state space......This paper presents a method for abstracting continuous dynamical systems by timed automata. The abstraction is based on partitioning the state space of a dynamical system using positive invariant sets, which form cells that represent locations of a timed automaton. The abstraction is intended...... of the verification process. The proposed abstraction is applied to two examples, which illustrate how sound and complete abstractions are generated and the type of specification we can check. Finally, an example shows how the compositionality of the abstraction can be used to analyze a high-dimensional system....

  8. Waiting time dynamics of priority-queue networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byungjoon; Goh, K-I; Kim, I-M

    2009-05-01

    We study the dynamics of priority-queue networks, generalizations of the binary interacting priority-queue model introduced by Oliveira and Vazquez [Physica A 388, 187 (2009)]. We found that the original AND-type protocol for interacting tasks is not scalable for the queue networks with loops because the dynamics becomes frozen due to the priority conflicts. We then consider a scalable interaction protocol, an OR-type one, and examine the effects of the network topology and the number of queues on the waiting time distributions of the priority-queue networks, finding that they exhibit power-law tails in all cases considered, yet with model-dependent power-law exponents. We also show that the synchronicity in task executions, giving rise to priority conflicts in the priority-queue networks, is a relevant factor in the queue dynamics that can change the power-law exponent of the waiting time distribution.

  9. Complexity, Sustainability, Justice, and Meaning: Chronological Versus Dynamical Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Velasco

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Times New Roman;">Abstract: It is shown that time may be appreciated in at least two senses: chronological and dynamical. Chronological time is the time of our naïve acquaintance as transient beings. At its most extensive scale, it corresponds to history encompassing both the abiotic and the biotic  universe. Dynamical time, deriving from classical mechanics, is the time embraced by most of the laws of physics. It concerns itself only with present conditions since it is held that that the past may be reconstructed from the present (literally and the future predicted from the present, a position known as Laplacian determinism.

    Times New Roman;"> 

    Times New Roman;">Nonlinear dynamics has shown the fallacy of this supposition because, of necessity, the concrete values that may be assumed in the variables of the equations of motion constituting the laws of physics (i.e. the present or starting conditions as a result of the spontaneous or intentional interaction of subject (or measuring systems and of object (or measured systems, cannot be of infinite precision. Indeed, even if they could be, it is not at all clear that they would permit Laplacian determinism because of what is thought to be the ubiquity of K-flow dynamics in nature in which even infinite past information leading to the present cannot yield prediction of the future. In consequence, nonlinear dynamics, in rebellion against dynamical time, generates a primitive form of history distinguishing past, present, and future that may be termed nonlinear dynamical hysteresis.

  10. Dynamic modelling of heavy metals - time scales and target loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch, M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade steady-state methods have been developed to assess critical loads of metals avoiding long-term risks in view of food quality and eco-toxicological effects on organisms in soils and surface waters. However, dynamic models are needed to estimate the times involved in attaining a

  11. Development and Analysis of Dynamic Time Based Pricing Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An algorithm is developed to impose RTFPP scheme on given user, in peak periods, for billing. To show the benefits, diverse realistic user load profiles are imposed with developed algorithm in MATLAB and results are evaluated and analysed. Keywords: Load Management, Residential demand response Dynamic time ...

  12. 'Human paced' walking: Followers adopt stride time dynamics of leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmelat, V.C.M.; Delignières, D.; Torre, K.; Beek, P.J.; Daffertshofer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Isochronous cueing is widely used in gait rehabilitation even though it alters the stride-time dynamics toward anti-persistent rather than the persistent, fractal fluctuations characteristic of human walking. In the present experiment we tested an alternative cueing method: pacing by a human. To

  13. Additive nonparametric reconstruction of dynamical systems from time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Kurths, Jürgen; Mandelj, Simon

    2005-01-01

    We present a nonparametric way to retrieve an additive system of differential equations in embedding space from a single time series. These equations can be treated with dynamical systems theory and allow for long-term predictions. We apply our method to a modified chaotic Chua oscillator in order to demonstrate its potential.

  14. Exponential stability of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffoul Youssef N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the exponential stability of the zero solution to a system of dynamic equations on time scales. We do this by defining appropriate Lyapunov-type functions and then formulate certain inequalities on these functions. Several examples are given.

  15. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Roger M; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  16. Dynamic Programming based Time-Delay Estimation (TDE) Technique for Analysis of Time-varying Time-delay

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Deepak K; Fonck, Raymond R

    2008-01-01

    A new time-delay estimation (TDE) technique based on dynamic programming is developed, to measures the time-varying time-delay between two signals. Dynamic programming based TDE technique provides a frequency response 5 to 10 times higher than previously known TDE techniques, namely those based on time-lag cross-correlation or wavelet analysis. Effects of frequency spectrum, signal-to-noise ratio and amplitude of time-delay on response (represented as transfer function) of TDE technique is studied using simulated data signals. Transfer function for the technique decreases with increase in noise in signal; however it is independent of signal spectrum shape. Dynamic programming based TDE technique is applied to the Beam-Emission-Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic data to measure poloidal velocity fluctuations, which led to the observation of theoretically predicted zonal flows in high-temperature tokamak plasmas.

  17. Time-series analysis of Music: Perceptual and Information Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus T. Pearce

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dean and Bailes (2010 provide a tutorial on the use of time-series analysis in research on music perception and a study of the influence of acoustic factors on real-time perception of music. They illustrate their approach with a detailed case study of an electroacoustic composition by Trevor Wishart. In this commentary, I discuss four aspects of Dean and Bailes’ presentation: first, the importance of focusing on dynamic changes in musical structure; second, the benefits of computer-generated music for research on music perception; third, the need for caution in averaging responses from multiple listeners; and finally, the role of time-series analysis in understanding computational information-dynamic models of music cognition.

  18. Electro-suppression of water nano-droplets' solidification in no man's land: Electromagnetic fields' entropic trapping of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Prithwish K.; Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding water solidification, especially in "No Man's Land" (NML) (150 K ice-crystallite formation is inevitably present electromagnetic fields' role. Here, we employ non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of aggressively quenched supercooled water nano-droplets in the gas phase under NML conditions, in externally applied electromagnetic (e/m) fields, elucidating significant differences between effects of static and oscillating fields: although static fields induce "electro-freezing," e/m fields exhibit the contrary - solidification inhibition. This anti-freeze action extends not only to crystal-ice formation but also restricts amorphisation, i.e., suppression of low-density amorphous ice which forms otherwise in zero-field NML environments. E/m-field applications maintain water in the deeply supercooled state in an "entropic trap," which is ripe for industrial impacts in cryo-freezing, etc.

  19. Observing Bridge Dynamic Deflection in Green Time by Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengxin; Zhang, Guojian; Zhao, Yongqian; Chen, Mingzhi

    2018-01-01

    As traditional surveying methods are limited to observe bridge dynamic deflection; information technology is adopted to observe bridge dynamic deflection in Green time. Information technology used in this study means that we use digital cameras to photograph the bridge in red time as a zero image. Then, a series of successive images are photographed in green time. Deformation point targets are identified and located by Hough transform. With reference to the control points, the deformation values of these deformation points are obtained by differencing the successive images with a zero image, respectively. Results show that the average measurement accuracies of C0 are 0.46 pixels, 0.51 pixels and 0.74 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction. The average measurement accuracies of C1 are 0.43 pixels, 0.43 pixels and 0.67 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction in these tests. The maximal bridge deflection is 44.16mm, which is less than 75mm (Bridge deflection tolerance value). Information technology in this paper can monitor bridge dynamic deflection and depict deflection trend curves of the bridge in real time. It can provide data support for the site decisions to the bridge structure safety.

  20. Dynamic vehicle routing with time windows in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiwei; van Osta, Jan-Paul; van Veen, Barry; van Krevelen, Rick; van Klaveren, Richard; Stam, Andries; Kok, Joost; Bäck, Thomas; Emmerich, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The vehicle routing problem is a classical combinatorial optimization problem. This work is about a variant of the vehicle routing problem with dynamically changing orders and time windows. In real-world applications often the demands change during operation time. New orders occur and others are canceled. In this case new schedules need to be generated on-the-fly. Online optimization algorithms for dynamical vehicle routing address this problem but so far they do not consider time windows. Moreover, to match the scenarios found in real-world problems adaptations of benchmarks are required. In this paper, a practical problem is modeled based on the procedure of daily routing of a delivery company. New orders by customers are introduced dynamically during the working day and need to be integrated into the schedule. A multiple ant colony algorithm combined with powerful local search procedures is proposed to solve the dynamic vehicle routing problem with time windows. The performance is tested on a new benchmark based on simulations of a working day. The problems are taken from Solomon's benchmarks but a certain percentage of the orders are only revealed to the algorithm during operation time. Different versions of the MACS algorithm are tested and a high performing variant is identified. Finally, the algorithm is tested in situ: In a field study, the algorithm schedules a fleet of cars for a surveillance company. We compare the performance of the algorithm to that of the procedure used by the company and we summarize insights gained from the implementation of the real-world study. The results show that the multiple ant colony algorithm can get a much better solution on the academic benchmark problem and also can be integrated in a real-world environment.

  1. The impact of conventional space-time aggregation on the dynamics of continuous-time rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, John; Bulla, Jan; Carey-Smith, Trevor; Thomson, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall is a continuous-time phenomenon typically characterized by precipitation states such as rain, showers, and dry whose dependence varies over a variety of space-time scales. Here attention is focused on the effective identification of rain and shower precipitation states over a region where these states have been determined by a hidden semi-Markov model of continuous-time precipitation. The states identified provide an accurate description of precipitation dynamics and can be regarded as close proxies to synoptic weather types of the same name. The stochastic properties and structure of these states (rather than precipitation amounts) are explored and delineated. A primary objective of the paper is to better understand the impact of conventional space-time aggregation on the dynamics of rainfall. What aggregation time scales result in more faithful descriptions of the space-time dynamics of continuous-time rainfall? While rain might be expected to be more spatially coherent than showers and involve longer time scales, dry periods involve much longer time and space scales again than either rain or showers. These issues are discussed and conclusions drawn which provide guidance and insights useful for the development of space-time precipitation models and, more generally, the design of rainfall observation networks and data archives.

  2. Dynamic time warping for temperature compensation in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Alexander; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring uses ultrasonic waves to identify changes in structures. To identify these changes, most guided wave methods require a pristine baseline measurement with which other measurements are compared. Damage signatures arise when there is a deviation between the baseline and the recorded measurement. However, temperature significantly complicates this analysis by creating misalignment between the baseline and measurements. This leads to false alarms of damage and significantly reduces the reliability of these systems. Several methods have been created to account for these temperature perturbations. Yet, most of these compensation methods fail in harsh, highly variable temperature conditions or require a prohibitive amount of prior data. In this paper, we use an algorithm known as dynamic time warping to compensate for temperature in these harsh conditions. We demonstrate that dynamic time warping is able to account for temperature variations whereas the more traditional baseline signal stretch method is unable to resolve damage under high temperature fluctuations.

  3. Fixed-Time Synchronization for Hybrid Coupled Dynamical Networks with Multilinks and Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolin Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the problem of fixed/finite-time synchronization of hybrid coupled dynamical networks. The considered dynamical networks with multilinks contain only one transmittal time-varying delay for each subnetwork, which makes us get hold of more interesting and practical points. Two kinds of delay-dependent feedback controllers with multilinks as well as appropriate Lyapunov functions are defined to achieve the goal of fixed-time synchronization and finite-time synchronization for the networks. Some novel and effective criteria of hybrid coupled networks are derived based on fixed-time and finite-time stability analysis. Finally, two numerical simulation examples are given to show the effectiveness of the results proposed in our paper.

  4. Modeling the Nonlinear Time Dynamics of Multidimensional Hormonal Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Daniel M.; Wang, Xin; Pincus, Steven M.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2012-01-01

    In most hormonal systems (as well as many physiological systems more generally), the chemical signals from the brain, which drive much of the dynamics, can not be observed in humans. By the time the molecules reach peripheral blood, they have been so diluted so as to not be assayable. It is not possible to invasively (surgically) measure these agents in the brain. This creates a difficult situation in terms of assessing whether or not the dynamics may have changed due to disease or aging. Moreover, most biological feedforward and feedback interactions occur after time delays, and the time delays need to be properly estimated. We address the following two questions: (1) Is it possible to devise a combination of clinical experiments by which, via exogenous inputs, the hormonal system can be perturbed to new steady-states in such a way that information about the unobserved components can be ascertained; and, (2) Can one devise methods to estimate (possibly, time-varying) time delays between components of a multidimensional nonlinear time series, which are more robust than traditional methods? We present methods for both questions, using the Stress (ACTH-cortisol) hormonal system as a prototype, but the approach is more broadly applicable. PMID:22977290

  5. Online dynamic mode decomposition for time-varying systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Rowley, Clarence; Deem, Eric; Cattafesta, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a popular technique for modal decomposition, flow analysis, and reduced-order modeling. In situations where a system is time varying, one would like to update the system's description online as time evolves. This work provides an efficient method for computing the DMD matrix in real time, updating the approximation of a system's dynamics as new data becomes available. The algorithm does not require storage of past data, and computes the exact DMD matrix using rank-1 updates. A weighting factor that places less weight on older data can be incorporated in a straightforward manner, making the method particularly well suited to time-varying systems. The efficiency of the method is compared against several existing DMD algorithms: for problems in which the state dimension is less than about 200, the proposed algorithm is the most efficient for real-time computation, and it can be orders of magnitude more efficient than the standard DMD algorithm. The method is demonstrated on several examples, including a time-varying linear system and a more complex example using data from a wind tunnel experiment. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0289, and by DARPA award HR0011-16-C-0116.

  6. Short-time dynamics of molecular junctions after projective measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gaomin; Xing, Yanxia; Wang, Jian

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study the short-time dynamics of a molecular junction described by Anderson-Holstein model using full-counting statistics after projective measurement. The coupling between the central quantum dot (QD) and two leads was turned on at remote past and the system is evolved to steady state at time t =0 , when we perform the projective measurement in one of the lead. Generating function for the charge transfer is expressed as a Fredholm determinant in terms of Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function in the time domain. It is found that the current is not constant at short times indicating that the measurement does perturb the system. We numerically compare the current behaviors after the projective measurement with those in the transient regime where the subsystems are connected at t =0 . The universal scaling for high-order cumulants is observed for the case with zero QD occupation due to the unidirectional transport at short times. The influences of electron-phonon interaction on short-time dynamics of electric current, shot noise, and differential conductance are analyzed.

  7. Controller synthesis for dynamic hierarchical real-time plants using timed automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bin Waez, Md Tawhid; Wasowski, Andrzej; Dingel, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    two essential features for industrial systems: (i) compositional modeling with reusable designs for different contexts, and (ii) state-space reduction technique. Timed process automata model dynamic networks of continuous-time communicating plant processes which can activate other plant processes. We....... In this article, we demonstrate the theoretical framework of timed process automata and the effectiveness of the proposed state-space reduction technique by extending the case study....

  8. Recurrence time statistics in deterministic and stochastic dynamical systems in continuous time: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, V.; Nicolis, G.; Nicolis, C.

    2000-03-01

    The dynamics of transitions between the cells of a finite phase-space partition is analyzed for deterministic and stochastic dynamical systems in continuous time. Special emphasis is placed on the dependence of mean recurrence time on the resolution τ between successive observations, in the limit τ-->0. In deterministic systems the limit is found to exist, and to depend on only the intrinsic parameters of the underlying dynamics. In stochastic systems two different cases are identified, leading to a τ-independent behavior and a τ1/2 behavior, depending on whether a finite speed of propagation of the signals exists or not. An extension of the results to the second moment of the recurrence time is outlined.

  9. Chemical and entropic control on the molecular self-assembly process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Han, Patrick; Hitosugi, Taro

    2017-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly refers to the spontaneous assembly of molecules into larger structures. In order to exploit molecular self-assembly for the bottom-up synthesis of nanomaterials, the effects of chemical control (strength of the directionality in the intermolecular interaction) and entropic control (temperature) on the self-assembly process should be clarified. Here we present a theoretical methodology that unambiguously distinguishes the effects of chemical and entropic control on the self-assembly of molecules adsorbed to metal surfaces. While chemical control simply increases the formation probability of ordered structures, entropic control induces a variety of effects. These effects range from fine structure modulation of ordered structures, through to degrading large, amorphous structures into short, chain-shaped structures. Counterintuitively, the latter effect shows that entropic control can improve molecular ordering. By identifying appropriate levels of chemical and entropic control, our methodology can, therefore, identify strategies for optimizing the yield of desired nanostructures from the molecular self-assembly process. PMID:28195175

  10. Prediction of dynamic expected time to system failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Deog Yeon; Lee, Chong Chul [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The mean time to failure (MTTF) expressing the mean value of the system life is a measure of system effectiveness. To estimate the remaining life of component and/or system, the dynamic mean time to failure concept is suggested. It is the time-dependent property depending on the status of components. The Kalman filter is used to estimate the reliability of components using the on-line information (directly measured sensor output or device-specific diagnostics in the intelligent sensor) in form of the numerical value (state factor). This factor considers the persistency of the fault condition and confidence level in measurement. If there is a complex system with many components, each calculated reliability`s of components are combined, which results in the dynamic MTTF of system. The illustrative examples are discussed. The results show that the dynamic MTTF can well express the component and system failure behaviour whether any kinds of failure are occurred or not. 9 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  11. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness with Nearly Time-Independent Hamiltonian Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Nakata

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum randomness is an essential key to understanding the dynamics of complex many-body systems and also a powerful tool for quantum engineering. However, exact realizations of quantum randomness take an extremely long time and are infeasible in many-body systems, leading to the notion of quantum pseudorandomness, also known as unitary designs. Here, to explore microscopic dynamics of generating quantum pseudorandomness in many-body systems, we provide new efficient constructions of unitary designs and propose a design Hamiltonian, a random Hamiltonian of which dynamics always forms a unitary design after a threshold time. The new constructions are based on the alternate applications of random potentials in the generalized position and momentum spaces, and we provide explicit quantum circuits generating quantum pseudorandomness significantly more efficient than previous ones. We then provide a design Hamiltonian in disordered systems with periodically changing spin-glass-type interactions. The design Hamiltonian generates quantum pseudorandomness in a constant time even in the system composed of a large number of spins. We also point out the close relationship between the design Hamiltonian and quantum chaos.

  12. Dynamical continuous time random Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiaosong

    2016-03-01

    The Lévy flights' diffusive behavior is studied within the framework of the dynamical continuous time random walk (DCTRW) method, while the nonlinear friction is introduced in each step. Through the DCTRW method, Lévy random walker in each step flies by obeying the Newton's Second Law while the nonlinear friction f(v) = - γ0v - γ2v3 being considered instead of Stokes friction. It is shown that after introducing the nonlinear friction, the superdiffusive Lévy flights converges, behaves localization phenomenon with long time limit, but for the Lévy index μ = 2 case, it is still Brownian motion.

  13. q-entropies and the entanglement dynamics of two-qubits interacting with an environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hamadou-Ibrahim, A.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate entropic aspects of the quantum entanglement dynamics of two-qubits systems interacting with an environment. In particular we consider the detection, based on the violation of classical entropic inequalities involving q-entropies, of the phenomenon of entanglement disappearance and subsequent entanglement revival during the alluded two-qubits' evolution.

  14. Enthalpic and entropic stages in alpha-helical peptide unfolding, from laser T-jump/UV Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Gurusamy; Hu, Ying; Bender, Gretchen M; Getahun, Zelleka; DeGrado, William F; Spiro, Thomas G

    2007-10-24

    The alpha-helix is a ubiquitous structural element in proteins, and a number of studies have addressed the mechanism of helix formation and melting in simple peptides. However, fundamental issues remain to be resolved, particularly the temperature (T) dependence of the rate. In this work, we report application of a novel kHz repetition rate solid-state tunable NIR (pump) and deep UV Raman (probe) laser system to study the dynamics of helix unfolding in Ac-GSPEA3KA4KA4-CO-D-Arg-CONH2, a peptide designed for helix stabilization in aqueous solution. Its T-dependent UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra, excited at 197 nm for optimal enhancement of amide vibrations, were decomposed into variable contributions from helix and coil spectra. The helix fractions derived from the UVRR spectra and from far UV CD spectra were coincident at low T but deviated increasingly at high T, the UVRR curve giving higher helix content. This difference is consistent with the greater sensitivity of UVRR spectra to local conformation than CD. After a laser-induced T-jump, the UVRR-determined helix fractions defined monoexponential decays, with time-constants of approximately 120 ns, independent of the final T (Tf = 18-61 degrees C), provided the initial T (Ti) was held constant (6 degrees C). However, there was also a prompt loss of helicity, whose amplitude increased with increasing Tf, thereby defining an initial enthalpic phase, distinct from the subsequent entropic phase. These phases are attributed to disruption of H-bonds followed by reorientation of peptide links, as the chain is extended. When Ti was raised in parallel with Tf (10 degrees C T-jumps), the prompt phase merged into an accelerating slow phase, an effect attributable to the shifting distribution of initial helix lengths. Even greater acceleration with rising Ti has been reported in T-jump experiments monitored by IR and fluorescence spectroscopies. This difference is attributable to the longer range character of these probes

  15. Dynamics of particles around time conformal Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Abdul; Ali, Farhad; Shahzad, M. Umair; Abbas, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we present the new technique for discussing the dynamical motion of neutral as well as charged particles in the absence/presence of a magnetic field around the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. Initially, we find the numerical solutions of geodesics of the Schwarzschild black hole and the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We observe that the Schwarzschild spacetime admits the time conformal factor e^{ɛ f(t)}, where f( t) is an arbitrary function and ɛ is very small, which causes a perturbation in the spacetimes. This technique also re-scales the energy content of spacetime. We also investigate the thermal stability, horizons and energy conditions corresponding to time conformal Schwarzschild spacetime. Also, we examine the dynamics of a neutral and charged particle around a time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We investigate the circumstances under which the particle can escape from the vicinity of a black hole after collision with another particle. We analyze the effective potential and effective force of a particle in the presence of a magnetic field with angular momentum graphically.

  16. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key pointsStatic stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching.There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time.Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis on Four Semi-Active Dynamic Vibration Absorbers with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper four semi-active dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs are analytically studied, where the time delay induced by measurement and execution in control procedure is included in the system. The first-order approximate analytical solutions of the four semi-active DVAs are established by the averaging method, based on the illustrated phase difference of the motion parameters. The comparisons between the analytical and the numerical solutions are carried out, which verify the correctness and satisfactory precision of the approximate analytical solutions. Then the effects of the time delay on the dynamical responses are analyzed, and it is found that the stability conditions for the steady-state responses of the primary systems are all periodic functions of time delay, with the same period as the excitation one. At last the effects of time delay on control performance are discussed.

  18. Space-time Contraction and the Dynamics of Urban Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to identify the dynamics of urban systems during the historical process of their evolution. An illustration is made with the case of European cities between 1200 and 1990, using harmonised historical data bases. Simple maps show first a general expansion in cities number and size over time, reflecting the ability of the system to continuously adapt its structure over time. A second trend is an increased hierarchisation in city size, which may be related to the continuous improvement in the speed and capacity of transportation means. Because of this space-time contraction, large cities short-circuit small towns, and inequalities in city size are widening. A third trend leading to a spatial reorganisation, emerges from maps of the urban population potentials. Among all possible mathematical equations and parameters values which could describe the intensity and the spatial range of interactions between cities, we choose those which give rather stable results and which are compatible with the analysis of urban historians, as De Vries, Braudel, Bairoch, Hohenberg and Lees, for the centuries preceding industrial revolution, by using evaluations of distances in terms of time and cost. Urban systems dynamics is better approached with reference to this relative space than on usual topographic maps.

  19. Dynamic ADMM for Real-time Optimal Power Flow: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-23

    This paper considers distribution networks featuring distributed energy resources (DERs), and develops a dynamic optimization method to maximize given operational objectives in real time while adhering to relevant network constraints. The design of the dynamic algorithm is based on suitable linearizations of the AC power flow equations, and it leverages the so-called alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). The steps of the ADMM, however, are suitably modified to accommodate appropriate measurements from the distribution network and the DERs. With the aid of these measurements, the resultant algorithm can enforce given operational constraints in spite of inaccuracies in the representation of the AC power flows, and it avoids ubiquitous metering to gather the state of non-controllable resources. Optimality and convergence of the propose algorithm are established in terms of tracking of the solution of a convex surrogate of the AC optimal power flow problem.

  20. Dynamic Time Expansion and Compression Using Nonlinear Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findikoglu, Alp T.; Hahn, Sangkoo F.; Jia, Quanxi

    2004-06-22

    Dynamic time expansion or compression of a small amplitude input signal generated with an initial scale is performed using a nonlinear waveguide. A nonlinear waveguide having a variable refractive index is connected to a bias voltage source having a bias signal amplitude that is large relative to the input signal to vary the reflective index and concomitant speed of propagation of the nonlinear waveguide and an electrical circuit for applying the small amplitude signal and the large amplitude bias signal simultaneously to the nonlinear waveguide. The large amplitude bias signal with the input signal alters the speed of propagation of the small-amplitude signal with time in the nonlinear waveguide to expand or contract the initial time scale of the small-amplitude input signal.

  1. Producción de entropía y ley de enfriamiento de newton

    OpenAIRE

    Barragán, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Para un sistema con una fuente interna de generación de calor se analizan, en el marco de la termodinámica de los procesos irreversibles, las ecuaciones evolutivas que describen la transferencia de calor según la ley de enfriamiento de Newton. A partir del balance de flujo de entropía se muestra que la generación de entropía no es mínima en el estado estacionario descrito por la ley de enfriamiento de Newton. Igualmente, se discute cómo realizar el balance de flujos en el sistema, su conex...

  2. Electrochemical deposition of coatings of highly entropic alloys from non-aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeníček V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with electrochemical deposition of coatings of highly entropic alloys. These relatively new materials have been recently intensively studied. The paper describes the first results of electrochemical coating with highly entropic alloys by deposition from non-aqueous solutions. An electrochemical device was designed and coatings were deposited. The coatings were characterised with electronic microscopy scanning, atomic absorption spectrometry and X-ray diffraction methods and the combination of methods of thermic analysis of differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry.

  3. Producción de entropía y ley de enfriamiento de Newton

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Barragán

    2009-01-01

    Para un sistema con una fuente interna de generación de calor se analizan, en el marco de la termodinámica de los procesos irreversibles, las ecuaciones evolutivas que describen la transferencia de calor según la ley de enfriamiento de Newton. A partir del balance de flujo de entropía se muestra que la generación de entropía no es mínima en el estado estacionario descrito por la ley de enfriamiento de Newton. Igualmente, se discute cómo realizar el balance de flujos en el sistema, su conex...

  4. Relationships between Isometric Force-Time Characteristics and Dynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dos’Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP force-time characteristics (peak force and time-specific force vales (100–250 ms and dynamic performance and compare dynamic performance between stronger and weaker athletes. Forty-three athletes from different sports (rowing, soccer, bicycle motocross, and hockey performed three trials of the squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, and IMTP, and performed a one repetition maximum power clean (PC. Reactive strength index modified (RSImod was also calculated from the CMJ. Statistically significant large correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics and PC (ρ = 0.569–0.674, p < 0.001, and moderate correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics (excluding force at 100 ms and RSImod (ρ = 0.389–0.449, p = 0.013–0.050 were observed. Only force at 250 ms demonstrated a statistically significant moderate correlation with CMJ height (ρ = 0.346, p = 0.016 and no statistically significant associations were observed between IMTP force-time characteristics and SJ height. Stronger athletes (top 10 demonstrated statistically significantly greater CMJ heights, RSImods, and PCs (p ≤ 0.004, g = 1.32–1.89 compared to weaker (bottom 10 athletes, but no differences in SJ height were observed (p = 0.871, g = 0.06. These findings highlight that the ability to apply rapidly high levels of force in short time intervals is integral for PC, CMJ height, and reactive strength.

  5. Parareal in Time for Dynamic Simulations of Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurrala, Gurunath [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant developments in parallel algorithms and high performance parallel computing platforms. Parareal in time algorithm has become popular for long transient simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics, fusion, reacting flows). Parareal is a parallel algorithm which divides the time interval into sub-intervals and solves them concurrently. This paper investigates the applicability of the parareal algorithm to power system dynamic simulations. Preliminary results on the application of parareal for multi-machine power systems are reported in this paper. Two widely used test systems, WECC 3-generator 9-bus system, New England 10-generator 39- bus system, is used to explore the effectiveness of the parareal. Severe 3 phase bus faults are simulated using both the classical and detailed models of multi-machine power systems. Actual Speedup of 5-7 times is observed assuming ideal parallelization. It has been observed that the speedup factors of the order of 20 can be achieved by using fast coarse approximations of power system models. Dependency of parareal convergence on fault duration and location has been observed.

  6. Classification of genomic signals using dynamic time warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Classification methods of DNA most commonly use comparison of the differences in DNA symbolic records, which requires the global multiple sequence alignment. This solution is often inappropriate, causing a number of imprecisions and requires additional user intervention for exact alignment of the similar segments. The similar segments in DNA represented as a signal are characterized by a similar shape of the curve. The DNA alignment in genomic signals may adjust whole sections not only individual symbols. The dynamic time warping (DTW) is suitable for this purpose and can replace the multiple alignment of symbolic sequences in applications, such as phylogenetic analysis. Methods The proposed method is composed of three main parts. The first part represent conversion of symbolic representation of DNA sequences in the form of a string of A,C,G,T symbols to signal representation in the form of cumulated phase of complex components defined for each symbol. Next part represents signals size adjustment realized by standard signal preprocessing methods: median filtration, detrendization and resampling. The final part necessary for genomic signals comparison is position and length alignment of genomic signals by dynamic time warping (DTW). Results The application of the DTW on set of genomic signals was evaluated in dendrogram construction using cluster analysis. The resulting tree was compared with a classical phylogenetic tree reconstructed using multiple alignment. The classification of genomic signals using the DTW is evolutionary closer to phylogeny of organisms. This method is more resistant to errors in the sequences and less dependent on the number of input sequences. Conclusions Classification of genomic signals using dynamic time warping is an adequate variant to phylogenetic analysis using the symbolic DNA sequences alignment; in addition, it is robust, quick and more precise technique. PMID:24267034

  7. Extending the Dynamic Range of a Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estee, Justin; S πRIT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The use of Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) in intermediate heavy ion reactions faces some challenges in addressing the energy losses that range from the small energy loss of relativistic pions to the large energy loss of slow moving heavy ions. A typical trade-off can be to set the smallest desired signals to be well within the lower limits of the dynamic range of the electronics while allowing for some larger signals to saturate the electronics. With wire plane anodes, signals from readout pads further away from the track remain unsaturated and allow signals from tracks with saturated pads to be accurately recovered. We illustrate this technique using data from the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (S πRIT) TPC , which recently measured pions and light charged particles in collisions of Sn+Sn isotopes. Our method exploits knowledge of how the induced charge distribution depends on the distance from the track to smoothly extend dynamic range even when some of the pads in the track are saturated. To accommodate the analysis of slow moving heavy ions, we have extended the Bichsel energy loss distributions to handle slower moving ions as well. In this talk, I will discuss a combined approach which successfully extends the dynamic range of the TPC electronics. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant Nos. DE-SC0014530, DE-NA0002923, US NSF Grant No. PHY-1565546 and the Japan MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 24105004.

  8. Identifying seasonal patterns of phosphorus storm dynamics with dynamic time warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupas, Rémi; Tavenard, Romain; Fovet, Ophélie; Gilliet, Nicolas; Grimaldi, Catherine; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) transfer during storm events represents a significant part of annual P loads in streams and contributes to eutrophication in downstream water bodies. To improve understanding of P storm dynamics, automated or semiautomated methods are needed to extract meaningful information from ever-growing water quality measurement data sets. In this paper, seasonal patterns of P storm dynamics are identified in two contrasting watersheds (arable and grassland) through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) combined with k-means clustering. DTW was used to align discharge time series of different lengths and with differences in phase, which allowed robust application of a k-means clustering algorithm on rescaled P time series. In the arable watershed, the main storm pattern identified from autumn to winter displayed distinct export dynamics for particulate and dissolved P, which suggests independent transport mechanisms for both P forms. Conversely, the main storm pattern identified in spring displayed synchronized export of particulate and dissolved P. In the grassland watershed, the occurrence of synchronized export of dissolved and particulate P forms was not related to the season, but rather to the amplitude of storm events. Differences between the seasonal distributions of the patterns identified for the two watersheds were interpreted in terms of P sources and transport pathways. The DTW-based clustering algorithm used in this study proved useful for identifying common patterns in water quality time series and for isolating unusual events. It will open new possibilities for interpreting the high-frequency and multiparameter water quality time series that are currently acquired worldwide.

  9. Continuous time modelling of dynamical spatial lattice data observed at sparsely distributed times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Møller, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Summary. We consider statistical and computational aspects of simulation-based Bayesian inference for a spatial-temporal model based on a multivariate point process which is only observed at sparsely distributed times. The point processes are indexed by the sites of a spatial lattice......, and they exhibit spatial interaction. For specificity we consider a particular dynamical spatial lattice data set which has previously been analysed by a discrete time model involving unknown normalizing constants. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using continuous time processes compared...

  10. Introduction to Focus Issue: Time-delay dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erneux, Thomas; Javaloyes, Julien; Wolfrum, Matthias; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    The field of dynamical systems with time delay is an active research area that connects practically all scientific disciplines including mathematics, physics, engineering, biology, neuroscience, physiology, economics, and many others. This Focus Issue brings together contributions from both experimental and theoretical groups and emphasizes a large variety of applications. In particular, lasers and optoelectronic oscillators subject to time-delayed feedbacks have been explored by several authors for their specific dynamical output, but also because they are ideal test-beds for experimental studies of delay induced phenomena. Topics include the control of cavity solitons, as light spots in spatially extended systems, new devices for chaos communication or random number generation, higher order locking phenomena between delay and laser oscillation period, and systematic bifurcation studies of mode-locked laser systems. Moreover, two original theoretical approaches are explored for the so-called Low Frequency Fluctuations, a particular chaotical regime in laser output which has attracted a lot of interest for more than 30 years. Current hot problems such as the synchronization properties of networks of delay-coupled units, novel stabilization techniques, and the large delay limit of a delay differential equation are also addressed in this special issue. In addition, analytical and numerical tools for bifurcation problems with or without noise and two reviews on concrete questions are proposed. The first review deals with the rich dynamics of simple delay climate models for El Nino Southern Oscillations, and the second review concentrates on neuromorphic photonic circuits where optical elements are used to emulate spiking neurons. Finally, two interesting biological problems are considered in this Focus Issue, namely, multi-strain epidemic models and the interaction of glucose and insulin for more effective treatment.

  11. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Doubly-Foliable Space-Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Gergely

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2 + 1 + 1 decomposition of space-time is useful in monitoring the temporal evolution of gravitational perturbations/waves in space-times with a spatial direction singled-out by symmetries. Such an approach based on a perpendicular double foliation has been employed in the framework of dark matter and dark energy-motivated scalar-tensor gravitational theories for the discussion of the odd sector perturbations of spherically-symmetric gravity. For the even sector, however, the perpendicularity has to be suppressed in order to allow for suitable gauge freedom, recovering the 10th metric variable. The 2 + 1 + 1 decomposition of the Einstein–Hilbert action leads to the identification of the canonical pairs, the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Hamiltonian dynamics is then derived via Poisson brackets.

  12. Stability in Totally Nonlinear Neutral Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Belaid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Let T be a time scale which is unbounded above and below and such that 0∈T. Let id-τ:[0,∞∩T→T be such that (id-τ([0,∞∩T is a time scale. We use the Krasnoselskii-Burton's fixed point theorem to obtain stability results about the zero solution for the following totally nonlinear neutral dynamic equation with variable delay x^{△}(t=-a(th(x^{σ}(t+c(tx^{△}(t-τ(t+b(tG(x(t,x(t-τ(t, t∈[0,∞∩T, where f^{△} is the △-derivative on T and f^{△} is the △-derivative on (id-τ(T. The results obtained here extend the work of Ardjouni, Derrardjia and Djoudi [2].

  13. Managing time-substitutable electricity usage using dynamic controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Hosking, Jonathan R.; Natarajan, Ramesh; Subramaniam, Shivaram; Zhang, Xiaoxuan

    2017-02-07

    A predictive-control approach allows an electricity provider to monitor and proactively manage peak and off-peak residential intra-day electricity usage in an emerging smart energy grid using time-dependent dynamic pricing incentives. The daily load is modeled as time-shifted, but cost-differentiated and substitutable, copies of the continuously-consumed electricity resource, and a consumer-choice prediction model is constructed to forecast the corresponding intra-day shares of total daily load according to this model. This is embedded within an optimization framework for managing the daily electricity usage. A series of transformations are employed, including the reformulation-linearization technique (RLT) to obtain a Mixed-Integer Programming (MIP) model representation of the resulting nonlinear optimization problem. In addition, various regulatory and pricing constraints are incorporated in conjunction with the specified profit and capacity utilization objectives.

  14. Managing time-substitutable electricity usage using dynamic controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Hosking, Jonathan R.; Natarajan, Ramesh; Subramaniam, Shivaram; Zhang, Xiaoxuan

    2017-02-21

    A predictive-control approach allows an electricity provider to monitor and proactively manage peak and off-peak residential intra-day electricity usage in an emerging smart energy grid using time-dependent dynamic pricing incentives. The daily load is modeled as time-shifted, but cost-differentiated and substitutable, copies of the continuously-consumed electricity resource, and a consumer-choice prediction model is constructed to forecast the corresponding intra-day shares of total daily load according to this model. This is embedded within an optimization framework for managing the daily electricity usage. A series of transformations are employed, including the reformulation-linearization technique (RLT) to obtain a Mixed-Integer Programming (MIP) model representation of the resulting nonlinear optimization problem. In addition, various regulatory and pricing constraints are incorporated in conjunction with the specified profit and capacity utilization objectives.

  15. The dynamics of female time allocation upon a first birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belzil, Christian

    1997-01-01

    I estimate a non-stationary dynamic programming model of time allocation decisions between full-time work, child care and search activities upon a first birth using recursive methods. The model incorporates the following sequence of decisions; whether to stop working or not (for those who work......), whether to give up tenure, when to undertake search activities (for those who give up tenure) and the setting of the optimal reservation wage. The value of specializing in child care activities is allowed to vary with child's age and I implement a version of the model where unobserved ability may affect...... both home an labor market productivities. Overall, the model is able to explain the relatively large fraction of women who do not experience career interruptions, the rapidly declining re-employment hazards and the weak effect of education on the duration of non-employment (hometime) spells....

  16. Real Time Mapping and Dynamic Navigation for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki K. Habib

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance, the complexity and the challenges of mapping mobile robot?s unknown and dynamic environment, besides the role of sensors and the problems inherited in map building. These issues remain largely an open research problems in developing dynamic navigation systems for mobile robots. The paper presenst the state of the art in map building and localization for mobile robots navigating within unknown environment, and then introduces a solution for the complex problem of autonomous map building and maintenance method with focus on developing an incremental grid based mapping technique that is suitable for real-time obstacle detection and avoidance. In this case, the navigation of mobile robots can be treated as a problem of tracking geometric features that occur naturally in the environment of the robot. The robot maps its environment incrementally using the concept of occupancy grids and the fusion of multiple ultrasonic sensory information while wandering in it and stay away from all obstacles. To ensure real-time operation with limited resources, as well as to promote extensibility, the mapping and obstacle avoidance modules are deployed in parallel and distributed framework. Simulation based experiments has been conducted and illustrated to show the validity of the developed mapping and obstacle avoidance approach.

  17. Entropic Regularization to Assist a Geologist in Producing a Geologic Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco S. Oliveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The gravity and magnetic data measured on the Earth’s surface or above it (collected from an aircraft flying at low altitude can be used to assist in geologic mapping by estimating the spatial density and magnetization distributions, respectively, presumably confined to the interior of a horizontal slab with known depths to the top and bottom. To estimate density or magnetization distributions we assume a piecewise constant function defined on a user-specified grid of cells and invert the gravity or magnetic data by using the entropic regularization as a stabilizing function that allows estimating abrupt changes in the physical-property distribution. The entropic regularization combines the minimization of the first-order entropy measure with the maximization of the zeroth-order entropy measure of the solution vector. The aim of this approach is to detect sharp-bounded geologic units through the discontinuities in the estimated density or magnetization distributions. Tests conducted with synthetic data show that the entropic regularization can delineate discontinuous geologic units, allowing a better mapping of sharp-bounded (but buried geologic bodies. We demonstrate the potential of the entropic regularization to assist a geologist in obtaining a geologic map by analyzing the estimated magnetization distributions from field magnetic data over a magnetic skarn in Butte Valley, Nevada, U.S.A. We show that it is an exoskarn where the ion exchange between the intrusive and the host rock occurs along a limited portion of the southern intrusive border.

  18. Exploiting large-pore metal-organic frameworks for separations through entropic molecular mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres-Knoop, A.; Dubbeldam, D.

    2015-01-01

    We review the molecular mechanisms behind adsorption and the separations of mixtures in metal-organic frameworks and zeolites. Separation mechanisms can be based on differences in the affinity of the adsorbate with the framework and on entropic effects. To develop next-generation adsorbents, the

  19. Un método sencillo para definir la entropía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alejo Pinzón Bello

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Analizando un proceso adiabático de comprimir y expandir un gas y con base en el enunciado de la segunda ley de la termodinámica, dado por Carathéodory, se define la entropía sin cálculos matemáticos complicados.

  20. Relations Between Tsallis and Kaniadakis Entropic Measures and Rigorous Discussion of Conditional Kaniadakis Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Tsallis and Kaniadakis entropies are generalizing the Shannon entropy and have it as their limit when their entropic indices approach specific values. Here we show some relations existing between Tsallis and Kaniadakis entropies. We will also propose a rigorous discussion of the conditional Kaniadakis entropy, deduced from these relations.

  1. Automatic seismic event tracking using a dynamic time warping algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song; Chen, ShuangQuan; Wei, Jianxin; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2017-10-01

    For seismic data interpretation, horizon picking based on seismic events in stacked or migrated seismic sections is essential for obtaining information on subsurface structures. This conventional work is time-consuming via manual implementation. In this paper, we develop an automatic seismic event tracking method of horizon interpretation using the dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm. The proposed method consists of two steps: calculating local time shifts between adjacent traces through a pilot trace and then event tracking. In the method, the DTW algorithm is applied to calculate time shifts between two adjacent traces, and an improved multitrace DTW strategy is proposed to improve the robustness. One synthetic seismic trace is used to demonstrate the DTW algorithm, and a synthetic seismic section is used to verify the feasibility of the proposed method handling contaminated seismic data with noise. Finally, we apply the method to a 3D physical model dataset. The result indicates that the proposed method is quantitatively feasible for seismic event automatic tracking and is reasonably stable for noisy seismic section flattening, which also has the potential to extract seismic horizon slices effectively.

  2. Dynamic headspace time-extended helix liquid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Pin; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2009-05-15

    Liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) has been proved to be a fast, inexpensive and effective sample pre-treatment technique for the analyses of pesticides and many other compounds. In this investigation, a new headspace microextraction technique, dynamic headspace time-extended helix liquid-phase microextraction (DHS-TEH-LPME), is presented. In this work, use of a solvent cooling system, permits the temperature of the extraction solvent to be lowered. Lowering the temperature of the extraction solvent not only reduces solvent loss but also extends the feasible extraction time, thereby improving extraction efficiency. Use of a larger volume of the solvent not only extends the feasible extraction time but also, after extraction, leaves a larger volume to be directly injected into the gas chromatography (GC) to increase extraction efficiency and instrument signal. The DHS-TEH-LPME technique was used to extract six organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from 110ml water samples that had been spiked with the analytes at ng/l levels, and stirred for 60min. The proposed method attained enrichments up to 2121 fold. The effects of extraction solvent identity, sample agitation, extraction time, extraction temperature, and salt concentration on extraction performance were also investigated. The method detection limits (MDLs) varied from 0.2 to 25ng/l. The calibration curves were linear for at least 2 orders of magnitude with R(2)>==0.996. Relative recoveries in river water were more than 86%.

  3. Dynamic Web Expression for Near-real-time Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, K. G.; Newman, R. L.; Nayak, A.; Vernon, F. L.; Nelson, C.; Hansen, T. S.; Yuen-Wong, R.

    2003-12-01

    As near-real-time sensor grids become more widespread, and processing systems based on them become more powerful, summarizing the raw and derived information products and delivering them to the end user become increasingly important both for ongoing monitoring and as a platform for cross-disciplinary research. We have re-engineered the dbrecenteqs program, which was designed to express real-time earthquake databases into dynamic web pages, with several powerful new technologies. While the application is still most fully developed for seismic data, the infrastructure is extensible (and being extended) to create a real-time information architecture for numerous signal domains. This work provides a practical, lightweight approach suitable for individual seismic and sensor networks, which does not require a full 'web-services' implementation. Nevertheless, the technologies here are extensible to larger applications such as the Storage-Resource-Broker based VORB project. The technologies included in the new system blend real-time relational databases as a focus for processing and data handling; an XML->XSLT architecture as the core of the web mirroring; PHP extensions to Antelope (the environmental monitoring-system context adopted for RoadNET) in order to support complex, user-driven interactivity; and VRML output for expression of information as web-browsable three-dimensional worlds.

  4. LSD-induced entropic brain activity predicts subsequent personality change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A V; Kaelen, M; Lövdén, M; Nilsson, J; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2016-09-01

    Personality is known to be relatively stable throughout adulthood. Nevertheless, it has been shown that major life events with high personal significance, including experiences engendered by psychedelic drugs, can have an enduring impact on some core facets of personality. In the present, balanced-order, placebo-controlled study, we investigated biological predictors of post-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) changes in personality. Nineteen healthy adults underwent resting state functional MRI scans under LSD (75µg, I.V.) and placebo (saline I.V.). The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) was completed at screening and 2 weeks after LSD/placebo. Scanning sessions consisted of three 7.5-min eyes-closed resting-state scans, one of which involved music listening. A standardized preprocessing pipeline was used to extract measures of sample entropy, which characterizes the predictability of an fMRI time-series. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate drug-induced shifts in brain entropy and their relationship with the observed increases in the personality trait openness at the 2-week follow-up. Overall, LSD had a pronounced global effect on brain entropy, increasing it in both sensory and hierarchically higher networks across multiple time scales. These shifts predicted enduring increases in trait openness. Moreover, the predictive power of the entropy increases was greatest for the music-listening scans and when "ego-dissolution" was reported during the acute experience. These results shed new light on how LSD-induced shifts in brain dynamics and concomitant subjective experience can be predictive of lasting changes in personality. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3203-3213, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dynamically multiplexed ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E; Clowers, Brian H; Prior, David C; Danielson, William F; Liyu, Andrei V; Petritis, Brianne O; Smith, Richard D

    2008-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity, high-throughput platform, for example, for proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, including efficient ion accumulation in an ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube, and signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter, into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of, for example, blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have developed and rigorously evaluated a novel dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity throughout the experiment. The MP IMS-TOFMS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in the presence of a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a 3 orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features were found to yield approximately 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of approximately 7.5%. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of approximately 4%. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80%, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were <15%. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min that constitutes almost 1 order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach.

  6. Long-time atomistic dynamics through a new self-adaptive accelerated molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Yang, L.; Gao, F.; Kurtz, R. J.; West, D.; Zhang, S.

    2017-02-27

    A self-adaptive accelerated molecular dynamics method is developed to model infrequent atomic- scale events, especially those events that occur on a rugged free-energy surface. Key in the new development is the use of the total displacement of the system at a given temperature to construct a boost-potential, which is slowly increased to accelerate the dynamics. The temperature is slowly increased to accelerate the dynamics. By allowing the system to evolve from one steady-state con guration to another by overcoming the transition state, this self-evolving approach makes it possible to explore the coupled motion of species that migrate on vastly different time scales. The migrations of single vacancy (V) and small He-V clusters, and the growth of nano-sized He-V clusters in Fe for times in the order of seconds are studied by this new method. An interstitial- assisted mechanism is rst explored for the migration of a helium-rich He-V cluster, while a new two-component Ostwald ripening mechanism is suggested for He-V cluster growth.

  7. Population dynamics of minimally cognitive individuals. Part 2: Dynamics of time-dependent knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The dynamical principle for a population of interacting individuals with mutual pairwise knowledge, presented by the author in a previous paper for the case of constant knowledge, is extended to include the possibility that the knowledge is time-dependent. Several mechanisms are presented by which the mutual knowledge, represented by a matrix K, can be altered, leading to dynamical equations for K(t). The author presents various examples of the transient and long time asymptotic behavior of K(t) for populations of relatively isolated individuals interacting infrequently in local binary collisions. Among the effects observed in the numerical experiments are knowledge diffusion, learning transients, and fluctuating equilibria. This approach will be most appropriate to small populations of complex individuals such as simple animals, robots, computer networks, agent-mediated traffic, simple ecosystems, and games. Evidence of metastable states and intermittent switching leads them to envision a spectroscopy associated with such transitions that is independent of the specific physical individuals and the population. Such spectra may serve as good lumped descriptors of the collective emergent behavior of large classes of populations in which mutual knowledge is an important part of the dynamics.

  8. Long-time atomistic dynamics through a new self-adaptive accelerated molecular dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, N.; Yang, L.; Gao, F.; Kurtz, R. J.; West, D.; Zhang, S.

    2017-04-01

    A self-adaptive accelerated molecular dynamics method is developed to model infrequent atomic-scale events, especially those events that occur on a rugged free-energy surface. Key in the new development is the use of the total displacement of the system at a given temperature to construct a boost-potential, which is slowly increased to accelerate the dynamics. The temperature is slowly increased to accelerate the dynamics. By allowing the system to evolve from one steady-state configuration to another by overcoming the transition state, this self-evolving approach makes it possible to explore the coupled motion of species that migrate on vastly different time scales. The migrations of single vacancy (V) and small He-V clusters, and the growth of nano-sized He-V clusters in Fe for times in the order of seconds are studied by this new method. An interstitial-assisted mechanism is first explored for the migration of a helium-rich He-V cluster, while a new two-component Ostwald ripening mechanism is suggested for He-V cluster growth.

  9. Formal methods for discrete-time dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Belta, Calin; Aydin Gol, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    This book bridges fundamental gaps between control theory and formal methods. Although it focuses on discrete-time linear and piecewise affine systems, it also provides general frameworks for abstraction, analysis, and control of more general models. The book is self-contained, and while some mathematical knowledge is necessary, readers are not expected to have a background in formal methods or control theory. It rigorously defines concepts from formal methods, such as transition systems, temporal logics, model checking and synthesis. It then links these to the infinite state dynamical systems through abstractions that are intuitive and only require basic convex-analysis and control-theory terminology, which is provided in the appendix. Several examples and illustrations help readers understand and visualize the concepts introduced throughout the book.

  10. Classification of time series patterns from complex dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, J.C.; Rao, N.

    1998-07-01

    An increasing availability of high-performance computing and data storage media at decreasing cost is making possible the proliferation of large-scale numerical databases and data warehouses. Numeric warehousing enterprises on the order of hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes are a reality in many fields such as finance, retail sales, process systems monitoring, biomedical monitoring, surveillance and transportation. Large-scale databases are becoming more accessible to larger user communities through the internet, web-based applications and database connectivity. Consequently, most researchers now have access to a variety of massive datasets. This trend will probably only continue to grow over the next several years. Unfortunately, the availability of integrated tools to explore, analyze and understand the data warehoused in these archives is lagging far behind the ability to gain access to the same data. In particular, locating and identifying patterns of interest in numerical time series data is an increasingly important problem for which there are few available techniques. Temporal pattern recognition poses many interesting problems in classification, segmentation, prediction, diagnosis and anomaly detection. This research focuses on the problem of classification or characterization of numerical time series data. Highway vehicles and their drivers are examples of complex dynamic systems (CDS) which are being used by transportation agencies for field testing to generate large-scale time series datasets. Tools for effective analysis of numerical time series in databases generated by highway vehicle systems are not yet available, or have not been adapted to the target problem domain. However, analysis tools from similar domains may be adapted to the problem of classification of numerical time series data.

  11. Evaluation of robotic surgery skills using dynamic time warping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingyu; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Shuxin; Liang, Ke

    2017-12-01

    accompanied with the wide acceptance of robot assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS), the demand for efficient and objective surgical skills evaluation method is increased. Recently, with the development of medical engineering technology, several evaluation methods have been proposed. Among them, kinematic analysis, an unsupervised and data-based method, has been accepted by many researchers. However, this method is still limited by the number of metrics and unconvinced scoring system. This paper aims to propose a new evaluation method to assess surgical skills efficiently and objectively. this research proposed an efficient and effective surgical skills evaluation algorithm which used the trajectories of instrument tip and dynamic time warping (DTW) to provide trainees with real-time and summative feedback. The optimum trajectories based on 'Therbligs' theory was designed as a template. DTW algorithm was used to align actual trajectories to optimum trajectories with an evaluating indicator designed to emphasize the crucial motion features in surgical skills evaluation. The real-time feedback was obtained through a sliding time window to help trainees improve learning efficiency. experts (n = 2) and novices (n = 8) were invited to complete the peg transfer tasks and 60 instrument tip trajectories were assessed by the proposed algorithm. Significant differences between different groups were observed (experts' right trajectories versus experts' left trajectories, p = 0.0002; experts' right trajectories versus novices' right trajectories, p = 0.0124). In addition, evaluation results of trajectories with operational mistakes were significantly different from those of others. the proposed evaluation method showed its advantages in distinguishing and evaluating surgical performance. Given its ability to evaluate the performance based on kinematic information, the proposed evaluation method can be further developed in the future. Furthermore, because

  12. MyDTW - Dynamic Time Warping program for stratigraphical time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Sergey; Paelike, Heiko

    2017-04-01

    One of the general tasks in many geological disciplines is matching of one time or space signal to another. It can be classical correlation between two cores or cross-sections in sedimentology or marine geology. For example, tuning a paleoclimatic signal to a target curve, driven by variations in the astronomical parameters, is a powerful technique to construct accurate time scales. However, these methods can be rather time-consuming and can take ours of routine work even with the help of special semi-automatic software. Therefore, different approaches to automate the processes have been developed during last decades. Some of them are based on classical statistical cross-correlations such as the 'Correlator' after Olea [1]. Another ones use modern ideas of dynamic programming. A good example is as an algorithm developed by Lisiecki and Lisiecki [2] or dynamic time warping based algorithm after Pälike [3]. We introduce here an algorithm and computer program, which are also stemmed from the Dynamic Time Warping algorithm class. Unlike the algorithm of Lisiecki and Lisiecki, MyDTW does not lean on a set of penalties to follow geological logics, but on a special internal structure and specific constrains. It differs also from [3] in basic ideas of implementation and constrains design. The algorithm is implemented as a computer program with a graphical user interface using Free Pascal and Lazarus IDE and available for Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Examples with synthetic and real data are demonstrated. Program is available for free download at http://www.marum.de/Sergey_Kotov.html . References: 1. Olea, R.A. Expert systems for automated correlation and interpretation of wireline logs // Math Geol (1994) 26: 879. doi:10.1007/BF02083420 2. Lisiecki L. and Lisiecki P. Application of dynamic programming to the correlation of paleoclimate records // Paleoceanography (2002), Volume 17, Issue 4, pp. 1-1, CiteID 1049, doi: 10.1029/2001PA000733 3. Pälike, H. Extending the

  13. Detection of time delays and directional interactions based on time series from complex dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huanfei; Leng, Siyang; Tao, Chenyang; Ying, Xiong; Kurths, Jürgen; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Data-based and model-free accurate identification of intrinsic time delays and directional interactions is an extremely challenging problem in complex dynamical systems and their networks reconstruction. A model-free method with new scores is proposed to be generally capable of detecting single, multiple, and distributed time delays. The method is applicable not only to mutually interacting dynamical variables but also to self-interacting variables in a time-delayed feedback loop. Validation of the method is carried out using physical, biological, and ecological models and real data sets. Especially, applying the method to air pollution data and hospital admission records of cardiovascular diseases in Hong Kong reveals the major air pollutants as a cause of the diseases and, more importantly, it uncovers a hidden time delay (about 30-40 days) in the causal influence that previous studies failed to detect. The proposed method is expected to be universally applicable to ascertaining and quantifying subtle interactions (e.g., causation) in complex systems arising from a broad range of disciplines.

  14. The Time Diagram Control Approach for the Dynamic Representation of Time-Oriented Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dornberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic representation of time-oriented data on small screen devices is of increasing importance. Most solution approaches use issue-specific requirements based on established desktop technologies. Applied to mobile devices with small multi-touch displays such approaches often lead to a limited usability. Particularly, the time-dependent data can only be fragmentarily visualized due to limited screen sizes. Instead of reducing the complexity by visualizing the data, the interpretation of the data is getting more complex. This paper proposes a Time Diagram Control (TDC approach, a new way of representing time-based diagrams on small screen devices. The TDC uses a principle of cybernetics to integrate the user in the visualization process and thus reduce complexity. TDC focuses on simplicity of design by only providing 2D temporal line diagrams with a dynamic zooming function that works via standard multi-touch controls. Involving the user into a continuous loop of refining the visualization, TDC allows to compare data of different temporal granularities without losing the overall context of the presented data. The TDC approach ensures constant information reliability on small screen devices.

  15. Time-Resolved Dynamics of Shallow Acceptor Transitions in Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Q. Vinh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Shallow group-V donors in silicon may be thought of as hydrogenlike, and shallow acceptors are similarly described by effective-mass theory with similar energy scales, which implies that donor and acceptor excitations should be just as long-lived. Yet, spectral widths of acceptors are considerably wider. We have measured the orbital dynamics of acceptors in silicon using time-domain spectroscopy with a free-electron laser. Both the population and coherence lifetimes for acceptors in natural silicon are substantially longer—e.g. approximately 60 ps for boron—than implied by the spectral linewidths; our experiments also establish the recombination time for ionized acceptors to be, at approximately 500 ps, nearly an order of magnitude longer. We show that there are no extra sources of decoherence introduced by the host crystal, other than the population relaxation. In this sense, the crystal acts as an atom trap, and, by introducing quantum coherent control of acceptors to that previously established for donors, we open the way to optically controllable nanoscale p-n devices.

  16. Turnout Fault Diagnosis through Dynamic Time Warping and Signal Normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turnout is one key fundamental infrastructure in the railway signal system, which has great influence on the safety of railway systems. Currently, turnout fault diagnoses are conducted manually in China; engineers are obliged to observe the signals and make problem solving decisions. Thus, the accuracies of fault diagnoses totally depend on the engineers’ experience although massive data are produced in real time by the turnout microcomputer-based monitoring systems. This paper aims to develop an intelligent diagnosis method for railway turnout through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW. We firstly extract the features of normal turnout operation current curve and normalize the collected turnout current curves. Then, five typical fault reference curves are ascertained through the microcomputer-based monitoring system, and DTW is used to identify the turnout current curve fault through test data. The analysis results based on the similarity data indicate that the analyzed five turnout fault types can be diagnosed automatically with 100% accuracy. Finally, the benefits of the proposed method and future research directions were discussed.

  17. Predicting Physical Time Series Using Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Ghazali, Rozaida; Hussain, Abir

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting naturally occurring phenomena is a common problem in many domains of science, and this has been addressed and investigated by many scientists. The importance of time series prediction stems from the fact that it has wide range of applications, including control systems, engineering processes, environmental systems and economics. From the knowledge of some aspects of the previous behaviour of the system, the aim of the prediction process is to determine or predict its future behaviour. In this paper, we consider a novel application of a higher order polynomial neural network architecture called Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Network that combines the properties of higher order and recurrent neural networks for the prediction of physical time series. In this study, four types of signals have been used, which are; The Lorenz attractor, mean value of the AE index, sunspot number, and heat wave temperature. The simulation results showed good improvements in terms of the signal to noise ratio in comparison to a number of higher order and feedforward neural networks in comparison to the benchmarked techniques. PMID:25157950

  18. Reverse engineering time discrete finite dynamical systems: a feasible undertaking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Eckert, Edgar

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput profiling methods, interest in reverse engineering the structure and dynamics of biochemical networks is high. Recently an algorithm for reverse engineering of biochemical networks was developed by Laubenbacher and Stigler. It is a top-down approach using time discrete dynamical systems. One of its key steps includes the choice of a term order, a technicality imposed by the use of Gröbner-bases calculations. The aim of this paper is to identify minimal requirements on data sets to be used with this algorithm and to characterize optimal data sets. We found minimal requirements on a data set based on how many terms the functions to be reverse engineered display. Furthermore, we identified optimal data sets, which we characterized using a geometric property called "general position". Moreover, we developed a constructive method to generate optimal data sets, provided a codimensional condition is fulfilled. In addition, we present a generalization of their algorithm that does not depend on the choice of a term order. For this method we derived a formula for the probability of finding the correct model, provided the data set used is optimal. We analyzed the asymptotic behavior of the probability formula for a growing number of variables n (i.e. interacting chemicals). Unfortunately, this formula converges to zero as fast as , where and . Therefore, even if an optimal data set is used and the restrictions in using term orders are overcome, the reverse engineering problem remains unfeasible, unless prodigious amounts of data are available. Such large data sets are experimentally impossible to generate with today's technologies.

  19. The Attempt to Overcome Time Dynamic Theory in the Concept Of Eternal Return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizbar Elizbarashvili

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the various variants of time rotation eternal concept, and how it was directed to overcome time dynamical theory. The article describes time cycle theory in the period of the Vedas, antiques philosophy and Nietzsche’s philosophy. The article highlights three major features of the time dynamic theory but none of them is finally overcame in time cycling concept. It is concluded that the time dynamic theory is theoretically not established.

  20. At the Same Time or Apart in Time? The Role of Presentation Timing and Retrieval Dynamics in Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlach, Haley A.; Ankowski, Amber A.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Several bodies of research have found different results with regard to presentation timing, categorization, and generalization. Both presenting instances at the same time (simultaneous) and presenting instances apart in time (spacing) have been shown to facilitate generalization. In this study, we resolved these results by examining simultaneous, massed, and spaced presentations in 2-year-old children’s (N = 144) immediate and long-term performance on a novel noun generalization task. Results revealed that, when tested immediately, children in the simultaneous condition outperformed children in all other conditions. However, when tested after 15 minutes, children in the spaced condition outperformed children in all other conditions. Results are discussed in terms of how retrieval dynamics during learning affect abstraction, retention, and generalization across time. PMID:21895392

  1. ANALYSIS ON THE ENTROPIC MODEL OF THE INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL. CASE STUDY OF THE SMES IN THE NORTH EAST REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Mironescu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The intellectual capital in its dynamic approach focusses on the development of the entropic model, which expresses the dynamic transformation of the theoretical intellectual capital in a concrete and useful intellectual capital. The aim of the present paper is to perform a detailed analysis of the intellectual capital inside the SMES of the North-Est region of the country. It also speaks about the influence of the main integrators of the intellectual capital, divided into three elements: the cognitive, the emotional and the spiritual capital, about how they are acting as a field of forces upon the basic components of the intellectual capital, such as knowledge, intelligence and values and how they determine the generation and development of the intellectual capital in the eastern analyzed SMEs. Both jobs and teams inside the analyzed SMEs are stimulating the development of the intellectual skills, which reduces the need for involving the external experts, by appealing only those specialists who could transform the tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge. The organizational communication provides the necessary information and contributes to the establishment of a fair climate and of the effective relationships between managers and employees, between work mates, and also with the people outside the organization.

  2. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  3. A Study of Dynamic Stall Using Real Time Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, L.W.; Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Ahmed, S.; Brock, N

    1991-01-01

    29th Aerospace Sciences Meeting January 7-10, 1991/Reno, Nevada Dynamic stall over an oscillating airfoil in compressible flow was studied using a real-tine interferometry technique. Instantaneous flow field data was obtained for various unsteady as well as steady flow conditions. The details of the dynamic stall vortex, including its formation and development have been revealed by the interferograms, resulting in the first documentation of the complete dynamic stall flow field...

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of wind waves: multifractal phase/time effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Mellen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the bispectral coherence method, phase/time analysis of analytic signals is another promising avenue for the investigation of phase effects in wind waves. Frequency spectra of phase fluctuations obtained from both sea and laboratory experiments follow an F-β power law over several decades, suggesting that a fractal description is appropriate. However, many similar natural phenomena have been shown to be multifractal. Universal multifractals are quantified by two additional parameters: the Lévy index 0 α 2 for the type of multifractal and the co-dimension 0 C1 1 for intermittence. The three parameters are a full statistical measure the nonlinear dynamics. Analysis of laboratory flume data is reported here and the results indicate that the phase fluctuations are 'hard multifractal' (α > 1. The actual estimate is close to the limiting value α = 2,  which is consistent with Kolmogorov's lognormal model for turbulent fluctuations. Implications for radar and sonar backscattering from the sea surface are briefly considered.

  5. Can post-error dynamics explain sequential reaction time patterns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eGoldfarb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate human error dynamics in sequential two-alternative choice tasks. When subjects repeatedly discriminate between two stimuli, their error rates and mean reaction times (RTs systematically depend on prior sequences of stimuli. We analyze these sequential effects on RTs, separating error and correct responses, and identify a sequential RT tradeoff: a sequence of stimuli which yields a relatively fast RT on error trials will produce a relatively slow RT on correct trials and vice versa. We reanalyze previous data and acquire and analyze new data in a choice task with stimulus sequences generated by a first-order Markov process having unequal probabilities of repetitions and alternations. We then show that relationships among these stimulus sequences and the corresponding RTs for correct trials, error trials, and averaged over all trials are significantly influenced by the probability of alternations; these relationships have not been captured by previous models. Finally, we show that simple, sequential updates to the initial condition and thresholds of a pure drift diffusion model can account for the trends in RT for correct and error trials. Our results suggest that error-based parameter adjustments are critical to modeling sequential effects.

  6. Estimation of dynamic flux profiles from metabolic time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou I-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in modern high-throughput techniques of molecular biology have enabled top-down approaches for the estimation of parameter values in metabolic systems, based on time series data. Special among them is the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE, which uses such data not only for parameter estimation but also for the identification of functional forms of the processes governing a metabolic system. DFE furthermore provides diagnostic tools for the evaluation of model validity and of the quality of a model fit beyond residual errors. Unfortunately, DFE works only when the data are more or less complete and the system contains as many independent fluxes as metabolites. These drawbacks may be ameliorated with other types of estimation and information. However, such supplementations incur their own limitations. In particular, assumptions must be made regarding the functional forms of some processes and detailed kinetic information must be available, in addition to the time series data. Results The authors propose here a systematic approach that supplements DFE and overcomes some of its shortcomings. Like DFE, the approach is model-free and requires only minimal assumptions. If sufficient time series data are available, the approach allows the determination of a subset of fluxes that enables the subsequent applicability of DFE to the rest of the flux system. The authors demonstrate the procedure with three artificial pathway systems exhibiting distinct characteristics and with actual data of the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully complements DFE under various situations and without a priori assumptions regarding the model representation. The proposed method also permits an examination of whether at all, to what degree, or within what range the available time series data can be validly represented in a particular functional format of

  7. Plankton dynamics under different climatic conditions in space and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senerpont Domis, de L.N.; Elser, J.J.; Huszar, V.L.M.; Ibelings, B.W.; Jeppesen, E.; Kosten, S.; Mooij, W.M.; Roland, F.; Sommer, U.; Donk, van E.; Winder, M.; Lurling, M.

    2013-01-01

    1.Different components of the climate system have been shown to affect temporal dynamics in natural plankton communities on scales varying from days to years. The seasonal dynamics in temperate lake plankton communities, with emphasis on both physical and biological forcing factors, were captured in

  8. Positive dynamical systems in discrete time theory, models, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic, rigorous and self-contained treatment of positive dynamical systems. A dynamical system is positive when all relevant variables of a systemare nonnegative in a natural way. This is in biology, demography or economics, where the levels of populations or prices of goods are positive. The principle also finds application in electrical engineering, physics and computer sciences.

  9. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concepcion, Ricky James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Ryan Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  10. Nonlinear Dynamics of Complex Coevolutionary Systems in Historical Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.

    2016-04-01

    A new theoretical paradigm for statistical-dynamical modeling of complex coevolutionary systems is introduced, with the aim to provide historical geoscientists with a practical tool to analyse historical data and its underlying phenomenology. Historical data is assumed to represent the history of dynamical processes of physical and socio-economic nature. If processes and their governing laws are well understood, they are often treated with traditional dynamical equations: deterministic approach. If the governing laws are unknown or impracticable, the process is often treated as if being random (even if it is not): statistical approach. Although single eventful details - such as the exact spatiotemporal structure of a particular hydro-meteorological incident - may often be elusive to a detailed analysis, the overall dynamics exhibit group properties summarized by a simple set of categories or dynamical regimes at multiple scales - from local short-lived convection patterns to large-scale hydro-climatic regimes. The overwhelming microscale complexity is thus conveniently wrapped into a manageable group entity, such as a statistical distribution. In a stationary setting whereby the distribution is assumed to be invariant, alternating regimes are approachable as dynamical intermittence. For instance, in the context of bimodal climatic oscillations such as NAO and ENSO, each mode corresponds to a dynamical regime or phase. However, given external forcings or longer-term internal variability and multiscale coevolution, the structural properties of the system may change. These changes in the dynamical structure bring about a new distribution and associated regimes. The modes of yesteryear may no longer exist as such in the new structural order of the system. In this context, aside from regime intermittence, the system exhibits structural regime change. New oscillations may emerge whilst others fade into the annals of history, e.g. particular climate fluctuations during

  11. Synthesis of multivalent silica nanoparticles combining both enthalpic and entropic patchiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Céline; Chomette, Cyril; Désert, Anthony; Sun, Ming; Treguer-Delapierre, Mona; Mornet, Stéphane; Perro, Adeline; Duguet, Etienne; Ravaine, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Silica particles with a controlled number of entropic patches, i.e. dimples, are synthesized through the growth of the silica core of binary multipods that have been produced by a seeded-growth emulsion polymerization reaction. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that the silica surface conforms to the shape of the polystyrene (PS) nodules of the multipods while growing, allowing good control of the final shape of the dimpled silica particles. The PS nodules are also used as protecting masks to regioselectively graft amino groups, as revealed by the adsorption of gold markers. After dissolution of the PS nodules, some polymer chains remain grafted onto the silica surface, forming organic bumps. These residues are also selectively functionalized, leading to silica particles with both entropic and enthalpic patches.

  12. Producción de entropía y ley de enfriamiento de Newton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barragán

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Para un sistema con una fuente interna de generación de calor se analizan, en el marco de la termodinámica de los procesos irreversibles, las ecuaciones evolutivas que describen la transferencia de calor según la ley de enfriamiento de Newton. A partir del balance de flujo de entropía se muestra que la generación de entropía no es mínima en el estado estacionario descrito por la ley de enfriamiento de Newton. Igualmente, se discute cómo realizar el balance de flujos en el sistema, su conexión con los parámetros de control y su futura aplicación a procesos de optimización basados en la segunda ley de la termodinámica.

  13. The Dynamics of Cuspate Spits at Geological Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchette, F.; Manna, M.; Camps, N.; Mohammadi, B.

    2016-12-01

    Zenkovitch (1959) first described cuspate spits as a limited category of shore-connected features that result from symmetrical wind/ wave forcings and/ or peculiar initial shore configuration. Later on, Asthon et al. (2001) and Asthon and Murray (2006) proned that cuspate spits, flying spits and other shoreline features derive from instabilities inherent in the relationship between alongshore sediment transport and local shoreline orientation. They exhibited a comprehensive weakly non-linear theory for cuspate and spit dynamics, and gave a striking numerical solutions to the problem. Recently, Bouchette et al. (2014) provided an alternative explicit formulation for the growth of cuspate spits through time. From this last formulation, it was demonstrated that there exists an exact relationship between the amplitude, the length of a cuspate on one side, and the longshore diffusivity and the time on the other side. In the present work, we explore how this relationship can be used to predict various coastal characteristics at decadal/geological time scales as soon as a cuspate develops in the area concerned. This formulation can be considered as a method for the datation of a cuspate spit. Alternatively, it can allow to estimate the mean fluxes of sediment trapped along the shore. The model is validated thanks to a comparison with observed cuspates. The cuspate law suggests that the length of the cuspate and its amplitude may be related through a power law (to the power of three). We demonstrate that this power law is not a simple mathematical result but does exist in the nature. The occurrence of a power law suggests also that more underlying physics remain to be analysed in the process of nucleation and growth of cuspate spits.Asthon, A., Murray, B., 2006. High-angle wave instability and emergent shoreline shapes: 1) modeling of sand waves, flying spits and capes. Journal of Geophysical Research, 111, F04011. Asthon, A., Murray, B., Arnault, O., 2001. Formation of

  14. Entropic Uncertainty Principle and Information Exclusion Principle for multiple measurements in the presence of quantum memory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chang-shui

    2015-01-01

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle shows that no one can specify the values of the non-commuting canonically conjugated variables simultaneously. However, the uncertainty relation is usually applied to two incompatible measurements. We present tighter bounds on both entropic uncertainty relation and information exclusion principle for multiple measurements in the presence of quantum memory. As applications, three incompatible measurements on Werner state and Horodecki's bound entangled stat...

  15. Entropic Uncertainty Relation and Information Exclusion Relation for multiple measurements in the presence of quantum memory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chang-shui

    2015-01-01

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle shows that no one can specify the values of the non-commuting canonically conjugated variables simultaneously. However, the uncertainty relation is usually applied to two incompatible measurements. We present tighter bounds on both entropic uncertainty relation and information exclusion relation for multiple measurements in the presence of quantum memory. As applications, three incompatible measurements on Werner state and Horodecki?s bound entangled state...

  16. Entropía de la información: una herramienta útil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotta, P.

    En este trabajo se presenta una muy breve introducción al concepto de Entropía de la Información y se muestran distintas aplicaciones de una misma técnica para estudiar problemas tan variados como la determinación de periodicidad en una serie de tiempo arbitraria o de estimar el grado de caoticidad de una trayectoria en un sistema dinámico de N grados de libertad.

  17. Tsallis and Kaniadakis Entropic Measures in Polytropic, Logarithmic and Exponential Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Among nonextensive statistical approaches, those proposed by Constantino Tsallis and Giorgio Kaniadakis had been involved in the study of several physical phenomena. Here, we will discuss the case of the polytropic solutions of self-gravitating fluid spheres used in astrophysics as approximate stellar models. We will see how, in this problem, Tsallis and Kaniadakis entropic measures are related. After, following the same approach, we will find the links between general...

  18. Entropic screening preserves non-equilibrium nature of nematic phase while enthalpic screening destroys it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, K; Roy, M; Datta, A

    2016-02-14

    The present manuscript describes the role of entropic and enthalpic forces mediated by organic non-polar (hexane) and polar (methanol) solvents on the bulk and microscopic phase transition of a well known nematic liquid crystalline material MBBA (N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline) through Differential Scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-Visible (UV-Vis), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. DSC study indicates continuous linear decreases in both nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition temperature and enthalpy of MBBA in presence of hexane while both these parameters show a saturation after an initial decay in methanol. These distinct transitional behaviours were explained in terms of the "depletion force" model for entropic screening in hexane and "screening-self-screening" model for methanol. Heating rate dependent DSC studies find that non-Arrhenius behaviour, characteristic of pristine MBBA and a manifestation of non-equilibrium nature [Dan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 094501 (2015)], is preserved in presence of entropic screening in the hexane solution, while it changes to Arrhenius behaviour (signifying equilibrium behaviour) in presence of enthalpic screening in methanol solution. FTIR spectra show similar dependence on the solvent induced screening in the intensities of the imine (-C = N) stretch and the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings of MBBA with hexane and methanol as in DSC, further establishing our entropic and enthalpic screening models. UV-Vis spectra of the electronic transitions in MBBA as a function of temperature also exhibit different dependences of intensities on the solvent induced screening, and an exponential decrease is observed in presence of hexane while methanol completely changes the nature of interaction to follow a linear dependence.

  19. Real time assessment of dynamic loads on bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Highway bridges are an important class of civil structures that are subject to continuously : acting and varying dynamic loads due to traffic. A large number of highway bridges in the US : (bridges on interstate highways or state highways which have ...

  20. Estimating the level of dynamical noise in time series by using fractal dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sase, Takumi, E-mail: sase@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ramírez, Jonatán Peña [CONACYT Research Fellow, Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918, Zona Playitas, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Kitajo, Keiichi [BSI-Toyota Collaboration Center, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2016-03-11

    We present a method for estimating the dynamical noise level of a ‘short’ time series even if the dynamical system is unknown. The proposed method estimates the level of dynamical noise by calculating the fractal dimensions of the time series. Additionally, the method is applied to EEG data to demonstrate its possible effectiveness as an indicator of temporal changes in the level of dynamical noise. - Highlights: • A dynamical noise level estimator for time series is proposed. • The estimator does not need any information about the dynamics generating the time series. • The estimator is based on a novel definition of time series dimension (TSD). • It is demonstrated that there exists a monotonic relationship between the • TSD and the level of dynamical noise. • We apply the proposed method to human electroencephalographic data.

  1. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  2. Replenishment policy for Entropic Order Quantity (EnOQ model with two component demand and partial back-logging under inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanupriya Dash

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Replenishment policy for entropic order quantity model with two component demand and partial backlogging under inflation is an important subject in the stock management. Methods: In this paper an inventory model for  non-instantaneous  deteriorating items with stock dependant consumption rate and partial back logged in addition the effect of inflection and time value of money on replacement policy with zero lead time consider was developed. Profit maximization model is formulated by considering the effects of partial backlogging under inflation with cash discounts. Further numerical example presented to evaluate the relative performance between the entropic order quantity and EOQ models separately. Numerical example is present to demonstrate the developed model and to illustrate the procedure. Lingo 13.0 version software used to derive optimal order quantity and total cost of inventory. Finally sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution with respect to different parameters of the system carried out. Results and conclusions: The obtained inventory model is very useful in retail business. This model can extend to total backorder.

  3. AN ENTROPIC ORDER QUANTITY MODEL WITH FUZZY HOLDING COST AND FUZZY DISPOSAL COST FOR PERISHABLE ITEMS UNDER TWO COMPONENT DEMAND AND DISCOUNTED SELLING PRICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Tripathy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A new type of replenishment policy is suggested in an entropy order quantity model for a perishable product possessing fuzzy holding cost and fuzzy disposal cost. This model represents an appropriate combination of two component demand with discounted selling price, particularly over a finite time horizon. Its main aim lies in the need for an entropic cost of the cycle time is a key feature of specific perishable product like fruits, vegetables, food stuffs, fishes etc. To handle this multiplicity of objectives in a pragmatic approach, entropic ordering quantity model with discounted selling price during pre and post deterioration of perishable items to optimize its payoff is proposed. It has been imperative to demonstrate this model by analysis, which reveals some important characteristics of discounted structure. Furthermore, numerical experiments are conducted to evaluate the difference between the crisp and fuzzy cases in EOQ and EnOQ separately. This paper explores the economy of investing in economics of lot sizing in Fuzzy EOQ, Crisp EOQ and Crisp EnOQ models. The proposed paper reveals itself as a pragmatic alternative to other approaches based on two component demand function with very sound theoretical underpinnings but with few possibilities of actually being put into practice. The results indicate that this can become a good model and can be replicated by researchers in neighbourhood of its possible extensions.

  4. Introduction to modern dynamics chaos, networks, space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Nolte, David D

    2015-01-01

    The best parts of physics are the last topics that our students ever see. These are the exciting new frontiers of nonlinear and complex systems that are at the forefront of university research and are the basis of many high-tech businesses. Topics such as traffic on the World Wide Web, the spread of epidemics through globally-mobile populations, or the synchronization of global economies are governed by universal principles just as profound as Newton's laws. Nonetheless, the conventional university physics curriculum reserves most of these topics for advanced graduate study. Two justifications are given for this situation: first, that the mathematical tools needed to understand these topics are beyond the skill set of undergraduate students, and second, that these are speciality topics with no common theme and little overlap. Introduction to Modern Dynamics dispels these myths. The structure of this book combines the three main topics of modern dynamics - chaos theory, dynamics on complex networks, and gener...

  5. Causes and Consequences of Time-Varying Dynamic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicky

    2013-04-01

    Convective circulation of the Earth's mantle maintains plate motion but we know little about the spatial and temporal details of this circulation. Accurate maps of the spatial and temporal pattern of dynamic topography will profoundly affect our understanding the the relationship between surface geology and deep Earth processes. A major difficulty is the 'tyranny of isostasy'. In other words, dynamic topography is difficult to measure because crustal and lithospheric thickness and density changes are the dominant control of surface elevation. Some progress can be made along continental margins by measuring residual depth anomalies of the oldest oceanic floor on newly available seismic reflection and wide-angle profiles. These estimates of dynamic topography have amplitudes of ±1 km and wavelengths of 102-104 km. They mostly, but not always, correlate with long wavelength free-air gravity anomalies. Correlation with seismic tomographic images is much poorer. The distribution of dynamic topography throughout the rest of the oceanic realm can be supplemented by using ship-track data in regions with sparse sedimentary cover and by exploiting the mid-oceanic ridge system. On the continents, it is more difficult to measure dynamic topography with the same accuracy since the density structure of continental lithosphere is so variable but progress can be made on three fronts. First, long-wavelength gravity anomalies which straddle continental margins are an obvious and important guide. Secondly, stratal geometries across continental shelves contain information about positive and negative surface elevation changes. In several cases, 2- and 3-D seismic surveys calibrated by boreholes can be used to constrain spatial and temporal patterns of dynamic topography. In the North Atlantic Ocean, examples of buried ephemeral landscapes suggest that dynamic topography can grow and decay on timescales as short as a few million years. Recognition of positive and negative vertical

  6. Characterisation and modelling of vacancy dynamics in Ni–Mn–Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merida, D., E-mail: david.merida@ehu.es [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Elektrizitate eta Elektronika Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); García, J.A. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); BC Materials (Basque Centre for Materials, Application and Nanostructures), 48040 Leioa (Spain); Sánchez-Alarcos, V. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Institute for Advanced Materials (INAMAT), Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadía, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Plazaola, F. [Elektrizitate eta Elektronika Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • We study the dynamics of vacancies for three different Ni–Mn–Ga alloy samples. • The formation and migration energies have been obtained experimentally. • The entropic factor and the distance a vacancy has to reach a sink are measured. • We present a theoretical model to explain the dynamics of vacancies. • Results are applicable for any thermal treatment and extensible to other alloys. - Abstract: The dynamics of vacancies in Ni–Mn–Ga shape memory alloys has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The temperature evolution of the vacancy concentration for three different Ni–Mn–Ga samples, two polycrystalline and one monocrystalline, have been determined. The formation and migration energies and the entropic factors are quite similar in all cases, but vary slightly according to composition. However, the number of jumps a vacancy has to overtake to reach a sink is five times higher in the single crystal. This is an expected result, due to the role that surfaces and grain boundaries should play in balancing the vacancy concentration. In all cases, the initial vacancy concentration for the samples quenched from 1173 K lies between 1000 ppm and 2000 ppm. A phenomenological model able to explain the dynamics of vacancies has been developed in terms of the previous parameters. The model can reproduce the vacancy dynamics for any different kind of thermal history and can be easily extended to other alloys.

  7. Mobile charge generation dynamics in P3HT: PCBM observed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  8. Multiple time scale dynamics in the breakdown of superhydrophobicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirat, C.; Sbragaglia, M.; Peters, A.M.; Borkent, B.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    Drops deposited on rough and hydrophobic surfaces can stay suspended with gas pockets underneath the liquid, then showing very low hydrodynamic resistance. When this superhydrophobic state breaks down, the subsequent wetting process can show different dynamical properties. A suitable choice of the

  9. Quantum dynamics via a time propagator in Wigner's phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    that the simple classical deterministic motion breaks down surprisingly fast in an anharmonic potential. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the scheme as a useful approach to quantum dynamics in many dimensions. To that end we present a Monte Carlo integration scheme using the norm of the propagator...

  10. Dynamics of nonlinear oscillators with time-varying conjugate coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reverse Hopf bifurcation at k = 0.2 [4]. Therefore, we observed three dynamical regimes, no-synchronization state (NS), complete synchronization state .... (5) where x and y represent the prey and predator popula- tions respectively. The growth rate of the prey is repre- sented by a logistic growth function, with the maximum.

  11. Multiple time scales and multiform dynamics in learning to juggle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huys, R.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    To study the acquisition of perceptual-motor skills as an instance of dynamic pattern formation, we examined the evolution of postural sway and eye and head movements in relation to changes in performance, while 13 novices practiced 3-ball cascade juggling for 9 weeks. Ball trajectories, postural

  12. Time-resolved nanoseconds dynamics of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbin, V.; Garbin, Valeria; Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Overvelde, M.L.J.; Versluis, Michel; van der Meer, S.M.; de Jong, N.; Lohse, Detlef; Dholakia, Kishan; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2006-01-01

    Optical tweezers enable non-destructive, contact-free manipulation of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles, which are used in medical imaging for enhancing the echogenicity of the blood pool and to quantify organ perfusion. The understanding of the fundamental dynamics of ultrasound-driven

  13. Quantifying the entropic cost of cellular growth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; De Martino, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Viewing the ways a living cell can organize its metabolism as the phase space of a physical system, regulation can be seen as the ability to reduce the entropy of that space by selecting specific cellular configurations that are, in some sense, optimal. Here we quantify the amount of regulation required to control a cell's growth rate by a maximum-entropy approach to the space of underlying metabolic phenotypes, where a configuration corresponds to a metabolic flux pattern as described by genome-scale models. We link the mean growth rate achieved by a population of cells to the minimal amount of metabolic regulation needed to achieve it through a phase diagram that highlights how growth suppression can be as costly (in regulatory terms) as growth enhancement. Moreover, we provide an interpretation of the inverse temperature β controlling maximum-entropy distributions based on the underlying growth dynamics. Specifically, we show that the asymptotic value of β for a cell population can be expected to depend on (i) the carrying capacity of the environment, (ii) the initial size of the colony, and (iii) the probability distribution from which the inoculum was sampled. Results obtained for E. coli and human cells are found to be remarkably consistent with empirical evidence.

  14. Large entropic effect in flexible crystalline media for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Satoshi; Kohbara, Masa-aki; Miyake, Ryosuke

    2009-04-06

    To develop the application of the adsorption ability of our flexible single-crystal host [Cu(2)(bza)(4)(pyz)](n) (1) (bza = benzoate; pyz =pyrazine) possessing a 1D channel, we study the separation ability of a 1 packed column for various organic vapors and inorganic gases. A 1 packed column can detect various organic molecules with sharp signals although steric or nonpolar molecules give broad signals. Interestingly, 1 separates various organic mixtures even if the mixture contains nonpolar molecules. Comparing the separation properties with columns of other separation media, including zeolite, activated carbon, activated alumina, and silica gel, suggests that a 1 packed column separates various gaseous molecules under moderate conditions. Additionally, the eluted order of similar molecules, such as N(2)/O(2) and methanol/ethanol using the 1 packed column is different from the others (zeolite, activated carbon, activated alumina, and silica gel), which suggests a difference in the separation mechanism of 1. From GC measurements, the estimated changes in Gibbs free energy by gas adsorption, under diluted gas conditions, exhibits a large entropy dependence caused by regularity in the generated adsorption state, which enables the dynamic control of gas adsorption selectivity. Therefore, it is suggested that single-crystal host 1, because of its flexibility, can separate various gases by adjusting its channel structure according to the features of the guest gaseous molecules. This generates active controllability of the adsorption potential in addition to the intrinsic adsorption interaction.

  15. Entropic localization in non-unitary Newtonian gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Maimone

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The localizing properties and the entropy production of the Newtonian limit of a nonunitary version of fourth order gravity are analyzed. It is argued that pure highly unlocalized states of the center of mass motion of macroscopic bodies rapidly evolve into unlocalized ensembles of highly localized states. The localization time and the final entropy are estimated.

  16. A Time-Resolved Dynamic Stall Investigation Based On Coherent Structure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mulleners, Karen; Raffel, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic stall on an airfoil comprises a series of complex aerodynamic phenomena in response to an unsteady change of the angle of attack. It is accompanied by a lift overshoot and delayed massive flow separation with respect to static stall. The classical hallmark of the dynamic stall phenomenon is the dynamic stall vortex. The flow over an oscillating OA209 airfoil under dynamic stall conditions was investigated by means of unsteady surface pressure measurements and time-resolved particle im...

  17. Diffusive long-time behavior of Kawasaki dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cancrin, C; Roberto, C

    2003-01-01

    If $P_t$ is the semigroup associated with the Kawasaki dynamics on $\\Z^d$ and $f$ is a local function on the configuration space, then the variance with respect to the invariant measure $\\mu$ of $P_t f$ goes to zero as $t\\to\\oo$ faster than $t^{-d/2+\\e}$, with $\\e$ arbitrarily small. The fundamental assumption is a mixing condition on the interaction of Dobrushin and Schlosman type.

  18. Time, models and narratives : Towards understanding the dynamics of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geert, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Whereas Rudolph's (2006a) article provides a discussion of mathematical models of time, Yamado and Kato (2006a) present a particular image of time-circular time-as a key feature of an entirely different model of temporality, namely people life-span narratives. In the present article, I attempt to

  19. Efectos de la entropía urbana en el coste energético del trasporte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bascuñán Walker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo presentado fue descubrir los efectos de la diversidad de uso de suelo o entropía urbana sobre el gasto energético del transporte. Se eligió como zona de estudio la ciudad de La Serena y se encuestó a un grupo representativo de familias con gastos energéticos y de estratos sociales diversos y se comparó con las zonas urbanas de diferentes grados de entropía. El estudio mostró que, indistintamente del nivel social, los habitantes de las zonas que mostraban niveles mayores de entropía gastaban menos energía en traslados a destinos urbanos que aquellos que vivían en zonas de menores entropías. Basados en los resultados del estudio se concluyó que para disminuir el gasto energético en trasporte de los habitantes de la ciudad se requería incrementar el nivel de entropía. La alternativa más eficiente estudiada fue contemplar en la planificación urbana, pequeños policentros de multiservicios (más de tres servicios diferentes que cubran una superficie de población urbana de 78 has aproximadamente.

  20. Time and inequality in labor and family dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Cano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The social changes in last decades have modified the time use of individuals. However, how time is used varies according to the position occupied within the social structure. This paper argues that the social inequality in the power over the time use is increasing among different socioeconomic statuses, while social policies are failing in their equalizer potential. To do so, this essay critically synthetizes three recent published books covering the cases of United States, France and Spain. Three elements that shape the social organization of time are being discussed: (a the dependency among different social groups in time’s control and the endogeneity between family time and work time; (b the ambivalence of flexibility regarding its relation with gender and socioeconomic status; and (c the need for a new assessment of the social policies designated to protect the workers’ family time.

  1. Predictive Event Triggered Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Continuous Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Continuous-Time Systems In this paper, a novel predictive event-triggered control...method based on heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) algorithm is developed for nonlinear continuous-time systems. A model network is used to estimate...College Road, Suite II Kingston, RI 02881 -1967 ABSTRACT Predictive Event-Triggered Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear

  2. Computing and Visualizing Dynamic Time Warping Alignments in R: The dtw Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toni Giorgino

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic time warping is a popular technique for comparing time series, providing both a distance measure that is insensitive to local compression and stretches and the warping which optimally deforms...

  3. Entropic forces drive self-organization and membrane fusion by SNARE proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Hakhamanesh; Thiyagarajan, Sathish; Stratton, Benjamin S; Karatekin, Erdem; Warner, Jason M; Rothman, James E; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2017-05-23

    SNARE proteins are the core of the cell's fusion machinery and mediate virtually all known intracellular membrane fusion reactions on which exocytosis and trafficking depend. Fusion is catalyzed when vesicle-associated v-SNAREs form trans-SNARE complexes ("SNAREpins") with target membrane-associated t-SNAREs, a zippering-like process releasing ∼65 kT per SNAREpin. Fusion requires several SNAREpins, but how they cooperate is unknown and reports of the number required vary widely. To capture the collective behavior on the long timescales of fusion, we developed a highly coarse-grained model that retains key biophysical SNARE properties such as the zippering energy landscape and the surface charge distribution. In simulations the ∼65-kT zippering energy was almost entirely dissipated, with fully assembled SNARE motifs but uncomplexed linker domains. The SNAREpins self-organized into a circular cluster at the fusion site, driven by entropic forces that originate in steric-electrostatic interactions among SNAREpins and membranes. Cooperative entropic forces expanded the cluster and pulled the membranes together at the center point with high force. We find that there is no critical number of SNAREs required for fusion, but instead the fusion rate increases rapidly with the number of SNAREpins due to increasing entropic forces. We hypothesize that this principle finds physiological use to boost fusion rates to meet the demanding timescales of neurotransmission, exploiting the large number of v-SNAREs available in synaptic vesicles. Once in an unfettered cluster, we estimate ≥15 SNAREpins are required for fusion within the ∼1-ms timescale of neurotransmitter release.

  4. Audibility of time switching in dynamic binaural synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo Faundez; Møller, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    In binaural synthesis, signals are convolved with head-related transfer functions HRTFs. In dynamic systems, the update is often done by cross-fading between signals that have been filtered in parallel with two HRTFs. An alternative to cross-fading that is attractive in terms of computing power...... is direct switching between HRTFs that are close enough in space to provide an adequate auralization of moving sound. However, direct switching between HRTFs does not only move the sound but may also generate artifacts such as audible clicks. HRTF switching involves switching of spectral characteristics...

  5. Audibility of time switching in dynamic binaural synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo F.F.; Møller, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    In binaural synthesis, signals are convolved with head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). In dynamic systems, the update is often done by cross- fading between signals that have been filtered in parallel with two HRTFs. An alternative to cross-fading that is attractive in terms of computing power...... is direct switching between HRTFs that are close enough in space to provide an adequate auralization of moving sound. However, direct switching between HRTFs does not only move the sound but may also generate artifacts such as audible clicks. HRTF switching involves switching of spectral characteristics...

  6. Physical relativity space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Harvey R

    2005-01-01

    Physical Relativity explores the nature of the distinction at the heart of Einstein's 1905 formulation of his special theory of relativity: that between kinematics and dynamics. Einstein himself became increasingly uncomfortable with this distinction, and with the limitations of what he called the 'principle theory' approach inspired by the logic of thermodynamics. A handful of physicists and philosophers have over the last century likewise expressed doubts about Einstein'streatment of the relativistic behaviour of rigid bodies and clocks in motion in the kinematical part of his great paper, a

  7. Computer Modeling of Real-Time Dynamic Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, James C.; Pace, J.; Novak, J.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Station tasks involve procedures that are very complex and highly dependent on the availability of visual information. In many situations, cameras are used as tools to help overcome the visual and physical restrictions associated with space flight. However, these cameras are effected by the dynamic lighting conditions of space. Training for these is conditions is necessary. The current project builds on the findings of an earlier NRA funded project, which revealed improved performance by humans when trained with computer graphics and lighting effects such as shadows and glare.

  8. Finite-time rotation number: A fast indicator for chaotic dynamical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szezech, J.D., E-mail: jds98@fisica.ufpr.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84033-240, Ponta Grossa, Paraná (Brazil); Schelin, A.B., E-mail: schelin@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, 80230-901, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Caldas, I.L., E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, S.R., E-mail: lopes@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Morrison, P.J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Viana, R.L., E-mail: rlv640@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2013-02-04

    Lagrangian coherent structures are effective barriers, sticky regions, that separate chaotic phase space regions of different dynamical behavior. The usual way to detect such structures is by calculating finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We show that similar results can be obtained for time-periodic systems by calculating finite-time rotation numbers, which are faster to compute. We illustrate our claim by considering examples of continuous- and discrete-time dynamical systems of physical interest.

  9. Free surface entropic lattice Boltzmann simulations of film condensation on vertical hydrophilic plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Karlin, Iliya; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A model for vapor condensation on vertical hydrophilic surfaces is developed using the entropic lattice Boltzmann method extended with a free surface formulation of the evaporation–condensation problem. The model is validated with the steady liquid film formation on a flat vertical wall....... It is shown that the model is in a good agreement with the classical Nusselt equations for the laminar flow regime. Comparisons of the present model with other empirical models also demonstrate good agreement beyond the laminar regime. This allows the film condensation modeling at high film Reynolds numbers...

  10. Entropical Aspects in Auditory Processes and Psychoacoustical Law of Weber-Fechner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, I.; Popescu, D. I.

    For hearing sense, the mechanoreceptors fire action potentials when their membranes are physically stretched. Based on the statistical physics, we analyzed the entropical aspects in auditory processes of hearing. We develop a model that connects the logarithm of relative intensity of sound (loudness) to the level of energy disorder within the system of cellular sensory system. The increasing of entropy and disorder in the system is connected to the free energy available to signal the production of action potentials in inner hair cells of the vestibulocochlear auditory organ.

  11. Entropic force law in the presence of a noncommutative inspired spacetime for a solar system scale

    CERN Document Server

    Mehdipour, S Hamid

    2016-01-01

    We first study some aspects of a physically inspired kind of a noncommutative spherically symmetric spacetime based on the Gaussian-smeared mass distribution for a solar system scale. This leads to the elimination of a singularity appeared in the origin of the spacetime. Afterwards, we investigate some features of Verlinde's scenario in the presence of the mentioned spacetime and derive several quantities such as Unruh-Verlinde temperature, the energy and the entropic force on three different types of holographic screens, namely the static, the stretched horizon and the accelerating surface.

  12. Real-time visualization of dynamic particle contact failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Ben; Guo, Zherui; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-01-01

    Granular materials are widely used to resist impact and blast. Under these dynamic loadings, the constituent particles in the granular system fracture. To study the fracture mechanisms in brittle particles under dynamic compressive loading, a high speed X-ray phase contrast imaging setup was synchronized with a Kolsky bar apparatus. Controlled compressive loading was applied on two contacting particles using the Kolsky bar apparatus and fracture process was captured using the high speed X-ray imaging setup. Five different particles were investigated: soda-lime glass, polycrystalline silica (silicon dioxide), polycrystalline silicon, barium titanate glass, and yttrium stabilized zirconia. For both soda lime glass and polycrystalline silica particles, one of the particles fragmented explosively, thus breaking into many small pieces. For Silicon and barium titanate glass particles, a finite number of cracks were observed in one of the particles causing it to fracture. For yttrium stabilized zirconia particles, a single meridonial crack developed in one of the particles, breaking it into two parts.

  13. Time dependent analysis with dynamic counter measure trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Guck, Dennis; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    The success of a security attack crucially depends on time: the more time available to the attacker, the higher the probability of a successful attack. Formalisms such as Reliability block diagrams, Reliability graphs and Attack Countermeasure trees provide quantitative information about attack

  14. Robust time-optimal control of uncertain structural dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Sinha, Ravi; Liu, Qiang

    1993-01-01

    A time-optimal open-loop control problem of flexible spacecraft in the presence of modeling uncertainty has been investigated. The results indicate that the proposed approach significantly reduces the residual structural vibrations caused by modeling uncertainty. The results also indicate the importance of proper jet placement for practical tradeoffs among the maneuvering time, fuel consumption, and performance robustness.

  15. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    correlation function g4(r,t) and corresponding "structure factor" S4(q,t) which measure the spatial correlations between the local liquid density at two points in space, each at two different times, and so are sensitive to dynamical heterogeneity. We study g4(r,t) and S4(q,t) via molecular dynamics......Relaxation in supercooled liquids above their glass transition and below the onset temperature of "slow" dynamics involves the correlated motion of neighboring particles. This correlated motion results in the appearance of spatially heterogeneous dynamics or "dynamical heterogeneity." Traditional...... two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density...

  16. Dynamic Planar Convex Hull with Optimal Query Time and O(log n · log log n ) Update Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jakob, Riko

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic maintenance of the convex hull of a set of points in the plane is one of the most important problems in computational geometry. We present a data structure supporting point insertions in amortized O(log n · log log log n) time, point deletions in amortized O(log n · log log n) time, a...

  17. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  18. Time limited optimal dynamics beyond the Quantum Speed Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.; Opatrný, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    The quantum speed limit sets the minimum time required to transfer a quantum system completely into a given target state. At shorter times the higher operation speed has to be paid with a loss of fidelity. Here we quantify the trade-off between the fidelity and the duration in a system driven by a time-varying control. The problem is addressed in the framework of Hilbert space geometry offering an intuitive interpretation of optimal control algorithms. This approach is applied to non-uniform ...

  19. Beyond the dynamical universe unifying block universe physics and time as experienced

    CERN Document Server

    Silberstein, Michael; McDevitt, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical physics and foundations of physics have not made much progress in the last few decades. Whether we are talking about unifying general relativity and quantum field theory (quantum gravity), explaining so-called dark energy and dark matter (cosmology), or the interpretation and implications of quantum mechanics and relativity, there is no consensus in sight. In addition, both enterprises are deeply puzzled about various facets of time including above all, time as experienced. The authors argue that, across the board, this impasse is the result of the "dynamical universe paradigm," the idea that reality is fundamentally made up of physical entities that evolve in time from some initial state according to dynamical laws. Thus, in the dynamical universe, the initial conditions plus the dynamical laws explain everything else going exclusively forward in time. In cosmology, for example, the initial conditions reside in the Big Bang and the dynamical law is supplied by general relativity. Accordingly, th...

  20. Time-series analysis of vibrational nuclear wave packet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, Uwe; Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the extent to which measured time-dependent fragment kinetic energy release (KER) spectra and calculated nuclear probability densities can reveal 1) the transition frequencies between stationary vibrational states, 2) the nodal structure of stationary vibrational states, 3) the ground-state adiabatic electronic potential curve of the molecular ion, and 4) the progression of decoherence induced by random interactions with the environment. We illustrate our discussion with numerical simulations for the time-dependent nuclear motion of vibrational wave packets in the D2^+ molecular ion caused by the ionization of its neutral D2 parent molecule with an intense pump laser pulse. Based on a harmonic time-series analysis, we suggest a general scheme for the full reconstruction, up to an overall phase factor, of the initial wave packets based on measured KER spectra, cf., Phys. Rev. A 77, 063401 (2008).

  1. Ideal CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals enabled by entropic ligands and their core size-, shell thickness-, and ligand-dependent photoluminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianhai; Zhu, Meiyi; Meng, Renyang; Qin, Haiyan; Peng, Xiaogang

    2017-11-02

    This work explored possibilities to obtain colloidal quantum dots (QDs) with ideal photoluminescence (PL) properties, i.e., mono-exponential PL decay dynamics, unity PL quantum yield, ensemble PL spectrum identical to that at single-dot level, single-dot PL non-blinking, and anti-bleaching. Using CdSe/CdS core/shell QDs as the model system, shell-epitaxy, ligand exchange, and shape conversion of the core/shell QDs were studied systematically to establish a strategy for reproducibly synthesizing QDs with the targeted properties. The key synthetic parameter during epitaxy was application of entropic ligands, i.e., mixed carboxylate ligands with different hydrocarbon-chain length and/or structure. While well-controlled epitaxial shells with certain thickness (~3-8 monolayers of the CdS shells) were found to be necessary to reach ideal photoluminescence properties, size of the core QDs was found to play a critical role in determining both photo-physical and photo-chemical properties of the core/shell QDs. Effects of shape of the core QDs were unnoticeable, and shape of the core/shell QDs only affected photo-physical properties quantitatively. Surface ligands-amines versus carboxylates-were important for photo-chemical properties (anti-blinking and anti-bleaching) but barely affected photo-physical properties as long as entropic ligands (mixed carboxylate ligands with distinguishable hydrocarbon chain lengths) were applied during epitaxy. Chemical environment (in polymer or in air), coupled with surface ligands, determined photo-chemical properties of the core/shell QDs with a given core size and shell thickness.

  2. Time-limited optimal dynamics beyond the Quantum Speed Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    by a time-varying control. The problem is addressed in the framework of Hilbert space geometry offering an intuitive interpretation of optimal control algorithms. This approach leads to a necessary criterion for control optimality applicable as a measure of algorithm convergence. The time fidelity trade......-off expressed in terms of the direct Hilbert velocity provides a robust prediction of the quantum speed limit and allows to adapt the control optimization such that it yields a predefined fidelity. The results are verified numerically in a multilevel system with a constrained Hamiltonian, and a classification...

  3. Enthalpic and entropic phase transitions in high energy density nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Features of Gas-Liquid (GL) and Quark-Hadron (QH) phase transitions (PT) in dense nuclear matter are under discussion in comparison with their terrestrial counterparts, e.g. so-called "plasma" PT in shock-compressed hydrogen, nitrogen, xenon etc. Both, GLPT and QHPT, when being represented in widely accepted $T - \\mu$ diagram, are often considered as similar, i.e. amenable to one-to-one mapping by simple scaling. It is argued that this impression is illusive and that GLPT and QHPT belong to different classes: namely, GLPT is typical \\emph{enthalpic} (VdW-like) PT while QHPT ("deconfinement-driven") is typical \\emph{entropic} PT like hypothetical ionization- and dissociation-driven phase transitions in hot and dense hydrogen, nitrogen etc. of megabar pressure range. Newly introduced terms "enthalpic" and "entropic" PT, are defined and clarified in their illustrative comparison successively from $T - \\mu$ to $P - T$ and $P - V$ phase diagrams for GLPT and QHPT from one side (dense nuclear plasma) vs. GLPT and "...

  4. Comparison of entropic contributions to binding in a "hydrophilic" versus "hydrophobic" ligand-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, Neil R; Dennis, Caitriona; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Paesen, Guido C; Homans, Steve W

    2010-06-30

    In the present study we characterize the thermodynamics of binding of histamine to recombinant histamine-binding protein (rRaHBP2), a member of the lipocalin family isolated from the brown-ear tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding pocket of this protein contains a number of charged residues, consistent with histamine binding, and is thus a typical example of a "hydrophilic" binder. In contrast, a second member of the lipocalin family, the recombinant major urinary protein (rMUP), binds small hydrophobic ligands, with a similar overall entropy of binding in comparison with rRaHBP2. Having extensively studied ligand binding thermodynamics for rMUP previously, the data we obtained in the present study for HBP enables a comparison of the driving forces for binding between these classically distinct binding processes in terms of entropic contributions from ligand, protein, and solvent. In the case of rRaHBP2, we find favorable entropic contributions to binding from desolvation of the ligand; however, the overall entropy of binding is unfavorable due to a dominant unfavorable contribution arising from the loss of ligand degrees of freedom, together with the sequestration of solvent water molecules into the binding pocket in the complex. This contrasts with binding in rMUP where desolvation of the protein binding pocket makes a minor contribution to the overall entropy of binding given that the pocket is substantially desolvated prior to binding.

  5. Anti-Icing Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Controlling Entropic Molecular Interactions to Design Novel Icephobic Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Ramachandran

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tribology involves the study of friction, wear, lubrication, and adhesion, including biomimetic superhydrophobic and icephobic surfaces. The three aspects of icephobicity are the low ice adhesion, repulsion of incoming water droplets prior to freezing, and delayed frost formation. Although superhydrophobic surfaces are not always icephobic, the theoretical mechanisms behind icephobicity are similar to the entropically driven hydrophobic interactions. The growth of ice crystals in saturated vapor is partially governed by entropically driven diffusion of water molecules to definite locations similarly to hydrophobic interactions. The ice crystal formation can be compared to protein folding controlled by hydrophobic forces. Surface topography and surface energy can affect both the icephobicity and hydrophobicity. By controlling these properties, micro/nanostructured icephobic concrete was developed. The concrete showed ice adhesion strength one order of magnitude lower than regular concrete and could repel incoming water droplets at −5 °C. The icephobic performance of the concrete can be optimized by controlling the sand and polyvinyl alcohol fiber content.

  6. Entropic Nomogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korablev Grigoriy Andreevich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of entropy spatial-energy interactions is used to reflect the similar views on the statistical thermodynamics of entropy. The resulting nomogram is obtained for estimating the entropy of various processes. The authors discuss the variety of manifestations of entropy, including the biochemical processes in the economy. In living systems the entropy increase is offset by the negative entropy, which is formed through interaction with the external environment. Thus, a living system is an open system. And businesses can no longer be isolated systems without exchange process and the relationship with the external environment. The role of the external system reducing the increase in business entropy must perform, for example, relevant state and public structures, functionally separated from the business. Perhaps, inevitable process in this direction can be de-monopolization of the largest economic structures, carried out “on top” in an evolutionary way. In thermodynamics it is considered that the uncontrolled growth of entropy leads to the termination of any macroeconomic systems, that is, to their death. Therefore, the main task is to search for the methods of reducing the uncontrolled growth of entropy in big business. In addition, these critical numbers of entropy relate mainly to big business. A simple reduction of the number of its employees may not give the real result of a decrease in entropy. So, reduction of the number of employees by 10 % would decrease the entropy of only 0.6 % and this despite the general negative effects of unemployment, which inevitably accompanies such a process. Therefore, such sermonettes not controlled either by the state or society are aimed to reduce the entropy of the business in a more real way of demonopolization without optimization (that is, without reducing the total number of employees. Now the scientific world is puzzled by the intensification of technological processes on the basis of energy-saving technology, for example. This technique P-parameter can also be used in this promising direction.

  7. Dynamic maintenance of majority information in constant time per update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Skyum, Sven

    1997-01-01

    We show how to maintain information about the existence of a majority colour in a set of elements under insertion and deletion of single elements using O(1) time and at most 4 equality tests on colours per update. No ordering information is used....

  8. Labour Market Dynamics in Times of Crisis: Evidence from Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    By examining recent panel data from Ghana, Madagascar, South Africa and Uganda, plus cross-sectional data from Kenya, researchers will track how the labour trajectories for men and women change over time, and the links between firm outcomes and labour markets. It is hoped that the findings will help policymakers ...

  9. Dynamic-Threshold-Limited Timed-Token (DTLTT) Protocol | Kalu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An improved version of the Static-Threshold-Limited On-Demand Guaranteed Service Timed-Token (STOGSTT) Media Access Control (MAC) protocol for channel capacity allocation to the asynchronous trac in Multiservice Local Area Network (MLANs) was developed and analyzed. TLODGSTT protocol uses static value of ...

  10. Time-and-Spatially Adapting Simulations for Efficient Dynamic Stall Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    SIMULATIONS FOR EFFICIENTDYNAMIC STALL PREDICTIONS The ability to accurately and efficiently predict the occurrence and severity of dynamic stall ...reduce the cost of these dynamic stall simulations for airfoils and finite wings are investigated. Temporal error controllers, variable time step sizes...and feature-based near-body mesh adaptation are evaluated for their ability to more cost-effectively predict dynamic stall on three different

  11. Dynamic scheduling and analysis of real time systems with multiprocessors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Nashid Anjum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research work considers a scenario of cloud computing job-shop scheduling problems. We consider m realtime jobs with various lengths and n machines with different computational speeds and costs. Each job has a deadline to be met, and the profit of processing a packet of a job differs from other jobs. Moreover, considered deadlines are either hard or soft and a penalty is applied if a deadline is missed where the penalty is considered as an exponential function of time. The scheduling problem has been formulated as a mixed integer non-linear programming problem whose objective is to maximize net-profit. The formulated problem is computationally hard and not solvable in deterministic polynomial time. This research work proposes an algorithm named the Tube-tap algorithm as a solution to this scheduling optimization problem. Extensive simulation shows that the proposed algorithm outperforms existing solutions in terms of maximizing net-profit and preserving deadlines.

  12. Global Format for Conservative Time Integration in Nonlinear Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    The widely used classic collocation-based time integration procedures like Newmark, Generalized-alpha etc. generally work well within a framework of linear problems, but typically may encounter problems, when used in connection with essentially nonlinear structures. These problems are overcome...... in the new generation of energy conserving algorithms developed over the last two decades. However, the conservative algorithms typically rely on the special structure of the problem to be solved and require intermediate calculations using a mean state. This seems to have limited their use outside academia...... over the time step. This explicit formula is exact for structures with internal energy in the form of a polynomial in the displacement components of degree four. A fully general form follows by introducing an additional term based on a secant representation of the internal energy. The option...

  13. Interacting relativistic quantum dynamics for multi-time wave functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lienert Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on recent progress about a rigorous and manifestly covariant interacting model for two Dirac particles in 1+1 dimensions [9, 10]. It is formulated using the multi-time formalism of Dirac, Tomonaga and Schwinger. The mechanism of interaction is a relativistic generalization of contact interactions, and it is achieved going beyond the usual functional-analytic Hamiltonian method.

  14. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...... coherent detection, respectively. We find that the measured frequency dependent conductivity can be well described by a Drude-Smith model, supplemented by a Lorentz model oscillating near 5 THz....

  15. Decision dynamics of departure times: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Han, Xiao; Bao, Jian-Zhang; Jiang, Rui; Jia, Bin; Yan, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Boyu; Wang, Wen-Xu; Gao, Zi-You

    2017-10-01

    A fundamental problem in traffic science is to understand user-choice behaviors that account for the emergence of complex traffic phenomena. Despite much effort devoted to theoretically exploring departure time choice behaviors, relatively large-scale and systematic experimental tests of theoretical predictions are still lacking. In this paper, we aim to offer a more comprehensive understanding of departure time choice behaviors in terms of a series of laboratory experiments under different traffic conditions and feedback information provided to commuters. In the experiment, the number of recruited players is much larger than the number of choices to better mimic the real scenario, in which a large number of commuters will depart simultaneously in a relatively small time window. Sufficient numbers of rounds are conducted to ensure the convergence of collective behavior. Experimental results demonstrate that collective behavior is close to the user equilibrium, regardless of different scales and traffic conditions. Moreover, the amount of feedback information has a negligible influence on collective behavior but has a relatively stronger effect on individual choice behaviors. Reinforcement learning and Fermi learning models are built to reproduce the experimental results and uncover the underlying mechanism. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed collective behaviors.

  16. Dynamics on Multilayered Hyperbranched Fractals Through Continuous Time Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Antonio; Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel; Gallo, Tommaso; Gualandri, Luciano

    We introduce a new method to generate three-dimensional structures, with mixed topologies. We focus on Multilayered Regular Hyperbranched Fractals (MRHF), three-dimensional networks constructed as a set of identical generalized Vicsek fractals, known as Regular Hyperbranched Fractals (RHF), layered on top of each other. Every node of any layer is directly connected only to copies of itself from nearest-neighbor layers. We found out that also for MRHF the eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix is determined through a semi-analytical method, which gives the opportunity to analyze very large structures. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover effects of two basic topologies: linear, corresponding to the way we connect the layers and fractal due to the layers' topology. From the wealth of applications which depends on the eigenvalue spectrum we choose the return-to-the-origin probability. The results show the expected short-time and long-time behaviors. In the intermediate time domain we obtained two different power-law exponents: the first one is given by the combination linear-RHF, while the second one is peculiar either of a single RHF or of a single linear chain.

  17. The multiple time scales of sleep dynamics as a challenge for modelling the sleeping brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Eckehard; Claussen, Jens Christian; Achermann, Peter

    2011-10-13

    A particular property of the sleeping brain is that it exhibits dynamics on very different time scales ranging from the typical sleep oscillations such as sleep spindles and slow waves that can be observed in electroencephalogram (EEG) segments of several seconds duration over the transitions between the different sleep stages on a time scale of minutes to the dynamical processes involved in sleep regulation with typical time constants in the range of hours. There is an increasing body of work on mathematical and computational models addressing these different dynamics, however, usually considering only processes on a single time scale. In this paper, we review and present a new analysis of the dynamics of human sleep EEG at the different time scales and relate the findings to recent modelling efforts pointing out both the achievements and remaining challenges.

  18. Time-series modeling of gross migration and dynamic equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, T

    1985-02-01

    Firstly, the high association between in- and out-migration is investigated in a time-series context and modeled according to three categories: 1) job transfer, 2) job search and marriage, and 3) return migration. Under certain coditions it is shown that aggregation of these migrations yields a bivariate time-series model having feedbacks in both directions. Secondly, the recent phenomenon of sharp changes in net migration seems to be discontinuous and, hence, catastrophic modeling [Casetti (1981) may be appropriate. However, this paper considers gross migration between cores (metropolitan areas) and peripheries (rest of the nation) for which a continuous function seems adequate. This is done by introducing a multivariate time-series model. This model is empirically supported, especially in Japan, divided into 32 regions, by t-tests and Durbin-Watson ratios, although it excludes economic variables such as employment growth and wage differentials. This may imply that the recent dispersal from core to peripheral regions could be explained primarily by feedback from return migrants. Finallym, provided future streams of gross migration follow the past trends given by simultaneous equation estimates, in-migration and out-migration would approach a stable state in most regions. Irrespective of random shocks in the future, in- and out-migration would tend to approach a stable equilibrium. According to the estimation of the stable states, the 45 core regions in the US would continue to lose population through net outflows while those in Japan would continue to gain. The present model may thus be valid only for short-term forecasts. By introducing feedback and lag structures, however, it does offer one explanation for the recent population turnaround.

  19. Two Wheeled Vehicle Dynamics Synthesis for Real-Time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hima, Salim; Arioui, Hichem

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a modeling technique for deriving the motorcycles equation of motion. The proposed technique is based on the recursive Newton-Euler approach and adapted to tree structure with floating base multibody systems. The derived model presents a low number of arithmetic operations, and hence, suitable for implementation into a two wheeled vehicles real-time applications such as driving simulators. The synthesized model takes in consideration the main wrenches that affect the behavior of motorcycle such as: pneumatic, aerodynamic, suspensions, contact constraints and control inputs.

  20. Real time modeling, simulation and control of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mughal, Asif Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces modeling and simulation of linear time invariant systems and demonstrates how these translate to systems engineering, mechatronics engineering, and biomedical engineering. It is organized into nine chapters that follow the lectures used for a one-semester course on this topic, making it appropriate for students as well as researchers. The author discusses state space modeling derived from two modeling techniques and the analysis of the system and usage of modeling in control systems design. It also contains a unique chapter on multidisciplinary energy systems with a special focus on bioengineering systems and expands upon how the bond graph augments research in biomedical and bio-mechatronics systems.

  1. Physical relativity: space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Harvey R

    2005-01-01

    ... relativity, there was nonetheless a vein of doubt running through his writings- culminating in his 1949 Autobiographical Notes- concerning the way he formulated the theory in 1905. It is clear, to me at least, that Einstein was fully conscious right from the beginning that there were two routes to relativistic kinematics, and that as time went on the appropriateness of the route he had chosen, which he felt he had to choose in 1905, was increasingly open to question. In his acclaimed 1982 scientific biogr...

  2. Return times at periodic points in random dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, Nicolai; Todd, Mike

    2017-01-01

    We prove a quenched limiting law for random measures on subshifts at periodic points. We consider a family of measures {≤ft\\{{{μω}\\right\\}}ω \\in Ω } , where the ‘driving space’ Ω is equipped with a probability measure which is invariant under a transformation θ. We assume that the fibred measures {μω} satisfy a generalised invariance property and are ψ-mixing. We then show that for almost every ω the return times to cylinders A n at periodic points are in the limit compound Poisson distributed for a parameter ϑ which is given by the escape rate at the periodic point.

  3. A place for time: the spatiotemporal structure of neural dynamics during natural audition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, G.J.; Honey, C.J.; Hasson, U.

    2013-01-01

    We use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to analyze neural responses to natural auditory stimuli. We characterize the fMRI time series through the shape of the voxel power spectrum and find that the timescales of neural dynamics vary along a spatial gradient, with faster dynamics in early

  4. Solving Algebraic Riccati Equation Real Time for Integrated Vehicle Dynamics Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnappillil Madhusudhanan, A; Corno, M.; Bonsen, B.; Holweg, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a comparison study of different computational methods to implement State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) based control in real time for a vehicle dynamics control application. Vehicles are mechatronic systems with nonlinear dynamics. One of the promising nonlinear control

  5. Dynamic coupling design for nonlinear output agreement and time-varying flow control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buerger, Mathias; De Persis, Claudio

    This paper studies the problem of output agreement in networks of nonlinear dynamical systems under time-varying disturbances, using dynamic diffusive couplings. Necessary conditions are derived for general networks of nonlinear systems, and these conditions are explicitly interpreted as conditions

  6. An integrative time-varying frequency detection and channel sounding method for dynamic plasma sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Yao, Bo; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Xiaotong; Yang, Min; Liu, Yanming

    2018-01-01

    The plasma sheath-surrounded hypersonic vehicle is a dynamic and time-varying medium and it is almost impossible to calculate time-varying physical parameters directly. The in-fight detection of the time-varying degree is important to understand the dynamic nature of the physical parameters and their effect on re-entry communication. In this paper, a constant envelope zero autocorrelation (CAZAC) sequence based on time-varying frequency detection and channel sounding method is proposed to detect the plasma sheath electronic density time-varying property and wireless channel characteristic. The proposed method utilizes the CAZAC sequence, which has excellent autocorrelation and spread gain characteristics, to realize dynamic time-varying detection/channel sounding under low signal-to-noise ratio in the plasma sheath environment. Theoretical simulation under a typical time-varying radio channel shows that the proposed method is capable of detecting time-variation frequency up to 200 kHz and can trace the channel amplitude and phase in the time domain well under -10 dB. Experimental results conducted in the RF modulation discharge plasma device verified the time variation detection ability in practical dynamic plasma sheath. Meanwhile, nonlinear phenomenon of dynamic plasma sheath on communication signal is observed thorough channel sounding result.

  7. Real-time dynamic imaging of virus distribution in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean E Hofherr

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of viruses and gene therapy vectors is difficult to assess in a living organism. For instance, trafficking in murine models can usually only be assessed after sacrificing the animal for tissue sectioning or extraction. These assays are laborious requiring whole animal sectioning to ascertain tissue localization. They also obviate the ability to perform longitudinal or kinetic studies in one animal. To track viruses after systemic infection, we have labeled adenoviruses with a near-infrared (NIR fluorophore and imaged these after intravenous injection in mice. Imaging was able to track and quantitate virus particles entering the jugular vein simultaneous with injection, appearing in the heart within 500 milliseconds, distributing in the bloodstream and throughout the animal within 7 seconds, and that the bulk of virus distribution was essentially complete within 3 minutes. These data provide the first in vivo real-time tracking of the rapid initial events of systemic virus infection.

  8. Radioactive waste. Risk, reward, space and time dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, I J

    2001-01-01

    to ensure isolation from the biosphere while it remains hazardous. The outcome of this research is applicable to the disposal of all solid hazardous waste. This study considers, in a geographical context, issues arising from the disposal of radioactive waste with particular emphasis on societal perceptions of Risk, Trust, NIMBYand Time. It establishes that the wider community now accepts the concepts of 'user pays' and offsetting compensation to any community that accepts a risk, such risk to be minimised and interruptible as necessary. The underlying causes of NIMBYism have been misjudged by industry and this work establishes that they are as much due to exclusion from the decision making process as they are to direct concerns about the social impact, health and environment. The principal cause of NIMBYism is discussed and a procedure to assist siting approval is suggested. This study establishes that industry, government or specialists working alone in this field engender less trust by society than composit...

  9. An assessment of the differential quadrature time integration scheme for nonlinear dynamic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Xinwei

    2008-07-01

    In 1996, Xie [An assessment of time integration schemes for non-linear dynamic equations, Journal of Sound and Vibration 192(1) (1996) 321-331] presented an assessment on seven existing and commonly used time integration schemes for nonlinear dynamic equations. In this work, the differential quadrature (DQ) time integration scheme proposed by Fung in 2001 is assessed following the same procedures as Xie's. It is shown that accurate numerical results can be obtained by the DQ method when using much larger time step over the commonly used time integration schemes. Based on the results reported herein, some conclusions are drawn.

  10. Chaotic dynamics and basin erosion in nanomagnets subject to time-harmonic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, M., E-mail: daquino@uniparthenope.it [Engineering Department, University of Naples “Parthenope”, 80143 Naples (Italy); Quercia, A.; Serpico, C. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Bertotti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [ECE Department and UMIACS, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Perna, S. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Ansalone, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized particles subject to time-harmonic (AC) external fields is considered. The study is focused on the behavior of the AC-driven dynamics close to saddle equilibria. It happens that such dynamics has chaotic nature at moderately low power level, due to the heteroclinic tangle phenomenon which is produced by the combined effect of AC-excitations and saddle type dynamics. By using analytical theory for the threshold AC excitation amplitudes necessary to create the heteroclinic tangle together with numerical simulations, we quantify and show how the tangle produces the erosion of the safe basin around the stable equilibria.

  11. Hybrid approximations via second order combined dynamic derivatives on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the approximation of conventional second order derivative via the combined (diamond-$\\alpha$ dynamic derivative on time scales with necessary smoothness conditions embedded. We will show the constraints under which the second order dynamic derivative provides a consistent approximation to the conventional second derivative; the cases where the dynamic derivative approximates the derivative only via a proper modification of the existing formula; and the situations in which the dynamic derivative can never approximate consistently even with the help of available structure correction methods. Constructive error analysis will be given via asymptotic expansions for practical hybrid modeling and computational applications.

  12. DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING SUBHASISH MOHANTY*, ADITI CHATTOPADHYAY, JOHN N. RAJADAS, AND CLYDE...

  13. Assessment of Clogging Dynamics in Permeable Pavement Systems with Time Domain Reflectometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infiltration is a primary functional mechanism in green infrastructure stormwater controls. This study used time domain reflectometers (TDRs) to measure spatial infiltration and assess clogging dynamics of permeable pavement systems in Edison, NJ, and Louisville, KY. In 2009, t...

  14. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Functional Dynamic Equations with Damping on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Tuğla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study oscillatory behavior of second-order dynamic equations with damping under some assumptions on time scales. New theorems extend and improve the results in the literature. Illustrative examples are given.

  15. VEHICLE RECOGNITION IN AERIAL LIDAR POINT CLOUD BASED ON DYNAMIC TIME WARPING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. Zhang; G. Vosselman; S. J. Oude Elberink

    2017-01-01

    .... Then the vehicle is recognized according to the profile shape based on dynamic time warping. The proposed method can detect vehicles parking under trees in an urban scene, and classifies the vehicles into different classes...

  16. IceBridge ZLS Dynamic Gravity Meter Time-Registered L1B Vertical Accelerations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IceBridge ZLS Dynamic Gravity Meter Time-Registered L1B Vertical Accelerations (IGZLS1B) data set contains vertical, cross body, and along body acceleration...

  17. Judo strategy. The competitive dynamics of Internet time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoffie, D B; Cusumano, M A

    1999-01-01

    Competition on the Internet is creating fierce battles between industry giants and small-scale start-ups. Smart start-ups can avoid those conflicts by moving quickly to uncontested ground and, when that's no longer possible, turning dominant players' strengths against them. The authors call this competitive approach judo strategy. They use the Netscape-Microsoft battles to illustrate the three main principles of judo strategy: rapid movement, flexibility, and leverage. In the early part of the browser wars, for instance, Netscape applied the principle of rapid movement by being the first company to offer a free stand-alone browser. This allowed Netscape to build market share fast and to set the market standard. Flexibility became a critical factor later in the browser wars. In December 1995, when Microsoft announced that it would "embrace and extend" competitors' Internet successes, Netscape failed to give way in the face of superior strength. Instead it squared off against Microsoft and even turned down numerous opportunities to craft deep partnerships with other companies. The result was that Netscape lost deal after deal when competing with Microsoft for common distribution channels. Netscape applied the principle of leverage by using Microsoft's strengths against it. Taking advantage of Microsoft's determination to convert the world to Windows or Windows NT, Netscape made its software compatible with existing UNIX systems. While it is true that these principles can't replace basic execution, say the authors, without speed, flexibility, and leverage, very few companies can compete successfully on Internet time.

  18. How have inflation dynamics changed over time? Evidence from the euro area and USA

    OpenAIRE

    Oinonen, Sami; Paloviita, Maritta; Vilmi , Lauri

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes euro area and U.S. inflation dynamics since the beginning of the 1990s by estimating New Keynesian hybrid Phillips curves with time-varying parameters. We measure inflation expectations by subjective forecasts from Consensus Economics survey and so do not assume rational expectations. Both rolling regressions and state-space models are employed. The results indicate that in both economic areas the inflation dynamics have steadily become more forward-looking over time. We a...

  19. X-ray testing for short-time dynamic applications; Roentgenuntersuchungen fuer kurzzeitdynamische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfiss, Malte; Moser, Stefan; Popko, Gregor; Nau, Siegfried [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik, Efringen-Kirchen (Germany). Ernst-Mach-Inst. (EMI)

    2017-08-01

    For nondestructive testing purposes new challenges are short-time dynamic processes. The application of x-ray flash tubes and modern high-speed cameras allows the observation of the opening of air-bags or the energy absorption of compressed tubes as occurring during a vehicle crash. Special algorithms designed for computerized tomography analyses allow the 3D reconstruction at individual time points of the dynamic process. Possibilities and limitations of the actual techniques are discussed.

  20. Elastic scattering dynamics of cavity polaritons: Evidence for time-energy uncertainty and polariton localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    for increasing time after excitation, giving direct evidence for the time-energy uncertainty in the dynamics of the scattering by disorder. The ring width converges with time to a finite value, a direct measure of an intrinsic momentum broadening of the polariton states localized by multiple disorder scattering....

  1. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...... of the cation in 1.6 ps. The real-time probing of the excited-state dynamics is made possible by exploiting the interaction between the two bromine chromophores and its dependence on molecular conformation. This experiment therefore illustrates the applicability of the concept of probing ultrafast molecular...... dynamics using the intramolecular interaction between two chromophores....

  2. Entropic uncertainty for spin-1/2 XXX chains in the presence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields and its steering via weak measurement reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Ming, Fei; Huang, Ai-Jun; Sun, Wen-Yang; Ye, Liu

    2017-09-01

    The uncertainty principle configures a low bound to the measuring precision for a pair of non-commuting observables, and hence is considerably nontrivial to quantum precision measurement in the field of quantum information theory. In this letter, we consider the entropic uncertainty relation (EUR) in the context of quantum memory in a two-qubit isotropic Heisenberg spin chain. Specifically, we explore the dynamics of EUR in a practical scenario, where two associated nodes of a one-dimensional XXX-spin chain, under an inhomogeneous magnetic field, are connected to a thermal entanglement. We show that the temperature and magnetic field effect can lead to the inflation of the measuring uncertainty, stemming from the reduction of systematic quantum correlation. Notably, we reveal that, firstly, the uncertainty is not fully dependent on the observed quantum correlation of the system; secondly, the dynamical behaviors of the measuring uncertainty are relatively distinct with respect to ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism chains. Meanwhile, we deduce that the measuring uncertainty is dramatically correlated with the mixedness of the system, implying that smaller mixedness tends to reduce the uncertainty. Furthermore, we propose an effective strategy to control the uncertainty of interest by means of quantum weak measurement reversal. Therefore, our work may shed light on the dynamics of the measuring uncertainty in the Heisenberg spin chain, and thus be important to quantum precision measurement in various solid-state systems.

  3. Real-time visualization of 3-D dynamic microscopic objects using optical diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Kyung Sang; Park, Hyunjoo; Ye, Jong Chul; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-12-30

    3-D refractive index (RI) distribution is an intrinsic bio-marker for the chemical and structural information about biological cells. Here we develop an optical diffraction tomography technique for the real-time reconstruction of 3-D RI distribution, employing sparse angle illumination and a graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation. The execution time for the tomographic reconstruction is 0.21 s for 96(3) voxels, which is 17 times faster than that of a conventional approach. We demonstrated the real-time visualization capability with imaging the dynamics of Brownian motion of an anisotropic colloidal dimer and the dynamic shape change in a red blood cell upon shear flow.

  4. Thermodynamic modeling, energy equipartition, and nonconservation of entropy for discrete-time dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellaboina Vijaysekhar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop thermodynamic models for discrete-time large-scale dynamical systems. Specifically, using compartmental dynamical system theory, we develop energy flow models possessing energy conservation, energy equipartition, temperature equipartition, and entropy nonconservation principles for discrete-time, large-scale dynamical systems. Furthermore, we introduce a new and dual notion to entropy; namely, ectropy, as a measure of the tendency of a dynamical system to do useful work and grow more organized, and show that conservation of energy in an isolated thermodynamic system necessarily leads to nonconservation of ectropy and entropy. In addition, using the system ectropy as a Lyapunov function candidate, we show that our discrete-time, large-scale thermodynamic energy flow model has convergent trajectories to Lyapunov stable equilibria determined by the system initial subsystem energies.

  5. Role of Entropic Barriers in Controlling Polymer Diffusion in Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Philip; Tung, Wei-Shao; Meth, Jeffrey; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Winey, Karen

    Polymer diffusion in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) is significantly modified relative to the neat state. While it is suspected that nanoparticle-induced confinement plays a key role in the diffusion process, a detailed understanding of this process remains nonetheless elusive. We present recent studies of the temperature dependent polymer center-of-mass tracer diffusion coefficient in an athermal PNC comprising polystyrene and phenyl-capped, spherical silica NPs using elastic recoil detection. We find that the polymer tracer diffusion coefficient in the PNC relative to the bulk decreases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and is unexpectedly more strongly reduced at higher temperatures. This unusual temperature dependence of polymer diffusion in PNCs cannot be explained by the reptation model or a modified version incorporating an effective tube diameter, but instead it is the direct result of entropic free energy barriers imposed on polymer chains under confinement.

  6. Bounds on topological Abelian string-vortex and string-cigar from information-entropic measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.C. Correa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we obtain bounds on the topological Abelian string-vortex and on the string-cigar, by using a new measure of configurational complexity, known as configurational entropy. In this way, the information-theoretical measure of six-dimensional braneworlds scenarios is capable to probe situations where the parameters responsible for the brane thickness are arbitrary. The so-called configurational entropy (CE selects the best value of the parameter in the model. This is accomplished by minimizing the CE, namely, by selecting the most appropriate parameters in the model that correspond to the most organized system, based upon the Shannon information theory. This information-theoretical measure of complexity provides a complementary perspective to situations where strictly energy-based arguments are inconclusive. We show that the higher the energy the higher the CE, what shows an important correlation between the energy of the a localized field configuration and its associated entropic measure.

  7. Entropic contributions enhance polarity compensation for CeO2(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevila-Cortada, Marçal; López, Núria

    2017-03-01

    Surface structure controls the physical and chemical response of materials. Surface polar terminations are appealing because of their unusual properties but they are intrinsically unstable. Several mechanisms, namely metallization, adsorption, and ordered reconstructions, can remove thermodynamic penalties rendering polar surfaces partially stable. Here, for CeO2(100), we report a complementary stabilization mechanism based on surface disorder that has been unravelled through theoretical simulations that: account for surface energies and configurational entropies; show the importance of the ion distribution degeneracy; and identify low diffusion barriers between conformations that ensure equilibration. Disordered configurations in oxides might also be further stabilized by preferential adsorption of water. The entropic stabilization term will appear for surfaces with a high number of empty sites, typically achieved when removing part of the ions in a polar termination to make the layer charge zero. Assessing the impact of surface disorder when establishing new structure-activity relationships remains a challenge.

  8. Entropic solvation force between surfaces modified by grafted chains: a density functional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pizio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of a hard sphere fluid in slit-like pores with walls modified by grafted chain molecules composed of hard sphere segments is studied using density functional theory. The chains are grafted to opposite walls via terminating segments forming pillars. The effects of confinement and of "chemical" modification of pore walls on the entropic solvation force are investigated in detail. We observe that in the absence of adsorbed fluid the solvation force is strongly repulsive for narrow pores and attractive for wide pores. In the presence of adsorbed fluid both parts of the curve of the solvation force may develop oscillatory behavior dependent on the density of pillars, the number of segments and adsorption conditions. Also, the size ratio between adsorbed fluid species and chain segments is of importance for the development of oscillations. The choice of these parameters is crucial for efficient manipulation of the solvation force as desired for pores of different width.

  9. Bounds on topological Abelian string-vortex and string-cigar from information-entropic measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, R.A.C., E-mail: rafael.couceiro@ufabc.edu.br [CCNH, Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), 09210-580, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Dantas, D.M., E-mail: davi@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), 60455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, C.A.S., E-mail: carlos@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, 60455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Rocha, Roldão da, E-mail: roldao.rocha@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), 09210-580, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2016-04-10

    In this work we obtain bounds on the topological Abelian string-vortex and on the string-cigar, by using a new measure of configurational complexity, known as configurational entropy. In this way, the information-theoretical measure of six-dimensional braneworlds scenarios is capable to probe situations where the parameters responsible for the brane thickness are arbitrary. The so-called configurational entropy (CE) selects the best value of the parameter in the model. This is accomplished by minimizing the CE, namely, by selecting the most appropriate parameters in the model that correspond to the most organized system, based upon the Shannon information theory. This information-theoretical measure of complexity provides a complementary perspective to situations where strictly energy-based arguments are inconclusive. We show that the higher the energy the higher the CE, what shows an important correlation between the energy of the a localized field configuration and its associated entropic measure.

  10. Segmentation of genomic DNA through entropic divergence: Power laws and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Rajeev K.; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna; Rao, J. Subba

    2002-05-01

    Genomic DNA is fragmented into segments using the Jensen-Shannon divergence. Use of this criterion results in the fragments being entropically homogeneous to within a predefined level of statistical significance. Application of this procedure is made to complete genomes of organisms from archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes. The distribution of fragment lengths in bacterial and primitive eukaryotic DNAs shows two distinct regimes of power-law scaling. The characteristic length separating these two regimes appears to be an intrinsic property of the sequence rather than a finite-size artifact, and is independent of the significance level used in segmenting a given genome. Fragment length distributions obtained in the segmentation of the genomes of more highly evolved eukaryotes do not have such distinct regimes of power-law behavior.

  11. Large entropic effects on the thermochemistry of silicon nanodusty plasma constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Prasenjit; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-02-19

    Determination of the thermodynamic properties of reactor constituents is the first step in designing control strategies for plasma-mediated deposition processes and is also a key fundamental issue in physical chemistry. In this work, a recently proposed multistructural statistical thermodynamic method is used to show the importance of multiple structures and torsional anharmonicity in determining the thermodynamic properties of silicon hydride clusters, which are important both in plasmas and in thermally driven systems. It includes five different categories of silicon hydride clusters and radicals, including silanes, silyl radicals, and silenes. We employed a statistical mechanical approach, namely the recently developed multistructural (MS) anharmonicity method, in combination with density functional theory to calculate the partition functions, which in turn are used to estimate thermodynamic quantities, namely Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity, for all of the systems considered. The calculations are performed using all of the conformational structures of each molecule or radical by employing the multistructural quasiharmonic approximation (MS-QH) and also by including torsional potential anharmonicity (MS-T). For those cases where group additivity (GA) results are available, the thermodynamic quantities obtained from our MS-T calculations differ considerably due to the fact that the GA method is based on single-structure data for isomers of each stoichiometry, and hence lack multistructural effects; whereas we find that multistructural effects are very important in silicon hydride systems. Our results also indicate that the entropic effect on the thermochemistry is huge and is dominated by multistructural effects. The entropic effect of multiple structures is also expected to be important for other kinds of chain molecules, and its effect on nucleation kinetics is expected to be large.

  12. Entropic chiral symmetry breaking in self-organized two-dimensional colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Kenny; Mason, Thomas G

    2014-07-07

    Long-range chiral symmetry breaking (CSB) has been recently observed in 2D self-organized rhombic crystals of hard, achiral, 72 degree rhombic microparticles. However, purely entropic selection of a CSB crystal in an idealized system of hard achiral shapes, in which attractions are entirely absent and the shape does not dictate a chiral tiling, has not yet been quantitatively predicted. Overcoming limitations of a purely rotational cage model, we investigate a translational-rotational cage model (TRCM) of dense systems of hard achiral rhombs and quantitatively demonstrate that entropy can spontaneously drive the preferential self-organization of a chiral crystal composed of achiral shapes that also tile into an achiral crystal. At different particle area fractions, ϕA, we calculate the number of accessible translational-rotational microstates, Ω, of a mobile central rhomb in a static cage of neighboring rhombs, which can have different orientation angles, γ, relative to the bisector of the crystalline axes. As we raise ϕA, two maxima emerge in Ω(γ) at non-zero cage orientation angles, ±γmax. These maxima correspond to additional translational microstates that become accessible in the CSB crystalline polymorph through reduced translational tip-tip interference. Thus, entropy, often associated with structural disorder, can drive CSB in condensed phase systems of non-attractive achiral objects that do not tile into chiral structures. The success of the TRCM in explaining the entropic origin of CSB in systems of hard rhombs indicates that the TRCM will have significant utility in predicting the self-organized behavior of dense systems of other hard shapes in 2D.

  13. Entropic Profiler – detection of conservation in genomes using information theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jonas S

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decades, with the successive availability of whole genome sequences, many research efforts have been made to mathematically model DNA. Entropic Profiles (EP were proposed recently as a new measure of continuous entropy of genome sequences. EP represent local information plots related to DNA randomness and are based on information theory and statistical concepts. They express the weighed relative abundance of motifs for each position in genomes. Their study is very relevant because under or over-representation segments are often associated with significant biological meaning. Findings The Entropic Profiler application here presented is a new tool designed to detect and extract under and over-represented DNA segments in genomes by using EP. It allows its computation in a very efficient way by recurring to improved algorithms and data structures, which include modified suffix trees. Available through a web interface http://kdbio.inesc-id.pt/software/ep/ and as downloadable source code, it allows to study positions and to search for motifs inside the whole sequence or within a specified range. DNA sequences can be entered from different sources, including FASTA files, pre-loaded examples or resuming a previously saved work. Besides the EP value plots, p-values and z-scores for each motif are also computed, along with the Chaos Game Representation of the sequence. Conclusion EP are directly related with the statistical significance of motifs and can be considered as a new method to extract and classify significant regions in genomes and estimate local scales in DNA. The present implementation establishes an efficient and useful tool for whole genome analysis.

  14. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  15. Dynamic routing based on real-time traffic information in LBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nianbo; Li, Qingquan; Song, Ying

    2005-10-01

    Location based services (LBS) are capturing global spotlights increasingly, in which users tend to pick up navigation service as their favorites. This paper examines the dynamic routing problems based on real-time traffic information in LBS. At first, the overall structure of dynamic navigation system is illustrated, which is composed of four ingredients: traffic data collection, digital road map, static routing and dynamic re-routing. Traffic data collection is the task of traffic information center (TIC), where various sources of data are fused into link travel times that are used as criteria to choose candidates in path determining. Digital road map includes digital road network and historical traffic data, where the topology relationship of road network is elementarily explored and the method to represent statistical traffic data is referred to. Routing with historical traffic data and dynamic re-routing with live traffic data are two main functions of dynamic navigation service. The flow of dynamic re-routing algorithm is exhibited. Lastly, a first-in-first-out (FIFO) time-depend shortest path algorithm is discussed for dynamic routing, which adopts the adaptive A * algorithm based on binary heap priority queue and RB-tree.

  16. Real-Time Dynamics in U(1 Lattice Gauge Theories with Tensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pichler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tensor network algorithms provide a suitable route for tackling real-time-dependent problems in lattice gauge theories, enabling the investigation of out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We analyze a U(1 lattice gauge theory in (1+1 dimensions in the presence of dynamical matter for different mass and electric-field couplings, a theory akin to quantum electrodynamics in one dimension, which displays string breaking: The confining string between charges can spontaneously break during quench experiments, giving rise to charge-anticharge pairs according to the Schwinger mechanism. We study the real-time spreading of excitations in the system by means of electric-field and particle fluctuations. We determine a dynamical state diagram for string breaking and quantitatively evaluate the time scales for mass production. We also show that the time evolution of the quantum correlations can be detected via bipartite von Neumann entropies, thus demonstrating that the Schwinger mechanism is tightly linked to entanglement spreading. To present a variety of possible applications of this simulation platform, we show how one could follow the real-time scattering processes between mesons and the creation of entanglement during scattering processes. Finally, we test the quality of quantum simulations of these dynamics, quantifying the role of possible imperfections in cold atoms, trapped ions, and superconducting circuit systems. Our results demonstrate how entanglement properties can be used to deepen our understanding of basic phenomena in the real-time dynamics of gauge theories such as string breaking and collisions.

  17. Considering time in LCA: dynamic LCA and its application to global warming impact assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Annie; Lesage, Pascal; Margni, Manuele; Deschênes, Louise; Samson, Réjean

    2010-04-15

    The lack of temporal information is an important limitation of life cycle assessment (LCA). A dynamic LCA approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of LCA by addressing the inconsistency of temporal assessment. This approach consists of first computing a dynamic life cycle inventory (LCI), considering the temporal profile of emissions. Then, time-dependent characterization factors are calculated to assess the dynamic LCI in real-time impact scores for any given time horizon. Although generally applicable to any impact category, this approach is developed here for global warming, based on the radiative forcing concept. This case study demonstrates that the use of global warming potentials for a given time horizon to characterize greenhouse gas emissions leads to an inconsistency between the time frame chosen for the analysis and the time period covered by the LCA results. Dynamic LCA is applied to the US EPA LCA on renewable fuels, which compares the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of different biofuels with fossil fuels including land-use change emissions. The comparison of the results obtained with both traditional and dynamic LCA approaches shows that the difference can be important enough to change the conclusions on whether or not a biofuel meets some given global warming reduction targets.

  18. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2018-01-14

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  19. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  20. Accurate Non-adiabatic Quantum Dynamics from Pseudospectral Sampling of Time-dependent Gaussian Basis Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Heaps, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics requires an accurate representation of the molecular potential energy surface from a minimal number of electronic structure calculations, particularly for nonadiabatic dynamics where excited states are required. In this paper, we employ pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis functions for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics. Unlike other methods, the pseudospectral Gaussian molecular dynamics tests the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with $N$ Dirac delta functions located at the centers of the Gaussian functions reducing the scaling of potential energy evaluations from $\\mathcal{O}(N^2)$ to $\\mathcal{O}(N)$. By projecting the Gaussian basis onto discrete points in space, the method is capable of efficiently and quantitatively describing nonadiabatic population transfer and intra-surface quantum coherence. We investigate three model systems; the photodissociation of three coupled Morse oscillators, the bound state dynamics of two coupled Morse oscillators, and a two-d...

  1. A Method Based on Dial's Algorithm for Multi-time Dynamic Traffic Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjie Kuang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to static traffic assignment has poor performance in reflecting actual case and dynamic traffic assignment may incurs excessive compute cost, method of multi-time dynamic traffic assignment combining static and dynamic traffic assignment balances factors of precision and cost effectively. A method based on Dial's logit algorithm is proposed in the article to solve the dynamic stochastic user equilibrium problem in dynamic traffic assignment. Before that, a fitting function that can proximately reflect overloaded traffic condition of link is proposed and used to give corresponding model. Numerical example is given to illustrate heuristic procedure of method and to compare results with one of same example solved by other literature's algorithm. Results show that method based on Dial's algorithm is preferable to algorithm from others.

  2. Dynamic Reconfiguration in Real-Time Systems Energy, Performance, and Thermal Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weixun; Ranka, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Given the widespread use of real-time multitasking systems, there are tremendous optimization opportunities if reconfigurable computing can be effectively incorporated while maintaining performance and other design constraints of typical applications. The focus of this book is to describe the dynamic reconfiguration techniques that can be safely used in real-time systems. This book provides comprehensive approaches by considering synergistic effects of computation, communication as well as storage together to significantly improve overall performance, power, energy and temperature.  Provides a comprehensive introduction to optimization and dynamic reconfiguration techniques in real-time embedded systems; Covers state-of-the-art techniques and ongoing research in reconfigurable architectures; Focuses on algorithms tuned for dynamic reconfiguration techniques in real-time systems;  Provides reference for anyone designing low-power systems, energy-/temperature-constrained devices, and power-performance efficie...

  3. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  4. Dynamics of Bayesian non-Gaussian sensorimotor learning with multiple time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baohua; Hofmann, David; Sober, Samuel; Nemenman, Ilya

    Various theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that sensorimotor learning in animals happens on multiple time scales. In such models, animals can respond to perturbations quickly but keep memories for a long period of time. However, those previous models only focus on average learning behaviors. Here, we propose a model with multiple time scales that deals with the dynamics of whole behavior distributions. The model includes multiple memories, each with a non-Gaussian distribution and its own associated time scale. The memories are combined to generate a distribution of the desired motor command. Our model explains simultaneously the dynamics of distributions of the songbird vocal behaviors in various experiments, including adaptations after step changes or ramps in the error signals and dynamics of forgetting during the washout period, where an immediate sharp approach to the baseline is followed by a prolonged decay. This work was supported partially by NIH Grant # 1 R01 EB022872, and NIH Grant # NS084844.

  5. Slow Dynamic Processes in Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells. Characteristic Times and Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rafael S; Gonzalez-Pedro, Victoria; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Kang, Yong Soo; Mora-Sero, Ivan; Bisquert, Juan

    2014-07-03

    Characteristic times of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have been measured by different techniques: transient photovoltage decay, transient photoluminescence, and impedance spectroscopy. A slow dynamic process is detected that shows characteristic times in the seconds to milliseconds scale, with good quantitative agreement between transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy. Here, we show that this characteristic time is related with a novel slow dynamic process caused by the peculiar structural properties of lead halide perovskites and depending on perovskite crystal size and organic cation nature. This new process may lie at the basis of the current-voltage hysteresis reported for PSCs and could have important implications in PSC performance because it may give rise to distinct dynamical behavior with respect to other classes of photovoltaic devices. Furthermore, we show that low-frequency characteristic time, commonly associated with electronic carrier lifetime in other photovoltaic devices, cannot be attributed to a recombination process in the case of PSCs.

  6. Some Opial Dynamic Inequalities Involving Higher Order Derivatives on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Saker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We will prove some new Opial dynamic inequalities involving higher order derivatives on time scales. The results will be proved by making use of Hölder's inequality, a simple consequence of Keller's chain rule and Taylor monomials on time scales. Some continuous and discrete inequalities will be derived from our results as special cases.

  7. Real Time Emulation of Dynamic Tariff for Congestion Management in Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Theis Bo; Wu, Qiuwei; Huang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the real time evaluation of the dynamic tariff (DT) method for alleviating congestion in a distribution networks with high penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs). The DT method is implemented in a real time digital testing platform that emulates a real distribution...

  8. On a nonstandard Volterra type dynamic integral equation on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Pachpatte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present paper is to study some basic qualitative properties of solutions of a nonstandard Volterra type dynamic integral equation on time scales. The tools employed in the analysis are based on the applications of the Banach fixed point theorem and a certain integral inequality with explicit estimate on time scales.

  9. A non-critical string approach to black holes, time and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    1994-01-01

    We review our approach to time and quantum dynamics based on non-critical string theory, developing its relationship to previous work on non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and the microscopic arrow of time. We exhibit specific non-factorizing contributions to the {\

  10. A Dynamic Traffic Signal Timing Model and its Algorithm for Junction of Urban Road

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yanguang; Cai, Hao

    2012-01-01

    As an important part of Intelligent Transportation System, the scientific traffic signal timing of junction can improve the efficiency of urban transport. This paper presents a novel dynamic traffic signal timing model. According to the characteristics of the model, hybrid chaotic quantum evoluti...

  11. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, T. W J

    2010-01-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different

  12. Hydration water dynamics around a protein surface: a first passage time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Biswas, Parbati

    2018-01-01

    A stochastic noise-driven dynamic model is proposed to study the diffusion of water molecules around a protein surface, under the effect of thermal fluctuations that arise due to the collision of water molecules with the surrounding environment. The underlying dynamics of such a system may be described in the framework of the generalized Langevin equation, where the thermal fluctuations are assumed to be algebraically correlated in time, which governs the non-Markovian behavior of the system. Results of the calculations of mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function reveal that the hydration water around the protein surface follows subdiffusive dynamics at long times. Analytical expressions for the first passage time distribution, survival probability, mean residence time and mean first passage time of water molecules are derived for different boundary conditions, to analyze hydration water dynamics under the effect of thermally correlated noise. The results depict a unimodal distribution of the first passage time unlike Brownian motion. The survival probability of hydration water follows a stretched exponential decay for both boundary conditions. The mean residence time of the hydration water molecule for different initial positions increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the surrounding environment for both boundary conditions. The mean first passage time of the water molecule to reach the absorbing/reflecting boundary follows an asymptotic power law with respect to the thickness of the hydration layer, and increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the environment.

  13. Dynamic Bus Travel Time Prediction Models on Road with Multiple Bus Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cong; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Lu, Qing-Chang; Sun, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and real-time travel time information for buses can help passengers better plan their trips and minimize waiting times. A dynamic travel time prediction model for buses addressing the cases on road with multiple bus routes is proposed in this paper, based on support vector machines (SVMs) and Kalman filtering-based algorithm. In the proposed model, the well-trained SVM model predicts the baseline bus travel times from the historical bus trip data; the Kalman filtering-based dynamic algorithm can adjust bus travel times with the latest bus operation information and the estimated baseline travel times. The performance of the proposed dynamic model is validated with the real-world data on road with multiple bus routes in Shenzhen, China. The results show that the proposed dynamic model is feasible and applicable for bus travel time prediction and has the best prediction performance among all the five models proposed in the study in terms of prediction accuracy on road with multiple bus routes.

  14. Early-time particle dynamics and non-affine deformations during microstructure selection in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Surajit [Centre for Advanced Materials, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B, Raja S C Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Rao, Madan [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560 080 (India); Bhattacharya, Jayee [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2011-07-27

    Solid-solid transitions are invariably associated with groups of particles whose deformations cannot be expressed as an affine strain about a reference configuration. The dynamics of these non-affine zones (NAZ) determine the subsequent microstructure, i.e. the mesoscale patterning resulting from the structural transition. Here, we focus on early-time dynamics of individual particles within an NAZ associated with a nucleation event. We show that the early-time behavior of these particles have distinctive characteristics depending on the transition temperature. The dynamics is heterogeneous, consisting of a few active particles exhibiting complex intermittent jamming and flow in response to internal stresses generated during the transformation. At low temperatures, the dynamics of these active particles is ballistic and the structural transformation proceeds via string-like correlated movement of active particles, along ridges in the potential energy topography set up by inactive particles. On increasing temperature, the dynamics of active particles show an abrupt transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior with a diffusion coefficient which appears to be independent of temperature. This dynamical transition in the nature of the trajectories of particles is coincident with a discontinuous transition in the microstructure of the solid. Finally, we characterize this transition in terms of a dynamical order parameter in the space of trajectories and discuss its connection with the glass transition and rheology of soft and granular matter.

  15. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Aarash Bordbar; Yurkovich, James T.; Giuseppe Paglia; Ottar Rolfsson; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed " unsteady-state flux balance analysis" (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. u...

  16. Statistical test for dynamical nonstationarity in observed time-series data

    CERN Document Server

    Kennel, M B

    1997-01-01

    Information in the time distribution of points in a state space reconstructed from observed data yields a test for ``nonstationarity''. Framed in terms of a statistical hypothesis test, this numerical algorithm can discern whether some underlying slow changes in parameters have taken place. The method examines a fundamental object in nonlinear dynamics, the geometry of orbits in state space, with corrections to overcome difficulties in real dynamical data which cause naive statistics to fail.

  17. A dynamic programming heuristic for vehicle routing with time-dependent travel times and required breaks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, A.L.; Hans, Elias W.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    2010-01-01

    For the intensively studied vehicle routing problem (VRP), two real-life restrictions have received only minor attention in the VRP-literature: traffic congestion and driving hours regulations. Traffic congestion causes late arrivals at customers and long travel times resulting in large transport

  18. Bayesian dynamic modeling of time series of dengue disease case counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adyro Martínez-Bello

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to model the association between weekly time series of dengue case counts and meteorological variables, in a high-incidence city of Colombia, applying Bayesian hierarchical dynamic generalized linear models over the period January 2008 to August 2015. Additionally, we evaluate the model's short-term performance for predicting dengue cases. The methodology shows dynamic Poisson log link models including constant or time-varying coefficients for the meteorological variables. Calendar effects were modeled using constant or first- or second-order random walk time-varying coefficients. The meteorological variables were modeled using constant coefficients and first-order random walk time-varying coefficients. We applied Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations for parameter estimation, and deviance information criterion statistic (DIC for model selection. We assessed the short-term predictive performance of the selected final model, at several time points within the study period using the mean absolute percentage error. The results showed the best model including first-order random walk time-varying coefficients for calendar trend and first-order random walk time-varying coefficients for the meteorological variables. Besides the computational challenges, interpreting the results implies a complete analysis of the time series of dengue with respect to the parameter estimates of the meteorological effects. We found small values of the mean absolute percentage errors at one or two weeks out-of-sample predictions for most prediction points, associated with low volatility periods in the dengue counts. We discuss the advantages and limitations of the dynamic Poisson models for studying the association between time series of dengue disease and meteorological variables. The key conclusion of the study is that dynamic Poisson models account for the dynamic nature of the variables involved in the modeling of time series of dengue disease

  19. Dynamic RSA: Examining parasympathetic regulatory dynamics via vector-autoregressive modeling of time-varying RSA and heart period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aaron J; Reeves, Jonathan W; Chi, Cyrus

    2016-07-01

    Expanding on recently published methods, the current study presents an approach to estimating the dynamic, regulatory effect of the parasympathetic nervous system on heart period on a moment-to-moment basis. We estimated second-to-second variation in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in order to estimate the contemporaneous and time-lagged relationships among RSA, interbeat interval (IBI), and respiration rate via vector autoregression. Moreover, we modeled these relationships at lags of 1 s to 10 s, in order to evaluate the optimal latency for estimating dynamic RSA effects. The IBI (t) on RSA (t-n) regression parameter was extracted from individual models as an operationalization of the regulatory effect of RSA on IBI-referred to as dynamic RSA (dRSA). Dynamic RSA positively correlated with standard averages of heart rate and negatively correlated with standard averages of RSA. We propose that dRSA reflects the active downregulation of heart period by the parasympathetic nervous system and thus represents a novel metric that provides incremental validity in the measurement of autonomic cardiac control-specifically, a method by which parasympathetic regulatory effects can be measured in process. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley Buckley, Emma M.; Allen, Craig R.; Forsberg, Michael; Farrell, Michael; Caven, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  1. An energy efficient and dynamic time synchronization protocol for wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anran; Bai, Fengshan

    2017-01-01

    Time synchronization is an important support technology of WSN(Wireless Sensor Network), and plays an irreplaceable role in the development of WSN. In view of the disadvantage of the traditional timing sync protocol for sensor networks (TPSN), we present a Physical Timing-sync Protocol (PTPSN) that aims at reducing the energy consumption of the synchronization process and realizes a dynamic Network. The algorithm broadcasts reference message to select some nodes in specific area. The receiver calculate offset of every selected node, and then calculate the average of offset to compensate for clock skew . At the same time ,we add time-filter process to ensure the security of the algorithm for time synchronization. The experiment results show that our algorithm is efficient in both saving energy consumption and dynamic network, and it can effectively resist attacks.

  2. Impact Time Guidance Law Considering Autopilot Dynamics Based on Variable Coefficients Strategy for Maneuvering Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the terminal guidance problem for the missile intercepting a maneuvering target with impact time constraint. An impact time guidance law based on finite time convergence control theory is developed regarding the target motion as an unknown disturbance. To further improve the performance of the guidance law, an autopilot dynamics which is considered as a first-order lag is taken into consideration. In the proposed method, the coefficients change with the relative distance between missile and target. This variable coefficient strategy ensures that the missile impacts the target at the desired time with little final miss distance. Then it is proved that states of the guidance system converge to sliding mode in finite time under the proposed guidance law. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the impact time guidance law with autopilot dynamics (ITGAD.

  3. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  4. Time Dynamic Modeling and Inference Approaches for Outcomes in Patients on Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Jason

    2015-01-01

    In the first chapter of this work, we characterize the dynamics of cardiovascular event risk trajectories for patients on dialysis while conditioning on survival status via multiple time indices: (1) time since the start of dialysis, (2) time since the pivotal initial infection-related hospitalization and (3) the patient's age at the start of dialysis. This is achieved by using a new class of generalized multiple-index varying coefficient (GM-IVC) models utilizing a multiplicative structure a...

  5. Modeling and Bifurcation Research of a Worm Propagation Dynamical System with Time Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Xiang, Wenlong; Yang, Wei; Gao, Fuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Both vaccination and quarantine strategy are adopted to control the Internet worm propagation. By considering the interaction infection between computers and external removable devices, a worm propagation dynamical system with time delay under quarantine strategy is constructed based on anomaly intrusion detection system (IDS). By regarding the time delay caused by time window of anomaly IDS as the bifurcation parameter, local asymptotic stability at the positive equilibrium and local Hopf bi...

  6. Detecting dynamical changes in time series by using the Jensen Shannon divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, D M; Riveaud, L E; Lamberti, P W

    2017-08-01

    Most of the time series in nature are a mixture of signals with deterministic and random dynamics. Thus the distinction between these two characteristics becomes important. Distinguishing between chaotic and aleatory signals is difficult because they have a common wide band power spectrum, a delta like autocorrelation function, and share other features as well. In general, signals are presented as continuous records and require to be discretized for being analyzed. In this work, we introduce different schemes for discretizing and for detecting dynamical changes in time series. One of the main motivations is to detect transitions between the chaotic and random regime. The tools here used here originate from the Information Theory. The schemes proposed are applied to simulated and real life signals, showing in all cases a high proficiency for detecting changes in the dynamics of the associated time series.

  7. Asset Price Dynamics in a Chartist-Fundamentalist Model with Time Delays: A Bifurcation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretti I. Dobrescu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the dynamic behavior of asset prices using a chartist-fundamentalist model with two speculative markets. To this effect, we employ a differential system with delays à la Dibeh (2007 to describe the price dynamics and we assume that the two markets are coupled via diffusive coupling terms. We study two different time delay cases, namely, when both markets experience the same time delay and when the time delay is different across markets. First, we theoretically determine that the equilibrium exists and investigate its stability. Second, we establish the general conditions for the existence of local Hopf bifurcations and analyze their direction and stability. The common conclusion from both the delay scenarios we consider is that coupled speculative markets with heterogeneous agents in each, but with different price dynamics, can be synchronized through diffusive coupling. Finally, we provide some numerical illustrations to confirm our theoretical findings.

  8. Detecting dynamical changes in time series by using the Jensen Shannon divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, D. M.; Riveaud, L. E.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2017-08-01

    Most of the time series in nature are a mixture of signals with deterministic and random dynamics. Thus the distinction between these two characteristics becomes important. Distinguishing between chaotic and aleatory signals is difficult because they have a common wide band power spectrum, a delta like autocorrelation function, and share other features as well. In general, signals are presented as continuous records and require to be discretized for being analyzed. In this work, we introduce different schemes for discretizing and for detecting dynamical changes in time series. One of the main motivations is to detect transitions between the chaotic and random regime. The tools here used here originate from the Information Theory. The schemes proposed are applied to simulated and real life signals, showing in all cases a high proficiency for detecting changes in the dynamics of the associated time series.

  9. Interacting opinion and disease dynamics in multiplex networks: Discontinuous phase transition and nonmonotonic consensus times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Rojas, Fátima; Vazquez, Federico

    2017-05-01

    Opinion formation and disease spreading are among the most studied dynamical processes on complex networks. In real societies, it is expected that these two processes depend on and affect each other. However, little is known about the effects of opinion dynamics over disease dynamics and vice versa, since most studies treat them separately. In this work we study the dynamics of the voter model for opinion formation intertwined with that of the contact process for disease spreading, in a population of agents that interact via two types of connections, social and contact. These two interacting dynamics take place on two layers of networks, coupled through a fraction q of links present in both networks. The probability that an agent updates its state depends on both the opinion and disease states of the interacting partner. We find that the opinion dynamics has striking consequences on the statistical properties of disease spreading. The most important is that the smooth (continuous) transition from a healthy to an endemic phase observed in the contact process, as the infection probability increases beyond a threshold, becomes abrupt (discontinuous) in the two-layer system. Therefore, disregarding the effects of social dynamics on epidemics propagation may lead to a misestimation of the real magnitude of the spreading. Also, an endemic-healthy discontinuous transition is found when the coupling q overcomes a threshold value. Furthermore, we show that the disease dynamics delays the opinion consensus, leading to a consensus time that varies nonmonotonically with q in a large range of the model's parameters. A mean-field approach reveals that the coupled dynamics of opinions and disease can be approximately described by the dynamics of the voter model decoupled from that of the contact process, with effective probabilities of opinion and disease transmission.

  10. Exploratory Study for Continuous-time Parameter Estimation of Ankle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a parallel pathway model to describe ankle dynamics was proposed. This model provides a relationship between ankle angle and net ankle torque as the sum of a linear and nonlinear contribution. A technique to identify parameters of this model in discrete-time has been developed. However, these parameters are a nonlinear combination of the continuous-time physiology, making insight into the underlying physiology impossible. The stable and accurate estimation of continuous-time parameters is critical for accurate disease modeling, clinical diagnosis, robotic control strategies, development of optimal exercise protocols for longterm space exploration, sports medicine, etc. This paper explores the development of a system identification technique to estimate the continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed via simulation of a continuous-time model of ankle dynamics with typical parameters found in clinical studies. The results show that although this technique improves estimates, it does not provide robust estimates of continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. Due to this we conclude that alternative modeling strategies and more advanced estimation techniques be considered for future work.

  11. 3D Time-lapse Imaging and Quantification of Mitochondrial Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, Jérôme; Nahas, Amir; James Marchand, Paul; Lopez, Antonio; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2017-02-01

    We present a 3D time-lapse imaging method for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in living HeLa cells based on photothermal optical coherence microscopy and using novel surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. The biocompatible protein-based biopolymer coating contains multiple functional groups which impart better cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting efficiency. The high stability of the gold nanoparticles allows continuous imaging over an extended time up to 3000 seconds without significant cell damage. By combining temporal autocorrelation analysis with a classical diffusion model, we quantify mitochondrial dynamics and cast these results into 3D maps showing the heterogeneity of diffusion parameters across the whole cell volume.

  12. An evaluation of dynamic mutuality measurements and methods in cyclic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohua; Huang, Guitian; Duan, Na

    2010-12-01

    Several measurements and techniques have been developed to detect dynamic mutuality and synchronicity of time series in econometrics. This study aims to compare the performances of five methods, i.e., linear regression, dynamic correlation, Markov switching models, concordance index and recurrence quantification analysis, through numerical simulations. We evaluate the abilities of these methods to capture structure changing and cyclicity in time series and the findings of this paper would offer guidance to both academic and empirical researchers. Illustration examples are also provided to demonstrate the subtle differences of these techniques.

  13. Efficient Worst-Case Execution Time Analysis of Dynamic Branch Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic branch prediction is commonly found in modern processors, but notoriously difficult to model for worst-case execution time analysis. This is particularly true for global dynamic branch predictors, where predictions are influenced by the global branch history. Prior research in this area has...... concluded that modeling of global branch prediction is too costly for practical use. This paper presents an approach to model global branch prediction while keeping the analysis effort reasonably low. The approach separates the branch history analysis from the integer linear programming formulation...... of the worst-case execution time problem. Consequently, the proposed approach scales to longer branch history lengths than previous approaches....

  14. Gas-phase chloroiodomethane short-time photodissociation dynamics in the A-band absorption and a comparison with the solution phase short-time photodissociation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Wai Ming; Phillips, David Lee

    A gas-phase resonance Raman spectrum of chloroiodomethane has been obtained with excitation in the A-band absorption with similar resolution and the same experimental apparatus used to obtain solution-phase A-band resonance Raman spectra of chloroiodomethane reported previously. This allows a careful and detailed comparison of the gasand solution-phase chloroiodomethane A-band resonance Raman spectra and their associated short-time photodissociation dynamics. The gas-phase A-band resonance Raman spectrum has four Franck-Condon active vibrational modes and a noticeable degree of multidimensionality in its photodissociation reaction. The A-band gas-phase resonance Raman intensities and absorption spectrum were simulated using a simple model and time-dependent wave-packet calculations. The motion of the wave packet on the excited state gas-phase potential surface was converted from dimensionless normal coordinates into easy-to-visualize internal coordinates using the results of normal coordinate calculations. The A-band early-time photodissociation dynamics are very similar to those of the solution phase in that the C-I bond lengthens, the I-C-Cl and H-C-I angles become smaller, and the H-C-Cl angles become larger. These short-time photodissociation dynamics are consistent with a simple impulsive 'semirigid' radical model description of the photodissociation. A comparison of the gas-phase and solution-phase short-time photodissociation dynamics suggests that solvation effects are not important for internal coordinate motions such as the C-I stretch and I-C-Cl angle where there are strong intramolecular forces but that solvation effects are noticeable for internal coordinate motions such as H-C-H angle and H-C-Cl angles which are weakly involved in the dissociation coordinate and have relatively weak intramolecular forces that are more easily perturbed by the solvent-solute forces. This implies that 'static' or mean-field solvation effects may be more significant for

  15. Global Phase Synchronization for a Class of Dynamical Complex Networks with Time-Varying Coupling Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XinBin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Global phase synchronization for a class of dynamical complex networks composed of multiinput multioutput pendulum-like systems with time-varying coupling delays is investigated. The problem of the global phase synchronization for the complex networks is equivalent to the problem of the asymptotical stability for the corresponding error dynamical networks. For reducing the conservation, no linearization technique is involved, but by Kronecker product, the problem of the asymptotical stability of the high dimensional error dynamical networks is reduced to the same problem of a class of low dimensional error systems. The delay-dependent criteria guaranteeing global asymptotical stability for the error dynamical complex networks in terms of Liner Matrix Inequalities (LMIs are derived based on free-weighting matrices technique and Lyapunov function. According to the convex characterization, a simple criterion is proposed. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  16. Time dependency of psychotherapeutic exchanges: the contribution of the theory of dynamic systems in analyzing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Sergio; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a general framework for the use of Theory of Dynamic Systems (TDS) in the field of psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy is inherently dynamic, namely a function of time. Consequently, the improvement of construct validity and clinical relevance of psychotherapy process research require the development of models of investigation allowing dynamic mappings of clinical exchange. Thus, TDS becomes a significant theoretical and methodological reference. The paper focuses two topics. First, the main concepts of TDS are briefly introduced together with a basic typology of approaches developed within this domain. Second, we propose a repertoire of investigation strategies that can be used to capture the dynamic nature of clinical exchange. In this way we intend to highlight the feasibility and utility of strategies of analysis informed by TDS.

  17. Time dependency of psychotherapeutic exchanges: The contribution of the Theory of Dynamic Systems in analyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eSalvatore

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a general framework for the use of TDS in the field of psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy is inherently dynamic, namely a function of time. Consequently, the improvement of construct validity and clinical relevance of psychotherapy process research require the development of models of investigation allowing dynamic mappings of clinical exchange. Thus, the Theory of Dynamic Systems (TDS becomes a significant theoretical and methodological reference. The paper focuses two topics. First, the main concepts of TDS are briefly introduced together with a basic typology of approaches developed within this domain. Second, we propose a repertoire of investigation strategies that can be used to capture the dynamic nature of clinical exchange. In this way we intend to highlight the feasibility and utility of strategies of analysis informed by TDS.

  18. Optimized stiffness for linear time-invariant dynamic system according to a new system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraklaew, Tawiwat

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with a linear time-invariant dynamic system such as spring-mass-damper system. General dynamic systems are quite commonly to be redesigned for another purpose of using. For example, if one automobile must be redesigned to have more weights, the existing suspension must be replaced due to that gained weight. Therefore the stiffness and damping coefficient must be recomputed in order to make the automobile become suitable for using as previous. Here the spring-mass-damper system is used as an example to demonstrate the technique through dynamic optimization where the problem is solved in two categories as minimum energy and maximum jerk. Once the state and control variables are provided from the problem of minimum energy and maximum jerk, respectively, these parameter will be substituted in dynamic equations and leave the stiffness and damping coefficient as the unknown parameters to be solved.

  19. Classification of biosensor time series using dynamic time warping: applications in screening cancer cells with characteristic biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shesh N; Trainor, Patrick J; Khosravi, Farhad; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    The development of biosensors that produce time series data will facilitate improvements in biomedical diagnostics and in personalized medicine. The time series produced by these devices often contains characteristic features arising from biochemical interactions between the sample and the sensor. To use such characteristic features for determining sample class, similarity-based classifiers can be utilized. However, the construction of such classifiers is complicated by the variability in the time domains of such series that renders the traditional distance metrics such as Euclidean distance ineffective in distinguishing between biological variance and time domain variance. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is a sequence alignment algorithm that can be used to align two or more series to facilitate quantifying similarity. In this article, we evaluated the performance of DTW distance-based similarity classifiers for classifying time series that mimics electrical signals produced by nanotube biosensors. Simulation studies demonstrated the positive performance of such classifiers in discriminating between time series containing characteristic features that are obscured by noise in the intensity and time domains. We then applied a DTW distance-based k-nearest neighbors classifier to distinguish the presence/absence of mesenchymal biomarker in cancer cells in buffy coats in a blinded test. Using a train–test approach, we find that the classifier had high sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (81.8%) in differentiating between EpCAM-positive MCF7 cells spiked in buffy coats and those in plain buffy coats. PMID:27942497

  20. Inferring changes in water cycle dynamics of intensively managed landscapes via the theory of time-variant travel time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, Mohammad; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Karwan, Diana L.; Botter, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    Climatic trends and anthropogenic changes in land cover and land use are impacting the hydrology and water quality of streams at the field, watershed, and regional scales in complex ways. In poorly drained agricultural landscapes, subsurface drainage systems have been successful in increasing crop productivity by removing excess soil moisture. However, their hydroecological consequences are still debated in view of the observed increased concentrations of nitrate, phosphorus, and pesticides in many streams, as well as altered runoff volumes and timing. In this study, we employ the recently developed theory of time-variant travel time distributions within the StorAge Selection function framework to quantify changes in water cycle dynamics resulting from the combined climate and land use changes. Our results from analysis of a subbasin in the Minnesota River Basin indicate a significant decrease in the mean travel time of water in the shallow subsurface layer during the growing season under current conditions compared to the pre-1970s conditions. We also find highly damped year-to-year fluctuations in the mean travel time, which we attribute to the "homogenization" of the hydrologic response due to artificial drainage. The dependence of the mean travel time on the spatial heterogeneity of some soil characteristics as well as on the basin scale is further explored via numerical experiments. Simulations indicate that the mean travel time is independent of scale for spatial scales larger than approximately 200 km2, suggesting that hydrologic data from larger basins may be used to infer the average of smaller-scale-driven changes in water cycle dynamics.

  1. Space and time dynamical heterogeneity in glassy relaxation. The role of democratic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appignanesi, G A; Rodriguez Fris, J A [Fisicoquimica, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 BahIa Blanca (Argentina); Seccion de Fisicoquimica, Instituto de Quimica de la Universidad Nacional del Sur, INQUISUR-UNS-CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 BahIa Blanca (Argentina)], E-mail: appignan@criba.edu.ar

    2009-05-20

    In this work we review recent computational advances in the understanding of the relaxation dynamics of supercooled glass-forming liquids. In such a supercooled regime these systems experience a striking dynamical slowing down which can be rationalized in terms of the picture of dynamical heterogeneities, wherein the dynamics can vary by orders of magnitude from one region of the sample to another and where the sizes and timescales of such slowly relaxing regions are expected to increase considerably as the temperature is decreased. We shall focus on the relaxation events at a microscopic level and describe the finding of the collective motions of particles responsible for the dynamical heterogeneities. In so doing, we shall demonstrate that the dynamics in different regions of the system is not only heterogeneous in space but also in time. In particular, we shall be interested in the events relevant to the long-time structural relaxation or {alpha} relaxation. In this regard, we shall focus on the discovery of cooperatively relaxing units involving the collective motion of relatively compact clusters of particles, called 'democratic clusters' or d-clusters. These events have been shown to trigger transitions between metabasins of the potential energy landscape (collections of similar configurations or structures) and to consist of the main steps in the {alpha} relaxation. Such events emerge in systems quite different in nature such as simple model glass formers and supercooled amorphous water. Additionally, another relevant issue in this context consists in the determination of a link between structure and dynamics. In this context, we describe the relationship between the d-cluster events and the constraints that the local structure poses on the relaxation dynamics, thus revealing their role in reformulating structural constraints. (topical review)

  2. Energetic and Entropic Contributions to the Landau–de Gennes Potential for Gay–Berne Models of Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Gupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Landau–de Gennes theory provides a successful macroscopic description of nematics. Cornerstone of this theory is a phenomenological expression for the effective free energy as a function of the orientational order parameter. Here, we show how such a macroscopic Landau–de Gennes free energy can systematically be constructed for a microscopic model of liquid crystals formed by interacting mesogens. For the specific example of the Gay–Berne model, we obtain an enhanced free energy that reduces to the familiar Landau–de Gennes expression in the limit of weak ordering. By carefully separating energetic and entropic contributions to the free energy, our approach reconciles the two traditional views on the isotropic–nematic transition of Maier–Saupe and Onsager, attributing the driving mechanism to attractive interactions and entropic effects, respectively.

  3. Impact of Stock Market Structure on Intertrade Time and Price Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization–a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  4. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plamen Ch Ivanov

    Full Text Available We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising

  5. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  6. Fully-dynamic minimum spanning forest with improved worst-case update time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    techniques, one of which involves keeping track of low-conductance cuts in a dynamic graph. An immediate corollary of our result is the first Las Vegas data structure for fully-dynamic connectivity where each update is handled in worst-case time polynomially faster than Θ(√n) w.h.p.; this data structure has......We give a Las Vegas data structure which maintains a minimum spanning forest in an n-vertex edge-weighted undirected dynamic graph undergoing updates consisting of any mixture of edge insertions and deletions. Each update is supported in O(n1/2-c) worst-case time wh.p. where c > 0 is some constant...

  7. Real-time spectral interferometry probes the internal dynamics of femtosecond soliton molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herink, G.; Kurtz, F.; Jalali, B.; Solli, D. R.; Ropers, C.

    2017-04-01

    Solitons, particle-like excitations ubiquitous in many fields of physics, have been shown to exhibit bound states akin to molecules. The formation of such temporal soliton bound states and their internal dynamics have escaped direct experimental observation. By means of an emerging time-stretch technique, we resolve the evolution of femtosecond soliton molecules in the cavity of a few-cycle mode-locked laser. We track two- and three-soliton bound states over hundreds of thousands of consecutive cavity roundtrips, identifying fixed points and periodic and aperiodic molecular orbits. A class of trajectories acquires a path-dependent geometrical phase, implying that its dynamics may be topologically protected. These findings highlight the importance of real-time detection in resolving interactions in complex nonlinear systems, including the dynamics of soliton bound states, breathers, and rogue waves.

  8. Discrete-time dynamic network model for the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-07-01

    We propose a discrete-time dynamic network model describing the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases in a population. We consider the case in which the nodes in the network change their links due to social mixing dynamics as well as in response to the disease. The model shows the behavior that, as we increase social mixing, disease spread is inhibited in certain cases, while in other cases it is enhanced. We also extend this dynamic network model to take into account the case of hidden infection. Here we find that, as expected, the disease spreads more readily if there is a time period after contracting the disease during which an individual is infective but is not known to have the disease.

  9. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmerman, Dolev [Department; Leshchev, Denis [Department; Hsu, Darren J. [Department; Hong, Jiyun [Department; Kosheleva, Irina [Center; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical

    2017-09-05

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ~8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  10. Adaptive control for time-delay teleoperation systems with uncertain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Zhang, Xia; Zheng, Wenfeng; Yang, Bo

    2017-08-01

    In most teleoperation systems, the dynamics are uncertain and the communications exhibit time delays. In order to confront these problems, this paper reports a position error-based bilateral adaptive controller, in which the unknown operator dynamical parameters and environmental dynamical parameters are included in the unknown vector of the system to be evaluated, adaptive estimate laws are compensated by estimate errors and dissipation by time delays are compensated. By using Lyapunov-Krasovskii stability theorem, it is proved that both position errors and velocities of the teleoperation system asymptotically convergent to zero. Simulations are performed to compare the performance of the proposed controller with the traditional adaptive controller and to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed teleoperation control system.

  11. A Discontinuous Galerkin Time-Domain Method with Dynamically Adaptive Cartesian Meshes for Computational Electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Su; Arslanbekov, Robert R; Kolobov, Vladimir I; Jin, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    A discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method based on dynamically adaptive Cartesian meshes (ACM) is developed for a full-wave analysis of electromagnetic fields in dispersive media. Hierarchical Cartesian grids offer simplicity close to that of structured grids and the flexibility of unstructured grids while being highly suited for adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The developed DGTD-ACM achieves a desired accuracy by refining non-conformal meshes near material interfaces to reduce stair-casing errors without sacrificing the high efficiency afforded with uniform Cartesian meshes. Moreover, DGTD-ACM can dynamically refine the mesh to resolve the local variation of the fields during propagation of electromagnetic pulses. A local time-stepping scheme is adopted to alleviate the constraint on the time-step size due to the stability condition of the explicit time integration. Simulations of electromagnetic wave diffraction over conducting and dielectric cylinders and spheres demonstrate that the proposed meth...

  12. Feynman’s clock, a new variational principle, and parallel-in-time quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Jarrod R.; Parkhill, John A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a discrete-time variational principle inspired by the quantum clock originally proposed by Feynman and use it to write down quantum evolution as a ground-state eigenvalue problem. The construction allows one to apply ground-state quantum many-body theory to quantum dynamics, extending the reach of many highly developed tools from this fertile research area. Moreover, this formalism naturally leads to an algorithm to parallelize quantum simulation over time. We draw an explicit connection between previously known time-dependent variational principles and the time-embedded variational principle presented. Sample calculations are presented, applying the idea to a hydrogen molecule and the spin degrees of freedom of a model inorganic compound, demonstrating the parallel speedup of our method as well as its flexibility in applying ground-state methodologies. Finally, we take advantage of the unique perspective of this variational principle to examine the error of basis approximations in quantum dynamics. PMID:24062428

  13. Dynamic mode extrapolation to improve the efficiency of dual time stepping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Gang; Ye, Zhengyin

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology to improve the computational efficiency of unsteady flow simulations with dual time stepping scheme. The methodology is developed on the combination of dynamic mode extrapolation and dual time stepping scheme. It accelerates the convergence speed of the inner iterations by using dynamic mode extrapolation to provide an initial solution for each physical time step. The validation and verification are demonstrated by three cases, including unsteady flow past a stationary circular cylinder at Re = 200, transonic flow over periodic and non-periodic pitching NACA 0012 airfoil and buffeting flow around NASA(SC)-0714 airfoil. For comparison, Lagrange extrapolation initial condition and natural initial condition are also applied. The results confirm that the proposed methodology is very successful in reducing computational time for both incompressible and transonic unsteady flow.

  14. Real-time Dynamic Coupling of GPC-enhanced Diffraction-limited Focal Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Kopylov, Oleksii

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling of an optically manipulated wave-guided optical waveguide (WOW) using diffractive techniques on a “point and shoot” approach. In this work, the generation of the coupling focal spots is done in real-time following the position of the WOW....

  15. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for water distribution networks: steady state modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osman, Mohammad S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available steady state hydraulic model that will be used within a real-time dynamic hydraulic model (DHM). The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) water distribution network (WDN) is used as a pilot study for this purpose. A hydraulic analysis...

  16. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order nonlinear dynamic equations of the form on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  17. The contact problem for linear continuous-time dynamical systems : A geometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    tenDam, AA; Dwarshuis, KF; Willems, JC

    In this paper linear time-invariant dynamical systems described by a combination of differential equalities and static inequalities in state-space formulation are investigated, Of special interest is the contact problem: the effect of the boundary of the constraint set on the behavior of the system,

  18. Space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for inviscid gas dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ven, H.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Bouwman, E.G.; Bathe, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an overview is given of the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for the solution of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. This technique is well suited for problems which require moving meshes to deal with changes in the domain boundary. The method is demonstrated

  19. Real-Time Dynamic MLC Tracking for Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne

    Motion management of intra-fraction tumour motion during radiotherapy treatment can be a challenging task in order to achieve tumour control as well as minimizing the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a novel method for intra-fraction...

  20. Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete Time Models of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A new promising way to significantly improve computational efficiency of neurobiological network simulations is to design a...network activity. D· 1S. SUBJECT TERMS Map-based neuronal model, Discrete time spiking dynamics, Synapses, Neurons, Neurobiological Networks 16...advertisement for search of suitable candidate and posted it in several forum groups related to computational neurobiology . Task 1. Meanwhile I

  1. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  2. The effect of finite response–time in coupled dynamical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The paper investigates synchronization in unidirectionally coupled dynamical systems wherein the influence of drive on response is cumulative: coupling signals are integrated over a time interval τ. A major consequence of integrative coupling is that the onset of the generalized and phase synchronization occurs ...

  3. On the Mutual Dynamics of Interregional Gross Migration Flows in Space and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo

    2016-01-01

    . Using a time-dynamic spatial Durbin model as preferred empirical specification, the results indicate that regional differences in real income growth, the labor participation rate and real-estate prices impact on interregional out-migration flows. The estimated coefficients signs of the obtained space...

  4. Dynamic time warping: A new method in the study of poor handwriting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brina, C. di; Niels, R.M.J.; Overvelde, A.J.A.A.M.; Levi, G.; Hulstijn, W.

    2008-01-01

    Poor handwriting is a diagnostic criterion for developmental coordination disorder. Typical of poor handwriting is its low overall quality and the high variability of the spatial characteristics of the letters, usually assessed with a subjective handwriting scale. Recently, Dynamic Time Warping

  5. Time series analysis of landslide dynamics using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Darren; Lucieer, Arko; de Jong, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to collect a time series of high-resolution images over four years at seven epochs to assess landslide dynamics. Structure from Motion (SfM) was applied to create Digital Surface Models (DSMs) of the landslide surface with an accuracy of 4-5 cm

  6. Short hold times in dynamic vapor sorption measurements mischaracterize the equilibrium moisture content of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) technique has been used to measure sorption isotherms and develop moisture-mechanics models for wood and cellulosic materials. This method typically involves measuring the time-dependent mass response of a sample following step changes in relative humidity (RH), fitting a kinetic model to the data, and extrapolating the...

  7. Dynamics of Perceived Exertion in Constant-Power Cycling: Time- and Workload-Dependent Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagué, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; García, Sergi; Aguirre, Cecilia; Vázquez, Pablo; Razon, Selen; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the dynamics of perceived exertion shifts (PES) as a function of time and workload during constant-power cycling. Method: Fifty-two participants assigned to 4 groups performed a cycling task at 4 different constant workloads corresponding to their individual rates of perceived exertion (RPEs = 13, 15,…

  8. Computation of the Exact Information Matrix of Gaussian Dynamic Regression Time Series Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.A.B.; Melard, G.; Zahaf, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the computation of the exact Fisher information matrix of a large class of Gaussian time series models is considered. This class, which is often called the single-input-single-output (SISO) model, includes dynamic regression with autocorrelated errors and the transfer function model,

  9. Hardy inequality on time scales and its application to half-linear dynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řehák Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-scale version of the Hardy inequality is presented, which unifies and extends well-known Hardy inequalities in the continuous and in the discrete setting. An application in the oscillation theory of half-linear dynamic equations is given.

  10. Time-Varying Dynamic Properties of Offshore Wind Turbines Evaluated by Modal Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, J. K. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    resonance of the wind turbine structure. In this paper, free vibration tests and a numerical Winkler type approach are used to evaluate the dynamic properties of a total of 30 offshore wind turbines located in the North Sea. Analyses indicate time-varying eigenfrequencies and damping ratios of the lowest...

  11. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coodination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Geuze, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder L.D. Jelsma1, B.C.M. Smits-Engelsman2 & R.H. Geuze1 1Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2-1, 9712 TS Groningen, the Netherlands.

  12. Real-Time Dynamics in the (1+1)-D Abelian Higgs Model with Fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, G.; Smit, J.

    2000-01-01

    In approximate dynamical equations, inhomogenous classical (mean) gauge and Higgs fields are coupled to quantized fermions. The equations are solved numerically on a spacetime lattice. The fermions appear to equilibrate according to the Fermi-Dirac distribution with time-dependent temperature and

  13. Stability of Intelligent Transportation Network Dynamics: A Daily Path Flow Adjustment considering Travel Time Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chorng Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretic formulation on how traffic time information distributed by ITS operations influences the trajectory of network flows is presented in this paper. The interactions between users and ITS operator are decomposed into three parts: (i travel time induced path flow dynamics (PFDTT; (ii demand induced path flow dynamics (PFDD; and (iii predicted travel time dynamics for an origin-destination (OD pair (PTTDOD. PFDTT describes the collective results of user’s daily route selection by pairwise comparison of path travel time provided by ITS services. The other two components, PTTDOD and PFDD, are concentrated on the evolutions of system variables which are predicted and observed, respectively, by ITS operators to act as a benchmark in guiding the target system towards an expected status faster. In addition to the delivered modelings, the stability theorem of the equilibrium solution in the sense of Lyapunov stability is also provided. A Lyapunov function is developed and employed to the proof of stability theorem to show the asymptotic behavior of the aimed system. The information of network flow dynamics plays a key role in traffic control policy-making. The evaluation of ITS-based strategies will not be reasonable without a well-established modeling of network flow evolutions.

  14. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Krijnen, W. P.; Geuze, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in underlying adaptations of dynamic balance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) during a Wii Fit game and to measure changes over time and after intervention. Twenty-eight children with DCD and 21 typically

  15. No Time Like the Present : Discovering the Hidden Dynamics in Intensive Longitudinal Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Wichers, Marieke

    2017-01-01

    There has been a strong increase in the number of studies based on intensive longitudinal data, such as those obtained with experience sampling and daily diaries. These data contain a wealth of information regarding the dynamics of processes as they unfold within individuals over time. In this

  16. A Controller for Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration in FPGA-Based Real-Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezzarossa, Luca; Schoeberl, Martin; Sparsø, Jens

    2017-01-01

    In real-time systems, the use of hardware accelerators can lead to a worst-case execution-time speed-up, to a simplification of its analysis, and to a reduction of its pessimism. When using FPGA technology, dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR) can be used to minimize the area, by only loading...... those accelerators that are needed at any given point in time. The DPR controllers provided by the FPGA vendors satisfy a wide range of requirements and rely on software to manage the reconfiguration. This approach may lead to slow reconfiguration and unpredictable timing. This paper presents an open...

  17. 3D Time-lapse Imaging and Quantification of Mitochondrial Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, J?r?me; Nahas, Amir; James Marchand, Paul; Lopez, Antonio; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D time-lapse imaging method for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in living HeLa cells based on photothermal optical coherence microscopy and using novel surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. The biocompatible protein-based biopolymer coating contains multiple functional groups which impart better cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting efficiency. The high stability of the gold nanoparticles allows continuous imaging over an extended time up to 3000 seconds withou...

  18. Noise-correlation-time-mediated localization in random nonlinear dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, J L; De la Rubia, F J; Cabrera, Juan L.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the residence times density function for different nonlinear dynamical systems with limit cycle behavior and perturbed parametrically with a colored noise. We present evidence that underlying the stochastic resonancelike behavior with the noise correlation time, there is an effect of optimal localization of the system trajectories in the phase space. This phenomenon is observed in systems with different nonlinearities, suggesting a degree of universality.

  19. Effective description of the short-time dynamics in open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Foti, Caterina; Cuccoli, Alessandro; Trapani, Jacopo; Verrucchi, Paola; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2017-09-01

    We address the dynamics of a bosonic system coupled to either a bosonic or a magnetic environment and derive a set of sufficient conditions that allow one to describe the dynamics in terms of the effective interaction with a classical fluctuating field. We find that for short interaction times the dynamics of the open system is described by a Gaussian noise map for several different interaction models and independently on the temperature of the environment. In order to go beyond a qualitative understanding of the origin and physical meaning of the above short-time constraint, we take a general viewpoint and, based on an algebraic approach, suggest that any quantum environment can be described by classical fields whenever global symmetries lead to the definition of environmental operators that remain well defined when increasing the size, i.e., the number of dynamical variables, of the environment. In the case of the bosonic environment this statement is exactly demonstrated via a constructive procedure that explicitly shows why a large number of environmental dynamical variables and, necessarily, global symmetries, entail the set of conditions derived in the first part of the work.

  20. Kv1 channels control spike threshold dynamics and spike timing in cortical pyramidal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies showed that cortical pyramidal neurones (PNs) have a dynamic spike threshold that functions as a high-pass filter, enhancing spike timing in response to high-frequency input. While it is commonly assumed that Na(+) channel inactivation is the primary mechanism of threshold accommodation, the possible role of K(+) channel activation in fast threshold changes has not been well characterized. The present study tested the hypothesis that low-voltage activated Kv1 channels affect threshold dynamics in layer 2-3 PNs, using α-dendrotoxin (DTX) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to block these conductances. We found that Kv1 blockade reduced the dynamic changes of spike threshold in response to a variety of stimuli, including stimulus-evoked synaptic input, current steps and ramps of varied duration, and noise. Analysis of the responses to noise showed that Kv1 channels increased the coherence of spike output with high-frequency components of the stimulus. A simple model demonstrates that a dynamic spike threshold can account for this effect. Our results show that the Kv1 conductance is a major mechanism that contributes to the dynamic spike threshold and precise spike timing of cortical PNs.

  1. Dynamic inversion time for improved 3D late gadolinium enhancement imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Haldar, Shouvik; Wage, Ricardo; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Firmin, David N

    2015-02-01

    High resolution three-dimensional (3D) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging is performed with single R-wave gating to minimize lengthy acquisition durations. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), heart rate variability results in variable magnetization recovery between sequence repeats, and image quality is often poor. In this study, we implemented and tested a dynamic inversion time (dynamic-TI) scheme designed to reduce sequence sensitivity to heart rate variations. An inversion-prepared 3D segmented gradient echo sequence was modified so that the TI varied automatically from beat-to-beat (dynamic-TI) based on the time since the last sequence repeat. 3D LGE acquisitions were performed in 17 patients prior to radio frequency ablation of persistent AF both with and without dynamic-TI. Qualitative image quality scores, blood signal-to-ghosting ratios (SGRs). and blood-myocardium contrast-to-ghosting ratios (CGRs) were compared. Image quality scores were higher with dynamic-TI than without dynamic-TI (2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.8 ± 1.1, P = 0.008), as were blood-myocardium CGRs (13.8 ± 7.6 vs. 8.3 ± 6.1, P = 0.003) and blood SGRs (19.6 ± 8.5 vs. 13.1 ± 8.0, P = 0.003). The dynamic-TI algorithm improves image quality of 3D LGE imaging in this difficult patient population by reducing the sequence sensitivity to RR interval variations © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dynamic Flow Model for Real-Time Application in Wind Farm Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rott, Andreas; Boersma, Sjoerd; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem; Kühn, Martin

    2017-05-01

    For short-term power predictions and estimations of the available power during curtailment of a wind farm, it is necessary to consider the flow dynamics and aerodynamic interactions of the turbines. In this paper, a control-oriented dynamic two-dimensional wind farm model is introduced that aims to incorporate real-time measurements such as flow velocities at turbine locations to estimate the ambient wind farm flow. The model is intended to derive flow predictions for real-time applications. Since fully resolved computational fluid dynamics are too CPU-intensive for such a task, the dynamic model presented in this paper relies on an approximation of the flow equations in a two-dimensional framework. A semi-Lagrangian advection scheme and a step-wise flow solver together offer fast calculation speed, which scales linearly with the number of grid points. In order to emulate effects of realistic three-dimensional wind farm flow, a relaxation of the two-dimensional continuity equation is presented. Furthermore, with little extra computational expense, additional dynamic state variables for various possible applications can be propagated along the wind flow. For instance, a dynamic confidence parameter can provide estimations of the accuracy of flow predictions, while a turbulence parameter adds the possibility to estimate wake induced loads on downstream turbines. In order to demonstrate the performance and validity of the new model it is compared with other models. At first a two turbine reference case is compared with a steady-state model and secondly with results obtained by the dynamic wind farm flow model WFSim. Finally a small wind farm is simulated in order to show the computational scaling of the model.

  3. Travel time distributions, soil moisture dynamics and the old water paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, G.; Bertuzzo, E.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for the general definition and computation of travel time distributions defined by the closure of a catchment control volume, where the input flux is an arbitrary rainfall pattern and the output fluxes are green and blue water flows (namely, evapotranspiration and the hydrologic response embedding runoff production through soil water dynamics). The relevance of the problem is both practical, owing to implications in hydrologic watershed modeling and planning of measurement network, and conceptual, for the linkages and the explanations the theory provides on the dependence of travel time distributions on geomorphology, climate, soils, and vegetation through soil water dynamics. The work focuses in particular on the origins of the conditional and time variant nature of travel time distributions and on the differences between unit hydrographs and travel time distributions. Both carrier flow and solute matter transport in the control volume are accounted for coherently. The key effect of mixing processes occurring within runoff production is also investigated, in particular by a model that assumes that mobilization of soil water involves randomly sampled particles from the available storage. Travel time distributions are thus analytically expressed in terms of the major water fluxes driving soil moisture dynamics (rainfall, streamflows, evapotranpiration), irrespectively of the specific model used to compute such fluxes. Relevant numerical examples and a set of generalized applications are finally provided and discussed.

  4. Analysis of nucleation using mean first-passage time data from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a method for the analysis of nucleation using mean first-passage time (MFPT) statistics obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. The method is based on the Becker-Döring model for the dynamics of a nucleation-mediated phase change and rigorously accounts for the system size dependence of first-passage statistics. It is thus suitable for the analysis of systems in which the separation between time scales for nucleation and growth is small, due to either a small free energy barrier or a large system size. The method is made computationally practical by an approximation of the first-passage time distribution based on its cumulant expansion. Using this approximation, the MFPT of the model can be fit to data from molecular dynamics simulation in order to estimate valuable kinetic parameters, including the free energy barrier, critical nucleus size, and monomer attachment pre-factor, as well as the steady-state rates of nucleation and growth. The method is demonstrated using a case study on nucleation of n-eicosane crystals from the melt. For this system, we found that the observed distribution of first-passage times do not follow an exponential distribution at short times, rendering it incompatible with the assumptions made by some other methods. Using our method, the observed distribution of first-passage times was accurately described, and reasonable estimates for the kinetic parameters and steady-state rates of nucleation and growth were obtained.

  5. Time-dependent fractional dynamics with memory in quantum and economic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Tarasova, Valentina V.

    2017-08-01

    Fractional dynamics of open quantum systems and sectors of national economies, where the parameters depend on time, are discussed. We show that the quantum and economic processes can demonstrate the same dynamic behavior caused by effects of power-law fading memory. In this paper, we propose generalizations of time-ordered exponential (T-exponential) and time-ordered product (T-product) for processes with power-lawmemory. The expressions of time-ordered exponential with memory and corresponding generalization time-ordered product are derived by using matrix fractional differential equations. In quantum physics, we consider equations of N-level open quantum system with memory, quantum oscillator with friction and memory. In economic physics (econophysics), we use equations of dynamic intersectoral model with power-law memory, where the matrix of direct material costs and the matrix of incremental capital intensity of production depend on time. The solutions of these equations with derivatives of non-integer orders are suggested.

  6. Waiting time distribution revealing the internal spin dynamics in a double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszyński, Krzysztof

    2017-07-01

    Waiting time distribution and the zero-frequency full counting statistics of unidirectional electron transport through a double quantum dot molecule attached to spin-polarized leads are analyzed using the quantum master equation. The waiting time distribution exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the value of the exchange coupling between the dots and the gradient of the applied magnetic field, which reveals the oscillations between the spin states of the molecule. The zero-frequency full counting statistics, on the other hand, is independent of the aforementioned quantities, thus giving no insight into the internal dynamics. The fact that the waiting time distribution and the zero-frequency full counting statistics give a nonequivalent information is associated with two factors. Firstly, it can be explained by the sensitivity to different timescales of the dynamics of the system. Secondly, it is associated with the presence of the correlation between subsequent waiting times, which makes the renewal theory, relating the full counting statistics and the waiting time distribution, no longer applicable. The study highlights the particular usefulness of the waiting time distribution for the analysis of the internal dynamics of mesoscopic systems.

  7. Detecting chaos in a citrus orchard: Reconstruction of nonlinear dynamics from very short ecological time series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Kenshi [Strategic Research Initiative for Sustainability and Survival, Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8, Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Department of Eco-Region Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8, Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)], E-mail: ken@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Noguchi, Yuko [Department of Eco-Region Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8, Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Asada, Shin-ichi [Nebukawa Branch, Ashigara Region Office, Kanagawa Agricultural Technology Center, 574-1 Nebukawa, Odawara-shi, Kanagawa 250-0024 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    The reconstruction of nonlinear dynamics from short ecological time series has been an attractive subject in ecology for the last two decade since May's classical work. Nonlinear time series analysis (NTSA) is used to investigate deterministic chaos. However, most ecological time series are too short to perform NTSA, which usually requires a time series whose size is in the thousands. Here we propose a way to reconstruct local dynamics from a very short ecological time series whose data point is smaller than ten. For most tree crops such as citrus, nuts and acorns, the yield alternates between high- and low-bearing years. Isagi et al. [Isagi Y, Sugimura K, Sumida A, Ito H. How does masting happen and synchronize? J Theor Biol 1997;187:231-9] proposed a mechanistic model that describes masting as chaos and can be applied to alternate bearing. Here we have used an ensemble data set consisting of the yields of 48 individual trees over seven years to test our proposed method and have successfully validated this method by a one-year forward prediction three times in 2002, 2003 and 2004. We also show the applicability of NTSA tools such as Lyapunov exponents, correlation dimension and deterministic nonlinear prediction on the reconstructed local dynamics.

  8. Genetics vs. entropy: longevity factors suppress the NF-kappaB-driven entropic aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2010-07-01

    Molecular studies in model organisms have identified potent longevity genes which can delay the aging process and extend the lifespan. Longevity factors promote stress resistance and cellular survival. It seems that the aging process itself is not genetically programmed but a random process involving the loss of molecular fidelity and subsequent accumulation of waste products. This age-related increase in cellular entropy is compatible with the disposable soma theory of aging. A large array of host defence systems has been linked to the NF-kappaB system which is an ancient signaling pathway specialized to host defence, e.g. functioning in immune system. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the NF-kappaB system is activated during aging. Oxidative stress and DNA damage increase with aging and elicit a sustained activation of the NF-kappaB system which has negative consequences, e.g. chronic inflammatory response, increase in apoptotic resistance, decline in autophagic cleansing, and tissue atrophy, i.e. processes that enhance the aging process. We will discuss the role of NF-kappaB system in the pro-aging signaling and will emphasize that several longevity factors seem to be inhibitors of NF-kappaB signaling and in that way they can suppress the NF-kappaB-driven entropic host defence catastrophe. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Movement Complexity and Neuromechanical Factors Affect the Entropic Half-Life of Myoelectric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson-Tole, Emma F.; Wakeling, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular functioning is essential for survival and features underpinning motor control are present in myoelectric signals recorded from skeletal muscles. One approach to quantify control processes related to function is to assess signal variability using measures such as Sample Entropy. Here we developed a theoretical framework to simulate the effect of variability in burst duration, activation duty cycle, and intensity on the Entropic Half-Life (EnHL) in myoelectric signals. EnHLs were predicted to be signal amplitude and activation duty cycle. Comparison with myoelectic data from rats walking and running at a range of speeds and inclines confirmed the range of EnHLs, however, the direction of EnHL change in response to altered locomotor demand was not correctly predicted. The discrepancy reflected different associations between the ratio of the standard deviation and mean signal intensity (Ist:It¯) and duty factor in simulated and physiological data, likely reflecting additional information in the signals from the physiological data (e.g., quiescent phase content; variation in action potential shapes). EnHL could have significant value as a novel marker of neuromuscular responses to alterations in perceived locomotor task complexity and intensity. PMID:28974932

  10. Entropic Measure of Epistemic Uncertainties in Multibody System Models by Axiomatic Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Villecco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of the MaxInf Principle in real optimization problems is investigated for engineering applications, where the current design solution is actually an engineering approximation. In industrial manufacturing, multibody system simulations can be used to develop new machines and mechanisms by using virtual prototyping, where an axiomatic design can be employed to analyze the independence of elements and the complexity of connections forming a general mechanical system. In the classic theories of Fisher and Wiener-Shannon, the idea of information is a measure of only probabilistic and repetitive events. However, this idea is broader than the probability alone field. Thus, the Wiener-Shannon’s axioms can be extended to non-probabilistic events and it is possible to introduce a theory of information for non-repetitive events as a measure of the reliability of data for complex mechanical systems. To this end, one can devise engineering solutions consistent with the values of the design constraints analyzing the complexity of the relation matrix and using the idea of information in the metric space. The final solution gives the entropic measure of epistemic uncertainties which can be used in multibody system models, analyzed with an axiomatic design.

  11. Dynamic fiber Bragg grating strain sensor interrogation with real-time measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jeon, Min Yong

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate a 1550 nm band resonance Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber laser with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array. Using the FDML fiber laser, we successfully demonstrate real-time monitoring of dynamic FBG strain sensor interrogation for structural health monitoring. The resonance FDML fiber laser consists of six multiplexed FBGs, which are arranged in series with delay fiber lengths. It is operated by driving the fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) with a sinusoidal waveform at a frequency corresponding to the round-trip time of the laser cavity. Each FBG forms a laser cavity independently in the FDML fiber laser because the light travels different length for each FBG. The very closely positioned two FBGs in a pair are operated simultaneously with a frequency in the FDML fiber laser. The spatial positions of the sensing pair can be distinguished from the variation of the applied frequency to the FFP-TF. One of the FBGs in the pair is used as a reference signal and the other one is fixed on the piezoelectric transducer stack to apply the dynamic strain. We successfully achieve real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the frequencies applied to the FBG without any signal processing delay. The real-time monitoring system is displayed simultaneously on the monitor for the variation of the two peaks, the modulation interval of the two peaks, and their fast Fourier transform spectrum. The frequency resolution of the dynamic variation could reach up to 0.5 Hz for 2 s integration time. It depends on the integration time to measure the dynamic variation. We believe that the real-time monitoring system will have a potential application for structural health monitoring.

  12. Dynamic linear models to explore time-varying suspended sediment-discharge rating curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kuk-Hyun; Yellen, Brian; Steinschneider, Scott

    2017-06-01

    This study presents a new method to examine long-term dynamics in sediment yield using time-varying sediment-discharge rating curves. Dynamic linear models (DLMs) are introduced as a time series filter that can assess how the relationship between streamflow and sediment concentration or load changes over time in response to a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic watershed disturbances or long-term changes. The filter operates by updating parameter values using a recursive Bayesian design that responds to 1 day-ahead forecast errors while also accounting for observational noise. The estimated time series of rating curve parameters can then be used to diagnose multiscale (daily-decadal) variability in sediment yield after accounting for fluctuations in streamflow. The technique is applied in a case study examining changes in turbidity load, a proxy for sediment load, in the Esopus Creek watershed, part of the New York City drinking water supply system. The results show that turbidity load exhibits a complex array of variability across time scales. The DLM highlights flood event-driven positive hysteresis, where turbidity load remained elevated for months after large flood events, as a major component of dynamic behavior in the rating curve relationship. The DLM also produces more accurate 1 day-ahead loading forecasts compared to other static and time-varying rating curve methods. The results suggest that DLMs provide a useful tool for diagnosing changes in sediment-discharge relationships over time and may help identify variability in sediment concentrations and loads that can be used to inform dynamic water quality management.

  13. Quantifying the behavior of price dynamics at opening time in stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Tomoshiro; Takada, Hideyuki; Nacher, Jose C.

    2014-11-01

    The availability of huge volume of financial data has offered the possibility for understanding the markets as a complex system characterized by several stylized facts. Here we first show that the time evolution of the Japan’s Nikkei stock average index (Nikkei 225) futures follows the resistance and breaking-acceleration effects when the complete time series data is analyzed. However, in stock markets there are periods where no regular trades occur between the close of the market on one day and the next day’s open. To examine these time gaps we decompose the time series data into opening time and intermediate time. Our analysis indicates that for the intermediate time, both the resistance and the breaking-acceleration effects are still observed. However, for the opening time there are almost no resistance and breaking-acceleration effects, and volatility is always constantly high. These findings highlight unique dynamic differences between stock markets and forex market and suggest that current risk management strategies may need to be revised to address the absence of these dynamic effects at the opening time.

  14. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock studies of the dynamical fusion threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatsukasa Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A microscopic description of dynamical fusion threshold in heavy ion collisions is performed in the framework of time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF theory using Skyrme energy density functional (EDF. TDHF fusion threshold is in a better agreement with experimental fusion barrier. We find that the onset of extra push lies at the effective fissility 33, which is consistent with the prediction of Swiatecki’s macroscopic model. The extra push energy in our TDHF simulation is systematically smaller than the prediction in macroscopic model. The important dynamical effects and the way to fit the parameter might be responsible for the different results.

  15. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, A.V. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modelling, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics. (orig.)

  16. A dynamic model of mobile concrete pump boom based on discrete time transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wu; Wu, Yunxin; Zhang, Zhaowei

    2013-12-01

    Mobile concrete pump boom is typical multibody large-scale motion manipulator. Due to posture constantly change in working process, kinematic rule and dynamic characteristic are difficult to solve. A dynamics model of a mobile concrete pump boom is established based on discrete time transfer matrix method (DTTMM). The boom system is divided into sub-structure A and substructure B. Sub-structure A is composed by the 1st boom and hydraulic actuator as well as the support. And substructure B is consists of the other three booms and corresponding hydraulic actuators. In the model, the booms and links are regarded as rigid elements and the hydraulic cylinders are equivalent to spring-damper. The booms are driven by the controllable hydraulic actuators. The overall dynamic equation and transfer matrix of the model can be assembled by sub-structures A and B. To get a precise result, step size and integration parameters are studied then. Next the tip displacement is calculated and compared with the result of ADAMS software. The displacement and rotation angle curves of the proposed method fit well with the ADAMS model. Besides it is convenient in modeling and saves time. So it is suitable for mobile concrete pump boom real-time monitoring and dynamic analysis. All of these provide reference to boom optimize and engineering application of such mechanisms.

  17. Time-varying nonlinear dynamics of a deploying piezoelectric laminated composite plate under aerodynamic force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S. F.; Zhang, W.; Song, X. J.

    2017-09-01

    Using Reddy's high-order shear theory for laminated plates and Hamilton's principle, a nonlinear partial differential equation for the dynamics of a deploying cantilevered piezoelectric laminated composite plate, under the combined action of aerodynamic load and piezoelectric excitation, is introduced. Two-degree of freedom (DOF) nonlinear dynamic models for the time-varying coefficients describing the transverse vibration of the deploying laminate under the combined actions of a first-order aerodynamic force and piezoelectric excitation were obtained by selecting a suitable time-dependent modal function satisfying the displacement boundary conditions and applying second-order discretization using the Galerkin method. Using a numerical method, the time history curves of the deploying laminate were obtained, and its nonlinear dynamic characteristics, including extension speed and different piezoelectric excitations, were studied. The results suggest that the piezoelectric excitation has a clear effect on the change of the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of such piezoelectric laminated composite plates. The nonlinear vibration of the deploying cantilevered laminate can be effectively suppressed by choosing a suitable voltage and polarity.

  18. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  19. Dynamic failure of dry and fully saturated limestone samples based on incubation time concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Petrov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the results of experimental study of the dynamic rock failure based on the comparison of dry and saturated limestone samples obtained during the dynamic compression and split tests. The tests were performed using the Kolsky method and its modifications for dynamic splitting. The mechanical data (e.g. strength, time and energy characteristics of this material at high strain rates are obtained. It is shown that these characteristics are sensitive to the strain rate. A unified interpretation of these rate effects, based on the structural–temporal approach, is hereby presented. It is demonstrated that the temporal dependence of the dynamic compressive and split tensile strengths of dry and saturated limestone samples can be predicted by the incubation time criterion. Previously discovered possibilities to optimize (minimize the energy input for the failure process is discussed in connection with industrial rock failure processes. It is shown that the optimal energy input value associated with critical load, which is required to initialize failure in the rock media, strongly depends on the incubation time and the impact duration. The optimal load shapes, which minimize the momentum for a single failure impact, are demonstrated. Through this investigation, a possible approach to reduce the specific energy required for rock cutting by means of high-frequency vibrations is also discussed.

  20. Real-time submillisecond single-molecule FRET dynamics of freely diffusing molecules with liposome tethering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yeol; Kim, Cheolhee; Lee, Nam Ki

    2015-04-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is one of the powerful techniques for deciphering the dynamics of unsynchronized biomolecules. However, smFRET is limited in its temporal resolution for observing dynamics. Here, we report a novel method for observing real-time dynamics with submillisecond resolution by tethering molecules to freely diffusing 100-nm-sized liposomes. The observation time for a diffusing molecule is extended to 100 ms with a submillisecond resolution, which allows for direct analysis of the transition states from the FRET time trace using hidden Markov modelling. We measure transition rates of up to 1,500 s-1 between two conformers of a Holliday junction. The rapid diffusional migration of Deinococcus radiodurans single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) on single-stranded DNA is resolved by FRET, faster than that of Escherichia coli SSB by an order of magnitude. Our approach is a powerful method for studying the dynamics and movements of biomolecules at submillisecond resolution.

  1. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  2. A Dynamic Optimization Method of Indoor Fire Evacuation Route Based on Real-time Situation Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Yulin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available How to provide safe and effective evacuation routes is an important safeguard to correctly guide evacuation and reduce the casualties during the fire situation rapidly evolving in complex indoor environment. The traditional static path finding method is difficult to adjust the path adaptively according to the changing fire situation, which lead to the evacuation decision-making blindness and hysteresis. This paper proposes a dynamic method which can dynamically optimize the indoor evacuation routes based on the real-time situation awareness. According to the real-time perception of fire situation parameters and the changing indoor environment information, the evacuation route is optimized dynamically. The integrated representation of multisource indoor fire monitoring sensor observations oriented fire emergency evacuation is presented at first, real-time fire threat situation information inside building is then extracted from the observation data of multi-source sensors, which is used to constrain the dynamical optimization of the topology of the evacuation route. Finally, the simulation experiments prove that this method can improve the accuracy and efficiency of indoor evacuation routing.

  3. A Novel Data-Driven Fault Diagnosis Algorithm Using Multivariate Dynamic Time Warping Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyuan Mei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Process monitoring and fault diagnosis (PM-FD has been an active research field since it plays important roles in many industrial applications. In this paper, we present a novel data-driven fault diagnosis algorithm which is based on the multivariate dynamic time warping measure. First of all, we propose a Mahalanobis distance based dynamic time warping measure which can compute the similarity of multivariate time series (MTS efficiently and accurately. Then, a PM-FD framework which consists of data preprocessing, metric learning, MTS pieces building, and MTS classification is presented. After that, we conduct experiments on industrial benchmark of Tennessee Eastman (TE process. The experimental results demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed algorithm when compared with other classical PM-FD classical methods.

  4. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Time-Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics : Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lathouwers, L

    1992-01-01

    From March 30th to April 3rd, 1992, a NATO Advanced Research workshop entitled "Time Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Experiment" was held at Snowbird, Utah. The organizing committee consisted of J. BROECKHOVE (Antwerp, Belgium), L. CEDERBAUM (Heidelberg, Germany), L. LATHOUWERS (Antwerp, Belgium), N. OHRN (Gainesville, Florida) and J. SIMONS (Salt Lake City, Utah). Fifty-two participants from eleven different countries attended the meeting at which thirty-three talks and one poster session were held. Twenty-eight participants submitted contributions to the proceedings of the meeting, which are reproduced in this volume. The workshop brought together experts in different areas 0 f molecular quantum dynamics, all adhering to the time dependent approach. The aim was to discuss and compare methods and applications. The ~amiliarityo~ the aUdience with the concepts o~ time dependent approaches greatly facilitated topical discussions and probing towards new applications. A broad area of subject matt...

  5. Polar solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 by ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Intae; Joo, Taiha

    2009-12-01

    Polar solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 in acetonitrile, methanol, and butanol are investigated by dynamic Stokes shift function, S(t ). In small protic solvents, it is known that an initial ultrafast component below 50 fs constitutes more than half of the total solvation process. We use fluorescence up-conversion technique via two-photon absorption process, which can provide 40 fs time resolution for the whole emission wavelength range. Moreover, time-resolved fluorescence spectra are recorded directly without the spectral reconstruction. We observe a temporal oscillation in frequency of whole emission spectrum in the solvation curve. In the obtained S(t ), initial solvation time scale is 120 fs, invariant to solvents used in this experiment, although its amplitude varies in different solvents.

  6. Effects of weather and climate on the dynamics of animal population time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knape, Jonas; de Valpine, Perry

    2011-04-07

    Weather is one of the most basic factors impacting animal populations, but the typical strength of such impacts on population dynamics is unknown. We incorporate weather and climate index data into analysis of 492 time series of mammals, birds and insects from the global population dynamics database. A conundrum is that a multitude of weather data may a priori be considered potentially important and hence present a risk of statistical over-fitting. We find that model selection or averaging alone could spuriously indicate that weather provides strong improvements to short-term population prediction accuracy. However, a block randomization test reveals that most improvements result from over-fitting. Weather and climate variables do, in general, improve predictions, but improvements were barely detectable despite the large number of datasets considered. Climate indices such as North Atlantic Oscillation are not better predictors of population change than local weather variables. Insect time series are typically less predictable than bird or mammal time series, although all taxonomic classes display low predictability. Our results are in line with the view that population dynamics is often too complex to allow resolving mechanisms from time series, but we argue that time series analysis can still be useful for estimating net environmental effects.

  7. Entrenched time delays versus accelerating opinion dynamics: are advanced democracies inherently unstable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Claudius

    2017-11-01

    Modern societies face the challenge that the time scale of opinion formation is continuously accelerating in contrast to the time scale of political decision making. With the latter remaining of the order of the election cycle we examine here the case that the political state of a society is determined by the continuously evolving values of the electorate. Given this assumption we show that the time lags inherent in the election cycle will inevitable lead to political instabilities for advanced democracies characterized both by an accelerating pace of opinion dynamics and by high sensibilities (political correctness) to deviations from mainstream values. Our result is based on the observation that dynamical systems become generically unstable whenever time delays become comparable to the time it takes to adapt to the steady state. The time needed to recover from external shocks grows in addition dramatically close to the transition. Our estimates for the order of magnitude of the involved time scales indicate that socio-political instabilities may develop once the aggregate time scale for the evolution of the political values of the electorate falls below 7-15 months.

  8. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of pyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P.; Worth, Graham A., E-mail: g.a.worth@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 109 61 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The dynamics of pyrrole excited at wavelengths in the range 242-217 nm are studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and wavepacket propagations performed using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. Excitation close to the origin of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum, at 242 and 236 nm, is found to result in an ultrafast decay of the system from the ionization window on a single timescale of less than 20 fs. This behaviour is explained fully by assuming the system to be excited to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in accord with previous experimental and theoretical studies. Excitation at shorter wavelengths has previously been assumed to result predominantly in population of the bright A{sub 1}(ππ{sup ∗}) and B{sub 2}(ππ{sup ∗}) states. We here present time-resolved photoelectron spectra at a pump wavelength of 217 nm alongside detailed quantum dynamics calculations that, together with a recent reinterpretation of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum [S. P. Neville and G. A. Worth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034317 (2014)], suggest that population of the B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state (hitherto assumed to be optically dark) may occur directly when pyrrole is excited at energies in the near UV part of its electronic spectrum. The B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state is found to decay on a timescale of less than 20 fs by both N-H dissociation and internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state.

  9. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  10. A coverage metric to evaluate tests for continuous-time dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skruch, Paweł

    2011-06-01

    We present a test quality measure that allows for quantifying the completeness of black-box tests for continuous-time dynamic systems. The measure is based on a state space model of the system under test. The metric has been called the state space coverage. The classical coverage metrics, such as statement, branch, and path coverage, are not appropriate for dynamic systems because such systems are defined by differential equations and usually have an infinite number of states. The objective of the paper is to develop a necessary foundation for the metric as well as to present guidance on its application to software systems that incorporate dynamic behavior. The purpose of the proposed solution is to better assure the test engineer that a given test set is sufficient and to indicate where additional testing is required. An application example is presented to illustrate theoretical analysis and mathematical formulation.

  11. Dynamic quantised feedback stabilisation of discrete-time linear system with white noise input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Mingming; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we mainly focus on the problem of quantised feedback stabilisation of a stochastic discrete-time linear system with white noise input. The dynamic quantiser is used here. The stability of the system under state quantisation and input quantisation is analysed in detail, respectively. Both the convergence of the state's mean and the boundedness of the state's covariance matrix norm should be considered when analysing its stability. It is shown that for the two situations of the state quantisation and the input quantisation, if the system without noise input can be stabilised by a linear feedback law, it must be stabilised by the dynamic quantised feedback control policy. The sufficient conditions that the dynamic quantiser should satisfy are given. Using the results obtained in this paper, one can test whether the stochastic system is stabilisable or not. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the results.

  12. The dynamic wave expansion neural network model for robot motion planning in time-varying environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Dmitry V; Steil, Jochen J; Ritter, Helge J

    2005-04-01

    We introduce a new type of neural network--the dynamic wave expansion neural network (DWENN)--for path generation in a dynamic environment for both mobile robots and robotic manipulators. Our model is parameter-free, computationally efficient, and its complexity does not explicitly depend on the dimensionality of the configuration space. We give a review of existing neural networks for trajectory generation in a time-varying domain, which are compared to the presented model. We demonstrate several representative simulative comparisons as well as the results of long-run comparisons in a number of randomly-generated scenes, which reveal that the proposed model yields dominantly shorter paths, especially in highly-dynamic environments.

  13. Computing and Visualizing Dynamic Time Warping Alignments in R: The dtw Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Giorgino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic time warping is a popular technique for comparing time series, providing both a distance measure that is insensitive to local compression and stretches and the warping which optimally deforms one of the two input series onto the other. A variety of algorithms and constraints have been discussed in the literature. The dtw package provides an unification of them; it allows R users to compute time series alignments mixing freely a variety of continuity constraints, restriction windows, endpoints, local distance definitions, and so on. The package also provides functions for visualizing alignments and constraints using several classic diagram types.

  14. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  15. Using dynamic mode decomposition for real-time background/foreground separation in video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Jose Nathan; Grosek, Jacob; Brunton, Steven; Fu, Xing; Pendergrass, Seth

    2017-06-06

    The technique of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is disclosed herein for the purpose of robustly separating video frames into background (low-rank) and foreground (sparse) components in real-time. Foreground/background separation is achieved at the computational cost of just one singular value decomposition (SVD) and one linear equation solve, thus producing results orders of magnitude faster than robust principal component analysis (RPCA). Additional techniques, including techniques for analyzing the video for multi-resolution time-scale components, and techniques for reusing computations to allow processing of streaming video in real time, are also described herein.

  16. About Robust Stability of Dynamic Systems with Time Delays through Fixed Point Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the global asymptotic stability independent of the sizes of the delays of linear time-varying systems with internal point delays which possess a limiting equation via fixed point theory. The error equation between the solutions of the limiting equation and that of the current one is considered as a perturbation equation in the fixed- point and stability analyses. The existence of a unique fixed point which is later proved to be an asymptotically stable equilibrium point is investigated. The stability conditions are basically concerned with the matrix measure of the delay-free matrix of dynamics to be negative and to have a modulus larger than the contribution of the error dynamics with respect to the limiting one. Alternative conditions are obtained concerned with the matrix dynamics for zero delay to be negative and to have a modulus larger than an appropriate contributions of the error dynamics of the current dynamics with respect to the limiting one. Since global stability is guaranteed under some deviation of the current solution related to the limiting one, which is considered as nominal, the stability is robust against such errors for certain tolerance margins.

  17. Multidimensional electron-nuclear wavepacket dynamics via Time-, Energy- and Angle-resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrinas, K.; Makhija, V.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Forbes, R.; Wilkinson, I.; Moffatt, D.; Lausten, R.; Stolow, A.

    2017-04-01

    Generating and probing a coherent superposition of coupled vibrational-electronic (vibronic) states - a multidimensional wavepacket - remains a challenging problem in molecular dynamics. Here, we present recent results using time-resolved photoelectron velocity map imaging (VMI) of complex vibronic wavepacket dynamics in the NO molecule following femtosecond single photon excitation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) range (λpump = 160 nm, 80 fs). The induced ultrafast dynamics, involving highly excited valence and Rydberg states, is probed by single photon ionization (λprobe = 400 nm, 40 fs). Varying the pump-probe time delay, the emitted photoelectrons are detected in a VMI spectrometer for time-, energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We observe that the different final vibrational states of the NO+ (X 1Σ+) cation, onto which this evolving vibronic wavepacket is projected, reveal different time dependences for the kinetic energy distribution and the laboratory frame photoelectron angular distribution (LFPAD). In particular, we observe unusually strong oscillations in the β4 asymmetry parameter, indicating sensitivity to the higher angular momentum components of the electronic aspect of this complex vibronic wavepacket.

  18. Synaptic Dynamics and Neuronal Network Connectivity are reflected in the Distribution of Times in Up states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh eDao Duc

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of neuronal networks connected by synaptic dynamics can sustain long periods of depolarization that can last for hundreds of milliseconds such as Up states recorded during sleep or anesthesia. Yet the underlying mechanism driving these periods remain unclear. We show here within a mean-field model that the residence times of the neuronal membrane potential in cortical Up states does not follow a Poissonian law, but presents several peaks. Furthermore, the present modeling approach allows extracting some information about the neuronal network connectivity from the time distribution histogram. Based on a synaptic-depression model, we find that these peaks, that can be observed in histograms of patch-clamp recordings are not artifacts of electrophysiological measurements, but rather are an inherent property of the network dynamics. Analysis of the equations reveals a stable focus located close to the unstable limit cycle, delimiting a region that defines the Up state. The model further shows that the peaks observed in the Up state time distribution are due to winding around the focus before escaping from the basin of attraction. Finally, we use in vivo recordings of intracellular membrane potential and we recover from the peak distribution, some information about the network connectivity. We conclude that it is possible to recover the network connectivity from the distribution of times that the neuronal membrane voltage spends in Up states.

  19. Dynamical complexity of short and noisy time series. Compression-Complexity vs. Shannon entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nithin; Balasubramanian, Karthi

    2017-07-01

    Shannon entropy has been extensively used for characterizing complexity of time series arising from chaotic dynamical systems and stochastic processes such as Markov chains. However, for short and noisy time series, Shannon entropy performs poorly. Complexity measures which are based on lossless compression algorithms are a good substitute in such scenarios. We evaluate the performance of two such Compression-Complexity Measures namely Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZ) and Effort-To-Compress (ETC) on short time series from chaotic dynamical systems in the presence of noise. Both LZ and ETC outperform Shannon entropy (H) in accurately characterizing the dynamical complexity of such systems. For very short binary sequences (which arise in neuroscience applications), ETC has higher number of distinct complexity values than LZ and H, thus enabling a finer resolution. For two-state ergodic Markov chains, we empirically show that ETC converges to a steady state value faster than LZ. Compression-Complexity measures are promising for applications which involve short and noisy time series.

  20. Dynamic Absorbers Used to Reduce Transient Time of Spacecraft Structural Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Kotsur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the dynamic absorber effect on damping of low frequency transient processes, which occur when a spacecraft  (SC performs scheduled maneuvers.Transient time is analysed to define the effectiveness of using dynamic absorbers in the SC with non-rigid large-sized structural members. The Spacecraft “Kondor” is considered as a prototype.Two dynamical models of the SC in question are built and analyzed, namely the first one without absorbers and the other one with mounted absorbers. The both models represent a combination of point masses, connected with each other by viscoelastic coupling. The motion equations in modal coordinates are deduced using the Lagrange equation of the second kind.The prototype data chosen from the open publications are used as initial data for the model. The absorber parameters are iteratively selected without solving optimization problem.As a transient model, is used an initial displacement of four particular degrees of freedom, which correspond to the main non-rigid structural members (antenna module, solar panels.The result obtained shows that the use of dynamic absorbers allows us to decrease the time of particular transient process under consideration totally by 55%.The main utility of the proposed method is that it can be used at the front end engineering design stage of a newly designed SC to prevent arising spurious modes. The model can also be useful for an existing SC, which for various reasons does not meet requirements of the transient process time.The paper clearly shows the positive effect of dynamic absorbers available in the SC construction.

  1. Solving a Location, Allocation, and Capacity Planning Problem with Dynamic Demand and Response Time Service Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Ka Yuk Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Logistic systems with uncertain demand, travel time, and on-site processing time are studied here where sequential trip travel is allowed. The relationship between three levels of decisions: facility location, demand allocation, and resource capacity (number of service units, satisfying the response time requirement, is analysed. The problem is formulated as a stochastic mixed integer program. A simulation-based hybrid heuristic is developed to solve the dynamic problem under different response time service level. An initial solution is obtained from solving static location-allocation models, followed by iterative improvement of the three levels of decisions by ejection, reinsertion procedure with memory of feasible and infeasible service regions. Results indicate that a higher response time service level could be achieved by allocating a given resource under an appropriate decentralized policy. Given a response time requirement, the general trend is that the minimum total capacity initially decreases with more facilities. During this stage, variability in travel time has more impact on capacity than variability in demand arrivals. Thereafter, the total capacity remains stable and then gradually increases. When service level requirement is high, the dynamic dispatch based on first-come-first-serve rule requires smaller capacity than the one by nearest-neighbour rule.

  2. From dynamical systems with time-varying delay to circle maps and Koopman operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, David; Otto, Andreas; Radons, Günter

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the retarded access by a time-varying delay on the dynamics of delay systems. We show that there are two universality classes of delays, which lead to fundamental differences in dynamical quantities such as the Lyapunov spectrum. Therefore, we introduce an operator theoretic framework, where the solution operator of the delay system is decomposed into the Koopman operator describing the delay access and an operator similar to the solution operator known from systems with constant delay. The Koopman operator corresponds to an iterated map, called access map, which is defined by the iteration of the delayed argument of the delay equation. The dynamics of this one-dimensional iterated map determines the universality classes of the infinite-dimensional state dynamics governed by the delay differential equation. In this way, we connect the theory of time-delay systems with the theory of circle maps and the framework of the Koopman operator. In this paper, we extend our previous work [A. Otto, D. Müller, and G. Radons, Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 044104 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.044104] by elaborating the mathematical details and presenting further results also on the Lyapunov vectors.

  3. Real-time reference-based dynamic phase retrieval algorithm for optical measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Kai, Li; Kemao, Qian

    2017-09-20

    To study dynamic behaviors of a phenomenon, measuring the evolving field of a specimen/material/structure is required. Optical interferometry, as a full-field, non-contact, and highly sensitive optical measurement technique, has been applied, where the evolving field is represented as dynamic phase distribution. A dynamic phase retrieval algorithm, called least-squares with 3 unknowns (LS3U), which estimates the phase change between each two consecutive patterns by a least-squares fitting method and denoises the phase change by a windowed Fourier filtering (WFF) algorithm, has been shown to be a simple yet effective algorithm. However, LS3U is computationally expensive, restricting its potential application in real-time dynamic phase retrieval systems. In this paper, a real-time LS3U algorithm powered by GPU parallel computing is proposed, with which frame rates of up to 64.5 frames per second (fps) and 131.8 fps are achieved on NVIDIA's GTX 680 and GTX 1080 graphics cards, respectively.

  4. DynaPho: a web platform for inferring the dynamics of time-series phosphoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Lang; Wang, Jian-Kai; Lu, Pei-Chun; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2017-07-07

    Large-scale phosphoproteomics studies have improved our understanding of dynamic cellular signaling, but the downstream analysis of phosphoproteomics data is still a bottleneck. We develop DynaPho, a useful web-based tool providing comprehensive and in-depth analyses of time-course phosphoproteomics data, making analysis intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. The tool currently implements five analytic modules, which reveal the transition of biological pathways, kinase activity, dynamics of interaction networks and the predicted kinase-substrate associations. These features can assist users in translating their larger-scale time-course phosphoproteomics data into valuable biological discoveries. DynaPho is freely available at http://dynapho.jhlab.tw/ . hsuancheng@ym.edu.tw or yukijuan@ntu.edu.tw . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Nonradiative Relaxation in Real-Time Electronic Dynamics OSCF2: Organolead Triiodide Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Triet S; Parkhill, John

    2016-09-01

    We apply our recently developed nonequilibrium real-time time-dependent density functional theory (OSCF2) to investigate the transient spectrum and relaxation dynamics of the tetragonal structure of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite (MAPbI3). We obtain an estimate of the interband relaxation kinetics and identify multiple ultrafast cooling channels for hot electrons and hot holes that largely corroborate the dual valence-dual conduction model. The computed relaxation rates and absorption spectra are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. We present the first ab initio simulations of the perovskite transient absorption (TA) spectrum, substantiating the assignment of induced bleaches and absorptions including a Pauli-bleach signal. This paper validates both OSCF2 as a good qualitative model of electronic dynamics, and the dominant interpretation of the TA spectrum of this material.

  6. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T.; Paglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    metabolic flux states for red blood cells, platelets, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, only uFBA predicts that stored red blood cells metabolize TCA intermediates to regenerate important cofactors, such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. These pathway usage predictions were subsequently validated through 13C......The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time...... isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems....

  7. Phase change in an opinion-dynamics model with separation of time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo K.; Barrio, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We define an opinion formation model of agents in a one-dimensional ring, where the opinion of an agent evolves due to its interactions with close neighbors and due to its either positive or negative attitude toward the overall mood of all the other agents. While the dynamics of the agent’s opinion is described with an appropriate differential equation, from time to time pairs of agents are allowed to change their locations to improve the homogeneity of opinion (or comfort feeling) with respect to their short-range environment. In this way the timescale of transaction dynamics and that of environment update are well separated and controlled by a single parameter. By varying this parameter we discovered a phase change in the number of undecided individuals. This phenomenon arises from the fact that too frequent location exchanges among agents result in frustration in their opinion formation. Our mean field analysis supports this picture.

  8. A practical MGA-ARIMA model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shuhong; Gao, Yifeng; Shi, Houbao; Zhao, Ge

    2013-05-01

    novel and practical modified genetic algorithm (MGA)-autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation has been established by combining genetic algorithm ideas with the ARIMA model. It is proved that due to the introduction of MGA into the ARIMA(1,1,7) model, the MGA-ARIMA model has the potential to be conveniently applied in every country or area by creating a parameter database used by the ARIMA(1,1,7) model. The parameter database is given in this paper based on attenuation data measured in Xi'an, China. The methods to create the parameter databases in other countries or areas are offered, too. Based on the experimental results, the MGA-ARIMA model has been proved practical for forecasting dynamic rain-induced attenuation in real time. The novel model given in this paper is significant for developing adaptive fade mitigation technologies at millimeter wave bands.

  9. Constant-net-time headway as a key mechanism behind pedestrian flow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders

    2009-08-01

    We show that keeping a constant lower limit on the net-time headway is the key mechanism behind the dynamics of pedestrian streams. There is a large variety in flow and speed as functions of density for empirical data of pedestrian streams obtained from studies in different countries. The net-time headway, however, stays approximately constant over all these different data sets. By using this fact, we demonstrate how the underlying dynamics of pedestrian crowds, naturally follows from local interactions. This means that there is no need to come up with an arbitrary fit function (with arbitrary fit parameters) as has traditionally been done. Further, by using not only the average density values but the variance as well, we show how the recently reported stop-and-go waves [Helbing, Phys. Rev. E 75, 046109 (2007)] emerge when local density variations take values exceeding a certain maximum global (average) density, which makes pedestrians stop.

  10. Dynamical Performances of a Vibration Absorber for Continuous Structure considering Time-Delay Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuting Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear effect incurred by time delay in vibration control is investigated in this study via a vibration absorber coupled with a continuous beam structure. The stability of the vibration absorber coupled structure system with time-delay coupling is firstly studied, which provides a general guideline for the potential time delay to be introduced to the system. Then it is shown that there is a specific region for the time delay which can bring bifurcation modes to the dynamic response of the coupling system, and the vibration energy at low frequencies can be transferred or absorbed due to the bifurcation mode and the vibration in the corresponding frequency range is thus suppressed. The nonlinear mechanism of this vibration suppression incurred by the coupling time delay is discussed in detail, which provides a novel and alternative approach to the analysis, design, and control of vibration absorbers in engineering practice.

  11. Modeling and Bifurcation Research of a Worm Propagation Dynamical System with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both vaccination and quarantine strategy are adopted to control the Internet worm propagation. By considering the interaction infection between computers and external removable devices, a worm propagation dynamical system with time delay under quarantine strategy is constructed based on anomaly intrusion detection system (IDS. By regarding the time delay caused by time window of anomaly IDS as the bifurcation parameter, local asymptotic stability at the positive equilibrium and local Hopf bifurcation are discussed. Through theoretical analysis, a threshold τ0 is derived. When time delay is less than τ0, the worm propagation is stable and easy to predict; otherwise, Hopf bifurcation occurs so that the system is out of control and the containment strategy does not work effectively. Numerical analysis and discrete-time simulation experiments are given to illustrate the correctness of theoretical analysis.

  12. Real-time inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics for lower limb applications using OpenSim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, C; Reggiani, M; Modenese, L; Lloyd, D G

    2017-03-01

    Real-time estimation of joint angles and moments can be used for rapid evaluation in clinical, sport, and rehabilitation contexts. However, real-time calculation of kinematics and kinetics is currently based on approximate solutions or generic anatomical models. We present a real-time system based on OpenSim solving inverse kinematics and dynamics without simplifications at 2000 frame per seconds with less than 31.5 ms of delay. We describe the software architecture, sensitivity analyses to minimise delays and errors, and compare offline and real-time results. This system has the potential to strongly impact current rehabilitation practices enabling the use of personalised musculoskeletal models in real-time.

  13. Modeling of the long-time asymptotic dynamics of a point-like object

    CERN Document Server

    Ribaric, Marijan

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first-ever mathematical framework for modeling of the long-time asymptotic behavior of acceleration of such a point-like object whose velocity eventually stops changing after the cessations of the external force. For the small and slowly changing external force we approximate its long-time asymptotic acceleration by a relativistic polynomial in time-derivatives of the external force. Without knowing the equation of motion for such a point-like object, an approximation of this kind enables us to model the long-time asymptotic behavior of its dynamics, and access its long-time asymptotic kinetic constants, which supplement mass and charge. We give various examples.

  14. Dynamical modelling of measured time series from a Q-switched CO sub 2 laser

    CERN Document Server

    Horbelt, W; Bünner, M J; Meucci, R; Ciofini, M

    2003-01-01

    The transient dynamics of a Q-switched CO sub 2 laser is modelled quantitatively on the base of the four level model, a five dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations. Using the multiple shooting technique, internal parameters of the laser are estimated and the unobserved time courses of the population densities are constructed. For excitations barely above the laser threshold large pulse variations are identified as an effect of small variations of the pump parameter.

  15. Interval Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Forced Functional Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order forced functional dynamic equations of the form (r(t(xΔ(tγΔ+∑i=0n‍qi(t|x(δi(t|αisgn  x(δi(t=e(t on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  16. Noise Induced Dissipation in Discrete-Time Classical and Quantum Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wolowski, Lech

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new characteristics of chaoticity of classical and quantum dynamical systems by defining the notion of the dissipation time which enables us to test how the system responds to the noise and in particular to measure the speed at which an initially closed, conservative system converges to the equilibrium when subjected to noisy (stochastic) perturbations. We prove fast dissipation result for classical Anosov systems and ...

  17. A compact multifunctional microfluidic platform for exploring cellular dynamics in real-time using electrochemical detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto; Caviglia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    and electrochemical analysis platform with in-built fluid handling and detection, enabling complete cell based assays comprising on-line electrode cleaning, sterilization, surface functionalization, cell seeding, cultivation and electrochemical real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics. To demonstrate the versatility...... capability. The here presented platform is aimed at applications utilizing cell based assays, ranging from e.g. monitoring of drug effects in pharmacological studies, characterization of neural stem cell differentiation, and screening of genetically modified microorganisms to environmental monitoring....

  18. A dynamic Time Warping Algorithm for Recognition of Multi-Stroke On-Line Handwriten Characters

    OpenAIRE

    Mouchère, Harold; Li, Jinpeng; Viard-Gaudin, Christian; Chen, Zhaoxin

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Dynamic time warping (DTW) is a famous distance to compare two mono-stroke symbols online. It obeys boundary and continuity constraints. The extension of DTW to multi-stroke symbols raises specific problems. A naive solution is to convert the multi-stroke symbol into a single one via a direct concatenation in the handwriting order. However, people may write a symbol with different stroke directions and orders. Applying a brute force method by searching all the possible...

  19. Analysis of temperature time-series: Embedding dynamics into the MDS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, António M.; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Global warming and the associated climate changes are being the subject of intensive research due to their major impact on social, economic and health aspects of the human life. Surface temperature time-series characterise Earth as a slow dynamics spatiotemporal system, evidencing long memory behaviour, typical of fractional order systems. Such phenomena are difficult to model and analyse, demanding for alternative approaches. This paper studies the complex correlations between global temperature time-series using the Multidimensional scaling (MDS) approach. MDS provides a graphical representation of the pattern of climatic similarities between regions around the globe. The similarities are quantified through two mathematical indices that correlate the monthly average temperatures observed in meteorological stations, over a given period of time. Furthermore, time dynamics is analysed by performing the MDS analysis over slices sampling the time series. MDS generates maps describing the stations' locus in the perspective that, if they are perceived to be similar to each other, then they are placed on the map forming clusters. We show that MDS provides an intuitive and useful visual representation of the complex relationships that are present among temperature time-series, which are not perceived on traditional geographic maps. Moreover, MDS avoids sensitivity to the irregular distribution density of the meteorological stations.

  20. Dynamic Allocation of SPM Based on Time-Slotted Cache Conflict Graph for System Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianping; Ling, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Mei, Chen; Wang, Huan

    This paper proposes a novel dynamic Scratch-pad Memory allocation strategy to optimize the energy consumption of the memory sub-system. Firstly, the whole program execution process is sliced into several time slots according to the temporal dimension; thereafter, a Time-Slotted Cache Conflict Graph (TSCCG) is introduced to model the behavior of Data Cache (D-Cache) conflicts within each time slot. Then, Integer Nonlinear Programming (INP) is implemented, which can avoid time-consuming linearization process, to select the most profitable data pages. Virtual Memory System (VMS) is adopted to remap those data pages, which will cause severe Cache conflicts within a time slot, to SPM. In order to minimize the swapping overhead of dynamic SPM allocation, a novel SPM controller with a tightly coupled DMA is introduced to issue the swapping operations without CPU's intervention. Last but not the least, this paper discusses the fluctuation of system energy profit based on different MMU page size as well as the Time Slot duration quantitatively. According to our design space exploration, the proposed method can optimize all of the data segments, including global data, heap and stack data in general, and reduce the total energy consumption by 27.28% on average, up to 55.22% with a marginal performance promotion. And comparing to the conventional static CCG (Cache Conflicts Graph), our approach can obtain 24.7% energy profit on average, up to 30.5% with a sight boost in performance.

  1. Transition path times reveal memory effects and anomalous diffusion in the dynamics of protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Rohit; Das, Atanu; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2017-10-01

    Recent single-molecule experiments probed transition paths of biomolecular folding and, in particular, measured the time biomolecules spend while crossing their free energy barriers. A surprising finding from these studies is that the transition barriers crossed by transition paths, as inferred from experimentally observed transition path times, are often lower than the independently determined free energy barriers. Here we explore memory effects leading to anomalous diffusion as a possible origin of this discrepancy. Our analysis of several molecular dynamics trajectories shows that the dynamics of common reaction coordinates used to describe protein folding is subdiffusive, at least at sufficiently short times. We capture this effect using a one-dimensional fractional Brownian motion (FBM) model, in which the system undergoes a subdiffusive process in the presence of a potential of mean force, and show that this model yields much broader distributions of transition path times with stretched exponential long-time tails. Without any adjustable parameters, these distributions agree well with the transition path times computed directly from protein trajectories. We further discuss how the FBM model can be tested experimentally.

  2. Nonadiabatic Dynamics for Electrons at Second-Order: Real-Time TDDFT and OSCF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Triet S; Parkhill, John

    2015-07-14

    We develop a new model to simulate nonradiative relaxation and dephasing by combining real-time Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) with our recent open-systems theory of electronic dynamics. The approach has some key advantages: it has been systematically derived and properly relaxes noninteracting electrons to a Fermi-Dirac distribution. This paper combines the new dissipation theory with an atomistic, all-electron quantum chemistry code and an atom-centered model of the thermal environment. The environment is represented nonempirically and is dependent on molecular structure in a nonlocal way. A production quality, O(N(3)) closed-shell implementation of our theory applicable to realistic molecular systems is presented, including timing information. This scaling implies that the added cost of our nonadiabatic relaxation model, time-dependent open self-consistent field at second order (OSCF2), is computationally inexpensive, relative to adiabatic propagation of real-time time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) or time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Details of the implementation and numerical algorithm, including factorization and efficiency, are discussed. We demonstrate that OSCF2 approaches the stationary self-consistent field (SCF) ground state when the gap is large relative to k(b)T. The code is used to calculate linear-response spectra including the effects of bath dynamics. Finally, we show how our theory of finite-temperature relaxation can be used to correct ground-state DFT calculations.

  3. Nonlinear stochastic exclusion financial dynamics modeling and time-dependent intrinsic detrended cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    In attempt to reproduce price dynamics of financial markets, a stochastic agent-based financial price model is proposed and investigated by stochastic exclusion process. The exclusion process, one of interacting particle systems, is usually thought of as modeling particle motion (with the conserved number of particles) in a continuous time Markov process. In this work, the process is utilized to imitate the trading interactions among the investing agents, in order to explain some stylized facts found in financial time series dynamics. To better understand the correlation behaviors of the proposed model, a new time-dependent intrinsic detrended cross-correlation (TDI-DCC) is introduced and performed, also, the autocorrelation analyses are applied in the empirical research. Furthermore, to verify the rationality of the financial price model, the actual return series are also considered to be comparatively studied with the simulation ones. The comparison results of return behaviors reveal that this financial price dynamics model can reproduce some correlation features of actual stock markets.

  4. Time-Domain Ab Initio Modeling of Photoinduced Dynamics at Nanoscale Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linjun; Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-04-01

    Nonequilibrium processes involving electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in nanoscale materials are under active experimental investigation. Corresponding theoretical studies are much scarcer. The review starts with the basics of time-dependent density functional theory, recent developments in nonadiabatic molecular dynamics, and the fusion of the two techniques. Ab initio simulations of this kind allow us to directly mimic a great variety of time-resolved experiments performed with pump-probe laser spectroscopies. The focus is on the ultrafast photoinduced charge and exciton dynamics at interfaces formed by two complementary materials. We consider purely inorganic materials, inorganic-organic hybrids, and all organic interfaces, involving bulk semiconductors, metallic and semiconducting nanoclusters, graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, polymers, molecular crystals, molecules, and solvent. The detailed atomistic insights available from time-domain ab initio studies provide a unique description and a comprehensive understanding of the competition between electron transfer, thermal relaxation, energy transfer, and charge recombination processes. These advances now make it possible to directly guide the development of organic and hybrid solar cells, as well as photocatalytic, electronic, spintronic, and other devices relying on complex interfacial dynamics.

  5. Dynamic Subcarrier Allocation for Real-Time Traffic over Multiuser OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li VictorOK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic resource allocation algorithm to satisfy the packet delay requirements for real-time services, while maximizing the system capacity in multiuser orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM systems is introduced. Our proposed cross-layer algorithm, called Dynamic Subcarrier Allocation algorithm for Real-time Traffic (DSA-RT, consists of two interactive components. In the medium access control (MAC layer, the users' expected transmission rates in terms of the number of subcarriers per symbol and their corresponding transmission priorities are evaluated. With the above MAC-layer information and the detected subcarriers' channel gains, in the physical (PHY layer, a modified Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is developed to minimize the system power for a certain subcarrier allocation, then a PHY-layer resource allocation scheme is proposed to optimally allocate the subcarriers under the system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and power constraints. In a system where the number of mobile users changes dynamically, our developed MAC-layer access control and removal schemes can guarantee the quality of service (QoS of the existing users in the system and fully utilize the bandwidth resource. The numerical results show that DSA-RT significantly improves the system performance in terms of the bandwidth efficiency and delay performance for real-time services.

  6. Universal short-time quantum critical dynamics of finite-size systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yu-Rong; Yin, Shuai; Yao, Dao-Xin

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the short-time quantum critical dynamics in the imaginary-time relaxation processes of finite-size systems. Universal scaling behaviors exist in the imaginary-time evolution. In particular, the system undergoes a critical initial slip stage characterized by an exponent θ , in which an initial power-law increase emerges in the imaginary-time correlation function when the initial state has a zero order parameter and a vanishing correlation length. Under different initial conditions, the quantum critical point and critical exponents can be determined from the universal scaling behaviors. We apply the method to the one- and two-dimensional transverse field Ising models using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. In the one-dimensional case, we locate the quantum critical point at (h/J ) c=1.000 03 (8 ) in the thermodynamic limit, and we estimate the critical initial slip exponent θ =0.3734 (2 ) and the static exponent β /ν =0.1251 (2 ) by analyzing data on chains of length L =32 -256 and 48-256, respectively. For the two-dimensional square-lattice system, the critical coupling ratio is given by 3.044 51 (7 ) in the thermodynamic limit, while the critical exponents are θ =0.209 (4 ) and β /ν =0.518 (1 ) estimated by data on systems of size L =24 -64 and 32-64, respectively. Remarkably, the critical initial slip exponents obtained in both models are notably distinct from their classical counterparts due to the essential differences between classical and quantum dynamics. The short-time critical dynamics and the imaginary-time relaxation QMC approach can be readily adapted to various models.

  7. A Time-Splitting and Sine Spectral Method for Dynamics of Dipolar Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Qi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC described by two coupled a three-dimension Gross-Pitaevskii (GP equations is considered, where one equation has dipole-dipole interaction while the other one has only the usual s-wave contact interaction, in a cigar trap. The time-splitting and sine spectral method in space is proposed to discretize the time-dependent equations for computing the dynamics of dipolar BEC. The singularity in the dipole-dipole interaction brings significant difficulties both in mathematical analysis and in numerical simulations. Numerical results are given to show the efficiency of this method.

  8. Conservative fourth-order time integration of non-linear dynamic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2015-01-01

    An energy conserving time integration algorithm with fourth-order accuracy is developed for dynamic systems with nonlinear stiffness. The discrete formulation is derived by integrating the differential state-space equations of motion over the integration time increment, and then evaluating...... is a direct fourth-order accurate representation of the original differential equations. This fourth-order form is energy conserving for systems with force potential in the form of a quartic polynomial in the displacement components. Energy conservation for a force potential of general form is obtained...

  9. The turnpike property for dynamic discrete time zero-sum games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Zaslavski

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of dynamic discrete-time two-player zero-sum games. We show that for a generic cost function and each initial state, there exists a pair of overtaking equilibria strategies over an infinite horizon. We also establish that for a generic cost function f, there exists a pair of stationary equilibria strategies (xf,yf such that each pair of “approximate” equilibria strategies spends almost all of its time in a small neighborhood of (xf,yf.

  10. Cough Recognition Based on Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients and Dynamic Time Warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunmei; Liu, Baojun; Li, Ping

    Cough recognition provides important clinical information for the treatment of many respiratory diseases, but the assessment of cough frequency over a long period of time remains unsatisfied for either clinical or research purpose. In this paper, according to the advantage of dynamic time warping (DTW) and the characteristic of cough recognition, an attempt is made to adapt DTW as the recognition algorithm for cough recognition. The process of cough recognition based on mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) and DTW is introduced. Experiment results of testing samples from 3 subjects show that acceptable performances of cough recognition are obtained by DTW with a small training set.

  11. Fractal dynamics of heartbeat time series of young persons with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Alonso-Martínez, A.; Ramírez-Hernández, L.; Martínez-Hernández, G.

    2012-10-01

    Many physiological systems have been in recent years quantitatively characterized using fractal analysis. We applied it to study heart variability of young subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS); we examined the RR time series (time between two R waves in ECG) with the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method, the Higuchi's fractal dimension method and the multifractal analysis to detect the possible presence of heart problems. The results show that although the young persons have MS, the majority do not present alterations in the heart dynamics. However, there were cases where the fractal parameter values differed significantly from the healthy people values.

  12. The dynamics of the HIV infection: a time-delay differential equation approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bacelar, Flora S; Santos, Rita M Zorzenon dos

    2010-01-01

    In this work we introduce a differential equation model with time-delay that describes the three-stage dynamics and the two time scales observed in HIV infection. Assuming that the virus has high mutation and rapid reproduction rates that stress the immune system throughout the successive activation of new responses to new undetectable strains, the delay term describes the time interval necessary to mount new specific immune responses. This single term increases the number of possible solutions and changes the phase space dynamics if compared to the model without time delay. We observe very slow transits near the unstable fixed point, corresponding to a healthy state, and long time decay to the stable fixed point that corresponds to the infected state. In contrast to the results obtained for models using regular ODE, which only allow for partial descriptions of the course of the infection, our model describes the entire course of infection observed in infected patients: the primary infection, the latency peri...

  13. Stability analysis and the stabilization of a class of discrete-time dynamic neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patan, Krzysztof

    2007-05-01

    This paper deals with problems of stability and the stabilization of discrete-time neural networks. Neural structures under consideration belong to the class of the so-called locally recurrent globally feedforward networks. The single processing unit possesses dynamic behavior. It is realized by introducing into the neuron structure a linear dynamic system in the form of an infinite impulse response filter. In this way, a dynamic neural network is obtained. It is well known that the crucial problem with neural networks of the dynamic type is stability as well as stabilization in learning problems. The paper formulates stability conditions for the analyzed class of neural networks. Moreover, a stabilization problem is defined and solved as a constrained optimization task. In order to tackle this problem two methods are proposed. The first one is based on a gradient projection (GP) and the second one on a minimum distance projection (MDP). It is worth noting that these methods can be easily introduced into the existing learning algorithm as an additional step, and suitable convergence conditions can be developed for them. The efficiency and usefulness of the proposed approaches are justified by using a number of experiments including numerical complexity analysis, stabilization effectiveness, and the identification of an industrial process.

  14. Time-reversal symmetric work distributions for closed quantum dynamics in the histories framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harry J. D.; Anders, Janet

    2017-06-01

    A central topic in the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics is the definition of thermodynamic work in the quantum regime. One widely used solution is to define work for a closed system undergoing non-equilibrium dynamics according to the two-point energy measurement scheme. However, due to the invasive nature of measurement the two-point quantum work probability distribution cannot describe the statistics of energy change from the perspective of the system alone. We here introduce the quantum histories framework as a method to characterise the thermodynamic properties of the unmeasured, closed dynamics. Constructing continuous power operator trajectories allows us to derive an alternative quantum work distribution for closed quantum dynamics that fulfils energy conservation and is time-reversal symmetric. This opens the possibility to compare the measured work with the unmeasured work, contrasting with the classical situation where measurement does not affect the work statistics. We find that the work distribution of the unmeasured dynamics leads to deviations from the classical Jarzynski equality and can have negative values highlighting distinctly non-classical features of quantum work.

  15. Adaptive dynamics on an environmental gradient that changes over a geological time-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortelius, Mikael; Geritz, Stefan; Gyllenberg, Mats; Toivonen, Jaakko

    2015-07-07

    The standard adaptive dynamics framework assumes two timescales, i.e. fast population dynamics and slow evolutionary dynamics. We further assume a third timescale, which is even slower than the evolutionary timescale. We call this the geological timescale and we assume that slow climatic change occurs within this timescale. We study the evolution of our model population over this very slow geological timescale with bifurcation plots of the standard adaptive dynamics framework. The bifurcation parameter being varied describes the abiotic environment that changes over the geological timescale. We construct evolutionary trees over the geological timescale and observe both gradual phenotypic evolution and punctuated branching events. We concur with the established notion that branching of a monomorphic population on an environmental gradient only happens when the gradient is not too shallow and not too steep. However, we show that evolution within the habitat can produce polymorphic populations that inhabit steep gradients. What is necessary is that the environmental gradient at some point in time is such that the initial branching of the monomorphic population can occur. We also find that phenotypes adapted to environments in the middle of the existing environmental range are more likely to branch than phenotypes adapted to extreme environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Soil water storage, mixing dynamics and resulting travel times through the critical zone in northern latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Weiler, Markus; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Water partitioning in the unsaturated zone into groundwater recharge, plant transpiration, and evaporation is fundamental for estimating storages and travel times. How water is mixed and routed through the soil is of broad interest to understand plant available water, contamination transport and weathering rates in the critical zone. Earlier work has shown how seasonal changes in hydroclimate influence the time variant character of travel times. A strong seasonality characterizes the northern latitudes which are particularly sensitive to climate and land use changes. It is crucial to understand how variation and change in hydroclimate and vegetation phenology impact time variant storage dynamics and flow path partitioning in the unsaturated zone. To better understand the influence of these ecohydrological processes on travel times of evaporative, transpiration and recharge fluxes in northern latitudes, we characterized soil physical properties, hydrometric conditions and soil water isotopic composition in the upper soil profile in two different land scape units in the long term experimental catchment, Bruntland Burn in the Scottish Highlands. Our two sampling locations are characterized by podzol soils with high organic matter content but they differ with regard to their vegetation cover with either Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) or heather (Calluna sp. and Erica Sp). To assess storage and mixing dynamics in the vadose zone, we parameterized a numerical 1-D flow model using the soil textural information along with soil moisture and soil water stable isotopes (δ2H and δ18O). The water flow and transport were simulated based on the Richards and the advection dispersion equation. Differences between water flows of mobile and tightly bound soil waters and the mixing between the two pore spaces were considered. Isotopic fractionation due to evaporation from soil and interception storage was taken into account, while plant water uptake did not alter the isotopic

  17. Dynamic time warping assessment of high-resolution melt curves provides a robust metric for fungal identification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sha Lu; Gordana Mirchevska; Sayali S Phatak; Dongmei Li; Janos Luka; Richard A Calderone; William A Fonzi

    2017-01-01

    .... Dynamic time warping (DTW), first introduced in the context of speech recognition to identify temporal distortion of similar sounds, is an elastic distance measure that has been successfully applied to a wide range of time series data...

  18. Basins of attraction of the bistable region of time-delayed cutting dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yao; Xu, Jian; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates the effects of bistability in a nonsmooth time-delayed dynamical system, which is often manifested in science and engineering. Previous studies on cutting dynamics have demonstrated persistent coexistence of chatter and chatter-free responses in a bistable region located in the linearly stable zone. As there is no widely accepted definition of basins of attraction for time-delayed systems, bistable regions are coined as unsafe zones (UZs). Hence, we have attempted to define the basins of attraction and stability basins for a typical delayed system to get insight into the bistability in systems with time delays. Special attention was paid to the influences of delayed initial conditions, starting points, and states at time zero on the long-term dynamics of time-delayed systems. By using this concept, it has been confirmed that the chatter is prone to occur when the waviness frequency in the workpiece surface coincides with the effective natural frequency of the cutting process. Further investigations unveil a thin "boundary layer" inside the UZ in the immediate vicinity of the stability boundary, in which we observe an extremely fast growth of the chatter basin stability. The results reveal that the system is more stable when the initial cutting depth is smaller. The physics of the tool deflection at the instant of the tool-workpiece engagement is used to evaluate the cutting safety, and the safe level could be zero when the geometry of tool engagement is unfavorable. Finally, the basins of attraction are used to quench the chatter by a single strike, where the resultant "islands" offer an opportunity to suppress the chatter even when the cutting is very close to the stability boundary.

  19. Mean-field approximations of fixation time distributions of evolutionary game dynamics on graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Li-Min; Zhou, Jie; Tang, Ming; Guan, Shu-Guang; Zou, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The mean fixation time is often not accurate for describing the timescales of fixation probabilities of evolutionary games taking place on complex networks. We simulate the game dynamics on top of complex network topologies and approximate the fixation time distributions using a mean-field approach. We assume that there are two absorbing states. Numerically, we show that the mean fixation time is sufficient in characterizing the evolutionary timescales when network structures are close to the well-mixing condition. In contrast, the mean fixation time shows large inaccuracies when networks become sparse. The approximation accuracy is determined by the network structure, and hence by the suitability of the mean-field approach. The numerical results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  20. Nanosecond time-resolved investigations using the in situ of dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrange, Thomas; Campbell, Geoffrey H; Reed, B W; Taheri, Mitra; Pesavento, J Bradley; Kim, Judy S; Browning, Nigel D

    2008-10-01

    Most biological processes, chemical reactions and materials dynamics occur at rates much faster than can be captured with standard video rate acquisition methods in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). Thus, there is a need to increase the temporal resolution in order to capture and understand salient features of these rapid materials processes. This paper details the development of a high-time resolution dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) that captures dynamics in materials with nanosecond time resolution. The current DTEM performance, having a spatial resolution <10nm for single-shot imaging using 15ns electron pulses, will be discussed in the context of experimental investigations in solid state reactions of NiAl reactive multilayer films, the study of martensitic transformations in nanocrystalline Ti and the catalytic growth of Si nanowires. In addition, this paper will address the technical issues involved with high current, electron pulse operation and the near-term improvements to the electron optics, which will greatly improve the signal and spatial resolutions, and to the laser system, which will allow tailored specimen and photocathode drive conditions.