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Sample records for enterococcus faecalis dna-dependent

  1. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis (IE) is a disease of increasing importance, with more patients infected, increasing frequency of health-care associated infections and increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistances. The typical clinical presentation is a subacute course with fever...... or ceftriaxone. E. faecalis infective endocarditis continues to be a very serious disease with considerable percentages of high-level gentamicin resistant strains and in-hospital mortality around 20%. Strategies to prevent E. faecalis IE, improve diagnostics, optimize treatment and reduce morbidity...

  2. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bundgaard, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Because of the nephrotoxic effects of aminoglycosides, the Danish guidelines on infective endocarditis were changed in January 2007, reducing gentamicin treatment in enterococcal infective endocarditis from 4 to 6 weeks to only 2 weeks. In this pilot study, we compare outcomes in patients...... with Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis treated in the years before and after endorsement of these new recommendations....

  3. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Periodontal Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    Background: Enterococcus faecalis may contribute to periodontal breakdown in heavily infected subgingival sites, particularly in patients responding poorly to mechanical forms of periodontal therapy. Because only limited data are available on the antimicrobial sensitivity of enterococci of

  4. Serological diagnosis of experimental Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerulf, A; Espersen, F; Gutschik, E

    1998-01-01

    A modified rat model of endocarditis with catheterization for 2 days was established in female Lewis rats using different inocula of Enterococcus faecalis (strain no. EF 19) in order to measure IgG antibodies in serum during the course of infection. Increasing the inocula intravenously resulted...

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of periodontal Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2013-07-01

    Enterococcus faecalis may contribute to periodontal breakdown in heavily infected subgingival sites, particularly in patients responding poorly to mechanical forms of periodontal therapy. Because only limited data are available on the antimicrobial sensitivity of enterococci of subgingival origin, this study evaluates the in vitro antibiotic susceptibility of E. faecalis isolated from periodontitis patients in the United States. Pure cultures of 47 subgingival E. faecalis clinical isolates were each inoculated onto specially prepared broth microdilution susceptibility panels containing vancomycin, teicoplanin, and six oral antibiotics of potential use in periodontal therapy. After incubation in ambient air for 18 to 20 hours, minimal inhibitory drug concentrations were determined using applicable Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute criteria and interpretative guidelines. The organisms were additionally evaluated for in vitro resistance to metronidazole at 4 μg/mL. Periodontal E. faecalis exhibited substantial in vitro resistance to tetracycline (53.2% resistant), erythromycin (80.8% resistant or intermediate resistant), clindamycin (100% resistant to 2 μg/mL), and metronidazole (100% resistant to 4 μg/mL). In comparison, the clinical isolates were generally sensitive to ciprofloxacin (89.4% susceptible; 10.6% intermediate resistant) and 100% susceptible in vitro to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, vancomycin, and teicoplanin. Tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, and metronidazole revealed poor in vitro activity against human subgingival E. faecalis clinical isolates, and would likely be ineffective therapeutic agents against these species in periodontal pockets. Among orally administered antibiotics, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and ciprofloxacin exhibited marked in vitro inhibitory activity against periodontal E. faecalis, and may be clinically useful in treatment of periodontal infections involving enterococci.

  6. Characterization of monolaurin resistance in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Muriel; Manson, Janet M; Bremer, Philip J; Dufour, Jean-Pierre; Cook, Gregory M; Simmonds, Robin S

    2007-09-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in domestically farmed animals, which may act as reservoirs and vehicles of transmission for drug-resistant enterococci to humans, resulting in serious infections. In order to assess the potential for the use of monolaurin as a food preservative, it is important to understand both its target and potential mechanisms of resistance. A Tn917 mutant library of Enterococcus faecalis AR01/DGVS was screened for resistance (MIC, >100 microg/ml) to monolaurin. Three mutants were identified as resistant to monolaurin and were designated DGRM2, DGRM5, and DGRM12. The gene interrupted in all three mutants was identified as traB, which encodes an E. faecalis pheromone shutdown protein and whose complementation in trans restored monolaurin sensitivity in all three mutants. DGRM2 was selected for further characterization. E. faecalis DGRM2 showed increased resistance to gentamicin and chloramphenicol (inhibitors of protein synthesis), while no difference in the MIC was observed with the cell wall-active antibiotics penicillin and vancomycin. E. faecalis AR01/DGVS and DGRM2 were shown to have similar rates (30% cell lysis after 4 h) of cell autolytic activity when activated by monolaurin. Differences in cell surface hydrophobicity were observed between the wild type and the mutant, with the cell surface of the parent strain being significantly more hydrophobic. Analysis of the cell wall structure of DGRM2 by transmission electron microscopy revealed an increase in the apparent cell wall thickness and contraction of its cytoplasm. Taken together, these results suggest that the increased resistance of DGRM2 was due to a change in cell surface hydrophobicity, consequently limiting the diffusion of monolaurin to a potential target in the cytoplasmic membrane and/or cytoplasm of E. faecalis.

  7. Serological diagnosis of experimental Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerulf, A; Espersen, F; Gutschik, E

    1998-01-01

    A modified rat model of endocarditis with catheterization for 2 days was established in female Lewis rats using different inocula of Enterococcus faecalis (strain no. EF 19) in order to measure IgG antibodies in serum during the course of infection. Increasing the inocula intravenously resulted...... in an increase in the CFU/g vegetation and the CFU/g spleen, the ID50 being about 10 CFU/ml and the ID90 about 1x10(2) CFU/ml. The lowest bacterial inoculum infecting 100% of the rats was 3x10(3) CFU/ml, and for further investigations we used this inoculum size. Rats were sacrificed on day 2, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 28...

  8. Influence of Streptococcus mutans on Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Dong Mei; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Exterkate, Rob A. M.; Jiang, Lei Meng; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; Crielaard, Wim

    Introduction: An important virulence factor of Enterococcus faecalis is its ability to form biofilms. Most studies on biofilm formation have been carried out by using E. faecalis monocultures. Given the polymicrobial nature of root canal infections, it is important to understand biofilm formation of

  9. Influence of Streptococcus mutans on enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, D.M.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Exterkate, R.A.M.; Jiang, L.M.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: An important virulence factor of Enterococcus faecalis is its ability to form biofilms. Most studies on biofilm formation have been carried out by using E. faecalis monocultures. Given the polymicrobial nature of root canal infections, it is important to understand biofilm formation of

  10. Enterococcus faecalis Endogenous Endophthalmitis from Valvular Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei Barge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 74-year-old female, with a mitral heart valve, who presented with pain and blurred vision in the right eye for 2 days. Her visual acuity was light perception (LP in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. Slit lamp examination showed corneal edema and hypopyon, and a view of the right fundus was impossible. Echography showed vitreous condensation. One day after presentation, the patient developed acute lung edema requiring hospitalization, so she was not submitted to vitreous tap and intravitreal treatment. The cardiac and systemic evaluations revealed a mitral endocarditis secondary to Enterococcus faecalis. The patient improved systemically with treatment with gentamicin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Her visual acuity remained as no LP, and her intraocular pressure (IOP has been controlled with brimonidine bid despite developing a total cataract with 360° posterior synechia. A cardiac source for endogenous endophthalmitis should be considered in the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve. The treatment and followup must be made in cooperation with a cardiologist specialist, but the ophthalmologist can play a key role in the diagnosis.

  11. Exploiting CRISPR-Cas to manipulate Enterococcus faecalis populations

    OpenAIRE

    Hullahalli, Karthik; Rodrigues, Marinelle; Palmer, Kelli L

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas provides a barrier to horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes. It was previously observed that functional CRISPR-Cas systems are absent from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterococcus faecalis, which only possess an orphan CRISPR locus, termed CRISPR2, lacking cas genes. Here, we investigate how the interplay between CRISPR-Cas genome defense and antibiotic selection for mobile genetic elements shapes in vitro E. faecalis populations. We demonstrate that CRISPR2 can be reactivated for ...

  12. Influence of Streptococcus mutans on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong Mei; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Exterkate, Rob A M; Jiang, Lei Meng; van der Sluis, Lucas W M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2009-09-01

    An important virulence factor of Enterococcus faecalis is its ability to form biofilms. Most studies on biofilm formation have been carried out by using E. faecalis monocultures. Given the polymicrobial nature of root canal infections, it is important to understand biofilm formation of E. faecalis in the presence of other microorganisms. Eight clinical strains of E. faecalis were tested for biofilm formation on hydroxyapatite disks in the presence and absence of a Streptococcus mutans biofilm. Significantly more E. faecalis viable cells were found in biofilms in the presence of S. mutans. This phenomenon was, however, strain-dependent. Of the 8 strains tested, biofilm formation of strains AA-OR34, ER5/1, and V583 was not influenced by S. mutans biofilms. The results from this study, especially the strain difference, underline the importance of studying biofilm formation in a more realistic multispecies setting.

  13. The occurrence of Enterococcus faecium and faecalis is significantly associated with anastomotic leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmouhand, M; Krohn, P S; Svendsen, L B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Enterococcus has emerged as a virulent species; Enterococcus faecium especially has arisen as a source of nosocomial infections. Furthermore, specific Enterococcus faecalis species are significantly associated with anastomotic leakage in rodent studies. The objective...

  14. Pathogenesis of nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, Karola

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyzed the role of the different virulence factors of E. faecalis known in literature in the pathogenesis of infections. We investigated the prevalence of virulence factors in E. faecalis isolates from different hosts as well as their role in biomaterial related infections. The

  15. Enterococcus faecalis strains show culture heterogeneity in cell surface charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Annet; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Waar, K; Krom, BP

    Adhesion of micro-organisms to biotic and abiotic surfaces is an important virulence factor and involves different types of interactions. Enterococcus faecalis, a human commensal and an important opportunistic pathogen, has the ability to adhere to surfaces. Biliary stents frequently become clogged

  16. Risk Factors of Endocarditis in Patients with Enterococcus faecalis Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Lauridsen, Trine K; Arpi, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The NOVA score is a recently developed diagnostic tool to identify patients with increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) among patients with Enterococcus faecalis (EF) bacteremia. We aim to validate an adapted version of the NOVA score and to identify risk factors for IE...

  17. An antimicrobial peptidoglycan hydrolase for treating Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterococcus faecalis is an intestinal bacteria species that can become an opportunistic pathogen in humans and farm animals with antibiotic resistant strains becoming increasingly common. In farm animals, strong antimicrobials, such as Vancomycin, should not be used due to the risk of propagation ...

  18. Transcriptome analysis of Enterococcus faecalis in response to alkaline stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Shujun; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Wei; Sun, Zhe; Liang, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is the most commonly isolated species from endodontic failure root canals; its persistence in treated root canals has been attributed to its ability to resist high pH stress. The goal of this study was to characterize the E. faecalis transcriptome and to identify candidate genes for response and resistance to alkaline stress using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing. We found that E. faecalis could survive and form biofilms in a pH 10 environment and that alkaline stress had a great impact on the transcription of many genes in the E. faecalis genome. The transcriptome sequencing results revealed that 613 genes were differentially expressed (DEGs) for E. faecalis grown in pH 10 medium; 211 genes were found to be differentially up-regulated and 402 genes differentially down-regulated. Many of the down-regulated genes found are involved in cell energy production and metabolism and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and the up-regulated genes are mostly related to nucleotide transport and metabolism. The results presented here reveal that cultivation of E. faecalis in alkaline stress has a profound impact on its transcriptome. The observed regulation of genes and pathways revealed that E. faecalis reduced its carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and increased nucleotide synthesis to adapt and grow in alkaline stress. A number of the regulated genes may be useful candidates for the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of E. faecalis infections.

  19. Enterococcus faecalis and pathogenic streptococci inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Elizabeth V K; Pader, Vera; Edwards, Andrew M

    2017-10-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic with activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We showed previously that Staphylococcus aureus can survive daptomycin exposure by releasing membrane phospholipids that inactivate the antibiotic. To determine whether other pathogens possess this defence mechanism, phospholipid release and daptomycin activity were measured after incubation of Staphylococcus epidermidis, group A or B streptococci, Streptococcus gordonii or Enterococcus faecalis with the antibiotic. All bacteria released phospholipids in response to daptomycin, which resulted in at least partial inactivation of the antibiotic. However, E. faecalis showed the highest levels of lipid release and daptomycin inactivation. As shown previously for S. aureus, phospholipid release by E. faecalis was inhibited by the lipid biosynthesis inhibitor platensimycin. In conclusion, several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecalis, inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids, which may contribute to the failure of daptomycin to resolve infections caused by these pathogens.

  20. Exploiting CRISPR-Cas to manipulate Enterococcus faecalis populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullahalli, Karthik; Rodrigues, Marinelle; Palmer, Kelli L

    2017-06-23

    CRISPR-Cas provides a barrier to horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes. It was previously observed that functional CRISPR-Cas systems are absent from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterococcus faecalis , which only possess an orphan CRISPR locus, termed CRISPR2, lacking cas genes. Here, we investigate how the interplay between CRISPR-Cas genome defense and antibiotic selection for mobile genetic elements shapes in vitro E. faecalis populations. We demonstrate that CRISPR2 can be reactivated for genome defense in MDR strains. Interestingly, we observe that E. faecalis transiently maintains CRISPR targets despite active CRISPR-Cas systems. Subsequently, if selection for the CRISPR target is present, toxic CRISPR spacers are lost over time, while in the absence of selection, CRISPR targets are lost over time. We find that forced maintenance of CRISPR targets induces a fitness cost that can be exploited to alter heterogeneous E. faecalis populations.

  1. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes offers adequate detection of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, K; Degener, JE; van Luyn, MJ; Harmsen, HJM

    2005-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium are among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. Reliable and quick identification of E faecalis and E faecium is important for accurate treatment and understanding their role in the pathogenesis of infections. Fluorescent in situ

  2. Overexpression of Enterococcus faecalis elr operon protects from phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Perez, Naima G; Dumoulin, Romain; Gaubert, Stéphane; Lacoux, Caroline; Bugli, Francesca; Martin, Rebeca; Chat, Sophie; Piquand, Kevin; Meylheuc, Thierry; Langella, Philippe; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Rigottier-Gois, Lionel; Serror, Pascale

    2015-05-25

    Mechanisms underlying the transition from commensalism to virulence in Enterococcus faecalis are not fully understood. We previously identified the enterococcal leucine-rich protein A (ElrA) as a virulence factor of E. faecalis. The elrA gene is part of an operon that comprises four other ORFs encoding putative surface proteins of unknown function. In this work, we compared the susceptibility to phagocytosis of three E. faecalis strains, including a wild-type (WT), a ΔelrA strain, and a strain overexpressing the whole elr operon in order to understand the role of this operon in E. faecalis virulence. While both WT and ΔelrA strains were efficiently phagocytized by RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, the elr operon-overexpressing strain showed a decreased capability to be internalized by the phagocytic cells. Consistently, the strain overexpressing elr operon was less adherent to macrophages than the WT strain, suggesting that overexpression of the elr operon could confer E. faecalis with additional anti-adhesion properties. In addition, increased virulence of the elr operon-overexpressing strain was shown in a mouse peritonitis model. Altogether, our results indicate that overexpression of the elr operon facilitates the E. faecalis escape from host immune defenses.

  3. Physiological characterization of Enterococcus faecalis during azoreductase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Punj, Sumit; John, Gilbert H.

    2011-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, paper, and textile industries. Some azo dyes are known to produce carcinogenic compounds upon reductive cleavage of the azo bond (N=N) by intestinal flora. There is not much information available on the effect of these dyes on the physiology of the gut microflora as well as their kinetics of reduction in different environments. The azoreductase activity of Enterococcus faecalis, an important opportunistic intestinal pathogen, was tested us...

  4. Virulence Factors Associated with Enterococcus Faecalis Infective Endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian T; Skov, Marianne N; Gill, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    been associated with E. faecalis infective endocarditis. Absence of these factors entailed attenuation of strains in both mixed- and mono-bacterial infection endocarditis models as well as in in vitro and ex vivo assays when compared to their virulence factor expressing parental strains. PATHOGENESIS......INTRODUCTION: The enterococci are accountable for up to 20% of all cases of infective endocarditis, with Enterococcus faecalis being the primary causative isolate. Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infection of the endocardium that results in the formation of vegetations. Based...... on a literature review, this paper provides an overview of the virulence factors associated with E. faecalis infective endocarditis. Furthermore, it reports the effects of active or passive immunization against some of these involved factors. INDIVIDUAL VIRULENCE FACTORS: Nine virulence factors have in particular...

  5. Structure, Function, and Biology of the Enterococcus faecalis Cytolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Van Tyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive commensal member of the gut microbiota of a wide range of organisms. With the advent of antibiotic therapy, it has emerged as a multidrug resistant, hospital-acquired pathogen. Highly virulent strains of E. faecalis express a pore-forming exotoxin, called cytolysin, which lyses both bacterial and eukaryotic cells in response to quorum signals. Originally described in the 1930s, the cytolysin is a member of a large class of lanthionine-containing bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria. While the cytolysin shares some core features with other lantibiotics, it possesses unique characteristics as well. The current understanding of cytolysin biosynthesis, structure/function relationships, and contribution to the biology of E. faecalis are reviewed, and opportunities for using emerging technologies to advance this understanding are discussed.

  6. Investigating the mobilome in clinically important lineages of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikalsen, Theresa; Pedersen, Torunn; Willems, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Background: The success of Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis evolving as multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens is associated with their ability to acquire and share adaptive traits, including antimicrobial resistance genes encoded by mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Here, we investigate this mob...

  7. Investigating the mobilome in clinically important lineages of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikalsen, Theresa; Pedersen, Torunn; Willems, Rob; Coque, Teresa M; Werner, Guido; Sadowy, Ewa; van Schaik, Willem; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Hegstad, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The success of Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis evolving as multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens is associated with their ability to acquire and share adaptive traits, including antimicrobial resistance genes encoded by mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Here, we investigate this

  8. Presence of virulence factors in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium susceptible and resistant to vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baldisserotto Comerlato

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing importance of Enterococcus as opportunistic pathogens, their virulence factors are still poorly understood. This study determines the frequency of virulence factors in clinical and commensal Enterococcus isolates from inpatients in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Fifty Enterococcus isolates were analysed and the presence of the gelE, asa1 and esp genes was determined. Gelatinase activity and biofilm formation were also tested. The clonal relationships among the isolates were evaluated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The asa1, gelE and esp genes were identified in 38%, 60% and 76% of all isolates, respectively. The first two genes were more prevalent in Enterococcus faecalis than in Enterococcus faecium, as was biofilm formation, which was associated with gelE and asa1 genes, but not with the esp gene. The presence of gelE and the activity of gelatinase were not fully concordant. No relationship was observed among any virulence factors and specific subclones of E. faecalis or E. faecium resistant to vancomycin. In conclusion, E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates showed significantly different patterns of virulence determinants. Neither the source of isolation nor the clonal relationship or vancomycin resistance influenced their distribution.

  9. Buwchitin: a ruminal peptide with antimicrobial potential against Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Linda B.; Crochet, Jean-Adrien; Edwards, Joan E.; Girdwood, Susan E.; Cookson, Alan R.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Hilpert, Kai; Golyshin, Peter N.; Golyshina, Olga V.; Privé, Florence; Hess, Matthias; Mantovani, Hilario C.; Creevey, Christopher J.; Huws, Sharon A.

    2017-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are gaining popularity as alternatives for treatment of bacterial infections and recent advances in omics technologies provide new platforms for AMP discovery. We sought to determine the antibacterial activity of a novel antimicrobial peptide, buwchitin, against Enterococcus faecalis. Buwchitin was identified from a rumen bacterial metagenome library, cloned, expressed and purified. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was assessed using a broth microdilution susceptibility assay to determine the peptide's killing kinetics against selected bacterial strains. The killing mechanism of buwchitin was investigated further by monitoring its ability to cause membrane depolarization (diSC3(5) method) and morphological changes in E. faecalis cells. Transmission electron micrographs of buwchitin treated E. faecalis cells showed intact outer membranes with blebbing, but no major damaging effects and cell morphology changes. Buwchitin had negligible cytotoxicity against defibrinated sheep erythrocytes. Although no significant membrane leakage and depolarization was observed, buwchitin at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was bacteriostatic against E. faecalis cells and inhibited growth in vitro by 70% when compared to untreated cells. These findings suggest that buwchitin, a rumen derived peptide, has potential for antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis.

  10. Buwchitin: A Ruminal Peptide with Antimicrobial Potential against Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda B. Oyama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are gaining popularity as alternatives for treatment of bacterial infections and recent advances in omics technologies provide new platforms for AMP discovery. We sought to determine the antibacterial activity of a novel antimicrobial peptide, buwchitin, against Enterococcus faecalis. Buwchitin was identified from a rumen bacterial metagenome library, cloned, expressed and purified. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was assessed using a broth microdilution susceptibility assay to determine the peptide's killing kinetics against selected bacterial strains. The killing mechanism of buwchitin was investigated further by monitoring its ability to cause membrane depolarization (diSC3(5 method and morphological changes in E. faecalis cells. Transmission electron micrographs of buwchitin treated E. faecalis cells showed intact outer membranes with blebbing, but no major damaging effects and cell morphology changes. Buwchitin had negligible cytotoxicity against defibrinated sheep erythrocytes. Although no significant membrane leakage and depolarization was observed, buwchitin at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was bacteriostatic against E. faecalis cells and inhibited growth in vitro by 70% when compared to untreated cells. These findings suggest that buwchitin, a rumen derived peptide, has potential for antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis.

  11. Blue light-mediated inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Giorgio; Wataha, John C; Girard, Myriam; Grad, Iwona; Schrenzel, Jacques; Lange, Norbert; Bouillaguet, Serge

    2013-05-01

    In dentistry, residual infection remains a major cause of failure after endodontic treatment; many of these infections involve Enterococcus faecalis. In the current study, we explored the possibility that blue light activated photosensitizers could be used, in principle, to inactivate this microbe as an adjunct disinfection strategy for endodontic therapy. Three blue light absorbing photosensitizers, eosin-Y, rose bengal, and curcumin, were tested on E. faecalis grown in planktonic suspensions or biofilms. Photosensitizers were incubated for 30 min with bacteria then exposed to blue light (450-500 nm) for 240 s. Sodium hypochlorite (3%) was used as a control. After 48 h, the viability of E. faecalis was estimated by measuring colony-forming units post-exposure vs. untreated controls (CFU/mL). Blue light irradiation alone did not alter E. faecalis viability. For planktonic cultures, blue light activated eosin-Y (5 μM), rose bengal (1 μM), or curcumin (5 μM) significantly (pcurcumin of 100, 10, and 10 μM respectively, completely suppressed E. faecalis viability (p<0.05). Although the current results are limited to an in vitro model, they support further exploration of blue light activated antimicrobials as an adjunct therapy in endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CARRIAGE OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM AND ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS AMONG APPARENTLY HEALTHY HUMANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesida, Solayide A; Ezenta, Cynthia C; Adagbada, Ajoke O; Aladesokan, Amudat A; Coker, Akitoye O

    2017-01-01

    Enterococci are indigenous flora of the gastro-intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Recently, interest in two major species, E. faecium and E. faecalis , has heightened because of their ability to cause serious infections and their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of E . faecium and E . faecalis in human faecal samples and evaluating the susceptibility of the isolates to antibiotics. One hundred faecal samples were collected from apparently healthy individuals and analysed using conventionalbacteriological methods. The susceptibility profile of the isolates to nine antibiotics were determined using disk diffusion method. Seventy-three (73) Enterococcus were phenotypically identified and 65 of the isolates were differentiated into 36 (55.4%) E. faecium and 29 (44.6%) E. faecalis . Eight (8) isolates could not be identified by the conventional biochemical methods employed. No dual colonization by the E. faecalis and E. faecium was observed and isolation rate was not dependent on sex of the participants. All the isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, cefuroxime and ceftizoxime. Enterococcus faecium exhibited resistance toerythromycin (88.9%), gentamicin (77.8%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (63.9%), ofloxacin (44.4%), teicoplanin (19.4%) and vancomycin (16.7%). Enterococcus faecalis showed the least resistance to vancomycin (13.8%) and teicoplanin (27.7%). Remarkable multiple antibiotic resistances to the classes of antibiotic tested were observed among the two species. The high carriage rate of antibiotic resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis in this study provides information on the local antibiotic patterns of our enterococci isolates thereby suggesting that they could present as important reservoir and vehicle for dissemination of resistant genes in our community.

  13. Antibacterial Effect of Diclofenac Sodium on Enterococcus faecalis

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    Amin Salemmilani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have shown antibacterial activity in some recent studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of diclofenac against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis as a resistant endodontic bacterium in comparison with ibuprofen, calcium hydroxide and amoxicillin.Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of materials was evaluated using agar diffusion test and tube dilution method. Mixtures of 400 mg/ml of materials were prepared. The bacteria were seeded on 10 Muller-Hinton agar culture plates. Thirty microliter of each test material was placed in each well punched in agar plates. After incubation, the zone of bacterial inhibition was measured. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the test materials was determined by agar dilution method. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA followed by Sidak post hoc test was used to compare the mean zone of microbial growth in the groups.Results: There were significant differences between the two groups (p< 0.05. Results of the agar diffusion test showed that antibiotics (amoxicillin, gentamycin had the greatest antibacterial activity followed by NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac. Ca(OH2 failed to show antibacterial activity. Diclofenac and ibuprofen showed distinct antibacterial activity against E. faecalis in 50 µg/ml and above concentrations.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it is concluded that diclofenac and ibuprofen have significantly more pronounced antibacterial activity against E. faecalis in comparison with Ca(OH2.

  14. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

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    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  15. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from the cloaca of 'fancy breeds' and confined chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S L; Poulsen, L L; Thorndahl, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The aim was to investigate the intestinal community of Enterococcus faecalis from healthy confined non-industrialized chicken. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 206 E. faecalis isolates were collected from cloacal swabs. The prevalence of E. faecalis from two confined flocks was 83 and 96%, w...

  16. In vitro effectiveness of Brazilian brown propolis against Enterococcus faecalis

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    Hévelin Couto PIMENTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Brazilian brown propolis as an intracanal medication against Enterococcus faecalis. Thirty dentin discs prepared from intact freshly extracted bovine maxillary central incisors were infected with E. faecalis for 21 days. The specimens were distributed into six groups according to the medicament used as follows: G1- calcium hydroxide paste; G2- Carbowax 400 (control group; G3- 20% brown propolis paste; G4- 40% brown propolis paste; G5- 20% brown propolis paste + calcium hydroxide paste; and G6- 40% brown propolis paste + calcium hydroxide paste. The experimental pastes were placed into the canal lumen and left for 14 days. After each period, irrigation was performed with sterile saline to remove the medicament, and the canals were dried with sterile paper points. The dentin chips were removed from the canals with sequential sterile round burs at low speed and were immediately collected in separate test tubes containing BHI broth. The tubes were incubated at 37°C, and microbial growth was analyzed by spectrophotometry after 15 days. All the experimental medications significantly reduced the number of viable bacteria. The G4 and G5 pastes were more effective than the G1 paste, with 35.8%, 41%, and 21.3% antibacterial activity, respectively. Brazilian brown propolis shows antibacterial capacity against E. faecalis.

  17. Reciprocal regulation of cephalosporin resistance in Enterococcus faecalis.

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    Kristich, Christopher J; Little, Jaime L; Hall, Cherisse L; Hoff, Jessica S

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant enterococci are major causes of hospital-acquired infections and therefore represent a serious public health problem. One well-known risk factor for the acquisition of hospital-acquired enterococcal infections is prior therapy with broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics. Enterococci can proliferate in patients undergoing cephalosporin therapy due to intrinsic cephalosporin resistance, a characteristic of the genus Enterococcus. However, the molecular basis for cephalosporin resistance in E. faecalis has yet to be adequately elucidated. Previously we determined that a putative Ser/Thr kinase, IreK (formerly PrkC), is required for intrinsic cephalosporin resistance in E. faecalis. Here we show that kinase activity is required for cephalosporin resistance and, further, that resistance in E. faecalis is reciprocally regulated by IreK and IreP, a PP2C-type protein phosphatase encoded immediately upstream of IreK. Mutants of two divergent lineages of E. faecalis lacking IreP exhibit remarkable hyperresistance to cephalosporins but not to antibiotics targeting other cellular processes. Further genetic analyses indicate that hyperresistance of the IreP mutant is mediated by the IreK kinase. Additionally, competition experiments reveal that hyperresistant ΔireP mutants exhibit a substantial fitness defect in the absence of antibiotics, providing an evolutionary rationale for the use of a complex signaling system to control intrinsic cephalosporin resistance. These results support a model in which IreK and IreP act antagonistically via protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation as part of a signal transduction circuit to regulate cellular adaptation to cephalosporin-induced stress. As a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic-resistant enterococci represent a serious public health problem. Enterococci are well-known to exhibit intrinsic resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics, a trait that enables them to proliferate

  18. Investigating the mobilome in clinically important lineages of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalsen, Theresa; Pedersen, Torunn; Willems, Rob; Coque, Teresa M; Werner, Guido; Sadowy, Ewa; van Schaik, Willem; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Hegstad, Kristin

    2015-04-10

    The success of Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis evolving as multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens is associated with their ability to acquire and share adaptive traits, including antimicrobial resistance genes encoded by mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Here, we investigate this mobilome in successful hospital associated genetic lineages, E. faecium sequence type (ST)17 (n=10) and ST78 (n=10), E. faecalis ST6 (n=10) and ST40 (n=10) by DNA microarray analyses. The hybridization patterns of 272 representative targets including plasmid backbones (n=85), transposable elements (n=85), resistance determinants (n=67), prophages (n=29) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-cas sequences (n=6) separated the strains according to species, and for E. faecalis also according to STs. RCR-, Rep_3-, RepA_N- and Inc18-family plasmids were highly prevalent and with the exception of Rep_3, evenly distributed between the species. There was a considerable difference in the replicon profile, with rep 17/pRUM , rep 2/pRE25 , rep 14/EFNP1 and rep 20/pLG1 dominating in E. faecium and rep 9/pCF10 , rep 2/pRE25 and rep 7 in E. faecalis strains. We observed an overall high correlation between the presence and absence of genes coding for resistance towards antibiotics, metals, biocides and their corresponding MGEs as well as their phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. Although most IS families were represented in both E. faecalis and E. faecium, specific IS elements within these families were distributed in only one species. The prevalence of IS256-, IS3-, ISL3-, IS200/IS605-, IS110-, IS982- and IS4-transposases was significantly higher in E. faecium than E. faecalis, and that of IS110-, IS982- and IS1182-transposases in E. faecalis ST6 compared to ST40. Notably, the transposases of IS981, ISEfm1 and IS1678 that have only been reported in few enterococcal isolates were well represented in the E. faecium strains. E. faecalis ST40 strains harboured

  19. The Enterococcus faecalis exoproteome: identification and temporal regulation by Fsr.

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    Jayendra Shankar

    Full Text Available Analysis of the culture supernatant exoproteins produced by two PFGE clusters of high-level gentamicin and ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis from the UK and Ireland revealed two distinct protein profiles. This grouping distinguished OG1RF and GelE metalloprotease-expressing isolates from JH2-2 and other GelE-negative isolates. The integrity of the fsrABDC operon was found to determine the exoproteome composition, since an fsrB mutant of strain OG1RF appeared very similar to that of strain JH2-2, and complementation of the latter with the fsrABDC operon produced an OG1RF-like exoproteome. The proteins present in the supernatant fraction of OG1RF were separated using 2D gels and identified by mass spectrometry and comprised many mass and pI variants of the GelE and SprE proteases. In addition cell wall synthesis and cell division proteins were identified. An OG1RF fsrB mutant had a distinct exoprotein fraction with an absence of the Fsr-regulated proteases and was characterised by general stress and glycolytic proteins. The exoproteome of the OG1RF fsrB mutant resembles that of a divIVA mutant of E. faecalis, suggestive of a stress phenotype.

  20. The cell wall-targeting antibiotic stimulon of Enterococcus faecalis.

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    Jacqueline Abranches

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that is highly resistant to a variety of environmental insults, including an intrinsic tolerance to antimicrobials that target the cell wall (CW. With the goal of determining the CW-stress stimulon of E. faecalis, the global transcriptional profile of E. faecalis OG1RF exposed to ampicillin, bacitracin, cephalotin or vancomycin was obtained via microarrays. Exposure to the β-lactams ampicillin and cephalotin resulted in the fewest transcriptional changes with 50 and 192 genes differentially expressed 60 min after treatment, respectively. On the other hand, treatment with bacitracin or vancomycin for 60 min affected the expression of, respectively, 377 and 297 genes. Despite the differences in the total number of genes affected, all antibiotics induced a very similar gene expression pattern with an overrepresentation of genes encoding hypothetical proteins, followed by genes encoding proteins associated with cell envelope metabolism as well as transport and binding proteins. In particular, all drug treatments, most notably bacitracin and vancomycin, resulted in an apparent metabolic downshift based on the repression of genes involved in translation, energy metabolism, transport and binding. Only 19 genes were up-regulated by all conditions at both the 30 and 60 min time points. Among those 19 genes, 4 genes encoding hypothetical proteins (EF0026, EF0797, EF1533 and EF3245 were inactivated and the respective mutant strains characterized in relation to antibiotic tolerance and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. The phenotypes obtained for two of these mutants, ΔEF1533 and ΔEF3245, support further characterization of these genes as potential candidates for the development of novel preventive or therapeutic approaches.

  1. Comparative genomics and transduction potential of Enterococcus faecalis temperate bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Azra; Kenny, John G; Shankar, Jayendra; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Edwards, Clive; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2010-02-01

    To determine the relative importance of temperate bacteriophage in the horizontal gene transfer of fitness and virulence determinants of Enterococcus faecalis, a panel of 47 bacteremia isolates were treated with the inducing agents mitomycin C, norfloxacin, and UV radiation. Thirty-four phages were purified from culture supernatants and discriminated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and restriction mapping. From these analyses the genomes of eight representative phages were pyrosequenced, revealing four distinct groups of phages. Three groups of phages, PhiFL1 to 3, were found to be sequence related, with PhiFL1A to C and PhiFL2A and B sharing the greatest identity (87 to 88%), while PhiFL3A and B share 37 to 41% identity with PhiFL1 and 2. PhiFL4A shares 3 to 12% identity with the phages PhiFL1 to 3. The PhiFL3A and B phages possess a high DNA sequence identity with the morphogenesis and lysis modules of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris prophages. Homologs of the Streptococcus mitis platelet binding phage tail proteins, PblA and PblB, are encoded on each sequenced E. faecalis phage. Few other phage genes encoding potential virulence functions were identified, and there was little evidence of carriage of lysogenic conversion genes distal to endolysin, as has been observed with genomes of many temperate phages from the opportunist pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. E. faecalis JH2-2 lysogens were generated using the eight phages, and these were examined for their relative fitness in Galleria mellonella. Several lysogens exhibited different effects upon survival of G. mellonella compared to their isogenic parent. The eight phages were tested for their ability to package host DNA, and three were shown to be very effective for generalized transduction of naive host cells of the laboratory strains OG1RF and JH2-2.

  2. Manual and Rotary Instrumentation Ability to Reduce Enterococcus faecalis Associated with Photodynamic Therapy in Deciduous Molars

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Sérgio Luiz; Silva,Josianne Neres da; Gonçalves,Rafael Orro; Villalpando,Karina Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    This aim of this study was to assess the ability of manual or rotary instrumentation associated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) to reduce Enterococcus faecalis using three combinations of light/photosensitizers: toluidine blue O/laser, fuchsin/halogen light and fuchsin/LED. Twenty deciduous molars were selected and contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis (McFarland 0.5 scale). Working length determination was performed by visual method. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: G1 (n=1...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Porcine Isolate Enterococcus faecalis D32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zischka, Melanie; Kuenne, Carsten; Blom, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The complete and annotated genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis D32, a commensal strain isolated from a Danish pig, suggests putative adaptation to the porcine host and absence of distinct virulence-associated traits.......The complete and annotated genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis D32, a commensal strain isolated from a Danish pig, suggests putative adaptation to the porcine host and absence of distinct virulence-associated traits....

  4. Resistência antimicrobiana em Enterococcus faecalis e Enterococcus faecium isolados de carcaças de frango

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    Ana Claudia F. Borges de Campos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar o isolamento e analisar o perfil de resistência antimicrobiana de Enterococcus de carcaças de frango resfriadas e congeladas comercializadas no Distrito Federal, detectando genes de resistência antimicrobiana e identificando as espécies Enterococcus faecalis e Enterococcus faecium por reação polimerase em cadeia. Foram analisadas 100 carcaças de frangos, das quais foram isoladas 50 cepas de Enterococcus spp., sendo 42% de E. faecalis e 2% de E. faecium. O teste de susceptibilidade antimicrobiana demonstrou que todas as cepas isoladas apresentaram resistência a pelo menos um antimicrobiano, dos quais 90,47% das cepas de E. faecalis, 100% das cepas de E. Faecium e 82,14% dos Enterococcus spp. apresentaram resistência à Tetraciclina; 80,95% das cepas de E. faecalis e 35,71% das cepas de Enterococcus spp. foram resistentes à Eritromicina; 39,28% dos Enterococcus spp. e 23,80% dos E. faecalis à Ciprofloxacina e 28,57% dos E. faecalis apresentaram resistência ao Cloranfenicol. Foram detectados os genes de resistência antimicrobiana erm(B, vanC-1, aph(3'-llla, ant(6-la, vanB, vanA, aac(6'-le-aph(2''-la, erm(A e tet(M - este último mais frequente. Estes resultados sugerem sérios problemas para a Saúde Pública, uma vez que esses microrganismos podem possuir a capacidade de transmitir genes de resistência antimicrobiana para outros microrganismos presentes na microbiota intestinal de humanos e animais, podendo inviabilizar o uso destas drogas para tratamentos clínicos.

  5. The dynamics of biofilm overgrowth of Enterococcus faecalis

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    E. A. Synetar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature of microorganisms can exist in two physiological forms that allow microbes to preserve livelihoods and continue their life cycle. The first is the population of planktonic forms of microorganisms which live freely in the environment with the developed systems of active and passive mobility, contributing to the rapid spread of a liquid medium. The second forms are those expressing specific mechanisms of adhesion, and able to aggregate on biogenic and abiogenic surfaces. Even in the deep sea vast number of species of bacteria live in their inherent horizons. Thus, the study of biofilms tube life support systems, diagnostic, laparoscopic devices during prolonged catheterization of the urinary system is of great practical, theoretical and biological significance in medicine and biology. For almost 20% of catheter-associated infections antibiotic therapy is uneffective, particularly through the formation of microbial biofilms on the surface of urinary catheters. We characterized the dynamics of biofilm growth of Enterococcus faecalis on fragments ofsilicone catheter. The study was conducted using bacteriological and electron microscopic techniques. Study of the dynamics of biofilm formation was performed using E. faecalis strain 49, which is isolated from the urine of persons who are not the patients of the urological department of resuscitation and intensive therapy. Using scanning electron microscopy we have established dynamics and phase attachment ofE. faecalis bacteria and subsequent overgrowth of silicone catheter surface. Aftercalculations, index of adhesion on the turbulent wall amounted to 0,49 microbial cells. That is, every other cell of the monolayer adhered on the catheter. Area of biofilm growth of E. faecalis after 24 hour incubation was equal to 51.5 μm2, in 48 hours it increased to 231.5 μm2. After 72 hours of incubation we recorded the increase in biofilm growth of E. faecalisto 1922,8 μm2. The results were obtained

  6. Fitness costs of various mobile genetic elements in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikova, Irina; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Werner, Guido; Roberts, Adam P.; Sørum, Vidar; Nielsen, Kaare M.; Johnsen, Pål J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the fitness effects of various mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis when newly acquired. We also tested the hypothesis that the biological cost of vancomycin resistance plasmids could be mitigated during continuous growth in the laboratory. Methods Different MGEs, including two conjugative transposons (CTns) of the Tn916 family (18 and 33 kb), a pathogenicity island (PAI) of 200 kb and vancomycin-resistance (vanA) plasmids (80–200 kb) of various origins and classes, were transferred into common ancestral E. faecium and E. faecalis strains by conjugation assays and experimentally evolved (vanA plasmids only). Transconjugants were characterized by PFGE, S1 nuclease assays and Southern blotting hybridization analyses. Single specific primer PCR was performed to determine the target sites for the insertion of the CTns. The fitness costs of various MGEs in E. faecium and E. faecalis were estimated in head-to-head competition experiments, and evolved populations were generated in serial transfer assays. Results The biological cost of a newly acquired PAI and two CTns were both host- and insertion-locus-dependent. Newly acquired vanA plasmids may severely reduce host fitness (25%–27%), but these costs were rapidly mitigated after only 400 generations of continuous growth in the absence of antibiotic selection. Conclusions Newly acquired MGEs may impose an immediate biological cost in E. faecium. However, as demonstrated for vanA plasmids, the initial costs of MGE carriage may be mitigated during growth and beneficial plasmid–host association can rapidly emerge. PMID:23833178

  7. Demetallization of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: a preliminary study

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    Carlos ESTRELA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine the concentration of calcium, iron, manganese and zinc ions after the application of chelator to Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Material and Methods Fifty bovine maxillary central incisors were prepared and inoculated with E. faecalis for 60 days. The following were used as irrigation solutions: 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl combined with 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10, distilled water (pH 3, 7 and 10, and 2.5% NaOCl. Each solution was kept in the root canal for five minutes. Fifteen uncontaminated root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10. Six teeth were used as bacterial control. The number of calcium, iron, manganese and zinc ions was determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Mean ± standard deviation (SD values were used for descriptive statistics. Results Calcium chelation using 17% EDTA at pH 7 was higher than at pH 3 and 10, regardless of whether bacterial biofilm was present. The highest concentration of iron occurred at pH 3 in the presence of bacterial biofilm. The highest concentration of manganese found was 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA at pH 7 in the presence of bacterial biofilm. Zinc levels were not detectable. Conclusions The pH of chelating agents affected the removal of calcium, iron, and manganese ions. The concentration of iron ions in root canals with bacterial biofilm was higher after the use of 17% EDTA at pH 3 than after the use of the other solutions at all pH levels.

  8. Demetallization of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Costa E Silva, Rodrigo; Urban, Roberta Cerasi; Gonçalves, Pablo José; Silva, Júlio A; Estrela, Cyntia R A; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Peters, Ove A

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To determine the concentration of calcium, iron, manganese and zinc ions after the application of chelator to Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Material and Methods Fifty bovine maxillary central incisors were prepared and inoculated with E. faecalis for 60 days. The following were used as irrigation solutions: 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10), 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) combined with 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10), distilled water (pH 3, 7 and 10), and 2.5% NaOCl. Each solution was kept in the root canal for five minutes. Fifteen uncontaminated root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10). Six teeth were used as bacterial control. The number of calcium, iron, manganese and zinc ions was determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) values were used for descriptive statistics. Results Calcium chelation using 17% EDTA at pH 7 was higher than at pH 3 and 10, regardless of whether bacterial biofilm was present. The highest concentration of iron occurred at pH 3 in the presence of bacterial biofilm. The highest concentration of manganese found was 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA at pH 7 in the presence of bacterial biofilm. Zinc levels were not detectable. Conclusions The pH of chelating agents affected the removal of calcium, iron, and manganese ions. The concentration of iron ions in root canals with bacterial biofilm was higher after the use of 17% EDTA at pH 3 than after the use of the other solutions at all pH levels.

  9. Identification of vat(E) in Enterococcus faecalis isolates from retail poultry and its transferability to Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simjee, S; White, D G; Wagner, D D; Meng, J; Qaiyumi, S; Zhao, S; McDermott, P F

    2002-12-01

    Sixteen isolates of Enterococcus faecalis were recovered from retail poultry samples (seven chickens and nine turkeys) purchased from grocery stores in the greater Washington, D.C., area. PCR for known streptogramin resistance genes identified vat(E) in five E. faecalis isolates (three isolates from chickens and two isolates from turkeys). The vat(E) gene was transmissible on a ca. 70-kb plasmid, along with resistance to erythromycin, tetracycline, and streptomycin, by conjugation to E. faecalis and Enterococcus faecium recipient strains. DNA sequencing showed little variation between E. faecalis vat(E) genes from the chicken samples; however, one E. faecalis vat(E) gene from a turkey sample possessed 5 nucleotide changes that resulted in four amino acid substitutions. None of these substitutions in the vat(E) allele have previously been described. This is the first report of vat(E) in E. faecalis and its transferability to E. faecium, which indicates that E. faecalis can act as a reservoir for the dissemination of vat(E)-mediated streptogramin resistance to E. faecium.

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Quorum-Sensing in Enterococcus faecalis: Its Role in Virulence and Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Liaqat; Goraya, Mohsan Ullah; Arafat, Yasir; Ajmal, Muhammad; Chen, Ji-Long; Yu, Daojin

    2017-05-03

    Quorum-sensing systems control major virulence determinants in Enterococcus faecalis , which causes nosocomial infections. The E . faecalis quorum-sensing systems include several virulence factors that are regulated by the cytolysin operon, which encodes the cytolysin toxin. In addition, the E . faecalis Fsr regulator system controls the expression of gelatinase, serine protease, and enterocin O16. The cytolysin and Fsr virulence factor systems are linked to enterococcal diseases that affect the health of humans and other host models. Therefore, there is substantial interest in understanding and targeting these regulatory pathways to develop novel therapies for enterococcal infection control. Quorum-sensing inhibitors could be potential therapeutic agents for attenuating the pathogenic effects of E . faecalis . Here, we discuss the regulation of cytolysin, the LuxS system, and the Fsr system, their role in E . faecalis -mediated infections, and possible therapeutic approaches to prevent E . faecalis infection.

  11. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

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    Chetana S. Makade

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Literature has shown that micro-organisms contaminate gutta percha (GP during storage and manipulation. Till date herbal extracts are not explored as an alternative medicament for pre-operative chairside disinfection of GP cones. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and efficacy of lemon grass oil (LG, basil oil (BO, and obicure tea extract (OT in disinfecting GP cones before obturation. Materials and Methods Agar diffusion method was used to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of LG, BO, OT, and sodium hypochlorite (control against common contaminants, namely, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. One hundred and twenty GP cones were contaminated and cut into 2. First half was placed in the broth and incubated; whereas the second was treated with herbal extracts for 1 minute and then incubated for 24 hours in the broth. Any inhibition in bacterial growth was noted with presence/absence of turbidity. Two-way analysis of variance and χ2 test were used to assess the effectiveness of herbal extracts to decontaminate GP. Results LG showed the highest inhibition zones (29.9 ± 6.9 mm for all tested organisms, followed by OT extract (16.3 ± 1.8 mm, sodium hypochlorite (16.0 ± 1.6 mm, and BO (14.5 ± 5.3 mm. Statistically significant difference was observed between LG and other herbal extracts (p < 0.05. Conclusions All extracts proved to be potential rapid chairside disinfectants of GP cones with LG showing the highest antimicrobial activity.

  12. Dissemination of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium in a ricotta processing plant and evaluation of pathogenic and antibiotic resistance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Meg da Silva; Fujimoto, Graciela; de Souza, Leandro Pio; Kabuki, Dirce Yorika; da Silva, Márcio José; Kuaye, Arnaldo Yoshiteru

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the sources of contamination by Enterococcus spp. in a ricotta processing line were evaluated. The isolated strains were tested for virulence genes (gelE, cylA,B, M, esp, agg, ace, efaA, vanB), expression of virulence factors (hemolysin and gelatinase), and the resistance to 10 different antibiotics. Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis were subjected to discriminatory identification by intergenic spacer region (ITS)-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the ITS region. The results showed that Enterococcus spp. was detected in the raw materials, environment samples and the final product. None of the 107 Enterococcus isolates were completely free from all virulence genes considered. A fraction of 21.5% of the isolates containing all of the genes of the cylA, B, M operon also expressed β-hemolysis. Most of the isolates showed the gelE gene, but only 9.3% were able to hydrolyze gelatin. In addition, 23.5% of the observed Enterococcus isolates had the vanB gene but were susceptible to vancomycin in vitro. The dissemination of antibiotic-resistant enterococci was revealed in this study: 19.3% of the E. faecium samples and 78.0% of the E. faecalis samples were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. Sequencing of region discriminated 5 and 7 distinct groups among E. faecalis and E. faecium, respectively. Although some similarity was observed among some of the isolates, all E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates had genetic differences both in the ITS region and in the virulence profile, which makes them different from each other. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Antibiotic resistance patterns and genetic relatedness of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from military working dogs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kiman; An, Jae-Uk; Kim, Woohyun; Dong, Hee-Jin; Kim, Junhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2017-06-30

    Enterococcus spp. are normally present in the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans, but can cause opportunistic infections that can be transmitted to other animals or humans with integrated antibiotic resistance. To investigate if this is a potential risk in military working dogs (MWDs), we analyzed antibiotic resistance patterns and genetic relatedness of Enterococcus spp. isolated from fecal samples of MWDs of four different age groups. Isolation rates of Enterococcus spp., Enterococcus ( E. ) faecalis , and E. faecium , were 87.7% (57/65), 59.6% (34/57), and 56.1% (32/57), respectively, as determined by bacterial culture and multiplex PCR. The isolation rate of E. faecalis gradually decreased with age (puppy, 100%; adolescent, 91.7%; adult, 36.4%; and senior, 14.3%). Rates of resistance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, imipenem, and kanamycin among Enterococcus spp. increased in adolescents and adults and decreased in senior dogs, with some isolates having three different antibiotic resistance patterns. There were indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns among the age groups. The results suggest that Enterococcus is horizontally transferred, regardless of age. As such, periodic surveillance studies should be undertaken to monitor changes in antibiotic resistance, which may necessitate modification of antibiotic regimens to manage antibiotic resistance transmission.

  14. Antibiotic resistance patterns and genetic relatedness of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from military working dogs in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kiman; An, Jae-Uk; Kim, Woohyun; Dong, Hee-Jin; Kim, Junhyung

    2017-01-01

    Enterococcus spp. are normally present in the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans, but can cause opportunistic infections that can be transmitted to other animals or humans with integrated antibiotic resistance. To investigate if this is a potential risk in military working dogs (MWDs), we analyzed antibiotic resistance patterns and genetic relatedness of Enterococcus spp. isolated from fecal samples of MWDs of four different age groups. Isolation rates of Enterococcus spp., Enterococcus (E.) faecalis, and E. faecium, were 87.7% (57/65), 59.6% (34/57), and 56.1% (32/57), respectively, as determined by bacterial culture and multiplex PCR. The isolation rate of E. faecalis gradually decreased with age (puppy, 100%; adolescent, 91.7%; adult, 36.4%; and senior, 14.3%). Rates of resistance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, imipenem, and kanamycin among Enterococcus spp. increased in adolescents and adults and decreased in senior dogs, with some isolates having three different antibiotic resistance patterns. There were indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns among the age groups. The results suggest that Enterococcus is horizontally transferred, regardless of age. As such, periodic surveillance studies should be undertaken to monitor changes in antibiotic resistance, which may necessitate modification of antibiotic regimens to manage antibiotic resistance transmission. PMID:27659717

  15. Sensibilidad antimicrobiana in vitro en aislamientos de Enterococcus faecalis y Enterococcus faecium obtenidos de pacientes hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Medell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Actualmente se considera a Enterococcus spp. como uno de los agentes de infección hospitalaria más importantes, siendo su resistencia a los antibióticos un problema importante en los centros de salud. Objetivos. Caracterizar la resistencia antimicrobiana en 50 cepas de Enterococcus spp. aisladas de muestras clínicas de pacientes hospitalizados. Materiales y métodos. Se llevó a cabo un estudio de tipo descriptivo observacional de corte transversal en 50 aislamientos clínicos de estas especies microbianas. Se trabajó un aislamiento por paciente. La identificación y la sensibilidad a los antibióticos se realizaron por métodos automatizados y convencionales. El análisis fenotípico de los mecanismos de resistencia a glucopéptidos se hizo según las recomendaciones de la Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. Resultados. De 50 aislamientos, 30 (60,0 % y 20 (40,0 % pertenecían a las especies de Enterococcus faecalis y Enterococcus faecium, respectivamente. La resistencia global expresada por este género fue de 38/50 (76,0 % para ampicilina; 33/50 (66,0 % para gentamicina de alto nivel; 34/50 (68,0 % para estreptomicina de alto nivel; 26/50 (52,0 % para ciprofloxacina; 4/50 (8,0 % para linezolid; 17/50 (34,0 % para teicoplanina; 25/50 (50,0 % para vancomicina; 31/50 (62,0 % para minociclina; 34/50 (68,0 % para tetraciclina y 9/50 (18,0 % para nitrofurantoina. Frente a los glucopéptidos, 25/50 (50,0 % y 10/50 (20,0 % de los aislamientos presentaron los mecanismos Van A y Van B, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Podemos concluir que la mayoría de las veces, las cepas aisladas en el Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras mostraron porcentajes de resistencia por encima de lo reportado en la literatura científica consultada. El alto porcentaje de cepas con resistencia a la vancomicina podría influir en la aparición de otros gérmenes Gram positivos con resistencia a este fármaco. Se reporta por

  16. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    OpenAIRE

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (C...

  17. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis Alkaline Phosphatase and Use in Identifying Streptococcus agalactiae Secreted Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Martin H.; Nittayajarn, Aphakorn; Ross, R. Paul; Rothschild, Cynthia B.; Parsonage, Derek; Claiborne, Al; Rubens, Craig E.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified and characterized an Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase (AP, encoded by phoZ). The predicted gene product shows homology with alkaline phosphatases from a variety of species; it has especially high similarity with two alkaline phosphatases from Bacillus subtilis. Expression of phoZ in Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), or Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) produces a blue-colony phenotype on plate...

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Enterococcus faecalis in Response to Alkaline Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran eshujun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available E. faecalis is the most commonly isolated species from endodontic failure root canals; its persistence in treated root canals has been attributed to its ability to resist high pH stress. The goal of this study was to characterize the E. faecalis transcriptome and to identify candidate genes for response and resistance to alkaline stress using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing.We found that E. faecalis could survive and form biofilms in a pH 10 environment and that alkaline stress had a great impact on the transcription of many genes in the E. faecalis genome. The transcriptome sequencing results revealed that 613 genes were differentially expressed (DEGs for E. faecalis grown in pH 10 medium; 211 genes were found to be differentially up-regulated and 402 genes differentially down-regulated. Many of the down-regulated genes found are involved in cell energy production and metabolism and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and the up-regulated genes are mostly related to nucleotide transport and metabolism. The results presented here reveal that cultivation of E. faecalis in alkaline stress has a profound impact on its transcriptome. The observed regulation of genes and pathways revealed that E. faecalis reduced its carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and increased nucleotide synthesis to adapt and grow in alkaline stress. A number of the regulated genes may be useful candidates for the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of E. faecalis infections.

  19. New combinations of mutations in VanD-Type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus avium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depardieu, F; Foucault, M-L; Bell, J; Dubouix, A; Guibert, M; Lavigne, J-P; Levast, M; Courvalin, P

    2009-05-01

    We studied the clinical isolates Enterococcus faecium NEF1, resistant to high levels of vancomycin (MIC, 512 microg/ml) and teicoplanin (MIC, 64 microg/ml); Enterococcus faecium BM4653 and BM4656 and Enterococcus avium BM4655, resistant to moderate levels of vancomycin (MIC, 32 microg/ml) and to low levels of teicoplanin (MIC, 4 microg/ml); and Enterococcus faecalis BM4654, moderately resistant to vancomycin (MIC, 16 microg/ml) but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC, 0.5 microg/ml). The strains were distinct, were constitutively resistant via the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-alanyl-D-lactate, and harbored a chromosomal vanD gene cluster that was not transferable. New mutations were found in conserved domains of VanS(D): at T(170)I near the phosphorylation site in NEF1, at V(67)A at the membrane surface in BM4653, at G(340)S in the G2 ATP-binding domain in BM4655, in the F domain in BM4656 (a 6-bp insertion), and in the G1 and G2 domains of BM4654 (three mutations). The mutations resulted in constitutivity, presumably through the loss of the phosphatase activity of the sensor. The chromosomal Ddl D-Ala:D-Ala ligase had an IS19 copy in NEF1, a mutation in the serine (S(185)F) or near the arginine (T(289)P) involved in D-Ala1 binding in BM4653 or BM4655, respectively, and a mutation next to the lysine (P(180)S) involved in D-Ala2 binding in BM4654, leading to the production of an impaired enzyme. In BM4653 vanY(D), a new insertion sequence, ISEfa9, belonging to the IS3 family, resulted in the absence of D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. Strain BM4656 had a functional D-Ala:D-Ala ligase, associated with high levels of both VanX(D) and VanY(D) activities, and is the first example of a VanD-type strain with a functional Ddl enzyme. Study of these five clinical isolates, displaying various assortments of mutations, confirms that all VanD-type strains isolated so far have undergone mutations in the vanS(D) or vanR(D) gene, leading to constitutive resistance

  20. Evolution of resistance to cationic biocides in Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Haruaki; Izutani, Naomi; Kitagawa, Ranna; Maezono, Hazuki; Yamaguchi, Mikiyo; Imazato, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis develop resistance to the cationic biocides chlorhexidine (CHX), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CHX, CPC, and MDPB were assessed after repeated exposure of S. mutans and E. faecalis to these biocides. Cell-surface hydrophobicity and protein expression profiles of bacterial cells were examined to elucidate possible resistance mechanisms. The MIC of CHX against E. faecalis showed constant increases up to 10 passages. No changes in the MICs of CPC and MDPB against E. faecalis were observed. The MICs of CHX, CPC, and MDPB against S. mutans did not increase. The surface hydrophobicity of E. faecalis significantly increased with increasing exposure to CHX and CPC. However, changes in protein expression profiles were only found in CHX-adapted E. faecalis, as evidenced by the emergence of a novel, approximately 19-kDa band following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. While E. faecalis and S. mutans did not exhibit increased resistance to CPC or MDPB, repeated exposure of E. faecalis to CHX led to resistance. It is likely that the acquisition of resistance is related to an altered protein composition. Alkyl pyridinium compounds, such as CPC and MDPB, could have a lower risk to cause adaptation of E. faecalis, which is advantageous compared with CHX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multicenter clinical evaluation of VRESelect agar for identification of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil W; Buchan, Blake W; Young, Carol L; Newton, Duane W; Brenke, Connie; Lapsley, Linda; Granato, Paul A; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2013-08-01

    A chromogenic medium for identification of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, VRESelect, was compared to bile esculin azide agar with 6 μg/ml vancomycin (BEAV) for the isolation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from stool specimens. At 24 to 28 h, VRESelect demonstrated 98.7% (confidence interval [CI], 96.1 to 99.7%) sensitivity and 99.0% (CI, 98.0 to 99.6%) specificity versus 85.1% (CI, 79.8 to 89.5%) and 90.1% (CI, 79.8 to 89.5%) sensitivity and specificity, respectively, for BEAV.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Commensal Enterococcus faecalis 62, Isolated from a Healthy Norwegian Infant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brede, Dag Anders; Snipen, Lars Gustav; Ussery, David

    2011-01-01

    The genome of Enterococcus faecalis 62, a commensal isolate from a healthy Norwegian infant, revealed multiple adaptive traits to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) environment and the milk-containing diet of breast-fed infants. Adaptation to a commensal existence was emphasized by lactose and other...

  3. Sodium chloride and potassium sorbate : a synergistic combination against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms: an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, Suzette V.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; de Soet, Johannes J.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wesselink, Paul R.; Crielaard, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Incomplete disinfection of the root canal system is a major cause of post-treatment disease. This study aimed to investigate the disinfecting property of organic acid salts and sodium chloride (NaCl), in a double-hurdle strategy, on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. First of all, the high-throughput

  4. Comprehensive molecular, genomic and phenotypic analysis of a major clone of Enterococcus faecalis MLST ST40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zischka, Melanie; Kuenne, Carsten T.; Blom, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Enterococcus faecalis is a multifaceted microorganism known to act as a beneficial intestinal commensal bacterium. It is also a dreaded nosocomial pathogen causing life-threatening infections in hospitalised patients. Isolates of a distinct MLST type ST40 represent the most frequent s...

  5. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, K; van der Mei, HC; Harmsen, HJM; Degener, JE; Busscher, HJ

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber,

  6. The Relationship among Tyrosine Decarboxylase and Agmatine Deiminase Pathways in Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Marta; Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begona; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar; Kok, Jan; Martin, M. Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Enterococci are considered mainly responsible for the undesirable accumulation of the biogenic amines tyramine and putrescine in cheeses. The biosynthesis of tyramine and putrescine has been described as a species trait in Enterococcus faecalis. Tyramine is formed by the decarboxylation of the amino

  7. Calcium hydroxide treatment does not alter the susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms to sodium hypochlorite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, S.V.; de Soet, J.J.; Wesselink, P.R.; Crielaard, W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) on susceptibility to disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) of biofilm bacteria. Methods: Monospecies biofilms of eight Enterococcus faecalis strains were subjected to a 2-h challenge with Ca(OH)2. After a recovery phase,

  8. Role of surface charge heterogeneity in Enterococcus faecalis adhesion and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Annet

    2006-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most animal species. It is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans and has the abllity to adhere to the surface of biomaterials and form biofilms on them. ... Zie: Summary

  9. Enterococcus faecalis zinc-responsive proteins mediate bacterial defence against zinc overload, lysozyme and oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Abrantes, Marta; Kok, Jan; de Fatima Silva Lopes, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Two Enterococcus faecalis genes encoding the P-type ATPase EF1400 and the putative SapB protein EF0759 were previously shown to be strongly upregulated in the presence of high concentrations of zinc. In the present work, we showed that a Zn(2+)-responsive DNA-binding motif (zim) is present in the

  10. An indigenous gut bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis (Lactobacillales: Enterococcaceae), increases seed consumption by Harpalus pensylvanicus (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpalus pensylvanicus is a beneficial beetle contributing to insect control and seed predation in North American cropland. The bacterial endosymbiont Enterococcus faecalis is found in the intestinal tract of H. pensylvanicus and is thought to contribute to the digestion of the insect's seed diet. W...

  11. Nonclinical and Clinical Enterococcus faecium Strains, but Not Enterococcus faecalis Strains, Have Distinct Structural and Functional Genomic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Bae

    2014-01-01

    Certain strains of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis contribute beneficially to animal health and food production, while others are associated with nosocomial infections. To determine whether there are structural and functional genomic features that are distinct between nonclinical (NC) and clinical (CL) strains of those species, we analyzed the genomes of 31 E. faecium and 38 E. faecalis strains. Hierarchical clustering of 7,017 orthologs found in the E. faecium pangenome revealed that NC strains clustered into two clades and are distinct from CL strains. NC E. faecium genomes are significantly smaller than CL genomes, and this difference was partly explained by significantly fewer mobile genetic elements (ME), virulence factors (VF), and antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. E. faecium ortholog comparisons identified 68 and 153 genes that are enriched for NC and CL strains, respectively. Proximity analysis showed that CL-enriched loci, and not NC-enriched loci, are more frequently colocalized on the genome with ME. In CL genomes, AR genes are also colocalized with ME, and VF are more frequently associated with CL-enriched loci. Genes in 23 functional groups are also differentially enriched between NC and CL E. faecium genomes. In contrast, differences were not observed between NC and CL E. faecalis genomes despite their having larger genomes than E. faecium. Our findings show that unlike E. faecalis, NC and CL E. faecium strains are equipped with distinct structural and functional genomic features indicative of adaptation to different environments. PMID:24141120

  12. Longer Intestinal Persistence of Enterococcus faecalis Compared to Enterococcus faecium Clones in Intensive-Care-Unit Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; del Campo, Rosa; Coque, Teresa M.; Asensio, Angel; Bonten, Marc; Willems, Rob; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of intestinal colonization with enterococcal clones in intensive-care-unit (ICU) patients was evaluated. Eight patients admitted directly to the neurosurgical ICU at the Ramón y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) from the community and with no overlapping stay during a 10-month period in 2006 were studied. Rectal swab specimens were collected on admission and daily until the patients were discharged. Clonality was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Clonal colonization dynamics were estimated by using two new parameters: the clonal diversity per patient per day (CDPD) and the clonal persistence ratio (CPR). Enterococcus faecalis isolates (n = 123) and Enterococcus faecium isolates (n = 66) were resolved into 13 and 15 clones, respectively. The CDPD of E. faecalis steadily increased during admission, and E. faecalis showed a higher (P = 0.001) CPR value than E. faecium (0.86 and 0.42, respectively). E. faecium, with the exception of an ampicillin-resistant clone belonging to clonal complex 17, frequently appeared as a short-term colonizer, even though the E. faecalis clones had significantly (P = 0.03) more days under antibiotic exposure than E. faecium (77.5 and 65 days/100 colonization days, respectively). E. faecalis had a longer persistence than E. faecium, except for the CC17 ampicillin-resistant clone, and E. faecalis showed a cumulative increase in CDPD, whereas E. faecium did not. CDPD and CPR were useful for measuring the dynamics of intestinal colonization with enterococcal clones. PMID:19052172

  13. Manual and rotary instrumentation ability to reduce Enterococcus faecalis associated with photodynamic therapy in deciduous molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; Silva, Josianne Neres da; Gonçalves, Rafael Orro; Villalpando, Karina Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    This aim of this study was to assess the ability of manual or rotary instrumentation associated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) to reduce Enterococcus faecalis using three combinations of light/photosensitizers: toluidine blue O/laser, fuchsin/halogen light and fuchsin/LED. Twenty deciduous molars were selected and contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis (McFarland 0.5 scale). Working length determination was performed by visual method. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: G1 (n=10): manual instrumentation (Kerr-type files) and G2 (n=10): rotary instrumentation (ProTaper system). The bacteria were collected three times using sterile paper cones compatible with the anatomic diameter of the root canal for 30 s before and after instrumentation and after PDT. The samples were diluted in peptone water, seeded on blood agar plates and incubated in an oven at 37 °C for colony-forming units counting. The decrease of E. faecalis counts after instrumentation and after PDT was compared using the Wilcoxon test, t-test and Kruskal Wallis test. A significant reduction of E. faecalis occurred after manual and rotary instrumentation and after PDT using the three combinations of light/photosensitizer (protary and manual instrumentation reduced E. faecalis. Fuchsin with halogen light or LED irradiation and toluidine blue O with laser irradiation can be used to reduce E. faecalis in root canals of primary molars. PDT can be used as an adjuvant to conventional endodontic treatment.

  14. Enterococcus faecium ve Enterococcus faecalis 'in Starter ve Probiyotik Kültür Özellikleri

    OpenAIRE

    Erginkaya, Zerrin; Yurdakul, Naci Erhan; Karakaş, Ayşegül

    2007-01-01

    ÖzetEnterococcus faecium ve Enterococcus faecalis bazı gıdalarda organoleptik özellikleri iyileştirmenin yanı sıra lipolitik ve esterolitik aktivite, sitrattan yararlanma ile uçucu aromatik bileşikleri sentezleme gibi özellikleri nedeniyle bazı fermente süt ve et ürünlerinin olgunlaştırılması sırasında diğer laktik asit bakterileri ile birlikte starter kültür olarak kullanılmaktadır. Günümüzde Enterococcus 'ların gıda üretiminde starter kültür ve/veya probiyotik olarak kullanılmaları s...

  15. Enterococcus faecium ve Enterococcus faecalis 'in Starter ve Probiyotik Kültür Özellikleri

    OpenAIRE

    Erginkaya, Zerrin; Yurdakul, Naci Erhan; Karakaş, Ayşegül

    2015-01-01

    ÖzetEnterococcus faecium ve Enterococcus faecalis bazı gıdalarda organoleptik özellikleri iyileştirmenin yanı sıra lipolitik ve esterolitik aktivite, sitrattan yararlanma ile uçucu aromatik bileşikleri sentezleme gibi özellikleri nedeniyle bazı fermente süt ve et ürünlerinin olgunlaştırılması sırasında diğer laktik asit bakterileri ile birlikte starter kültür olarak kullanılmaktadır. Günümüzde Enterococcus 'ların gıda üretiminde starter kültür ve/veya probiyotik olarak kullanılmala...

  16. Infectious Endocarditis from Enterococcus faecalis Associated with Tubular Adenoma of the Sigmoid Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilly Caroline de Freitas Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, a constituent of the gut microbiota, can be associated with both colonic lesions and endocarditis. Since this microorganism is one of the endocarditis etiological agents, there is a need for greater study in regard to the association with endocarditis and colonic lesions. Case Presentation. This is the case description of a 53-year-old man with history of prolapse of the anterior mitral valve leaflet who was diagnosed with endocarditis by E. faecalis and treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. Upon investigation by colonoscopy, he was found to have a tubular adenoma with low grade dysplasia. Conclusion. There are a few descriptions in scientific literature of an association between endocarditis by E. faecalis and colonic lesions. However, further studies with significant correlation between the two pathologies are required, so that proper measures can be implemented in clinical practice.

  17. Enterococcus faecalis demonstrates pathogenicity through increased attachment in an ex vivo polymicrobial pulpal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio Ayre, Wayne; Melling, Genevieve; Cuveillier, Camille; Natarajan, Madhan; Roberts, Jessica L; Marsh, Lucy L; Lynch, Christopher D; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Denyer, Stephen P; Sloan, Alastair J

    2018-02-26

    This study investigated the host response to a polymicrobial pulpal infection consisting of Streptococcus anginosus and Enterococcus faecalis , bacteria commonly implicated in dental abscesses and endodontic failure, using a validated ex vivo rat tooth model. Tooth slices were inoculated with planktonic cultures of S. anginosus or E. faecalis alone or in co-culture at ratios of 50:50 and 90:10 S. anginosus to E. faecalis Attachment was semi-quantified by measuring area covered by fluorescently labelled bacteria. Host response was established by viable histological cell counts and inflammatory response using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. A significant reduction in cell viability was observed for single and polymicrobial infections, with no significant differences between infection types (≈2000cells/mm 2 for infected pulps compared to ≈4000cells/mm 2 for uninfected pulps). E. faecalis demonstrated significantly higher levels of attachment (6.5%) compared to S. anginosus alone (2.3%) and mixed species infections (3.4% for 50:50 and 2.3% for 90:10), with a remarkable affinity to the pulpal vasculature. Infections with E. faecalis demonstrated the greatest increase in TNF-α (47.1 fold for E. faecalis , 14.6 fold for S. anginosus , 60.1 fold for 50:50 and 25.0 fold for 90:10) and IL-1β expression (54.8 fold for E. faecalis , 8.8 fold for S. anginosus , 54.5 fold for 50:50 and 39.9 fold for 90:10) when compared to uninfected samples. Immunohistochemistry confirmed this with the majority of inflammation localised to the pulpal vasculature and odontoblast regions. Interestingly, E. faecalis supernatant and heat killed E. faecalis treatment was unable to induce the same inflammatory response, suggesting E. faecalis pathogenicity in pulpitis is linked to its greater ability to attach to the pulpal vasculature. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Enterococcus faecalis colonisation and endocarditis in five intensive care patients as late sequelae of selective decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijpkens, Y W; Buurke, E J; Ulrich, C; van Asselt, G J

    1995-03-01

    To describe Enterococcus faecalis colonisation and endocarditis in 5 intensive care patients after treatment with selective decontamination (SDD). Intensive care unit (ICU) in a general hospital. The patients were admitted to the ICU because of adult respiratory distress syndrome, polytrauma (2 patients), abdominal aortic surgery and gastrointestinal surgery. Because these patients needed mechanical ventilation they received systemic cefotaxime and SDD (polymyxin E, amphotericin B and norfloxacin). Colonisation with E. faecalis was documented in all patients. Intravascular catheter-related infection with E. faecalis occurred in 4 patients. None of the patients received antibiotics active against, E. faecalis, because body temperature normalised after catheter removal. In the course of his ICU stay one patient died. Autopsy showed E. faecalis endocarditis. The other 4 patients recovered from their primary illness, but had to be readmitted after several months because of E. faecalis endocarditis. One of these patients died. One patient recovered of endocarditis, but one year later valve surgery was necessary. The other 2 patients needed acute valve replacement. The latter 3 patients survived. We observed 5 patients with E. faecalis endocarditis as a late and severe sequela of SDD during their ICU stay.

  19. Inactivation of airborne Enterococcus faecalis and infectious bursal disease virus using a pilot-scale ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation scrubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Xin, H.

    2014-01-01

    High microbial concentrations and emissions associated with livestock houses raise health and environmental concerns. A pilot-scale ultraviolet photocatalytic (UV-PCO) scrubber was tested for its efficacy to inactivate aerosolized Enterococcus faecalis and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

  20. Bactericidal Effect of Strong Acid Electrolyzed Water against Flow Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Chunmiao; Qu, Tiejun; Ma, Chi; Liu, Xiaohua; Yu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of strong acid electrolyzed water (SAEW) against flow Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its potential application as a root canal irrigant. Flow E. faecalis biofilms were generated under a constant shear flow in a microfluidic system. For comparison, static E. faecalis biofilms were generated under a static condition on coverslip surfaces. Both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms were treated with SAEW. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5.25%) and normal saline (0.9%) were included as the controls. Bacterial reductions were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the cell count method. Morphological changes of bacterial cells were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The confocal laser scanning microscopic and cell count results showed that SAEW had a bactericidal effect similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl against both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms. The scanning electron microscopic results showed that smooth, consecutive, and bright bacteria surfaces became rough, shrunken, and even lysed after treated with SAEW, similar to those in the NaOCl group. SAEW had an effective bactericidal effect against both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms, and it might be qualified as a root canal irrigant for effective root canal disinfection. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A rare case of Enterococcus faecalis-induced orbital cellulitis and myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Piyush; Ichhpujani, Parul; Bansal, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-08-01

    Orbital cellulitis is an infection of soft tissue behind the orbital septum. Common pathogens isolated include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is a straightforward diagnosis and usually responds to empirical treatment without any sequela. We report a case of orbital cellulitis caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which was complicated by myositis of levator palpebrae superioris. To the best of our knowledge, only one case report exists dating way back to 1986.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecalis Symbioflor 1 Clones DSM16430 and DSM16434

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Chakraborty, Anindita; Hain, Torsten; Zimmermann, Kurt; Domann, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Symbioflor 1 is a historical concoction of 10 isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two groups: one comprising eight identical clones (DSM16430, DSM16432, DSM16433, DSM16435 to DSM16439) and a further two isolates (DSM16431, DSM16434) with marginally different profiles. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the draft genome sequences of representative isolates.

  3. A rare case of Enterococcus faecalis-induced orbital cellulitis and myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Kohli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital cellulitis is an infection of soft tissue behind the orbital septum. Common pathogens isolated include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is a straightforward diagnosis and usually responds to empirical treatment without any sequela. We report a case of orbital cellulitis caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which was complicated by myositis of levator palpebrae superioris. To the best of our knowledge, only one case report exists dating way back to 1986.

  4. Could β-hemolytic, group B Enterococcus faecalis be mistaken for Streptococcus agalactiae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Gherardi, Giovanni; Marrollo, Roberta; Franco, Alessia; Pimentel De Araujo, Fernanda; Dottarelli, Samuele; Fazii, Paolo; Battisti, Antonio; Carretto, Edoardo

    2015-05-01

    A β-hemolytic Enterococcus faecalis strain agglutinating Lancefield group A, B, C, D, F, and G antisera was observed from a rectovaginal swab, in the context of antenatal screening for Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]). This is the first multi-Lancefield antisera-agglutinating isolate of this species, and it raised particular concern, as it may mimic GBS, leading to false reporting and useless receipt of intrapartum antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enterococcus faecalis proteolytic activity: The mechanism of resistance to antimicrobial peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešuta, Ondřej; Monincová, Lenka; Buděšínský, Miloš; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Hadravová, Romana; Čeřovský, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2017), s. 24-25 ISSN 2336-7202. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /17./. 30.05.2017-01.06.2017, Milovy] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04010638; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-27726A Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * bacterial resistance * Enterococcus faecalis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  6. Genome sequences of copper resistant and sensitive Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from copper-fed pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Siyu; Wang, Dan; Wang, Yihua

    2015-01-01

    Six strains of Enterococcus faecalis (S1, S12, S17, S18, S19 and S32) were isolated from copper fed pigs in Denmark. These Gram-positive bacteria within the genus Enterococcus are able to survive a variety of physical and chemical challenges by the acquisition of diverse genetic elements. The gen...

  7. Antibacterial effect of four endodontic cements against Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. An in vitro study.

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    Marcos J. Carruitero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the in vitro antibacterial effect of the root canal cements Endobalsam®, Top Seal®, Apexit® and Endofill® against Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. Materials and method: Eighty-five applications of cements on Enterococcus faecalis, cultured in vitro on solid media in Petri dishes, were analyzed. Five groups were evaluated: four for each cement, and the fifth for the positive control (amoxicillin. The antibacterial effect was measured by the diameters of the bacterial inhibition halos at 24 hours, 48 hours, and seven days. Student´s t-test, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used for the statistical analysis. Results: No statistically significant differences were found at 24 hours (p>0.05; at 48 hours and seven days, Endofill® and Apexit® had the greatest effect (p0.05. Conclusion: Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was susceptible to all cements. Endofill® had greater in vitro antibacterial effect than Apexit®, Top Seal® and Endobalsam®.

  8. Ag-loaded mesoporous bioactive glasses against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm in root canal of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Daming; Ma, Tengjiao; Fan, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Ag-loaded mesoporous bioactive glass (Ag-MBG) powders were synthesized and characterized. The ions release of Ag-MBGs in Tris-HCl and the pH stability of simulated body fluids after immersing Ag-MBGs were tested. Root canals were inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 4 weeks, and the antibacterial activity of MBGs, Ag-MBGs and calcium hydroxide against E. faecalis biofilm were evaluated. Results showed that Ag-MBGs possessed highly ordered mesoporous structure with silver nanoparticles deposited in the mesopores, which enabled a sustained Ag ions released. The biofilms treated with Ag-MBGs showed a significant structural disruption compared with MBGs. These results indicated that Ag-MBGs possess a potent antibacterial effect against E.faecalis biofilm in root canal, and the antibacterial activity was induced by the release of Ag ions from Ag-MBGs.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of Leaf Extract of Annona muricata and Simarouba glauca on Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jain; George, Reshmi; Theruvil, Robin; Padavil, Tobin C; Tomy, Lincy; Kurian, Anil

    2016-08-01

    To determine the antimicrobial effect of water extracts of leaves of Annona muricata and Simarouba glauca on Enterococcus faecalis using agar diffusion method. Dried leaves of A. muricata and S. glauca were powdered and extracted in a soxhlet apparatus. Enterococcus faecalis was grown overnight in Trypticase soy agar plates. About 10 μl of each extract was placed on agar plates and incubated overnight. The zone of inhibition was measured after 24 hours. About 1% sodium hypochlorite and distilled water were used as positive and negative controls. The leaf extract of A. muricata showed similar effectiveness as that of sodium hypochlorite, whereas the leaf extract of S. glauca showed only a slight reduction in growth of E. faecalis. Leaf extract of A. muricata can be developed as an alternative to sodium hypochlorite for root canal irrigants. Success of endodontic treatment depends on complete disinfection of the root canals. Root canal irrigants have a major role in complete disinfection of the root canals. Chemical root canal irrigants are more or less toxic to the oral environment. In this study, naturally derived leaf extracts of A. muricata and S. glauca are compared with sodium hypochlorite for its effectiveness against E. faecalis - the most common pathogen found in the root canals.

  10. Comparison of statistical methods for identification of Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium from randomly amplified polymorphic DNA patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Villani, F; Coppola, S; Parente, E

    2001-05-01

    Thermophilic streptococci play an important role in the manufacture of many European cheeses, and a rapid and reliable method for their identification is needed. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR (RAPD-PCR) with two different primers coupled to hierarchical cluster analysis has proven to be a powerful tool for the classification and typing of Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis (G. Moschetti, G. Blaiotta, M. Aponte, P. Catzeddu, F. Villani, P. Deiana, and S. Coppola, J. Appl. Microbiol. 85:25-36, 1998). In order to develop a fast and inexpensive method for the identification of thermophilic streptococci, RAPD-PCR patterns were generated with a single primer (XD9), and the results were analyzed using artificial neural networks (Multilayer Perceptron, Radial Basis Function network, and Bayesian network) and multivariate statistical techniques (cluster analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and classification trees). Cluster analysis allowed the identification of S. thermophilus but not of enterococci. A Bayesian network proved to be more effective than a Multilayer Perceptron or a Radial Basis Function network for the identification of S. thermophilus, E. faecium, and E. faecalis using simplified RAPD-PCR patterns (obtained by summing the bands in selected areas of the patterns). The Bayesian network also significantly outperformed two multivariate statistical techniques (linear discriminant analysis and classification trees) and proved to be less sensitive to the size of the training set and more robust in the response to patterns belonging to unknown species.

  11. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the "zone of dead bacteria" (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules.

  12. Indole production provides limited benefit to Escherichia coli during co-culture with Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Shelly L; Palmer, Kelli L; McLean, Robert J C

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli lives in the gastrointestinal tract and elsewhere, where it coexists within a mixed population. Indole production enables E. coli to grow with other gram-negative bacteria as indole inhibits N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum regulation. We investigated whether E. coli indole production enhanced competition with gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, wherein quorum signaling is mediated by small peptides. During planktonic co-culture with E. faecalis, the fitness and population density of E. coli tnaA mutants (unable to produce indole) equaled or surpassed that of E. coli wt. During biofilm growth, the fitness of both populations of E. coli stabilized around 100 %, whereas the fitness of E. faecalis declined over time to 85-90 %, suggesting that biofilm and planktonic populations have different competition strategies. Media supplementation with indole removed the competitive advantage of E. coli tnaA in planktonic populations but enhanced it in biofilm populations. E. coli wt and tnaA showed similar growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth. However, E. coli growth was inhibited in the presence of filter-sterilized spent LB from E. faecalis, with inhibition being enhanced by indole. Similarly, there was also an inhibition of E. faecalis growth by proteinaceous components (likely bacteriocins) from spent culture media from both E. coli strains. We conclude that E. coli indole production is not a universal competition strategy, but rather works against gram-negative, AHL-producing bacteria.

  13. Identification of malic and soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase enzymes in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espariz, Martín; Repizo, Guillermo; Blancato, Víctor; Mortera, Pablo; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Two paralogous genes, maeE and citM, that encode putative malic enzyme family members were identified in the Enterococcus faecalis genome. MaeE (41 kDa) and CitM (42 kDa) share a high degree of homology between them (47% identities and 68% conservative substitutions). However, the genetic context of each gene suggested that maeE is associated with malate utilization whereas citM is linked to the citrate fermentation pathway. In the present work, we focus on the biochemical characterization and physiological contribution of these enzymes in E. faecalis. With this aim, the recombinant versions of the two proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity purified and finally their kinetic parameters were determined. This approach allowed us to establish that MaeE is a malate oxidative decarboxylating enzyme and CitM is a soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Moreover, our genetic studies in E. faecalis showed that the citrate fermentation phenotype is not affected by citM deletion. On the other hand, maeE gene disruption resulted in a malate fermentation deficient strain indicating that MaeE is responsible for malate metabolism in E. faecalis. Lastly, it was demonstrated that malate fermentation in E. faecalis is associated with cytoplasmic and extracellular alkalinization which clearly contributes to pH homeostasis in neutral or mild acidic conditions. Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS. No claim to original Argentinian government works.

  14. Bacteriocinogenic potential and virulence traits of Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis isolated from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali, Soodabeh; Mojgani, Naheed

    2017-08-01

    Human milk is a continuous supply of Lactic Acid bacteria (LAB), including enterococci with probiotic potentials. The aim of this study was to analyze two Enterococcus species, isolated from human milk for their probiotic potential, bacteriocin producing ability and virulence traits. Enterococcus faecium TA0033 and E. faecalis TA102 were tested for acid and bile tolerance, survival in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. The antibacterial spectrum of the isolates was tested by agar well diffusion assay. The antagonistic agent was characterized by physico-chemical methods. The enterocin structural genes, virulence determinants, vancomycin resistance and biogenic amine genes, such as hdc1 , hdc2 , tdc , ldc and odc were also determined. The tested isolates survived acidic conditions, high bile salt (1%), simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. The culture supernatant fluids of the two isolates inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli , Listeria monocytogenes , Salmonella typhi , Staphylococcus aureus , Shigella dysenteriae and Streptococcus agalactiae . The antagonistic activity was lost in the presence of proteolytic enzymes but tolerated the action of catalase, lysozyme and lipase. In contrast to enterocin TA102, enterocin TA0033 possessed bactericidal mode of action. Bacteriocin structural genes, entA and entB were present in the genome of the two isolates, while E. faecalis TA102 additionally harboured entP and bac31 genes. The phenotypic and genotypic virulence assessment studies indicated hyaluronidase ( hyl ) production and vancomycin resistance in E. faecalis TA102 while, none of the isolates harboured the biogenic amine genes. The presence of virulence genes in E. faecalis TA102 calls for careful monitoring of Enterococcus isolates for their safety parameters.

  15. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis phage IME-EF1 and its endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhui; Mi, Zhiqiang; Yin, Xiuyun; Fan, Hang; An, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhiyi; Chen, Jiankui; Tong, Yigang

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is increasingly becoming an important nosocomial infection opportunistic pathogen. E. faecalis can easily obtain drug resistance, making it difficult to be controlled in clinical settings. Using bacteriophage as an alternative treatment to drug-resistant bacteria has been revitalized recently, especially for fighting drug-resistant bacteria. In this research, an E. faecalis bacteriophage named IME-EF1 was isolated from hospital sewage. Whole genomic sequence analysis demonstrated that the isolated IME-EF1 belong to the Siphoviridae family, and has a linear double-stranded DNA genome consisting of 57,081 nucleotides. The IME-EF1 genome has a 40.04% G+C content and contains 98 putative coding sequences. In addition, IME-EF1 has an isometric head with a width of 35 nm to 60 nm and length of 75 nm to 90 nm, as well as morphology resembling a tadpole. IME-EF1 can adsorb to its host cells within 9 min, with an absorbance rate more than 99% and a latent period time of 25 min. The endolysin of IME-EF1 contains a CHAP domain in its N-terminal and has a wider bactericidal spectrum than its parental bacteriophage, including 2 strains of vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. When administrated intraperitoneally, one dose of IME-EF1 or its endolysin can reduce bacterial count in the blood and protected the mice from a lethal challenge of E. faecalis, with a survival rate of 60% or 80%, respectively. Although bacteriophage could rescue mice from bacterial challenge, to the best of our knowledge, this study further supports the potential function of bacteriophage in dealing with E. faecalis infection in vivo. The results also indicated that the newly isolated bacteriophage IME-EF1 enriched the arsenal library of lytic E. faecalis bacteriophages and presented another choice for phage therapy in the future.

  16. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis phage IME-EF1 and its endolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Zhang

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is increasingly becoming an important nosocomial infection opportunistic pathogen. E. faecalis can easily obtain drug resistance, making it difficult to be controlled in clinical settings. Using bacteriophage as an alternative treatment to drug-resistant bacteria has been revitalized recently, especially for fighting drug-resistant bacteria. In this research, an E. faecalis bacteriophage named IME-EF1 was isolated from hospital sewage. Whole genomic sequence analysis demonstrated that the isolated IME-EF1 belong to the Siphoviridae family, and has a linear double-stranded DNA genome consisting of 57,081 nucleotides. The IME-EF1 genome has a 40.04% G+C content and contains 98 putative coding sequences. In addition, IME-EF1 has an isometric head with a width of 35 nm to 60 nm and length of 75 nm to 90 nm, as well as morphology resembling a tadpole. IME-EF1 can adsorb to its host cells within 9 min, with an absorbance rate more than 99% and a latent period time of 25 min. The endolysin of IME-EF1 contains a CHAP domain in its N-terminal and has a wider bactericidal spectrum than its parental bacteriophage, including 2 strains of vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. When administrated intraperitoneally, one dose of IME-EF1 or its endolysin can reduce bacterial count in the blood and protected the mice from a lethal challenge of E. faecalis, with a survival rate of 60% or 80%, respectively. Although bacteriophage could rescue mice from bacterial challenge, to the best of our knowledge, this study further supports the potential function of bacteriophage in dealing with E. faecalis infection in vivo. The results also indicated that the newly isolated bacteriophage IME-EF1 enriched the arsenal library of lytic E. faecalis bacteriophages and presented another choice for phage therapy in the future.

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitor as an Antimicrobial Agent to Eradicate Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chiew Xsia; Quah, Samantha Yiling; Lui, Jeen Nee; Yu, Victoria Soo Hoon; Tan, Kai Soo

    2015-06-01

    Successful endodontic treatment outcomes require new strategies for the complete eradication of microbial biofilms in the root canal system. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential enzymes in microbial cell growth and homeostasis, and they require transition metal ion cofactors to function. Targeting MMP activity also preserves dentin collagen integrity. In this study, 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione (Phendione), a metal chelator, was tested as a potentially novel antimicrobial agent against Enterococcus faecalis and inhibitor of human MMP in the root canal. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Phendione on E. faecalis were determined. The antimicrobial properties of Phendione in the presence of dentin powder and various transition metal ions were examined. The ability of Phendione to inhibit human MMP-2 was subsequently tested. The efficacy of Phendione against E. faecalis biofilm was determined by exposure of 7-day-old E. faecalis biofilms to Phendione. The MIC and MBC of Phendione were 2.0 μg/mL and 16 μg/mL, respectively, whereas 64 μg/mL was required to kill E. faecalis biofilm. Phendione completely eradicated E. faecalis despite dentin preincubation. The presence of Zn(2+), and to a lesser extent Fe(2+), abrogated the antimicrobial effect of Phendione. In addition, Phendione at MIC and MBC significantly inhibited human MMP-2 activity. Phendione effectively eradicated E. faecalis biofilms and significantly inhibited human MMP-2 through its ability to chelate metal ions. The antibacterial property of Phendione was preserved in the presence of dentin. Phendione can potentially be applied in endodontic treatment as both an antimicrobial agent and MMP inhibitor. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A newly isolated probiotic Enterococcus faecalis strain from vagina microbiota enhances apoptosis of human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Y; Abdullah, N; Haghshenas, B; Radiah, D; Rosli, R; Yari Khosroushahi, A

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to describe probiotic properties and bio-therapeutic effects of newly isolated Enterococcus faecalis from the human vaginal tract. The Enterococcus faecalis strain was originally isolated from the vaginal microbiota of Iranian women and was molecularly identified using 16SrDNA gene sequencing. Some biochemical methodologies were preliminarily used to characterize the probiotic potential of Ent. faecalis, including antibiotic susceptibility, antimicrobial activity, as well as acid and bile resistance. The bio-therapeutic effects of this strain's secreted metabolites on four human cancer cell lines (AGS, HeLa, MCF-7 and HT-29) and one normal cell line (HUVEC) were evaluated by cytotoxicity assay and apoptosis scrutiny. The characterization results demonstrated into the isolated bacteria strain revealed probiotic properties, such as antibiotic susceptibility, antimicrobial activity and resistance under conditions similar to those in the gastrointestinal tract. Results of bio-therapeutic efficacy assessments illustrated acceptable apoptotic effects on four human cancer cell lines and negligible side effects on assayed normal cell line. Our findings revealed that the apoptotic effect of secreted metabolites mainly depended on proteins secreted by Ent. faecalis on different cancer cells. These proteins can induce the apoptosis of cancer cells. The metabolites produced by this vaginal Ent. faecalis strain can be used as alternative pharmaceutical compounds with promising therapeutic indices because they are not cytotoxic to normal mammalian cells. Accordingly, the physicochemical, structural and functional properties of the secreted anticancer substances should be further investigated before using them as anticancer therapeutics. This study aim to screen total bacterial secreted metabolites as a wealthy source to find the new active compounds to introduce as anticancer therapeutics in the future. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Infection dynamics of vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis in an Indian teaching hospital

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    Debasmita Dubey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To do surveillance for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, a Gram-positive bacterium in a teaching hospital. Methods: E. faecalis strains isolated from clinical samples were screened for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance, i.e., D-test positivity, using vancomycin screen agar and blood agar plates, respectively. For the D-test screening, erythromycin resistant (Er-r and clindamycin sensitive (Cd-s strain were used. Results: Of 265 isolated E. faecalis strains, 159 (60% were vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and 106 were vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (VSE. Of 265 strains, 42 were constitutively resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin and of 148 Er-r and Cd-s strains, 87 (32.83% had D-test positivity, while the rest 61 strains were D-test negatives. D-test results examined with 6 hospital factors as bivalents, only 2 factors, the VSE/VRE and the presence/absence of prior antibiotic use > 90 days bivalent were statistically significant. A VRE strain with D-test positivity would be picked up 0.570 2 times more frequently than a strain with VSE and D-test positivity. Also, patients with prior antibiotic use > 90 days had 3.737 5 times more chance of picking up D-test positive strains than patients without any prior antibiotic use. Resistance pattern of E. faecalis strains to individual 14 antibiotics were recorded; the maximum values of resistance were against ampicillin 10 μg/disc and linezolid 30 μg/disc. Student’s t-test for hospital acquired and community acquired data revealed that drug resistant strains were equally prevalent in both sources. Conclusions: Prevalence of 60% VRE in both hospital and adjoining community creates consternation. In total 87 (32.83% strains had D-test positivity; patients who had used antibiotics within the last 90 days have got an ample chance of picking of D-test positive E. faecalis. D-test protocol should be followed with

  20. First Japanese case of infectious endocarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis small-colony variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Shinji; Saito, Ryoichi; Sawabe, Etsuko; Hagihara, Michio; Tohda, Shuji

    2016-10-01

    A male patient was admitted to our hospital due to infectious endocarditis. He had been treated with levofloxacin for 6 weeks, sulbactam/cefoperazone for 4 weeks, and benzylpenicillin for 2 days prior to valve replacement surgery. Gram-positive cocci, with morphology consistent with γ-Streptococcus, were detected in blood cultures obtained at admission, as well as in vegetation obtained from the aortic valve. However, the strain could not be identified using biochemical methods. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the culture was a small-colony variant of Enterococcus faecalis. This is the first case in Japan of infectious endocarditis due to E. faecalis small-colony variants. Small-colony variants are subpopulations of bacteria with slow growth, reduced sugar fermentation, and unstable phenotype. As a result, these strains tend to be misidentified. Further, small-colony variants are associated with recurrent and persistent infections such as prosthetic joint infection and infectious endocarditis. These strains are found in various bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but rarely in Enterococcus species. The case highlights the need to be vigilant of E. faecalis small-colony variants, especially in patients who received long-term courses of antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibacterial Effect of All-in-one Self-etch Adhesives on Enterococcus faecalis

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    Mohammad Esmaeel Ebrahimi Chaharom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of one-step self-etch adhesives on Enterococcus faecalis on days 1, 7 and 14 with the use of modified direct contact test. Materials and methods. The modified directcontact test was used to evaluate the antibacterial effect of Adper Easy One, Bond Force, Clearfil S3 Bond, Futurabond M, G-Bond, iBond and OptiBond All-in-one adhesives on Enterococcus faecalisafter aging the samples in phosphate-buffered saline for one, seven and fourteen days. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Aging effect of each adhesive was evaluated by paired-sample test. In this study, P0.05. Conclusion. iBond exhibited the highest antibacterial effect on E. faecalis after one week. Futurabond and OptiBond All-in-one exhibited antibacterial effects against E. faecalis for one week.

  2. A Case of Fatal Bacterial Meningitis Caused by Enterococcus Faecalis: Postmortem Diagnosis

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    Gülhan Yağmur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus species rarely cause bacterial meningitis without predisposing factors such as trauma, brain surgery, etc. In this study, we present a bacterial meningitis case caused by Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis in a 13-year-old male who was found dead at home. One hundred and forty two cm tall, 37 kg weight male had admitted to hospital two days after the beginning of complaints such as weakness, headache, swelling of left eye, nausea and vomiting. Body temperature was 37.3 oC, leucocyte count 22100/ mm3, and CRP 71 g/dl at the hospital admission. Antibiotic treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (625 mg was given to the patient but he was found dead in his house the day after. In autopsy; yellow-green purulant liquid in left frontoparietal zone, fullness of meningeal vessels and oedema was seen in brain. Isolated bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was identificated as E. faecalis by mini API 32 Strep®. Postmortem microbiological sampling in autopsy and defining etiologic agents is important for rare meningitis cases in which antemortem identification could not be done before death.

  3. Enterococcus faecalis produces extracellular superoxide and hydrogen peroxide that damages colonic epithelial cell DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huycke, Mark M; Abrams, Victoria; Moore, Danny R

    2002-03-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a commensal microorganism of the human intestinal tract that produces substantial extracellular superoxide (O(-)(2)), and derivative reactive oxygen species such as H(2)O(2) and hydroxyl radical, through autoxidation of membrane-associated demethylmenaquinone. Because these oxidants may be important as a cause of chromosomal instability (CIN) associated with sporadic adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer, the ability of E.faecalis to damage eukaryotic cell DNA was examined using the alkaline lysis single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Both Chinese hamster ovary and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells showed increased DNA damage after co-incubation with wild-type E. faecalis strain OG1RF, but not a transposon-inactivated mutant with attenuated extracellular O(-)(2) production. E. faecalis-mediated DNA damage was prevented by catalase, but not manganese superoxide dismutase, indicating H(2)O(2) arising from O(-)(2) was the genotoxin. In a rat model of intestinal colonization, OG1RF resulted in significantly higher stool concentrations of H(2)O(2) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide adducts of hydroxyl and thiyl radicals, as identified by electron spin resonance-spin trapping, compared with rats colonized with a mutant strain having attenuated O(-)(2) production. Using the comet assay, luminal cells from the colon of rats colonized with O(-)(2)-producing E. faecalis showed significantly increased DNA damage compared with control rats colonized with the mutant. These findings suggest a potentially profound role for extracellular free radical production by E. faecalis in promoting CIN associated with sporadic adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer.

  4. Antibacterial activity of selected marine macro algae against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis

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    Manivachagam Chandrasekaran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of different extracts of Caulerpa chemnitzia (Epser J.V. Lamououx, Caulerpa racemosa (Frosk. Weber-van-Bosse (C. racemosa, Caulerpa scalpelliformis (R.Br. Weber-van-Bosse, Ulva lactuca Lin, Ulva fasciata Dellie, Ulva reticulata Forsk, Stoechospermum marginatum (Ag. Kutz (S. marginatum, Sargassum wightii Grev, Gracilaria verrucosa (Huds. Papenfuss and Gracilaria edulis (S.G. Gemelin P.C. Silva against Enterococcus faecalis (MTCC 439 (E. faecalis and one clinical isolate of vancomycin resistant E. faecalis. Methods: The selected marine macro algae were extracted with different solvents viz., hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol. Antibacterial assay was carried out by using disc diffusion method, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. Results: The maximum antibacterial activity was recorded in the ethyl acetate extracts of S. marginatum and C. racemosa than the other extracts. The mean zone of inhibition produced by the extracts in agar diffusion assays against the tested bacterial strains ranged from 7.1 to 14.5 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration was between 250 and 500 µg/mL, while the minimum bactericidal concentration was from 500 to 1 000 µg/mL. The ethyl acetate extracts of the seaweeds showed the presence of strong terpenoids, tannins and phenolic compounds compared with the other solvent extracts. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ethyl acetate extracts of S. marginatum and C. racemosa can be used as an antibacterial substance for the treatment of infection caused by E. faecalis.

  5. Effects of laser treatment on endodontic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadık, Burak; Arıkan, Serdar; Beldüz, Nihal; Yaşa, Yasin; Karasoy, Durdu; Cehreli, Murat

    2013-05-01

    The effects of laser on eradication of Enterococcus faecalis in the root canal are unclear. The purpose of this review was to explore the antimicrobial effects of laser radiation on E. faecalis. Using the combined search terms root canal, laser, antimicrobial, as inclusion and exclusion criteria, eligible articles were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and OVID by hand searching. The initial search yielded 4192 titles, and 162 articles were assigned to full text analysis. Upon classification of the data with regard to laser source, laser energy level and watt, duration of application, initial and final bacterial count, and rate of decrease in bacteria, p values were pooled and data were calculated using Fisher's Z method. The initial and final bacterial count, the standard deviation of data, and data expressed in logarithm were pooled and calculated using standardized difference in means method. In the event homogeneity was found between studies, the outcome of the fixed effect model was used, and if heterogeneity was found, the result of the random effect model was used. A total of 12 articles were included. Er, Cr:YSGG, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers and 1 and 1.5 W energy levels significantly reduced E. faecalis count. Despite the limited number of publications, the outcome of present meta-analytical assessment suggests that lasers are effective in eradication of E. faecalis.

  6. Importance of the collagen adhesin ace in pathogenesis and protection against Enterococcus faecalis experimental endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavindra V Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ace is an adhesin to collagen from Enterococcus faecalis expressed conditionally after growth in serum or in the presence of collagen. Here, we generated an ace deletion mutant and showed that it was significantly attenuated versus wild-type OG1RF in a mixed infection rat endocarditis model (P<0.0001, while no differences were observed in a peritonitis model. Complemented OG1RFDeltaace (pAT392::ace enhanced early (4 h heart valve colonization versus OG1RFDeltaace (pAT392 (P = 0.0418, suggesting that Ace expression is important for early attachment. By flow cytometry using specific anti-recombinant Ace (rAce immunoglobulins (Igs, we showed in vivo expression of Ace by OG1RF cells obtained directly from infected vegetations, consistent with our previous finding of anti-Ace antibodies in E. faecalis endocarditis patient sera. Finally, rats actively immunized against rAce were less susceptible to infection by OG1RF than non-immunized (P = 0.0004 or sham-immunized (P = 0.0475 by CFU counts. Similarly, animals given specific anti-rAce Igs were less likely to develop E. faecalis endocarditis (P = 0.0001 and showed fewer CFU in vegetations (P = 0.0146. In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that Ace is involved in pathogenesis of, and is useful for protection against, E. faecalis experimental endocarditis.

  7. Probiotic assessment of Enterococcus faecalis CP58 isolated from human gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Narbad, Arjan

    2011-02-28

    A total of seventy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from the faeces of healthy humans and their identities were confirmed by sequencing of their 16S rDNA genes. Of these only 5 isolates were found to resist bile salts and indicated survival in the simulated in vitro digestion assay which reproduces the stomach and intestinal digestion indicating their tolerance to gastric enzymes and the low pH conditions. Species that showed the best resistance to these conditions were: Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus sp., uncultured bifidobacteria, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus anginosus. These strains were investigated further to study their capacity to adhere to human intestinal Caco-2 cells. E. faecalis was the most adherent strain. Examination of the virulence determinants for this strain indicated that it was positive for efaAfs, gelE, agg, cpd, cob, ccf and cad, a profile that is similar to that of many E. faecalis isolates from food sources. The cytolysin biosynthetic genes cylA, cylB and cylM that are more associated with the clinical isolates of E. faecium were not detected in this strain. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the strain was sensitive to vancomycin, tetracycline, rifampicin and erythromycin but resistant only to kanamycin and chloramphenicol. These data suggest that the strain E. faecalis CP58 may be tested further for beneficial properties and developed as a new probiotic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptomic and functional analysis of NaCl-induced stress in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrete Solheim

    Full Text Available The robust physiology of Enterococcus faecalis facilitates tolerance to various stresses. We here report the transcriptional response of E. faecalis V583 to growth in the presence of 6.5% NaCl. Among the early responses observed was an immediate down-regulation of mscL, accompanied by an up-regulation of genes predicted to be involved in uptake of extracellular potassium and glycine betaine. The high NaCl concentration also induced expression of chaperons and cell envelope related traits, such as the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (epa locus. Functional genetic analysis revealed reduced salt stress resistance in both epaB and epaE mutants. The reduced salt resistance phenotype associated with the epaB mutant was restored by complementation, hence demonstrating a role of Epa in the physiological robustness of E. faecalis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Epa confers increased resistance towards multiple cell envelope stress-inducing factors. Accordingly, these findings delineate a potential link between the robust nature of E. faecalis and its ability to perform as a human pathogen, and provide a new perspective on the mechanisms by which Epa contributes to virulence. Notably, the high NaCl concentration also resulted in strict repression of the gelE-sprE operon and impaired gelatinase activity. We demonstrate that NaCl antagonize the GBAP-pheromone dependent induction in a concentration dependent manner.

  9. Linezolid in prophylaxis against experimental aortic valve endocarditis due to Streptococcus oralis or Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassopoulos, George; Pefanis, Angelos; Sakka, Vissaria; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Perrea, Despina; Giamarellou, Helen

    2006-02-01

    There are no experimental studies regarding the prophylactic efficacy of linezolid against infective endocarditis. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis of the aortic valve was induced in rabbits by the insertion of a polyethylene catheter. Twenty-four hours later, animals were randomly assigned to a control group, and groups receiving either ampicillin (two doses of 40 mg/kg of body weight each, given intravenously, 2 h apart) or linezolid (a single per os dose of 75 mg/kg). The first dose of ampicillin and the single dose of linezolid were administered 0.5 and 1 h, respectively, prior to the intravenous inoculation of approximately 10(7) CFU of Streptococcus oralis or Enterococcus faecalis. Linezolid peak levels in rabbit serum were similar to the peak serum levels in humans following a 600-mg oral dose of linezolid. Linezolid prevented endocarditis in 87% of S. oralis-challenged rabbits (P faecalis, linezolid prevented endocarditis in 73% (P = 0.003 versus controls; P = 0.049 versus ampicillin). Ampicillin prevented endocarditis due to S. oralis or due to E. faecalis in 47% (P = 0.005 versus controls) and in 30% (P = not significant versus controls) of the challenged animals, respectively. In conclusion, linezolid was effective as prophylaxis against endocarditis caused by a strain of S. oralis and to a lesser degree against that caused by a strain of E. faecalis. Its prophylactic efficacy was superior to that of ampicillin.

  10. Comparative efficacy of endodontic medicaments and sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plutzer, B; Zilm, P; Ratnayake, J; Cathro, P

    2017-11-27

    Many studies have investigated the effectiveness of root canal irrigants and medicaments against Enterococcus faecalis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of commonly used medicaments against E. faecalis cultured as a biofilm on dentine substrate. An E. faecalis biofilm was established on human dentine slices using a continuous flow cell. Each test medicament (Ledermix, Ca(OH) 2 , Odontopaste, 0.2% chlorhexidine and 50:50 combinations of Ledermix/Ca(OH) 2 and Odontopaste/Ca(OH) 2 ) was introduced into the flow cell and biofilms were harvested and quantitated by determining cellular protein. Cellular viability was determined using serial plating and the number of colony-forming units was normalized against cellular protein to allow treatment protocols to be compared. Qualitative scanning electron microscopy analyses of the biofilm were performed after a 48-h exposure to each test agent. Sodium hypochlorite achieved total bacterial elimination. Ledermix and Odontopaste had no significant effect on the E. faecalis biofilm. Ca(OH) 2 and 50:50 combinations of Ca(OH) 2 /Ledermix or Ca(OH) 2 /Odontopaste reduced the viability by more than 99% while 0.2% chlorhexidine reduced bacterial numbers by 97%. Sodium hypochlorite remains the gold standard for bacterial elimination in root canal therapy. However, Ca(OH) 2 in isolation and combined with Ledermix, and Odontopaste was highly effective in reducing bacterial viability. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Topoisomerase mutations and efflux are associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hideaki; Inoue, Matsuhisa; Yamagishi, Jun-ichi

    2006-10-01

    To understand better the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterococcus faecalis, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants isolated from Ent. faecalis ATCC 29212 by stepwise selection with sparfloxacin (SPX) and norfloxacin (NOR) were analysed. The results showed the following. (i) In general, fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms in Ent. faecalis are similar to those in other Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, namely, mutants with amino acid changes in both GyrA and ParC exhibited high fluoroquinolone resistance, and single GyrA mutants and a single ParC mutant were more resistant to SPX and NOR, respectively, than the parent strain, indicating that the primary targets of SPX and NOR in Ent. faecalis are DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, respectively. (ii) Alterations in GyrB (DeltaKGA, residues 395-397) and ParE (Glu-459 to Lys) were associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in some mutants. Moreover, the facts that the NOR MIC, but not the SPX MIC, decreased in the presence of multidrug efflux pump inhibitors, that NOR accumulation decreased in the cells, and that the EmeA mRNA expression level did not change, strongly suggested that a NorA-like efflux pump, rather than EmeA, was involved in resistance to NOR.

  12. Chemical composition of Enterococcus faecalis in biofilm cells initiated from different physiologic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyan; Xu, Qiong; Huo, Lijun; Wei, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2014-09-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a ubiquitous bacterium of the gut that is observed in persistent periradicular infections. Its pathogenicity is associated with biofilm formation and the ability to survive under nutrient-poor (starvation) conditions. However, characteristics of chemical composition of biofilm cells developed by starved E. faecalis cells remain poorly understood. In this study, E. faecalis cells in exponential, stationary, and starvation phases were prepared and separately cultured to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was performed to verify biofilm formation. Raman microscopy was used to investigate the chemical composition of cells within the biofilms. Compared to cells in exponential or stationary phase, starved cells developed biofilms with fewer culturable cells (P cells produced in the biofilms from starved planktonic cells contained more protein and less nucleic acids than either the corresponding planktonic cells or the cells in biofilms from planktonic cells in exponential or stationary phases, suggesting that biofilm-grown cells from the starvation phase were characterized by increased synthesis of proteins and decreased nucleic acids. This study provides an insight into the chemical composition of biofilm cells developed by starved E. faecalis.

  13. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SecA from Enterococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meining, Winfried; Scheuring, Johannes; Fischer, Markus; Weinkauf, Sevil

    2006-01-01

    SecA ATPase from E. faecalis has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C2 and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution. The gene coding for SecA from Enterococcus faecalis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In this protein, the lysine at position 6 was replaced by an asparagine in order to reduce sensitivity towards proteases. The modified protein was purified and crystallized. Crystals diffracting to 2.4 Å resolution were obtained using the vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 203.4, b = 49.8, c = 100.8 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 119.1°. A selenomethionine derivative was prepared and is currently being tested in crystallization trials

  14. Presence of pathogenicity island genes in Enterococcus faecalis isolates from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shankar, Nathan; Baghdayan, Arto S.; Willems, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates of porcine origin were screened for the presence of a previously identified pathogenicity island (PAI). By using the esp gene as a genetic marker for the presence of this PAI, 9 esp-positive and 10 esp-negative isolates of porcine origin were investigated by use...... of a designed oligonucleotide array. The results indicated the clustering of esp-positive strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), but surprisingly, all strains investigated contained parts of the PAL None of the strains of animal origin investigated belonged to previously identified MLST complex 2, where...... most isolates from patients cluster. Five of the nine esp-positive E. faecalis isolates of animal origin belonged to the same PAI complex as human isolate MMH594 but differed in their sequence types, which strongly indicates the horizontal transfer of the PAI between enterococci of porcine and human...

  15. Aspirin plus ticlopidine prevented experimental endocarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gallolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Tiago Rafael; Oechslin, Frank; Que, Yok-Ai; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José Manuel; Mancini, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gallolyticus cause infective endocarditis (IE), which can originate from the continuous release or translocation of low bacterial numbers into the bloodstream. In this context, IE cannot be prevented with antibiotics. We previously demonstrated that aspirin plus ticlopidine protected rats from IE due to S. gordonii and Staphylococcus aureus. Here we showed that aspirin plus ticlopidine significantly reduced vegetation weight and protected 73 and 64% rats (P faecalis and S. gallolyticus, respectively. These results further support the potential use of aspirin plus ticlopidine for a global prevention of IE in high-risk patients. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Prevalence, outcome and risk factor associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A; Shukla, S K; Singh, A; Prasad, K N

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, genotype, risk factors and mortality in patients having vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VR E. faecalis) and Enterococcus faecium (VR E. faecium) infection or colonisation. A total of 1488 clinical isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium were tested for vancomycin resistance by phenotypic (disk diffusion, E-test and broth micro-dilution test) and genotypic polymerase chain reaction methods. Records of all 1488 patients who had E. faecalis or E. faecium infection or colonisation were reviewed for the identification of host, hospital and medication related risk factors associated with VR E. faecalis and VR E. faecium. Of 1488 isolates, 118 (7.9%) were vancomycin-resistant and their distributions were as follows: E. faecalis=72 (61%) and E. faecium=46 (39%). All 118 vancomycin-resistant isolates were vanA genotype (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] to vancomycin ≥64 μg/ml and MIC to teicoplanin≥32 μg/ml) and none of the isolates was vanB genotype. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified ventilator support and hospital stay for ≥48 h as independent risk factors associated with VR E. faecalis and VR E. faecium infection or colonisation. Hospital stay≥48 h was the only independent risk factor for mortality in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Strategies to limit the nosocomial infection especially in patients on ventilator support can reduce VRE incidence and related mortality.

  17. Ecological replacement of Enterococcus faecalis by multiresistant clonal complex 17 Enterococcus faecium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Top, J.; Willems, R.; Blok, H.; de Regt, M.; Jalink, K.; Troelstra, A.; Goorhuis, B.; Bonten, M.

    2007-01-01

    The proportion of enterococcal infections caused by ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (AREfm) in a European hospital increased from 2% in 1994 to 32% in 2005, with prevalence rates of AREfm endemicity of up to 35% in at least six hospital wards. Diabetes mellitus, three or more admissions in

  18. Characterization of transferable tetracycline resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis isolated from raw food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Andersen, Sigrid Rita; Licht, Tine Rask

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of tetracycline resistance, and of specific genetic determinants for this resistance was investigated in 1003 strains of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from various raw food products originating from five categories including chicken meat, other poultry meat, beef, pork, and 'other......'. For the 238 resistant isolates identified, the ability to transfer the resistant phenotype to a given recipient in vitro was investigated. New and interesting observations were that the tet(L) resistance determinant was more readily transferred than tet(M), and that the presence of Tn916-like elements known...

  19. Estudo in vitro da ação antimicrobiana de extratos de plantas contra Enterococcus faecalis In vitro antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edja Maria Melo de Brito Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Muitos estudos têm sido realizados para avaliar o potencial terapêutico das plantas. OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a ação antimicrobiana dos extratos etanólicos da aroeira-da-praia (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, da aroeira-do-sertão (Astronium urundeuva [Fr. All.] Engl., da ameixa-do-mato (Ximenia americana L., da quixabeira (Syderoxylum obtusifolium [Roem et Schult.] e do hipoclorito de sódio (NaOCl a 2,5%, contra o Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212. METODOLOGIA: Foi realizado teste de difusão em ágar, pelo método do poço, utilizando-se como controle positivo a clorexidina a 0,12%. Os microrganismos foram semeados em caldo BHI e incubados a 37ºC por 24 horas. Posteriormente, as suspensões microbianas foram semeadas em placas Petri, com ágar Mueller Hinton, sendo confeccionados seis poços equidistantes. As placas foram mantidas à temperatura ambiente por 2 horas, para ocorrer a pré-difusão das substâncias, e incubadas a 37ºC por 48 horas. Foram feitas as análises e medições dos halos de inibição em triplicata e os resultados foram analisados estatisticamente (teste de análise de variância [ANOVA]. RESULTADOS: A quixabeira apresentou os menores halos de inibição (teste t, p INTRODUCTION: Several studies have evaluated the therapeutic benefits of plants. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts of pepper tree (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, aroeira (Astronium urundeuva [Fr. All.] Engl., Olacaceae (Ximenia americana L., quixaba (Syderoxylum obtusifolium [Roem et Schult.], and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl 2.5% against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212. METHODS: The agar diffusion test was performed and 0.12% chlorhexidine was applied as positive control. The microorganisms were allowed to grow in a brain-heart infusion broth (BHI and incubated at 37ºC for 24 hours. Subsequently, the microbial suspensions were seeded on Petri dishes

  20. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans in the community, broilers and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Agersø, Yvonne; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolated from humans in the community (98 and 65 isolates), broilers (126 and 122), and pigs (102 and 88) during 1998 were tested for susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents and for the presence of selected genes encoding resistance using PCR...

  1. Role of glycolipids in the pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecalis urinary tract infection.

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    Ann-Kristin Diederich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, Enterococcus faecalis is the second most common pathogen causing urinary tract infections. Monoglucosyl-diacylglycerol (MGlcDAG and diglucosyl-diacylglycerol (DGlcDAG are the main glycolipids of the E. faecalis cell membrane. Examination of two mutants in genes bgsB and bgsA (both glycosyltransferases showed that these genes are involved in cell membrane glycolipid biosynthesis, and that their inactivation leads to loss of glycolipids DGlcDAG (bgsA or both MGlcDAG and DGlcDAG (bgsB. Here we investigate the function of bgsB and bgsA regarding their role in the pathogenesis in a mouse model of urinary tract infection and in bacterial adhesion to T24 bladder epithelial cells. RESULTS: In a mouse model of urinary tract infection, we showed that E. faecalis 12030ΔbgsB and E. faecalis 12030ΔbgsA mutants, colonize uroepithelial surfaces more efficiently than wild-type bacteria. We also demonstrated that these mutants showed a more than three-fold increased binding to human bladder carcinoma cells line T24 compared to the wild-type strain. Bacterial binding could be specifically inhibited by purified glycolipids. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA, wall-teichoic acid (WTA, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were not significantly involved in binding of E. faecalis to the bladder epithelial cell line. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that the deletion of bgsB and bgsA and the absence of the major glycolipid diglucosyl-diacylglycerol increases colonization and binding to uroepithelial cells. We hypothesize that secreted diglucosyl-diacylglycerol blocks host binding sites, thereby preventing bacterial adhesion. Further experiments will be needed to clarify the exact mechanism underlying the adhesion through glycolipids and their cognate receptors.

  2. Strawberry Extract’s Effects on Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis Biofilms in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelia Sari Widyarman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis are oral bacteria related to root canal infection and periodontal disease pathogenesis. Strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa fruit are rich in vitamins and minerals, have antibacterial and antioxidant effects. Objective: This study investigated the inhibition effect of strawberry extract on monospecies and multispecies E. faecalis and P. gingivalis bacteria grown as biofilms in vitro. Methods: This study used E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. It analyzed the effect of strawberry extract on bacteria biofilm formation using a biofilm assay on microplate wells. Five concentrations of strawberry extracts were used (100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.25%, and the inhibition effect was observed after a 1h, 3h, 6h, and 24h incubation period. Biofilms without the strawberry extract were used as the negative controls, and crystal violet and safranin (0.5%w/v were used to count the biofilm mass. The biofilms grown on microplates were counted using an ELISA reader at 450 nm after 200 mL of 90% ethanol was added to attract the absorbed stain. The strawberry extract inhibition effectiveness on the biofilm formation of each bacterium tested was analyzed using one-way Anova, where p<0.05 was defined as a significant difference. Result: The strawberry extract inhibited the tested monospecies and multispecies bacteria biofilm formation. The optimal strawberry extract concentration for the inhibition of either monospecies biofilms was 100%. However, the optimal incubation time for the strawberry extract to inhibit the multispecies biofilm formation was 24h, which was the study’s biofilm maturity phase. Conclusions: The 100% strawberry extract concentration inhibited the formation of both the monospecies and multispecies E. faecalis and P. gingivalis biofilms. Future studies are needed to evaluate the potential of strawberry extract as an alternative dental

  3. Antimicrobial effects of root canal medicaments against Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atila-Pektaş, B; Yurdakul, P; Gülmez, D; Görduysus, O

    2013-05-01

    To compare the antimicrobial activities of Activ Point (Roeko, Langenau, Germany), Calcium Hydroxide Plus Point (Roeko, Langenau, Germany), calcium hydroxide, 1% chlorhexidine gel and bioactive glass (S53P4) against Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans. One hundred and twenty extracted single-rooted human teeth were used. After removing the crowns, root canals were prepared by using the Protaper rotary system. Following autoclave sterilization, root canals were incubated at 37 °C with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and S. mutans RSHM 676 for 1 week. The specimens, which were divided into five treatment groups for each microorganism according to the intracanal medicament used, were tested in 10 experimental runs. In each experimental run, 10 roots were included as treatment, one root as positive control and one root as sterility control. Sterile paper points were utilized to take samples from root canals after the incubation of teeth in thioglycollate medium at 37 °C for 1 week. Samples taken from teeth by sterile paper points were inoculated onto sheep blood agar, and following an overnight incubation, the colonies grown on sheep blood agar were counted and interpreted as colony-forming units. Results were tested statistically by using Kruskal-Wallis and Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison tests. CHX gel (P faecalis than that of Ca(OH)₂ Plus Point and bioactive glass, respectively. On the other hand, compared with Ca(OH)₂ , CHX gel (P faecalis and S. mutans, respectively. Compared with the medicaments having an antimicrobial effect because of their alkaline pH, the medicaments containing chlorhexidine were effective against both E. faecalis and S. mutans. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  4. Morphine Promotes Colonization of Anastomotic Tissues with Collagenase - Producing Enterococcus faecalis and Causes Leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhsheer, Baddr A; Versten, Luke A; Luo, James N; Defazio, Jennifer R; Klabbers, Robin; Christley, Scott; Zaborin, Alexander; Guyton, Kristina L; Krezalek, Monika; Smith, Daniel P; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Fleming, Irma D; Belogortseva, Natalia; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2016-10-01

    Despite ever more powerful antibiotics, newer surgical techniques, and enhanced recovery programs, anastomotic leaks remain a clear and present danger to patients. Previous work from our laboratory suggests that anastomotic leakage may be caused by Enterococcus faecalis strains that express a high collagenase phenotype (i.e., collagenolytic). Yet the mechanisms by which the practice of surgery shifts or selects for collagenolytic phenotypes to colonize anastomotic tissues remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that morphine, an analgesic agent universally used in gastrointestinal surgery, promotes tissue colonization with collagenolytic E. faecalis and causes anastomotic leak. To test this, rats were administered morphine in a chronic release form as would occur during routine surgery or vehicle. Rats were observed for 6 days and then underwent exploratory laparotomy for anastomotic inspection and tissue harvest for microbial analysis. These results provide further rationale to enhanced recovery after surgery (i.e., ERAS) programs that suggest limiting or avoiding the use of opioids in gastrointestinal surgery. Results demonstrated that compared to placebo-treated rats, morphine-treated rats demonstrated markedly impaired anastomotic healing and gross leaks that correlated with the presence of high collagenase-producing E. faecalis adherent to anastomotic tissues. To determine the direct role of morphine on this response, various isolates of E. faecalis from the rats were exposed to morphine and their collagenase activity and adherence capacity determined in vitro. Morphine increased both the adhesiveness and collagenase production of four strains of E. faecalis harvested from anastomotic tissues, two that were low collagenase producers at baseline, and two that were high collagenase producers at baseline. These results provide further rationale to enhanced recovery after surgery (i.e., ERAS) programs that suggest limiting or avoiding the use of opioids in

  5. Stress response of a clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolate subjected to a novel antimicrobial surface coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss-Lendzian, Emanuel; Vaishampayan, Ankita; de Jong, Anne; Landau, Uwe; Meyer, Carsten; Kok, Jan; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2018-03-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria, paired with their ability to form biofilms on medical and technical devices, represents a serious problem for effective and long-term decontamination in health-care environments and gives rise to an urgent need for new antimicrobial materials. Here we present the impact of AGXX ® , a novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial surface coating consisting of micro-galvanic elements formed by silver and ruthenium, on the transcriptome of Enterococcus faecalis. A clinical E. faecalis isolate was subjected to metal stress by growing it for different periods in presence of the antimicrobial coating or silver-coated steel meshes. Subsequently, total RNA was isolated and next-generation RNA sequencing was performed to analyze variations in gene expression in presence of the antimicrobial materials with focus on known stress genes. Exposure to the antimicrobial coating had a large impact on the transcriptome of E. faecalis. After 24min almost 1/5 of the E. faecalis genome displayed differential expression. At each time-point the cop operon was strongly up-regulated, providing indirect evidence for the presence of free Ag + -ions. Moreover, exposure to the antimicrobial coating induced a broad general stress response in E. faecalis. Genes coding for the chaperones GroEL and GroES and the Clp proteases, ClpE and ClpB, were among the top up-regulated heat shock genes. Differential expression of thioredoxin, superoxide dismutase and glutathione synthetase genes indicates a high level of oxidative stress. We postulate a mechanism of action where the combination of Ag + -ions and reactive oxygen species generated by AGXX ® results in a synergistic antimicrobial effect, superior to that of conventional silver coatings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. pHTβ-promoted mobilization of non-conjugative resistance plasmids from Enterococcus faecium to Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Laura; Morroni, Gianluca; Brenciani, Andrea; Vignaroli, Carla; Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Di Cesare, Andrea; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Biavasco, Francesca

    2017-09-01

    To analyse the recombination events associated with conjugal mobilization of two multiresistance plasmids, pRUM17i48 and pLAG (formerly named pDO1-like), from Enterococcus faecium 17i48 to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2. The plasmids from two E. faecalis transconjugants (JH-4T, tetracycline resistant, and JH-8E, erythromycin resistant) and from the E. faecium donor (also carrying a pHTβ-like conjugative plasmid, named pHTβ17i48) were investigated by several methods, including PCR mapping and sequencing, S1-PFGE followed by Southern blotting and hybridization, and WGS. Two locations of repApHTβ were detected in both transconjugants, one on a ∼50 kb plasmid (as in the donor) and the other on plasmids of larger sizes. In JH-4T, WGS disclosed an 88.6 kb plasmid resulting from the recombination of pHTβ17i48 (∼50 kb) and a new plasmid, named pLAG (35.3 kb), carrying the tet(M), tet(L), lsa(E), lnu(B), spw and aadE resistance genes. In JH-8E, a 75 kb plasmid resulting from the recombination of pHTβ17i48 and pRUM17i48 was observed. In both cases, the cointegrates were apparently derived from replicative transposition of an IS1216 present in each of the multiresistance plasmids into pHTβ17i48. The cointegrates could resolve to yield the multiresistance plasmids and a pHTβ17i48 derivative carrying an IS1216 (unlike the pHTβ17i48 of the donor). Our results completed the characterization of the multiresistance plasmids carried by the E. faecium 17i48, confirming the role of pHT plasmids in the mobilization of non-conjugative antibiotic resistance elements among enterococci. Results also revealed that mobilization to E. faecalis was associated with the generation of cointegrate plasmids promoted by IS1216-mediated transposition. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. AhrC and Eep Are Biofilm Infection-Associated Virulence Factors in Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Pascale S.; Barnes, Aaron M. T.; Manias, Dawn A.; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N.; Kohler, Petra L.; Spaulding, Adam R.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the human intestinal microbiome and is a prominent cause of health care-associated infections. The pathogenesis of many E. faecalis infections, including endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), is related to the ability of clinical isolates to form biofilms. To identify chromosomal genetic determinants responsible for E. faecalis biofilm-mediated infection, we used a rabbit model of endocarditis to test strains with transposon insertions or in-frame deletions in biofilm-associated loci: ahrC, argR, atlA, opuBC, pyrC, recN, and sepF. Only the ahrC mutant was significantly attenuated in endocarditis. We demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator AhrC and the protease Eep, which we showed previously to be an endocarditis virulence factor, are also required for full virulence in murine CAUTI. Therefore, AhrC and Eep can be classified as enterococcal biofilm-associated virulence factors. Loss of ahrC caused defects in early attachment and accumulation of biofilm biomass. Characterization of ahrC transcription revealed that the temporal expression of this locus observed in wild-type cells promotes initiation of early biofilm formation and the establishment of endocarditis. This is the first report of AhrC serving as a virulence factor in any bacterial species. PMID:23460519

  8. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waar, Karola; van der Mei, Henny C; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Degener, John E; Busscher, Henk J

    2002-06-01

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber, fluoro-ethylene-propylene and polyethylene was examined. Four isogenic E. faecalis strains with and without aggregation substances and one strain expressing enterococcal surface protein were used. The kinetics of enterococcal adhesion to the materials was measured in situ in a parallel plate flow chamber. Initial deposition rates were similar for all strains, whereas the presence of surface proteins increased the total number of adhering bacteria. Nearest neighbour analysis demonstrated that enterococci expressing the whole sex-pheromone plasmid encoding aggregation substances 1 or 373 adhered in higher numbers through mechanisms of positive cooperativity, which means that adhesion of bacteria enhances the probability of adhesion of other bacteria near these bacteria. Enterococci with the enterococcal surface protein did not adhere through this mechanism. These findings indicate that the surface proteins of E. faecalis play a key role in the adhesion to bile drains and bile drain associated infections.

  9. Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa behaviour in frozen watercress (Nasturtium officinale) submitted to temperature abuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Silvia R.; Vieira, Margarida C.; Gaspar, Maria N. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Escola Superior de Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, Campus da Penha, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Cruz, Rui M.S.; Silva, Cristina L.M. [Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    Watercress is an herb traditionally consumed fresh. If frozen, would be readily available to consumers. However, pathogenics resistant to frozen storage are a safety concern in this new product. In this study watercress was artificially contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. Their survival was evaluated after blanching, frozen storage and temperature fluctuations of the frozen product. The blanching caused a reduction of about 2 log cfu per gram of product of total viable count (TVC) and about 1.7 and 1.3 log cfu per gram of product of P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis, respectively. P. aeruginosa seemed to be more sensitive to temperature abuses than E. faecalis. After 3 months, TVC was still observed with a reduction of about 3 log cfu per gram of product. At the end of the study, exposure to freeze-thaw cycles resulted in death or injury of the microorganisms. These findings on the behaviour of two microorganisms of concern in frozen watercress will help improving the safety and cold chain settings for this product. (author)

  10. Subinhibitory concentrations of cell wall synthesis inhibitors promote biofilm formation of Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Hallinen, Kelsey; Wood, Kevin

    Enterococcus faecalis are commonly associated with hospital acquired infections, because they readily form biofilms on instruments and medical devices. Biofilms are inherently more resistant to killing by antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria, in part because of their heterogeneous spatial structure. Surprisingly, however, subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of some antibiotics can actually promote biofilm formation. Unfortunately, much is still unknown about how low drug doses affect the composition and spatial structure of the biofilm. In this work, we investigate the effects of sub-MICs of ampicillin on the formation of E. faecalis biofilms. First, we quantified biofilm mass using crystal violet staining in polystyrene microtiter plates. We found that total biofilm mass is increased over a narrow range of ampicillin concentrations before ultimately declining at higher concentrations. Second, we show that sub-MICs of ampicillin can increase mass of E. faecalis biofilms while simultaneously increasing extracellular DNA/RNA and changing total number of viable cells under confocal microscopy. Further, we use RNA-seq to identify genes differentially expressed under sub-MICs of ampicillin. Finally, we show a mathematical model to explain this phenomenon. This work was funded by The Hartwell Foundation Individual Biomedical Research Award and NSF CAREER 1553208 to KBW.

  11. Chemical Compositions and Aroma Evaluation of Volatile Oil from the Industrial Cultivation Medium of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Toshirou; Usami, Atsushi; Nakaya, Satoshi; Maeba, Keisuke; Yonejima, Yasunori; Toyoda, Masanori; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is one of the major lactic acid bacterium (LAB) species colonizing the intestines of animals and humans. The characteristic odor of the volatile oils obtained from both the liquid medium after incubation (MAI) and liquid medium before incubation (MBI) in the cultivation process of E. faecalis was investigated to determine the utility of the liquid medium. In total, fifty-six and thirty-two compounds were detected in the volatile oils from the MAI (MAI oil) and MBI (MBI oil), respectively. The principle components of MAI oil were 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (19.3%), phenylacetaldehyde (19.3%), and phenylethyl alcohol (9.3%). The aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) method was performed using gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). The total number of aroma-active compounds identified in the volatile oil from MBI and MAI was thirteen compounds; in particular, 5-methyl-2-furanmethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethyl alcohol were the most primary aroma-active compounds in MAI oil. These results imply that the industrial cultivation medium after incubation of E. faecalis may be utilized as a source of volatile oils.

  12. Enterococcus faecalis from healthy infants modulates inflammation through MAPK signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugui Wang

    Full Text Available Colonizing commensal bacteria after birth are required for the proper development of the gastrointestinal tract. It is believed that bacterial colonization pattern in neonatal gut affects gut barrier function and immune system maturation. Studies on the development of faecal microbiota in infants showed that the neonatal gut was first colonized with enterococci followed by other microbiota such as Bifidobacterium. Other studies showed that babies who developed allergy were less often colonized with Enterococcus during the first month of life as compared to healthy infants. Many studies have been conducted to elucidate how bifidobacteria or lactobacilli, some of which are considered probiotic, regulate infant gut immunity. However, fewer studies have been focused on enterococi. In our study, we demonstrate that E. faecalis, isolated from healthy newborns, suppress inflammatory responses activated in vivo and in vitro. We found E. faecalis attenuates proinflammatory cytokine secretions, especially IL-8, through JNK and p38 signaling pathways. This finding shed light on how the first colonizer, E.faecalis, regulates inflammatory responses in the host.

  13. Antimicrobial effect of a modified vanadium chloroperoxidase on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms at root canal pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, I.F.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Bury, A.; Wesselink, P.R.; Hartog, A.F.; Wever, R.; Crielaard, W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Previous research showed an antimicrobial effect of vanadium chloroperoxidase (VCPO) on in vitro Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. The current study aimed to optimize the use of this enzyme at the root canal pH using a modified VCPO (mVCPO) that was adapted to function at a higher pH and

  14. Conjugal transfer of plasmid pAM beta 1 in Lactobacillus reuteri and between lactobacilli and Enterococcus faecalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tannock, G W

    1987-01-01

    The broad-host-range plasmid pAM beta 1 (erythromycin resistance) was transferred conjugally from Streptococcus lactis to Lactobacillus reuteri, L. murinus, and L. fermentum. Transfer of pAM beta 1 between two L. reuteri strains occurred, and lactobacillus transconjugants could act as donors of pAM beta 1 in crosses with Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2.

  15. Genogrouping and incidence of virulence factors of Enterococcus faecalis in liver transplant patients differ from blood culture and fecal isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, K; Muscholl-Silberhorn, AB; Slooff, MJH; Harmsen, HJM; Degener, JE; Willems, Rob J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a leading cause of infections in liver transplant patients. This study reviewed the incidence of virulence factors such as hemolysin, gelatinase, aggregation substances (asa1 and asa373), or the enterococcal surface protein (Esp) in isolates from liver transplant patients.

  16. Effect of pheromone induction on transfer of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 in intestinal mucus ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2001-01-01

    The effect of synthetic sex pheromone on pheromone-inducible conjugation between the isogenic Enterococcus faecalis strains OG1RF and OG1SS was investigated in (i) Todd-Hewitt broth medium and (ii) intestinal mucus isolated from germ-free rats. In broth, the presence of synthetic pheromone cCF10...

  17. Chitosan-propolis nanoparticle formulation demonstrates anti-bacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Teik Hwa; Chitra, Ebenezer; Ramamurthy, Srinivasan; Siddalingam, Rajinikanth Paruvathanahalli; Yuen, Kah Hay; Ambu, Stephen Periathamby; Davamani, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Propolis obtained from bee hives is a natural substance with antimicrobial properties. It is limited by its insolubility in aqueous solutions; hence ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Malaysian propolis were prepared. Both the extracts displayed antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against Enterococcus faecalis, a common bacterium associated with hospital-acquired infections. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of propolis revealed the presence of flavonoids like kaempferol and pinocembrin. This study investigated the role of propolis developed into nanoparticles with chitosan for its antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against E. faecalis. Bacteria that grow in a slimy layer of biofilm are resistant to penetration by antibacterial agents. The use of nanoparticles in medicine has received attention recently due to better bioavailability, enhanced penetrative capacity and improved efficacy. A chitosan-propolis nanoformulation was chosen based on ideal physicochemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, encapsulation efficiency and the rate of release of the active ingredients. This formulation inhibited E. faecalis biofilm formation and reduced the number of bacteria in the biofilm by ~90% at 200 μg/ml concentration. When tested on pre-formed biofilms, the formulation reduced bacterial number in the biofilm by ~40% and ~75% at 200 and 300 μg/ml, respectively. The formulation not only reduced bacterial numbers, but also physically disrupted the biofilm structure as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Treatment of biofilms with chitosan-propolis nanoparticles altered the expression of biofilm-associated genes in E. faecalis. The results of this study revealed that chitosan-propolis nanoformulation can be deemed as a potential anti-biofilm agent in resisting infections involving biofilm formation like chronic wounds and surgical site infections.

  18. Effect of fiber insertion depth on antibacterial efficacy of photodynamic therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in rootcanals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödig, Tina; Endres, Sarah; Konietschke, Frank; Zimmermann, Ortrud; Sydow, Hans Georg; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of fiber insertion depth on antimicrobial efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) using a photosensitizer (PS; toluidine blue) and a red light-emitting diode (LED) in root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared with nickel-titanium-instruments, sterilized, contaminated with E. faecalis, and incubated for 72 h. Roots were randomly divided into four experimental groups: PS only, LED only, aPDT with LED in the apical third, aPDT with LED in the coronal third, as well as into infection and sterile controls (each n = 10). Samples were taken by collecting standardized dentine shavings from the root canal walls. After serial dilution and culturing on blood agar, colony-forming units (CFU) were counted. Both aPDT groups showed a CFU reduction of 1-2 log 10 steps compared with the infection control, whereas the effect of fiber insertion depth was negligible (<0.5 log 10 steps). CFU reduction of approximately 0.5 log 10 steps for PS alone was detected compared with the infection control, but PS alone was less effective than both aPDT groups. No antibacterial effect was detected for LED alone. aPDT reduced E. faecalis within the root canal, whereas fiber insertion depth had a negligible influence on antimicrobial effectiveness of aPDT. The insertion depth of the light-emitting diode may not influence the antibacterial efficacy of photodynamic therapy against E. faecalis in straight root canals.

  19. Bactericidal effects of Nd:YAG laser irradiation and sodium hypochlorite solution on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Gholizadeh, Seddigheh; Shakouie, Sahar; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad Hossein; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Froughreyhani, Mohammad; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effects of Nd:YAG laser on biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis. It is difficult to eliminate bacterial biofilms with routine endodontic preparation techniques. It might be possible to eliminate biofilms remaining in the root canals of teeth with lasers. The root canals of 60 extracted teeth were prepared and E. faecalis biofilms were formed within the root canals. Then the teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 15. Group 1 samples did not undergo any interventions, to serve as controls. Group 2 samples underwent a 3-W laser beam for 10 sec. The root canals in group 3 were irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite for 15 min and then irradiated with a 3-W laser beam for 10 sec. The root canals in group 4 were irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite for 15 min. Dentin chips were collected from the root canal walls and weighed. Then the chips were used to prepare a suspension. The classic colony-forming unit (CFU) counting technique was used to determine remaining bacterial counts. The bacterial counts in groups 2 and 4 had decreased to 54% and 2.39% of the control group, respectively. In group 3 no bacterial growth was observed. There were no significant differences between groups 1 and 2 (p>0.05). Based on the results of the present study, the effect of Nd:YAG laser beam on E. faecalis biofilm is less than that of sodium hypochlorite solution. A combination of laser and sodium hypochlorite results in complete elimination of E. faecalis biofilm.

  20. Evaluation of antibacterial efficacy of fungal-derived silver nanoparticles against Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Rahul Halkai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main objective of endodontic therapy is complete elimination and prevention of bacteria from the root canal system; however, it is difficult due to anatomical ramifications of root canal system and growing resistant microbes to available disinfectants. Therefore, to overcome this problem, newer antimicrobial agents have to be developed. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of fungal-derived biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs against Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: Freshly prepared silver nanoparticles using the endophytic fungi Fusarium semitectum, characterized by different techniques were used to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy against E. faecalis by agar well diffusion method measuring the zone of inhibition using different concentrations of nanoparticles (AgNPs (A [20 μl], B [40 μl], C [60 μl], D [80 μl], and E [100 μl], F (0.2% chlorhexidine [CHX], G (2% CHX, H (ampicillin, and I (distilled water were used as control groups. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey multiple comparison test was done. Results: AgNPs (100 ml showed highest zone of inhibition 19.5 mm against E. faecalis. CHX (0.2% 14.52 mm, CHX (2% 20.02 mm, and ampicillin showed highest mean zone of inhibition 20.5 mm and distilled water showed no zone of inhibition. Results indicate no significant difference between E (100 μl, G (2% CHX, and H (ampicillin (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: Biosynthesized AgNPs exhibit efficient antibacterial activity against E. faecalis and therefore can be used as root canal irrigant or intracanal medicament for root canal disinfection.

  1. Chitosan-propolis nanoparticle formulation demonstrates anti-bacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teik Hwa Ong

    Full Text Available Propolis obtained from bee hives is a natural substance with antimicrobial properties. It is limited by its insolubility in aqueous solutions; hence ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Malaysian propolis were prepared. Both the extracts displayed antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against Enterococcus faecalis, a common bacterium associated with hospital-acquired infections. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of propolis revealed the presence of flavonoids like kaempferol and pinocembrin. This study investigated the role of propolis developed into nanoparticles with chitosan for its antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against E. faecalis. Bacteria that grow in a slimy layer of biofilm are resistant to penetration by antibacterial agents. The use of nanoparticles in medicine has received attention recently due to better bioavailability, enhanced penetrative capacity and improved efficacy. A chitosan-propolis nanoformulation was chosen based on ideal physicochemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, encapsulation efficiency and the rate of release of the active ingredients. This formulation inhibited E. faecalis biofilm formation and reduced the number of bacteria in the biofilm by ~90% at 200 μg/ml concentration. When tested on pre-formed biofilms, the formulation reduced bacterial number in the biofilm by ~40% and ~75% at 200 and 300 μg/ml, respectively. The formulation not only reduced bacterial numbers, but also physically disrupted the biofilm structure as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Treatment of biofilms with chitosan-propolis nanoparticles altered the expression of biofilm-associated genes in E. faecalis. The results of this study revealed that chitosan-propolis nanoformulation can be deemed as a potential anti-biofilm agent in resisting infections involving biofilm formation like chronic wounds and surgical site infections.

  2. Diode Laser and Calcium Hydroxide for Elimination of Enterococcus Faecalis in Root Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Naghavi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ultimate goal of endodontic treatment is to eliminate the bacterial infection in the root canal system. While mechanical debridement combined with chemical irrigation removes the bulk of microorganisms, residual bacteria are readily detectable in approximately one-half of teeth just prior to obturation. Laser light can be used to destroy bacteria. This in vitro study was performed to evaluate the effect of diode laser and calcium hydroxide on mono-infected dental canals.Methods: Fifty five single-rooted human premolars were prepared and contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. After three weeks of incubation, the samples were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 and two control groups (n = 5. In the first and second groups, the teeth were rinsed for 5 min with either sterile saline or 5.25% NaOCl and irradiated with a 810-nm diode laser at 1.5 W output for 5 × 4s. In the third group, the teeth were rinsed with 5.25% NaOCl and then Ca(OH2 paste was inserted in the canals for 1 week. Intracanal bacterial sampling was done and the samples were plated to determine the CFU count. Results: 5.25% NaOCl plus laser was as effective as calcium hydroxide and significantly more effective than sterile saline (P>0.05 in elimination of E. faecalis. Complete elimination of E. faecalis was seen only for the one week calcium hydroxide treatment. Conclusion: Combination therapy with NaOCl irrigation and diode laser irradiation can be recommended as an effective treatment option for elimination of E. faecalis from the root canal system.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Diode Laser and Sodium Hypochlorite in Enterococcus Faecalis-Contaminated Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Khosrow; Sooratgar, Aidin; Zolfagharnasab, Kaveh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Afkhami, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the disinfection ability of 980-nm diode laser in comparison with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as a common root canal irrigant in canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). The root canals of 18 extracted single-rooted premolars were prepared by rotary system. After decoronation, the roots were autoclaved. One specimen was chosen for the negative control, and the remaining teeth were incubated with E. faecalis suspension for two weeks. Subsequently, one specimen was selected as the positive control and the remaining samples were divided into two groups (n=8). The samples of the first group were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and the second group were treated with a 980-nm diode laser. Microbial samples were taken from the root canals and bacterial cultivation was carried out. The average value and the standard deviation of colony-forming units (CFU) of each specimen were measured using descriptive statistics. The student's t-test was used to compare the reduction in CFU in each group. The equality of variance of CFU was measured by the Levene's test. NaOCl resulted in 99.87% removal of the bacteria and showed significantly more antibacterial effect compared to the 980-nm diode laser which led to 96.56% bacterial reduction (P<0.05). Although 5.25% NaOCl seems to reduce E. faecalis more effectively, the diode laser also reduced the bacterial count. Therefore a 980-nm diode laser could be considered as a complementary disinfection method in root canal treatment.

  4. Global regulation of gene expression by the MafR protein of Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía eRuiz-Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is a natural inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. However, as an opportunistic pathogen, it is able to colonize other host niches and cause life-threatening infections. Its adaptation to new environments involves global changes in gene expression. The EF3013 gene (here named mafR of E. faecalis strain V583 encodes a protein (MafR, 482 residues that has sequence similarity to global response regulators of the Mga/AtxA family. The enterococcal OG1RF genome also encodes the MafR protein (gene OG1RF_12293. In this work, we have identified the promoter of the mafR gene using several in vivo approaches. Moreover, we show that MafR influences positively the transcription of many genes on a genome-wide scale. The most significant target genes encode components of PTS-type membrane transporters, components of ABC-type membrane transporters, and proteins involved in the metabolism of carbon sources. Some of these genes were previously reported to be up-regulated during the growth of E. faecalis in blood and/or in human urine. Furthermore, we show that a mafR deletion mutant strain induces a significant lower degree of inflammation in the peritoneal cavity of mice, suggesting that enterococcal cells deficient in MafR are less virulent. Our work indicates that MafR is a global transcriptional regulator. It might facilitate the adaptation of E. faecalis to particular host niches and, therefore, contribute to its potential virulence.

  5. Calcium-silicate mesoporous nanoparticles loaded with chlorhexidine for both anti- Enterococcus faecalis and mineralization properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In infected periapical tissues, Enterococcus faecalis is one of the most common dominant bacteria. Chlorhexidine has been proved to show strong antibacterial ability against E. faecalis but is ineffective in promoting mineralization for tissues around root apex. Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles are newly synthesized biomaterials with excellent ability to promote mineralization and carry-release bioactive molecules in a controlled manner. In this study, mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles were functionalized with chlorhexidine and their releasing profile, antibacterial ability, effect on cell proliferation and in vitro mineralization property were evaluated. Results The chlorhexidine was successfully incorporated into mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles by a mixing-coupling method. The new material could release chlorhexidine as well as Ca2+ and SiO3 2− in a sustained manner with an alkaline pH value under different conditions. The antimicrobial ability against planktonic E. faecalis was dramatically improved after chlorhexidine incorporation. The nanoparticles with chlorhexidine showed no negative effect on cell proliferation with low concentrations. On dentin slices, the new synthesized material demonstrated a similar inhibitory effect on E. faecalis as the chlorhexidine. After being immersed in SBF for 9 days, numerous apatite crystals could be observed on surfaces of the material tablets. Conclusions Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles loaded with chlorhexidine exhibited release of ions and chlorhexidine, low cytotoxicity, excellent antibacterial ability and in vitro mineralization. This material could be developed into a new effective intra-canal medication in dentistry or a new bone defect filling material for infected bone defects.

  6. Structural studies of the Enterococcus faecalis SufU [Fe-S] cluster protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, Gustavo P; Verli, Hugo; Frazzon, Jeverson

    2009-02-02

    Iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous and evolutionarily ancient inorganic prosthetic groups, the biosynthesis of which depends on complex protein machineries. Three distinct assembly systems involved in the maturation of cellular Fe-S proteins have been determined, designated the NIF, ISC and SUF systems. Although well described in several organisms, these machineries are poorly understood in Gram-positive bacteria. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the Enterococcus spp. genus have recently assumed importance in clinical microbiology being considered as emerging pathogens for humans, wherein Enterococcus faecalis represents the major species associated with nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phylogenetic analysis in Enterococcus faecalis V583 and a structural and conformational characterisation of it SufU protein. BLAST searches of the Enterococcus genome revealed a series of genes with sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SUF machinery of [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis, namely sufB, sufC, sufD and SufS. In addition, the E. coli IscU ortholog SufU was found to be the scaffold protein of Enterococcus spp., containing all features considered essential for its biological activity, including conserved amino acid residues involved in substrate and/or co-factor binding (Cys50,76,138 and Asp52) and, phylogenetic analyses showed a close relationship with orthologues from other Gram-positive bacteria. Molecular dynamics for structural determinations and molecular modeling using E. faecalis SufU primary sequence protein over the PDB:1su0 crystallographic model from Streptococcus pyogenes were carried out with a subsequent 50 ns molecular dynamic trajectory. This presented a stable model, showing secondary structure modifications near the active site and conserved cysteine residues. Molecular modeling using Haemophilus influenzae IscU primary sequence over the PDB:1su0 crystal followed by a MD trajectory was performed to analyse differences in the

  7. Structural studies of the Enterococcus faecalis SufU [Fe-S] cluster protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazzon Jeverson

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous and evolutionarily ancient inorganic prosthetic groups, the biosynthesis of which depends on complex protein machineries. Three distinct assembly systems involved in the maturation of cellular Fe-S proteins have been determined, designated the NIF, ISC and SUF systems. Although well described in several organisms, these machineries are poorly understood in Gram-positive bacteria. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the Enterococcus spp. genus have recently assumed importance in clinical microbiology being considered as emerging pathogens for humans, wherein Enterococcus faecalis represents the major species associated with nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phylogenetic analysis in Enterococcus faecalis V583 and a structural and conformational characterisation of it SufU protein. Results BLAST searches of the Enterococcus genome revealed a series of genes with sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SUF machinery of [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis, namely sufB, sufC, sufD and SufS. In addition, the E. coli IscU ortholog SufU was found to be the scaffold protein of Enterococcus spp., containing all features considered essential for its biological activity, including conserved amino acid residues involved in substrate and/or co-factor binding (Cys50,76,138 and Asp52 and, phylogenetic analyses showed a close relationship with orthologues from other Gram-positive bacteria. Molecular dynamics for structural determinations and molecular modeling using E. faecalis SufU primary sequence protein over the PDB:1su0 crystallographic model from Streptococcus pyogenes were carried out with a subsequent 50 ns molecular dynamic trajectory. This presented a stable model, showing secondary structure modifications near the active site and conserved cysteine residues. Molecular modeling using Haemophilus influenzae IscU primary sequence over the PDB:1su0 crystal followed by a MD

  8. Virulence Genes among Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Coastal Beaches and Human and Nonhuman Sources in Southern California and Puerto Rico

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    Donna M. Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium are harmless to humans; however, strains harboring virulence genes, including esp, gelE, cylA, asa1, and hyl, have been associated with human infections. E. faecalis and E. faecium are present in beach waters worldwide, yet little is known about their virulence potential. Here, multiplex PCR was used to compare the distribution of virulence genes among E. faecalis and E. faecium isolated from beaches in Southern California and Puerto Rico to isolates from potential sources including humans, animals, birds, and plants. All five virulence genes were found in E. faecalis and E. faecium from beach water, mostly among E. faecalis. gelE was the most common among isolates from all source types. There was a lower incidence of asa1, esp, cylA, and hyl genes among isolates from beach water, sewage, septage, urban runoff, sea wrack, and eelgrass as compared to human isolates, indicating that virulent strains of E. faecalis and E. faecium may not be widely disseminated at beaches. A higher frequency of asa1 and esp among E. faecalis from dogs and of asa1 among birds (mostly seagull suggests that further studies on the distribution and virulence potential of strains carrying these genes may be warranted.

  9. Comparison of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis Strains Isolated from Water and Clinical Samples: Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genetic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mazari-Hiríart, Marisa; Ponce de León, Sergio; Amieva-Fernández, Rosa I.; Agis-Juárez, Raúl A.; Huebner, Johannes; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Enterococci are part of the normal intestinal flora in a large number of mammals, and these microbes are currently used as indicators of fecal contamination in water and food for human consumption. These organisms are considered one of the primary causes of nosocomial and environmental infections due to their ability to survive in the environment and to their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials. The aims of this study were to determine the biochemical patterns and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from clinical samples and from water (groundwater, water from the Xochimilco wetland, and treated water from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area) and to determine the genetic relationships among these isolates. A total of 121 enterococcus strains were studied; 31 and 90 strains were isolated from clinical samples and water (groundwater, water from the Xochimilco wetland, and water for agricultural irrigation), respectively. Identification to the species level was performed using a multiplex PCR assay, and antimicrobial profiles were obtained using a commercial kit. Twenty-eight strains were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). E. faecium strains isolated from water showed an atypical biochemical pattern. The clinical isolates showed higher resistance to antibiotics than those from water. Both the enterococci isolated from humans, and those isolated from water showed high genetic diversity according to the PFGE analysis, although some strains seemed to be closely related. In conclusion, enterococci isolated from humans and water are genetically different. However, water represents a potential route of transmission to the community and a source of antimicrobial resistance genes that may be readily transmitted to other, different bacterial species. PMID:23560050

  10. Antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of Enterococcus faecalis and faecium bacteria isolated from the human and the livestock sources

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    Yaser Sharifi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococci have emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections and within this group, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium cause the majority of human and livestock enterococcal infections. In this article, we tried to determine antibiotics and metals resistance patterns of E. faecalis and E. faecium strains. Methods: One hundred sixty different strains of E. faecalis and E. faecium were collected from livestock sewage and the human fecal waste during 15 months. Then bacterial antibiotics sensitivity tests were carried out using the Agar disc diffusion method. Results: Generally, 100% of E. faecalis strains separated from human and livestock sources (i.e. sheep showed penicillin (P/ kanamycin (K/ nitrofurantoin (N/ loracarbef (L/ Ciprofloxacin (Cc/ ampicillin (AN/ nalidixic acid (NA/ sulfamethoxazole (S antibiotics resistance patterns. In addition, 55% of isolated E. faecium showed P/S/AN/NA antibiotics resistance patterns. Each strain showed a resistance to at least two aminoglycoside antibiotics. However, E. faecalis strains from human and the livestock sources showed 94% and 100% of resistance to nitrofurantoin, respectively. The effects of different metal concentrations was evaluated in both strains. The agar dilution method was applied in this stage. Hg at 0.05 mmol/L of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC showed toxicity to both the human and livestock Enterococcus strains. Cadmium at 1 mmol/L and 0.5 mmol/L concentrations had the most toxicity to E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, respectively. Obviously, toxicity to bacteria is less than other metals. As a result, Zn/Ni/Cu/Co resistance pattern is suggested for both strains. Finally, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns were monitored simultaneously. Conclusion: Almost all E. faecalis strains isolated from humans and livestock showed antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of P/K/L/Cc/S/AN/NA/Zn/Cu/Co simultaneously. Moreover, 55% of E

  11. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei; Huang Jun; Wang Xingquan; Lv Guohua; Zhang Guoping [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100190 Beijing (China); Du Ning; Liu Xiaodi; Guo Lihong [Department of Oral Biology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 100080 Beijing (China); Yang Size [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100190 Beijing (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O{sub 2} plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O{sub 2} plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O{sub 2} (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  12. The effect of carvacrol on Enterococcus faecalis as an intracanal medicament-Invitro study

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    Sharifian M.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Researches have shown that bacteria play the main role in development of pulpal and periapical diseases. Chemo-mechanical cleaning of infected root-canal system can not remove all of the microorganisms. Thus interappointment medicaments are necessary to aid this goal. Calcium hydroxide is one of the most useful medicaments in root canal therapy, but this medicament can not eliminated all of the bacteria in root canal system. Carvacrol is an edible plant extract that has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. If this extract is effective against endodontic bacteria, it can be used as an root canal medicament. "nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, Initially, MIC and MBC of carvacrol detected with Macro broth dilution method and determined as 0.3% and 0.6%, respectively. After that, 30 single root and single canal extracted human teeth were used in this study. The number of specimens determined in a pilot study on 4 extracted teeth. After preparation to apical size # 30 with hand and rotary instruments, teeth were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups. After culturing Enterococcus faecalis in prepared canals, we used emulsion of 0.6% carvacrol and calcium hydroxide in two A and B experimental groups for 7 days as the intracanal medicament. Microbial samples obtained before and after experiment. Then, canals with negative culture selected to obtain dentinal shaving to culture. Data obtained from microbiological samples analyzed with kruskal-wallis and Bonferroni tests. "nResults: Results of this study showed that emulsion of 0.6% carvacrol has no significant difference with calcium hydroxide in elimination enterococcus faecalis after 7 days dressing (p>0.05. "nConclusion: Carvacrol can be used as an intrappointment intracanal medicament.

  13. Serodiversity of opsonic antibodies against Enterococcus faecalis--glycans of the cell wall revisited.

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    Christian Theilacker

    Full Text Available In a typing system based on opsonic antibodies against carbohydrate antigens of the cell envelope, 60% of Enterococcus faecalis strains can be assigned to one of four serotypes (CPS-A to CPS-D. The structural basis for enterococcal serotypes, however, is still incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that antibodies raised against lipoteichoic acid (LTA from a CPS-A strain are opsonic to both CPS-A and CPS-B strains. LTA-specific antibodies also bind to LTA of CPS-C and CPS-D strains, but fail to opsonize them. From CPS-C and CPS-D strains resistant to opsonization by anti-LTA, we purified a novel diheteroglycan with a repeating unit of →6-β-Galf-(1→3- β-D-Glcp-(1→ with O-acetylation in position 5 and lactic acid substitution at position 3 of the Galf residue. The purified diheteroglycan, but not LTA absorbed opsonic antibodies from whole cell antiserum against E. faecalis type 2 (a CPS-C strain and type 5 (CPS-D. Rabbit antiserum raised against purified diheteroglycan opsonized CPS-C and CPS-D strains and passive protection with diheteroglycan-specific antiserum reduced bacterial counts by 1.4-3.4 logs in mice infected with E. faecalis strains of the CPS-C and CPS-D serotype. Diheteroglycan-specific opsonic antibodies were absorbed by whole bacterial cells of E. faecalis FA2-2 (CPS-C but not by its isogenic acapsular cpsI-mutant and on native PAGE purified diheteroglycan co-migrated with the gene product of the cps-locus, suggesting that it is synthesized by this locus. In summary, two polysaccharide antigens, LTA and a novel diheteroglycan, are targets of opsonic antibodies against typeable E. faecalis strains. These cell-wall associated polymers are promising candidates for active and passive vaccination and add to our armamentarium to fight this important nosocomial pathogen.

  14. The Natural Surfactant Glycerol Monolaurate Significantly Reduces Development of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Donavon J.; Henry-Stanley, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bacterial biofilms are involved in a large proportion of clinical infections, including device-related infections. Unfortunately, biofilm-associated bacteria are typically less susceptible to antibiotics, and infected devices must often be removed. On the basis of a recent observation that lipid-rich biofilm matrix material is present in early biofilm formation and may protect a population of bacteria from interacting with ordinarily diffusible small molecules, we hypothesized that surfactants may be useful in preventing biofilm development. Methods: Experimental Staphylococcus aureus or Enterococcus faecalis biofilms were cultivated on surgical suture suspended in a growth medium supplemented with the natural surfactant glycerol monolaurate (GML) or with a component molecule, lauric acid. After 16 h incubation, the numbers of viable biofilm-associated bacteria were measured by standard microbiologic techniques and biofilm biomass was measured using the colorimetric crystal violet assay. Results: Both GML and lauric acid were effective in inhibiting biofilm development as measured by decreased numbers of viable biofilm-associated bacteria as well as decreased biofilm biomass. Compared with lauric acid on a molar basis, GML represented a more effective inhibitor of biofilms formed by either S. aureus or E. faecalis. Conclusions: Because the natural surfactant GML inhibited biofilm development, resulting data were consistent with the hypothesis that lipids may play an important role in biofilm growth, implying that interfering with lipid formation may help control development of clinically relevant biofilms. PMID:26110557

  15. Bactericial effect of a non-thermal plasma needle against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunqi; Schaudinn, C.; Jaramillo, D. E.; Sedghizadeh, P. P.; Webster, P.; Costerton, J. W.

    2011-10-01

    Up to 3 cm long submillimeter-in-scale plasma needle was generated in ambient atmosphere for root canal disinfection. Powered with 1-2 kHz, multi-kilovolt nanosecond electric pulses, this He/(1%)O2 plasma jet consists of ionization fronts propagating at speeds of the order of 107 cm/s. Plasma treatment of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms on hydroxyapatite (HA) discs for 5 min resulted in severe damage of the bacterial cells and sterilized HA surfaces of more than 3 mm in diameter, observed by the scanning electron microscopy. With a curing dielectric microtube placed 1 cm or less below the nozzle, the plasma jet entered even at a sharp angle and followed the curvature of the tube, and reached the bottom of the tube. The bactericidal effect of the plasma needle against E. faecalis biofilm grown on the inner surfaces of the tube was demonstrated. However, the bactericidal effect weakens or diminishes for the bacteria grown deeper in the tube, indicating improvement of the plasma treatment scheme is needed. Mechanisms of the plasma bactericidal effects are discussed. Supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. The Presence and Origin of Enterococcus faecalis in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachman, A. J.; Sturm, P.; Viqueira Ríos, R.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a watershed management plan is being developed for Cabo Rojo region in Southwest Puerto Rico. This project fills in major gaps for water quality data on the Rio Viejo, a tributary on the Guanajibio River. The Rio Viejo flows through the town of Cabo Rojo, a town of 51,245 people. The project has identified 5 sites along the river to track bacterial loads. In the tropics, Enterococcus faecalis is an important indicator for fecal contamination in surface waters as it does not reproduce as quickly soils as E. coli. A combination of EPA 1600 and 9230B from Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater for identification of E. faecalis were utilized. The assay is a four step procedure that identifies the four criteria of bacteria in the group D Streptococcus system. The criteria require that the bacteria are Gram-positive cocci and Esculin-positive. There also must be growth in Brain Heart Infusion Broth at 35C and 45C as well as growth in Brain Heart Infusion broth + 6.5% NaCl. Further research will be conducted at North Carolina State University to ascertain the vertebrate species that is the source of the contamination through the use of qPCR.

  17. The Relationship among Tyrosine Decarboxylase and Agmatine Deiminase Pathways in Enterococcus faecalis

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    Marta Perez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are considered mainly responsible for the undesirable accumulation of the biogenic amines tyramine and putrescine in cheeses. The biosynthesis of tyramine and putrescine has been described as a species trait in Enterococcus faecalis. Tyramine is formed by the decarboxylation of the amino acid tyrosine, by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC route encoded in the tdc cluster. Putrescine is formed from agmatine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI pathway encoded in the agdi cluster. These biosynthesis routes have been independently studied, tyrosine and agmatine transcriptionally regulate the tdc and agdi clusters. The objective of the present work is to study the possible co-regulation among TDC and AGDI pathways in E. faecalis. In the presence of agmatine, a positive correlation between putrescine biosynthesis and the tyrosine concentration was found. Transcriptome studies showed that tyrosine induces the transcription of putrescine biosynthesis genes and up-regulates pathways involved in cell growth. The tyrosine modulation over AGDI route was not observed in the mutant Δtdc strain. Fluorescence analyses using gfp as reporter protein revealed PaguB (the promoter of agdi catabolic genes was induced by tyrosine in the wild-type but not in the mutant strain, confirming that tdc cluster was involved in the tyrosine induction of putrescine biosynthesis. This study also suggests that AguR (the transcriptional regulator of agdi was implicated in interaction among the two clusters.

  18. The Intraperitoneal Transcriptome of the Opportunistic Pathogen Enterococcus faecalis in Mice.

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    Cécile Muller

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive lactic acid intestinal opportunistic bacterium with virulence potential. For a better understanding of the adapation of this bacterium to the host conditions, we performed a transcriptome analysis of bacteria isolated from an infection site (mouse peritonitis by RNA-sequencing. We identified a total of 211 genes with significantly higher transcript levels and 157 repressed genes. Our in vivo gene expression database reflects well the infection process since genes encoding important virulence factors like cytolysin, gelatinase or aggregation substance as well as stress response proteins, are significantly induced. Genes encoding metabolic activities are the second most abundant in vivo induced genes demonstrating that the bacteria are metabolically active and adapt to the special nutrient conditions of the host. α- and β- glucosides seem to be important substrates for E. faecalis inside the host. Compared to laboratory conditions, the flux through the upper part of glycolysis seems to be reduced and more carbon may enter the pentose phosphate pathway. This may reflect the need of the bacteria under infection conditions to produce more reducing power for biosynthesis. Another important substrate is certainly glycerol since both pathways of glycerol catabolism are strongly induced. Strongly in vivo induced genes should be important for the infection process. This assumption has been verified in a virulence test using well characterized mutants affected in glycerol metabolism. This showed indeed that mutants unable to metabolize this sugar alcohol are affected in organ colonisation in a mouse model.

  19. [In vitro activity of ampicillin-ceftriaxone against Enterococcus faecalis isolates recovered from invasive infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguer Moreira, Noelia; Nastro, Marcela; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Ángela; Rodríguez, Carlos Hernán

    2016-01-01

    In vitro activity of the combination of ampicillin- ceftriaxone against 30 Enterococcus faecalis isolates recovered from invasive infections in patients admitted to Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martin in the city of Buenos Aires was assessed. Ampicillin- ceftriaxone synergies were determined by microdilution in Müeller-Hinton (MH) broth with and without subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone. Synergy was detected in 22/30 isolates. A decrease in both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed in 14/30 isolates, whereas in 6/30 isolates the decrease was observed in the MIC value and only in the MBC value in the 2 remaining isolates. The bactericidal activity of the combination showed to be higher at low concentrations of ampicillin (ceftriaxone combination and thus, its efficacy was confirmed in the treatment of severe infections by E. faecalis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibacterial Efficacy of Calcium Hypochlorite with Vibringe Sonic Irrigation System on Enterococcus faecalis: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumani, Aysin; Guvenmez, Hatice Korkmaz; Yilmaz, Sehnaz; Yoldas, Oguz; Kurklu, Zeliha Gonca Bek

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro efficacy of calcium hypochlorite (Ca[OCl]2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) associated with sonic (Vibringe) irrigation system in root canals which were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Material and Methods. The root canals of 84 single-rooted premolars were enlarged up to a file 40, autoclaved, inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis, and incubated for 21 days. The samples were divided into 7 groups according to the irrigation protocol: G0: no treatment; G1: distilled water; G2: 2.5% NaOCl; G3: 2.5% Ca(OCl)2; G4: distilled water with sonic activation; G5: 2.5% NaOCl with sonic activation; and G6: 2.5% Ca(OCl)2 with sonic activation. Before and after decontamination procedures microbiological samples were collected and the colony-forming units were counted and the percentages of reduction were calculated. Results. Distilled water with syringe irrigation and sonic activation groups demonstrated poor antibacterial effect on Enterococcus faecalis compared to other experimental groups (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between syringe and sonic irrigation systems with Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl. Conclusion. The antimicrobial property of Ca(OCl)2 has been investigated and compared with that of NaOCl. Both conventional syringe irrigation and sonic irrigation were found effective at removing E. faecalis from the root canal of extracted human teeth.

  1. Antibacterial Efficacy of Calcium Hypochlorite with Vibringe Sonic Irrigation System on Enterococcus faecalis: An In Vitro Study

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    Aysin Dumani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro efficacy of calcium hypochlorite (Ca[OCl]2 and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl associated with sonic (Vibringe irrigation system in root canals which were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Material and Methods. The root canals of 84 single-rooted premolars were enlarged up to a file 40, autoclaved, inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis, and incubated for 21 days. The samples were divided into 7 groups according to the irrigation protocol: G0: no treatment; G1: distilled water; G2: 2.5% NaOCl; G3: 2.5% Ca(OCl2; G4: distilled water with sonic activation; G5: 2.5% NaOCl with sonic activation; and G6: 2.5% Ca(OCl2 with sonic activation. Before and after decontamination procedures microbiological samples were collected and the colony-forming units were counted and the percentages of reduction were calculated. Results. Distilled water with syringe irrigation and sonic activation groups demonstrated poor antibacterial effect on Enterococcus faecalis compared to other experimental groups (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between syringe and sonic irrigation systems with Ca(OCl2 and NaOCl. Conclusion. The antimicrobial property of Ca(OCl2 has been investigated and compared with that of NaOCl. Both conventional syringe irrigation and sonic irrigation were found effective at removing E. faecalis from the root canal of extracted human teeth.

  2. New trends in dentistry: plant extracts against Enterococcus faecalis. The efficacy compared to chlorhexidine

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    Adriana Lígia de Castilho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is an important pathogen associated with endodontic diseases, and its elimination and control are of paramount importance, as it represents one of the major causes of failure in the treatment of endodontic disease. Twenty-five plant extracts obtained from Brazilian forests were found to be effective against planktonic E. faecalis and were subjected to two traditional antibacterial assays, the microdilution broth assay (MDBA and the disk diffusion assay (DDA, using chlorhexidine (CHX as a control. Seven out of 25 extracts showed significant antibacterial activity and were tested in a biofilm assay, and three of these extracts were subjected to chemical fractionation. Residues were tested for their antibacterial activity, and the first chemical findings were described based on thin layer chromatography (TLC. Extracts obtained from Ipomoea alba, Symphonia globulifera and Moronobea coccinea showed significant bactericidal activity in the MDBA. The same I. alba and S. globulifera extracts, as well as the extract obtained from Connarus ruber var. ruber, showed significant activity in the DDA. RH2O obtained from Psidium densicomum and Stryphnodendron pulcherrimum showed better antibacterial activity compared to the respective crude extracts and CHX. TLC analysis showed that phenolic compounds and triterpenes represent the first findings of chemical groups that may occur in all species. The results of the present study include the discovery of six active extracts against planktonic E. faecalis and support further testing via assays involving biofilm formation, as well as the determination of the compounds' chemical profiles, as their activity was significantly better than that observed for CHX.

  3. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase and use in identifying Streptococcus agalactiae secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M H; Nittayajarn, A; Ross, R P; Rothschild, C B; Parsonage, D; Claiborne, A; Rubens, C E

    1999-09-01

    We have identified and characterized an Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase (AP, encoded by phoZ). The predicted gene product shows homology with alkaline phosphatases from a variety of species; it has especially high similarity with two alkaline phosphatases from Bacillus subtilis. Expression of phoZ in Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), or Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) produces a blue-colony phenotype on plates containing a chromogenic substrate, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate (XP or BCIP). Two tests were made to determine if the activity of the enzyme is dependent upon the enzyme's subcellular location. First, elimination of the signal sequence reduced AP activity to 3% of the wild-type activity (or less) in three species of gram-positive bacteria. Restoration of export, using the signal sequence from C5a peptidase, restored AP activity to at least 50% of that of the wild type. Second, we engineered two chimeric proteins in which AP was fused to either a periplasmic domain or a cytoplasmic domain of lactose permease (a membrane protein). In E. coli, the periplasmic fusion had 17-fold-higher AP activity than the cytoplasmic fusion. We concluded that AP activity is export dependent. The signal sequence deletion mutant, phoZDeltass, was used to identify random genomic fragments from GBS that encode exported proteins or integral membrane proteins. Included in this set of fragments were genes that exhibited homology with the Rib protein (a cell wall protein from GBS) or with DppB (an integral membrane protein from GAS). AP acts as a reporter enzyme in GBS, GAS, and E. faecalis and is expected to be useful in a variety of gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Effect of Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation on Enterococcus faecalis from Root Canals: An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; de Faria-Júnior, Norberto Batista; Watanabe, Evandro; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic irrigation aims to clean and disinfect the root canal system. Passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) is based on the use of an ultrasound-activated instrument into the root canal filled with irrigant. The aim of this study was to evaluate, ex vivo, the effectiveness of PUI in eliminating Enterococcus faecalis from root canals. Seventy-five extracted human single-root teeth were used. After root canal preparation, specimens were inoculated with E. faecalis and incubated at 37 °C for 21 days. Specimens were distributed into five groups (n=15), according to the irrigation method: PUI + saline solution (PUI/SS); PUI + 1% NaOCl (PUI/NaOCl); conventional needle irrigation (CNI) + saline solution (CNI/SS); CNI + 1% NaOCl (CNI/NaOCl); No irrigation (control). Microbiological samples were collected at three time points: initial (21 days after inoculation), post-irrigation (immediately after irrigation), and final (7 days after irrigation). Data were obtained in CFU mL-1 and subjected to analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's tests at 5% significance level. The post-irrigation samples did not demonstrate statistical difference between PUI/SS and CNI/SS nor between PUI/NaOCl and CNI/NaOCl (p>0.05), but PUI/NaOCl and CNI/NaOCl had lower CFU mL-1 number than the other groups (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference was observed between the initial and post-irrigation samples and between the post-irrigation and final samples (p<0.05) in all groups, except in the control. The final samples of all groups presented bacterial counts similar to the initial samples. PUI or CNI with 1% NaOCl contribute to disinfection, but are unable to eradicate E. faecalis from the root canal system.

  5. Genome-wide identification of small RNAs in the opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583.

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    Kouki Shioya

    Full Text Available Small RNA molecules (sRNAs are key mediators of virulence and stress inducible gene expressions in some pathogens. In this work we identify sRNAs in the gram positive opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. We characterized 11 sRNAs by tiling microarray analysis, 5' and 3' RACE-PCR, and Northern blot analysis. Six sRNAs were specifically expressed at exponential phase, two sRNAs were observed at stationary phase, and three were detected during both phases. Searches of putative functions revealed that three of them (EFA0080_EFA0081 and EFB0062_EFB0063 on pTF1 and pTF2 plasmids, respectively, and EF0408_EF04092 located on the chromosome are similar to antisense RNA involved in plasmid addiction modules. Moreover, EF1097_EF1098 shares strong homologies with tmRNA (bi-functional RNA acting as both a tRNA and an mRNA and EF2205_EF2206 appears homologous to 4.5S RNA member of the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP ribonucleoprotein complex. In addition, proteomic analysis of the ΔEF3314_EF3315 sRNA mutant suggests that it may be involved in the turnover of some abundant proteins. The expression patterns of these transcripts were evaluated by tiling array hybridizations performed with samples from cells grown under eleven different conditions some of which may be encountered during infection. Finally, distribution of these sRNAs among genome sequences of 54 E. faecalis strains was assessed. This is the first experimental genome-wide identification of sRNAs in E. faecalis and provides impetus to the understanding of gene regulation in this important human pathogen.

  6. The effects of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine irrigants on the antibacterial activities of alkaline media against Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinglei; Tong, Zhongchun; Ling, Junqi; Liu, Hongyan; Wei, Xi

    2015-07-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX) and calcium hydroxide are common intracanal medicaments. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of NaOCl and CHX on the antibacterial activities of alkaline media against Enterococcus faecalis. The survival rates of planktonic and biofilm E. faecalis were evaluated by plate counts after 1 min of pretreatment with NaOCl and CHX, and time-kill assays were then used to assess subsequent pH alkaline challenges. Dead and living cells in the E. faecalis biofilm were assessed with SYTO 9 and PI staining in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy following exposure to NaOCl or CHX and subsequent alkaline challenges by common root canal irrigation and dressing procedures. One minute of pretreatment with 2% CHX, 0.2% CHX, or 5.25% NaOCl in combination with a subsequent alkaline challenge significantly decreased planktonic E. faecalis survival rates, but pretreatment with 1% NaOCl did not. The E. faecalis biofilm survival rates were reduced in the subsequent alkaline challenge following CHX pretreatment but gradually increased following NaOCl pretreatment. Similarly, CLSM analysis revealed that the greatest proportions of dead E. faecalis cells in the biofilms were presented in the CHX and alkaline treatment group. CHX might be more effective in improving the antibacterial activities of alkaline root canal medicaments against E. faecalis than NaOCl during routine root canal therapy procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The endolysin from the Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage VD13 and conditions stimulating its lytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Steven M; Rowley, D Treva; Young, Carly; Franks, Ashley; Hyman, Paul; Donovan, David M

    2016-09-14

    Bacteriophage produce endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases) to lyse the host cell from within and release nascent bacteriophage particles. Recombinant endolysins can lyse Gram-positive bacteria when added exogenously. As a potential alternative antimicrobial, we cloned and expressed the enterococcal VD13 bacteriophage endolysin. VD13 endolysin has a CHAP catalytic domain with 92% identity with the bacteriophage IME-EF1 endolysin. The predicted size of VD13 endolysin is ∼27 kDa as verified by SDS-PAGE. The VD13 endolysin lyses Enterococcus faecalis strains, but not Enterococcus faecium or other non-enterococci. VD13 endolysin has activity from pH 4 to pH 8, with peak activity at pH 5, and exhibits greater activity in the presence of calcium. Optimum activity at pH 5 occurs in the absence of NaCl. VD13 endolysin, in ammonium acetate (C 2 H 3 O 2 NH 4 ) calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) buffer pH 5, is stimulated to higher activity upon heating at temperatures up to 65°C for 30 minutes, whereas activity is lost upon heating to 42°C, in pH 7 buffer. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans in the community, broilers and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Agersø, Yvonne; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolated from humans in the community (98 and 65 isolates), broilers (126 and 122), and pigs (102 and 88) during 1998 were tested for susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents and for the presence of selected genes encoding resistance using PCR...... and pigs were susceptible to avilamycin, whereas 35% of isolates from broilers were resistant. All E. faecium isolates from humans were susceptible to vancomycin, whereas 10% and 17% of isolates from broilers and pigs, respectively, were resistant. A vancomycin resistant E. faecium isolate was found in one....... faecium isolates of human and animal origin, examined. tet(K) was not observed, whereas tet(L) was detected in 17% of tetracycline resistant E. faecalis isolates and in 16% of the E. faecium isolates. tet(O) was not detected in any of the isolates from pigs, but was observed in 38% of E. faecalis isolates...

  9. Investigation of the effect of rapid and slow external pH increases on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm grown on dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhouse, M; Zilm, P; Ratnayake, J; Cathro, P

    2018-01-11

    Calcium hydroxide is a common endodontic medicament and has an antimicrobial effect by increasing the localized pH within the root canal. However, Enterococcus faecalis has shown some resistance to calcium hydroxide. A flow cell apparatus was used to grow an E. faecalis biofilm on dentine discs. Following 4 weeks growth in Todd Hewitt Broth, flow cells were exposed to either a rapid or slow increase to pH 11.5 or 12.5. Cellular viability was determined using serial plating and the number of colony-forming units was normalized against the cellular protein content. Scanning electron microscopy was carried out to qualitatively observe the effects of the different rates of pH increase. A significant difference in viability between the pH rapid and slow groups was not shown in this study. Compared with pH 11.5 solutions, pH 12.5 solutions were more effective at killing bacteria although some E. faecalis still survived. Enterococcus faecalis did not adapt and develop a greater resistance to high pH following a slow rise in pH compared with a rapid rise in pH. As expected, pH 12.5 was more effective in reducing bacterial numbers compared with pH 11.5 although E. faecalis was not completely eliminated. © 2018 Australian Dental Association.

  10. Prevalence of Virulence Factors and Vancomycin-resistant Genes among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium Isolated from Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasaj, Mona; Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of virulence determinants and vancomycin-resistant genes among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium obtained from various clinical sources. The study was performed on the 280 enterococcal isolated from clinical specimens in Hamadan hospitals, western Iran in 2012-14. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods. The presence of vancomycin-resistant genes and virulence genes was investigated using PCR. Totally 280 enterococcal isolates were identified as follows: E. faecalis (62.5%), E. faecium (24%) and Enterococcus spp (13.5%). The results of antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that resistance rates to vancomycin and teicoplanin in E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates were 5% and 73%, respectively. Of Sixty vancomycin-resistant Enterococci strains, fifty-one isolates were identified as E. faecium (VREfm) and nine as E. faecalis (VREfs). Prevalence of esp, hyl, and asa1 genes were determined as 82%, 71.6%, and 100%, respectively in E. faecium strains; and 78%, 56/6%, and 97%, respectively in E. faecalis strains. The increased frequency of VREF, as seen with rapid rise in the number of vanA isolates should be considered in infection control practices.

  11. Presence of the resistance genes vanC1 and pbp5 in phenotypically vancomycin and ampicillin susceptible Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann; Hörmansdorfer, Stefan; Mölle, Gabriele; Preikschat, Petra; Kämpf, Peter; Bauer-Unkauf, Ilse; Bischoff, Meike; Hölzel, Christina

    2012-08-01

    Ampicillin and vancomycin are important antibiotics for the therapy of Enterococcus faecalis infections. The ampicillin resistance gene pbp5 is intrinsic in Enterococcus faecium. The vanC1 gene confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Both genes are chromosomally located. Resistance to ampicillin and vancomycin was determined in 484 E. faecalis of human and porcine origin by microdilution. Since E. faecalis are highly skilled to acquire resistance genes, all strains were investigated for the presence of pbp5 (and, in positive strains, for the penicillin-binding protein synthesis repressor gene psr) and vanC1 (and, in positive strains, for vanXYc and vanT) by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One porcine and one human isolate were phenotypically resistant to ampicillin; no strain was vancomycin resistant. Four E. faecalis (3/1 of porcine/human origin) carried pbp5 (MIC=1 mg/L), and four porcine strains were vanC1 positive (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]=1 mg/L). Real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR revealed that the genes were not expressed. The psr gene was absent in the four pbp5-positive strains; the vanXYc gene was absent in the four vanC1-positive strains. However, vanT of the vanC gene cluster was detected in two vanC1-positive strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of pbp5, identical with the "E. faecium pbp5 gene," and of vanC1/vanT in E. faecalis. Even if resistance is not expressed in these strains, this study shows that E. faecalis have a strong ability to acquire resistance genes-and potentially to spread them to other bacteria. Therefore, close monitoring of this species should be continued.

  12. High-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection: Twelve-year surveillance in the Minami Ibaraki Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuka, Hanako; Nakajima, Jun; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Funayama, Yasunori; Ebihara, Tsugio; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Saito, Kazuto; Koganemaru, Hiroshi; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2016-01-01

    We examined prevalence of high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection in the Minami Ibaraki Area. Ten strains of both species each, recovered from the blood or the cerebrospinal fluid between 2003 and 2014, were randomly selected every year. High-level resistance to gentamicin (HLR-GM) and streptomycin (HLR-SM) was detected in 34% (41 of 120 strains) and 18% (21) of E. faecalis and 9% (11) and 39% (48) of E. faecium, respectively. In comparisons of the proportions among three four-year periods, HLR-SM among E. faecium was significantly lower in the 2011-2014 period. All strains with HLR-GM were positive for the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. The ant(6')-Ia gene was detected in all with HLR-SM except for one E. faecalis strain. The present study showed that prevalence of HLR-GM among E. faecalis and E. faecium causing invasive infection in this area was nearly equivalent to that described in previous studies in Japan and that proportions of strains with HLAR did not vary during the study period except for that of HLR-SM among E. faecium. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The mazEF toxin-antitoxin system as an attractive target in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Sara; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Sekawi, Zamberi; Neela, Vasantha Kumari; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Taherikalani, Morovat; Khosravi, Afra; Ramli, Ramliza; Hamat, Rukman Awang

    2015-01-01

    The toxin-antitoxin (TA) system is a regulatory system where two sets of genes encode the toxin and its corresponding antitoxin. In this study, the prevalence of TA systems in independently isolated clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis was determined, the dominant TA system was identified, different virulence genes in E. faecium and E. faecalis were surveyed, the level of expression of the virulence and TA genes in normal and stress conditions was determined, and finally their associations with the TA genes were defined. Remarkably, the analysis demonstrated higBA and mazEF in all clinical isolates, and their locations were on chromosomes and plasmids, respectively. On the other hand, a quantitative analysis of TA and virulence genes revealed that the expression level in both genes is different under normal and stress conditions. The results obtained by anti-mazF peptide nucleic acids demonstrated that the expression level of virulence genes had decreased. These findings demonstrate an association between TA systems and virulence factors. The mazEF on the plasmids and the higBA TA genes on the chromosomes of all E. faecium and E. faecalis strains were dominant. Additionally, there was a decrease in the expression of virulence genes in the presence of anti-mazF peptide nucleic acids. Therefore, it is suggested that mazEF TA systems are potent and sensitive targets in all E. faecium and E. faecalis strains.

  14. New Combinations of Mutations in VanD-Type Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus avium Strains ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depardieu, F.; Foucault, M.-L.; Bell, J.; Dubouix, A.; Guibert, M.; Lavigne, J.-P.; Levast, M.; Courvalin, P.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the clinical isolates Enterococcus faecium NEF1, resistant to high levels of vancomycin (MIC, 512 μg/ml) and teicoplanin (MIC, 64 μg/ml); Enterococcus faecium BM4653 and BM4656 and Enterococcus avium BM4655, resistant to moderate levels of vancomycin (MIC, 32 μg/ml) and to low levels of teicoplanin (MIC, 4 μg/ml); and Enterococcus faecalis BM4654, moderately resistant to vancomycin (MIC, 16 μg/ml) but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC, 0.5 μg/ml). The strains were distinct, were constitutively resistant via the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in d-alanyl-d-lactate, and harbored a chromosomal vanD gene cluster that was not transferable. New mutations were found in conserved domains of VanSD: at T170I near the phosphorylation site in NEF1, at V67A at the membrane surface in BM4653, at G340S in the G2 ATP-binding domain in BM4655, in the F domain in BM4656 (a 6-bp insertion), and in the G1 and G2 domains of BM4654 (three mutations). The mutations resulted in constitutivity, presumably through the loss of the phosphatase activity of the sensor. The chromosomal Ddl d-Ala:d-Ala ligase had an IS19 copy in NEF1, a mutation in the serine (S185F) or near the arginine (T289P) involved in d-Ala1 binding in BM4653 or BM4655, respectively, and a mutation next to the lysine (P180S) involved in d-Ala2 binding in BM4654, leading to the production of an impaired enzyme. In BM4653 vanYD, a new insertion sequence, ISEfa9, belonging to the IS3 family, resulted in the absence of d,d-carboxypeptidase activity. Strain BM4656 had a functional d-Ala:d-Ala ligase, associated with high levels of both VanXD and VanYD activities, and is the first example of a VanD-type strain with a functional Ddl enzyme. Study of these five clinical isolates, displaying various assortments of mutations, confirms that all VanD-type strains isolated so far have undergone mutations in the vanSD or vanRD gene, leading to constitutive resistance, but that the Ddl host ligase is not

  15. Biochemical characterization of an anti-Candida factor produced by Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekh Raeesh M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because Candida albicans is resistant to several antifungal antibiotics, there is a need to identify other less toxic natural products, particularly antimicrobial proteins, peptides or bacteriocin like inhibitory substances. An attempt has been made to purify and characterise an anti-Candida compound produced by Enterococcus faecalis. Results An anti-Candida protein (ACP produced by E. faecalis active against 8 C. albicans strains was characterised and partially purified. The ACP showed a broad-spectrum activity against multidrug resistant C. albicans MTCC 183, MTCC 7315, MTCC 3958, NCIM 3557, NCIM 3471 and DI. It was completely inactivated by treatment with proteinase K and partially by pronase E. The ACP retained biological stability after heat-treatment at 90°C for 20 min, maintained activity over a pH range 6–10, and remained active after treatment with α-amylase, lipase, organic solvents, and detergents. The antimicrobial activity of the E. faecalis strain was found exclusively in the extracellular filtrate produced in the late logarithmic growth phase. The highest activity (1600 AU mL-1 against C. albicans MTCC 183 was recorded at 48 h of incubation, and activity decreased thereafter. The peptide showed very low haemagglutination and haemolytic activities against human red blood cells. The antimicrobial substance was purified by salt-fractionation and chromatography. Partially purified ACP had a molecular weight of approximately 43 KDa in Tricine-PAGE analysis. The 12 amino acid N terminal sequence was obtained by Edman degradation. The peptide was de novo sequenced by ESI-MS, and the deduced combined sequence when compared to other bacteriocins and antimicrobial peptide had no significant sequence similarity. Conclusions The inhibitory activity of the test strain is due to the synthesis of an antimicrobial protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of a promising non-haemolytic anti

  16. Calcium Enriched Mixture and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Activities against Enterococcus Faecalis in Presence of Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmi, Hasan; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Bolhari, Behnam; Shamshirgar, Farin; Shahsavan, Shadi; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the antibacterial activity of Calcium Enriched Mixture (CEM) with ProRoot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) in the presence/absence of dentin powder. Materials and Methods Two series of freshly mixed (10, 50, and 100 mg), set crushed powder (10, 50, and 100 mg), and pieces of uncrushed set (50, 100 mg) of CEM and MTA were prepared (n = 32 groups). All samples were suspended in normal saline for direct exposure test against E. faecalis; in the second series, 50 mg of the dentin powder was also added to the solution. Dentin powder suspension and bacterial suspension served as negative and positive control groups, respectively (n = 2). The suspensions were incubated at room temperature for 1, 60, and 240 min; each group was tested five times and survival of the bacteria in test solutions was assessed by 10-fold serial dilutions and cultured on Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) plates. The plates were incubated at 37ºC. The mean values of log10 CFU were calculated and compared in all tested groups. The total number of tests added up to 510 times. Results In presence of dentin powder, freshly mixed powder from set materials, and pieces of uncrushed set materials of both tested cements killed > 95% of the bacterial cell in 1 min. Adding dentin powder caused an increase in antibacterial activity of freshly mixed powder from crushed set CEM and MTA but no acceleration in bacterial killing was observed, when dentin was mixed with set or uncrushed cements. Dentin powder alone reduced the number of viable bacteria in the 4-hour duration. There were no significant differences between different weights of freshly mixed, crushed set powder and uncrushed set of CEM cement and MTA at different times. Conclusion Under the conditions of this in vitro study, CEM cement as well as MTA have antibacterial effects against E. faecalis. The addition of equal amounts of dentin powder to the

  17. Atomic force microscopy study on specificity and non-specificity of interaction forces between Enterococcus faecalis cells with and without aggregation substance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, Karola; van der Mei, Henderina; Harmsen, Hermie JM; de Vries, Jacob; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Degener, John E; Busscher, Hendrik

    Enterococcus faecalis is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections, and indwelling medical devices are especially prone to infection. E faecalis expressing aggregation substance (Agg) adheres to biomaterial surfaces by means of positive cooperativity, i.e. the ability of one adhering

  18. Alterations in the GyrA Subunit of DNA Gyrase and the ParC Subunit of DNA Topoisomerase IV Associated with Quinolone Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis

    OpenAIRE

    Kanematsu, Emiko; Deguchi, Takashi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nishino, Yoshinori; Kawada, Yukimichi

    1998-01-01

    The gyrA and parC genes of 31 clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, were partially sequenced and analyzed for target alterations. Topoisomerase IV may be a primary target in E. faecalis, but high-level fluoroquinolone resistance was associated with simultaneous alterations in both GyrA and ParC.

  19. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Tribulus terrestris, Allium sativum, Salvia officinalis, and Allium hirtifolium Boiss Against Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Amir Razavi Satvati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium which can cause life-threatening infections in humans. E. faecalis has been frequently found in root canal-treated teeth and is resistant to many commonly used antimicrobial agents. Nowadays modern medicine recognizes herbalism as a form of alternative medicine. Tribulus terrestris, Allium sativum, Salvia officinalis and Allium hirtifolium Boiss are commonly found in Iran and used as antimicrobial agents in folklore medicine. Objectives: In this study, antimicrobial activities of aqueous extracts of some plants were examined in vitro against E. faecalis. Materials and Methods: Antibacterial activities of the extracts of T. terrestris, A. sativum, S. officinalis and A. hirtifolium Boiss were examined using disc and well diffusion methods, and the19 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of aqueous extracts were determined against E. faecalis using agar and broth dilution methods. Results: The obtained results showed that the extract of A. hirtifolium Boiss inhibited the growth of E. faecalis (MIC of 10 mg/mL. Other plants had no effect on the target bacterium. Conclusion: According to the best effect of A. hirtifolium extract on E. faecalis and stability of this extract in thermal condition, we may purify this extract and use it for treatment of infections.

  20. Interaction between Galactomyces geotrichum KL20B, Lactobacillus plantarum LAT3 and Enterococcus faecalis KE06 during Milk Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Clemencia Chaves-López; Annalisa Serio; Chiara Rossi; Alessia Pepe; Elisabetta Compagnone; Antonello Paparella

    2017-01-01

    Microbial interactions are fundamental during milk fermentation, determining the product final characteristics. Galactomyces geotrichum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecalis are among the most common microorganisms in the Colombian Kumis. The aim of the research was to evaluate the yeast–bacteria interactions in milk fermentation at 28 °C. UHT (Ultra-High Temperature) milk was inoculated with single- or multiple-strains associations and analysed periodically to determine the micr...

  1. Influence of ultrasonic activation on photodynamic therapy over root canal system infected with Enterococcus faecalis--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinzelli, Guilherme Cavagnoli; Souza, Matheus Albino; Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the influence of ultrasonic activation on photodynamic therapy over root canal system infected with Enterococcus faecalis. The root canals of 50 single-rooted human extracted teeth were enlarged up to a file 60, autoclaved, inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated for 30 days. The samples were divided into five groups (n=10) according to the protocol of decontamination: G1 (control group) - no procedure was performed; G2 - photosensitizer (0.01% methylene blue); G3 - ultrasonic activation of photosensitizer (0.01% methylene blue); G4 - photodynamic therapy with no ultrasonic activation; and G5 - photodynamic therapy with ultrasonic activation. Microbiological tests (CFU counting) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to evaluate and illustrate, respectively, the effectiveness of proposed treatments. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey test (α=0.05). The microbiological test demonstrated that G5 (photodynamic therapy with ultrasonic activation) showed the lowest mean contamination (3.17 log CFU/mL), which was statistically different from all other groups (pphotodynamic therapy) showed a mean of contamination of 3.60 log CFU/mL, which was statistically different from groups 1, 2 and 3 (pphotodynamic therapy improved its potential for decontamination, resulting in the higher elimination Enterococcus faecalis from the root canal space. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of manganese, copper and zinc ions on the transcriptome of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Coelho Abrantes

    Full Text Available Mechanisms that enable Enterococcus to cope with different environmental stresses and their contribution to the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity of this organism are still poorly understood. Maintenance of intracellular homeostasis of metal ions is crucial for survival of these bacteria. In particular Zn(2+, Mn(2+ and Cu(2+ are very important metal ions as they are co-factors of many enzymes, are involved in oxidative stress defense and have a role in the immune system of the host. Their concentrations inside the human body vary hugely, which makes it imperative for Enterococcus to fine-tune metal ion homeostasis in order to survive inside the host and colonize it. Little is known about metal regulation in Enterococcus faecalis. Here we present the first genome-wide description of gene expression of E. faecalis V583 growing in the presence of high concentrations of zinc, manganese or copper ions. The DNA microarray experiments revealed that mostly transporters are involved in the responses of E. faecalis to prolonged exposure to high metal concentrations although genes involved in cellular processes, in energy and amino acid metabolisms and genes related to the cell envelope also seem to play important roles.

  3. The Fibronectin-Binding Protein EfbA Contributes to Pathogenesis and Protects against Infective Endocarditis Caused by Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavindra V.; La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Somarajan, Sudha R.; Roh, Jung Hyeob

    2015-01-01

    EfbA is a PavA-like fibronectin adhesin of Enterococcus faecalis previously shown to be important in experimental urinary tract infection. Here, we expressed and purified the E. faecalis OG1RF EfbA and confirmed that this protein binds with high affinity to immobilized fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen V. We constructed an efbA deletion mutant and demonstrated that its virulence was significantly attenuated (P endocarditis model. Furthermore, efbA deletion resulted in diminished ability to bind fibronectin (P endocarditis (P = 0.008 versus control). Taken together, our results demonstrate that EfbA is an important factor involved in E. faecalis endocarditis and that rEfbA immunization is effective in preventing such infection, likely by interfering with bacterial adherence. PMID:26351286

  4. The synergistic effect of ultrasonic activation and irrigation on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer A Al-Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI with either 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl or saline, with that of conventional syringe irrigation on intraradicular Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. Materials and Methods: Biofilms of E. faecalis were established over 21 days in 80 single roots that had undergone biomechanical preparation followed by gamma radiation. Biofilms were treated for 1 min with 2.5% NaOCl/PUI (Group 1, 2.5% NaOCl (Group 2, sterile saline/PUI (Group 3, and sterile saline (Group 4. The positive control (n = 4 was used to confirm the presence of biofilm before various treatments. Additional four samples that served as a negative control were used to confirm the sterility of the samples. Biofilm eradication was evaluated by Colony Forming Unit (CFU quantification and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results: The median of CFUs of S1 was significantly higher than that of S2 in all experimental groups. SEM examination showed a significant difference between the positive control and the experimental groups (P < 0.001, with the highest score of biofilm in the positive control group followed by Group 4 and both groups were not statistically significant from each other (P = 0.067. Following various treatments, the highest scores of biofilm were observed in the coronal third and the least were in the apical third. Conclusions: PUI did not increase the effectiveness of NaOCl irrigation on biofilm removal, however, PUI enhanced biofilm disturbance when used with saline. The least mean score of remaining biofilm was in the apical third of all treatment groups compared to other thirds.

  5. The transcriptome of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583 reveals adaptive responses to growth in blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi C Vebø

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococcus faecalis plays a dual role in human ecology, predominantly existing as a commensal in the alimentary canal, but also as an opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes nosocomial infections like bacteremia. A number of virulence factors that contribute to the pathogenic potential of E. faecalis have been established. However, the process in which E. faecalis gains access to the bloodstream and establishes a persistent infection is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To enhance our understanding of how this commensal bacterium adapts during a bloodstream infection and to examine the interplay between genes we designed an in vitro experiment using genome-wide microarrays to investigate what effects the presence of and growth in blood have on the transcriptome of E. faecalis strain V583. We showed that growth in both 2xYT supplemented with 10% blood and in 100% blood had a great impact on the transcription of many genes in the V583 genome. We identified several immediate changes signifying cellular processes that might contribute to adaptation and growth in blood. These include modulation of membrane fatty acid composition, oxidative and lytic stress protection, acquisition of new available substrates, transport functions including heme/iron transporters and genes associated with virulence in E. faecalis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results presented here reveal that cultivation of E. faecalis in blood in vitro has a profound impact on its transcriptome, which includes a number of virulence traits. Observed regulation of genes and pathways revealed new insight into physiological features and metabolic capacities which enable E. faecalis to adapt and grow in blood. A number of the regulated genes might potentially be useful candidates for development of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of E. faecalis infections.

  6. Biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from the processing of ricotta and the control of these pathogens through cleaning and sanitization procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fernandes, Meg; Kabuki, Dirce Yorika; Kuaye, Arnaldo Yoshiteru

    2015-05-04

    The biofilm formation of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from the processing of ricotta on stainless steel coupons was evaluated, and the effect of cleaning and sanitization procedures in the control of these biofilms was determined. The formation of biofilms was observed while varying the incubation temperature (7, 25 and 39°C) and time (0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days). At 7°C, the counts of E. faecalis and E. faecium were below 2 log10 CFU/cm(2). For the temperatures of 25 and 39°C, after 1 day, the counts of E. faecalis and E. faecium were 5.75 and 6.07 log10 CFU/cm(2), respectively, which is characteristic of biofilm formation. The tested sanitation procedures a) acid-anionic tensioactive cleaning, b) anionic tensioactive cleaning+sanitizer and c) acid-anionic tensioactive cleaning+sanitizer were effective in removing the biofilms, reducing the counts to levels below 0.4 log10 CFU/cm(2). The sanitizer biguanide was the least effective, and peracetic acid was the most effective. These studies revealed the ability of enterococci to form biofilms and the importance of the cleaning step and the type of sanitizer used in sanitation processes for the effective removal of biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Epidemiologic Analysis of Enterococcus faecalis Isolates in Cuba by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Nagashima, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    We carried out the first study of Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates in Cuba by multilocus sequence typing linking the molecular typing data with the presence of virulence determinants and the antibiotic resistance genes. A total of 23 E. faecalis isolates recovered from several clinic sources and geographic areas of Cuba during a period between 2000 and 2005 were typed by multilocus sequence typing. Thirteen sequence types (STs) including five novel STs were identified, and the ST 64 (clonal complex [CC] 8), ST 6 (CC2), ST 21(CC21), and ST 16 (CC58) were found in more than one strain. Sixty-seven percent of STs corresponded to STs reported previously in Spain, Poland, and The Netherlands, and other STs (ST115, ST64, ST6, and ST40) were genetically close to those detected in the United States. Prevalence of both antimicrobial resistance genes [aac(6′)-aph(2″), aph(3′), ant(6), ant(3″)(9), aph(2″)-Id, aph(2″)-Ic, erm(B), erm(A), erm(C), mef(A), tet(M), and tet(L)] and virulence genes (agg, gelE, cylA, esp, ccf, and efaAfs) were examined by polymerase chain reaction. Aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia, aph(3′), ant(6), ant(3″)(9) were more frequently detected in ST6, ST16, ST23, ST64, and ST115. The multidrug resistance was distributed to all STs detected, except for ST117 and singleton ST225. The presence of cyl gene was specifically linked to the ST64 and ST16. Presence of the esp, gel, and agg genes was not specific to any particular ST. This research provided the first insight into the population structure of E. faecalis in Cuba, that is, most Cuban strains were related to European strains, whereas others to U.S. strains. The CC2, CC21, and CC8, three of the biggest CCs in the world, were evidently circulating in Cuba, associated with multidrug resistance and virulence traits. PMID:19857135

  8. Enterococcus faecalis Responds to Individual Exogenous Fatty Acids Independently of Their Degree of Saturation or Chain Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Holly E; Harp, John R; Fozo, Elizabeth M

    2018-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract that can persist in the external environment and is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Given its diverse habitats, the organism has developed numerous strategies to survive a multitude of environmental conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that E. faecalis will incorporate fatty acids from bile and serum into its membrane, resulting in an induced tolerance to membrane-damaging agents. To discern whether all fatty acids induce membrane stress protection, we examined how E. faecalis responded to individually supplied fatty acids. E. faecalis readily incorporated fatty acids 14 to 18 carbons in length into its membrane but poorly incorporated fatty acids shorter or longer than this length. Supplementation with saturated fatty acids tended to increase generation time and lead to altered cellular morphology in most cases. Further, exogenously supplied saturated fatty acids did not induce tolerance to the membrane-damaging antibiotic daptomycin. Supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids produced variable growth effects, with some impacting generation time and morphology. Exogenously supplied unsaturated fatty acids that are normally produced by E. faecalis and those that are found in bile or serum could restore growth in the presence of a fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitor. However, only the eukaryote-derived fatty acids oleic acid and linoleic acid provided protection from daptomycin. Thus, exogenous fatty acids do not lead to a common physiological effect on E. faecalis The organism responds uniquely to each, and only host-derived fatty acids induce membrane protection. IMPORTANCE Enterococcus faecalis is a commonly acquired hospital infectious agent with resistance to many antibiotics, including those that target its cellular membrane. We previously demonstrated that E. faecalis will incorporate fatty acids found in human fluids, like serum, into its cellular membrane

  9. Heat-Killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Ju; Iwasa, Masahiro; Han, Kwon-Il; Kim, Wan-Jae; Tang, Yujiao; Hwang, Young Joung; Chae, Jeong Ryong; Han, Weon Cheol; Shin, Yu-Su; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-03-05

    Recent reports have shown the immunomodulatory effect of heat-killed lactic acid bacteria. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an allergic skin disease, caused by immune dysregulation among other factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 (EF-2001) on AD. We established an in vivo AD model by repeated local exposure of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE; house dust mite extract) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears of mice. After oral administration of EF-2001 for four weeks, the epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured. In addition, the gene expression levels of pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes were assayed. EF-2001 attenuated AD symptoms based on the ear thickness, histopathological analysis, and serum immunoglobulin levels. Moreover, EF-2001 decreased the DFE/DNCB-induced expression of various pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes. These results suggest that EF-2001 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD owing to its immunomodulatory effects.

  10. Heat-Killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ju Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown the immunomodulatory effect of heat-killed lactic acid bacteria. Atopic dermatitis (AD is an allergic skin disease, caused by immune dysregulation among other factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 (EF-2001 on AD. We established an in vivo AD model by repeated local exposure of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE; house dust mite extract and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB to the ears of mice. After oral administration of EF-2001 for four weeks, the epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured. In addition, the gene expression levels of pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes were assayed. EF-2001 attenuated AD symptoms based on the ear thickness, histopathological analysis, and serum immunoglobulin levels. Moreover, EF-2001 decreased the DFE/DNCB-induced expression of various pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes. These results suggest that EF-2001 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD owing to its immunomodulatory effects.

  11. Crystal structure of enterococcus faecalis sly A-like transcriptional factor.

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    Wu, R.; Zhang, R.; Zagnitko, O.; Dementieva, I.; Maltsev, N.; Watson, J. D.; Laskowski, R.; Gornicki, P.; Joachimiak, A.; Univ. of Chicago; European Bioinformatics Inst.

    2003-05-30

    The crystal structure of a SlyA transcriptional regulator at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution is presented, and structural relationships between members of the MarR/SlyA family are discussed. The SlyA family, which includes SlyA, Rap, Hor, and RovA proteins, is widely distributed in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Current evidence suggests that SlyA-like factors act as repressors, activators, and modulators of gene transcription. These proteins have been shown to up-regulate the expression of molecular chaperones, acid-resistance proteins, and cytolysin, and down-regulate several biosynthetic enzymes. The structure of SlyA from Enterococcus faecalis, determined as a part of an ongoing structural genomics initiative (www.mcsg.anl.gov), revealed the same winged helix DNA-binding motif that was recently found in the MarR repressor from Escherichia coli and the MexR repressor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a sequence homologue of MarR. Phylogenetic analysis of the MarR/SlyA family suggests that Sly is placed between the SlyA and MarR subfamilies and shows significant sequence similarity to members of both subfamilies.

  12. Chlorine disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis: revisiting reclaimed water regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Reyes-Gómez, Lidia María; Hernández-Muñoz, Aurelio; Martínez-Falcón, Ana Paola; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela A; Iturbe, Ulises

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic organisms can be transmitted orally through drinking water or through skin and mucosae by both direct and indirect contact, and their presence in water thus has a negative impact on public health. In wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), water is disinfected to inactivate pathogens. The quantification of several microbial indicators in aquatic systems is required to estimate the biological quality of such systems. So far, coliform bacteria have been used as traditional indicators world-wide. This study has assessed the resistance of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis to three dosages of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) at two exposure times. The bacteria were isolated from secondary effluents of a WWTP located in Hidalgo, Mexico. The results show that the number of colony-forming units of all studied bacterial types decreased when both the NaClO concentration and exposure times increased. However, they were not eliminated. The inclusion of the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa in regulations for treated wastewater quality as a new indicator is highly recommended due to its importance as an opportunistic pathogen. The detection of this species along with the traditional organisms could be particulary significant for reclaimed water to be used with direct human contact.

  13. Study on the susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis from infectious processes to ciprofloxacin and vancomycin

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    A. Genaro

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is considered a pathogen responsible for hospital infections and, due to its frequent multi-resistant profile, has caused preoccupations among many medical authorities. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 74 strains isolated from blood cultures and purulent secretions to vancomycin and ciprofloxacin through the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC by using the Microdilution test. The results showed a greater efficacy of vancomycin compared to ciprofloxacin (98.6% of the strains were inhibited by vancomycin at lower concentrations: 0.06 - 1 µg/ml. However, in the MBC analysis 73% of the strains showed a MBC of vancomycin only at high concentrations (equal to or higher than 64 µg/ml. For ciprofloxacin, the strains showed a broad sensitivity with MICs and MBCs distributed along all the MIC classes. Results also revealed a probability that some strains are tolerant to vancomycin, which indicates the need of other tests to confirm this characteristic.

  14. Lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 (LFK Suppressing Allergic Responses in Mouse Models

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    Takashi Shimada

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several clinical trials have been published to discuss the possibility of probiotic supplementation, especially some products of lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains, in prevention and treatment of allergic disorders. However, the results of some investigations were inconsistent with each other. The contradictory effect of probiotics among different individuals might suggest differences in genetic or environmental factors, or both. It is conceivably beneficial to use inbred mice as experimental models to explore whether the effect of probiotics on limiting allergy is under the influence of genetic factors. In this review, firstly, we summarized recent publications regarding the effects of lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 (LFK, which is a preparation of a probiotic lactic acid bacterium strain, on suppressing allergic responses in BALB/c mice. And then, we presented our latest data focused on the effects of LFK on suppressing active cutaneous anaphylaxis and local accumulation of eosinophils in four inbred mouse models by using the BALB/c, C57BL/ 6, C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ strains. The finding of our experimental study suggests that the effect of LFK on combating allergic inflammatory reactions might be affect by individuals’ hereditary background.

  15. Heat-Killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Ju; Iwasa, Masahiro; Han, Kwon-Il; Kim, Wan-Jae; Tang, Yujiao; Hwang, Young Joung; Chae, Jeong Ryong; Han, Weon Cheol; Shin, Yu-Su; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown the immunomodulatory effect of heat-killed lactic acid bacteria. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an allergic skin disease, caused by immune dysregulation among other factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 (EF-2001) on AD. We established an in vivo AD model by repeated local exposure of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE; house dust mite extract) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears of mice. After oral administration of EF-2001 for four weeks, the epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured. In addition, the gene expression levels of pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes were assayed. EF-2001 attenuated AD symptoms based on the ear thickness, histopathological analysis, and serum immunoglobulin levels. Moreover, EF-2001 decreased the DFE/DNCB-induced expression of various pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes. These results suggest that EF-2001 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD owing to its immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26959058

  16. The effect of sodium hypochlorite on Enterococcus faecalis when grown on dentine as a single- and multi-species biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Benlee; Zilm, Peter S; Briggs, Nancy; Rogers, Anthony H; Cathro, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is often involved in the aetiology of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment. This project aimed to establish, on dentine in vitro, a multi-species biofilm containing E. faecalis, and to determine if the organism had an increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite compared with an axenic biofilm. Biofilms were established on dentine discs in flow cells with either E. faecalis alone (axenic) or together with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus sanguinis. Following treatment with either 0.9% sodium hypochlorite or saline, the viability of E. faecalis was determined by serial plating and qualitative analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Viable counts indicated that 0.9% NaOCl is highly effective against E. faecalis grown alone and as part of a multi-species biofilm (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in its survival in the two biofilm types was found (P = 0.8276). © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  17. Inhibitory concentration and minimum contact time of Gambier extract (Uncaria gambier Roxb to growth of Enterococcus faecalis

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    Hafsah Katu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis was gram-positive bacteria commonly founded in endodontics retreatment cases. Gambier extracts,  type of dried sap from the leaves and young stems of gambier plants (Uncaria Gambir Roxb, contains cathecins, are efficacious antibacterial with minimal side effects. The aim of this study is to determine the inhibitory concentration and minimal time contact gambier extracts on the growth of the bacteria E.faecalis. Laboratory experiments, conducted on 30th May – 16th June 2011 in the Laboratory of Pharmacognosy-Phytochemicals Faculty of Pharmacy and Laboratory of  Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hasanuddin University. Six hundred grams gambier which has been crushed, extracted with reflux and rotavapor method. Minimal inhibition concentration is determined with 5 ml of 5.25% NaCl as a positive control and saline sterile water as negative control. Antibacterial activity is determined based on the time of contact and inhibition zone diameter. Statistical analysis SPSS version 16.0 for windows with One way ANOVA and LSD tests (p<0.05. Statistical analysis showed 1% concentration and 24 hours time contact effectively inhibits the growth of bacteria E. faecalis. Gambier extracts effectively inhibits the growth of bacteria E. faecalis.

  18. Antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: A comparison between EDTA, chlorhexidine, cetrimide, MTAD and QMix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Min; Lu, Yan; Guo, Xiangjun; Qiao, Feng; Wu, Ligeng

    2015-08-01

    We compared the antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities of five root canal irrigants (17% EDTA,2% chlorhexidine,0.2% cetrimide, MTAD, and QMix) in a model of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation. Sixty dentin blocks with 3-week E. faecalis biofilm were divided into six equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated. A blank control group was also established. Antibacterial activities of the irrigants were evaluated by counting colony forming units. To test residual antimicrobial activities, 280 dentin blocks were divided into seven equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated and then incubated with E. faecalis suspension for 48 h, or used as a blank. No bacteria were observed in the blank control group. The number of viable E. faecalis was significantly fewer in the irrigant-treated groups compared with the untreated control (P < 0.05). Among the five irrigants, QMix had the strongest antibacterial activity. Residual antimicrobial activities of CHX were significantly higher at 12 h, 24 h and 36 h compared to untreated control (P < 0.05). All five root canal irrigants were effective to some extent against E. faecalis, but QMix and CHX had the strongest, and CHX the longest (up to 36 h), antimicrobial activity.

  19. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance from Enterococcus faecium of fermented meat origin to clinical isolates of E. faecium and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Musarrat; Zhanel, George G; Sparling, Richard; Holley, Richard A

    2015-04-16

    Enterococcus species are part of the normal intestinal flora of a large number of mammals including humans and consequently, they can be used as indicators of faecal contamination in food and water for human consumption. Their presence in large numbers in foods may indicate a lapse in sanitation and their ability to serve as a genetic reservoir of transferable antibiotic resistance is of concern. In the present study, Enterococcus spp., isolated from commercially fermented meat and human clinical specimen were studied to determine genetic relationships. SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns exhibited genomic heterogeneity within and between both groups of isolates. However, in spite of this heterogeneity there were still substantial phenotypic similarities which suggested that food might be a potential vehicle for distribution of resistant bacteria among humans. In vitro conjugation experiments demonstrated transfer of the tetracycline resistant determinant, tet(M), from Enterococcus faecium S27 isolated from fermented sausage to clinical isolates of both E. faecium and Enterococcus faecalis. The streptomycin resistance of E. faecium S27 was also transferred to a clinical strain, E. faecalis 82916, which was confirmed by the presence of the streptomycin resistance gene, aadA, in the donor and transconjugant strains. Since the aadA gene is associated with a class 1 integron, results also suggested that resistance transfer might have occurred via an integron. It appears this is the first identification of a class 1 integron in E. faecium isolated from food. The importance of food enterococci as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes and the potential for their genetic transfer to human strains following consumption of uncooked or undercooked contaminated meat is underlined by this work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of Three Different Lasers on Eradication of Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans Biofilms in Root Canal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasić, Silvija; Knezović, Marita; Beader, Nataša; Gabrić, Dragana; Malčić, Ana Ivanišević; Baraba, Anja

    2017-07-01

    The objective was to compare the efficacy of three different lasers in disinfection of root canals inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans biofilms. Endodontic space disinfection depends on the type of root canal irrigant used and the way it is delivered and agitated because irrigants have limited ability to reach all parts of root canal system. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were selected. Root canals were instrumented and root surfaces were sealed using adhesive and the apical openings with adhesive and composite resin. Roots were fixed in Eppendorf tubes and sterilized in autoclave. The specimens were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 10) and inoculated with E. faecalis and C. albicans. After 7 days of incubation period, the number of E. faecalis and C. albicans colony-forming units (CFUs) was determined for each root canal. In the first experimental group, Er:YAG laser (0.3 W) with photon-induced photoacoustic streaming technique was used for root canal disinfection, in the second, Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W), and in the third, Er,Cr:YSGG (1.25 W) laser was used. After different root canal disinfection protocols, the number of E. faecalis and C. albicans CFUs was determined again for each root canal. Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers eradicated significant number of E. faecalis and C. albicans CFUs (p laser irradiation did not result in statistically significant reduction (p > 0.05). Er,Cr:YSGG laser eradicated significantly more microorganisms in comparison with Er:YAG laser (p laser was the most efficient tool in eradication of E. faecalis and C. albicans biofilms.

  1. Antibacterial activity of fig leaf (Ficus carica Linn. extract against Enterococcus faecalis and its cytotoxicity effects on fibroblast cells

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    Intan Nirwana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus faecalis is one of the bacteria that commonly found in root canal and pulp infection after root canal treatment. Sodium hypochlorite is the most widely used root canal irrigation, but it has toxic properties if exposed to periradicular tissues. It is necessary to develop an alternative for root canal irrigation. Fig leaf (Ficus carica Linn. extract contains active substances such as flavonoid, tannin, and terpenoid which have been known for their antibacterial potency. Aim: This study aimed to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of fig leaf (F. carica Linn. extract against E. faecalis and its cytotoxicity on fibroblast cells in vitro. Materials and Methods: A serial dilution method was used to determine the MBC of fig leaf extract on E. faecalis which grown on nutrient agar media. Inoculation was carried out at concentrations that suspected minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, MBC, concentration between MIC and MBC, and control groups on different nutrient agar. MIC and MBC of fig leaf extract against E. faecalis were known by counting the growth of bacteria colonies on nutrient agar media in CFU/ml. The cytotoxicity of MIC and MBC of the extract acquired were tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the results were read using an ELISA reader. Data of E. faecalis colonies were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test. Results: The result showed a significant difference among the groups (p<0.05. Fig leaf extract at a concentration of 50% showed no bacterial growth, and cell viability at this concentration was 77.7%. Conclusion: Fig leaf extract has antibacterial effect on E. faecalis with MBC at 50% and not cytotoxic to fibroblast cells.

  2. Assessment of antimicrobial potential of 10% ginger extract against Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Enterococcus faecalis: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriraju, Anjan; Yunus, G Y

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Enterococcus faecalis are the three oral microorganisms most commonly implicated in the causation of oral infections. All these oral microorganisms have shown resistant to routinely used antimicrobials. There is a need for an antimicrobial agent which is effective, safe, and economical. Zingiber officinale, commonly known as ginger is one such plant product which has been used from ancient time. It has been shown to possess promising inhibitory effect on many of the oral microorganisms. On review of dental literature, there was scarcity of studies which had tried to assess antimicrobial potential of ginger extract against S. mutans, E. faecalis, and C. albicans; hence, the present study was designed. To evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 10% ginger extract against S. mutans, E. faecalis, and C. albicans. Laboratory setting and experimental design. In the first part of the study, 10% ethanolic ginger extract was prepared in the laboratory of Pharmacy College. It was then subjected to microbiological assay to determine its zone of inhibition using Agar disk diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using serial broth dilution method against S. mutans, C. albicans, and E. faecalis. 10% ethanolic ginger extract showed: (a) Maximum zone of inhibition of 8 mm, 14 mm, and 11 mm against S. mutans, C. albicans, and E. faecalis respectively. (b) MIC of 1.25%, 2.5%, and 2.5% against S. mutans, C. albicans, and E. faecalis respectively. 10% ethanolic ginger extract was found to possess antimicrobial potential against all the three pathogens used in the study.

  3. Enterococcus faecalis Sex Pheromone cCF10 Enhances Conjugative Plasmid Transfer In Vivo

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    Helmut Hirt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication mediated by peptide pheromones (cCF10 [CF] is essential for high-frequency plasmid transfer in vitro in Enterococcus faecalis. To examine the role of pheromone signaling in vivo, we established either a CF-producing (CF+ recipient or a recipient producing a biologically inactive variant of CF (CF− recipient in a germfree mouse model 3 days before donor inoculation and determined transfer frequencies of the pheromone-inducible plasmid pCF10. Plasmid transfer was detected in the upper and middle sections of the intestinal tract 5 h after donor inoculation and was highly efficient in the absence of antibiotic selection. The transconjugant/donor ratio reached a maximum level approaching 1 on day 4 in the upper intestinal tract. Plasmid transfer was significantly lower with the CF− recipient. While rescue of the CF− mating defect by coculture with CF+ recipients is easily accomplished in vitro, no extracellular complementation occurred in vivo. This suggests that most pheromone signaling in the gut occurs between recipient and donor cells in very close proximity. Plasmid-bearing cells (donors plus transconjugants steadily increased in the population from 0.1% after donor inoculation to about 10% at the conclusion of the experiments. This suggests a selective advantage of pCF10 carriage distinct from antibiotic resistance or bacteriocin production. Our results demonstrate that pheromone signaling is required for efficient pCF10 transfer in vivo. In the absence of CF+ recipients, a low level of transfer to CF− recipients occurred in the gut. This may result from low-level host-mediated induction of the donors in the gastrointestinal (GI tract, similar to that previously observed in serum.

  4. In vitro and in vivo effects of Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 on Toxocara canis

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    Paula G Chiodo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper was to evaluate the larvicidal effect of Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 (Ef7121 on the Toxocara canis cycle both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro experiments, T. canis larvae were incubated with the supernatants of Ef7121 (EI and mutant Ef7121 (EIm, in a pre-culture of Ef7121 (EII and in a fresh culture with Ef7121 (EIII and the Ef7121 mutant strain (EIIIm. The viability of the larvae was calculated after a 48 h incubation. A significant reduction of the viability of T. canis larvae was observed in EI, EII and EIII. A decrease of this inhibitory effect was observed in EIm and EIIIm (p = 0.008. In the in vivo experiments, mice were orally inoculated with three doses of Ef7121. To study the probiotic persistence in the intestine, the animals were sacrificed every four days and their intestines were dissected. The initial average bacterial levels were 9.7 x 10(4 for Ef7121 (colony forming units/g. At the end of the assay the levels were 1.46 x 10(4. No bacterial translocation was detected in mesenteric lymphatic nodules and spleen. Ef7121 interference with the biological cycle was evaluated in mice challenged with T. canis. The interference was significant when the mice were challenged with probiotic and T. canis simultaneously (p = 0.001, but it was not significant when the challenge was performed 15 days after administration of the bacterial inoculum (p = 0.06. In conclusion, Ef7121 possessed in vitro and in vivo larvicidal activity.

  5. Immunostimulatory Effects Triggered by Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 Probiotic Strain Involve Activation of Dendritic Cells and Interferon-Gamma Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Matías Alejandro; Díaz, Ailén Magalí; Hesse, Christina; Ginter, Wiebke; Gentilini, María Virginia; Nuñez, Guillermo Gabriel; Canellada, Andrea Mercedes; Sparwasser, Tim; Berod, Luciana; Castro, Marisa Silvia; Manghi, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics can modulate the immune system, conferring beneficial effects on the host. Understanding how these microorganisms contribute to improve the health status is still a challenge. Previously, we have demonstrated that Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 implants itself and persists in the murine gastrointestinal tract, and enhances and skews the profile of cytokines towards the Th1 phenotype in several biological models. Given the importance of dendritic cells (DCs) in the orchestration of immunity, the aim of this work was to elucidate the influence of E. faecalis CECT7121 on DCs and the outcome of the immune responses. In this work we show that E. faecalis CECT7121 induces a strong dose-dependent activation of DCs and secretion of high levels of IL-12, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10. This stimulation is dependent on TLR signaling, and skews the activation of T cells towards the production of IFNγ. The influence of this activation in the establishment of Th responses in vivo shows the accumulation of specific IFNγ-producing cells. Our findings indicate that the activation exerted by E. faecalis CECT7121 on DCs and its consequence on the cellular adaptive immune response may have broad therapeutic implications in immunomodulation. PMID:25978357

  6. Oxidative stress enhances cephalosporin resistance of Enterococcus faecalis through activation of a two-component signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djorić, Dušanka; Kristich, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium, a normal resident of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and an important hospital-acquired pathogen. An important risk factor for hospital-acquired enterococcal infections is prior therapy with broad-spectrum cephalosporins, antibiotics that impair cell wall biosynthesis by inhibiting peptidoglycan cross-linking. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins; however, environmental factors that modulate cephalosporin resistance have not been described. While searching for the genetic determinants of cephalosporin resistance in E. faecalis, we unexpectedly discovered that oxidative stress, whether from external sources or derived from endogenous metabolism, drives enhanced intrinsic resistance to cephalosporins. A particular source of oxidative stress, H2O2, activates signaling through the CroR-CroS two-component signaling system, a known determinant of cephalosporin resistance in E. faecalis. We find that CroR-CroS is required for adaptation to H2O2 stress and that H2O2 potentiates the activities of cephalosporins against E. faecalis when the CroR-CroS signaling system is nonfunctional. Rather than directly detecting H2O2, our data suggest that the CroR-CroS system responds to cell envelope damage caused by H2O2 exposure in order to promote cell envelope repair and enhanced cephalosporin resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The Two Functional Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases of Enterococcus faecalis Do Not Mediate Triclosan Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Bi, Hongkai; Ma, Jincheng; Hu, Zhe; Zhang, Wenbin; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase catalyzes the last step of the elongation cycle in the synthesis of bacterial fatty acids. The Enterococcus faecalis genome contains two genes annotated as enoyl-ACP reductases, a FabI-type enoyl-ACP reductase and a FabK-type enoyl-ACP reductase. We report that expression of either of the two proteins restores growth of an Escherichia coli fabI temperature-sensitive mutant strain under nonpermissive conditions. In vitro assays demonstrated that both proteins support fatty acid synthesis and are active with substrates of all fatty acid chain lengths. Although expression of E. faecalis fabK confers to E. coli high levels of resistance to the antimicrobial triclosan, deletion of fabK from the E. faecalis genome showed that FabK does not play a detectable role in the inherent triclosan resistance of E. faecalis. Indeed, FabK seems to play only a minor role in modulating fatty acid composition. Strains carrying a deletion of fabK grow normally without fatty acid supplementation, whereas fabI deletion mutants make only traces of fatty acids and are unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs. PMID:24085780

  8. Antibacterial effect of two mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) preparations against Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus sanguis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Al-Shalan, Thakib A; Naghshbandi, Jafar; Oglesby, Samuel; Simon, James H S; Rotstein, Ilan

    2006-11-01

    The antibacterial effects of gray-colored MTA (GMTA) and white-colored MTA (WMTA) against Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus sanguis were assessed in vitro using the tube dilution test. Broth tubes were prepared and divided into experimental and control groups. Aliquots of each of the tested microorganisms were taken from a stock culture and added to each experimental and positive control group. All groups were incubated at 37 degrees C and evaluated for turbidity at 0, 1, 24, 48, and 72-hour time periods. A direct correlation was found between GMTA and WMTA concentrations and their antibacterial effect. Tubes containing GMTA in concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/ml did not show E. faecalis growth at any of the time periods tested whereas tubes containing WMTA showed E. faecalis growth at all concentrations and time periods tested. Statistically significant differences were found between tubes containing GMTA in concentrations of 50, 25 and 12.5 mg/ml and tubes containing similar concentrations of WMTA (p faecalis and S. sanguis to MTA differed and that GMTA requires lower concentrations than WMTA to exert the same antibacterial effect against each of the microorganisms tested.

  9. Sunlight mediated inactivation mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli in clear water versus waste stabilization pond water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Khalid; Nelson, Kara L

    2014-03-01

    Escherichia coli and enterococci have been previously reported to differ in the mechanisms and conditions that affect their sunlight-mediated inactivation in waste stabilization ponds. This study was undertaken to further characterize these mechanisms, using simulated sunlight and single strains of laboratory-grown E. coli and Enterococcus faecalis, with a focus on characterizing the contribution of exogenous reactive oxygen species to the inactivation process. We found that direct damage by UVB light (280-320 nm) was not a significant inactivation mechanism for either organism. E. coli inactivation was strongly dependent on dissolved oxygen concentrations and the presence of UVB wavelengths but E. coli were not susceptible to inactivation by exogenous sensitizers present in waste stabilization pond water. In contrast, E. faecalis inactivation in pond water occurred primarily through exogenous mechanisms, with strong evidence that singlet oxygen is an important transient reactive species. The exogenous mechanism could utilize wavelengths into the visible spectrum and sensitizers were mainly colloidal, distributed between 0.2 and ∼1 μm in size. Singlet oxygen is likely an important endogenous species in both E. faecalis and E. coli inactivation due to sunlight. Although the two organisms had similar inactivation rates in buffered, clear water, the inactivation rate of E. faecalis was 7 times greater than that of E. coli in air-saturated pond water at circumneutral pH due to its susceptibility to exogenous sensitizers and longer wavelengths. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibacterial efficacy of Mangifera indica L. kernel and Ocimum sanctum L. leaves against Enterococcus faecalis dentinal biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Mahalakshmi, Krishnan; Pushpangadan, Sivan; Padmavathy, Kesavaram; Vivekanandan, Paramasivam; Sukumaran, Vridhachalam Ganapathy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Enterococcus faecalis biofilm in the root canal makes it difficult to be eradicated by the conventional irrigants with no toxicity to the tissues. Hence, plant products with least side effects are explored for their use as irrigants in the root canal therapy. Aim: To evaluate and compare the antibacterial efficacy of Mangifera indica L. kernel (mango kernel) and Ocimum sanctum L. leaves (tulsi) extracts with conventional irrigants (5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 2% chlorhexidine) against E. faecalis dentinal biofilm. Materials and Methods: Agar diffusion and broth microdilution assay was performed with the herbal extracts and conventional irrigants (2% chlorhexidine and 5% NaOCl) against E. faecalis planktonic cells. The assay was extended onto 3 week E. faecalis dentinal biofilm. Results: Significant reduction of colony forming units (CFU)/mL was observed for the herbal groups and the antibacterial activity of the herbal groups was at par with 5% NaOCl. Conclusions: The antibacterial activity of these herbal extracts is found to be comparable with that of conventional irrigants both on the biofilm and planktonic counterparts. PMID:24082577

  11. Immunostimulatory Effects Triggered by Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 Probiotic Strain Involve Activation of Dendritic Cells and Interferon-Gamma Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Alejandro Molina

    Full Text Available Probiotics can modulate the immune system, conferring beneficial effects on the host. Understanding how these microorganisms contribute to improve the health status is still a challenge. Previously, we have demonstrated that Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 implants itself and persists in the murine gastrointestinal tract, and enhances and skews the profile of cytokines towards the Th1 phenotype in several biological models. Given the importance of dendritic cells (DCs in the orchestration of immunity, the aim of this work was to elucidate the influence of E. faecalis CECT7121 on DCs and the outcome of the immune responses. In this work we show that E. faecalis CECT7121 induces a strong dose-dependent activation of DCs and secretion of high levels of IL-12, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10. This stimulation is dependent on TLR signaling, and skews the activation of T cells towards the production of IFNγ. The influence of this activation in the establishment of Th responses in vivo shows the accumulation of specific IFNγ-producing cells. Our findings indicate that the activation exerted by E. faecalis CECT7121 on DCs and its consequence on the cellular adaptive immune response may have broad therapeutic implications in immunomodulation.

  12. Adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis 1131 grown under subinhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and vancomycin to a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic substratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Moreno, A M; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; González-Martín, M L; Bruque, J M; Pérez-Giraldo, C

    2001-09-11

    The effect of two subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations of ampicillin and vancomycin during growth on the adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis 1131 to glass and silicone rubber was studied in a parallel plate flow chamber. Initial deposition rates and numbers of adhering bacteria after 4 h were higher on hydrophilic glass than on hydrophobic silicone rubber, regardless of growth conditions. The presence of 1/4 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ampicillin during growth reduced enterococcal adhesion to both substrata, but growth in the presence of 1/4 MIC vancomycin did not affect the adhesion of E. faecalis. Moreover, enterococcal adhesion increased after growth in the presence of 1/8 MIC vancomycin. The increased adhesion after growth in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of vancomycin may have strong implications for patients living with implanted biomaterials, as they may suffer adverse effects from use of this antibiotic, especially since bacteria once adhered are less sensitive to antibiotics.

  13. An in vitro investigation of a newer intracanal medicament Nisin on Enterococcus faecalis in comparison with chlorhexidine and calcium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneel Kumar Chinni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the antibacterial efficacy of Nisin in comparison with Calcium hydroxide and Chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted lower premolar single-rooted teeth were collected and were instrumented with K3 rotary files. Then, root canals were inoculated with a bacterial solution of Enterococcus faecalis. After 21 days, the canals were inoculated with Saline, Nisin, Vancomycin, Calcium hydroxide, and Chlorhexidine. The roots were left for 7 days and on the 8 th day, to investigate the degree of infection of the radicular dentin, specimens of the dentin chips from the full length of the root canal were harvested using a sterile rotary K3 instrument (size 25 6% taper. Results: The results of the present study showed that Nisin and Chlorhexidine showed none of Colony Forming Units (CFU in their respective group. Conclusion: Within the limits of the study, Nisin was effective in eradicating E. faecalis cells in pure culture and root canal dentin.

  14. Effect of pheromone induction on transfer of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 in intestinal mucus ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2001-01-01

    The effect of synthetic sex pheromone on pheromone-inducible conjugation between the isogenic Enterococcus faecalis strains OG1RF and OG1SS was investigated in (i) Todd-Hewitt broth medium and (ii) intestinal mucus isolated from germ-free rats. In broth, the presence of synthetic pheromone cCF10...... had no detectable effect on the transfer kinetics observed for the tetracycline resistance encoding plasmid pCF10. In MUCUS, presence of the same pheromone significantly increased the transfer efficiency observed during the first 2 h of conjugation, while the effect was less pronounced later...... in the experiment. We suggest that due to differences in diffusion rates and medium-binding of the pheromones, the effect of the synthetic cCF10 was immediately dominated by the effect of pheromones produced by the recipient E. faecalis strain in broth, while this happened later in mucus....

  15. Virulence-associated characteristics of Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from clinical sources Características associadas à virulência de Enterococcus faecalis isolados de casos clínicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia T. Furumura

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-two clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis were screened for virulence factors. Twenty-four (75% isolates produced hemolysin on Mueller-Hinton blood agar plates with sheep erythrocytes. However, the cell free heat-stable hemolysin was detected in all isolates (100% of E. faecalis when grown in BHI-GA (BHI medium supplemented with 1% glucose and 0.03% L-arginine, but not in BHI broth alone. Twenty-four isolates (75% produced caseinase and 23 (71.9% lipase, but none of the isolates produced gelatinase. Fifteen (46.9% culture filtrates caused rounding and membrane alterations with blebbing formation followed by death in HeLa and HEp-2 cells, but not in Vero cells. Thirteen isolates (40.6% agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but did not produce hemagglutination in other bloods, containing or not 1% D-manose. Sixteen (50% E. faecalis isolates adhered to HeLa cells and thirteen (40.6% to HEp-2 cells, but all isolates adhered to polypropylene microtiter plates, indicating that clinical E. faecalis possess the ability to form biofilm in vitro. All the isolates were resistant to the bactericidal action of normal serum and did not produce aerobactin. These findings suggest that adherence and consequently biofilm formation on ephitelial host cells are the first steps in the E. faecalis virulence and that hemolysin, lipase, caseinase and other virulence factors act as causative of human epithelial cell damages.Foram estudados os fatores de virulência de trinta e duas amostras de Enterococcus faecalis, isolados de casos clínicos. Vinte e quatro amostras (75% produziram hemolisina em ágar sangue preparado com hemácias de carneiro. No sobrenadante da cultura em BHI nenhuma amostra produziu hemolisina, no entanto quando cultivadas em meio BHI suplementado com 1% de glucose e 0,03% de L-arginina (BHI-GA, 100% das amostras lisaram hemácias de carneiro. Vinte e quatro (75% amostras produziram caseinase e 23 (71,9% lipase, mas nenhuma amostra produziu

  16. [Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium with high resistance to aminoglycosides in the cities of Resistencia and Corrientes, Republic of Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronconi, M C; Merino, L A

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study was characterize the prevalence of high-level aminoglycosides resistance (HLRA) in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium, determine the relationship between high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) and other aminoglycosides, and their distribution according clinical samples (blood, urine and others). A total of 177 strain (157 E. faecalis and 20 E. faecium) isolated from 1996 to 1998 were studied. They were identified by using classic methods. Their susceptibility to gentamicin, streptomycin, and kanamycin was tested by the disk diffusion technique using high-level disks in agar Müller Hinton. E. faecalis showed HLRG of 28.7%, streptomycin 28.7% and kanamycin 37.6%, E. faecium showed 50%, 40%, and 60% respectively. The strains with HLRA have a tendency to high-level resistances to streptomycin and kanamycin (p < 0.0005). Statistical analysis demonstrated significative differences among strains with HLRA isolated from blood, urine and other clinical samples (p < 0.0005 to gentamicin and streptomycin and 0.004 < p < 0.007 to kanamycin). The prevalence of HLRA enterococci found in the area os this study, justify its detection, particularity in cases of serious infections.

  17. Persistencia intestinal y efecto inmunomodulador de Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121 en ratones inmunosuprimidos con dexametasona

    OpenAIRE

    Del Coco, V.; Córdoba, María Alejandra; Sparo, Mónica; Basualdo Farjat, Juan Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Los agentes bioterapéuticos son microorganismos vivos que a través de su acción local o general producen efectos profilácticos y/o terapéuticos sobre ciertas enfermedades en humanos. Dentro de este grupo se encuentran los probióticos, microorganismos vivos que al ser administrados en dosis adecuadas confieren efectos beneficiosos a la salud del hospedador. Los probióticos tienen efectos beneficiosos en la prevención y/o tratamiento de varias enfermedades entéricas. Enterococcus faecalis CECT ...

  18. Screening Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Clostridium perfringens as Indicator Organisms in Evaluating Pathogen-Reducing Capacity in Biogas Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watcharasukarn, Montira; Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify an indicator organism(s) in evaluating the pathogen-reducing capacity of biogas plants. Fresh cow manure containing 10(4) to 10(5) colony forming unit (CFU) per milliliter of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis along with an inoculated Clostridium...... as indicator organisms to evaluate pathogen-reducing capacity in biogas plants at high temperatures of 55A degrees C and 70A degrees C while at 37A degrees C E. coli could also be included as indicator organism....

  19. Investigation in vivo of Enterococcus faecalis in endodontic retreatment by phenotypic and genotypic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Sergio Endo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of E. faecalis in root-filled canals using culture and molecular approaches. It was evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility to different antibiotics and the virulence factors of E. faecalis isolates. Microbial samples were taken from thirty root-filled canals. Culture methods and 16S rDNA assay were used to identify E. faecalis. The antimicrobial susceptibility of E. faecalis was determined by MIC values using the E test. Cultivable strains of E. faecalis were investigated for virulence factors by PCR technique. E. faecalis were detected by culture (7/30, traditional PCR assay (13/30 and nested PCR (23/30. Both PCR were significantly more effective than culture in detecting  E. faecalis (p < 0.05. All tested E. faecalis were highly sensitive to amoxicillin. Some strains of E. faecalis were resistant to antibiotics such as rifampicin (4/12, erythromycin (3/12 and azythromycin (8/12. The genes efaA and ace were detected in all isolates. The other virulence genes were found in 91.6 (gelE, 83.3 (asa, 25 (esp and 16.6% (cylA. Strains of E. faecalis isolated from root-filled canals showed virulence factors related to adherence. They also showed resistance to some antibiotics commonly used in dentistry.

  20. Antibacterial effect of triantibiotic mixture, chlorhexidine gel, and two natural materials Propolis and Aloe vera against Enterococcus faecalis: An ex vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Bazvand, Leila; Aminozarbian, Mohammad Ghasem; Farhad, Alireza; Noormohammadi, Hamid; Hasheminia, Seyed Mohsen; Mobasherizadeh, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antimicrobial effect of triantibiotic paste, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, Propolis and Aloe vera on Enterococcus faecalis in deep dentin. Materials and Methods: Ninety fresh extracted single-rooted teeth were used in a dentin block model. Seventy-five teeth were infected with E. faecalis and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15). Experimental groups were treated with triantibiotic mixture with distilled water, 0.2% chlorhexi...

  1. First isolation of oleate-dependent Enterococcus faecalis small-colony variants from the umbilical exudate of a paediatric patient with omphalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Noriko; Kuzumoto, Kei; Hidaka, Eiko; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Yumoto, Kayoko; Oana, Kozue; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    An oleate-dependent Enterococcus faecalis isolate representing small-colony variants (SCVs) was isolated from the umbilical exudate of a 31-month-old Japanese male patient in Nagano Children's Hospital, Azumino, Japan. The patient had been suffering from recurrent omphalitis since early infancy. The initial E. faecalis SCV isolate formed small colonies on sheep blood agar plates and tiny colonies on chocolate and modified Drigalski agar, although no visible growth was observed in HK-semi soli...

  2. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) can colonize achlohydric stomachs and ...... in gastric cell culture. Finally the bacteria induced an NF-κB inflammatory response as well as impaired DNA damage response and cell cycle control gene expression....

  3. Enterococcus faecalis Uses a Phosphotransferase System Permease and a Host Colonization-Related ABC Transporter for Maltodextrin Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Nicolas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Joyet, Philippe; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Blancato, Víctor S; Repizo, Guillermo D; Henry, Céline; Pikis, Andreas; Thompson, John; Magni, Christian; Hartke, Axel; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-05-01

    Maltodextrin is a mixture of maltooligosaccharides, which are produced by the degradation of starch or glycogen. They are mostly composed of α-1,4- and some α-1,6-linked glucose residues. Genes presumed to code for the Enterococcus faecalis maltodextrin transporter were induced during enterococcal infection. We therefore carried out a detailed study of maltodextrin transport in this organism. Depending on their length (3 to 7 glucose residues), E. faecalis takes up maltodextrins either via MalT, a maltose-specific permease of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS), or the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter MdxEFG-MsmX. Maltotriose, the smallest maltodextrin, is primarily transported by the PTS permease. A malT mutant therefore exhibits significantly reduced growth on maltose and maltotriose. The residual uptake of the trisaccharide is catalyzed by the ABC transporter, because a malT mdxF double mutant no longer grows on maltotriose. The trisaccharide arrives as maltotriose-6″-P in the cell. MapP, which dephosphorylates maltose-6'-P, also releases P i from maltotriose-6″-P. Maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins are mainly (or exclusively) taken up via the ABC transporter, because inactivation of the membrane protein MdxF prevents growth on maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins up to at least maltoheptaose. E. faecalis also utilizes panose and isopanose, and we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that in contrast to maltotriose, its two isomers are primarily transported via the ABC transporter. We confirm that maltodextrin utilization via MdxEFG-MsmX affects the colonization capacity of E. faecalis , because inactivation of mdxF significantly reduced enterococcal colonization and/or survival in kidneys and liver of mice after intraperitoneal infection. IMPORTANCE Infections by enterococci, which are major health care-associated pathogens, are difficult to treat due to their increasing resistance to clinically

  4. Clonal diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from endodontic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhakim Suliman Al-Badah

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: E. faecalis demonstrated the highest prevalence in the tested dental root canal specimens collected from Saudi patients and were grouped into five to six different genotypes. Different levels of antimicrobial susceptibility were observed in the tested E. faecalis strains, which clearly indicated that although bacterial strains may be similar, point mutations can result in extreme susceptibility or resistance to various antibiotics. This phenomenon is a cause for concern for clinicians in the treatment of dental infections caused by E. faecalis.

  5. Modulators of Enterococcus faecalis Cell Envelope Integrity and Antimicrobial Resistance Influence Stable Colonization of the Mammalian Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banla, Ismael L; Kommineni, Sushma; Hayward, Michael; Rodrigues, Marinelle; Palmer, Kelli L; Salzman, Nita H; Kristich, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis is both a colonizer of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and an agent of serious nosocomial infections. Although it is typically required for pathogenesis, GIT colonization by E. faecalis is poorly understood. E. faecalis tolerates high concentrations of GIT antimicrobials, like cholate and lysozyme, leading us to hypothesize that resistance to intestinal antimicrobials is essential for long-term GIT colonization. Analyses of E. faecalis mutants exhibiting defects in antimicrobial resistance revealed that IreK, a determinant of envelope integrity and antimicrobial resistance, is required for long-term GIT colonization. IreK is a member of the PASTA kinase protein family, bacterial transmembrane signaling proteins implicated in the regulation of cell wall homeostasis. Among several determinants of cholate and lysozyme resistance in E. faecalis , IreK was the only one found to be required for intestinal colonization, emphasizing the importance of this protein to enterococcal adaptation to the GIT. By studying Δ ireK suppressor mutants that recovered the ability to colonize the GIT, we identified two conserved enterococcal proteins (OG1RF_11271 and OG1RF_11272) that function antagonistically to IreK and interfere with cell envelope integrity, antimicrobial resistance, and GIT colonization. Our data suggest that IreK, through its kinase activity, inhibits the actions of these proteins. IreK, OG1RF_11271, and OG1RF_11272 are found in all enterococci, suggesting that their effect on GIT colonization is universal across enterococci. Thus, we have defined conserved genes in the enterococcal core genome that influence GIT colonization through their effect on enterococcal envelope integrity and antimicrobial resistance. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis differ in their ability to coexist in biofilms with other root canal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez de Paz, L E; Davies, J R; Bergenholtz, G; Svensäter, G

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between protease production and the ability of Enterococcus faecalis strains to coexist in biofilms with other bacteria commonly recovered from infected root canals. Biofilms with bacteria in mono-, dual- and four-species communities were developed in flow chambers. The organisms used were Lactobacillus salivarius, Streptococcus gordonii and Actinomyces naeslundii and E. faecalis strains, GUL1 and OG1RF. Biovolume and species distribution were examined using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with confocal microscopy and image analysis. The full proteome of the E. faecalis strains was studied using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Spots of interest were identified using tandem mass spectroscopy and quantified using Delta 2D software. All bacteria formed biofilms and an anova analysis revealed that the biofilm biomass increased significantly (P ≤ 0.01) between 6 and 24 h. L. salivarius, S. gordonii and A. naeslundii formed mutualistic biofilm communities, and this pattern was unchanged when E. faecalis GUL1 was included in the consortium. However, with OG1RF, L. salivarius and S. gordonii were outcompeted in a 24-h biofilm. Proteomic analysis revealed that OG1RF secreted higher levels of proteases, GelE (P = 0.02) and SprE (P = 0.002) and a previously unidentified serine protease (P = 0.05), than GUL1. Different strains of E. faecalis can interact synergistically or antagonistically with a consortium of root canal bacteria. A possible mechanism underlying this, as well as potential differences in virulence, is production of different levels of proteases, which can cause detachment of neighbouring bacteria and tissue damage. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Multiple roles for Enterococcus faecalis glycosyltransferases in biofilm-associated antibiotic resistance, cell envelope integrity, and conjugative transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jennifer L; Cagnazzo, Julian; Phan, Chi Q; Barnes, Aaron M T; Dunny, Gary M

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the limited availability of new antibiotics are of increasing clinical concern. A compounding factor is the ability of microorganisms to form biofilms (communities of cells encased in a protective extracellular matrix) that are intrinsically resistant to antibiotics. Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic pathogen that readily forms biofilms and also has the propensity to acquire resistance determinants via horizontal gene transfer. There is intense interest in the genetic basis for intrinsic and acquired antibiotic resistance in E. faecalis, since clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to multiple antibiotics are not uncommon. We performed a genetic screen using a library of transposon (Tn) mutants to identify E. faecalis biofilm-associated antibiotic resistance determinants. Five Tn mutants formed wild-type biofilms in the absence of antibiotics but produced decreased biofilm biomass in the presence of antibiotic concentrations that were subinhibitory to the parent strain. Genetic determinants responsible for biofilm-associated antibiotic resistance include components of the quorum-sensing system (fsrA, fsrC, and gelE) and two glycosyltransferase (GTF) genes (epaI and epaOX). We also found that the GTFs play additional roles in E. faecalis resistance to detergent and bile salts, maintenance of cell envelope integrity, determination of cell shape, polysaccharide composition, and conjugative transfer of the pheromone-inducible plasmid pCF10. The epaOX gene is located in a variable extended region of the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (epa) locus. These data illustrate the importance of GTFs in E. faecalis adaptation to diverse growth conditions and suggest new targets for antimicrobial design. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Evaluación de la acción antibacteriana de dos pastas a base de hidróxido de calcio sobre el enterococcus faecalis

    OpenAIRE

    Jara Castro, Marisa Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    La flora de los conductos con fracaso de tratamiento endodóntico está formada por un limitado número de especies microbianas predominantemente gram positivas. Los microorganismos predominantes en piezas dentarias con periodontitis apical son los Streptococo no mutans, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus y Candida, los cuales al parecer sobreviven al tratamiento quimio-mecánico del conducto radicular. Uno de estos microorganismos, el Enterococcus faecalis, ha sido identificado como causa frecuente de ...

  9. The effect of diluted triple and double antibiotic pastes on dental pulp stem cells and established Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabrah, Alaa H A; Yassen, Ghaeth H; Liu, Wai-Ching; Goebel, W Scott; Gregory, Richard L; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of various dilutions of antibiotic medicaments used in endodontic regeneration on the survival of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and to determine their antibacterial effect against established Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. The cytotoxic and antibacterial effects of different triple (TAP) and double antibiotic paste (DAP) dilutions (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 10 mg/ml) were tested against Enterococcus faecalis established biofilm and DPSC. Established bacterial biofilm were exposed to antibiotic dilutions for 3 days. Then, biofilms were collected, spiral plated, and the numbers of bacterial colony forming units (CFU/ml) were determined. For the cytotoxic effect, lactate dehydrogenase activity assays (LDH) and cell viability assays (WST-1) were used to measure the percentage of DPSC cytotoxicity after 3-day treatment with the same antibiotic dilutions. A general linear mixed model was used for statistical analyses (α = 0.05). All antibiotic dilutions significantly decreased the bacterial CFU/ml. For WST-1 assays, all antibiotic dilutions except 0.125 mg/ml significantly reduced the viability of DPSC. For LDH assays, the three lowest tested concentrations of DAP (0.5, 0.25, 0.125 mg/ml) and the two lowest concentrations of TAP (0.25 and 0.125 mg/ml) were non-toxic to DPSC. All tested dilutions had an antibacterial effect against E. faecalis. However, 0.125 mg/ml of DAP and TAP showed a significant antibacterial effect with no cytotoxic effects on DPSCs. Using appropriate antibiotic concentrations of intracanal medicament during endodontic regeneration procedures is critical to disinfect root canal and decrease the adverse effects on stem cells.

  10. Identification of proteins related to the stress response in Enterococcus faecalis V583 caused by bovine bile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijsink Vincent GH

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important causes of hospital infections. Bile acids are a major stress factor bacteria have to cope with in order to colonize and survive in the gastro-intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bile acids on the intracellular proteome of E. faecalis V583. Results The proteomes of cells challenged with 1% bile were analyzed after 20 - 120 minutes exposure, using 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Among the approximately 500 observed proteins, 53 unique proteins were found to be regulated in response to bile and were identified with mass spectrometry. The identified proteins belonged to nine different functional classes, including fatty acid- and phospholipid-biosynthesis, energy metabolism, and transport and binding. Proteins involved in fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis pathways were clearly overrepresented among the identified proteins and all were down-regulated upon exposure to bile. The proteome data correlated reasonably well with data from previous transcriptome experiments done under the same conditions, but several differences were observed. Conclusion The results provide an overview of potentially important proteins that E. faecalis V583 needs to regulate in order to survive and adapt to a bile-rich environment, among which are several proteins involved in fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis pathways. In addition, this study reveals several hypothetical proteins, which are both abundant and clearly regulated and thus stand out as targets for future studies on bile stress.

  11. Antibiotic resistance gene transfer between Streptococcus gordonii and Enterococcus faecalis in root canals of teeth ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgley, Christine M; Lee, Esther H; Martin, Matthew J; Flannagan, Susan E

    2008-05-01

    Multiple bacterial species coexisting in infected root canals might interact, but evidence for interspecies gene transfer is lacking. This study tested the hypothesis that horizontal exchange of antibiotic resistance can occur between different bacterial species in root canals. Transfer of the conjugative plasmid pAM81 carrying erythromycin resistance between 2 endodontic infection-associated species, Streptococcus gordonii and Enterococcus faecalis, was investigated in an ex vivo tooth model. Equal numbers of each species (one with pAM81 and the other plasmid-free) were combined in prepared root canals of sterilized teeth and incubated at 37 degrees C. At 24 and 72 hours, bidirectional interspecies antibiotic resistance gene transfer was evident in microorganisms recovered from teeth; average transfer frequencies from S. gordonii to E. faecalis were 10(-3) transconjugants per donor and from E. faecalis to S. gordonii were 10(-6) and 10(-7) transconjugants per donor at 24 and 72 hours, respectively. Microbial accumulations were observed on root canal walls with scanning electron microscopy. Horizontal genetic exchange in endodontic infections might facilitate adoption of an optimal genetic profile for survival.

  12. Effects of Myrcia ovata Cambess. essential oil on planktonic growth of gastrointestinal microorganisms and biofilm formation of Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthya S. Cândido

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from the leaves of Myrcia ovata Cambess., commonly used in Brazil for the treatment of gastric illnesses, was screened for antimicrobial activity and action in the formation of microbial biofilms by Enterococcus faecalis. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type system. Its chemical composition was analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Both MIC and MBC of the essential oil were determined by broth microdilution techniques and agar dilution method. The essential oil showed antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida parapsilosis. The results showed that the essential oil of M. ovata Cambess. was effective against the formation of biofilm by E. faecalis when compared with the control. Four volatile compounds, representing 92.1 % of the oil, were identified and geranial was the major component (50.4 %. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from leaves of M. ovata.

  13. Effectiveness of repeated photodynamic therapy in the elimination of intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prażmo, Ewa Joanna; Godlewska, Renata Alicja; Mielczarek, Agnieszka Beata

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in the elimination of intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and to analyse how a repeated light irradiation, replenishment of oxygen and photosensitiser affect the results of the photodynamic disinfecting protocol. After chemomechanical preparation, 46 single-rooted human teeth were infected with a clinical strain of E. faecalis and incubated for a week in microaerobic conditions. The experimental procedures included groups of single application of photodynamic therapy, two cycles of PDT, irrigation with 5.25% NaOCl solution and negative and positive control. The number of residing bacterial colonies in the root canals was determined based on the CFU/ml method. In the group of preparations irrigated with NaOCl, bacterial colonies were not observed. A single PDT eliminated 45% of the initial CFU/ml. Repeated PDT eradicated 95% of the intracanal bacterial biofilm. Photodynamic therapy has a high potential for the elimination of E. faecalis biofilm. There is a safe therapeutic window where photoinduced disinfection can be used as an adjuvant to conventional endodontic treatment, which remains the most effective.

  14. Peptidoglycan Compositional Analysis of Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in a Bacterial Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, James D; Wallace, Ashley G; Foster, Erin E; Kim, Sung Joon

    2018-02-20

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is a major component of the cell wall in Enterococcus faecalis. Accurate analysis of PG composition provides crucial insights into the bacterium's cellular functions and responses to external stimuli, but this analysis remains challenging because of various chemical modifications to PG-repeat subunits. We characterized changes to the PG composition of E. faecalis grown as planktonic bacteria and biofilm by developing "stable isotope labeling by amino acids in bacterial culture" (SILAB), optimized for bacterial cultures with incomplete amino acid labeling. This comparative analysis by mass spectrometry was performed by labeling E. faecalis in biofilm with heavy Lys (l-[ 13 C 6 , 2 D 9 , 15 N 2 ]Lys) and planktonic bacteria with natural abundance l-Lys, then mixing equal amounts of bacteria from each condition, and performing cell wall isolation and mutanolysin digestion necessary for liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. An analytical method was developed to determine muropeptide abundances using correction factors to compensate for incomplete heavy Lys isotopic enrichment (98.33 ± 0.05%) and incorporation (83.23 ± 1.16%). Forty-seven pairs of PG fragment ions from isolated cell walls of planktonic and biofilm samples were selected for SILAB analysis. We found that the PG in biofilm showed an increased level of PG cross-linking, an increased level of N-deacetylation of GlcNAc, a decreased level of O-acetylation of MurNAc, and an increased number of stem modifications by d,d- and l,d-carboxypeptidases.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite associated with intracanal medication for Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals

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    Marcia Carneiro Valera

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the action of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl associated with an intracanal medication against Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-six human single-rooted teeth with single root canals were used. The canals were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days and were then instrumented with 1% NaOCl. The roots were divided into 3 groups (n=12 according to the intracanal medication applied: calcium hydroxide paste, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX gel, and 2% CHX gel associated with calcium hydroxide. The following collections were made from the root canals: a initial sample (IS: 21 days after contamination (control, b S1: after instrumentation, c S2: 14 days after intracanal medication placement; S3: 7 days after intracanal medication removal. The results were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test at 5% significance level. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Both 1% NaOCl irrigation and the intracanal medications were effective in eliminating E. faecalis and C. albicans inoculated in root canals.

  16. Biochemical and Structural Basis for Inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Synthase, mvaS, by Hymeglusin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaff, D. Andrew; Ramyar, Kasra X.; McWhorter, William J.; Barta, Michael L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Miziorko, Henry M. (UMKC)

    2012-07-25

    Hymeglusin (1233A, F244, L-659-699) is established as a specific {beta}-lactone inhibitor of eukaryotic hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS). Inhibition results from formation of a thioester adduct to the active site cysteine. In contrast, the effects of hymeglusin on bacterial HMG-CoA synthase, mvaS, have been minimally characterized. Hymeglusin blocks growth of Enterococcus faecalis. After removal of the inhibitor from culture media, a growth curve inflection point at 3.1 h is observed (vs 0.7 h for the uninhibited control). Upon hymeglusin inactivation of purified E. faecalis mvaS, the thioester adduct is more stable than that measured for human HMGCS. Hydroxylamine cleaves the thioester adduct; substantial enzyme activity is restored at a rate that is 8-fold faster for human HMGCS than for mvaS. Structural results explain these differences in enzyme-inhibitor thioester adduct stability and solvent accessibility. The E. faecalis mvaS-hymeglusin cocrystal structure (1.95 {angstrom}) reveals virtually complete occlusion of the bound inhibitor in a narrow tunnel that is largely sequestered from bulk solvent. In contrast, eukaryotic (Brassica juncea) HMGCS binds hymeglusin in a more solvent-exposed cavity.

  17. Carnosic acid is an efflux pumps modulator by dissipation of the membrane potential in Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-Sana, Adriana M; Repetto, Victoria; Moreno, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a serious problem of public health. Along with the controlled permeability by the cell-wall, active efflux systems can provide resistance by extruding antibiotics. Carnosic acid is capable to potentiate the antimicrobial activity of several antibiotics. However, the underlying molecular mechanism governing this effect remains unclear. The present study aims to investigate the effect of carnosic acid on the transport of ethidium bromide, on the permeability or the membrane potential in Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. By using fluorimetric assays it was demonstrated that in E. faecalis, carnosic acid is a modulator of the uptake and efflux of ethidium bromide which does not induce cell membrane permeabilization phenomena. Such effect was sensitive to the inhibition caused by both the proton-motive force carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and the calcium antagonist verapamil, but not to vanadate, an ATPase inhibitor. In this work it was demonstrated, for the first time, that the activity of carnosic acid on the uptake/efflux of ethidium bromide is correlated with its capacity to change the membrane potential gradient in S. aureus and E. faecalis. In conclusion, carnosic acid is a natural compound, structurally unrelated to known antibiotics, which can function as an efflux pump modulator by dissipation of the membrane potential. Therefore, carnosic acid would be a good candidate to be employed as a novel therapeutic agent to be used in combination therapies against drug-resistant enterococci and S. aureus infections.

  18. Mortality in Kittens Is Associated with a Shift in Ileum Mucosa-Associated Enterococci from Enterococcus hirae to Biofilm-Forming Enterococcus faecalis and Adherent Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Borst, Luke; Stauffer, Stephen H.; Suyemoto, Mitsu; Moisan, Peter; Zurek, Ludek

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 15% of foster kittens die before 8 weeks of age, with most of these kittens demonstrating clinical signs or postmortem evidence of enteritis. While a specific cause of enteritis is not determined in most cases, these kittens are often empirically administered probiotics that contain enterococci. The enterococci are members of the commensal intestinal microbiota but also can function as opportunistic pathogens. Given the complicated role of enterococci in health and disease, it would be valuable to better understand what constitutes a “healthy” enterococcal community in these kittens and how this microbiota is impacted by severe illness. In this study, we characterized the ileum mucosa-associated enterococcal community of 50 apparently healthy and 50 terminally ill foster kittens. In healthy kittens, Enterococcus hirae was the most common species of ileum mucosa-associated enterococci and was often observed to adhere extensively to the small intestinal epithelium. These E. hirae isolates generally lacked virulence traits. In contrast, non-E. hirae enterococci, notably Enterococcus faecalis, were more commonly isolated from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness. Isolates of E. faecalis had numerous virulence traits and multiple antimicrobial resistances. Moreover, the attachment of Escherichia coli to the intestinal epithelium was significantly associated with terminal illness and was not observed in any kitten with adherent E. hirae. These findings identify a significant difference in the species of enterococci cultured from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness compared to the species cultured from healthy kittens. In contrast to prior case studies that associated enteroadherent E. hirae with diarrhea in young animals, these controlled studies identified E. hirae as more often isolated from healthy kittens and adherence of E. hirae as more common and extensive in healthy kittens than in sick kittens. PMID:23966487

  19. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, S.V.; van der Sluis, L.W.; Özok, A.R.; Exterkate, R.A.M.; van Marle, J.; Wesselink, P.R.; de Soet, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    van der Waal SV, van der Sluis LWM, Ozok AR, Exterkate RAM, van Marle J, Wesselink PR, de Soet JJ. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vitro study. International Endodontic Journal, 44, 11101117, 2011. Aim To

  20. DISPLACEMENT OF ENTEROCOCCUS-FAECALIS FROM HYDROPHOBIC AAD HYDROPHILIC SUBSTRATA BY LACTOBACILLUS AND STREPTOCOCCUS SPP AS STUDIED IN A PARALLEL-PLATE FLOW CHAMBER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLSAP, K; REID, G; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    The displacement of Enterococcus faecalis 1131 from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata by isolates of Lactobacillus casei 36 and Streptococcus hyointestinalis KM1 was studied in a parallel plate flow chamber. The experiments were conducted with either 10 mM potassium phosphate buffer or human

  1. EfaR Is a Major Regulator of Enterococcus faecalis Manganese Transporters and Influences Processes Involved in Host Colonization and Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrantes, M. C.; Kok, J.; Lopes, M. de F.

    Metal ions, in particular manganese, are important modulators of bacterial pathogenicity. However, little is known about the role of manganese-dependent proteins in the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis, a major cause of bacterial endocarditis. The present study demonstrates that the

  2. An alternative magnesium-based root canal disinfectant: Preliminary study of its efficacy against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Zhu; Peng Wan; Jiaohong Duan; Lili Tan; Ke Yang

    2014-01-01

    Organisms invading root canal systems result in serious pulpal and periapical disease. To eliminate microorganisms and restrain secondary infections, dental materials with antibacterial properties are urgently needed in endodontics. Magnesium is considered as a promising biodegradable and biocompatible implant material. However, there are barely researches about its application in endodontic therapy. This work investigated the in vitro efficacy of magnesium powder against Enterococcus faecali...

  3. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa : an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, S. V.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Ozok, A. R.; Exterkate, R. A. M.; van Marle, J.; Wesselink, P. R.; de Soet, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    van der Waal SV, van der Sluis LWM, Ozok AR, Exterkate RAM, van Marle J, Wesselink PR, de Soet JJ. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vitro study. International Endodontic Journal, 44, 11101117, 2011. Aim To

  4. The Influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the Morphology and the Antibody-Binding Capacity of the Intestinal Bacteria of Ten Healthy Human Volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G.; Deddens, B.; Wilkinson, M.; Waaij, D. van der

    1995-01-01

    The influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the morphology of the bacterial cells which make up the gut microflora and on the levels of circulating IgG bound to the gut microflora was assessed. After 29 days of pretreatment monitoring, ten healthy human volunteers ingested 10^7 viable cells of E.

  5. A Comparison between Antibacterial Activity of Propolis and Aloe vera on Enterococcus faecalis (an In Vitro Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Maryam; Amin Marashi, Mahmood; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Issazadeh, Maryam; Khafri, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    Removing the bacteria, including Enterococcus faecalis, from the root canal is one of the important aims in endodontic treatment.We aimed to compare the antibacterial activity of Chlorhexidine with two natural drugs. The antibacterial activities of three different propolis extracts (alcohol concentrations: 0, 15, 40%) and Aloe vera gel on E. faecalis were compared using three methods: disk diffusion, microdilution and direct contact test. In addition to the above bacterium, the Aloe vera gel effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans was evaluated. Disk diffusion test revealed that propolis ethanolic extracts (the alcohol concentration of 15 and 40%) and Aloe vera gel have antibacterial activities but aqueous extract of propolis did not show any effect in this test. The MICs for propolis ethanolic extracts, Aloe vera gel and aqueous extract of propolis (0% alcohol) were 313 µg/ml, 750 µg/ml, 2250 µg/ml, and ≥ 500 µg/ml respectively, much higher than the Chlorhexidine one. In direct contact test, contrary to Aloe vera, all three propolis extracts showed antibacterial effects on E. faecalis. The Aloe vera gel also showed significant antibacterial effect on S.aureus and S.mutans. The hydroalcoholic extracts of propolis and Aloe vera gel had antibacterial effects on E. faecalis, however, propolis is more potent than Aloe vera. The antibacterial effect of Aloe vera on S. aureus and S. mutans is low (MIC ≥ 2250 µg/ml). Appropriate concentrations of alcoholic extracts of propolis and some fractions of Aloe vera gel might be good choices for disinfecting the root canal in endodontic treatments.

  6. Interaction between Galactomyces geotrichum KL20B, Lactobacillus plantarum LAT3 and Enterococcus faecalis KE06 during Milk Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemencia Chaves-López

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial interactions are fundamental during milk fermentation, determining the product final characteristics. Galactomyces geotrichum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecalis are among the most common microorganisms in the Colombian Kumis. The aim of the research was to evaluate the yeast–bacteria interactions in milk fermentation at 28 °C. UHT (Ultra-High Temperature milk was inoculated with single- or multiple-strains associations and analysed periodically to determine the microbial counts, organic acids and total free amino acids (FAA. The results evidenced different growth performance of the strains in single or co-culture, with a positive effect of G. geotrichum KL20B on the lactic acid bacteria (LAB growth performance. All the strains consumed citric acid after 6 h of incubation with E. faecalis KE06 as the major consumer; however, all the co-cultures showed an early metabolism of citrate but with a low intake rate. In addition, the interaction between G. geotrichum KL20B and E. faecalis KE06 led to a low accumulation of acetic acid. Formic acid fluctuated during fermentation. The strains interaction also led to an increase in ethanol content and a lower accumulation of FAA. In conclusion, the three strains co-culture enhances the LAB viability, with high production of lactic acid and ethanol, as a consequence of adaptation to the environment and substrate exploitation. To our knowledge, this is the first time in which it is showed that G. geotrichum KL20B could be used to compensate for the slow acid-producing ability of Lb. plantarum and E. faecalis in milk, underlining that this consortium applies some mechanisms to regulate the growth and milk composition in acids and ethanol content.

  7. Characterization of Multi-Drug Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Cephalic Recording Chambers in Research Macaques (Macaca spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E Woods

    Full Text Available Nonhuman primates are commonly used for cognitive neuroscience research and often surgically implanted with cephalic recording chambers for electrophysiological recording. Aerobic bacterial cultures from 25 macaques identified 72 bacterial isolates, including 15 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The E. faecalis isolates displayed multi-drug resistant phenotypes, with resistance to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, bacitracin, and erythromycin, as well as high-level aminoglycoside resistance. Multi-locus sequence typing showed that most belonged to two E. faecalis sequence types (ST: ST 4 and ST 55. The genomes of three representative isolates were sequenced to identify genes encoding antimicrobial resistances and other traits. Antimicrobial resistance genes identified included aac(6'-aph(2", aph(3'-III, str, ant(6-Ia, tetM, tetS, tetL, ermB, bcrABR, cat, and dfrG, and polymorphisms in parC (S80I and gyrA (S83I were observed. These isolates also harbored virulence factors including the cytolysin toxin genes in ST 4 isolates, as well as multiple biofilm-associated genes (esp, agg, ace, SrtA, gelE, ebpABC, hyaluronidases (hylA, hylB, and other survival genes (ElrA, tpx. Crystal violet biofilm assays confirmed that ST 4 isolates produced more biofilm than ST 55 isolates. The abundance of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor genes in the ST 4 isolates likely relates to the loss of CRISPR-cas. This macaque colony represents a unique model for studying E. faecalis infection associated with indwelling devices, and provides an opportunity to understand the basis of persistence of this pathogen in a healthcare setting.

  8. Antibacterial effect of calcium hydroxide combined with chlorhexidine on Enterococcus faecalis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud SAATCHI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis is the most frequently isolated strain in failed endodontic therapy cases since it is resistant to calcium hydroxide (CH. Whether a combination of CH and chlorhexidine (CHX is more effective than CH alone against E. faecalis is a matter of controversy. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. Material and Methods: A comprehensive search in PubMed, EMbase, EBSCOhost, The Cochrane Library, SciELO, and BBO databases, Clinical trials registers, Open Grey, and conference proceedings from the earliest available date to February 1, 2013 was carried out and the relevant articles were identified by two independent reviewers. Backward and forward search was performed and then inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The included studies were divided into "comparisons" according to the depth of sampling and dressing period of each medicament. Meta-analysis was performed using Stata software 10.0. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Eighty-five studies were retrieved from databases and backward/forward searches. Fortyfive studies were considered as relevant (5 in vivo, 18 in vitro, 18 ex vivo, and 4 review articles. Nine studies were included for meta-analysis. Inter-observer agreement (Cohen kappa was 0.93. The included studies were divided into 21 comparisons for meta-analysis. Chi-square test showed the comparisons were heterogeneous (p<0.001. Random effect model demonstrated no significant difference between CH/CHX mixture and CH alone in their effect on E. faecalis (p=0.115. Conclusions: According to the evidence available now, mixing CH with CHX does not significantly increase the antimicrobial activity of CH against E. faecalis. It appears that mixing CH with CHX does not improve its ex vivo antibacterial property as an intracanal medicament against E. faecalis. Further in vivo studies are necessary to confirm and correlate

  9. Antibacterial effect of calcium hydroxide combined with chlorhexidine on Enterococcus faecalis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAATCHI, Masoud; SHOKRANEH, Ali; NAVAEI, Hooman; MARACY, Mohammad Reza; SHOJAEI, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is the most frequently isolated strain in failed endodontic therapy cases since it is resistant to calcium hydroxide (CH). Whether a combination of CH and chlorhexidine (CHX) is more effective than CH alone against E. faecalis is a matter of controversy. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. Material and Methods A comprehensive search in PubMed, EMbase, EBSCOhost, The Cochrane Library, SciELO, and BBO databases, Clinical trials registers, Open Grey, and conference proceedings from the earliest available date to February 1, 2013 was carried out and the relevant articles were identified by two independent reviewers. Backward and forward search was performed and then inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The included studies were divided into "comparisons" according to the depth of sampling and dressing period of each medicament. Meta-analysis was performed using Stata software 10.0. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results Eighty-five studies were retrieved from databases and backward/forward searches. Fortyfive studies were considered as relevant (5 in vivo, 18 in vitro, 18 ex vivo, and 4 review articles). Nine studies were included for meta-analysis. Inter-observer agreement (Cohen kappa) was 0.93. The included studies were divided into 21 comparisons for meta-analysis. Chi-square test showed the comparisons were heterogeneous (p<0.001). Random effect model demonstrated no significant difference between CH/CHX mixture and CH alone in their effect on E. faecalis (p=0.115). Conclusions According to the evidence available now, mixing CH with CHX does not significantly increase the antimicrobial activity of CH against E. faecalis. It appears that mixing CH with CHX does not improve its ex vivo antibacterial property as an intracanal medicament against E. faecalis. Further in vivo studies are necessary to confirm and correlate the findings of

  10. Enterococcus faecalis strains from food, environmental, and clinical origin produce ACE-inhibitory peptides and other bioactive peptides during growth in bovine skim milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gútiez, Loreto; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; del Campo, Rosa; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2013-08-16

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates from food and environmental origin were evaluated for their angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA) after growth in bovine skim milk (BSM). Most (90% active) but not all (10% inactive) E. faecalis strains produced BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA. Known ACE-inhibitory peptides (ACE-IP) and an antioxidant peptide were identified in the E. faecalis hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-MS/MS). Antimicrobial activity against Pediococcus damnosus CECT4797 and Listeria ivanovii CECT913 was also observed in the E. faecalis hydrolysates. The incidence of virulence factors in the E. faecalis strains with ACE-IA and producers of ACE-IP was variable but less virulence factors were observed in the food and environmental strains than in the clinical reference strains. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based analysis demonstrated that food and environmental E. faecalis strains were genetically different from those of clinical origin. When evaluated, most E. faecalis strains of clinical origin also originated BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA due to the production of ACE-IP. Accordingly, the results of this work suggest that most E. faecalis strains of food, environmental and clinical origin produce BSM-derived bioactive peptides with human health connotations and potential biotechnological applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification and molecular characterization of Van A-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis in Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinalda Anselmo Vilela

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE in Brazil has rapidly increased, following the world wide tendency. We report in the present study the first isolation of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE in the Northeast of Brazil. The four VRE isolates were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility, genotypic typing by macro restriction of chromosomal DNA followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and for characterization of the Tn1546-like element and plasmid contents. The isolates showed resistance to multiple antibiotics and a single genotype profile, suggesting the dissemination of a single clone among the patients. Tn1546 associated to genetic elements as plasmids shows the importance of infection control measures to avoid the spreading of glycopetide resistance by conjugative transfer of VanA elements.

  12. Transfer of the pheromone-inducible plasmid pCF10 among Enterococcus faecalis microorganisms colonizing the intestine of mini-pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Laugesen, D.; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2002-01-01

    A new animal model, the streptomycin-treated mini-pig, was developed in order to allow colonization of defined strains of Enterococcus faecalis in numbers sufficient to study plasmid transfer. Transfer of the pheromone-inducible pCF10 plasmid between streptomycin-resistant strains of E. faecalis OG......1 was investigated in the model. The plasmid encodes resistance to tetracycline. Numbers of recipient, donor, and transconjugant bacteria were monitored by selective plating of fecal samples, and transconjugants were subsequently verified by PCR. After being ingested by the mini-pigs, the recipient...... until the end of the experiment. These observations showed that even in the absence of selective tetracycline pressure, plasmid pCF10 was transferred from ingested E. faecalis cells to other E. faecalis organisms already present in the intestinal environment and that the plasmid subsequently persisted...

  13. Frequency of enterococcus faecalis in saliva and root canals with treatment failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, T.; Manzoor, M.A.; Hussain, W.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the frequency of E.faecalis in the saliva and root canals of teeth associated with apical periodontitis due to endodontic treatment failure Study. Design: Cross-sectional comparative. Place and Duration of Study: Samples were collected from Operative Dentistry department, AFID, while laboratory processing was done at AFIP, Rawalpindi. Duration of this study was one year. Patients and Method: Fifty patients, both males and females with failed endodontic treatment were selected. Saliva and root canal samples were collected from each patient, inoculated on MacKonkey agar plate and incubated at 35-370 C for 48 hours. E.faecalis colonies were identified by colony morphology, Gram stain, catalase, bile asculin test, arabinose fermentation and growth in 6% NaCl nutrient broth. Results: The frequency of E.faecalis in saliva was 34% and 58% in root canal samples. Frequency of the presence of E.faecalis in root canals and saliva was found to be statistically different (p=0.000). Conclusion: The presence of E.faecalis in root canal was not associated with their presence in saliva. (author)

  14. [Study on the antibacterial activity of four kinds of nano-hydroxyapatite composites against Enterococcus faecalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhou, Rongjing; Wu, Hongkun

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to compare and determine a kind of nano-hydroxyapatite composite material with good antibacterial efficacy on Enterococcusfaecalis (E. faecalis) in vitro. We investigated the antimicrobial activity of four kinds of nano-hydroxyapatite composites, namely, silver/hydroxyapatite composite nanoparticles (Ag/nHA), yttrium/hydroxyapatite composite nanoparticles (Yi/nHA), cerium/hydroxyapatite composite nanoparticles (Ce/nHA), and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHA), against E. faecalis in vitro using the agar diffusion and broth dilution method by measuring the growth inhibition zone and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), respectively. The agar diffusion test results showed that Ag/nHA displayed an obvious growth inhibition zone, whereas Yi/nHA, Ce/nHA, and nHA showed no influence on E. faecalis. The MIC value of Ag/nHA was 1.0 g.L-1, and the three other materials had no effect on E.faecalis even at the high concentration of 32.0 g.L-1. Ag/nHA display a potential antimicrobial efficacy to planktonic E.faecalis. Whereas, the three other kinds of nano-hydroxyapatite composites (Yi/nHA, Ce/nHA, nHA) show no influence.

  15. The influence of different peritoneal dialysis fluids on the in vitro activity of ampicillin, daptomycin, and linezolid against Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussmann, M; Schuster, L; Zeitlinger, M; Pichler, P; Reznicek, G; Wiesholzer, M; Burgmann, H; Poeppl, W

    2015-11-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of antibiotics is recommended for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. However, little data are available on a possible interference between peritoneal dialysis fluids and the activity of antimicrobial agents. Thus, the present in vitro study set out to investigate the influence of different peritoneal dialysis fluids on the antimicrobial activity of ampicillin, linezolid, and daptomycin against Enterococcus faecalis. Time-kill curves in four different peritoneal dialysis fluids were performed over 24 h with four different concentrations (1 × MIC, 4 × MIC, 8 × MIC, 30 × MIC) of each antibiotic evaluated. Cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth was used as the comparator solution. All four peritoneal dialysis fluids evaluated had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Compared to the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth comparator solution, the antimicrobial activity of all antibiotics tested was reduced. For ampicillin and linezolid, no activity was found in any peritoneal dialysis fluid, regardless of the concentration. Daptomycin demonstrated dose-dependent activity in all peritoneal dialysis fluids. Bactericidal activity was observed at the highest concentrations evaluated in Dianeal® PDG4 and Extraneal®, but not in concentrations lower than 30 × MIC and not in Nutrineal® PD4 and Physioneal® 40. The antimicrobial activity of ampicillin and linezolid is limited in peritoneal dialysis fluids in vitro. Daptomycin is highly effective in peritoneal dialysis fluids and might, thus, serve as an important treatment option in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical impact of the present findings.

  16. Antimicrobial Effect of Citrus Aurantifolia Extract on Enterococcus Faecalis Within the Dentinal Tubules in The Presence of Smear Layer

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    Sharifian MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Instrumentation of the root canals results in formation of smear layer which covers the dentinal tubules. In infected teeth, it is ideal to achieve a material that has the ability to remove the smear layer besides antimicrobial activity. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of Citrus aurantifolia extracts (lime juice and rind extract on Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules in the presence of smear layer.Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty dentin tubes were prepared from bovine incisors. After removal the smear layer, the specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Then, the smear layer was reformed. Test solutions were used as the irrigants in study roups as follows: group 1: 5.25% NaOCl; group 2: 17% EDTA; group 3: NaOCl+EDTA; group 4: Lime juice; group 5: ethanolic rind extract of C.aurantifolia; group 6: 96% ethanol. Dentin chips were collected from inner and outer layers of dentinal walls and optical density was measured. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests.Results: In outer layer of dentin, the efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. Also Lime juice was less effective than EDTA, NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. In inner layer of dentin, Lime juice was significantly less effective than NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. The efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the presence of smear layer, the antimicrobial activity of Lime juice was less than that of NaOCl but the efficacy of rind extract was similar to that of NaOCl.

  17. The Effect of Diode Laser on Planktonic Enterococcus faecalis in Infected Root Canals in an Ex Vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretella, Gilda; Lajolo, Carlo; Castagnola, Raffaella; Somma, Francesco; Inchingolo, MariaTeresa; Marigo, Luca

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the bactericidal effect of diode laser irradiation against intracanal Enterococcus faecalis. m total of 128 extracted single-rooted and single-canal teeth were treated with ProTaper instruments (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). A total of 120 root canals were inoculated with E. faecalis for 21 days, and the samples were randomly divided into five groups: Group 1 (n = 24) samples were irrigated with only saline solution (positive controls); Group 2 (n = 24) was treated with only 5.25% sodium hypochlorite; Group 3 (n = 24) was irrigated with saline solutions activated by diode laser; Group 4 (n = 24) was treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite activated by diode laser; and Group 5 (n = 24) was irrigated with saline solution with methylene blue dye activated by the diode laser Fox (Sweden & Martina, Padova, Italy); additionally, eight teeth were not contaminated and their canals were irrigated with saline solution and used as a negative control. The Uro-Quick system was used to determine the microbial residual charge. The data were analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test (p  0.001). Evidence indicates that the diode laser was not more effective than sodium hypochlorite in reducing free bacteria.

  18. In vitro antibacterial effect of calcium hydroxide combined with chlorhexidine or iodine potassium iodide on Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, Eva K; Haapasalo, Markus P P; Waltimo, Tuomas M T; Ørstavik, Dag

    2004-08-01

    Several studies have shown a higher success rate of root canal therapy when the canal is free from bacteria at the time of obturation. Treatment strategies that are designed to eliminate this microflora should include agents that can effectively disinfect the root canal. Enterococcus faecalis is often associated with persistent endodontic infections. While in vivo studies have indicated calcium hydroxide to be the most effective all-purpose intracanal medicament, iodine potassium iodide (IKI) and chlorhexidine (CHX) may be able to kill calcium hydroxide-resistant bacteria. Supplementing the antibacterial activity of calcium hydroxide with IPI or CHX preparations was studied in bovine dentine blocks. While calcium hydroxide was unable to kill E. faecalis in the dentine, calcium hydroxide combined with IKI or CHX effectively disinfected the dentine. The addition of CHX or IKI did not affect the alkalinity of the calcium hydroxide suspensions. It may be assumed that combinations also have the potential to be used as long-term medication. Cytotoxicity tests using the neutral red method indicated that the combinations were no more toxic than their pure components.

  19. Protection of mice from oral Candidiasis by heat-killed enterococcus faecalis, possibly through its direct binding to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Ninomiya, Kentaro; Iwasa, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Abe, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    To develop a new therapy against oral candidiasis, a commensal microorganism, Enterococcus faecalis was tested for its ability to modulate Candida growth in vitro and its therapeutic activities against a murine model in vivo. Addition of heat-killed E. faecalis strain EF2001 (EF2001) isolated from healthy human feces to the culture of C. albicans strain TIMM1768 inhibited adherence of the latter to a microtiter plate in a dose dependent manner and Candida cells surrounded by EF2001 were increased. To examine the protective activities of EF2001 in vivo, heat-killed EF2001 was applied orally before and after inoculation of Candida to the tongue of mice previously immunosuppressed. Two days after inoculation this inoculation, both the symptom score and CFU from swabbed-tongue were significantly reduced in the EF2001-treated animals. Histological analysis indicated that EF2001 may potentiate the accumulation of polymorphnuclear cells near a Candida-infected region. These results suggest that oral administration of EF2001 has protective activity against oral candidiasis and that the in vivo activity may be reflected by direct interaction between EF2001 and Candida cells in vitro and the potentiation of an immunostimulatory effect of EF2001.

  20. Antimicrobial effect of a modified vanadium chloroperoxidase on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms at root canal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoon, Ilona F; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Bury, Aleksandra; Wesselink, Paul R; Hartog, Aloysius F; Wever, Ronald; Crielaard, Wim

    2013-08-01

    Previous research showed an antimicrobial effect of vanadium chloroperoxidase (VCPO) on in vitro Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. The current study aimed to optimize the use of this enzyme at the root canal pH using a modified VCPO (mVCPO) that was adapted to function at a higher pH and to explore the biocompatibility of mVCPO. The activity of the original and modified VCPO was assessed using the monochlorodimedone assay. For antimicrobial assessment, 48-hour biofilms of E. faecalis OS-16 were incubated 5 or 30 minutes with mVCPO, bromide, and hydrogen peroxide, and colony-forming units were determined. A metabolic activity assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of mVCPO on oral fibroblasts. Reaction products generated by mVCPO at a root canal pH of 7.7 significantly inactivated the biofilm after 5 minutes and even more after 30 minutes (Mann-Whitney U test, P root canal pH. Also, cytotoxicity tests showed preliminary biocompatibility. Therefore, an interappointment dressing containing mVCPO could aid in improving current endodontic treatment through continuous and local generation of antimicrobials. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel plasmid-based genetic tools for the study of promoters and terminators in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Espinosa, Manuel; Bravo, Alicia

    2010-11-01

    Promoter-probe and terminator-probe plasmid vectors make possible to rapidly examine whether particular sequences function as promoter or terminator signals in various genetic backgrounds and under diverse environmental stimuli. At present, such plasmid-based genetic tools are very scarce in the Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis. Hence, we developed novel promoter-probe and terminator-probe vectors based on the Streptococcus agalactiae pMV158 plasmid, which replicates autonomously in numerous Gram-positive bacteria. As reporter gene, a gfp allele encoding a variant of the green fluorescent protein was used. These genetic tools were shown to be suitable to assess the activity of promoters and terminators (both homologous and heterologous) in S. pneumoniae and E. faecalis. In addition, the promoter-probe vector was shown to be a valuable tool for the analysis of regulated promoters in vivo, such as the promoter of the pneumococcal fuculose kinase gene. These new plasmid vectors will be very useful for the experimental verification of predicted promoter and terminator sequences, as well as for the construction of new inducible-expression vectors. Given the promiscuity exhibited by the pMV158 replicon, these vectors could be used in a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Plectasin NZ2114 in Combination with Cell Wall Targeting Antibiotics Against VanA-Type Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenstein, Elena B M; Courvalin, Patrice; Meziane-Cherif, Djalal

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptide plectasin targeting bacterial cell wall precursor Lipid II has been reported to be active against benzylpenicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae but less potent against vancomycin-resistant enterococci than their susceptible counterparts. The aim of this work was to test plectasin NZ2114 in combination with cell wall targeting antibiotics on vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. The activity of antibiotic combinations was evaluated against VanA-type vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis strain BM4110/pIP816-1 by disk agar-induction, double-disk assay, determination of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index, and time-kill curve. The results indicated that plectasin NZ2114 was synergistic in combination with teicoplanin, moenomycin, and dalbavancin but not with vancomycin, telavancin, penicillin G, bacitracin, ramoplanin, daptomycin, and fosfomycin. To gain an insight into the synergism, we tested other cell wall antibiotic combinations. Interestingly, synergy was observed between teicoplanin or moenomycin and the majority of the antibiotics tested; however, vancomycin was only synergistic with penicillin G. Other cell wall active antibiotics such as ramoplanin, bacitracin, and fosfomycin did not synergize. It appeared that most of the synergies observed involved inhibition of the transglycosylation step in peptidoglycan synthesis. These results suggest that teicoplanin, dalbavancin, vancomycin, and telavancin, although they all bind to the C-terminal D-Ala-D-Ala of Lipid II, might act on different stages of cell wall synthesis.

  3. Antibacterial activity of synthetic peptides derived from lactoferricin against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Calvijo, María A; Leal-Castro, Aura L; Almanzar-Reina, Giovanni A; Rosas-Pérez, Jaiver E; García-Castañeda, Javier E; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly J

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from human and bovine lactoferricin were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific changes in the sequences were designed as (i) the incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the sequence, the (ii) reduction or (iii) elongation of the peptide chain length, and (iv) synthesis of molecules with different number of branches containing the same sequence. For each peptide, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was evaluated. Our results showed that Peptides I.2 (RWQWRWQWR) and I.4 ((RRWQWR)4K2Ahx2C2) exhibit bigger or similar activity against E. coli (MIC 4-33 μM) and E. faecalis (MIC 10-33 μM) when they were compared with lactoferricin protein (LF) and some of its derivate peptides as II.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA) and IV.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGAPSITCVRRAE). It should be pointed out that Peptides I.2 and I.4, containing the RWQWR motif, are short and easy to synthesize; our results demonstrate that it is possible to design and obtain synthetic peptides that exhibit enhanced antibacterial activity using a methodology that is fast and low-cost and that allows obtaining products with a high degree of purity and high yield.

  4. Pharmacodynamics of RWJ-54428 against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in a neutropenic mouse thigh infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, David C; Rodriguez, David; Corcoran, Erik; Dudley, Michael N

    2008-01-01

    RWJ-54428 (also known as MC-02,479) is a new cephalosporin with promising activity against gram-positive bacteria. The pharmacodynamics (PDs) of RWJ-54428 against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis were studied in a neutropenic mouse thigh infection model. The RWJ-54428 MICs ranged from 0.25 to 1 mg/liter. Mice with ca. 10(6) CFU/thigh at the initiation of therapy were treated intraperitoneally with RWJ-54428 at doses that ranged from 3 to 1,200 mg/kg of body weight/day (in 2, 3, 4, 6, or 12 divided doses) for 24 h. The maximal reductions in bacterial counts in thigh tissues at 24 h for the methicillin-resistant S. aureus, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and E. faecalis strains were -2.8, -3.8, and -1.7 log10 CFU/thigh, respectively. The percentage of a 24-h dosing interval that the unbound serum RWJ-54428 concentrations exceeded the MIC (fT>MIC) was the pharmacokinetic (PK)-PD parameter that best described the efficacy of RWJ-54428. The fT>MICs for a bacteriostatic effect (no net change in the numbers of CFU/thigh over 24 h) ranged from 14 to 20% for staphylococci and streptococci; for maximal reductions in the numbers of CFU/thigh, the fT>MICs ranged from 22 to 36% for these strains. For E. faecalis, the ranges of fT>MICs for static and maximal effects were 30 to 46% and 55 to 60%, respectively. These data show that treatment with RWJ-54428 results in marked antibacterial effects in vivo, with the PK-PD parameters for efficacy being comparable to those for the efficacy of penicillins and carbapenems active against staphylococci and pneumococci.

  5. Uses and limitations of green fluorescent protein as a viability marker in Enterococcus faecalis: An observational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Crielaard, Wim; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2015-08-01

    Enterococci are capable of producing biofilms that are notoriously difficult to treat and remove, for instance in root canal infections. The tenacious nature of these organisms makes screening of known and novel antimicrobial compounds necessary. While traditionally growth and fluorescence-based screening methods have proven useful, these methods have their limitations when applied to enterococci (e.g. time consuming, no kinetic data, diffusion properties of the fluorescent dyes). The aim of this study was to develop and validate a GFP-based high-throughput screening system to assess the bactericidal activity of a broad range of antimicrobial agents on Enterococcus faecalis and its biofilms. The effect of antimicrobial compounds on cell viability and GFP fluorescence of enterococcal planktonic and biofilm cells was determined using colony forming unit counts, fluorescence spectrophotometry and real-time imaging devices. There was a linear correlation between cell viability and GFP fluorescence. The intensity of the GFP signal was effected by the extracellular pH. For a range of antimicrobials however, there was no correlation between these two parameters. In contrast, for oxidizing agents such as sodium hypochlorite, the antimicrobial of choice for root canal disinfection, there was a correlation between loss of fluorescence and loss of viability. To conclude, the use of a GFP-based system to monitor the antimicrobial activity of compounds on E. faecalis is possible despite significant limitations. This approach is useful for analysis of susceptibility to oxidizing agents. Using real-time measuring devices to follow GFP fluorescence it should be possible to investigate the mode of action and rate of diffusion of oxidizing agents in E. faecalis biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved adsorption of an Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage ΦEF24C with a spontaneous point mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Some bacterial strains of the multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis can significantly reduce the efficacy of conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Thus, the introduction of bacteriophage (phage therapy is expected, where a phage is used as a bioagent to destroy bacteria. E. faecalis phage ΦEF24C is known to be a good candidate for a therapeutic phage against E. faecalis. However, this therapeutic phage still produces nonuniform antimicrobial effects with different bacterial strains of the same species and this might prove detrimental to its therapeutic effects. One solution to this problem is the preparation of mutant phages with higher activity, based on a scientific rationale. This study isolated and analyzed a spontaneous mutant phage, ΦEF24C-P2, which exhibited higher infectivity against various bacterial strains when compared with phage ΦEF24C. First, the improved bactericidal effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were attributable to its increased adsorption rate. Moreover, genomic sequence scanning revealed that phage ΦEF24C-P2 had a point mutation in orf31. Proteomic analysis showed that ORF31 (mw, 203 kDa was present in structural components, and immunological analysis using rabbit-derived antibodies showed that it was a component of a long, flexible fine tail fiber extending from the tail end. Finally, phage ΦEF24C-P2 also showed higher bactericidal activity in human blood compared with phage ΦEF24C using the in vitro assay system. In conclusion, the therapeutic effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were improved by a point mutation in gene orf31, which encoded a tail fiber component.

  7. In vitro antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Carneiro Valera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. Material and Methods: Seventy-two human tooth roots were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days. The groups were divided according to the auxiliary chemical substance into: G1 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, G2 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX, G3 castor oil, G4 glycolic Aloe vera extract, G5 glycolic ginger extract, and G6 sterile saline (control. The samples of the root canal were collected at different intervals: confirmation collection, at 21 days after contamination; 1st collection, after instrumentation; and 2nd collection, seven days after instrumentation. Microbiological samples were grown in culture medium and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. Results: The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn (5% statistical tests. NaOCl and CHX completely eliminated the microorganisms of the root canals. Castor oil and ginger significantly reduced the number of CFU of the tested bacteria. Reduction of CFU/mL at the 1st and 2nd collections for groups G1, G2, G3 and G4 was greater in comparison to groups G5 and G6. Conclusion: It was concluded that 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine gel were more effective in eliminating C. albicans and E. faecalis, followed by the castor oil and glycolic ginger extract. The Aloe vera extract showed no antimicrobial activity.

  8. Enterococcus faecalis Infection and Reactive Oxygen Species Down-Regulates the miR-17-92 Cluster in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cell Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A B; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    of many human diseases including gastric cancer. Here we studied the impact of infection by the gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) on global miRNA expression as well as the effect of ROS on selected miRNAs. Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line MKN74 was infected with living E....... faecalis for 24 h or for 5 days or with E. faecalis lysate for 5 days. The miRNA expression was examined by microarray analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays. To test the effect of ROS, MKN74 cells were treated with 100 mM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). Following 5 days of E. faecalis infection...... by living E. faecalis bacteria caused a significant global response in miRNA expression in the MKN74 cell culture. E. faecalis infection as well as ROS stimulation down-regulated the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster. We believe that these changes could reflect a general response of gastric epithelial...

  9. Surface-Associated Lipoproteins Link Enterococcus faecalis Virulence to Colitogenic Activity in IL-10-Deficient Mice Independent of Their Expression Levels.

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    Soeren Ocvirk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The commensal Enterococcus faecalis is among the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Recent findings regarding increased abundance of enterococci in the intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and induction of colitis in IL-10-deficient (IL-10-/- mice put a new perspective on the contribution of E. faecalis to chronic intestinal inflammation. Based on the expression of virulence-related genes in the inflammatory milieu of IL-10-/- mice using RNA-sequencing analysis, we characterized the colitogenic role of two bacterial structures that substantially impact on E. faecalis virulence by different mechanisms: the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen and cell surface-associated lipoproteins. Germ-free wild type and IL-10-/- mice were monoassociated with E. faecalis wild type OG1RF or the respective isogenic mutants for 16 weeks. Intestinal tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN were collected to characterize tissue pathology, loss of intestinal barrier function, bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immune cell activation. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC were stimulated with bacterial lysates and E. faecalis virulence was additionally investigated in three invertebrate models. Colitogenic activity of wild type E. faecalis (OG1RF score: 7.2±1.2 in monoassociated IL-10-/- mice was partially impaired in E. faecalis lacking enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (ΔepaB score: 4.7±2.3; p<0.05 and was almost completely abrogated in E. faecalis deficient for lipoproteins (Δlgt score: 2.3±2.3; p<0.0001. Consistently both E. faecalis mutants showed significantly impaired virulence in Galleria mellonella and Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of E-cadherin in the epithelium was shown for all bacterial strains in inflamed IL-10-/- but not wild type mice. Inactivation of epaB in E. faecalis reduced microcolony and biofilm formation in vitro, altered bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium of germ

  10. Pharmacodynamics of Ceftaroline plus Ampicillin against Enterococcus faecalis in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model of Simulated Endocardial Vegetations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Brian J; Shireman, Laura M

    2017-04-01

    The combination of ampicillin plus ceftaroline has been suggested to be more reliably synergistic against Enterococcus faecalis than ampicillin plus ceftriaxone using time-kill methods. The purpose of this study was to determine if this trend persists in a two-compartment model of simulated endocardial vegetations (SEV) using clinically relevant pharmacokinetic exposures of these antimicrobials. Three clinically derived E. faecalis strains were included in the study. The MICs of study antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution. Simulations of ampicillin (2 g every 4 h [q4h]; maximum concentration of drug in serum [ C max ], 72.4 mg/liter; half-life [ t 1/2 ], 1.9 h), ceftaroline-fosamil (600 mg q8h; C max , 21.3 mg/liter; t 1/2 , 2.66 h), ceftriaxone ( C max , 257 mg/liter; t 1/2 , 8 h), and ampicillin plus ceftaroline and ampicillin plus ceftriaxone were evaluated against 3 strains of E. faecalis isolated from patients with endocarditis in an in vitro PK/PD SEV model over 72 h, with a starting inoculum of ∼9 log 10 CFU/g. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin (MIC, ≤2 mg/liter). Ceftaroline MICs varied from 2 to 16 mg/liter. All strains had ceftriaxone MICs of 256 mg/liter. W04 and W151 exhibited high-level aminoglycoside resistance but W07 did not. Ampicillin plus ceftaroline resulted in significantly greater reductions in CFU per gram by 72 h than ampicillin for all strains ( P ≤ 0.025) than ampicillin plus ceftriaxone for W04 ( P = 0.019) but not W07 or W151 ( P ≥ 0.15). A 4-fold increase in ampicillin MIC was observed for W07 at 72 h, but this was prevented by the addition of ceftaroline or ceftriaxone. The combination of ampicillin plus ceftaroline appears to be at least as efficacious as ampicillin plus ceftriaxone and may lead to improved activity against some strains of E. faecalis , but these differences may be small and the clinical significance should not be overestimated. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance and quinolone resistance factors in high-level ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from fresh produce and fecal samples of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chan; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2017-07-01

    The emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant enterococci is worldwide. Antimicrobial resistance was characterized and the effect of quinolone-resistance factors was analyzed in high-level ciprofloxacin-resistant (HLCR) Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from fresh produce and fecal samples of patients. Among the 81 ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterococcus isolates, 46 showed high levels of ciprofloxacin resistance, resistance to other quinolone antibiotics, and multidrug resistance profiles. The virulence factors esp and hyl were identified in 27 (58.7%) and 25 (54.3%) of isolates, respectively. Sequence type analysis showed that 35 strains of HLCR E. faecium were clonal complex 17. Eleven strains of HLCR E. faecalis were confirmed as sequence type (ST) 28, ST 64 and ST 125. Quinolone resistance-determining region mutation was identified in HLCR Enterococcus isolates; with serine being changed in gyrA83, gyrA87 and parC80. This result shows that gyrA and parC mutations could be important factors for high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones. No significant differences were observed in antimicrobial resistance patterns and genetic characteristics among the isolates from fresh produce and fecal samples. Therefore, good agricultural practices in farming and continuous monitoring of patients, food and the environment for Enterococcus spp. should be performed to prevent antimicrobial resistance and enable reduction of resistance rates. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Relationship of biofilm formation and gelE gene expression in Enterococcus faecalis recovered from root canals in patients requiring endodontic retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Dong, Ming; Zheng, Jinbo; Song, Qiyi; Yin, Wei; Li, Jiyao; Niu, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is known to be the most frequently detected species in root canals with failed endodontic treatment. Many studies are available on biofilm formation and the expression of virulence factors such as gelatinase (gelE) in E. faecalis. However, the relationship of biofilm formation and the expression of gelE in E. faecalis recovered from root canals undergoing orthograde retreatment is not well understood. E. faecalis was isolated from clinical samples of root canal retreatment, and the expression of gelE in E. faecalis was assessed. Automatic microplate reader and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the biofilm formation ability of E. faecalis isolates. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used for detecting the expression of gelE in biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative E. faecalis isolates. The detection rate of E. faecalis in the root canal retreatment cases was 39.26%. An automatic microplate reader showed that most isolates were able to form biofilms, and the biofilm formation ability of strains isolated from the teeth without a sinus tract was better than that with a sinus tract (P < .05). The expression of gelE was stronger in the cases of apical radiolucency than in those without the symptom (P < .05). The expression of gelE was higher in the biofilm-positive than in biofilm-negative strains (P < .05). Biofilm formation in E. faecalis was facilitated in the cases without a sinus tract. In the cases of apical radiolucency and in the biofilm-positive strains, the expression of gelE was higher. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antimicrobial effect of two endodontic medicaments with different exposure times, and the morphologic alterations caused to Enterococcus faecalis = Efeito antimicrobiano de dois medicamentos endodônticos com diferentes exposições, e as alterações morfológicas causadas a Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado, Manoel Eduardo de Lima

    2011-01-01

    Conclusão: Pode-se concluir que ambos os medicamentos destroem o Enterococcus faecalis com tempo de exposição de 7 a 14 dias, onde a viabilidade celular não é observada após este período devido alterações irreversíveis na morfologia celular bacteriana

  14. In vitro effectiveness of different endodontic irrigants on the reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in root canals

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaykumar, Singamaneni; GunaShekhar, M.; Himagiri, Sura

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the reduction of E. faecalis counts in root canals produced by irrigation with distilled water, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and combinations of solutions, in vitro. Study Design: Study sample included sixty mandibular premolar teeth mounted in dental stone. Root canals were prepared using crown down technique under distilled water irrigation. Specimens were sterilized overnight by ethylene oxide gas. Each canal was comple...

  15. Phenotype and Genotype of Enterococcus faecalis Isolated form Root Canal and Saliva of Primary Endodontic Patients

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    Zaki Mubarak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the phenotype and genotype of E. faecalis isolated from the root canal and saliva of primary endodontic patients with periapical lesions. Eighteen adult male and female individuals suffering from primary endodontic infection, either had or had not periapical lesions, were involved in this study. Root canal scraping and saliva were collected from each subject and used for bacterial quantitation using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Enterococci were isolated using ChromAgar medium and then identified using both biochemical (Gram staining and catalase tests and molecular biology (conventional PCR methods. Gelatinase activity, polysaccharide capsul profile and mRNA ace expression level were determined using microbiological, biochemical and molecular biology approach, respectively.  Genotype of E. faecalis was determined based on nucleotide sequence of ace and gelE genes analyzed using web-based 3730xl DNA Analyze software. The results showed that high proportion of E. faecalis found in both root canal and saliva of is related to the incidence of periapical lessions in the primary endodontic patients. This is contrast to the insignificant relationship found between Cps polymorphism, gelatinase activity, and mRNA ace expression with periapical lesions in the patients, respectively.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v23i1.960

  16. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Aloe vera, garlic, and 5% sodium hypochlorite as root canal irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study

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    Swati Ramesh Karkare; Nivedita Pramod Ahire; Smita Uday Khedkar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Enterococcus faecalis are the most resistant and predominant microorganisms recovered from root canals of teeth where previous treatment has failed. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. In dentistry, phytomedicines has been used as an anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, analgesic, sedative, and also as an endodontic irrigant. In endodontics, because of the cytotoxic reactions of most of the commercial intracanal medicaments and...

  17. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis targets cell division loci and specifically recognizes L-Ala2-cross-bridged peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Inhibition effect of Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis and their related products on human colonic smooth muscle in vitro.

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    Gong, Jing; Bai, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Qian, Wei; Song, Jun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of four strains, generally used in clinic, including Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis, and their related products on human colonic smooth muscle in vitro. Human colonic circular muscle strips obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments from 25 patients with colorectal cancer were isometrically examined in a constant-temperature organ bath and exposed to different concentrations of living bacteria, sonicated cell fractions and cell-free supernatant (CFS). The area under the curve (AUC) representing the contractility of smooth muscle strips was calculated. (1) The four living probiotics inhibited the contractility of human colonic muscle strips only at high concentration (1010 CFUs/mL, all PStreptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis decreased obviously when pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 10-5 mol/L) (P0.05). Four common probiotics related products, including the sonicated cell fractions and the CFS, obviously inhibited human colonic smooth muscles strips contraction in a dose-dependent manner. Only high concentration living probiotics (1010 CFUs/mL) can inhibit the colonic smooth muscles strips contraction. The NO pathway may be partly involved in the inhibitory effect of CFS from Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis.

  19. Use of photo-Fenton's reaction by 400-nm LED light for endodontic disinfection: A preliminary in vitro study on Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagori, Giuseppe; Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta

    2017-06-01

    One of the biggest challenges in endodontics is the complete disinfection of root canals. In addition to mechanical preparation, the technique traditionally also involves channel disinfection with other agents such as sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, chlorhexidine, or a combination of these. Some bacterial species are particularly resistant to eradication. Using Enterococcus faecalis in this preliminary study, we tested the bactericidal effectiveness of the Fenton reaction and the photo-Fenton reaction using an LED light with a 400-nm wavelength. Discs of hydroxyapatite were incubated in brain-heart broth contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. After 4days, they were decontaminated with different bactericidal agents, including some with proven and well-known efficacy (5% sodium hypochlorite and 3% hydrogen peroxide) and other treatments using solutions of 1.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.15% iron gluconate (Fenton reaction) plus LED light at a Fluence of 4.0J/cm 2 (photo-Fenton reaction). The photo-Fenton reaction demonstrated comparable performance to that of sodium hypochlorite in eliminating Enterococcus faecalis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Partial Purification and Characterization of the Mode of Action of Enterocin S37: A Bacteriocin Produced by Enterococcus faecalis S37 Isolated from Poultry Feces

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    Y. Belguesmia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to purify and characterize the mode of action of enterocin S37, a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecalis S37, a strain recently isolated from the chicken feces. Enterocin S37 has a molecular weight comprised between 4 and 5 kDa. It remained active after 1 h at 80oC and at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 9.0. Furthermore, cell-free supernatant of Enterococcus faecalis S37 and purified enterocin S37 were active against Gram-positive bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes EGDe, L. innocua F, Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, and Lactobacillus brevis F145. The purification of enterocin S37 was performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed up by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography procedures. Treatment of enterocin S37 with proteinase K, -chymotrypsin, and papain confirmed its proteinaceous nature, while its treatment with lysozyme and lipase resulted in no alteration of activity. Enterocin S37 is hydrophobic, anti-Listeria and likely acting by depletion of intracellular K+ ions upon action on KATP channels. This study contributed to gain more insights into the mode of action of enterocins.

  1. Virulence and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates recovered from three states of Mexico. Detection of linezolid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Salas, Perla; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Tinoco, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Salcido-Gutierres, Lorena; González, Gloria M; Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Garza-González, Elvira

    2013-08-01

    The virulence of Enterococcus faecalis is associated with three proteins involved in biofilm production: Ace, Agg, and Esp. Isolates also vary with respect to drug resistance. The present study investigated four characteristics of clinical isolates of E. faecalis recovered from three hospitals in Mexico, including biofilm production, the presence of biofilm-related genes, antibiotic susceptibility, and clonal diversity. We studied 109 clinical isolates. Biofilm formation was investigated using crystal violet and the safranin method with biofilm index correction. The presence of ace, agg, and esp genes was determined by PCR. Susceptibility to antibiotics was determined by the broth microdilution method and clonal relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Using the crystal violet method, 4.6% (5/109) of isolates were high biofilm producers, 48% (52/109) were moderate producers, 20% (39/109) were low producers, and 11% (12/109) were nonproducers. The agg gene was present in 44% (48/109), the ace gene in 39% (43/109), and the esp gene in 33% (36/109). The esp gene was associated with biofilm production (p resistance (p resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. Also, 2% of isolates were resistant to linezolid and there was no vancomycin resistance. PFGE revealed 109 different restriction patterns. The presence of the esp and agg gene was associated with biofilm production, whereas the presence of the ace gene correlated with tetracycline resistance. Overall, a moderate resistance to antibiotics was detected and there was no clonal relatedness among isolates. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular detection of virulence factors among food and clinical Enterococcus faecalis strains in South Brazil

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    A.W. Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report aimed to perform a molecular epidemiological survey by investigating the presence of virulence factors in E. faecalis isolated from different human clinical (n = 57 and food samples (n = 55 in Porto Alegre, Brazil, collected from 2006 to 2009. In addition, the ability to form biofilm in vitro on polystyrene and the β-haemolytic and gelatinase activities were determined. Clinical strains presented a higher prevalence of aggregation substance (agg, enterococcal surface protein (esp and cytolysin (cylA genes when compared with food isolates. The esp gene was found only in clinical strains. On the other hand, the gelatinase (gelE and adherence factor (ace genes had similar prevalence among the strains, showing the widespread occurrence of these virulence factors among food and clinical E. faecalis strains in South Brazil. More than three virulence factor genes were detected in 77.2% and 18.2% of clinical and food strains, respectively. Gelatinase and β-haemolysin activities were not associated with the presence of gelE and cylA genes. The ability to produce biofilm was detected in 100% of clinical and 94.6% of food isolates, and clinical strains were more able to form biofilm than the food isolates (Student's t-test, p < 0.01. Results from the statistical analysis showed significant associations between strong biofilm formation and ace (p = 0.015 and gelE (p = 0.007 genes in clinical strains. In conclusion, our data indicate that E. faecalis strains isolated from clinical and food samples possess distinctive patterns of virulence factors, with a larger number of genes that encode virulence factors detected in clinical strains.

  4. Enhancing the Performance of Solar Water Disinfection with Potassium Persulfat: Laboratory Study with Enterococcus faecalis

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    Ghader Ghanizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: The safe drinking water providing is one of the most crucial objections in these centenaries. Bacterial water contamination and high rate of morbidity and mortality is crucial health threat. Efficiency of potassium persulfat (KPS associated solar disinfection as a novel water disinfection technology was evaluated in batch scale experiments, using Ent. faecalis (ATTCC 29212. Material and Methods: This research is a descriptive and experimental study which done on Tehran city, Iran. Ent. faecalis (ATTCC 29212 was provided in standard form from reference laboratory. Desired bacterial density in water was prepared by Mc Farland method. Water specimens were exhibited with solar radiations from 10 a.m to 16 p.m of Tehran local time. All experiments were conducted into 1.5 L volume of Damavand bottled water. Non-injured bacteria cells were detected by plating onto Bile Esculin azide agar media. Turbid water samples were provided by spiking of sterile slurry. Contact time (1-6 h, turbidity (30-200 NTU, KPS concentration (0.1, 0.7, 1.5 and 2 mMol/l, Ent. faecalis density(1000 and 1500 cell/ml and UV intensity  were independent and disinfection efficiency was a dependent variable, respectively. Results: Intensity of UVA solar irradiation varied from 3770 to 6263.3 µW/Cm2, with the highest value was measured on 13.30 p.m. In single SODIS and 1 hour contact time, increasing of bacterial closeness from 1000 to 1500 cell/ml implied disinfection performance decreasing in which, the vital bacteria was 10 and 20 cell/ml, respectively; but beyond of this contact time, a complete disinfection was occurred. Disinfection of Ent. faecalis was achieved within 2 h with single solar irradiation but KPS associated solar disinfection with applied dosage of KPS provide completely disinfection in 1 h in which the process efficiency was not influenced by increasing of bacterial density and turbidity up to 200 NTU. Conclusion: Association of

  5. Effect of Salvia chorassanica Root Aqueous, Ethanolic and Hydro Alcoholic Extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli

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    Azam Mehraban

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays, through the previous researches, it has become clear that Salvia has important health benefits. Salvia chorassanica is one of the valuable native Iranian species which only grows in Khorasan province, Iran. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of Salvia chorassanica root aqueous, ethanolic and hydro alcoholic extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Methods In this experimental study, maceration method was used to prepare extracts. Study setup was conducted in March 2014.The duration of study setup took for two months. The micro dilution method by ELISA was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of aqueous, ethanolic and hydro alcoholic extracts of root of Salvia chorassanica against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. The antibacterial effect also was evaluated using agar diffusion method. The inhibition zones of growth against the extracts were measured in comparison to standards antibiotics. Chloramphenicol as positive control on Enterococcus faecalis, Tetracycline on Staphylococcus aureus, Gentamicin on Escherichia coli and Neomycin on Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA with SPSS version 16. Results The highest inhibition zone in diffusion method was related to ethanolic extract of Salvia chorassanica root against Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The calculated MIC in aqueous and ethanolic extracts of root for Staphylococcus aureus was 240 and 120 mg/mL, for Enterococcus faecalis was 120 and 60 mg/mL respectively, and for Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium was equal to 240 mg/mL. The amount in hydro alcoholic extracts for Gram-positive bacteria was 60 mg/mL and for Gram-negative bacteria was 120 mg/mL. The

  6. Evaluación in vitro de las cepas de Enterococcus faecalis y Enterococcus faecium, como potenciales probióticos

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    Diana Alejandra Pico Veslin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Los probióticos son conocidos como microrganismos vivos, que favorecen el equilibrio microbiano en el tracto gastrointestinal, sus metabolitos (ácidos orgánicos, ácido láctico, entre otros inhiben el crecimiento de patógenos, a nivel de sistema inmune activan la respuesta humoral (IL 2 y activan la fagocitosis. Diferentes estudios han demostrado que la utilización de probióticos en el sector avícola como suplemento, relegaría el uso de antibióticos, puesto que la utilización de los mismos, ha generado casos de resistencia bacteriana, afectando al consumidor final y  convirtiéndose en un problema de salud pública. El uso de probióticos según la FAO, encaminaría en estrategias de mejoramiento global del rendimiento y bienestar animal en  países en desarrollo. Objetivo: Identificar fenotípicamente el comportamiento de las cepas Enterorococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis aisladas del intestino de pollo de engorde y gallina comercial (Gallus gallus frente a  antibacterianos. Metodología: estudio descriptivo de corte transversal. Se tomaron muestras del mucus intestinal de las aves (íleon, yeyuno y duodeno  aisladas en medio MRS el cual permite evidenciar el crecimiento de bacterias ácido lácticas, se  realizaron pruebas microbiológicas y bioquímicas utilizando el sistema  semiautomatizado Crystal para Gram positivos  (BBLTM CrystalTM Gram-PositiveID Kit  posteriormente estas cepas fueron evaluadas en algunas características como potenciales probióticos: resistencia a pH bajo, concentraciones biliares de 0.1% a 0.3%, producción de hemolisinas, prueba de antagonismo;  posteriormente se evaluó un factor de virulencia,  la presencia de genes de resistencia a ciertos antibióticos; se realizó la caracterización fenotípica mediante difusión en disco Kirby Bauer , para evaluar la resistencia y/o sensibilidad, se  seleccionaron  los  antibióticos de las  familias Glicopetidos (Vancomicina, Inh

  7. Growth, biogenic amine production and tyrDC transcription of Enterococcus faecalis in synthetic medium containing defined amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargossi, E; Tabanelli, G; Montanari, C; Gatto, V; Chinnici, F; Gardini, F; Torriani, S

    2017-04-01

    The tyraminogenic potential of the strains Enterococcus faecalis EF37 and ATCC 29212 was investigated in a synthetic medium containing defined amounts of tyrosine and phenylalanine at different temperatures. Enterococci growth and the production of biogenic amines (BA) were evaluated in relation to their pre-growth in medium containing tyrosine. Significant differences between the two strains were evidenced at metabolic level. Both the pre-adapted strains grew faster in all the tested conditions, independently of the presence of the precursor. Temperatures of 30 and 40°C positively affected the growth parameters. The tyrosine decarboxylase (tyrDC) activity of the strain EF37 was positively affected by pre-adaptation, while ATCC 29212 showed a faster and higher tyramine accumulation with not-adapted cells. The expression analysis of the gene tyrDC confirmed the influence of the growth conditions on gene transcription. The small differences found between the two strains in the maximum transcript level reached rapidly after the inoculum and the different behaviour in the tyramine accumulation suggested the possible involvement of complex regulation mechanisms on the tyrDC or on the membrane transport systems, which could affect the different BA accumulation trend. This study gives deeper insight into the metabolic regulation of tyrDC activity of enterococci. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy using a light-emitting diode lamp against Enterococcus faecalis in extracted human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Alejandro; He, Jianing; Glickman, Gerald N; Spears, Robert; Schneiderman, Emet D; Honeyman, Allen L

    2011-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with high-power lasers as the light source has been proven to be effective in disinfecting root canals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of PDT using toluidine blue O (TBO) and a low-energy light-emitting diode (LED) lamp after the conventional disinfection protocol of 6% NaOCl. Single-rooted extracted teeth were cleaned, shaped, and sealed at the apex before incubation with Enterococcus faecalis for 2 weeks. Roots were randomly assigned to five experimental groups and three control groups. Dentin shavings were collected from the root canals of all groups with a #50/.06 rotary file, colony-forming units were determined, and the bacterial survival rate was calculated for each treatment. The bacterial survival rate of the NaOCl/TBO/light group (0.1%) was significantly lower (P lamp has the potential to be used as an adjunctive antimicrobial procedure in conventional endodontic therapy. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutation network-based understanding of pleiotropic and epistatic mutational behavior of Enterococcus faecalis FMN-dependent azoreductase

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    Jinyan Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified a highly active homodimeric FMN-dependent NADH-preferred azoreductase (AzoA from Enterococcus faecalis, which cleaves the azo bonds (R-N˭N-R of diverse azo dyes, and determined its crystal structure. The preliminary network-based mutational analysis suggested that the two residues, Arg-21 and Asn-121, have an apparent mutational potential for fine-tuning of AzoA, based on their beneficial pleiotropic feedbacks. However, epistasis between the two promising mutational spots in AzoA has not been obtained in terms of substrate binding and azoreductase activity. In this study, we further quantified, visualized, and described the pleiotropic and/or epistatic behavior of six single or double mutations at the positions, Arg-21 and Asn-121, as a further research endeavor for beneficial fine-tuning of AzoA. Based on this network-based mutational analysis, we showed that pleiotropy and epistasis are common, sensitive, and complex mutational behaviors, depending mainly on the structural and functional responsibility and the physicochemical properties of the residue(s in AzoA.

  10. Antibacterial effect of triantibiotic mixture, chlorhexidine gel, and two natural materials Propolis and Aloe vera against Enterococcus faecalis: An ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazvand, Leila; Aminozarbian, Mohammad Ghasem; Farhad, Alireza; Noormohammadi, Hamid; Hasheminia, Seyed Mohsen; Mobasherizadeh, Sina

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antimicrobial effect of triantibiotic paste, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, Propolis and Aloe vera on Enterococcus faecalis in deep dentin. Ninety fresh extracted single-rooted teeth were used in a dentin block model. Seventy-five teeth were infected with E. faecalis and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15). Experimental groups were treated with triantibiotic mixture with distilled water, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, 70% ethanol + Propolis and Aloe vera. Fifteen teeth treated with distilled water as the positive control and 15 samples, free of bacterial contamination, were considered as the negative control. Gates-Glidden drill #4 was used for removal of surface dentin and Gates-Glidden drill #5 was used to collect samples of deep dentin. The samples were prepared and colony-forming units were counted. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). Aloe vera had antibacterial effects on E. faecalis, but in comparison with other medicaments, it was less effective (P Aleo vera were relatively effective against E. faecalis. All the intracanal medicements had similar effects on E. faecalis in deep dentin except for Aloe vera.

  11. Antibacterial effect of triantibiotic mixture, chlorhexidine gel, and two natural materials Propolis and Aloe vera against Enterococcus faecalis: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Bazvand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antimicrobial effect of triantibiotic paste, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, Propolis and Aloe vera on Enterococcus faecalis in deep dentin. Materials and Methods: Ninety fresh extracted single-rooted teeth were used in a dentin block model. Seventy-five teeth were infected with E. faecalis and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15. Experimental groups were treated with triantibiotic mixture with distilled water, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, 70% ethanol + Propolis and Aloe vera. Fifteen teeth treated with distilled water as the positive control and 15 samples, free of bacterial contamination, were considered as the negative control. Gates-Glidden drill #4 was used for removal of surface dentin and Gates-Glidden drill #5 was used to collect samples of deep dentin. The samples were prepared and colony-forming units were counted. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. Aloe vera had antibacterial effects on E. faecalis, but in comparison with other medicaments, it was less effective (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This experimental study showed that triantibiotic mixture, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, Propolis and Aleo vera were relatively effective against E. faecalis. All the intracanal medicements had similar effects on E. faecalis in deep dentin except for Aloe vera.

  12. Comparison of Antibacterial Effects of 810 and 980- nanometer Diode Lasers on Enterococcus Faecalis in the Root Canal System —An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaashari, Mohamad; Ebad, Leila Tahmasebi

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim: Use of laser technology in endodontics has greatly increased in the recent years due to the introduction of new wavelengths and methods and optimal antimicrobial and smear layer removal properties of lasers. This in vitro study aimed to compare the antibacterial effects of diode lasers of 810 nm and 980 nm wavelength on Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) biofilm in the root canal system. Materials and methods: Fifty single-canal human anterior teeth were cleaned, shaped, sterilized and randomly divided into four groups namely two experimental, one positive and one negative control group. The experimental and positive control groups were inoculated with E. faecalis and incubated for two weeks. The experimental group one (n=20) received 810 nm diode laser irradiation (1.5W) while the experimental group two (n=20) was subjected to 980 nm diode laser irradiation (1.5W). The E. faecalis colony forming units (CFUs) were counted in each root canal before and after laser irradiation. Results: Laser irradiation significantly decreased the bacterial colony count in both experimental groups. The reduction in microbial count was significantly greater in 810 nm laser group compared to 980 nm laser group. Conclusion: Irradiation of both 810 and 980 nm lasers significantly decreased the E. faecalis count in the root canal system; 810 nm laser was more effective in decreasing the intracanal microbial load. PMID:27853346

  13. Antibacterial effect of triantibiotic mixture, chlorhexidine gel, and two natural materials Propolis and Aloe vera against Enterococcus faecalis: An ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazvand, Leila; Aminozarbian, Mohammad Ghasem; Farhad, Alireza; Noormohammadi, Hamid; Hasheminia, Seyed Mohsen; Mobasherizadeh, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antimicrobial effect of triantibiotic paste, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, Propolis and Aloe vera on Enterococcus faecalis in deep dentin. Materials and Methods: Ninety fresh extracted single-rooted teeth were used in a dentin block model. Seventy-five teeth were infected with E. faecalis and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15). Experimental groups were treated with triantibiotic mixture with distilled water, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, 70% ethanol + Propolis and Aloe vera. Fifteen teeth treated with distilled water as the positive control and 15 samples, free of bacterial contamination, were considered as the negative control. Gates-Glidden drill #4 was used for removal of surface dentin and Gates-Glidden drill #5 was used to collect samples of deep dentin. The samples were prepared and colony-forming units were counted. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). Aloe vera had antibacterial effects on E. faecalis, but in comparison with other medicaments, it was less effective (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This experimental study showed that triantibiotic mixture, 0.2% chlorhexidine gel, Propolis and Aleo vera were relatively effective against E. faecalis. All the intracanal medicements had similar effects on E. faecalis in deep dentin except for Aloe vera. PMID:25225560

  14. Relevance of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats of Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from retreatment root canals on periapical lesions, resistance to irrigants and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongchun; Du, Yu; Ling, Junqi; Huang, Lijia; Ma, Jinglei

    2017-12-01

    A high prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis ( E. faecalis ) is observed in teeth with root canal treatment failures. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are widely distributed in prokaryotes that have adaptive immune systems against mobile elements, including pathogenic genes. The present study investigated the relevance of the CRISPR in E. faecalis strains isolated from retreated root canals on biofilms, periapical lesions and drug resistance. A total of 20 E. faecalis strains were extracted from the root canals of teeth referred for root canal retreatment. CRISPR-Cas loci were identified by two pairs of relevant primers and polymerase chain reaction. The susceptibility of the 20 isolated strains to intracanal irrigants was evaluated by 1- and 5-minute challenges with a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid and a detergent (MTAD), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The microtiter plate assay and crystal violet staining were used to compare the biofilm formation of the E. faecalis isolate strains. Out of the 20 E. faecalis isolate strains, 5 strains that lacked CRISPR-cas determinants exhibited significant periapical lesions. Among the 15 strains containing CRISPR-cas determinants, 8 were isolated from root canals with inadequate fillings and 7 were isolated from root canals without any fillings. The five strains lacking CRISPR-cas loci were observed to be more resistant to MTAD and 2% CHX than the 15 strains that had CRISPR-cas loci. All of the strains exhibited the same susceptibility to 5.25% NaOCl. Furthermore, the 5 strains lacking CRISPR-cas determinants generated more biofilm than the other 15 strains. Thus, the results of the present study suggested that E. faecalis root canal isolates lacking CRISPR-cas exhibit higher resistance to intracanal irrigants, stronger biofilm formation and generate significant periapical lesions.

  15. The Starvation Resistance and Biofilm Formation of Enterococcus faecalis in Coexistence with Candida albicans, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces viscosus, or Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Jiang, Xiaoqiong; Lin, Dongjia; Chen, Yanhuo; Tong, Zhongchun

    2016-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is the most frequently detected species in root canal-treated teeth, and it is able to survive under starvation conditions. However, persistent periapical disease is often caused by multispecies. The aim of this study was to explore the survival of E. faecalis in starvation conditions and biofilm formation with the 4 common pathogenic species. A dual-species model of Candida albicans, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces viscosus, or Lactobacillus acidophilus in combination with E. faecalis was established and allowed to grow in phosphate-buffered saline for the examination of starvation survival. Cefuroxime sodium and vancomycin at a concentration of 100 mg/L were added into brain-heart infusion plate agar to count the 2 bacteria separately in the dual species. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the dual species and multiple species on the root canal dentin of bovine teeth for 48 hours. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to show the 4 groups of dual-species biofilms on substrates with glass bottoms for 48 hours. E. faecalis was more resistant to starvation in coexistence with C. albicans, S. gordonii, A. viscosus, or L. acidophilus, and S. gordonii was completely inhibited in coexistence with E. faecalis. The dual-species biofilm showed that E. faecalis formed thicker and denser biofilms on the root canal dentin and glass slides in coexistence with S. gordonii and A. viscosus than C. albicans and L. acidophilus. The multispecies community is conducive to the resistance to starvation of E. faecalis and biofilm formation in root canals. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Disinfection of dentinal tubules with 2% Chlorhexidine gel, Calcium hydroxide and herbal intracanal medicaments against Enterococcus faecalis: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Agrima; Sinha, Dakshita Joy; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Singh, Narendra Nath; Garg, Paridhi; Upadhyay, Deepti

    2017-12-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the disinfection of dentinal tubules using 2% Chlorhexidine gel, Honey, Aloe vera gel, Curcuma longa, Propolis gel and Calcium hydroxide against Enterococcus faecalis. Two hundred and ten human mandibular first premolars were infected with Enterococcus faecalis for 21 days. Samples were divided into 7 groups. Group I- Saline (negative control), Group II- 2% Chlorhexidine gel(CHX), Group III- honey, Group IV- Aloe vera gel, Group V- 20% Curcuma longa gel, Group VI- Propolis gel and Group VII -Calcium hydroxide (CH). At the end of 1, 3 and 5 days, the antimicrobial efficacy of medicaments against E.faecalis was assessed at the depths of 200µm and 400µm. 2% Chlorhexidine gel was most effective followed by Propolis and Curcuma longa. 2% Chlorhexidine gel gave the best results. Among the herbal extracts Propolis and Curcuma longa hold a promising future but to implement their use as sole intracanal medicaments clinically, further in vivo and long term studies are warranted. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The VanE operon in Enterococcus faecalis N00-410 is found on a putative integrative and conjugative element, Tn6202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, D A; Mulvey, M R

    2013-02-01

    To date no complete genetic structure of acquired DNA harbouring a d-Ala-d-Ser operon in an Enterococcus is known. We wished to characterize the acquired DNA harbouring the vanE operon located in the Enterococcus faecalis N00-410 chromosome. Whole genome sequencing of E. faecalis N00-410 was conducted by massively parallel sequencing. Two sequence contigs harbouring the vanE region were linked by PCR and the acquired DNA harbouring the vanE operon was completely characterized. Excision/integration of the region was determined by PCR and transfer attempted by conjugation. The regions flanking the vanE operon were analysed and a total of 42 open reading frames were identified in a region flanked by inverted terminal and direct repeats (Tn6202). Tn6202 could be excised from the chromosome, circularized and the target site rejoined, but transfer could not be demonstrated. The vanE operon was found on the putative integrative and conjugative element Tn6202 in the E. faecalis N00-410 chromosome. This represents the first characterization of acquired DNA harbouring a D-Ala-D-Ser operon.

  18. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of association of chlorhexidine to photosensitizer used in photodynamic therapy in root canals infected by Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Matheus Albino; Lima, Guilherme; Pazinatto, Bianca; Bischoff, Karolina Frick; Palhano, Huriel Scartazzini; Cecchin, Doglas

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, the influence of the addition of chlorhexidine to photosensitiser in the antimicrobial activity of photodynamic therapy in root canals infected by Enterococcus faecalis. The root canals of 50 single-rooted human extracted teeth were enlarged up to a file F3 of Pro-Taper system, autoclaved, inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated for 14days. The samples were divided into five groups (n=10) according to the protocol of decontamination: G1 (control group) - no procedure was performed; G2-photosensitiser (0.01% methylene blue); G3-2% chlorhexidine gel; G4-photodynamic therapy; and G5-photodynamic therapy with photosensitiser modified by chlorhexidine. Microbiological test (CFU counting) was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed treatments. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey test (α=0.05). Group 3 (CHX) showed the lowest mean contamination (2.03 log 10 CFU/mL), being statistically different from all other all groups (pphotodynamic therapy alone over root canals infected by E. faecalis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Daptomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis diverts the antibiotic molecule from the division septum and remodels cell membrane phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Truc T; Panesso, Diana; Mishra, Nagendra N; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Guan, Ziqianq; Munita, Jose M; Reyes, Jinnethe; Diaz, Lorena; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E; Shamoo, Yousif; Dowhan, William; Bayer, Arnold S; Arias, Cesar A

    2013-07-23

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant enterococci has become a challenging clinical problem in hospitals around the world due to the lack of reliable therapeutic options. Daptomycin (DAP), a cell membrane-targeting cationic antimicrobial lipopeptide, is the only antibiotic with in vitro bactericidal activity against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). However, the clinical use of DAP against VRE is threatened by emergence of resistance during therapy, but the mechanisms leading to DAP resistance are not fully understood. The mechanism of action of DAP involves interactions with the cell membrane in a calcium-dependent manner, mainly at the level of the bacterial septum. Previously, we demonstrated that development of DAP resistance in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis is associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins with two main functions, (i) control of the cell envelope stress response to antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides (LiaFSR system) and (ii) cell membrane phospholipid metabolism (glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase and cardiolipin synthase). In this work, we show that these VRE can resist DAP-elicited cell membrane damage by diverting the antibiotic away from its principal target (division septum) to other distinct cell membrane regions. DAP septal diversion by DAP-resistant E. faecalis is mediated by initial redistribution of cell membrane cardiolipin-rich microdomains associated with a single amino acid deletion within the transmembrane protein LiaF (a member of a three-component regulatory system [LiaFSR] involved in cell envelope homeostasis). Full expression of DAP resistance requires additional mutations in enzymes (glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase and cardiolipin synthase) that alter cell membrane phospholipid content. Our findings describe a novel mechanism of bacterial resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is a threat to public health

  20. A propidium monoazide–quantitative PCR method for the detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis in large-volume samples of marine waters

    KAUST Repository

    Salam, Khaled W.

    2014-08-23

    The development of rapid detection assays of cell viability is essential for monitoring the microbiological quality of water systems. Coupling propidium monoazide with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) has been successfully applied in different studies for the detection and quantification of viable cells in small-volume samples (0.25-1.00 mL), but it has not been evaluated sufficiently in marine environments or in large-volume samples. In this study, we successfully integrated blue light-emitting diodes for photoactivating PMA and membrane filtration into the PMA-qPCR assay for the rapid detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis cells in 10-mL samples of marine waters. The assay was optimized in phosphate-buffered saline and seawater, reducing the qPCR signal of heat-killed E. faecalis cells by 4 log10 and 3 log10 units, respectively. Results suggest that high total dissolved solid concentration (32 g/L) in seawater can reduce PMA activity. Optimal PMA-qPCR standard curves with a 6-log dynamic range and detection limit of 102 cells/mL were generated for quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in marine waters. The developed assay was compared with the standard membrane filter (MF) method by quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in seawater samples exposed to solar radiation. The results of the developed PMA-qPCR assay did not match that of the standard MF method. This difference in the results reflects the different physiological states of E. faecalis cells in seawater. In conclusion, the developed assay is a rapid (∼5 h) method for the quantification of viable E. faecalis cells in marine recreational waters, which should be further improved and tested in different seawater settings. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Relationship Between Enterococcus faecalis Infective Endocarditis and Colorectal Neoplasm: Preliminary Results From a Cohort of 154 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericàs, Juan M; Corredoira, Juan; Moreno, Asunción; García-País, M José; Falces, Carlos; Rabuñal, Ramón; Mestres, Carlos A; Alonso, M Pilar; Marco, Francesc; Quintana, Eduard; Almela, Manel; Paré, Juan C; Llopis, Jaume; Castells, Antoni; Miró, José M

    2017-06-01

    The association between Streptococcus bovis group infective endocarditis and colorectal neoplasm (CRN) is well-known. However, no studies have assessed the association between Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis (EFIE) and CRN. We aimed to determine whether the prevalence of CRN is higher in patients with EFIE and an unclear source of infection than in patients with EFIE and a known source of infection or in the general population. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 154 patients with definite EFIE (109 with an unclear source of infection and 45 with an identified source) from 2 Spanish teaching hospitals to determine the prevalence of CRN and other colorectal diseases. In the group with an unknown source of infection, 61 patients (56%) underwent colonoscopy; of these, 31 (50.8%) had CRN. Nonadvanced colorectal adenoma was detected in 22 patients (36%), advanced adenoma in 5 (8.2%), and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) in 4 (6.6%). Among patients who survived the EFIE episode with ≥ 2 years of follow-up, 1 case of CRC was subsequently diagnosed. Only 6 patients (13.3%) with an identified focus of infection underwent colonoscopy; 1 of these patients (16.7%) was diagnosed with CRN. The prevalence of adenomas was slightly higher than that of the Spanish population in the same age range, whereas that of CRC was 17-fold higher. CRN was found in more than half of patients with EFIE and an unclear focus of infection who underwent colonoscopy. Colonoscopy should be recommended in patients with EFIE and an unclear source of infection. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional analysis of the citrate activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis implicates a divalent metal in ligand binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor S. Blancato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD= 1.2±0.2 µM, while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation.

  3. Effectiveness of intracanal dressing protocols on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm in a bovine teeth model: an in vitro study = Eficácia de protocolos de medicação intracanal sobre o biofilme de Enterococcus faecalis em um modelo de dentes bovinos: estudo in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borba, Maristela Gutiérrez de

    2015-01-01

    Conclusão: Clorexidina gel 2%, clorexidina líquida 2% e pasta de hidróxido de cálcio em todos os terços do canal radicular, bem como tricresol formalina na entrada do canal radicular, podem ser consideradas efetivas medicações intracanais contra Enterococcus faecalis, quando associadas à penetração desinfetante prévia com hipoclorito de sódio 2%

  4. Study of the impact of cranberry extract on the virulence factors and biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnicz, Dorota; Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota; Korzekwa, Kamila; Kicia, Marta; Hendrich, Andrzej B

    2016-12-01

    Drinking of cranberry fruit juice and application of commercial preparations containing the cranberry extracts are recommended in the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs), especially in women with recurrent UTIs. Many studies focus on the activity of cranberries against uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. However, the knowledge of the cranberry effect on Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is limited. Therefore, the aim of our study was to establish the activity of commercial concentrated cranberry extract on the growth, virulence factors and biofilm formation of E. faecalis strains isolated from urine. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of cranberry extract were determined by the broth microdilution method. Disc diffusion method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. The impact of cranberry extract on bacterial survival, hydrophobicity, synthesis of lipase, lecithinase, DNase, hemolysin, gelatinase and biofilm mass was determined. Results show that cranberry extract inhibits the growth, enzymatic activities of bacteria and limits biofilm formation. The antibacterial activities of the studied cranberry extract confirm that it could be successfully used in prevention of UTIs caused by E. faecalis.

  5. Comparative antimicrobial efficacy of herbal alternatives (Emblica officinalis, Psidium guajava), MTAD, and 2.5% sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of herbal alternatives (Emblica officinalis, Psidium guajava), BioPure MTAD, and 2.5% sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis. The testing of the antimicrobial efficacy of selected medicaments against E. faecalis was done by the agar disk-diffusion method. Whatman paper discs of 6 mm diameter were prepared and soaked with the test solution. These discs were then placed onto the previously seeded agar Petri plates. Later, these plates were incubated for 48 h at 37 °C under the appropriate gaseous conditions in a CO2 incubator. A zone of inhibition was recorded in millimeter for each plate and the results were analyzed statistically. MTAD was found to be superior in its antibacterial abilities against E. faecalis compared with the other irrigants used. All the other tested irrigants showed significant zone of inhibition. BioPure MTAD offers better antibacterial efficacy than NaOCl. E. officinalis and P. guajava are effective antibacterial agents against E. faecalis and can be used to reduce root canal microflora and root canal failures.

  6. Streptococcus gordonii pheromone s.g.cAM373 may influence the reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants of Enterococcus faecalis origin in the oral metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Jillian M; Herrmann, Paul; Jesionowski, Amy M; Vickerman, M Margaret

    2017-11-01

    Streptococcus gordonii produces a pheromone heptapeptide, s.g.cAM373, which induces a conjugative mating response in Enterococcus faecalis cells carrying the responsive plasmid, pAM373. We investigated the extent of this intergeneric signaling on DNA acquisition by streptococcal species likely to cohabit oral biofilms. E. faecalis/pAM373/pAMS470 cells were incubated with synthetic s.g.cAM373, reverse peptide s.g.cAM373-R, or peptide-free medium and examined for their abilities to transfer plasmid DNA to streptococcal species in the presence of DNase. Preinduction of E. faecalis donors with s.g.cAM373 resulted in transconjugation frequencies in non-pheromone producing strains of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Streptococcus suis that were significantly higher than frequencies when donors were preincubated with s.g.cAM373-R or medium alone. Peptide-mediated communication between commensal streptococci and E. faecalis carrying pheromone-responsive plasmids may facilitate conjugative DNA transfer to bystander species, and influence the reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants of enterococcal origin in the oral metagenome.

  7. Detection of adherence of Enterococcus faecalis in infected dentin of extracted human teeth using confocal laser scanning microscope: An In vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Siddharth Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to detect in vitro adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to the infected dentinal tubules of human extracted teeth using confocal laser scanning microscope. Subjects and Methods: Roots from human premolar teeth (n = 40 were infected with E. faecalis strain the American Type Culture Collection 29212 in brain heart infusion for 21 days. After the experimental period, specimens were divided into two groups, Group A (n = 20, Group B (n = 20, and Group A specimens were stained with fluorescein diacetate dye for the detection of viability and adherence Group B were stained with acridine orange dye for detection of metabolic activity and adherence. Samples were washed, thoroughly sectioned and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Computer-assisted determinants of fluorescence, bacterial viability, metabolic activity, and adherence were compared statistically. Results: E. faecalis was able to invade the dentinal tubules to a depth of 1–400 μm and adhere to 1–200 μm depth. Adherence (90% was significantly higher in 1–100 μm using fluorescein diacetate and acridine orange dye. Conclusion: Adherence of E. faecalis as evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscope was highest at the depth of 1–100 μm which may have an impact on the shaping and cleaning procedures on the root canal.

  8. Effects of prolonged exposure to moderate static magnetic field and its synergistic effects with alkaline pH on Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Huang, Zhuo; Fan, Bing

    2018-02-01

    Static magnetic field (SMF) has been shown to biologically affect various microorganisms, but its effects on Enterococcus faecalis, which is associated with multiple dental infections, have not been reported yet. Besides, Enterococcus faecalis was found to be resistant to the alkaline environment provided by a major dental antimicrobial, calcium hydroxide. Therefore, the antibacterial activity of prolonged exposure to moderate SMF (170 mT) and its possible synergistic activity with alkaline pH (pH = 9) were evaluated in the study. The ability to form a biofilm under these conditions was examined by crystal violet assay. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed to evaluate the relative expression of stress (dnaK and groEL) and virulence (efaA, ace, gelE and fsrC) related genes. As the results indicated, cell proliferation was inhibited after 120 h of SMF exposure. What's more, the combined treatment of SMF and alkaline pH showed significantly improved antimicrobial action when compared to single SMF and alkaline pH treatment for more than 24 h and 72 h respectively. However, the ability to form a biofilm was also enhanced under SMF and alkaline pH treatments. SMF can induce stress response by up-regulating the expression of dnaK and elevate virulence gene expression (efaA and ace). These responses were more significant and more genes were up-regulated including groEL, gelE and fsrC when exposed to SMF and alkaline pH simultaneously. Hence, combination of SMF and alkaline pH could be a promising disinfection strategy in dental area and other areas associated with Enterococcus faecalis infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of different diode laser wavelengths on root dentin decontamination infected with Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Caroline Cristina; Estrela, Carlos; Lopes, Fabiane Carneiro; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; De Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião de

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect and the ultrastructural alterations of diode laser with different wavelengths (808nm and 970nm) and its association with irrigating solutions (2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine) in root dentin contaminated by a five days biofilm. Thirteen uniradicular teeth were sectioned into 100 dentin intraradicular blocks. Initially, the blocks were immersed for 5min in 17% EDTA and washed with distilled water for 5min, then samples were sterilized for 30min at 120°C. The dentin samples were inoculated with 0.1mL of E. faecalis suspension in 5mL BHI (Brain Heart Infusion) and incubated at 37°C for 5days. After contamination, the specimens were distributed into ten groups (n=10) according to surface treatment: GI - 5mL NaOCl 2.5%, GII - 5mL NaOCl 2.5%+808nm diode (0.1W for 20s), GIII - 5mL NaOCl 2.5%+970nm diode (0.5W for 4s), GIV - 808nm diode (0.1W for 20s), GV - 970nm diode (0.5W for 4s), GVI - CHX 2%, GVII - CHX 2%+808nm diode (0.1W for 20s), GVIII - CHX 2%+970nm diode (0.5W for 4s), GIX - positive control and GX - negative control. Bacterial growth was analyzed by turbidity and optical density of the growth medium by spectrophotometry (nm). Then, the specimens were processed for analysis ultrastructural changes of the dentin surface by SEM. The data was subject to the One-way ANOVA test. GI (77.5±12.1), GII (72.5±12.2), GIII (68.7±8.7), GV (68.3±8.7), GVI (62.0±5.5) and GVII (67.5±3.3) were statistically similar and statistically different from GIV (58.8±25.0), GVIII (59.2±4.0) and control groups (pdiode laser; erosion of the intertubular dentin in blocks submitted to 808nm diode laser irradiation; and an increased erosion of the intertubular dentin when 2.5% NaOCl was associated to the different wavelengths lasers. All the therapeutic protocols were able to reduce the bacterial contingent in dentin blocks, and the association of diode laser and solutions did not significantly improve

  10. Time-dependent antibacterial effects of Aloe vera and Zataria multiflora plant essential oils compared to calcium hydroxide in teeth infected with Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Sahebi, Safoora; Gholami, Ahmad; Delroba, Alireza; Kiani, Amin; Iraji, Aida; Abbott, Paul Vincent

    2016-02-01

    In the present in vitro study, we investigated the time-related antimicrobial efficacy of Aloe vera and Zataria multiflora (Z. multiflora) plant essential oils compared to calcium hydroxide ([Ca[OH]2 ) to eliminate Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) from root canals. A new strain of E. faecalis (Enterococcus spp. AGH04) was isolated from a previously root-filled tooth with persistent apical periodontitis. The 16S rRNA sequence was analyzed and deposited in GeneBank under accession number KF465681. A total of 108 extracted human single-rooted teeth were contaminated with this bacterial strain and treated with Aloe vera essential oil, Z. multiflora essential oil, and Ca(OH)2 for 1, 7, and 14 days. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to determine the chemical composition of the oils. The percentage reduction from initial c.f.u./mL counts were calculated and analyzed. Carvacrol, thymol, and linalool were the main constituents of both essential oils. The c.f.u./mL count reductions significantly increased for all three medicaments when the contact time was extended. A statistically-significant difference was observed between the medicaments after 1 and 7 days, but there was no significant difference after 14 days. Both medicinal herbs showed equal antimicrobial efficiency against E. faecalis, comparable to Ca(OH)2 for the prolonged contact time of 14 days. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Characterization of a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VREF) isolate from a dog with mastitis: further evidence of a clonal lineage of VREF in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Janet M; Keis, Stefanie; Smith, John M B; Cook, Gregory M

    2003-07-01

    We report here on the characterization of a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VREF) isolated from a dog with mastitis. The isolate was positive for the vanA, ermB, and tet(M) genes, with vanA and ermB carried on the same transferable plasmid. Comparison of this isolate with VREF from poultry and human sources in New Zealand demonstrated identical SmaI macrorestriction patterns and Tn1546-like elements. This is further evidence of a clonal lineage of VREF in New Zealand.

  12. Enterococcus faecalis PrgJ, a VirB4-Like ATPase, Mediates pCF10 Conjugative Transfer through Substrate Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Feng; Alvarez-Martinez, Cristina; Chen, Yuqing; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Christie, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The Enterococcus faecalis prg and pcf genes of plasmid pCF10 encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS) required for conjugative transfer. PrgJ is a member of the VirB4 family of ATPases that are universally associated with T4SSs. Here, we report that purified PrgJ dimers displayed ATP binding and hydrolysis activities. A PrgJ nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site mutation (K471E) slightly diminished ATP binding but abolished ATP hydrolysis in vitro and blocked pCF10 transfer in vivo. As s...

  13. Enterococcus faecalis PcfC, a Spatially Localized Substrate Receptor for Type IV Secretion of the pCF10 Transfer Intermediate▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuqing; Zhang, Xiaolin; Manias, Dawn; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Dunny, Gary M.; Christie, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Upon sensing of peptide pheromone, Enterococcus faecalis efficiently transfers plasmid pCF10 through a type IV secretion (T4S) system to recipient cells. The PcfF accessory factor and PcfG relaxase initiate transfer by catalyzing strand-specific nicking at the pCF10 origin of transfer sequence (oriT). Here, we present evidence that PcfF and PcfG spatially coordinate docking of the pCF10 transfer intermediate with PcfC, a membrane-bound putative ATPase related to the coupling proteins of gram-...

  14. Specificity determinants of conjugative DNA processing in the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 and the Lactococcus lactis plasmid pRS01

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuqing; Staddon, Jack H.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    The DNA-processing region of the Enterococcus faecalis pheromone-responsive plasmid pCF10 is highly similar to that of the otherwise unrelated plasmid pRS01 from Lactococcus lactis. A transfer-proficient pRS01 derivative was unable to mobilize plasmids containing the pCF10 origin of transfer, oriT. In contrast, pRS01 oriT-containing plasmids could be mobilized by pCF10 at a low frequency. Relaxases PcfG and LtrB were both capable of binding to single-stranded oriT DNAs; LtrB was highly specif...

  15. Conjugative transfer of the erm(A) gene from erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes to macrolide-susceptible S. pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanetti, E; Magi, G; Brenciani, A; Spinaci, C; Lupidi, R; Facinelli, B; Varaldo, P E

    2002-08-01

    In mating experiments, the erythromycin resistance methylase gene erm(A) was successfully transferred from erm(A)-positive clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes to macrolide-susceptible recipients of S. pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria innocua. Compared with the SmaI macrorestriction pattern of the S. pyogenes recipient, the patterns of S. pyogenes transconjugants shared the lack of a fragment and the appearance of a new, larger fragment. This is the first experimental evidence that the erm(A) gene can be transferred from erythromycin-resistant S. pyogenes to macrolide-susceptible S. pyogenes as well as to other Gram-positive recipients.

  16. Expression of the major heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL in Streptococcus pyogenes: a comparison to Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, M S; de Castro, A C; Villardo, A; Lemos, J A; Bastos, M C; Giambiagi-deMarval, M

    2001-04-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field of heat shock response has been to elucidate the mechanism underlying the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). In this work, we initiate an analysis of the expression of heat shock groEL and dnaK genes and their promoters in S. pyogenes. The synthesis of total cellular proteins was studied upon transfer of a log-phase culture from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C by performing 5-min pulse-labeling experiments with (35)S-Met. The heat shock responses in the pathogenic Gram-positive cocci, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus, were also analyzed.

  17. Ampicillin, gentamicin and teicoplanin as antimicrobial therapy for recurrent Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis in an intravenous drug abuser with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Marinacci, Ginevra; Fortunato, Lorenza; Chiodo, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    Infective endocarditis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection occurs almost exclusively in intravenous (i.v.) drug users and usually involves the tricuspid valve, with an increased mortality rate among patients with a severe degree of immunosuppression. The first reported case of recurrent tricuspid endocarditis sustained by Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis in an i.v. drug addict during HIV infection is presented. Antimicrobial therapy with i.v. ampicillin, gentamicin and teicoplanin led to complete clinical and echocardiographical recovery. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Eficacia de diferentes agentes desinfectantes en la remoción de Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans y Enterococcus faecalis adheridos a resina acrílica de termocurado

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Valencia, Mariella; Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Moromi-Nakata, Hilda; Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

    2015-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la eficacia de tres desinfectantes en la remoción de Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans y Enterococcus faecalis adheridos a resina acrílica de termocurado. Metodología: Se confeccionaron 51 piezas de resinas acrílicas de termocurado mediante patrones de cera con las mismas dimensiones (15mm x 15mm x 4mm) y se sometieron a un sistema de pulido simulando el de las prótesis completas. Las piezas se esterilizaron en autoclave (121 ºC x 15min) y luego fu...

  19. [Submucosal bacterial abscesses of the ascending colon and liver associated with portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis due to Enterococcus faecalis infection: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimura, Daisuke; Takeshima, Fuminao; Satou, Yoshiaki; Nakagoe, Tohru; Ohnita, Ken; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-06-01

    A 72-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted with fever and general fatigue. Blood biochemistry showed elevated hepatic and biliary enzyme levels, abdominal computed tomography showed multiple liver abscesses with portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, and total colonoscopy revealed a submucosal bacterial abscess in the ascending colon. The abscesses were determined to be associated with Enterococcus faecalis infection. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics (meropenem) and anticoagulants (warfarin), which led to a gradual amelioration of symptoms and resolution of thrombosis.

  20. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis bacteria resistant to heavy metals and antibiotics in surface waters of the Mololoa River in Tepic, Nayarit, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón, Verónica Alejandra; Llamas-Pérez, Dámaris F; González-Guzmán, Gladis E; Márquez-González, Antonio R; Padilla-Noriega, Roberto; Durán-Avelar, Ma de Jesús; Franco, Bernardo

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metal and antibiotic resistance have been shown to have a strong correlation in nature, and their inter-relation is an important subject of study. We report an analysis of surface waters of the Mololoa River in the municipality of Tepic, state of Nayarit, Mexico. This river has two distinctive sources of contamination: sewage waters and trash confinements. Our findings demonstrate a correlation between the river flow pattern and resistance to heavy metals or to heavy metals and antibiotics in isolated bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, specifically Enterococcus faecalis. The Mololoa River provides a model to study the relationship between water flow and generation of biodiversity, and more importantly, it constitutes a model for studying genetic diversity of bacteria affecting human health.

  1. Clonal dissemination of VanA-type glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecalis between hospitals of two cities located 100 km apart

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    Moretti M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial dissemination of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci represents a major problem in hospitals worldwide. In Brazil, the dissemination among hospitals in the city of São Paulo of polyclonal DNA profiles was previously described for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. We describe here the dissemination of VanA phenotype E. faecalis between two hospitals located in different cities in the State of São Paulo. The index outbreak occurred in a tertiary care university hospital (HCUSP in the city of São Paulo and three years later a cluster caused by the same strain was recognized in two patients hospitalized in a private tertiary care hospital (CMC located 100 km away in the interior of the state. From May to July 1999, 10 strains of vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis were isolated from 10 patients hospitalized in the HCUSP. The DNA genotyping using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE showed that all isolates were originated from the same clone, suggesting nosocomial dissemination. From May to July 2002, three strains of vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis were isolated from two patients hospitalized in CMC and both patients were colonized by the vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in skin lesions. All isolates from CMC and HCUSP were highly resistant to vancomycin and teicoplanin. The three strains from CMC had minimum inhibitory concentration >256 µg/ml for vancomycin, and 64 (CMC 1 and CMC 2 and 96 µg/ml (CMC 3 for teicoplanin, characterizing a profile of VanA resistance to glycopeptides. All strains had the presence of the transposon Tn1546 detected by PCR and were closely related when typed by PFGE. The dissemination of the E. faecalis VanA phenotype among hospitals located in different cities is of great concern because E. faecalis commonly colonizes the gastrointestinal tract of patients and healthy persons for periods varying from weeks to years, which, together with the persistence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in

  2. Removal of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis after Hand Washing with Antimicrobial and Nonantimicrobial Soap and Persistence of These Bacteria in Rinsates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Garza, J; García, S; Heredia, N

    2017-10-01

    Food handlers are important sources of contamination in the agricultural environment. This study was conducted (i) to evaluate the activity of antimicrobial soaps against Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis using a hand washing model with soiled hands and (ii) to determine the survival and persistence of these bacteria in rinsates. Sterilized agricultural soil from tomato and pepper farms was inoculated with E. coli or E. faecalis at 10 3 or 10 6 CFU/g. Decontaminated hands were placed in contact with contaminated soil for 2 min and were then washed with soaps with or without antimicrobial compounds (citric extracts, chloroxylenol, triclosan, or chlorhexidine gluconate). As the control, hands were washed with sterile distilled water. The levels of bacteria remaining on the hands and recovered from the rinsates were determined using a membrane filtration method and selective media. Antimicrobial soaps removed levels of E. coli similar to those removed by distilled water and nonantimicrobial soap on hands contaminated with E. coli at 10 3 CFU/g. However, when hands were contaminated with E. coli at 10 6 CFU/g, more E. coli was removed with the chlorhexidine gluconate soap. When hands were contaminated with E. faecalis at 10 3 CFU/g, bacteria were removed more effectively with soaps containing chloroxylenol or chlorhexidine gluconate. When hands were contaminated with E. faecalis at 10 6 CFU/g, all of the antimicrobial soaps were more effective for removing the bacteria than were distilled water and nonantimicrobial soap. E. coli grew in all of the hand washing rinsates except that containing triclosan, whereas E. faecalis from the 10 6 CFU/g treatments grew in rinsates containing chlorhexidine gluconate and in the distilled water rinsates. Washing with antimicrobial soap was more effective for reducing bacteria on soiled hands than was washing with water or nonantimicrobial soap. However, persistence or growth of bacteria in these rinsates poses health risks.

  3. Bactericidal Effect of Er:YAG Laser-Activated Sodium Hypochlorite Irrigation Against Biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis Isolate from Canal of Root-Filled Teeth with Periapical Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Xiang, Doudou; He, Wenxi; Qiu, Jun; Han, Bing; Yu, Qing; Tian, Yu

    2017-07-01

    This study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser-activated sodium hypochlorite irrigation (Er:YAG + NaOCl) on biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolate. It was reported that Er:YAG + NaOCl had effective bactericidal effect on laboratory-adapted E. faecalis strain, while no study has reported its effect on the clinical isolate. Eighteen E. faecalis strains were isolated from 39 root-filled teeth with periapical lesions, and their biofilm formation abilities were evaluated using the crystal violet staining method. Extracted human root canals were prepared to a 40#/.04 K3 instrument and contaminated with the E. faecalis isolate that presented the strongest biofilm formation ability for 4 weeks. The infected canals then received treatments of syringe irrigation with normal saline (NS) or NaOCl, ultrasonic activated irrigations US + NS and US + NaOCl, and Er:YAG laser-activated irrigations Er:YAG + NS and Er:YAG + NaOCl. The root canals were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The bacterial reductions were evaluated using the cell count method. SEM results showed that biofilm-like structures formed on the root canal walls after 4-week bacterial incubation. Er:YAG + NaOCl completely removed the E. faecalis biofilm from the root canal wall and made it the cleanest and most smooth surface among the treatment groups. Bacterial reductions in the treatment groups were presented in a descending order of Er:YAG + NaOCl (98.8%), US + NaOCl (98.6%) > NaOCl (94.0%) > Er:YAG + NS (91.9%) > US + NS (78.1%) > NS (51.1%) (p isolate, which may be considered an effective protocol for root canal treatment.

  4. Inhibition effect of Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis and their related products on human colonic smooth muscle in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Gong

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of four strains, generally used in clinic, including Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis, and their related products on human colonic smooth muscle in vitro.Human colonic circular muscle strips obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments from 25 patients with colorectal cancer were isometrically examined in a constant-temperature organ bath and exposed to different concentrations of living bacteria, sonicated cell fractions and cell-free supernatant (CFS. The area under the curve (AUC representing the contractility of smooth muscle strips was calculated.(1 The four living probiotics inhibited the contractility of human colonic muscle strips only at high concentration (1010 CFUs/mL, all P0.05.Four common probiotics related products, including the sonicated cell fractions and the CFS, obviously inhibited human colonic smooth muscles strips contraction in a dose-dependent manner. Only high concentration living probiotics (1010 CFUs/mL can inhibit the colonic smooth muscles strips contraction. The NO pathway may be partly involved in the inhibitory effect of CFS from Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis.

  5. Potentiation of the action of calcium hydroxide on Enterococcus faecalis by proton pump inhibitor omeprazole = Potencialização da ação do hidróxido de cálcio sobre o Enterococcus faecalis pelo inibidor da bomba de prótons omeprazol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cogo, Deborah Meirelles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: O hidróxido de cálcio não representa uma estratégia totalmente eficaz contra Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, uma bactéria anaeróbia facultativa resistente aos processos de desinfecção mais convencionais. O objetivo deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar o efeito do hidróxido de cálcio, do omeprazol e das associações destas substâncias contra Enterococcus faecalis, assim como avaliar se a catalização ácida do omeprazol pode ter influência sobre os resultados. Métodos: A Concentração Inibitória Mínima (CIM destes medicamentos contra E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 foi determinada pelo teste de macrodiluição adaptado do CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Soluções com diferentes concentrações de hidróxido de cálcio, associadas ou não ao omeprazol, foram testadas. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente pelo teste ANOVA com post-hoc de Tukey, com um nível de significância de 5%. Resultados: A CIM para o hidróxido de cálcio foi de 32 mg mL-1 e, quando associada com omeprazol, foi reduzida para 16 mg mL-1. O omeprazol e o omeprazol acidificado tiveram atividade semelhante. Conclusões: O omeprazol foi capaz de potencializar o efeito do hidróxido de cálcio, uma vez que a associação dessas drogas reduziu a CIM para o E. faecalis. A acidificação do omeprazol, quando associado com o hidróxido de cálcio, em concentrações diferentes, não influenciou o seu efeito

  6. Diversity of Enterococcus faecalis Genotypes from Multiple Oral Sites Associated with Endodontic Failure Using Repetitive Sequence-based Polymerase Chain Reaction and Arbitrarily Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delboni, Maraísa G; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Francisco, Priscila A; Teixeira, Fabrício B; Drake, David

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diversity and similarity of Enterococcus faecalis genotype isolates from multiple oral sites using repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction and arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Forty-two endodontically treated teeth with apical periodontitis were selected. A total of 126 microbial samples were collected from 3 different sites (saliva, pulp chamber, and root canals, all n = 42) during the nonsurgical retreatment procedures. After growth on m-Enterococcus agar, the colonies were isolated, characterized as gram-positive catalase negative cocci, and identified using an API 20 Strep kit (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Etoile, France). Seventy-four colonies from 10 patients were confirmed as E. faecalis by polymerase chain reaction (16S ribosomal RNA). Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reactions using ERIC and AP-PCR using RW3A primers were performed in all 74 colonies. Fingerprints were analyzed and separated into genotypic groups based on the Dice coefficient percentage of similarity (82% or greater) as determined by ERIC reproducibility assays involving E. faecalis controls. Seven different E. faecalis genotypes (GTs) (GT1 = 27%, GT2 = 17.6%, GT3 = 1.3%, GT4 = 18.9%, GT5 = 9.5%, GT6 = 14.9%, and GT7 = 10.8%) were observed in different subjects and oral sites associated with endodontic failure. Remarkably, in 4 of 5 patients, the same GTs present in the infected root canals were also isolated from either the pulp chamber or the saliva samples. In particular, GT6 was detected in all 3 oral sites of patient 37. E. faecalis GTs isolated from saliva, the pulp chamber, and the root canal were similar using the Rep-PCR and AP-PCR methods. These findings suggest that coronal microleakage is a conceivable cause of endodontic failure. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans in previously root-filled teeth in a population of Gujarat with polymerase chain reaction

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    Bruhvi Poptani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Micro-organisms are the primary causative agents of endodontic infections. Phenotype based procedures for bacterial identification has certain drawbacks especially, when investigating the microbiota of root-filled teeth. Thus, more sensitive methods like Polymerase chain reaction (PCR can provide results that are more accurate and reliable for the microbial prevalence in the root filled teeth. Aim: In this study, we have investigated twenty symptomatic root-filled teeth with chronic apical periodontitis for the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans in the root filled teeth associated with symptomatic cases with or without periradicular lesions. Materials and Methods: Microbiological samples were taken from the canals immediately after removal of previous gutta percha cones using aseptic techniques. After removal of root canal filling, samples were obtained with paper points placed in the canal. Paper points were transferred to a cryotube containing "Tris EDTA" buffer and immediately frozen at −20°C. Results: By PCR amplification of the samples using taxon specific primers, E. faecalis was found to be prevalent species, detected in 65% of the cases and C. albicans was detected in 35% of cases. Conclusion: The results of the study shows that geographical influence and dietary factors might have some role to play in the prevalence of the species like C. albicans and presence of E. faecalis confirming the assertion of previous culture-dependent and independent approaches for the microbiological survey of root filled teeth.

  8. An in vitro evaluation of antimicrobial activity of five herbal extracts and comparison of their activity with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis

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    Divya Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sodium hypochlorite is the most widely used irrigant in endodontic practice, but it has various disadvantages. Literature has shown that herbal products such as Propolis, Azadirachta indica (AI, Triphala, Curcuma longa, and Morinda citrifolia (MC possess good antimicrobial properties and thus can be used as potential endodontic irrigants. Aim: To evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity of five herbal extracts, i.e., Propolis, AI, Triphala, C. longa, and MC with that of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: E. faecalis American Type Culture Collection 21292 was inoculated onto brain heart infusion agar plate. Discs impregnated with herbal medicaments were placed on the inoculated plates and incubated at 37°C aerobically for 24 h and growth inhibition zones were measured. Statistical Analysis: Mean zone of inhibition in descending order was found as sodium hypochlorite > Propolis > AI > Triphala > C. longa = MC > ethanol. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance which showed a significant difference in the zone of inhibition of sodium hypochlorite and Propolis (P < 0.001. Results: Propolis showed highest zone of inhibition among all the herbal extracts next to sodium hypochlorite. Conclusion: Propolis and AI have significant antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis.

  9. Rapid Assessment of Resistance to Antibiotic Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis in the Gram-Positive Pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Based on Evaluation of the Lytic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Fátima; Tamayo, María; Santiso, Rebeca; Gosálvez, Jaime; Bou, Germán; Fernández, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    A novel assay for rapid determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis was developed for the gram-positive pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. To this purpose, a lytic response was obtained by a brief incubation with lysozyme or a mixture of lysozyme, Triton X-100, and EDTA for E. faecalis (n = 82) and S. pneumoniae (n = 51), respectively. Lysis was quantified by visualizing the released nucleoids. Antibiotic-susceptible bacteria treated with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint doses of erythromycin, azithromycin, or doxycycline that inhibited protein synthesis demonstrated a large reduction of lysed cells with respect to the control, that is, without antibiotics. However, cell lysis prevention was much lower in nonsusceptible strains, with unsuccessful inhibition of protein synthesis. ROC analysis showed that a reduction value of ≥35.6% and ≥40.4% discriminates susceptible and nonsusceptible strains for erythromycin and for doxycycline, respectively, in E. faecalis, whereas ≥20.0% is adequate for both macrolides and doxycycline in S. pneumoniae. Resistant stains were identified in 90-120 min with sensitivity and specificity between 91.7% and 100%. This is a proof of concept that evaluation of the lytic response may be a rapid and efficient test for determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis.

  10. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Aloe vera, garlic, and 5% sodium hypochlorite as root canal irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkare, Swati Ramesh; Ahire, Nivedita Pramod; Khedkar, Smita Uday

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis are the most resistant and predominant microorganisms recovered from root canals of teeth where previous treatment has failed. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. In dentistry, phytomedicines has been used as an anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, analgesic, sedative, and also as an endodontic irrigant. In endodontics, because of the cytotoxic reactions of most of the commercial intracanal medicaments and their inability to eliminate bacteria completely from dentinal tubules, the trend is shifting toward use of biologic medication extracted from natural plants. To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of newer irrigating agents which would probably be as effective or more and at the same time less irritating to the tissues than sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The objective of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of saturated and diluted (1:1) hydroalcoholic extract of Aloe vera, garlic, and 5% NaOCl against E. faecalis using the commonly used agar diffusion method. Saturated hydroalcoholic extract of A. vera showed the highest zone of inhibition against E. faecalis. NaOCl, which is considered as gold standard, also showed higher zones of inhibition.

  11. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Aloe vera, garlic, and 5% sodium hypochlorite as root canal irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Ramesh Karkare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enterococcus faecalis are the most resistant and predominant microorganisms recovered from root canals of teeth where previous treatment has failed. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. In dentistry, phytomedicines has been used as an anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, analgesic, sedative, and also as an endodontic irrigant. In endodontics, because of the cytotoxic reactions of most of the commercial intracanal medicaments and their inability to eliminate bacteria completely from dentinal tubules, the trend is shifting toward use of biologic medication extracted from natural plants. Aim: To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of newer irrigating agents which would probably be as effective or more and at the same time less irritating to the tissues than sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl. The objective of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of saturated and diluted (1:1 hydroalcoholic extract of Aloe vera, garlic, and 5% NaOCl against E. faecalis using the commonly used agar diffusion method. Results: Saturated hydroalcoholic extract of A. vera showed the highest zone of inhibition against E. faecalis. NaOCl, which is considered as gold standard, also showed higher zones of inhibition.

  12. Branched-chain alpha-keto acid catabolism via the gene products of the bkd operon in Enterococcus faecalis: a ne, secreted metabolite serving as a temporary redox sink.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, D.E.; van der Weijden, C.C.; van der Merwe, M.J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Claiborne, A.; Snoep, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Recently the bkd gene cluster from Enterococcus faecalis was sequenced, and it was shown that the gene products constitute a pathway for the catabolism of branched-chain α-keto acids. We have now investigated the regulation and physiological role of this pathway. Primer extension analysis identified

  13. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals and their susceptibility to endodontic treatment procedures: A molecular study

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    Stojanović Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Because apical periodontitis is recognizably an infectious disease, elimination or reduction of intracanal bacteria is of utmost importance for optimum treatment outcome. Objective. The prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals was studied Also, the effect of endodontic therapy by using intracanal medicaments, calcium hydroxide paste (CH or gutta-percha points containing calcium hydroxide (CH-GP or chlorhexidine (CHX-GP on these microorganisms was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Methods. Fifty-one patients with chronic apical periodontitis were randomly allocated in one of the following groups according to the intracanal medicament used: CH, CH-GP and CHX-GP group. Bacterial samples were taken upon access (S1, after chemomechanical instrumentation (S2 and after 15-day medication (S3. PCR assay was used to detect the presence of selected bacteria. Results. E. faecalis was detected in 49% (25/51 and P. gingivalis in 17.6% (9/51 of the samples. Samples which showed no bacterial presence at S1 were excluded from further analysis. Overall analysis of all 29 samples revealed significant differences between S1 and S2 (p<0.001, S2 and S3 (p<0.05, and S1 and S3 (p<0.001. When distinction was made between the intracanal medications, there was a significant difference in the number of PCR positive samples between S1 and S2, S1 and S3, but not between S2 and S3 samples. Conclusion. E. faecalis is more prevalent than P. gingivalis in primary endodontic infection. Intracanal medication in conduction with instrumentation and irrigation efficiently eliminates E. faecalis and P. gingivalis from infected root canals.

  14. In vitro activities of garenoxacin (BMS-284756) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci, and Enterococcus faecalis compared to those of six other quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohs, Patrick; Houssaye, Serge; Aubert, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2003-11-01

    The activity of garenoxacin, a new quinolone, was determined in comparison with other quinolones against different strains of S. pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci (VGS), and Enterococcus faecalis. Strains were quinolone-susceptible clinical isolates and quinolone-resistant strains with defined mechanisms of resistance obtained from either clinical isolates or derivatives of S. pneumoniae R6. Clinical quinolone-susceptible strains of S. pneumoniae, VGS and E. faecalis showed garenoxacin MICs within a range of 0.03 microg/ml to 0.25 micro g/ml. Garenoxacin MICs increased two- to eightfold when one mutation was present in the ParC quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR), fourfold when one mutation was present in the GyrA QRDR (S. pneumoniae), 8- to 64-fold when two or three mutations were associated in ParC and GyrA QRDR, and 2,048-fold when two mutations were present in both the GyrA and ParC QRDRs (Streptococcus pneumoniae). Increased active efflux had a moderate effect on garenoxacin MICs for S. pneumoniae and VGS. Against S. pneumoniae, garenoxacin behaved like moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin, being more affected by a single gyrA mutation than by a single parC mutation. Although garenoxacin was generally two- to fourfold more active than moxifloxacin against the different wild-type or mutant strains of S. pneumoniae, VGS, and E. faecalis, it was two- to fourfold less active than gemifloxacin. At four times the respective MIC for each strain, the bactericidal effect of garenoxacin, observed at 6 h for S. pneumoniae and at 24 h for S. oralis and E. faecalis, was not influenced by the presence of mutation either in the ParC or in both the ParC and GyrA QRDRs.

  15. Heterologous inducible expression of Enterococcus faecalis pCF10 aggregation substance asc10 in Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus gordonii contributes to cell hydrophobicity and adhesion to fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, H; Erlandsen, S L; Dunny, G M

    2000-04-01

    Aggregation substance proteins encoded by the sex pheromone plasmid family of Enterococcus faecalis have been shown previously to contribute to the formation of a stable mating complex between donor and recipient cells and have been implicated in the virulence of this increasingly important nosocomial pathogen. In an effort to characterize the protein further, prgB, the gene encoding the aggregation substance Asc10 on pCF10, was cloned in a vector containing the nisin-inducible nisA promoter and its two-component regulatory system. Expression of aggregation substance after nisin addition to cultures of E. faecalis and the heterologous bacteria Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus gordonii was demonstrated. Electron microscopy revealed that Asc10 was presented on the cell surfaces of E. faecalis and L. lactis but not on that of S. gordonii. The protein was also found in the cell culture supernatants of all three species. Characterization of Asc10 on the cell surfaces of E. faecalis and L. lactis revealed a significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity upon expression of the protein. Heterologous expression of Asc10 on L. lactis also allowed the recognition of its binding ligand (EBS) on the enterococcal cell surface, as indicated by increased transfer of a conjugative transposon. We also found that adhesion of Asc10-expressing bacterial cells to fibrin was elevated, consistent with a role for the protein in the pathogenesis of enterococcal endocarditis. The data demonstrate that Asc10 expressed under the control of the nisA promoter in heterologous species will be an useful tool in the detailed characterization of this important enterococcal conjugation protein and virulence factor.

  16. First isolation of oleate-dependent Enterococcus faecalis small-colony variants from the umbilical exudate of a paediatric patient with omphalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Noriko; Kuzumoto, Kei; Hidaka, Eiko; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Yumoto, Kayoko; Oana, Kozue; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    An oleate-dependent Enterococcus faecalis isolate representing small-colony variants (SCVs) was isolated from the umbilical exudate of a 31-month-old Japanese male patient in Nagano Children's Hospital, Azumino, Japan. The patient had been suffering from recurrent omphalitis since early infancy. The initial E. faecalis SCV isolate formed small colonies on sheep blood agar plates and tiny colonies on chocolate and modified Drigalski agar, although no visible growth was observed in HK-semi solid medium after 48 h incubation in ambient air. Moreover, the SCV isolate, the colonial morphology of which was reminiscent of Streptococcus species, could not be identified using the MicroScan WalkAway-40 and API 20 Strep systems, both of which yielded profile numbers that did not correspond to any bacterial species, probably as a result of insufficient growth of the isolate. The SCV isolate was subsequently identified as E. faecalis based on its morphological, cultural and biochemical properties, and this was confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene of the organism. Investigations revealed that the addition of oleate, an unsaturated fatty acid, enabled the isolate to grow on every medium with normal-sized colony morphology. Although it has long been known that long-chain fatty acids, especially unsaturated oleic acid, have a major inhibitory effect on the growth of a variety of microorganisms, including not only mycobacteria but also streptococci, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first clinical isolation of an oleate-dependent E. faecalis SCV isolate. In addition, oleic acid might be considered to affect the cell membrane permeability of carbohydrates or antimicrobial agents such as β-lactams.

  17. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6')-aph(2") Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-03-01

    Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6')-aph(2") and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6')-aph(2") and aph(3")-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6')-aph(2"). The prevalence of aph(3")-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6')-aph(2") among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary.

  18. The origin of endodontic Enterococcus faecalis explored by comparison of virulence factor patterns and antibiotic resistance to that of isolates from stool samples, blood cultures and food.

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    Vidana, R; Rashid, M U; Özenci, V; Weintraub, A; Lund, B

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the origin of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from secondary root canal infections and the possibility for a foodborne transmission by comparing them to strains recovered from food, blood and stool regarding putative virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility profiles, where strains from common origin were hypothesized to harbour similar characteristics. A total of 108 E. faecalis strains recovered in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, were screened using PCR for putative virulence factors esp, cylA, gelE/gelatinase-negative phenotype (ef1841/fsrC), efaA, ace and asa1. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ampicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, gentamicin, vancomycin, ciprofloxacin and linezolid was determined using the agar dilution method. Next to strains from blood, the food isolates presented the highest average number of virulence determinants and were frequently enriched with asa1 coding for aggregation substance. None of the endodontic strains carried cylA, and the gelatinase-negative phenotype caused by a deletion dominated the group. Altogether, the most prevalent genes were gelE, efaA and ace, and a combination of them was equally present in approximately 80% of the strains from food, stool and root canals in comparison with 43.3% of the blood isolates. High-level resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was observed in 30% of the blood isolates, whereas the isolates from other origins, with single exceptions, were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Evidence for a foodborne transmission, explaining the high reported prevalence of E. faecalis in root filled teeth, could not be determined based on the similarities in virulence factor patterns and antibiotic susceptibility. The only linkage between isolates from food and root canals consisted of a shared common combination of the genes gelE, efaA and ace. The high occurrence of putative virulence traits in food isolates questions the safety of E. faecalis in food

  19. Histopathological changes induced in an animal model by potentially pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis strains recovered from ready-to-eat food outlets in Osun State, Nigeria

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    Olawale AK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adetunji Kola Olawale,1,2 Oluwole Moses David,2,3 Adekemi Olubukunola Oluyege,2 Richard Temitope Osuntoyinbo,4 Solomon Anjuwon Laleye,5 Oladiran Famurewa,21Department of Applied Sciences, Osun State Polytechnic, Iree, 2Department of Microbiology, University of Ado-Ekiti, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria; 3Phytomedicine Research Centre, Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa; 4Department of Microbiology, Waterford Regional Hospital, Waterford, Republic of Ireland; 5Department of Microbiology, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko, NigeriaAbstract: Enterococci have been implicated as an emerging important cause of several diseases and multiple antibiotic resistance. However, there is little information about the prevalence of pathogenic and/or antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecalis in ready-to-eat foods in Nigeria. Here we report the pathogenic potential of three selected antibiotic-resistant E. faecalis strains isolated from food canteens and food outlets with different virulence determinant genes, including EFC 12 (with gel+, esp+, cylA+, and asa1+, EFT 148 (with gel+, ace+, and asa1+, and EFS 18 (with esp+ and cylA+ in an animal model. Enterococcemia, hematological parameters, and histopathological changes in organ tissues were examined in experimental animals. The results showed differences in enterococcemia and hematological parameters between the control group and experimental animal group. Enterococcemia was observed for 7 days, and the animal group infected with EFC 12 showed the highest growth rate, followed by EFT 148, with the lowest growth rate seen in the EFS 18-infected group. White blood cell count, packed cell volume, and platelets were significantly reduced (P<0.05 in the experimental animals compared with the controls. White blood cells decreased drastically during the study period in rats challenged with EFC 12 (from 7,800 to 6,120 per mm3 but levels remained higher in the control group (from 9,228 to 9

  20. Prevalence of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene and its linkage to Tn5281 in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates from Tabriz hospitals.

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    Behnood, Amir; Farajnia, Safar; Moaddab, Seyed Reza; Ahdi-Khosroshahi, Shiva; Katayounzadeh, Aliakbar

    2013-09-01

    High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR: MIC ≥ 500 µg/ml) in Enterococci is mediated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes which is mainly encoded by aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene in clinical isolates of Enterococcus facium and Enterococcus faecalis collected from hospitals in northwest of Iran. In the present study a total of 111 enterococcus isolates were collected from 4 hospitals during a two year period (July 2009-August 2011). Bacterial identification and species determination were carried out by standard biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. MICs were determined by agar dilution method. The frequency of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene in the isolates was determined by PCR. The carriage of resistance gene on Tn5281 transposon was identified by long PCR and dot-blot hybridization methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests revealed that the highest resistance was against streptomycin (74.77%) and erythromycin (67.58%) whereas the highest susceptibility was observed to vancomycin (81.1%). 36 isolates (32.43%) were identified as HLGR, 34(94.44%) of them had resistant gene in their genome. Long PCR studies revealed that 88% of HLGR clinical isolates harboured Tn5281. The aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene was present on Tn5281 transposon in all 32 isolates according to dot blot hybridization test. The results of this study indicated that aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene is highly prevalent in gentamicin resistant isolates. Carriage of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene on Tn5281 transposable element suggests possible contribution of this transposone on dissemination of resistance gene among enterococcus isolates.

  1. A novel role for D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acid of enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infection.

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    Dominique Wobser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are the third most common cause of healthcare-associated infections, which include urinary tract infections, bacteremia and endocarditis. Cell-surface structures such as lipoteichoic acid (LTA have been poorly examined in E. faecalis, especially with respect to urinary tract infections (UTIs. The dlt operon is responsible for the D-alanylation of LTA and includes the gene dltA, which encodes the D-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl. The involvement of LTA in UTI infection by E. faecalis has not been studied so far. Here, we examined the role of teichoic acid alanylation in the adhesion of enterococci to uroepithelial cells. RESULTS: In a mouse model of urinary tract infection, we showed that E. faecalis 12030ΔdltA mutant colonizes uroepithelial surfaces more efficiently than wild type bacteria. We also demonstrated that this mutant adhered four fold better to human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 compared to the wild type strain. Bacterial adherence could be significantly inhibited by purified lipoteichoic acid (LTA and inhibition was specific. CONCLUSION: In contrast to bacteraemia model and adherence to colon surfaces, E. faecalis 12030ΔdltA mutant colonized uroepithelial surfaces more efficiently than wild-type bacteria. In the case of the uroepithelial surface the adherence to specific host cells could be prevented by purified LTA. Our results therefore suggest a novel function of alanylation of LTA in E. faecalis.

  2. Comparison of the Antibacterial effect of Diapaste with Sealapex and Zinc Oxide-Eugenol (ZOE on Enterococcus Faecalis: A Laboratory Study

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    Reza Bahram Abadi

    Full Text Available Introduction: The antiseptic characteristic of root canal filling materials seems very critical in pulpectomy procedure to eliminate residual pathogens of root canals. The aim of this laboratory study was to compare the antibacterial activity of a newly introduced premixed calcium hydroxide root canal filling paste of deciduous teeth (Diapaste with Zinc Oxide-Eugenol (ZOE and Sealapex on Enterococcus faecalis. Materials & Methods: In this study, agar diffusion inhibitory test was used to assess antibacterial activity. Ten 10-cm-diameter dishes with 4.0mm thickness of agar inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis were used and four 5-mm-diameter wells per dish at equidistant points were filled with the three test root canal filling materials (Diapaste, ZOE and Sealapex and distilled water as a negative control was used to fill the fourth well. After incubation of the plates at 37oC for 48 hours, the diameter of the zones of bacterial growth inhibition produced around the wells was measured (in mm with a caliper. Data were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Kruskall-Wallis test indicated that there were statistically significant differences (P<0.001 among median of the zones of bacterial growth inhibition produced by the three different materials. Mean diameter of inhibition zones of bacterial growth was significantly higher in Diapaste than Sealapex (P<0.001 and ZOE (P<0.001. Conclusion: With respect to the limitations of an in vitro study, it appears that Diapaste has more antibacterial activity than ZOE and Sealapex.

  3. Role of EfrAB efflux pump in biocide tolerance and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from traditional fermented foods and the effect of EDTA as EfrAB inhibitor.

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    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Valenzuela, Antonio Sánchez; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from various traditional fermented foods of both animal and vegetable origins have shown multidrug resistance to several antibiotics and tolerance to biocides. Reduced susceptibility was intra and inter-species dependent and was due to specific and unspecific mechanisms such as efflux pumps. EfrAB, a heterodimeric ABC transporter efflux pump, was detected in 100% of multidrug resistant (MDR) E. faecalis strains and only in 12% of MDR E. faecium strains. EfrAB expression was induced by half of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of gentamicin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. However, expression of efrA and efrB genes was highly dependent on the strain tested and on the antimicrobial used. Our results indicated that 3 mM EDTA highly reduced the MICs of almost all drugs tested. Nevertheless, the higher reductions (>8 folds) were obtained with gentamicin, streptomycin, chlorhexidine and triclosan. Reductions of MICs were correlated with down-regulation of EfrAB expression (10-140 folds) in all three MDR enterococci strains. This is the first report describing the role of EfrAB in the efflux of antibiotics and biocides which reflect also the importance of EfrAB in multidrug resistance in enterococci. EDTA used at low concentration as food preservative could be one of the best choices to prevent spread of multidrug resistant enterococci throughout food chain by decreasing EfrAB expression. EfrAB could be an attractive target not only in enterococci present in food matrix but also those causing infections as well by using EDTA as therapeutic agent in combination with low doses of antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology.

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    Natalia Belogortseva

    Full Text Available Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE and serine protease (SprE leads to resultant condition media (CM capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis.

  5. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology.

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    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis.

  6. Effectiveness of KTP laser versus 980 nm diode laser to kill Enterococcus faecalis in biofilms developed in experimentally infected root canals.

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    Romeo, Umberto; Palaia, Gaspare; Nardo, Alessia; Tenore, Gianluca; Telesca, Vito; Kornblit, Roly; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Frioni, Alessandra; Valenti, Piera; Berlutti, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial action of KTP (potassium-titanyl-phosphate) laser irradiations (compared with 980 nm diode laser), associated with conventional endodontic procedures, on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Fifty-six dental roots with single canals were prepared with Ni-Ti rotary instruments, autoclaved, inoculated with an E. faecalis suspension and incubated for 72 h. They were randomly allocated to control and treatment groups. Laser parameters were as follows: power 2.5 W, Ton 35 ms, Toff 50 ms (KTP laser); power 2.5 W, Ton 30 ms, Toff 30 ms (980 nm diode laser). To evaluate the residual bacterial load, BioTimer Assay was employed. The chemo-mechanical treatment together with laser irradiations (KTP and 980 nm diode lasers) achieved a considerable reduction of bacterial load (higher than 96% and 93%, respectively). Regarding both laser systems, comparisons with conventional endodontic procedures (mortality rate of about 67%) revealed statistically highly significant differences (P ≤ 0.01). This study confirms that laser systems can provide an additional aid in endodontic disinfection. © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  7. Antibacterial efficacy of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea tree oil, Curcuma longa (Turmeric, 2% chlorhexidine, and 5% sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study

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    Dakshita Joy Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate and compare the antibacterial efficacy of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil, Curcumalonga (turmeric, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX, and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl against Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: Agar plates were prepared using tryptone soya agar. Cultures of E. faecalis were grown in tryptone soya broth. Agar well diffusion method was performed and the plates were incubated at 37΀C for 24 h. The zones of inhibition were recorded. The readings were subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc test. P-value was considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: Maximum antibacterial efficacy was exhibited by 2% CHX, followed by 5% NaOCl and C. longa with no statistically significant difference between them. It was followed by M. alternifolia (Tea tree oil. Ethanol and saline showed the least antibacterial action. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, C. longa and M. alternifolia can be used as an alternative root canal irrigant, although long-term in vivo studies are warranted.

  8. Mevalonate 5-diphosphate mediates ATP binding to the mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from the bacterial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis

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    Chen, Chun-Liang; Mermoud, James C.; Paul, Lake N.; Steussy, Calvin Nicklaus; Stauffacher, Cynthia V. (Purdue)

    2017-10-12

    The mevalonate pathway produces isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), a building block for polyisoprenoid synthesis, and is a crucial pathway for growth of the human bacterial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The final enzyme in this pathway, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), acts on mevalonate diphosphate (MVAPP) to produce IPP while consuming ATP. This essential enzyme has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections. Here, we report functional and structural studies on the mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from E. faecalis (MDDEF). The MDDEF crystal structure in complex with ATP (MDDEF–ATP) revealed that the phosphate-binding loop (amino acids 97–105) is not involved in ATP binding and that the phosphate tail of ATP in this structure is in an outward-facing position pointing away from the active site. This suggested that binding of MDDEF to MVAPP is necessary to guide ATP into a catalytically favorable position. Enzymology experiments show that the MDDEF performs a sequential ordered bi-substrate reaction with MVAPP as the first substrate, consistent with the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments. On the basis of ITC results, we propose that this initial prerequisite binding of MVAPP enhances ATP binding. In summary, our findings reveal a substrate-induced substrate-binding event that occurs during the MDDEF-catalyzed reaction. The disengagement of the phosphate-binding loop concomitant with the alternative ATP-binding configuration may provide the structural basis for antimicrobial design against these pathogenic enterococci.

  9. The PavA-like fibronectin-binding protein of Enterococcus faecalis, EfbA, is important for virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

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    Torelli, Riccardo; Serror, Pascale; Bugli, Francesca; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Florio, Ada Rita; Stringaro, Annarita; Colone, Marisa; De Carolis, Elena; Martini, Cecilia; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2012-09-15

    Enterococcus faecalis is an established nosocomial pathogen, yet the pathogenesis of enterococcal infections, particularly of urinary tract infections (UTIs), remains to be fully elucidated. Fibronectin-binding proteins have been identified as potent adhesins in pathogenic Gram-positive cocci. Here, we characterized EfbA, which is encoded by the enterococcal orthologue of Streptococcus pneumoniae pavA. Similar to PavA, the anchorless EfbA protein was localized to the enterococcal cell outer surface and bound to immobilized human fibronectin. In addition to abrogated EfbA expression, deletion of the efbA gene eliminated EfbA from the cell surface and drastically reduced the enterococcal cell binding to immobilized fibronectin. The ΔefbA deletion mutant was highly attenuated vs wild-type in a murine ascending UTI model, consistent with an increased tropism for the kidney relative to the bladder. These results provide the first evidence that EfbA of E. faecalis plays a role in UTIs, probably contributing to the pathogenesis in this site.

  10. Distribution of antimicrobial resistance determinants, virulence-associated factors and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats loci in isolates of Enterococcus faecalis from various settings and genetic lineages

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    Gawryszewska, Iwona; Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kuch, Alicja; Chrobak-Chmiel, Dorota; Trokenheim, Łucja Łaniewska-; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sadowy, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Enterococcus faecalis represents an important factor of hospital-associated infections (HAIs). The knowledge on its evolution from a commensal to an opportunistic pathogen is still limited; thus, we performed a study to characterise distribution of factors that may contribute to this adaptation. Using a collection obtained from various settings (hospitalised patients, community carriers, animals, fresh food, sewage, water), we investigated differences in antimicrobial susceptibility, distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes, virulence-associated determinants and phenotypes, and CRISPR loci in the context of the clonal relatedness of isolates. Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure revealed the presence of three major groups; two subgroups comprised almost exclusively HAI isolates, belonging to previously proposed enterococcal high-risk clonal complexes (HiRECCs) 6 and 28. Isolates of these two subgroups were significantly enriched in antimicrobial resistance genes, presumably produced a polysaccharide capsule and often carried the aggregation substance asa1; distribution of other virulence-associated genes, such as esp and cyl, formation of a biofilm and gelatinase production were more variable. Moreover, both subgroups showed a low prevalence of CRISPR-Cas 1 and 3 and presence of small CRISPR2 variants. Our study confirms the importance of HiRECCs in the population of E. faecalis and their confinement to the hospital settings. PMID:28334141

  11. Anti-microbial efficacy of Allium sativum extract against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its penetration into the root dentin: An in vitro study.

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    Birring, Ourvind J S; Viloria, Iluminada L; Nunez, Phides

    2015-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has long been the most preferred root canal irrigant in endodontic treatment, but besides being an effective anti-microbial agent, it is highly cytotoxic. Thus, a search for an alternative herbal irrigant which would be more biocompatible but equally effective led to this study. To assess the anti-microbial efficacy of garlic extract (GE) against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its ability to penetrate into root dentin. E. faecalis was cultured and treated with the test agents--normal saline, 5.25% of NaOCl, and the three different concentrations of GE (10%, 40%, and 70%). The experiment was done in four groups namely, 24-h Co-treatment group, 24-h biofilm treatment group, 1-week biofilm group, and 3-week biofilm group. These groups were subjected to microbial viability assay and fluorescence microscopic analysis. The most effective concentration of garlic (70%) was further tested and compared with 5.25% NaOCl for its dentin penetration property using 0.2% alizarin red under a fluorescence microscope. The findings revealed that GE was able to disrupt as well as prevent the formation of biofilm produced by E. faecalis. All the concentrations of GE displayed considerable anti-microbial efficacy where 70% concentration was most effective and exhibited similar anti-microbial efficacy as 5.25% NaOCl. In terms of dentin penetration, no significant difference was found between GE and NaOCl. The results indicate that GE has a potential to serve as an alternative herbal root canal irrigant being an effective and biocompatible anti-microbial agent with good dentinal penetration property.

  12. Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in human oral epithelial cells from subjects with periodontitis and periodontal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Andrea V; Barbosa, Graziela M; Higashi, Daniela; di Micheli, Giorgio; Rodrigues, Paulo H; Simionato, Maria Regina L

    2013-10-01

    Epithelial cells in oral cavities can be considered reservoirs for a variety of bacterial species. A polymicrobial intracellular flora associated with periodontal disease has been demonstrated in buccal cells. Important aetiological agents of systemic and nosocomial infections have been detected in the microbiota of subgingival biofilm, especially in individuals with periodontal disease. However, non-oral pathogens internalized in oral epithelial cells and their relationship with periodontal status are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect opportunistic species within buccal and gingival crevice epithelial cells collected from subjects with periodontitis or individuals with good periodontal health, and to associate their prevalence with periodontal clinical status. Quantitative detection of total bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis in oral epithelial cells was determined by quantitative real-time PCR using universal and species-specific primer sets. Intracellular bacteria were visualized by confocal microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, 33% of cell samples from patients with periodontitis contained at least one opportunistic species, compared with 15% of samples from healthy individuals. E. faecalis was the most prevalent species found in oral epithelial cells (detected in 20.6% of patients with periodontitis, P = 0.03 versus healthy individuals) and was detected only in cells from patients with periodontitis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that high levels of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were present in both the periodontitis and healthy groups. However, the proportion of these species was significantly higher in epithelial cells of subjects with periodontitis compared with healthy individuals (P = 0.016 for P. aeruginosa and P = 0.047 for S. aureus). Although E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa were detected in 57% and 50% of patients, respectively, with probing depth and

  13. Effect of Er:YAG laser-activated irrigation solution on Enterococcus Faecalis biofilm in an ex-vivo root canal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar-Helft, Sharonit; Stabholtz, Adam; Moshonov, Joshua; Gutkin, Vitaly; Redenski, Idan; Steinberg, Doron

    2013-07-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate mineral content and surface morphology of root canals coated with Enterococcus faecalis biofilm after treatment with several endodontic irrigation solutions, with and without Er:YAG laser-activated irrigation (LAI). LAI has been introduced as a powerful method for root canal irrigation resulting in smear-layer removal from the root canal wall. Distal and palatal roots from 60 freshly extracted human molars were used in this study. The coronal of each tooth was removed. Roots were split longitudinally and placed in an ultrasonic bath to remove the smear layer, creating conditions for the formation of E. faecalis biofilm. After incubation, the two halves were reassembled in impression material to simulate clinical conditions. Specimens were divided into two main groups: roots rinsed with irrigation solutions and roots subjected to laser irradiation combined with irrigation solutions. Solutions tested were 2% chlorhexidine and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and saline. Surface morphology: 17% EDTA irrigant solution combined with Er:YAG laser showed the best results for removing bacteria from the root canal walls. Chemical analysis: all samples treated with combined laser irradiation and irrigation solution had low surface levels of Ca compared with samples treated with irrigation alone. The Ca/P ratio was highest in the laser-EDTA group. Overall, mineral changes caused by laser with irrigation solutions were minimal, and statistically nonsignificant. In vitro irrigation solutions, combined with Er:YAG laser irradiation, were effective in removing E. faecalis biofilm from root canal walls. Irrigation solutions without laser irradiation were less effective, leaving a layer of biofilm on the dentin surface.

  14. A D-enantiomer of the antimicrobial peptide GL13K evades antimicrobial resistance in the Gram positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Helmut; Hall, Jeffrey W; Larson, Elliot; Gorr, Sven-Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides represent an alternative to traditional antibiotics that may be less susceptible to bacterial resistance mechanisms by directly attacking the bacterial cell membrane. However, bacteria have a variety of defense mechanisms that can prevent cationic antimicrobial peptides from reaching the cell membrane. The L- and D-enantiomers of the antimicrobial peptide GL13K were tested against the Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gordonii to understand the role of bacterial proteases and cell wall modifications in bacterial resistance. GL13K was derived from the human salivary protein BPIFA2. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by broth dilution and a serial assay used to determine bacterial resistance. Peptide degradation was determined in a bioassay utilizing a luminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to detect peptide activity. Autolysis and D-alanylation-deficient strains of E. faecalis and S. gordonii were tested in autolysis assays and peptide activity assays. E. faecalis protease inactivated L-GL13K but not D-GL13K, whereas autolysis did not affect peptide activity. Indeed, the D-enantiomer appeared to kill the bacteria prior to initiation of autolysis. D-alanylation mutants were killed by L-GL13K whereas this modification did not affect killing by D-GL13K. The mutants regained resistance to L-GL13K whereas bacteria did not gain resistance to D-GL13K after repeated treatment with the peptides. D-alanylation affected the hydrophobicity of bacterial cells but hydrophobicity alone did not affect GL13K activity. D-GL13K evades two resistance mechanisms in Gram-positive bacteria without giving rise to substantial new resistance. D-GL13K exhibits attractive properties for further antibiotic development.

  15. Disinfection of water inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis using solar/Fe(III)EDDS-H2O2or S2O82-process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, A; Polo López, M I; Fernández Ibáñez, P; Brigante, M; Mailhot, G

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the activation of H 2 O 2 and persulfate ions induced by solar photolysis of Fe(III)EDDS complex were investigated in water disinfection, applying solar AOPs processes. The use of Fe(III)EDDS complex maintains iron in soluble form until slightly basic pH and so the photolysis is efficient in a large range of pH compatible with natural waters. Moreover, for the first time, the impact of photogenerated hydroxyl and sulfate radicals on the inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis in water was studied. E. faecalis was proposed as alternative model microorganism given its higher resistance than the commonly used E. coli. The reactivity of hydroxyl radicals seems to be more efficient for the inactivation of such strain than the reactivity of sulfate radicals. Moreover, experimental results show that the concentration of Fe(III)EDDS complex is a key parameter for the inactivation of microrganisms. For the direct application in natural waters, the efficiency of the process in the presence of ubiquitous inorganic compounds, such as carbonate (HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- ) and chloride ions (Cl - ), was also investigated. Carbonates showed a strong reduction on the E. faecalis inactivation in all cases; meanwhile chloride ions enhanced the inactivation in the presence of persulfate as also shown by using a complementary kinetic modeling approach. A dual role of Fe(III)EDDS complex was established and discussed; essential for the generation of radical species but a trap for the reactivity of these same radicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular structure and evolution of the conjugative multiresistance plasmid pRE25 of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from a raw-fermented sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, Michael; Schwarz, Franziska; Perreten, Vincent

    2003-12-01

    Plasmid pRE25 from Enterococcus faecalis transfers resistances against kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, clindamycin, lincomycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, roxithromycin, tylosin, chloramphenicol, and nourseothricin sulfate by conjugation in vitro to E. faecalis JH2-2, Lactococcus lactis Bu2, and Listeria innocua L19. Its nucleotide sequence of 50237 base pairs represents the largest, fully sequenced conjugative multiresistance plasmid of enterococci (Plasmid 46 (2001) 170). The gene for chloramphenicol resistance (cat) was identified as an acetyltransferase identical to the one of plasmid pIP501 of Streptococcus agalactiae. Erythromycin resistance is due to a 23S ribosomal RNA methyl transferase, again as found in pIP501 (ermB). The aminoglycoside resistance genes are packed in tandem as in transposon Tn5405 of Staphylococcus aureus: an aminoglycoside 6-adenyltransferase, a streptothricin acetyl transferase, and an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase.). Identical resistance genes are known from pathogens like Streptococcus pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. aureus, Campylobacter coli, Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium difficile. pRE25 is composed of a 30.5-kbp segment almost identical to pIP501. Of the 15 genes involved in conjugative transfer, 10 codes for putative transmembrane proteins (e.g. trsB, traC, trsF, trsJ, and trsL). The enterococcal part is joined into the pIP501 part by insertion elements IS1216V of E. faecium Tn1545 (three copies), and homologs of IS1062 (E. faecalis) and IS1485 (E. faecium). pRE25 demonstrates that enterococci from fermented food do participate in the molecular communication between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria of the human and animal microflora.

  17. Antibiotic Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Gastrointestinal Tract of Broiler Chickens after Propolis and Bee Pollen Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Kročko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the safety aspects of antimicrobials (propolis and bee pollen use in poultry farms as growth promoters is higher susceptibility of gastrointestinal microorganisms to antibiotics used for human treatment. Enterococci belong to the normal microbiota of gastrointestinal tract of chickens and are widely distributed in nature, but they are not generally recognized as safe (GRAS. Poultry enterococci carrying antimicrobial resistance genes may not only transfer these genes to other, possibly pathogenic, bacteria in the chicken gut, but upon transfer to zoonotic bacteria they also may pose a human health hazard. Antibiotic resistance prevalence of E. faecalis isolates found in the crop was subsequently found in the ileum and caecum within each group of broiler chickens. No resistance of E. faecalis isolates was found against vancomycin and teicoplanin. Intermediate resistance to erythromycin in the most E. faecalis isolates from gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens with propolis supplement in their diet was eliminated. Our results suggest the probability of synergism effect of propolis and also bee pollen with some tested antibiotics against E. faecalis isolates.

  18. Determination of resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium strains isolated from poultry and their genotypic characterization by ADSRRS-fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakiewicz, A; Ziólkowska, G; Troscianczyk, A; Zieba, P; Gnat, S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance of E. faecalis and E. faecium strains isolated from poultry and to carry out genotypic characterization thereof with the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method (amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites) and analysis of the genetic relatedness between the isolates with different resistance and virulence determinants. Samples were collected from 70 4-week-old chickens and tested for Enterococcus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of 11 antimicrobials were determined using the broth microdilution method. Detection of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes was performed using PCR, and molecular analysis was carried out using the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method. The highest percentage of strains was resistant to tetracycline (60.5%) and erythromycin (54.4%), and a large number exhibited high-level resistance to both kanamycin (42.1%) and streptomycin (34.2%). Among 8 genes encoding AME, the tested strains showed mainly the presence of [aph(3΄)-IIIa], [ant(6)-Ia], [aac(6΄)-Ie-aph(2΄΄)-Ia], and [ant(9)-Ia] genes. Phenotypic resistance to erythromycin was encoded in 98.4% strains by the ermB gene. Genotypic resistance to tetracycline in E. faecium was associated with the presence of tetM and tetL (respectively, in 95.5 and 57.7% of the isolates); in contrast, E. faecalis strains were characterized mainly by the presence of tetO (83.3%). The virulence profile was homogenous for all E. faecium strains and included only efaAfm and ccf genes. All E. faecalis strains exhibited efaAfs, gelE, and genes encoding sex pheromones. The strains tested exhibited 34 genotypic profiles. Comparative analysis of phenotypic and genotypic resistance and virulence profiles and confrontation thereof with the genotypes of the strains tested showed that strains assigned to a particular genotype have an identical phenotypic resistance profile and a panel of resistance and virulence genes. The results of this

  19. Impact of manganese, copper and zinc ions on the transcriptome of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrantes, Marta Coelho; Lopes, Maria de Fátima; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms that enable Enterococcus to cope with different environmental stresses and their contribution to the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity of this organism are still poorly understood. Maintenance of intracellular homeostasis of metal ions is crucial for survival of these bacteria. In

  20. Depth-dependent inactivation of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis in soil after manure application and simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.coli and Enterococcus serve as important water quality indicator organisms. Rainfall action on manured fields and pastures releases these organisms into soil with infiltrating water. They can then be released back to runoff during subsequent rainfall or irrigation events as soil solution interacts...

  1. RNA and a cell wall component of Enterococcus faecalis IC-1 are required for phagocytosis and interleukin 12 production by the mouse macrophage cell line J774.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Junpei; Ukawa, Yuuichi; Takemoto, Syoji; Kubo, Takayoshi; Sagesaka, Yuko M; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2017-06-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a resident lactic acid bacterium in the human intestine. Its immunostimulatory action was reported to be enhanced by heat sterilization. To investigate its beneficial actions, we evaluated the ability of 10 E. faecalis strains to induce interleukin-12 (IL-12) production in a mouse macrophage cell line, J774.1 and found that the strain, E. faecalis IC-1, had a potent IL-12-inducing ability. Furthermore, we investigated the underlying mechanism by treating IC-1 cells with RNase or lysozyme. Its activity almost disappeared and an antagonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 inhibited this activity. Moreover, lysozyme-treated IC-1 bacteria were not phagocytized by J774.1 cells, and did not induce IL-12 production. Based on our results, we propose that macrophages recognize the cell wall components of IC-1, leading to phagocytosis. The IC-1 RNA is then recognized by TLR7, which induces the production of IL-12.

  2. Confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy investigation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm degradation using passive and active sodium hypochlorite irrigation within a simulated root canal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmmed, Saifalarab A; Vianna, Morgana E; Penny, Matthew R; Hilton, Stephen T; Mordan, Nicola; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2017-08-01

    Root canal irrigation is an important adjunct to control microbial infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2.5% (wt/vol) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) agitation on the removal, killing, and degradation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. A total of 45 root canal models were manufactured using 3D printing with each model comprising an 18 mm length simulated root canal of apical size 30 and taper 0.06. E. faecalis biofilms were grown on the apical 3 mm of the models for 10 days. A total of 60 s of 9 ml of 2.5% NaOCl irrigation using syringe and needle was performed, the irrigant was either left stagnant in the canal or agitated using manual (Gutta-percha), sonic, and ultrasonic methods for 30 s. Following irrigation, the residual biofilms were observed using confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Dunnett post hoc tests at a level of significance p ≤ .05. Consequence of root canal irrigation indicate that the reduction in the amount of biofilm achieved with the active irrigation groups (manual, sonic, and ultrasonic) was significantly greater when compared with the passive and untreated groups (p irrigation exhibited more residual biofilm on the model surface than irrigant agitated by manual or automated (sonic, ultrasonic) methods. Total biofilm degradation and nonviable cells were associated with the ultrasonic group. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparison of the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Calcium Hydroxide and Photodynamic Therapy Against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans in Teeth With Periapical Lesions; An In Vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangari, Zohre; Mojtahed Bidabadi, Maryam; Asnaashari, Mohammad; Rahmati, Afsaneh; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Elimination of pathological microflora of root canal systems is a major goal in endodontic treatment. This study aimed to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of calcium hydroxide as an intracanal medication and antibacterial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans in teeth with periapical (PA) lesions. Methods: This in vivo study was conducted on 20 patients with single-rooted mandibular premolar with previously failed endodontic treatment. This study was performed as a clinical trial (IRCTID: IRCT2016090429686N1). After conventional chemo-mechanical root canal preparation (hand and rotary instruments and 2.5% NaOCl), microbiological samples were obtained using sterile paper points, then stored in thioglycolate solution and transferred to a microbiology laboratory. Group 1 (n = 10) specimens underwent aPDT (diode laser 808 nm + 50 mg/mL methylene blue), while creamy calcium hydroxide paste was used in group 2 for a duration of 1 week. A control sample was taken with sterile paper points and F3 Protaper rotary file. The samples were dispersed in transport medium, serially diluted, and cultured on selective mediums to determine the number of colony forming units (CFUs). Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test at 5% significance level. The significance level for all analyses was set at P < 0.05. Results: Number of CFU significantly decreased in both groups after the interventions (P < 0.001); however, there was no significant difference in the colony count between the 2 groups. Conclusion: aPDT and calcium hydroxide therapy showed the same antimicrobial efficacy on E. faecalis and C. albicans. PMID:28652899

  4. Therapeutic effects of gold nanoparticles synthesized using Musa paradisiaca peel extract against multiple antibiotic resistant Enterococcus faecalis biofilms and human lung cancer cells (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, S; Vaseeharan, B; Malaikozhundan, B; Gopi, N; Ekambaram, P; Pachaiappan, R; Velusamy, P; Murugan, K; Benelli, G; Suresh Kumar, R; Suriyanarayanamoorthy, M

    2017-01-01

    Botanical-mediated synthesis of nanomaterials is currently emerging as a cheap and eco-friendly nanotechnology, since it does not involve the use of toxic chemicals. In the present study, we focused on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using the aqueous peel extract of Musa paradisiaca (MPPE-AuNPs) following a facile and cheap fabrication process. The green synthesized MPPE-AuNPs were bio-physically characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, TEM, Zeta potential analysis and EDX. MPPE-AuNPs were crystalline in nature, spherical to triangular in shape, with particle size ranging within 50 nm. The biofilm inhibition activity of MPPE-AuNPs was higher against multiple antibiotic resistant (MARS) Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis. Light and confocal laser scanning microscopic observations evidenced that the MPPE-AuNPs effectively inhibited the biofilm of E. faecalis when tested at 100 μg mL -1 . Cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that MPPE-AuNPs were effective in inhibiting the viability of human A549 lung cancer cells at higher concentrations of 100 μg mL -1 . The morphological changes in the MPPE-AuNPs treated A549 lung cancer cells were visualized under phase-contrast microscopy. Furthermore, the ecotoxicity of MPPE-AuNPs on the freshwater micro crustacean Ceriodaphnia cornuta were evaluated. Notably, no mortality was recorded in MPPE-AuNPs treated C. cornuta at 250 μg mL -1 . This study concludes that MPPE-AuNPs are non-toxic, eco-friendly and act as a multipurpose potential biomaterial for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of photodynamic therapy, 2 % chlorhexidine, triantibiotic mixture, propolis and ozone on root canals experimentally infected with Enterococcus faecalis: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Salmerón-Lozano, P; Martínez-Beneyto, Y

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT), 2 % chlorhexidine (CHX). The teeth were contaminated with 0.1 mL Enterococcus faecalis (3 × 10 8  cell/mL) and randomized into eight treatment groups: Group 1 (2.5 % NaOCl); Group 2 (PDT); Group 3 (2 % CHX); Group 4 (TAM); Group 5 (propolis), Group 6 (ozone), Group 7 (positive control) and Group 8 (negative control). Following treatment, the canal content was sampled. The samples were cultured in triplicate on blood agar plates to determine the number of colony forming units (CFU)/mL. The teeth were analyzed by SEM to determine the percentage of area with contamination and debris. The group with the lowest CFU/mL count was the ozone group, which obtained similar values to the PDT group. SEM images showed that 2.5 % NaOCL group showed the lowest percentage of contaminated area. Applications of PDT, 2 % CHX, TAM, propolis and ozone showed antibacterial potential similar to 2.5 % NaOCL.

  6. Characterization of the Deoxynucleotide Triphosphate Triphosphohydrolase (dNTPase) Activity of the EF1143 Protein from Enterococcus faecalis and Crystal Structure of the Activator-Substrate Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorontsov, Ivan I.; Minasov, George; Kiryukhina, Olga; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Anderson, Wayne F. (NWU)

    2012-06-19

    The EF1143 protein from Enterococcus faecalis is a distant homolog of deoxynucleotide triphosphate triphosphohydrolases (dNTPases) from Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus. These dNTPases are important components in the regulation of the dNTP pool in bacteria. Biochemical assays of the EF1143 dNTPase activity demonstrated nonspecific hydrolysis of all canonical dNTPs in the presence of Mn{sup 2+}. In contrast, with Mg{sup 2+} hydrolysis required the presence of dGTP as an effector, activating the degradation of dATP and dCTP with dGTP also being consumed in the reaction with dATP. The crystal structure of EF1143 and dynamic light scattering measurements in solution revealed a tetrameric oligomer as the most probable biologically active unit. The tetramer contains four dGTP specific allosteric regulatory sites and four active sites. Examination of the active site with the dATP substrate suggests an in-line nucleophilic attack on the {alpha}-phosphate center as a possible mechanism of the hydrolysis and two highly conserved residues, His-129 and Glu-122, as an acid-base catalytic dyad. Structural differences between EF1143 apo and holo forms revealed mobility of the {alpha}3 helix that can regulate the size of the active site binding pocket and could be stabilized in the open conformation upon formation of the tetramer and dGTP effector binding.

  7. In vitro evaluation of the effectiveness of the chemomechanical preparation against Enterococcus faecalis after single- or multiple-visit root canal treatment Avaliação in vitro da efetividade do preparo químico-mecânico frente ao Enterococcus faecalis após tratamento endodôntico realizado em uma ou em múltiplas sessões

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Diogo Gurgel-Filho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to assess the elimination of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro in human mandibular premolars after chemomechanical preparation with or without the use of a calcium hydroxide dressing. After 60 days of contamination with E. faecalis, the root canals were prepared using the Crown-Down technique combined with 2% chlorhexidine gel irrigation. Then, the specimens were divided into two experimental groups, treated in a single visit or in multiple visits, and two control groups. The multiple-visit group received a dressing with calcium hydroxide for 14 days (CalenTM and the single-visit group did not receive any medication. In the two control groups, the canals were filled with BHI after chemomechanical preparation with 2% chlorhexidine gel or distilled water. Microbial samples were taken from the root canals for colony forming unit count for each phase of the treatment using sterile paper points inside the root canal lumen. Data were ranked and analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test. The residual microbial colonies were then assessed. The results showed that chemomechanical preparation using 2% chlorhexidine gel with no intra-canal dressing reduced by 100% the E. faecalis contamination of the root canal lumen. The calcium-hydroxide group that received the 14-day intra-canal dressing allowed a small number of bacteria to grow between visits, but without statistical differences between groups.Objetivou-se avaliar in vitro a eliminação do Enterococcus faecalis em pré-molares inferiores humanos após o preparo químico-mecânico seguido ou não de curativo de hidróxido de cálcio. Após 60 dias de contaminação com E. faecalis os canais radiculares foram preparados utilizando-se a técnica coroa-ápice associada à irrigação com clorexidina em gel a 2%. Posteriormente os espécimes foram divididos em dois grupos experimentais, tratados em uma ou duas sessões, e dois grupos controles. O grupo tratado em duas sessões recebeu

  8. Conjugal transfer of aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia gene from native species and mechanism of regulation and cross resistance in Enterococcus faecalis MCC3063 by real time-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2017-09-01

    High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) derived from food animals is detrimental. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance genes, aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and aph(3')IIIa in different Enterococcus species. The cross resistance patterns in Enterococcus faecalis MCC3063 to clinically important aminoglycosides by real time PCR were also studied. Southern hybridization experiments revealed the presence of aac(6')Ie-aph(2 ″ )Ia and aph(3')IIIa genes conferring HLAR in high molecular weight plasmids except in Lactobacillus plantarum. The plasmid encoded bifunctional aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia gene was transferable from Enterococcus avium (n = 2), E. cecorum (n = 1), E. faecalis (n = 1) and Pediococcus lolii (n = 1) species into the recipient strain; E. faecalis JH2-2 by filter mating experiments thus indicating the possible risks of gene transfer into pathogenic strains. Molecular analysis of cross resistance patterns in native isolate of E. faecalis MCC3063 carrying aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and aph(3')IIIa gene was displayed by quantification of the mRNA levels in this study. For this, the culture was induced with increasing concentrations of gentamicin, kanamycin and streptomycin (2048, 4096, 8192, 16384 μg/mL) individually. The increasing concentrations of gentamicin and kanamycin induced the expression of the aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and aph(3')IIIa resistance genes, respectively. Interestingly, it was observed that induction with streptomycin triggered a significant fold increase in the expression of the aph(3')IIIa gene which otherwise was not known to modify the aminoglycoside. This is noteworthy as streptomycin was found to confer cross resistance to structurally unrelated kanamycin. Also, expression of the aph(3')IIIa gene when induced with streptomycin, revealed that bacteria harbouring this gene will be able to overcome streptomycin bactericidal action at

  9. Enterococcus faecalis PcfC, a spatially localized substrate receptor for type IV secretion of the pCF10 transfer intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuqing; Zhang, Xiaolin; Manias, Dawn; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Dunny, Gary M; Christie, Peter J

    2008-05-01

    Upon sensing of peptide pheromone, Enterococcus faecalis efficiently transfers plasmid pCF10 through a type IV secretion (T4S) system to recipient cells. The PcfF accessory factor and PcfG relaxase initiate transfer by catalyzing strand-specific nicking at the pCF10 origin of transfer sequence (oriT). Here, we present evidence that PcfF and PcfG spatially coordinate docking of the pCF10 transfer intermediate with PcfC, a membrane-bound putative ATPase related to the coupling proteins of gram-negative T4S machines. PcfC and PcfG fractionated with the membrane and PcfF with the cytoplasm, yet all three proteins formed several punctate foci at the peripheries of pheromone-induced cells as monitored by immunofluorescence microscopy. A PcfC Walker A nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site mutant (K156T) fractionated with the E. faecalis membrane and also formed foci, whereas PcfC deleted of its N-terminal putative transmembrane domain (PcfCDelta N103) distributed uniformly throughout the cytoplasm. Native PcfC and mutant proteins PcfCK156T and PcfCDelta N103 bound pCF10 but not pcfG or Delta oriT mutant plasmids as shown by transfer DNA immunoprecipitation, indicating that PcfC binds only the processed form of pCF10 in vivo. Finally, purified PcfCDelta N103 bound DNA substrates and interacted with purified PcfF and PcfG in vitro. Our findings support a model in which (i) PcfF recruits PcfG to oriT to catalyze T-strand nicking, (ii) PcfF and PcfG spatially position the relaxosome at the cell membrane to stimulate substrate docking with PcfC, and (iii) PcfC initiates substrate transfer through the pCF10 T4S channel by an NTP-dependent mechanism.

  10. Enterococcus faecalis PcfC, a Spatially Localized Substrate Receptor for Type IV Secretion of the pCF10 Transfer Intermediate▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuqing; Zhang, Xiaolin; Manias, Dawn; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Dunny, Gary M.; Christie, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Upon sensing of peptide pheromone, Enterococcus faecalis efficiently transfers plasmid pCF10 through a type IV secretion (T4S) system to recipient cells. The PcfF accessory factor and PcfG relaxase initiate transfer by catalyzing strand-specific nicking at the pCF10 origin of transfer sequence (oriT). Here, we present evidence that PcfF and PcfG spatially coordinate docking of the pCF10 transfer intermediate with PcfC, a membrane-bound putative ATPase related to the coupling proteins of gram-negative T4S machines. PcfC and PcfG fractionated with the membrane and PcfF with the cytoplasm, yet all three proteins formed several punctate foci at the peripheries of pheromone-induced cells as monitored by immunofluorescence microscopy. A PcfC Walker A nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site mutant (K156T) fractionated with the E. faecalis membrane and also formed foci, whereas PcfC deleted of its N-terminal putative transmembrane domain (PcfCΔN103) distributed uniformly throughout the cytoplasm. Native PcfC and mutant proteins PcfCK156T and PcfCΔN103 bound pCF10 but not pcfG or ΔoriT mutant plasmids as shown by transfer DNA immunoprecipitation, indicating that PcfC binds only the processed form of pCF10 in vivo. Finally, purified PcfCΔN103 bound DNA substrates and interacted with purified PcfF and PcfG in vitro. Our findings support a model in which (i) PcfF recruits PcfG to oriT to catalyze T-strand nicking, (ii) PcfF and PcfG spatially position the relaxosome at the cell membrane to stimulate substrate docking with PcfC, and (iii) PcfC initiates substrate transfer through the pCF10 T4S channel by an NTP-dependent mechanism. PMID:18326569

  11. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 2. Survival of Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis in aqueous extracts derived from six Mars analog soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Ming, Doug W.; Golden, D. C.

    2017-07-01

    The search for an extant microbiota on Mars depends on exploring sites that contain transient or permanent liquid water near the surface. Examples of possible sites for liquid water may be active recurring slope lineae (RSL) and fluid inclusions in ice or salt deposits. The presence of saline fluids on Mars will act to depress the freezing points of liquid water to as low as ‒60 °C, potentially permitting the metabolism and growth of halophilic microorganisms to temperatures significantly below the freezing point of pure water at 0 °C. In order to predict the potential risks of forward contamination by Earth microorganisms to subsurface sites on Mars with liquid brines, experiments were designed to characterize the short-term survival of two bacteria in aqueous soil solutions from six analog soils. The term ''soil'' is used here to denote any loose, unconsolidated matrix with no implications for the presence or absence of organics or biology. The analog soils were previously described (Schuerger et al., 2012, Planetary Space Sci., 72, 91-101), and represented crushed Basalt (benign control), Salt, Acid, Alkaline, Aeolian, and Phoenix analogs on Mars. The survival rates of spores of Bacillus subtilis and vegetative cells of Enterococcus faecalis were tested in soil solutions from each analog at 24, 0, or ‒70 °C for time periods up to 28 d. Survival of dormant spores of B. subtilis were mostly unaffected by incubation in the aqueous extracts of all six Mars analogs. In contrast, survival rates of E. faecalis cells were suppressed by all soil solutions when incubated at 24 °C but improved at 0 and ‒70 °C, except for assays in the Salt and Acid soil solutions in which most cells were killed. Results suggest that Earth microorganisms that form spores may persist in liquid brines on Mars better than non-spore forming species, and thus, spore-forming species may pose a potential forward contamination risk to sites with liquid brines.

  12. Effectiveness of a Lytic Phage SRG1 against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis in Compost and Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Rahmat Ullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus have become a major problem. Bacteriophage therapy is proposed as a potential alternative therapy. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria and are ubiquitous in nature. Lytic bacteriophage was isolated from sewage water that infects VREF, the causative agent of endocarditis, bacteraemia, and urinary tract infections (UTIs. The phage produced clear plaques with unique clear morphology and well-defined boundaries. TEM results of phage revealed it to be 108±0.2 nm long and 90±0.5 nm wide. The characterization of bacteriophage revealed that infection process of phage was calcium and magnesium dependent and phage titers were highest under optimum conditions for VREF, with an optimal temperature range of 37–50°C. The maximum growth was observed at 37°C, hence having 100% viability. The latent period for phage was small with a burst size of 512 viral particles per bacterial cell. The phage was tested against various clinical strains and results proved it to be host specific. It can be used as a potential therapeutic agent for VREF infections. The phage efficiently eradicated VREF inoculated in cattle compost, poultry compost, and a soil sample which makes it a potential agent for clearing compost and soil sample.

  13. Anti-breast cancer effects of live, heat-killed and cytoplasmic fractions of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus hominis isolated from human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zubaida; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Isa, Nurulfiza Mat

    2016-03-01

    Development of tumour that is resistant to chemotherapeutics and synthetic drugs, coupled with their life-threatening side effects and the adverse effects of surgery and hormone therapies, led to increased research on probiotics' anticancer potentials. The current study investigated the potential of live, heat-killed cells (HKC) and the cytoplasmic fractions (CF) of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus hominis as anti-breast cancer agents. MCF-7 cell line was treated with 25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/mL each of live, HKC and CF of the bacteria; and cytotoxicity was evaluated for 24, 48 and 72 h using MTT assay. The morphological features of the treated cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy. The stage of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometry. The bacterial effect on non-malignant breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, was assessed using MTT assay for 24, 48 and 72 h. All the three forms of the bacteria caused a significant decrease in MCF-7 (up to 33.29%) cell proliferation in concentration- and time-dependent manner. Morphological features of apoptosis like cell death, cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing were observed. Flow cytometry analyses suggested that about 34.60% of treated MCF-7 was undergoing apoptosis. A strong anti-proliferative activity was efficiently induced through sub-G1 accumulation (up to 83.17%) in treated MCF-7 and decreased number in the G0/G1 phase (74.39%). MCF-10A cells treated with both bacteria showed no significant difference with the untreated (>90% viability). These bacteria can be used as good alternative nutraceutical with promising therapeutic indexes for breast cancer because of their non-cytotoxic effects to normal cells.

  14. Specificity determinants of conjugative DNA processing in the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 and the Lactococcus lactis plasmid pRS01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuqing; Staddon, Jack H; Dunny, Gary M

    2007-03-01

    The DNA-processing region of the Enterococcus faecalis pheromone-responsive plasmid pCF10 is highly similar to that of the otherwise unrelated plasmid pRS01 from Lactococcus lactis. A transfer-proficient pRS01 derivative was unable to mobilize plasmids containing the pCF10 origin of transfer, oriT. In contrast, pRS01 oriT-containing plasmids could be mobilized by pCF10 at a low frequency. Relaxases PcfG and LtrB were both capable of binding to single-stranded oriT DNAs; LtrB was highly specific for its cognate oriT, whereas PcfG could recognize both pCF10 and pRS01 oriT. However, pcfG was unable to complement an ltrB insertion mutation. Genetic analysis showed that pcfF of pCF10 and ltrF of pRS01 are also essential for plasmid transfer. Purified PcfF and LtrF possess double-stranded DNA binding activities for the inverted repeat within either oriT sequence. PcfG and LtrB were recruited into their cognate F-oriT DNA complex through direct interactions with their cognate accessory protein. PcfG also could interact with LtrF when pCF10 oriT was present. In vivo cross-complementation analysis showed that ltrF partially restored the pCF10DeltapcfF mutant transfer ability when provided in trans, whereas pcfF failed to complement an ltrF mutation. Specificity of conjugative DNA processing in these plasmids involves both DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions.

  15. Enterococcus faecalis PrgJ, a VirB4-like ATPase, mediates pCF10 conjugative transfer through substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Alvarez-Martinez, Cristina; Chen, Yuqing; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Christie, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    The Enterococcus faecalis prg and pcf genes of plasmid pCF10 encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS) required for conjugative transfer. PrgJ is a member of the VirB4 family of ATPases that are universally associated with T4SSs. Here, we report that purified PrgJ dimers displayed ATP binding and hydrolysis activities. A PrgJ nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site mutation (K471E) slightly diminished ATP binding but abolished ATP hydrolysis in vitro and blocked pCF10 transfer in vivo. As shown with affinity pulldown assays, PrgJ and the K471E mutant protein interacted with the substrate receptor PcfC and with relaxase PcfG and accessory factor PcfF, which together form the relaxosome at the oriT sequence to initiate plasmid processing. The purified PrgJ and K471E proteins also bound single- and double-stranded DNA substrates without sequence specificity in vitro, and both PrgJ derivatives bound pCF10 in vivo by a mechanism dependent on an intact oriT sequence and cosynthesis of PcfC, PcfF, and PcfG, as shown by a formaldehyde-cross-linking assay. Our findings support a model in which the PcfC receptor coordinates with the PrgJ ATPase to drive early steps of pCF10 processing/transfer: (i) PcfC first binds the pCF10 relaxosome through contacts with PcfF, PcfG, and DNA; (ii) PcfC delivers the plasmid substrate to PrgJ; and (iii) PrgJ catalyzes substrate transfer to the membrane translocase. Substrate engagement with a VirB4-like subunit has not been previously described; consequently, our studies point to a novel function for these signature T4SS ATPases in mediating early steps of type IV secretion.

  16. Characterization of the chitinolytic machinery of Enterococcus faecalis V583 and high-resolution structure of its oxidative CBM33 enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Bøhle, Liv Anette; Gåseidnes, Sigrid; Dalhus, Bjørn; Bjørås, Magnar; Mathiesen, Geir; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2012-02-17

    Little information exists for the ability of enterococci to utilize chitin as a carbon source. We show that Enterococcus faecalis V583 can grow on chitin, and we describe two proteins, a family 18 chitinase (ef0361; EfChi18A) and a family 33 CBM (carbohydrate binding module) (ef0362; EfCBM33A) that catalyze chitin conversion in vitro. Various types of enzyme activity assays showed that EfChi18A has functional properties characteristic of an endochitinase. EfCBM33A belongs to a recently discovered family of enzymes that cleave glycosidic bonds via an oxidative mechanism and that act synergistically with classical hydrolytic enzymes (i.e., chitinases). The structure and function of this protein were probed in detail. An ultra-high-resolution crystal structure of EfCBM33A revealed details of a conserved binding surface that is optimized to interact with chitin and contains the catalytic center. Chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses of product formation showed that EfCBM33A cleaves chitin via the oxidative mechanism previously described for CBP21 from Serratia marcescens. Metal-depletion studies showed that EfCBM33A is a copper enzyme. In the presence of an external electron donor, EfCBM33A boosted the activity of EfChi18A, and combining the two enzymes led to rapid and complete conversion of β-chitin to chitobiose. This study provides insight into the structure and function of the CBM33 family of enzymes, which, together with their fungal counterpart called GH61, currently receive considerable attention in the biomass processing field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of sucrose on growth and sensitivity of Candida albicans alone and in combination with Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Fernanda Malagutti; Paula Ramos, Lucas De; Freire, Fernanda; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; de Oliveira, Ingrid Christine Barbosa; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Oliveira, Luciane Dias de

    2017-08-01

    This study has evaluated the effects of photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using erythrosine as photosensitizer and green light-emitting diode (LED) on biofilms of Candida albicans alone and in combination with Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans. We have also evaluated the effect of sucrose on biofilm formation and bacterial growth and sensitivity to PDI. Biofilms were formed in suspension of 10 6 cells/ml on plates before being grown in broth culture with and without sucrose and incubated for 48 h. Next, the treatment was applied using erythrosine at a concentration of 400 μM for 5 min and green LED (532 ± 10 nm) for 3 min on biofilms alone and in combination. The plates were washed and sonicated to disperse the biofilms, and serial dilutions were carried and aliquots seeded in Sabouraud agar before incubation for 48 h. Next, the colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml; log 10 ) were counted and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, P ≤ 0.05). Results show that S. mutans favors the growth of C. albicans in biofilms with sucrose, with treatment not being effective. However, when the biofilm was grown without sucrose, we found a reduction in biofilm formation and a significant decrease in the PDI treatment (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, both growth and sensitivity to PDI in biofilms of C. albicans are strongly influenced by bacterial combination, and the presence of sucrose affected directly the growth and sensitivity of the biofilm to PDI as sucrose is the substrate for construction of the exopolysaccharide matrix.

  18. A comparison between effect of photodynamic therapy by LED and calcium hydroxide therapy for root canal disinfection against Enterococcus faecalis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Ashraf, Hengameh; Rahmati, Afsaneh; Amini, Neda

    2017-03-01

    Insufficient root canal disinfection is one of the main reasons for persistent periapical pathology. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proven effective in disinfecting infected root canals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of photo activated disinfection (PAD) when using toluidine blue as photosensitizer and a LED lamp after the conventional treatment, and comparing it with calcium hydroxide therapy in vivo. This clinical trial includes 20 patients with molars requiring endodontic retreatment. After the conventional treatment, first microbiological samples were obtained using sterile rotary ProTaper F2 file and 3 paper points and transferred to a microbiology laboratory. Group 1 (n=10) specimens underwent PAD with photosensitizer (PS) solution (0.1mg/mL TB) and irradiation with Fotosan light emitting diode (LED) lamp (635nm, 200mW/cm2) for 60s. Creamy Ca(OH)2 paste was used in group 2 (n=10) for two weeks. A second sample was then obtained. The samples were cultured and then bacterial colonies were counted. Data included number of colony forming units (CFUs) before and after treatments, analyzed by t-test and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using SPSS vs.18. A significant difference between results of before and after treatment of both groups (calcium hydroxide therapy p=0.02therapy and PAD with LED irradiation was 10.1968 and 11.3773. After treatment, the mean numbers were 9.4202 and 8.3772, respectively. The difference in results after treatment between groups was significant (p=0.01therapy, as auxiliary methods adjunct to conventional root canal therapy, are both effective in root canal disinfection. In comparison with calcium hydroxide therapy, PAD leads to a greater reduction in enterococcus faecalis number in the infected root canals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative analysis of the biological and physical properties of Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage vB_EfaS_GEC-EfS_3 and Streptococcus mitis bacteriophage vB_SmM_GEC-SmitisM_2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigvava, Sophio; Tchgkonia, Irina; Jgenti, Darejan; Dvalidze, Teona; Carpino, James; Goderdzishvili, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mitis are common commensal inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. However, both species can be opportunistic pathogens and cause disease in nosocomial settings. These infections can be difficult to treat because of the frequency of antibiotic resistance among these strains. Bacteriophages are often suggested as an alternative therapeutic agent against these infections. In this study, E. faecalis and S. mitis strains were isolated from female patients with urinary tract infections. Bacteriophages active against these strains were isolated from sewage water from the Mtkvari River. Two phages, designated vB_EfaS_GEC-EfS_3 (Syphoviridae) and vB_SmM_GEC-SmitisM_2 (Myoviridae), were specific for E. faecalis and S. mitis, respectively. Each phage's growth patterns and adsorption rates were quantified. Sensitivity to ultraviolet light and temperature was determined, as was host range and serology. The S. mitis bacteriophage was found to be more resistant to ultraviolet light and exposure to high temperatures than the E. faecalis bacteriophage, despite having a much greater rate of replication. While each phage was able to infect a broad range of strains of the same species as the host species from which they were isolated, they were unable to infect other host species tested.

  20. Fractional maximal effect method for in vitro synergy between amoxicillin and ceftriaxone and between vancomycin and ceftriaxone against Enterococcus faecalis and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiolles, N; Piroth, L; Lequeu, C; Neuwirth, C; Portier, H; Chavanet, P

    2001-12-01

    In the present study we assessed the use of a new in vitro testing method and graphical representation of the results to investigate the potential effectiveness of combinations of amoxicillin (AMZ) plus ceftriaxone (CRO) and of CRO plus vancomycin (VAN) against strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae highly resistant to penicillin and cephalosporins (PRP strains). We used the fractional maximal effect (FME) method of time-kill curves to calculate adequate concentrations of the drugs to be tested rather than relying on arbitrary choices. The concentrations obtained, each of which corresponded to a fraction of the maximal effect, were tested alone and in combination with the bacterial strains in a broth medium. Synergy was defined as a ratio of observed effect/theoretical effect, called FME, of greater than 1, additivity was defined as an FME equal to 1, and antagonism was defined as an observed effect lower than the best effect of one of the antibiotics used alone. The area between antagonism and additivity is the indifference zone. The well-known synergy between amoxicillin and gentamicin against a reference strain of Enterococcus faecalis was confirmed, with a best FME equal to 1.07. Two strains of PRP, strains PRP-1 and PRP-2, were studied. The MICs for PRP-1 and PRP-2 were as follows: penicillin, 4 and 16 microg/ml, respectively; AMZ, 2 and 8 microg/ml, respectively, CRO, 1 and 4 microg/ml, respectively; and VAN, 0.5 and 0.25 microg/ml, respectively. For PRP-1 the best FME for the combination AMZ-CRO was 1.22 with drug concentrations of 1.68 mg/liter for AMZ and 0.17 mg/liter for CRO; the best FME for the combination VAN-CRO was 1.75 with VAN at 0.57 mg/liter and CRO at 0.17 mg/liter. For PRP-2 the best FME obtained for the combination AMZ-CRO was 1.05 with drug concentrations of 11.28 mg/liter for AMZ and 0.64 mg/liter for CRO; the best FME obtained for the combination VAN-CRO was 1.35 with VAN at 0.25 mg/liter and CRO at 1.49 mg/liter. These results demonstrated

  1. Combined effects of chitosan and microencapsulated Enterococcus faecalis CG1.0007 probiotic supplementation on performance and diarrhea incidences in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88+ challenged piglets

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    Kolawole Aluko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of chitosan oligosaccharide (COS and a microencapsulated Enterococcus faecalis CG1.0007 probiotic (PRO on growth performance and diarrhea incidences in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC K88+ challenged piglets in a 14-d study. Thirty piglets, 7.19 ± 0.52 kg initial BW weaned at 21 ± 1 d, were allotted to 5 treatment groups (n = 6 consisting of a corn–soybean meal diet with no additive (negative control, NC, NC + 0.25% chlortetracycline (positive control, PC, NC + 400 mg/kg COS (COS, NC + 100 mg/kg PRO (PRO and NC + a combination of COS and PRO (CPRO. Pigs were individually housed in cages, acclimated to treatments for a 7-d period and had ad libitum access to feed and water throughout the study. On d 8, pigs were weighed, blood samples were collected, and then orally challenged with 6 mL (1 × 1011 cfu/mL of freshly grown ETEC inoculum. During post-challenge period, blood was sampled at 24 and 48 h to determine plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, and diarrhea incidences and fecal consistency scores were recorded from d 9 to 12. On d 14, all pigs were weighed and then euthanized to obtain intestinal tissue samples for histomorphometric measurements. Growth performance responses were similar among treatments during the pre- and post-challenge periods. There were no significant differences in PUN content, incidences of diarrhea, and fecal consistency scores among treatments. The intestinal histomorphology results did not differ significantly among treatments except for PC with increased (P = 0.0001 villus:crypt ratio compared with the NC. Under the conditions of the present study, it can be concluded that supplementation of piglet diets with 400 mg/kg COS, 100 mg/kg microencapsulated PRO or their combination did not significantly improve piglet growth performance both during the pre- and post-ETEC K88+ oral inoculation. Also, there were no significant reduction

  2. The Impact of a 940 nm Diode Laser with Radial Firing Tip and Bare End Fiber Tip on Enterococcus faecalis in the Root Canal Wall Dentin of Bovine Teeth: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Lünzum, Ruth; Gutknecht, Norbert; Conrads, Georg; Franzen, Rene

    2017-07-01

    This in vitro study aimed to compare the bactericidal effect of two different laser delivery systems, a radial firing tip (RFT) and bare end fiber tip (BFT) used with the 940 nm diode laser on Enterococcus faecalis inoculated onto bovine radicular dentin. A total of 100 bovine dentin slices with a defined thickness of 500 and 1000 μm were prepared. They were assigned into four test groups together with untreated samples served as control for each slice thickness. The slices were inoculated on one side with 1 μL E. faecalis suspension and laser irradiation was performed indirectly on the opposite side with the 940 nm diode laser delivered with a 200 μm RFT and a BFT at 1 and 1.5 W in continuous wave mode for 8 sec per cycle and repeated four times. After irradiation, the remaining bacteria were detached and the produced suspension was diluted and plated onto blood agar plates with 5% sheep blood and incubated overnight at 37°C in a CO 2 -rich atmosphere. The colony-forming units of E. faecalis were counted and the bacterial reduction was analyzed. The diode laser equipped with RFT fiber design further reduced the number of vital E. faecalis cells significantly compared with BFT design, regardless of the used power and dentin thickness (p diode laser in conjugation with RFT showed a satisfactory bactericidal effect without any thermal side effect to the tooth-supporting tissues.

  3. A comparison of the antibacterial activity of the two methods of photodynamic therapy (using diode laser 810 nm and LED lamp 630 nm) against Enterococcus faecalis in extracted human anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Asadi, Zahra; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Maleki, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Failure of endodontic treatment is usually due to an inadequate disinfection of the root canal system. Enterococcus faecalis has been widely used as a valuable microbiological marker for in-vitro studies because of its ability to colonize in a biofilm like style in root canals, invading dentinal tubules and resistance to some endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of two methods of photodynamic therapy using a light emitting diode lamp (LED lamp, 630 nm) and a diode laser (810 nm) on E. faecalis biofilms in anterior extracted human teeth. Fifty six single-rooted extracted teeth were used in this study. After routine root canal cleansing, shaping and sterilization, the teeth were incubated with E. faecalis for a period of two weeks. Teeth were then divided into two experimental groups (nu=23) and two control groups (nu=5). Teeth in one experimental group were exposed to a diode laser (810 nm), and in the other group samples were exposed to a LED lamp (630 nm). Intracanal bacterial sampling was done, and bacterial survival rate was then evaluated for each group. The Colony Forming Unit (CFU) in LED group (log10 CFUs=4.88±0.82) was significantly lower than the laser group (log CFUs=5.49±0.71) (p value=0.021). CFUs in positive control group (Log10 CFUs=10.96±0.44) were significantly higher than the treatment group (p˂0.001). No bacterial colony was found in negative control group. The results of this research show that photodynamic therapy could be an effective supplement in root canal disinfection. PDT using LED lamp was more effective than diode laser 810 nm in reducing CFUs of E. faecalis in human teeth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative evaluation of calcium hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite associated with passive ultrasonic irrigation on antimicrobial activity of a root canal system infected with Enterococcus faecalis: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ana Paula; Souza, Matheus Albino; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Dal Bello, Yuri; Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare in vitro the effectiveness of calcium hypochlorite (Ca[OCl]2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) associated with passive ultrasonic irrigation in root canals of bovine teeth infected with Enterococcus faecalis. The root canals of 60 single-rooted bovine extracted teeth were enlarged up to a file 45, autoclaved, inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis, and incubated for 30 days. The samples were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) according to the protocol for decontamination: G1: no treatment; G2: distilled water; G3: 2.5% NaOCl; G4: 2.5% Ca(OCl)2; G5: 2.5% NaOCl with ultrasonic activation; and G6: 2.5% Ca(OCl)2 with ultrasonic activation (US). Microbiological testing (colony-forming unit [CFU] counting) was performed to evaluate and show, respectively, the effectiveness of the proposed treatments. Data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance followed by the post hoc Tukey test (α = 0.05). Groups 1 and 2 showed the highest mean contamination (3.26 log10 CFU/mL and 2.69 log10 CFU/mL, respectively), which was statistically different from all other groups (P < .05). Group 6 (Ca[OCl]2 + US) showed the lowest mean contamination (1.00 log10 CFU/mL), with no statistically significant difference found in groups 3 (NaOCl), 4 (Ca[OCl]2), and 5 (NaOCl + US) (P < .05). Ca(OCl)2 as well as passive ultrasonic irrigation can aid in chemomechanical preparation, contributing in a significant way to the reduction of microbial content during root canal treatment. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An in vitro comparative evaluation of the antibacterial efficacy of 10% metronidazole gel, 2% chlorhexidine gel, and a combination of calcium hydroxide and 2% chlorhexidine gel against Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Nagendra Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A major objective in endodontic therapy is to disinfect the root canal system prior to obturation. This is because the residual root canal infection can sustain persistent or recurrent periapical disease. Hence, the use of an intracanal medicament between appointments helps in the elimination of bacteria that remain even after cleaning and shaping. The objective of this in vitro study is to compare the antibacterial efficacy of 10% metronidazole gel, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX gel, and a combination of calcium hydroxide and 2% CHX gel against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis using a culture technique. Materials and Methods: The study included 40 single-rooted, human permanent teeth, -extracted for periodontal or other reasons. Conventional access to the root canals was obtained using access preparation burs in a high speed handpiece. The working length was determined using the Ingle′s radiographic method and the canals were instrumented using a Step-back technique with K-files, up to size 40, at the apex and irrigated with 1 ml of 2.5% Sodium hypochlorite and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid gel. The root canals were filled with a sterile Casein Soya meal peptone solution (CSL and autoclaved twice for 30 minutes at 121°C. An inoculum of E. faecalis was injected into the canals using a sterile syringe and it was incubated aerobically at 37°C for nine days. The specimens were then randomly divided into three experimental groups (10% metronidazole gel, 2% CHX gel, and a combination of calcium hydroxide and 2% CHX gel and one control group, each containing 10 samples. Following this, the canals were cleaned using an ultrasonically activated No.15 K-file, along with sodium -hypochlorite irrigation. After medicament removal, each root canal was prepared manually with a new size 40 hedstrom file. The colony forming units per millimeter were determined by the standard laboratory methods. The obtained data was subjected to

  6. A Comparison of Er:YAG Laser with Photon-Initiated Photoacoustic Streaming, Nd:YAG Laser, and Conventional Irrigation on the Eradication of Root Dentinal Tubule Infection by Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

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    Burcu Ozses Ozkaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of Er:YAG laser activation with photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS, Nd:YAG laser disinfection, and conventional irrigation on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Biofilms were grown on 110 root halves and divided into the following: Groups 1 and 2 (saline and 1% NaOCl with apical position of PIPS, resp., Groups 3 and 4 (saline and 1% NaOCl with coronal position of PIPS, resp., Groups 5 and 6 (Nd:YAG laser after saline and 1% NaOCl irrigation, resp. and Groups 7, 8, and 9 (conventional irrigation with 1% NaOCl, 6% NaOCl, and saline, resp.. SEM images of the apical, middle, and coronal levels were examined using a scoring system. Score differences between Groups 1 and 2 were insignificant at all levels in the remaining biofilm. Group 4 had significantly greater bacterial elimination than Group 3 at all levels. Differences in Nd:YAG laser irradiation between Groups 5 and 6 were insignificant. Groups 7 and 8 were insignificantly different, except at the middle level. Saline group had a higher percentage of biofilms than the others. In this study, PIPS activation with NaOCl eliminates more E. faecalis biofilms in all root canals regardless of the position of the fiber tip.

  7. Comparative Genomics of Enterococci: Variation in Enterococcus faecalis, Clade Structure in E. faecium, and Defining Characteristics of E. gallinarum and E. casseliflavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kelli L.; Godfrey, Paul; Griggs, Allison; Kos, Veronica N.; Zucker, Jeremy; Desjardins, Christopher; Cerqueira, Gustavo; Gevers, Dirk; Walker, Suzanne; Wortman, Jennifer; Feldgarden, Michael; Haas, Brian; Birren, Bruce; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The enterococci are Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tracts of diverse hosts. However, Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis have emerged as leading causes of multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired infections. The mechanism by which a well-adapted commensal evolved into a hospital pathogen is poorly understood. In this study, we examined high-quality draft genome data for evidence of key events in the evolution of the leading causes of enterococcal infections, including E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. casseliflavus, and E. gallinarum. We characterized two clades within what is currently classified as E. faecium and identified traits characteristic of each, including variation in operons for cell wall carbohydrate and putative capsule biosynthesis. We examined the extent of recombination between the two E. faecium clades and identified two strains with mosaic genomes. We determined the underlying genetics for the defining characteristics of the motile enterococci E. casseliflavus and E. gallinarum. Further, we identified species-specific traits that could be used to advance the detection of medically relevant enterococci and their identification to the species level. PMID:22354958

  8. Genome sequence of Enterococcus hirae (Streptococcus faecalis) ATCC 9790, a model organism for the study of ion transport, bioenergetics, and copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaechter, Thomas; Wunderlin, Christof; Schmidheini, Tobias; Solioz, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has been used in basic research for over 4 decades. Here we report the sequence and annotation of the 2.8-Mb genome of E. hirae and its endemic 29-kb plasmid pTG9790.

  9. Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis DNA in blood to diagnose bacteremia in patients in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Remco P. H.; van Agtmael, Michiel A.; Gierveld, Sonja; Danner, Sven A.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Direct detection of bacterial DNA in blood offers a fast alternative to blood culture and is presumably unaffected by the prior use of antibiotics. We evaluated the performance of two real-time PCR assays for the quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and for Enterococcus

  10. Effect of a passive sonic irrigation system on elimination of Enterococcus faecalis from root canal systems of primary teeth, using different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite: An in vitro evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Afshari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. This in vitro study aimed to compare the antibacterial effect of different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite on elimination of Enterococcus faecalis from root canal systems of primary teeth with or without a passive sonic irrigation system (EndoActivator. Methods. The root canals of 120 extracted single-rooted primary incisors were prepared using the crown-down technique. The teeth were autoclaved and inoculated with E. faecalis. The infected samples were then randomly divided into 6 experimental groups of 15 and positive and negative control groups as follows: group 1: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; group 2: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; group 3: 5% sodium hypochlorite solution; group 4: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution + sonic activation; group 5: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution + sonic activation; and group 6: 5% sodium hypochlorite solution + sonic activation. Microbiological samples were collected before and after disinfection procedures and the colony-forming units were counted. Statistical analyses were performed using the two-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests in cases of significant difference. Results. There were no significant differences between the groups in any of the variables (concentration of antiseptic or use of sonic irrigation system. Conclusion. Use of passive sonic irrigation systems in endodontic treatment of single-rooted primary teeth is of no benefit compared to regular needle irrigation. The results of this study also recommends use of lower concentrations of sodium hypochlorite solution (0.5% for irrigation of the root canal system rather than higher concentrations given approximately equal efficacy.

  11. Humoral immunity to commensal oral bacteria in human infants: salivary secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies reactive with Streptococcus mitis biovar 1, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans, and Enterococcus faecalis during the first two years of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M F; Bryan, S; Evans, M K; Pearce, C L; Sheridan, M J; Sura, P A; Wientzen, R L; Bowden, G H

    1999-04-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies reactive with the pioneer oral streptococci Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 and Streptococcus oralis, the late oral colonizer Streptococcus mutans, and the pioneer enteric bacterium Enterococcus faecalis in saliva samples from 10 human infants from birth to age 2 years were analyzed. Low levels of salivary SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with whole cells of all four species were detected within the first month after birth, even though S. mutans and E. faecalis were not recovered from the mouths of the infants during the study period. Although there was a fivefold increase in the concentration of SIgA between birth and age 2 years, there were no differences between the concentrations of SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with the four species over this time period. When the concentrations of SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with all four species were normalized to the concentrations of SIgA1 and SIgA2 in saliva, SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with these bacteria showed a significant decrease from birth to 2 years of age. Adsorption of each infant's saliva with cells of one species produced a dramatic reduction of antibodies recognizing the other three species. Sequential adsorption of saliva samples removed all SIgA antibody to the bacteria, indicating that the SIgA antibodies were directed to antigens shared by all four species. The induction by the host of a limited immune response to common antigens that are likely not involved in adherence may be among the mechanisms that commensal streptococci employ to persist in the oral cavity.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of natural extracts of Morinda citrifolia, papain and aloe vera (all in gel formulation), 2% chlorhexidine gel and calcium hydroxide, against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anuj; Ballal, Suma; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Aim: A comparative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of natural extracts of Morinda citrifolia, papain, and aloe vera (all in gel formulations), 2% chlorhexidine gel and calcium hydroxide, against Enterococcus faecalis—an in vitro study. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial efficacy was assessed in vitro using dentin shavings collected at 2 depths of 200 and 400 μm. The total colony forming units at the end of 1, 3, and 5 days were assessed. Results: The overall percentage inhibition of bacterial growth (200 and 400 μm depth) was 100% with chlorhexidine gel. This was followed by M. citrifolia gel (86.02%), which showed better antimicrobial efficacy as compared with aloe vera gel (78.9%), papain gel (67.3%), and calcium hydroxide (64.3%). There was no statistical difference between data at 200 and 400 μm depth. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine gel showed the maximum antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis, whereas calcium hydroxide showed the least. Among the natural intracanal medicaments, M. citrifolia gel consistently exhibited good inhibition up to the 5th day followed by aloe vera gel and papain gel. PMID:22876022

  13. Detection of linezolid resistance due to the optrA gene in Enterococcus faecalis from poultry meat from the American continent (Colombia)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Bernal, J F; Zankari, Ea

    2017-01-01

    Three Enterococcus isolates obtained from retail chicken collected in 2010-11 as part of the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (COIPARS) showed reduced susceptibility towards linezolid (MIC 8 mg/L). This study aimed at characterizing the isolates resistant...... to linezolid and detecting the resistance mechanism. Strains were analysed in 2011-12 without successful detection of the resistance mechanism. All isolates were found negative for the cfr gene and no 23S rRNA mutations were detected. In 2016, with the novel resistance gene optrA being described, the WGS data......A gene encoding resistance to linezolid and phenicols. Additional screening of 37 enterococci strains from the same study did not detect any further positives. Typing showed that two of the isolates belong to ST59, while the last belongs to ST489. All isolates carry genes encoding resistance to macrolide...

  14. Investigations of the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis in an experimental footpad infection model in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Ida; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Poulsen, Louise Ladefoged

    2016-01-01

    in the central foot pad. Birds underwent full post mortem and bacteriological investigation 3, 7 and 14 days after infection. Inoculation of the S. aureus resulted in systemic lesions (sepsis, endocarditis and arthritis) as well as injection site abscesses. The lesions and bacterial re-isolation in the birds......In broiler breeder flocks an increase in mortality due to septicaemic infections may be observed over time, with sepsis, endocarditis and arthritis as the major manifestations. Additionally footpad integrity is seen to decline throughout the production period with suboptimal litter quality...... and heavy breeds as predisposing factors. Although the pathogenesis of these infections is not fully elucidated, the aetiology is often Gram positive cocci, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. It is hypothesized that footpad lesions serve as port of entry for systemic or localised bacterial...

  15. Susceptibility to disinfectants in antimicrobial-resistant and -susceptible isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from poultry-ESBL/AmpC-phenotype of E. coli is not associated with resistance to a quaternary ammonium compound, DDAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, N; Boss, J; Lettmann, S; Fritz, B; Schwaiger, K; Bauer, J; Hölzel, C S

    2017-06-01

    The spread of bacteria that are simultaneously resistant to disinfectants and antimicrobials would constitute an unsettling scenario. In order to explore an association between antimicrobial resistance and reduced susceptibility to biocides/microbicides (disinfectants) in agriculture, we investigated Escherichia coli (n = 438) and enterococci (n = 120) isolated from six different flocks of the same poultry farm with known history of antimicrobial treatment. Susceptibility to disinfectants (formic acid and a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), didecyldimethylammoniumchloride-DDAC) was assessed by macrodilution according to guidelines of the German Veterinary Society. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were screened (i) for reduced biocide susceptibility and (ii) for an association of biocide susceptibility and antimicrobial resistance including the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and the hyperproduction of AmpC-type beta-lactamases. DDAC inhibited ESBL/AmpC(hyper)-producing E. coli (n = 53) from poultry at similar or slightly lower inhibitory concentrations, compared with non-ESBL/AmpC strains (median MIC = 0·36 vs 1·44 mg l -1 ). In contrast, DDAC-MICs were positively correlated with several other antibiotic MICs (e.g. piperacillin and sulphamethoxazole + trimethoprim in E. coli, chloramphenicol in E. faecalis) and increased DDAC-MICs were statistically linked to high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci (streptomycin high level). DDAC-MICs did not correlate with the presence of the integron marker qacEDelta1. This study provides indication that residual disinfectant might be able to select antimicrobial-resistant enterococci, but not ESBL-/AmpC (hyper)producing E. coli from poultry. While ESBL-/AmpC-E. coli were inhibited at disinfectant concentrations comparable to or lower than wildtype values, low concentrations of QACs might be able to select other antimicrobial-resistant E

  16. Çiğ Sütten İzole Edilen Enterosin B Üreticisi Enterococcus Faecalis Mye58 Suşunun Güvenlik Değerlendirmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Tuncer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmada, çiğ sütten izole edilen bakteriyosin üreticisi Enterococcus faecalis MYE58’de enterosin, virülens faktör ve vankomisin direnç genlerinin varlığını araştırdık. Ayrıca, bu suşun hemolitik aktivite, jelatinaz üretimi ve antibiyotik dirençlilik özelliklerini de test ettik. MYE58 suşunun Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus ve Staphylococcus aureus gibi Gram pozitif bakterileri inhibe ettiği belirlenmiştir. MYE58 suşunda enterosin B yapısal geninin (entB varlığı tespit edilmiştir. MYE58 suşu hemoliz ve jalatinaz aktivitesi göstermemiştir. MYE58 suşunda gelE ve espfs genlerinin varlığı tespit edilmiş fakat agg, ace, efaAfs, ccf, cob, cpd, cat, cylM, cylB, cylA, vanA ve vanB genlerinin varlığı tespit edilmemiştir. MYE58 suşu streptomisin ve tetrasikline dirençli bulunmuştur. Bu çalışmanın sonuçları, enterosin B üreticisi E. faecalis MYE58 suşunun starter kültür olarak kullanılmasının tüketici sağlığı açısından risk teşkil edebileceğini göstermiştir. Ancak, MYE58 suşu tarafından üretilen enterosin B’nin saflaştırılmış veya kısmi saflaştırılmış preparatlarının Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus'e Staphylococcus aureus’a karşı gıda muhafazasında kullanılabilme potansiyeli vardır.

  17. The All-Alpha Domains of Coupling Proteins from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB/VirD4 and Enterococcus faecalis pCF10-Encoded Type IV Secretion Systems Confer Specificity to Binding of Cognate DNA Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Neal; Chen, Yuqing; Jakubowski, Simon J; Sarkar, Mayukh K; Li, Feng; Christie, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) bind and mediate the delivery of DNA substrates through associated type IV secretion systems (T4SSs). T4CPs consist of a transmembrane domain, a conserved nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), and a sequence-variable helical bundle called the all-alpha domain (AAD). In the T4CP structural prototype, plasmid R388-encoded TrwB, the NBD assembles as a homohexamer resembling RecA and DNA ring helicases, and the AAD, which sits at the channel entrance of the homohexamer, is structurally similar to N-terminal domain 1 of recombinase XerD. Here, we defined the contributions of AADs from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirD4 and Enterococcus faecalis PcfC T4CPs to DNA substrate binding. AAD deletions abolished DNA transfer, whereas production of the AAD in otherwise wild-type donor strains diminished the transfer of cognate but not heterologous substrates. Reciprocal swaps of AADs between PcfC and VirD4 abolished the transfer of cognate DNA substrates, although strikingly, the VirD4-AADPcfC chimera (VirD4 with the PcfC AAD) supported the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid. Purified AADs from both T4CPs bound DNA substrates without sequence preference but specifically bound cognate processing proteins required for cleavage at origin-of-transfer sequences. The soluble domains of VirD4 and PcfC lacking their AADs neither exerted negative dominance in vivo nor specifically bound cognate processing proteins in vitro. Our findings support a model in which the T4CP AADs contribute to DNA substrate selection through binding of associated processing proteins. Furthermore, MOBQ plasmids have evolved a docking mechanism that bypasses the AAD substrate discrimination checkpoint, which might account for their capacity to promiscuously transfer through many different T4SSs. For conjugative transfer of mobile DNA elements, members of the VirD4/TraG/TrwB receptor superfamily bind cognate DNA substrates through mechanisms that are largely undefined. Here

  18. Intestinal translocation of clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in a rat model of bacterial colonization and liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M van der Heijden

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to develop a rat model of gastrointestinal colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing E. coli and to evaluate intestinal translocation to blood and tissues after total and partial hepatic ischemia. Methods - We developed a model of rat colonization with VRE and ESBL-E coli. Then we studied four groups of colonized rats: Group I (with hepatic pedicle occlusion causing complete liver ischemia and intestinal stasis; Group II (with partial liver ischemia without intestinal stasis; Group III (surgical manipulation without hepatic ischemia or intestinal stasis; Group IV (anesthetized without surgical manipulation. After sacrifice, portal and systemic blood, large intestine, small intestine, spleen, liver, lungs, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured. Endotoxin concentrations in portal and systemic blood were determined. Results - The best inocula were: VRE: 2.4×10(10 cfu and ESBL-E. coli: 1.12×10(10 cfu. The best results occurred 24 hours after inoculation and antibiotic doses of 750 µg/mL of water for vancomycin and 2.1 mg/mL for ceftriaxone. There was a significantly higher proportion of positive cultures for ESBL-E. coli in the lungs in Groups I, II and III when compared with Group IV (67%; 60%; 75% and 13%, respectively; p:0.04. VRE growth was more frequent in mesenteric lymph nodes for Groups I (67% and III (38% than for Groups II (13% and IV (none (p:0.002. LPS was significantly higher in systemic blood of Group I (9.761 ± 13.804 EU/mL-p:0.01. No differences for endotoxin occurred in portal blood. Conclusion -We developed a model of rats colonized with resistant bacteria useful to study intestinal translocation. Translocation occurred in surgical procedures with and without hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and probably occurred via the bloodstream. Translocation was probably lymphatic in the ischemia-reperfusion groups

  19. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  20. degradation by Enterococcus faecalis and Burkholderia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... because of the difficulty to digest lipid substances. So far, many investigations have been realized on microbial degradation of lipids under anaerobic conditions (Ahring,. 2003). In an anaerobic environment, lipids are first hydrolyzed by extracellular lipase to produce glycerol and long-chain fatty acids ...

  1. Phenotypic characterisation of Enterococcus spp. from femoral head necrosis lesions of chickens

    OpenAIRE

    OKTAY, Nevin; TEMELLİ, Seran; ÇARLI, Kamil Tayfun

    2009-01-01

    Two types of Enterococcus species were isolated from femoral head necrosis lesions of chickens. A total of 150 femoral articular tissues, of which 121 were from commercial broilers, 18 from broiler breeders, and 11 from layer breeders, were sampled. Out of 48 Enterococcus isolates of these clinical samples, 37 and 11 isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, respectively. Additionally, 42 (28%) Escherichia coli and 33 (22%) Staphylococcus aureus isolates were...

  2. Horizontal transfer of tet(M) and erm(B) resistance plasmids from food strains of Lactobacillus plantarum to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Louise; Wilcks, Andrea; Hammer, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Two wild-type strains of Lactobacillus plantarum previously isolated from fermented dry sausages were analysed for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gastrointestinal tract. For this purpose, we used gnotobiotic rats as an in vivo model. Rats were initially inoculated......(2) CFU g(-1) faeces towards the end of the experiment. For erm(B)-TCs, the number was significantly higher and increased to c. 10(3) CFU g(-1) faeces. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing in vivo transfer of wild-type antibiotic resistance plasmids from L. plantarum to E. faecalis....

  3. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility in clinical isolates of Enterococcus species

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Jaimes Ernesto; Arredondo-García José Luis; Aguilar-Ituarte Felipe; García-Roca Pilar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the antimicrobial activity of several antimicrobial agents against 97 clinical significant isolates of Enterococcus spp. MATHERIAL AND METHODS: During a 2-year prospective study at Instituto Nacional de Pediatria (National Institute of Pediatrics) in Mexico City. Ninety seven strains of Enterococcus spp. (60 E. faecalis and 37 E. faecium) were tested against 11 antibiotics. Susceptibility tests were performed with agar, according to the standards of the sNational Commit...

  4. Enterococcus faecium small colony variant endocarditis in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hernández Egido

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small colony variants (SCV are slow-growing subpopulations of bacteria usually associated with auxotrophism, causing persistent or recurrent infections. Enterococcus faecalis SCV have been seldom described, and only one case of Enterococcus faecium SCV has been reported, associated with sepsis in a leukaemia patient. Here we report the first case described of bacteraemia and endocarditis by SCV E. faecium in an immunocompetent patient.

  5. Characterization of Monolaurin Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Muriel; Manson, Janet M.; Bremer, Philip J.; Dufour, Jean-Pierre; Cook, Gregory M.; Simmonds, Robin S.

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in domestically farmed animals, which may act as reservoirs and vehicles of transmission for drug-resistant enterococci to humans, resulting in serious infections. In order to assess the potential for the use of monolaurin as a food preservative, it is important to understand both its target and potential mechanisms of resistance. A Tn917 mutant library of Enterococcus faecalis AR01/DGVS was screened for re...

  6. A rapid PCR based method to distinguish between Enterococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... by using Efm1/Efm2, Efs1/Efs2 and Eh1/Eh2 primers, ten different genotypes were recognised. Enterococcus faecium was the dominant biotype followed by E. faecalis. The results suggest that wild bacterial populations should be preserved in order to protect the traditional lactic fermentation and for product innovation.

  7. First isolation of Enterococcus strains in pig faeces in Turkey and determination of antibiotic susceptibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Metiner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this trial, Enterococcus strains were isolated from a total of 69 faecal samples obtained from 238 pigs (105 pigs 6 months old on three pig farms located in Istanbul and Tekirdag Provinces in the Marmara Region of Turkey in the summer season of 2003. Forty-seven of the isolates were determined as Enterococcus faecium (68%, 15 isolates as Enterococcus faecalis (21.7%, three isolates as Enterococcus gallinarum (4.3% and one of each as Enterococcus hirae (1.4%, Enterococcus casseliflavus (1.4%, Enterococcus cecorum (1.4% and Enterococcus sulfurens (1.4%. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibilites of isolates were assessed through the disk diffusion method. Among 47 E. faecium isolates, 44 were determined to be resistant to erythromycin, 38 to ciprofloxacine, and three isolates were resistant to vancomycin. All E. faecalis isolates were resistant to erythromycin (100% and four were resistant to vancomycin (27%. Five E. faecium (11% and five E. faecalis isolates (33% were found to exhibit intermediate resistance to vancomycin. In this study, isolates obtained from pig faeces were determined to exhibit a high rate of antimicrobial resistance. This study is the first report on isolation and determination of antimicrobial resistance of Enterocci in Turkey.

  8. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility in clinical isolates of Enterococcus species Susceptibilidad antimicrobiana in vitro en aislamientos clínicos de Enterococcus species

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Calderón-Jaimes; José Luis Arredondo-García; Felipe Aguilar-Ituarte; Pilar García-Roca

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the antimicrobial activity of several antimicrobial agents against 97 clinical significant isolates of Enterococcus spp. MATHERIAL AND METHODS: During a 2-year prospective study at Instituto Nacional de Pediatria (National Institute of Pediatrics) in Mexico City. Ninety seven strains of Enterococcus spp. (60 E. faecalis and 37 E. faecium) were tested against 11 antibiotics. Susceptibility tests were performed with agar, according to the standards of the sNational Commit...

  9. Eight-year Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance among Enterococcus Spp. Isolated in the First Bethune Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Qi

    This study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus spp. isolated in 8 consecutive years in the First Bethune Hospital. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Most of 1446 strains of Enterococcus spp. were collected from urine 640 (44.3%), sputum 315 (21.8%), secretions and pus 265 (18.3%) during the past 8 years. The rates of high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were 57.4%∼75.9% and 69.0%∼93.8% during the past 8 years, respectively. No Enterococcus spp. was resistant to vancomycin. The antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus spp. had increased in recent 8 years. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to direct rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  10. Diversity, distribution and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus spp. recovered from tomatoes, leaves, water and soil on U.S. Mid-Atlantic farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Shirley A; Goldstein, Rachel E Rosenberg; George, Ashish; Ewing, Laura; Tall, Ben D; Boyer, Marc S; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic-resistant enterococci are important opportunistic pathogens and have been recovered from retail tomatoes. However, it is unclear where and how tomatoes are contaminated along the farm-to-fork continuum. Specifically, the degree of pre-harvest contamination with enterococci is unknown. We evaluated the prevalence, diversity and antimicrobial susceptibilities of enterococci collected from tomato farms in the Mid-Atlantic United States. Tomatoes, leaves, groundwater, pond water, irrigation ditch water, and soil were sampled and tested for enterococci using standard methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Sensititre microbroth dilution system. Enterococcus faecalis isolates were characterized using amplified fragment length polymorphism to assess dispersal potential. Enterococci (n = 307) occurred in all habitats and colonization of tomatoes was common. Seven species were identified: Enterococcus casseliflavus, E. faecalis, Enterococcus gallinarum, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus avis, Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus raffinosus. E. casseliflavus predominated in soil and on tomatoes and leaves, and E. faecalis predominated in pond water. On plants, distance from the ground influenced presence of enterococci. E. faecalis from samples within a farm were more closely related than those from samples between farms. Resistance to rifampicin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin was prevalent. Consumption of raw tomatoes as a potential exposure risk for antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus spp. deserves further attention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Man-Kwang; Kim, Young-Eun; Rho, Hyun-In; Kim, Tae-Rahk; Kim, Yoon-Bum; Sung, Won-Kyung; Kim, Taw-Woo; Kim, Dae-Ok; Kang, Hee

    2017-06-28

    A rise in the occurrence of allergic diseases is attributed to the dysregulated balance of type 1/type 2 immunity, where type 2 T-helper (Th2) cells predominate over type 1 T-helper (Th1) cells, leading to an abnormally increased production of IgE in response to unharmful antigens. Kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food, is a rich source of beneficial lactic acid bacteria. In this study, we investigated the ability of Enterococcus faecium FC-K derived from kimchi to induce type I immunity in the presence of Th2 polarizing conditions in vitro and in vivo. Stimulation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with E. faecium FC-K induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-12. Under the in vitro Th2 conditions in which splenic T cells were activated in the presence of IL-4, E. faecium FC-K enhanced the ability of T cells to produce interferon (IFN)-γ. Using the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergy model, male BALB/c mice receiving E. faecium FC-K reduced the serum level of total IgE, but not that of OVA-specific IgE. Furthermore, the population of activated splenic B cells during OVA immunization was decreased in E. faecium FC-K-treated mice, accounting for a reduction of total IgE in the serum. Restimulating splenocytes from OVA-immunized mice with OVA ex vivo resulted in an increased production of IFN-γ, with no effect on IL-4, in E. faecium FC-Ktreated mice. These observations provide the evidence that E. faecium FC-K can be a beneficial probiotic strain that can modulate the Th2-mediated pathologic response.

  12. Characterization of Monolaurin Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Muriel; Manson, Janet M.; Bremer, Philip J.; Dufour, Jean-Pierre; Cook, Gregory M.; Simmonds, Robin S.

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in domestically farmed animals, which may act as reservoirs and vehicles of transmission for drug-resistant enterococci to humans, resulting in serious infections. In order to assess the potential for the use of monolaurin as a food preservative, it is important to understand both its target and potential mechanisms of resistance. A Tn917 mutant library of Enterococcus faecalis AR01/DGVS was screened for resistance (MIC, >100 μg/ml) to monolaurin. Three mutants were identified as resistant to monolaurin and were designated DGRM2, DGRM5, and DGRM12. The gene interrupted in all three mutants was identified as traB, which encodes an E. faecalis pheromone shutdown protein and whose complementation in trans restored monolaurin sensitivity in all three mutants. DGRM2 was selected for further characterization. E. faecalis DGRM2 showed increased resistance to gentamicin and chloramphenicol (inhibitors of protein synthesis), while no difference in the MIC was observed with the cell wall-active antibiotics penicillin and vancomycin. E. faecalis AR01/DGVS and DGRM2 were shown to have similar rates (30% cell lysis after 4 h) of cell autolytic activity when activated by monolaurin. Differences in cell surface hydrophobicity were observed between the wild type and the mutant, with the cell surface of the parent strain being significantly more hydrophobic. Analysis of the cell wall structure of DGRM2 by transmission electron microscopy revealed an increase in the apparent cell wall thickness and contraction of its cytoplasm. Taken together, these results suggest that the increased resistance of DGRM2 was due to a change in cell surface hydrophobicity, consequently limiting the diffusion of monolaurin to a potential target in the cytoplasmic membrane and/or cytoplasm of E. faecalis. PMID:17630314

  13. High incidence of oligozoospermia and teratozoospermia in human semen infected with the aerobic bacterium Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, R H; Sridhar, H; Vijay Kumar, B R; Anand Kumar, T C

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial culture of semen samples from 100 male partners in infertile couples revealed the presence of aerobic bacteria in 49 cases. Streptococcus faecalis (Enterococcus) was isolated from 53%, micrococci species from 20% and alpha-haemolytic streptococci from 16% of the infected samples. The incidence of oligozoospermia and teratozoospermia was significantly (P faecalis than those whose semen samples contained micrococci or alpha-haemolytic streptococci or those that did not contain bacteria. The mean sperm concentration, as well as the mean percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa, was significantly (P faecalis compared with that containing micrococci or alpha-haemolytic streptococci and the uninfected samples. There is a high incidence of semen infection with S. faecalis, and it is associated with compromised semen quality in terms of sperm concentration and morphology. The presence of micrococci or alpha-haemolytic streptococci does not appear to have any detrimental effect on sperm quality.

  14. Enterococcus infection biology: lessons from invertebrate host models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Grace J; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2014-03-01

    The enterococci are commensals of the gastrointestinal tract of many metazoans, from insects to humans. While they normally do not cause disease in the intestine, they can become pathogenic when they infect sites outside of the gut. Recently, the enterococci have become important nosocomial pathogens, with the majority of human enterococcal infections caused by two species, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Studies using invertebrate infection models have revealed insights into the biology of enterococcal infections, as well as general principles underlying host innate immune defense. This review highlights recent findings on Enterococcus infection biology from two invertebrate infection models, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella and the free-living bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  15. Antibacterial effects of Pluchea indica Less leaf extract on E. faecalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agni Febrina Pargaputri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus. faecalis (E. faecalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum are the most common bacteria found in infected tooth root canal. Most of these bacteria often cause failure in endodontic treatments. Pluchea indica Less leaf is a species of plants that has several chemical properties. It consists of flavonoids, tannins, polyphenols, and essensial oils which have been reported as antibacterial agents. Because of its benefits, the extract of Pluchea indica Less leaves may be potentially developed as one of root canal sterilization dressing. Purpose: This study aimed to determine antibacterial activity of Pluchea indica Less leaves extract against E. faecalis and F. nucleatum bacteria. Method: Dilution method was conducted first to show Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extract against E. faecalis and F. nucleatum. The antibacterial activity test on Pluchea indica Less leaves extract was performed on E. faecalis and F. nucleatum bacteria using agar diffusion method. The Pluchea indica Less leaves extract used for antibacterial activity test was at a concentrations of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.25%. Thirty-five petridiscs were used and divided into five groups based on the extract concentration. Result: The results showed strong and moderate antibacterial effects of the Pluchea indica Less leaves extract on E. faecalis at the concentrations of 100% and 50%, while on F. nucleatum only at the concentration of 100% with moderate effect. Conclusion: Pluchea indica Less leaves extract has antibacterial activity against E. faecalis and F. nucleatum bacteria with strong-moderate effect.

  16. Emergence of vanA Enterococcus faecium in Denmark, 2005-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette M; Baig, Sharmin; Kamel, Yasmin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the changing epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis in clinical samples in Denmark 2005-15 according to species and van type, and, furthermore, to investigate the genetic relatedness of the clinical E. faecium isolates from 2015...... for the vancomycin-resistant E. faecium isolates. Results: During 2005-15, 1043 vanA E. faecium , 25 vanB E. faecium , 4 vanA E. faecalis and 28 vanB E. faecalis were detected. The number of VRE was  200 isolates/year in 2013-15. In 2015, 368 vanA E. faecium and 1 vanB E. faecium...

  17. Enterococcus species diversity in fecal samples of wild marine species as determined by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Aline Weber; Blaese Amorim, Derek; Tavares, Maurício; de Moura, Tiane Martin; Franco, Ana Claudia; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Frazzon, Jeverson; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2017-02-01

    Analyses using culture-independent molecular techniques have improved our understanding of microbial composition. The aim of this work was to identify and quantify enterococci in fecal samples of wild marine species using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven Enterococcus species were examined in fecal DNA of South American fur seals (Arctocephalus australis), Subantarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus tropicalis), green turtles (Chelonia mydas), Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), snowy-crowned tern (Sterna trudeaui), white-backed stilt (Himantopus melanurus), white-chinned petrels (Procellaria aequinoctialis), red knot (Calidris canutus), and black-browed albatross (Thalassarche melanophris). All Enterococcus species evaluated were detected in all fecal samples of wild marine species, with a concentration ranging between 10 6 and 10 12 copies/ng of total DNA. Differences in the enterococci distribution were observed. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus mundtii were most abundant in marine mammals. Enterococcus faecalis was frequent in green turtle, Magellanic penguin, snowy-crowned tern, red knot, and black-browed albatross. Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus gallinarum showed elevated occurrence in white-backed stilt, and Enterococcus faecium in white-chinned petrel. This study showed highest diversity of enterococci in feces of wild marine species than currently available data, and reinforced the use of culture-independent analysis to help us to enhance our understanding of enterococci in gastrointestinal tracts of wild marine species.

  18. AN EFFICIENT IMMUNOMAGNETIC CAPTURE SYSTEM FOR ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS AND ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterococci detection is one of the two approved procedures by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) used for the assessment of the microbiological quality of recreational waters. The action levels established by the EPA for enterococci are 35 pr 100 ml in marine recreati...

  19. Multidrug resistance in Enterococcus species of faecal origin from commercial dairy lactating cattle: Public health concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfred Ngu Tanih

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of Enterococcus species in cattle faeces, their corresponding drug resistant patterns as well as the genes coding for resistance in the isolates. Methods: Two hundred and ninety rectal swabs were cultured for the isolation of Enterococcus. Presumptive isolates were confirmed by PCR, targeting the tuf gene, and confirmed isolates were identified to species level, using species-specific primers aimed at targeting six different species. Additionally, antibiogram was performed by disc diffusion and genes implicated in resistance were evaluated using molecular methods. Results: All presumptive isolates were confirmed as Enterococcus and speciated as: Enterococcus hirae (82%, Enterococcus faecium (5%, Enterococcus durans (5%, Enterococcus faecalis (2% and 6% of unidentified species. Resistance to various antimicrobials ranged from 16.4% for penicillin to 69.6% for erythromycin. Among the tetracycline and erythromycin-resistant isolates, tet M (100% and erm B (29% were the only amplified genes known to mediate resistance respectively. Other detected genes included van B (25%, van C1 (21% and bla Z (11%. Conclusions: A high prevalence of multidrug resistant Enterococcus species was observed in this study, accentuating the need to improve on animal farming practices to prevent the dissemination of this microorganism to the environment.

  20. Isolation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus from apparently healthy human animal attendants, cattle and cattle wastes in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madoshi, B. P.; Mtambo, M. M.A.; Muhairwa, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    resistance to VA by disc diffusion test, were analysed for VA-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) by PCR. The vanA gene was detected in 14 isolates of E. faecium and 12 isolates of E. faecalis, while vanB was detected in three isolates. No isolates were found to carry vanC1-gene. Conclusion: VRE was detected...

  1. Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterococcus Spp. Isolated from the River and Coastal Waters in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiesmaili, Reza; Talebjannat, Maryam; Yahyapour, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    As fecal streptococci commonly inhabit the intestinal tract of humans and warm blooded animals, and daily detection of all pathogenic bacteria in coastal water is not practical, thus these bacteria are used to detect the fecal contamination of water. The present study examined the presence and the antibiotic resistance patterns of Enterococcus spp. isolated from the Babolrud River in Babol and coastal waters in Babolsar. Seventy samples of water were collected in various regions of the Babolrud and coastal waters. Isolated bacteria were identified to the species level using standard biochemical tests and PCR technique. In total, 70 Enterococcus spp. were isolated from the Babolrud River and coastal waters of Babolsar. Enterococcus faecalis (68.6%) and Enterococcus faecium (20%) were the most prevalent species. Resistance to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclin was prevalent. The presence of resistant Enterococcus spp. in coastal waters may transmit resistant genes to other bacteria; therefore, swimming in such environments is not suitable. PMID:25525617

  2. Transformation and fusion of Streptococcus faecalis protoplasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, M D

    1985-01-01

    Nonconjugative plasmids were transferred by protoplast fusion among Streptococcus faecalis strains and from Streptococcus sanguis to S. faecalis. S. faecalis protoplasts were also transformed with several different plasmids, including the Tn917 delivery vehicle pTV1. Transformation was reproducible, but low in frequency (10(-6) transformants per viable protoplast). A new shuttle vector (pAM610), able to replicate in Escherichia coli and S. faecalis, was constructed and transformed into S. fae...

  3. Identification, antimicrobial resistance and genotypic characterization of Enterococcus spp. isolated in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Eduardo André; de Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto; Reiter, Keli Cristine; Lutz, Larissa; Barth, Afonso Luís

    2009-01-01

    In the past two decades the members of the genus Enterococcus have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the antimicrobial resistance and genotypic characteristics of 203 Enterococcus spp. recovered from different clinical sources from two hospitals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The species were identified by conventional biochemical tests and by an automated system. The genetic diversity of E. faecalis presenting high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA after SmaI digestion. The E. faecalis was the most frequent specie (93.6%), followed by E. faecium (4.4%). The antimicrobial resistance profile was: 2.5% to ampicillin, 0.5% to vancomycin, 0.5% teicoplanin, 33% to chloramphenicol, 2% to nitrofurantoin, 66.1% to erythromycin, 66.5% to tetracycline, 24.6% to rifampicin, 30% to ciprofloxacin and 87.2% to quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 10.3% of the isolates proved to be HLAR to both gentamicin and streptomycin (HLR-ST/GE), with 23.6% resistant only to gentamicin (HLR-GE) and 37.4% only to streptomycin (HLR-ST). One predominant clonal group was found among E. faecalis HLR-GE/ST. The prevalence of resistance among beta-lactam antibiotics and glycopeptides was very low. However, in this study there was an increased number of HLR Enterococcus which may be spreading intra and inter-hospital. PMID:24031416

  4. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterococcus Species: A Hospital-Based Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus species isolated from a university hospital, and explore the mechanisms underlying the antimicrobial resistance, so as to provide clinical evidence for the inappropriate clinical use of antimicrobial agents and the control and prevention of enterococcal infections. Methods: a total of 1,157 enterococcal strains isolated from various clinical specimens from January 2010 to December 2012 in the General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University were identified to species level with a VITEK-2 COMPACT fully automated microbiological system, and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterococcus species was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The multiple-drug resistant enterococcal isolates were screened from the clinical isolates of Enterococcus species from the burns department. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of Enterococcus species to the three fluoroquinolones, including ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin and levofloxacin was determined with the agar dilution method, and the changes in the MIC of Enterococcus species to the three fluoroquinolones following reserpine treatment were evaluated. The β-lactam, aminoglycoside, tetracycline, macrolide, glycopeptide resistance genes and the efflux pump emeA genes were detected in the enterococcal isolates using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Results: the 1,157 clinical isolates of Enterococcus species included 679 E. faecium isolates (58.7%, 382 E. faecalis isolates (33%, 26 E. casseliflavus isolates (2.2%, 24 E. avium isolates (2.1%, and 46 isolates of other Enterococcus species (4%. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance varied significantly between E. faecium and E. faecalis, and ≤1.1% of these two Enterococcus species were found to be resistant to vancomycin, teicoplanin or linezolid. In addition, the Enterococcus species isolated from different departments of the hospital

  5. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterococcus Species: A Hospital-Based Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Li, Gang; Wang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus species isolated from a university hospital, and explore the mechanisms underlying the antimicrobial resistance, so as to provide clinical evidence for the inappropriate clinical use of antimicrobial agents and the control and prevention of enterococcal infections. Methods: a total of 1,157 enterococcal strains isolated from various clinical specimens from January 2010 to December 2012 in the General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University were identified to species level with a VITEK-2 COMPACT fully automated microbiological system, and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterococcus species was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The multiple-drug resistant enterococcal isolates were screened from the clinical isolates of Enterococcus species from the burns department. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Enterococcus species to the three fluoroquinolones, including ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin and levofloxacin was determined with the agar dilution method, and the changes in the MIC of Enterococcus species to the three fluoroquinolones following reserpine treatment were evaluated. The β-lactam, aminoglycoside, tetracycline, macrolide, glycopeptide resistance genes and the efflux pump emeA genes were detected in the enterococcal isolates using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Results: the 1,157 clinical isolates of Enterococcus species included 679 E. faecium isolates (58.7%), 382 E. faecalis isolates (33%), 26 E. casseliflavus isolates (2.2%), 24 E. avium isolates (2.1%), and 46 isolates of other Enterococcus species (4%). The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance varied significantly between E. faecium and E. faecalis, and ≤1.1% of these two Enterococcus species were found to be resistant to vancomycin, teicoplanin or linezolid. In addition, the Enterococcus species isolated from different departments of the hospital exhibited various

  6. Identification of Multiple Bacteriocins in Enterococcus spp. Using an Enterococcus-Specific Bacteriocin PCR Array

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    Chris Henning

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two bacteriocin-producing Enterococcus isolates obtained from food and animal sources, and demonstrating activity against Listeria monocytogenes, were screened for bacteriocin-related genes using a bacteriocin PCR array based on known enterococcal bacteriocin gene sequences in the NCBI GenBank database. The 22 bacteriocin-positive (Bac+ enterococci included En. durans (1, En. faecalis (4, En. faecium (12, En. hirae (3, and En. thailandicus (2. Enterocin A (entA, enterocins mr10A and mr10B (mr10AB, and bacteriocin T8 (bacA were the most commonly found structural genes in order of decreasing prevalence. Forty-five bacteriocin genes were identified within the 22 Bac+ isolates, each containing at least one of the screened structural genes. Of the 22 Bac+ isolates, 15 possessed two bacteriocin genes, seven isolates contained three different bacteriocins, and three isolates contained as many as four different bacteriocin genes. These results may explain the high degree of bactericidal activity observed with various Bac+ Enterococcus spp. Antimicrobial activity against wild-type L. monocytogenes and a bacteriocin-resistant variant demonstrated bacteriocins having different modes-of-action. Mixtures of bacteriocins, especially those with different modes-of-action and having activity against foodborne pathogens, such as L. monocytogenes, may play a promising role in the preservation of food.

  7. Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Enterococcus Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-10-25

    The objective of the study was to answer the question of whether the ready-to-eat meat products can pose indirect hazard for consumer health serving as reservoir of Enterococcus strains harboring tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and macrolides resistance genes. A total of 390 samples of ready-to-eat meat products were investigated. Enterococcus strains were found in 74.1% of the samples. A total of 302 strains were classified as: Enterococcus faecalis (48.7%), Enterococcus faecium (39.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.3%), Enterococcus durans (3.0%), Enterococcus hirae (2.6%), and other Enterococcus spp. (1.7%). A high percentage of isolates were resistant to streptomycin high level (45%) followed by erythromycin (42.7%), fosfomycin (27.2%), rifampicin (19.2%), tetracycline (36.4%), tigecycline (19.9%). The ant(6')-Ia gene was the most frequently found gene (79.6%). Among the other genes that encode aminoglycosides-modifying enzymes, the highest portion of the strains had the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (18.5%) and aph(3'')-IIIa (16.6%), but resistance of isolates from food is also an effect of the presence of aph(2'')-Ib, aph(2'')-Ic, aph(2'')-Id genes. Resistance to tetracyclines was associated with the presence of tetM (43.7%), tetL (32.1%), tetK (14.6%), tetW (0.7%), and tetO (0.3%) genes. The ermB and ermA genes were found in 33.8% and 18.9% of isolates, respectively. Nearly half of the isolates contained a conjugative transposon of the Tn916/Tn1545 family. Enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat meat products. Many isolated strains (including such species as E. casseliflavus, E. durans, E. hirae, and Enterococcus gallinarum) are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Genome-based characterization of hospital-adaptedEnterococcus faecalislineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Kathy E; Reuter, Sandra; Gouliouris, Theodore; Reynolds, Rosy; Russell, Julie E; Brown, Nicholas M; Török, M Estée; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J

    2016-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VREfs) is an important nosocomial pathogen1,2. We undertook whole genome sequencing of E. faecalis associated with bloodstream infection in the UK and Ireland over more than a decade to determine the population structure and genetic associations with hospital adaptation. Three lineages predominated in the population, two of which (L1 and L2) were nationally distributed, and one (L3) geographically restricted. Genome comparison with a global collection identified that L1 and L3 were also present in the USA, but were genetically distinct. Over 90% of VREfs belonged to L1-L3, with resistance acquired and lost multiple times in L1 and L2, but only once followed by clonal expansion in L3. Putative virulence and antibiotic resistance genes were over-represented in L1, L2 and L3 isolates combined, versus the remainder. Each of the three main lineages contained a mixture of vancomycin-resistant and -susceptible E. faecalis (VSEfs), which has important implications for infection control and antibiotic stewardship.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus isolates in Turkey: A meta-analysis of current studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbas, Imdat; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakki

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a meta-analysis of Enterococcus isolates collected in 2000-2015 in Turkey and their susceptibility/resistance to antibiotics, clinical indications for initial drug treatment, and identification of alternative treatments was conducted. The meta-analysis examined antibiotic susceptibility/resistance in Enterococcus spp. isolates. The study was planned and conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Statements on antimicrobial resistance were grouped according to the antimicrobial stewardship programme (ASP). The mean resistance rates of Enterococcus faecalis to vancomycin (VAN) and linezolid (LNZ) were 1.0±2.2% and 1.9±2.6%, respectively, whereas the mean resistance rates of Enterococcus faecium to VAN and LNZ were 10.3±11.3% and 2.4±0%, respectively. This study is the first meta-analysis of the resistance of clinical Enterococcus isolates in Turkey to antimicrobial agents, which is a major problem stemming from the excessive usage of antibiotics. The development of antibiotic resistance in Turkey has changed over time. To support the practice of evidence-based medicine, more notifications about Enterococcus resistance status are needed, especially notifications following ASP rules. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of bacteriocinogenic Enterococcus mundtii CRL35 and Enterococcus faecium ST88Ch in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Pingitore, Esteban; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Sesma, Fernando; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2012-10-01

    Several strains of Enterococcus spp. are capable of producing bacteriocins with antimicrobial activity against important bacterial pathogens in dairy products. In this study, the bacteriocins produced by two Enterococcus strains (Enterococcus mundtii CRL35 and Enterococcus faecium ST88Ch), isolated from cheeses, were characterized and tested for their capability to control growth of Listeria monocytogenes 426 in experimentally contaminated fresh Minas cheese during refrigerated storage. Both strains were active against a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms and bacteriocin absorption to various L. monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19443 and Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 varied according to the strain and the testing conditions (pH, temperature, presence of salts and surfactants). Growth of L. monocytogenes 426 was inhibited in cheeses containing E. mundtii CRL35 up to 12 days at 8 °C, evidencing a bacteriostatic effect. E. faecium ST88Ch was less effective, as the bacteriostatic affect occurred only after 6 days at 8 °C. In cheeses containing nisin (12.5 mg/kg), less than one log reduction was observed. This research underlines the potential application of E. mundtii CRL35 in the control of L. monocytogenes in Minas cheese. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diurnal Variation in Enterococcus Species Composition in Polluted Ocean Water and a Potential Role for the Enterococcal Carotenoid in Protection against Photoinactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraccini, Peter A.; Ferguson, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus species composition was determined each hour for 72 h at a polluted marine beach in Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, CA. Species composition during the day was significantly different from that at night, based on an analysis of similarity. Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis were more prevalent at night than during the day, while E. hirae and other Enterococcus species were more prevalent during the day than the night. Enterococcus spp. containing a yellow pigment were more common during the day than the night, suggesting that the pigmented phenotype may offer a competitive advantage under sunlit conditions. A laboratory microcosm experiment established that the pigmented E. casseliflavus isolate and a pigmented E. faecalis isolate recovered from the field site decay slower than a nonpigmented E. faecalis isolate in a solar simulator in simulated, clear seawater. This further supports the idea that the yellow carotenoid pigment in Enterococcus provides protection under sunlit conditions. The findings are in accordance with previous work with other carotenoid-containing nonphotosynthetic and photosynthetic bacteria that suggests that the carotenoid is able to quench reactive oxygen species capable of causing photoinactivation and photostress. The results suggest that using enterococcal species composition as a microbial source tracking tool may be hindered by the differential environmental persistence of pigmented and nonpigmented enterococci. PMID:22081569

  12. Multidrug-resistant enterococci in animal meat and faeces and co-transfer of resistance from an Enterococcus durans to a human Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignaroli, Carla; Zandri, Giada; Aquilanti, Lucia; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Biavasco, Francesca

    2011-05-01

    Forty-eight isolates resistant to at least two antibiotics were selected from 53 antibiotic-resistant enterococci from chicken and pig meat and faeces and analysed for specific resistance determinants. Of the 48 multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, 31 were resistant to two antibiotics (29 to erythromycin and tetracycline, 1 to erythromycin and vancomycin, 1 to vancomycin and tetracycline), 14 to three (erythromycin, tetracycline and vancomycin or ampicillin) and 3 to four (erythromycin, vancomycin, ampicillin and gentamicin). erm(B), tet(M), vanA and aac (6')-Ie aph (2'')-Ia were the antibiotic resistance genes most frequently detected. All 48 MDR enterococci were susceptible to linezolid and daptomycin. Enterococcus faecalis (16), Enterococcus faecium (8), Enterococcus mundtii (2) and Enterococcus gallinarum (1) were identified in meat, and E. faecium (13) and Enterococcus durans (13) in faeces. Clonal spread was not detected, suggesting a large role of gene transfer in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conjugative transfer of resistance genes was more successful when donors were enterococcal strains isolated from faeces; co-transfer of vanA and erm(B) to a human E. faecium occurred from both E. faecium and E. durans pig faecal strains. These data show that multidrug resistance can be found in food and animal species other than E. faecium and E. faecalis, and that these species can efficiently transfer antibiotic resistance to human strains in inter-specific matings. In particular, the occurrence of MDR E. durans in the animal reservoir could have a role in the emergence of human enterococcal infections difficult to eradicate with antibiotics.

  13. Speciation and frequency of virulence genes of Enterococcus spp. isolated from rainwater tank samples in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W; Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S

    2012-06-19

    In this study, 212 Enterococcus isolates from 23 rainwater tank samples in Southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia were identified to the species level. The isolates were also tested for the presence of 6 virulence genes associated with Enterococcus related infections. Among the 23 rainwater tank samples, 20 (90%), 10 (44%), 7 (30%), 5 (22%), 4 (17%), 2 (9%), and 1 (4%) samples yielded E. faecalis, E. mundtii, E. casseliflavus, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. avium, and E. durans, respectively. Among the 6 virulence genes tested, gelE and efaA were most prevalent, detected in 19 (83%) and 18 (78%) of 23 rainwater tank samples, respectively. Virulence gene ace was also detected in 14 (61%) rainwater tank samples followed by AS, esp (E. faecalis variant), and cylA genes which were detected in 3 (13%), 2 (9%), and 1 (4%) samples, respectively. In all, 120 (57%) Enterococcus isolates from 20 rainwater tank samples harbored virulence genes. Among these tank water samples, Enterococcus spp. from 5 (25%) samples harbored a single virulence gene and 15 (75%) samples were harboring two or more virulence genes. The significance of these strains in terms of health implications remains to be assessed. The potential sources of these strains need to be identified for the improved management of captured rainwater quality. Finally, it is recommended that Enterococcus spp. should be used as an additional fecal indicator bacterium in conjunction with E. coli for the microbiological assessment of rainwater tanks.

  14. [Choice of media for detection of Streptococcus faecalis in routine water testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulska, B; Szlachta, R

    1996-01-01

    The aim the study was to find a medium for routine water testing for detection of Streptococcus faecalis which could be used by water supply laboratories and sanitary services. In the study dry ready Merck media were used: Mf-enterococcus agar, MF-enterococcus agar base, K-F-streptococcus agar, and Azide Nutrient Pad Sets (of Sartorius). The Slanetz-Bartley medium prepared in our laboratory National Institute of Hygiene (PZH). Method served as control. The usefulness of media for the isolation of Str. faecalis was tested in waters of household wells in the environs of Warsaw. Water from 50 wells was tested; from each well two samples of 10 ml and 100 ml were filtered. The filters were placed on the tested media and incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Colonies with characteristic pink or orange brown colour were counted. From each plate 3-5 colonies were taken for verification tests. For verification tests 609 bacterial colonies showing characteristic growth on tested media were taken. For the statistical analysis of the results variance analysis was used which showed no significant differences between the control Slanetz-Bartley medium and the ready Merck media. These media can be used alternatively for routine water testing for detection of Str. faecalis. The Azide medium is not recommended since 96% of colonies showing in this test the growth characteristic of Str. faecalis were negative in verification tests. In routine water testing in case of growth of characteristic colonies on isolation media, it is recommended to carry out verification tests including, at least, a test for catalyse production, and culture on Litsky liquid medium or agar medium with bile salts and aesculin.

  15. PYRUVATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEIBEL, R H; NIVEN, C F

    1964-07-01

    Deibel, R. H. (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), and C. F. Niven, Jr. Pyruvate fermentation by Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 88:4-10. 1964.-Streptococcus faecalis, as opposed to S. faecium, utilizes pyruvate as an energy source for growth. The fermentation is adaptive, as demonstrated by growth experiments in a casein-hydrolysate medium and the fermentation of pyruvate by cell suspensions. The principal products of pyruvate catabolism were acetoin, CO(2), and lactic, acetic, and formic acids, although carbon recoveries were low due to the formation of slime. End-product analyses suggested that both the phosphoroclastic and dismutation systems were active in pyruvate breakdown. Studies with cell-free extracts indicated a thiamine diphosphate requirement for active pyruvate catabolism. The involvement of lipoic acid in the phosphoroclastic system was investigated, and, although inconclusive results were obtained, no association of this cofactor with phosphoroclastic activity could be made.

  16. Emergence of vanA Enterococcus faecium in Denmark, 2005-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerum, Anette M; Baig, Sharmin; Kamel, Yasmin; Roer, Louise; Pinholt, Mette; Gumpert, Heidi; Holzknecht, Barbara; Røder, Bent; Justesen, Ulrik S; Samulioniené, Jurgita; Kjærsgaard, Mona; Østergaard, Claus; Holm, Anette; Dzajic, Esad; Søndergaard, Turid Snekloth; Gaini, Shahin; Edquist, Petra; Alm, Erik; Lilje, Berit; Westh, Henrik; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2017-08-01

    To describe the changing epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis in clinical samples in Denmark 2005-15 according to species and van type, and, furthermore, to investigate the genetic relatedness of the clinical E. faecium isolates from 2015. During 2005-14, all clinical VRE isolates were tested for the presence of vanA/B/C genes by PCR. In 2015, all clinical VRE isolates were whole-genome sequenced. From the WGS data, the presence of van genes and MLST STs were extracted in silico . Core-genome MLST (cgMLST) analysis was performed for the vancomycin-resistant E. faecium isolates. During 2005-15, 1043 vanA E. faecium , 25 vanB E. faecium , 4 vanA E. faecalis and 28 vanB E. faecalis were detected. The number of VRE was  200 isolates/year in 2013-15. In 2015, 368 vanA E. faecium and 1 vanB E. faecium were detected along with 1 vanA E. faecalis and 1 vanB E. faecalis . cgMLST subdivided the 368 vanA E. faecium isolates into 33 cluster types (CTs), whereas the vanB E. faecium isolate belonged to a different CT. ST203-CT859 was most prevalent (51%), followed by ST80-CT14 (22%), ST117-CT24 (6%), ST80-CT866 (4%) and ST80-CT860 (2%). Comparison with the cgMLST.org database, previous studies and personal communications with neighbouring countries revealed that the novel cluster ST203-CT859 emerged in December 2014 and spread to the south of Sweden and the Faroe Islands during 2015. VRE increased in Denmark during 2005-15 due to the emergence of several vanA E. faecium clones.

  17. Evaluation ofEnterococcus faecalisadhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration ofEnterococcus faecalisinto root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul S; Hegde, Mithra N; Halkai, Kiran R

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration.

  18. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanxiang Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6'-Ie-aph(2'', aph(2'-Id, aph(3'-IIIa, and ant(6'-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2''-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species.

  19. Use of the Phoenix Automated System for Identification of Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigante, Gioconda; Luzzaro, Francesco; Bettaccini, Alessia; Lombardi, Gianluigi; Meacci, Francesca; Pini, Beatrice; Stefani, Stefania; Toniolo, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, MD) was evaluated for identification (ID) to the species level of streptococci and enterococci. Two hundred clinical isolates were investigated: beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 50), Streptococcus pneumoniae organisms (n = 46), viridans group streptococci (n = 31), Enterococcus faecium (n = 36), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 25), and other catalase-negative cocci (n = 12). The API system (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Étoile, France) was used as a comparator. Molecular methods (sequencing of 16S rRNA and zwf and gki genes and ddl gene amplification) were used to investigate discordant results. Upon resolution of discrepancies, correct species ID was achieved by the Phoenix system for 121/129 (93.8%) streptococci and 63/70 (90.0%) enterococci. Excellent results were obtained for S. pneumoniae (45/45) and beta-hemolytic streptococci (49/50). With regard to viridans streptococci, the accuracy of the Phoenix system was 83.9%. Among the latter organisms, the best performance was obtained with isolates of the Streptococcus sanguinis group and Streptococcus anginosus group; problems were instead encountered with the Streptococcus mitis group. Four E. faecium and three E. faecalis isolates were misidentified as Enterococcus casseliflavus/Enterococcus gallinarum or Enterococcus durans. Thus, these isolates were identified only at the genus level. Compared with commercially available systems, the Phoenix system appears a reliable diagnostic tool for identifying clinically relevant streptococci and enterococci. The SMIC/ID-2 panel proved particularly effective for beta-hemolytic streptococci and pneumococci. PMID:16954258

  20. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species. PMID:25768240

  1. Comparison of Enterococcus Species Diversity in Marine Water and Wastewater Using Enterolert and EPA Method 1600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Donna M.; Griffith, John F.; McGee, Charles D.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Hagedorn, Charles

    2013-01-01

    EPA Method 1600 and Enterolert are used interchangeably to measure Enterococcus for fecal contamination of public beaches, but the methods occasionally produce different results. Here we assess whether these differences are attributable to the selectivity for certain species within the Enterococcus group. Both methods were used to obtain 1279 isolates from 17 environmental samples, including influent and effluent of four wastewater treatment plants, ambient marine water from seven different beaches, and freshwater urban runoff from two stream systems. The isolates were identified to species level. Detection of non-Enterococcus species was slightly higher using Enterolert (8.4%) than for EPA Method 1600 (5.1%). E. faecalis and E. faecium, commonly associated with human fecal waste, were predominant in wastewater; however, Enterolert had greater selectivity for E. faecalis, which was also shown using a laboratory-created sample. The same species selectivity was not observed for most beach water and urban runoff samples. These samples had relatively higher proportions of plant associated species, E. casseliflavus (18.5%) and E. mundtii (5.7%), compared to wastewater, suggesting environmental inputs to beaches and runoff. The potential for species selectivity among water testing methods should be considered when assessing the sanitary quality of beaches so that public health warnings are based on indicators representative of fecal sources. PMID:23840233

  2. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus species from gut microbiota of Chilean Altiplano camelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katheryne Guerrero-Olmos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus is one of the major human pathogens able to acquire multiple antibiotic-resistant markers as well as virulence factors which also colonize remote ecosystems, including wild animals. In this work, we characterized the Enterococcus population colonizing the gut of Chilean Altiplano camelids without foreign human contact. Material and methods: Rectal swabs from 40 llamas and 10 alpacas were seeded in M-Enterococcus agar, and we selected a total of 57 isolates. Species identification was performed by biochemical classical tests, semi-automated WIDER system, mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and, finally, nucleotide sequence of internal fragments of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, pheS, and aac(6-I genes. Genetic diversity was measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE-SmaI, whereas the antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the WIDER system. Carriage of virulence factors was explored by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: Our results demonstrated that the most prevalent specie was Enterococcus hirae (82%, followed by other non–Enterococcus faecalis and non–Enterococcus faecium species. Some discrepancies were detected among the identification methods used, and the most reliable were the rpoB, pheS, and aac(6-I nucleotide sequencing. Selected isolates exhibited susceptibility to almost all studied antibiotics, and virulence factors were not detected by PCR. Finally, some predominant clones were characterized by PFGE into a diverse genetic background. Conclusion: Enterococcus species from the Chilean camelids’ gut microbiota were different from those adapted to humans, and they remained free of antibiotic resistance mechanisms as well as virulence factors.

  3. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus species from gut microbiota of Chilean Altiplano camelids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Olmos, Katheryne; Báez, John; Valenzuela, Nicomédes; Gahona, Joselyne; del Campo, Rosa; Silva, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Background Enterococcus is one of the major human pathogens able to acquire multiple antibiotic-resistant markers as well as virulence factors which also colonize remote ecosystems, including wild animals. In this work, we characterized the Enterococcus population colonizing the gut of Chilean Altiplano camelids without foreign human contact. Material and methods Rectal swabs from 40 llamas and 10 alpacas were seeded in M-Enterococcus agar, and we selected a total of 57 isolates. Species identification was performed by biochemical classical tests, semi-automated WIDER system, mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer), and, finally, nucleotide sequence of internal fragments of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, pheS, and aac(6)-I genes. Genetic diversity was measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)-SmaI, whereas the antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the WIDER system. Carriage of virulence factors was explored by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Our results demonstrated that the most prevalent specie was Enterococcus hirae (82%), followed by other non–Enterococcus faecalis and non–Enterococcus faecium species. Some discrepancies were detected among the identification methods used, and the most reliable were the rpoB, pheS, and aac(6)-I nucleotide sequencing. Selected isolates exhibited susceptibility to almost all studied antibiotics, and virulence factors were not detected by PCR. Finally, some predominant clones were characterized by PFGE into a diverse genetic background. Conclusion Enterococcus species from the Chilean camelids’ gut microbiota were different from those adapted to humans, and they remained free of antibiotic resistance mechanisms as well as virulence factors. PMID:25405007

  4. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus species from gut microbiota of Chilean Altiplano camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Olmos, Katheryne; Báez, John; Valenzuela, Nicomédes; Gahona, Joselyne; Del Campo, Rosa; Silva, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Enterococcus is one of the major human pathogens able to acquire multiple antibiotic-resistant markers as well as virulence factors which also colonize remote ecosystems, including wild animals. In this work, we characterized the Enterococcus population colonizing the gut of Chilean Altiplano camelids without foreign human contact. Rectal swabs from 40 llamas and 10 alpacas were seeded in M-Enterococcus agar, and we selected a total of 57 isolates. Species identification was performed by biochemical classical tests, semi-automated WIDER system, mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer), and, finally, nucleotide sequence of internal fragments of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, pheS, and aac(6)-I genes. Genetic diversity was measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)-SmaI, whereas the antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the WIDER system. Carriage of virulence factors was explored by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results demonstrated that the most prevalent specie was Enterococcus hirae (82%), followed by other non-Enterococcus faecalis and non-Enterococcus faecium species. Some discrepancies were detected among the identification methods used, and the most reliable were the rpoB, pheS, and aac(6)-I nucleotide sequencing. Selected isolates exhibited susceptibility to almost all studied antibiotics, and virulence factors were not detected by PCR. Finally, some predominant clones were characterized by PFGE into a diverse genetic background. Enterococcus species from the Chilean camelids' gut microbiota were different from those adapted to humans, and they remained free of antibiotic resistance mechanisms as well as virulence factors.

  5. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using Indocyanine green and near-infrared diode laser in reducing Entrerococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltes, Charis; Sakkas, Hercules; Economides, Nikolaos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2017-03-01

    The use of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT) has been suggested as an adjuvant method to eliminate facultative bacteria during root canal disinfection. The purpose of this preliminary in vitro study was to determine whether the light-activated antimicrobial agent, Indocyanine green (ICG), could be used as photosensitizer and kill Enterococcus faecalis strain under planktonic conditions when irradiated with near-infared (NIR) diode laser emitting in 810nm wavelength. Planktonic suspension containing Enterococcus faecalis strain was divided into nine experimental groups: (1) aPDT with ICG and laser (medium energy fluence), (2) aPDT with ICG and laser (high energy fluence), (3) only ICG without laser activation, (4) only laser emission without ICG (5) 2.5% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as irrigant, (6) 2.5% NaOCl and aPDT with ICG and laser, (7) 2.0% Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) as irrigant (8) No treatment (positive control), (9) No bacterial biofilm growth (negative control). The samples were incubated for 7days and colony-forming units (CFUs) were determined to evaluate bacterial viability. The microbiological test revealed that aPDT groups, regardless the overall power, showed significant lower mean log 10 CFU levels, than groups 3, 4 and 7 (plaser may be a novel supplement in aPDT and provide better disinfection during endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Antibiotics susceptibility of Streptococcus and Enterococcus: data of Onerba network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachée, A; Varon, E; Jouy, E; Meunier, D

    2009-05-01

    This work was aimed to analyze trends in susceptibility to antibiotics among the main species of beta-hemolytic streptococci involved in community-acquired infections in human (Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae), or in animals (Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus uberis) and also among the main enterocci species, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Data were recorded since 1996 through the Onerba networks. S. pyogenes, as the other beta-hemolytic streptococci studied remained fully susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics. However, susceptibility to macrolides is clearly decreasing in S. pyogenes. In 2002, only 62 to 65% of the strains according to the network considered, were susceptible to erythromycin. A similar trend was observed for S. agalactiae with only 75% of erythromycin susceptibility in 2002, and for both species isolated from animals S. suis and S. uberis, with respectively 35 and 76% of strains susceptible to erythromycin. In enterococci, susceptibility to beta-lactams remained stable between 2000 and 2004. Indeed, the susceptibility to aminopenicillins remained high in E. faecalis (about 98%), whereas the proportion of E. faecium isolates susceptible to these antibiotics were lower than 60%. From 1999 to 2004, various studies conducted in French hospitals showed that the vancomycin resistance among enterococci accounted for less than 2%. However, the recent emergence of glycopeptide resistant enterococci clusters in French hospitals is a matter of concern and emphasizes the need for an ongoing surveillance. Such trend in macrolide resistance among S. pyogenes or S. agalactiae should consequently lead to propose other alternatives in case of beta-lactam allergy, and for pharyngitis, to rethink the place of the culture for susceptibility testing.

  7. Technologically important characteristics of Enterococcus isolates from milk and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, D; Jooste, P J; Mostert, J F

    1990-05-01

    Enterococcus faecium (54 strains), E. faecalis (40 strains), and E. durans (14) were isolated from various dairy products (raw milk, cream, butter and fermented milk products) during a previous study (Wessels et al., 1988). In this article various characteristics of these isolates, which may have a bearing on their significance in dairy products, have been studied. A large percentage of the identified strains of all three species were able to grow at 7 degrees C. Seventy-six percent of the E. faecium strains, 62% E. faecalis and 50% E. durans strains also showed proteolytic activity at psychrotrophic temperatures. The fact that proteolytic activity could be detected within 2 days at 7 degrees C is significant, since bulk cooled milk is normally held for 3 to 4 days at temperatures between 4 and 7 degrees C at farms or factories prior to processing. This examination confirmed that enterococci are proteolytic rather than lipolytic.

  8. Purulent pericarditis as a complication of bacteraemicEnterococcus faecalisurinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Fredy; Gitau, Jane; Liu, Jing

    2017-03-15

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare clinical entity in the modern antibiotic era. The most common portal of entry is thought to be direct extension from a primary lung source and is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae We report the case of a man aged 69 years who presented with purulent pericarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis likely caused by haematogenous spread from a urinary tract source. Urgent pericardiocentesis was vital and restored his haemodynamic stability. He was treated for a total duration of 4 weeks with susceptible antibiotics. Echocardiography 3 weeks later showed persistent resolution of the pericardial effusion. This case shows that prompt diagnosis and drainage of the pericardial effusion are vital to achieve a positive outcome in purulent pericarditis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of purulent pericarditis caused by E. faecalis from a urinary tract source. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF A FLOW CYTOMETER USED FOR DETECTING ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM AND ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved method for Enterococci (Method 1600) in recreational water is a membrane filter (MF) method that takes 24 hours to obtain results. If the recreational water is not in compliance with the standard, the risk of exposure to...

  10. Longer Intestinal Persistence of Enterococcus faecalis Compared to Enterococcus faecium Clones in Intensive-Care-Unit Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; del Campo, Rosa; Coque, Teresa M.; Asensio, Angel; Bonten, Marc; Willems, Rob; Baquero, Fernando; Canton, Rafael

    The dynamics of intestinal colonization with enterococcal clones in intensive-care-unit (ICU) patients was evaluated. Eight patients admitted directly to the neurosurgical ICU at the Ramon y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) from the community and with no overlapping stay during a 10-month

  11. Emerging Incidence of Enterococcus faecium among Hospital Isolates (1993 to 2002)

    OpenAIRE

    Treitman, Adam N.; Yarnold, Paul R.; Warren, John; Noskin, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, most clinical microbiology laboratories report that 80 to 90% of enterococci are Enterococcus faecalis, whereas E. faecium accounts for 5 to 10% of isolates. At our medical center from 1993 to 2002, we evaluated the percentages of E. faecium among all enterococcal isolates and the percentages of E. faecium isolates that were vancomycin resistant. Over this 10-year period, the percentage of enterococci that were identified as E. faecium increased from 12.7 to 22.2% (P < 0.001) an...

  12. Population Biology of Intestinal Enterococcus Isolates from Hospitalized and Nonhospitalized Individuals in Different Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedim, Ana P.; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M.; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J.; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  13. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Oral Cariogenic Streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the inhibitory effect of probiotic Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on biofilm formation by cariogenic streptococci. The ability of E. faecium WB2000 and JCM5804 and Enterococcus faecalis JCM5803 to inhibit biofilm formation by seven laboratory oral streptococcal strains and 13 clinical mutans streptococcal strains was assayed. The Enterococcal strains inhibited biofilm formation in dual cultures with the mutans streptococcal strains Streptococcus mutans Xc and Streptococcus sobrinus JCM5176 (P<0.05, but not with the noncariogenic streptococcal strains. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 inhibited biofilm formation by 90.0% (9/10 of the clinical S. mutans strains and 100% (3/3 of the clinical S. sobrinus strains. After culturing, the pH did not differ between single and dual cultures. The viable counts of floating mutans streptococci were lower in dual cultures with E. faecium WB2000 than in single cultures. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 acted as a probiotic bacterial inhibitor of cariogenic streptococcal biofilm formation.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus faecium strain TX16 and comparative genomic analysis of Enterococcus faecium genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterococci are among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in the United States and Europe, with Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium being the two most common species isolated from enterococcal infections. In the last decade, the proportion of enterococcal infections caused by E. faecium has steadily increased compared to other Enterococcus species. Although the underlying mechanism for the gradual replacement of E. faecalis by E. faecium in the hospital environment is not yet understood, many studies using genotyping and phylogenetic analysis have shown the emergence of a globally dispersed polyclonal subcluster of E. faecium strains in clinical environments. Systematic study of the molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis of E. faecium has been hindered by the lack of closed, complete E. faecium genomes that can be used as references. Results In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of the E. faecium strain TX16, also known as DO, which belongs to multilocus sequence type (ST) 18, and was the first E. faecium strain ever sequenced. Whole genome comparison of the TX16 genome with 21 E. faecium draft genomes confirmed that most clinical, outbreak, and hospital-associated (HA) strains (including STs 16, 17, 18, and 78), in addition to strains of non-hospital origin, group in the same clade (referred to as the HA clade) and are evolutionally considerably more closely related to each other by phylogenetic and gene content similarity analyses than to isolates in the community-associated (CA) clade with approximately a 3–4% average nucleotide sequence difference between the two clades at the core genome level. Our study also revealed that many genomic loci in the TX16 genome are unique to the HA clade. 380 ORFs in TX16 are HA-clade specific and antibiotic resistance genes are enriched in HA-clade strains. Mobile elements such as IS16 and transposons were also found almost exclusively in HA strains, as previously reported

  15. Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. associated with chronic and self-medicated urinary tract infections in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Louise Ladefoged; Bisgaard, Magne; Son, Nguyen Thai; Trung, Nguyen Vu; An, Hoang Manh; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-11-23

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most common infections among women worldwide. E. coli often causes more than 75% of acute uncomplicated UTI, however, little is known about how recurrent UTIs and indiscriminate use of antimicrobials affect the aetiology of UTIs. This study aimed to establish the aetiology of UTI in a population of recurrent and self-medicated patients referred from pharmacies to a hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam and to describe genotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of the associated bacterial pathogens. The aetiology of bacterial pathogens associated with UTI (defined as ≥ 104 CFU/ml urine) was established by phenotypic and molecular methods. Enterococcus faecalis isolates were typed by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Urine samples from 276 patients suffering symptoms of urinary tract infection were collected and cultured on Flexicult agar® allowing for detection of the most common urine pathogens. Patients were interviewed about underlying diseases, duration of symptoms, earlier episodes of UTI, number of episodes diagnosed by doctors and treatment in relation to UTI. All tentative E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates were identified to species level by PCR, 16S rRNA and partial sequencing of the groEL gene. E. faecalis isolates were further characterized by Multi Locus Sequence Typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Mean age of 49 patients was 48 yrs (range was 11-86 yrs) and included 94% women. On average, patients reported to have suffered from UTI for 348 days (range 3 days-10 years, and experienced 2.7 UTIs during the previous year). Cephalosporins were reported the second drug of choice in treatment of UTI at the hospital. E. faecalis (55.1%), E. coli (12.2%) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (8.2%) were main bacterial pathogens. MIC testing of E. faecalis showed susceptibility to ampicillin, penicillin and

  16. Enterocin from Enterococcus faecium isolated from mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Enterococcus faecium isolated from mangrove environment produced enterocin and it showed broad inhibitory spectrum against gram positive and gram negative bacteria such as Lactobacillus plantarum,. Enterococcus facealis, Listeria monocytogens and Salmonella paratyphii. The optimum production of.

  17. Enterocin from Enterococcus faecium isolated from mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterococcus faecium isolated from mangrove environment produced enterocin and it showed broad inhibitory spectrum against gram positive and gram negative bacteria such as Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus facealis, Listeria monocytogens and Salmonella paratyphii. The optimum production of bacteriocin ...

  18. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence traits in Enterococcus strains isolated from dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseppi, Ramona; Messi, Patrizia; Anacarso, Imacolata; Bondi, Moreno; Sabia, Carla; Condò, Carla; de Niederhausern, Simona

    2015-07-01

    We investigated presence and prevalence of antibiotic-resistances and other biological characters in enterococci isolated from faeces of healthy dogs and cats because these microorganisms represent important human and veterinary pathogens/opportunists, and a significant burden for healthcare systems. In all samples (n=115) we detected enterococci, with a predominance of Enterococcus faecium (42; 36.5%) and Enterococcus faecalis (36; 31.3%) species, endowed with virulence traits and multidrug-resistance. The two predominant resistance patterns (erythromycin, tetracycline) were examined by polymerase chain reaction for tet and erm genes. Only tetM for tetracycline, and ermA and ermB for erythromycin were detected. PCR for gelatinase gene (gelE) was positive in 62.6% of isolates, but only 26.1% produce gelatinase suggesting the existence of silent genes. efaAfs and efaAfm genes were found in E. faecalis and E. faecium respectively. 89.6% of isolates produced bacteriocin-like substances with a prevailing action against Listeria genus and, among these, 33.9% were positive for the bacteriocin structural genes entA, entL50 or entP. According to our study, pet animals can be considered a reservoir of potentially pathogenic enterococci and we cannot exclude that those microorganisms may be responsible for opportunistic infections in high-risk pet owners.

  19. Genetic characterization of a VanG-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Mohamed; Guérin, François; Lesec, Léonie; Isnard, Christophe; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Cattoir, Vincent; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2018-01-16

    To characterize, phenotypically and genotypically, the first Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate harbouring a vanG operon. The antibiotic resistance profile of E. faecium 16-346 was determined and its whole genome sequenced using PacBio technology. Attempts to transfer vancomycin resistance by filter mating were performed and the inducibility of expression of the vanG operon was studied by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in the presence or absence of subinhibitory concentrations of vancomycin. E. faecium 16-346 was resistant to rifampicin (MIC >4 mg/L), erythromycin (MIC >4 mg/L), tetracycline (MIC >16 mg/L) and vancomycin (MIC 8 mg/L), but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC 0.5 mg/L). The strain harboured the vanG operon in its chromosome, integrated in a 45.5 kb putative mobile genetic element, similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis BM4518. We were unable to transfer vancomycin resistance from E. faecium 16-346 to E. faecium BM4107 and E. faecalis JH2-2. Lastly, transcription of the vanG gene was inducible by vancomycin. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of a VanG-type vancomycin-resistant strain of E. faecium. Despite the alarm pulled because of the therapeutic problems caused by VRE, our work shows that new resistant loci can still be found in E. faecium.

  20. Assessing outcomes of adult oncology patients treated with linezolid versus daptomycin for bacteremia due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Khilna; Kabir, Rubiya; Ahmad, Samrah; Allen, Steven L

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and severity of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus blood stream infections continue to rise and is a significant burden in the healthcare setting. Literature thus far is minimal regarding treatment outcomes in patients with malignancy and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia. Appropriate antibiotic selection is vital to treatment success due to high rates of resistance, limited antimicrobials and mortality in this patient population. We conducted this study to determine whether treatment outcomes differed between cancer patients treated with linezolid and those treated with daptomycin for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia. This single-center, retrospective study included adult patients hospitalized on the oncology service with documented vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia who received at least 48 h of either linezolid or daptomycin as primary treatment. A total of 65 patients were included in the analysis. Thirty-two patients received daptomycin as primary treatment, and 33 patients received linezolid as primary treatment. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients in the linezolid cohort versus 22 (71%) patients in the daptomycin cohort achieved microbiological cure (p = 0.6141). Median length of stay in days (30 vs. 42, p = 0.0714) and mortality (7/32 (20.6%) vs. 8/33 (25.8%), p = 0.6180) were also similar between the linezolid and daptomycin treated patients, respectively. No differences in microbiological cure, length of stay or mortality were identified between the groups. This study suggests that linezolid and daptomycin are each reasonable options for treating vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in oncology patients. Further prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the optimal treatment for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in this patient population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Oxidation of glycerol by Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLARIDGE, C A; HENDLIN, D

    1962-12-01

    Claridge, C. A. (Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, N.J.) and David Hendlin. Oxidation of glycerol by Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1181-1186. 1962.-The nature of the factors in yeast autolysate essential for the oxidation of glycerol by Streptococcus faecalis F24 was examined. Two factors appear to be involved in the oxidation of glycerol. One factor was shown to be an inducer of the enzyme system required for glycerol oxidation; the other was shown to be alpha-lipoic acid. Minute quantities of glucose will "spark" growth of S. faecalis in a medium containing glycerol and acetate as carbon sources, probably by supplying sufficient energy for induction of the glycerol-oxidation system.

  2. Role of a Highly Conserved and Catalytically Important Glutamate-49 in the Enterococcus faecalis Acetolactate Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Miyoung; Lee, Sangchoon; Cho, Junehaeng; Ryu, Seong Eon; Yoon, Moonyoung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Bonsung [Rural Development Administration, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) is a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate and then condenses the hydroxyethyl moiety with another molecule of pyruvate to give 2-acetolactate (AL). AL is a key metabolic intermediate in various metabolic pathways of microorganisms. In addition, AL can be converted to acetoin, an important physiological metabolite that is excreted by many microorganisms. There are two types of ALSs reported in the literature, anabolic aceto-hydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) and catabolic ALSs (cALS). The anabolic AHAS is primarily found in plants, fungi, and bacteria, is involved in the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), and contains flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), whereas the cALS is found only in some bacteria and is involved in the butanediol fermentation pathway. Both of the enzymes are ThDP-dependent and require a divalent metal ion for catalytic activity. Despite the similarities of the reactions catalyzed, the cALS can be distinguished from anabolic AHAS by a low optimal pH of about 6.0, FAD-independent functionality, a genetic location within the butanediol operon, and lack of a regulatory subunit. It is noteworthy that the structural and functional features of AHAS have been extensively studied, in contrast to those of cALS, for which only limited information is available. To date, the only crystal structure of cALS reported is from Klebsiella pneumonia, which revealed that the overall structure of K. pneumonia ALS is similar to that of AHAS except for the FAD binding region found in AHAS.

  3. Relationship between the level of acquired resistance to gentamicin and synergism with amoxicillin in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslangul, Elisabeth; Ruimy, Raymond; Chau, Françoise; Garry, Louis; Andremont, Antoine; Fantin, Bruno

    2005-10-01

    In enterococci, intrinsic low-level resistance to gentamicin does not abolish synergism with a cell wall-active antibiotic while high-level resistance due to acquired aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes does. To study the impact of intermediate levels of resistance to gentamicin (64 resistant to gentamicin by enzymatic inactivation was used as control. In in vitro killing curves experiments, gentamicin concentrations allowing bactericidal activity and synergism in combination with amoxicillin increased from 4 microg/ml (1/16th the MIC), 16 microg/ml (one-eighth the MIC), 64 microg/ml (one-quarter the MIC), and 256 microg/ml (one-half the MIC) for strains JH2-2, G1-1477, G2-1573 and G3-1688, respectively. As expected, no bactericidal effect of the combination or synergism could be obtained with strain 102. In rabbits with aortic endocarditis caused by strain G1-1477 or G2-1573, combination therapy with amoxicillin and gentamicin was significantly more active than amoxicillin alone (P resistance to gentamicin was not associated with a loss of a beneficial effect of the gentamicin-amoxicillin combination in vivo even though higher concentrations of gentamicin were necessary to achieve in vitro synergism. Therefore, the use of an MIC of 500 microg/ml as a clinical cutoff limit to predict in vivo benefit of the combination remains a simple and effective tool.

  4. Inhibition of initial adhesion of uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis by biosurfactants from Lactobacillus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velraeds, MMC; vanderMei, HC; Reid, G; Busscher, HJ

    In this study, 15 Lactobacillus isolates were found to produce biosurfactants in the mid-exponential and stationary growth phases. The stationary-phase biosurfactants from Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469, Lactobacillus fermentum B54, and Lactobacillus acidophilus RC14 were

  5. Functional characterization and Me2+ ion specificity of a Ca2+-citrate tr