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Sample records for enteric gram-negative bacteria

  1. [Enteric Gram negative rods and unfermented of glucose bacteria in patients with peri-implant disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuegra, Jessika; Gutiérrez, Sonia Jakeline; Jaramillo, Adriana; Sanz, Ignacio; Olave, Gilberto; Soto, Jorge Enrique; Valencia, Carlos; Contreras, Adolfo

    2011-03-01

    Implants can be colonized by microorganisms from oral biofilms and may affect peri-implant tissues health. Among these bacteria, pathogens typically associated with periodontitis can be found, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis, as well as Gram negative enteric bacilli not typically associated with periodontal diseases. Superinfecting bacteria were characterized from peri-implant lesions in patients with history of periodontitis. Sixty-eight implants were studied in 55 patients; the average patient age was 56 years. Forty-nine implants had peri-implant lesions and 19 were considered stable. Subgingival samples were obtained in affected and stable implants. The samples were streaked on Mac-Conkey agar and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The colonies were identified with the kit-BD BBL Crystal E/NF®. Superinfecting organisms were detected in 20 patients--they were seen more frequently at diseased implants (n=15) than at healthy implants (n=5). The prevalence of superinfecting bacteria on the selected implants was 33.8% (n=23/68). These bacteria were more prevalent among affected implants (n=17 or 25%) than those with stable implants n=6 (8.8%). Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most frequent Gram negative rod detected (n=12). One-third of the implants had superinfecting organisms. Implants with a peri-implant lesion had a higher frequency of superinfecting bacteria. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common superinfecting organism isolated. A multiple infection caused by superinfecting bacteria was present only at diseased implants. These microbial agents potentially affect implant stability.

  2. Multi-drug resistant gram-negative enteric bacteria isolated from flies at Chengdu Airport, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Yu; Zhao, Feng; Fan, Xuejun; Zhong, Wei; Qiao, Dairong; Cao, Yi

    2013-11-01

    We collected flies from Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport to examine for the presence of bacteria and to determine the sensitivity patterns of those bacteria. A total of 1,228 flies were collected from 6 sites around Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport from April to September 2011. The predominant species was Chrysomya megacephala (n=276, 22.5%). Antimicrobial-resistant gram-negative enteric bacteria (n=48) were isolated from flies using MacConkey agar supplemented with cephalothin (20 microg/ml). These were identified as Escherichia coli (n=37), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=6), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=3) and Aeromonas hydrophila (n=2). All isolated bacteria were tested for resistance to 21 commonly used antimicrobials: amoxicillin (100%), ticarcillin (100%), cephalothin (100%), cefuroxime (100%), ceftazidime 1 (93.8%), piperacillin (93.8%), cefotaxime (89.6%), ticarcillin-clavulanate (81.3%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (62.5%), ciprofloxacin (54.2%), gentamicin (45.8%), cefepime (39.6%), tobramycin (39.6%), ceftazidime (22.9%), cefoxitin (16.7%), amikacin (16.7%), netilmicin (14.6%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (6.3%) and piperacillin-tazobactam (2.1%). No resistance to meropenem or imipenem was observed. Antibiotic resistance genes among the isolated bacteria were analyzed for by polymerase chain reaction. Thirty of the 48 bacteria with resistance (62.5%) possessed the blaTEM gene.

  3. Group of peptides that act synergistically with hydrophobic antibiotics against gram-negative enteric bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Vaara, M; Porro, M

    1996-01-01

    A synthetic peptide, KFFKFFKFFK [corrected], consisting of cationic lysine residues and hydrophobic phenylalanine residues was found to sensitize gram-negative bacteria to hydrophobic and amphipathic antibiotics. At a concentration of 3 micrograms/ml, it decreased the MIC of rifampin for smooth, encapsulated Escherichia coli by a factor of 300. Other susceptible bacterial species included Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella typhimurium, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa was r...

  4. Associations Between Enteral Colonization With Gram-Negative Bacteria and Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Infections and Colonization of the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, Jos F; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Plantinga, Nienke L; Spitoni, Cristian; van de Groep, Kirsten; Cremer, Olaf L; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-09-16

    Enteral and respiratory tract colonization with gram-negative bacteria may lead to subsequent infections in critically ill patients. We aimed to clarify the interdependence between gut and respiratory tract colonization and their associations with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections in patients receiving selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD). Colonization status of the rectum and respiratory tract was determined using twice-weekly microbiological surveillance in mechanically ventilated subjects receiving SDD between May 2011 and June 2015 in a tertiary medical-surgical ICU in the Netherlands. Acquisition of infections was monitored daily by dedicated observers. Marginal structural models were used to determine the associations between gram-negative rectal colonization and respiratory tract colonization, ICU-acquired gram-negative infection, and ICU-acquired gram-negative bacteremia. Among 2066 ICU admissions, 1157 (56.0%) ever had documented gram-negative carriage in the rectum during ICU stay. Cumulative incidences of ICU-acquired gram-negative infection and bacteremia were 6.0% (n = 124) and 2.1% (n = 44), respectively. Rectal colonization was an independent risk factor for both respiratory tract colonization (cause-specific hazard ratio [CSHR], 2.93 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.02-4.23]) and new gram-negative infection in the ICU (CSHR, 3.04 [95% CI, 1.99-4.65]). Both rectal and respiratory tract colonization were associated with bacteremia (CSHR, 7.37 [95% CI, 3.25-16.68] and 2.56 [95% CI, 1.09-6.03], respectively). Similar associations were observed when Enterobacteriaceae and glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria were analyzed separately. Gram-negative rectal colonization tends to be stronger associated with subsequent ICU-acquired gram-negative infections than gram-negative respiratory tract colonization. Gram-negative rectal colonization seems hardly associated with subsequent ICU-acquired gram-negative respiratory tract

  5. Antibiotic resistance of gram-negative enteric bacteria from pigs in three herds with different histories of antibiotic exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Gellin, G; Langlois, B E; Dawson, K A; Aaron, D K

    1989-01-01

    The antibiotic resistance patterns of gram-negative fecal bacteria from pigs in three herds with different histories of antibiotic exposure were examined. In general, smaller proportions of antibiotic-resistant or multiply resistant fecal isolates (P less than 0.05) were obtained from pigs in a herd not exposed to antimicrobial agents for 154 months than from pigs in a herd continuously exposed to antimicrobial agents at subtherapeutic doses or from pigs in a herd exposed only to therapeutic ...

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Ephedra pachyclada Methanol Extract on Some Enteric Gram Negative Bacteria Which Causes Nosocomial Infections by Agar Dilution Method

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    Amin Sadeghi Dosari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Past history indicates that plants were served as an important source of medicine. Otherwise, in developing countries people use medicinal plants against infectious disease because they cannot afford expensive drugs. Due to increasing rate of drug-resistant diseases, there is an urgent need to detect novel antimicrobial compounds from medicinal plants. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine Antimicrobial activity of Ephedra pachyclada methanol extract on some enteric Gram-negative bacteria which causes nosocomial infections by agar dilution method. Methods In this cross-sectional study, in order to examine the antimicrobial effects of Ephedra pachyclada extract on intestinal Gram-negative bacteria, we exposed them to 0/128, 0/25, 0/5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/mL of the extract. Ephedra pachyclada was collected from Jiroft Heights and methanolic extract was prepared with maceration method, during which, 50 gr powder of Ephedra pachyclada was dissolved in 300 mL of 80% methanol. Results In this study, the antibacterial effects of Ephedra pachyclada extract on Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli (PTCC-O157, Escherichia coli (ATCC-25922, Klebsiella pnemoniae, Serratia marcescens was investigated, defining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC by agar dilution method. It has been demonstrated that methanolic extract of Ephedra pachyclada affect intestinal Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions The result showed that, Ephedra pachyclada extract has effective antimicrobial ingredients which are cheap and readily available. It can be used for medicinal purposes in the production of antimicrobial drug.

  7. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment...

  8. Low prevalence of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and specific resistance genes in Gram-negative enteric bacteria recovered from 42 different drinking water sources servicing 2 rural villages in south-western Uganda. These water sites were prone to contamination by both human and cattle activity.

  9. Multi-resistant gram negative enteric bacteria causing urinary tract infection among malnourished underfives admitted at a tertiary hospital, northwestern, Tanzania.

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    Ahmed, Maimuna; Moremi, Nyambura; Mirambo, Mariam M; Hokororo, Adolfine; Mushi, Martha F; Seni, Jeremiah; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Mshana, Stephen E

    2015-06-19

    Infections are common complications occurring in malnourished childrenas a result of impaired immunity. Urinary tract infections (UTI) have been found to be the commonest cause of fever in normal children in developing countries. However, data regarding UTI among malnourished children is limited because in most of time severe and moderately malnourished children are afebrile despite significant bacteriuria. A total of 402 malnourished underfives were enrolled. Demographic and other clinical characteristics were collected using standardized data collection tool. Urine specimens were cultured and interpreted according to standard operating procedures. Data were analyzed using STATA version 11. Out of 402 malnourished underfives, 229 (56.9 %) were male. The median age in months was 17 (IQR; 12-31). Of 402 malnourished underfives, 83 (20.3 %) had significant bacteriuria of gram negative enteric bacteria. Escherichia coli 35/84 and Klebsiella pneumonia 20/84 were predominant bacteria isolated. More than 37 % of isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins with all of them exhibiting extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) phenotype. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxillin/clavulanic acid, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were 82/84 (98.7 %), 47/55 (85.4 %), 45/84 (57.8 %) and 9/84 (10.8 %) respectively. Decrease in age and increase in lymphocytes count were independent factors on multivariate logistic regression analysis found to predict UTI (penteric bacteria are common cause of UTI among underfives. A significant number of severe and moderate malnourished children with bacteriuria had no fever. Therefore, routine testing for UTI is emphasized in all malnourished underfives so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.

  10. Volatile metabolites from some gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöller, Charlotte; Molin, Søren; Wilkins, Ken

    1997-01-01

    A survey of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) excreted from various Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp. and Enterobacter spp.) was carried out. Compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. VOCs identified included dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide...

  11. Gram-negative bacteria can also form pellicles.

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    Armitano, Joshua; Méjean, Vincent; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the bacterial pellicle, a biofilm floating at the air-liquid interface. Pellicles have been well studied in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, but far less in Gram-negative bacteria, where pellicle studies have mostly focused on matrix components rather than on the regulatory cascades involved. Several Gram-negative bacteria, including pathogenic bacteria, have been shown to be able to form a pellicle under static conditions. Here, we summarize the growing body of knowledge about pellicle formation in Gram-negative bacteria, especially about the components of the pellicle matrix. We also propose that the pellicle is a specific biofilm, and that its formation involves particular processes. Since this lifestyle concerns a growing number of bacteria, its properties undoubtedly deserve further investigation.

  12. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

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    Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  13. Insights into Newer Antimicrobial Agents Against Gram-negative Bacteria

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    Taneja, Neelam; Kaur, Harsimran

    2016-01-01

    Currently, drug resistance, especially against cephalosporins and carbapenems, among gram-negative bacteria is an important challenge, which is further enhanced by the limited availability of drugs against these bugs. There are certain antibiotics (colistin, fosfomycin, temocillin, and rifampicin) that have been revived from the past to tackle the menace of superbugs, including members of Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas species. Very few newer antibiotics have been added to the pool of existing drugs. There are still many antibiotics that are passing through various phases of clinical trials. The initiative of Infectious Disease Society of America to develop 10 novel antibiotics against gram-negative bacilli by 2020 is a step to fill the gap of limited availability of drugs. This review aims to provide insights into the current and newer drugs in pipeline for the treatment of gram-negative bacteria and also discusses the major challenging issues for their management. PMID:27013887

  14. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

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    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future.

  15. NDM 1 Gene Carrying Gram negative Bacteria Isolated from Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we screened 56 Gram negative bacteria comprising: 3 isolates of Enterobacter ludwigii, 30 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 22 Proteus mirabilis, and 1 Aeromonas caviae isolated from oral cavity and rectum of rats captured from commercial poultry houses in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria that were resistant to at least ...

  16. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of vi...

  17. Bacteriocins from Gram-Negative Bacteria: A Classification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffat, Sylvie

    Bacteria produce an arsenal of toxic peptides and proteins, which are termed bacteriocins and play a role in mediating the dynamics of microbial populations and communities. Bacteriocins from Gram-negative bacteria arise mainly from Enterobacteriaceae. They assemble into two main families: high molecular mass modular proteins (30-80 kDa) termed colicins and low molecular mass peptides (between 1 and 10 kDa) termed microcins. The production of colicins is mediated by the SOS response regulon, which plays a role in the response of many bacteria to DNA damages. Microcins are highly stable hydrophobic peptides that are produced under stress conditions, particularly nutrient depletion. Colicins and microcins are found essentially in Escherichia coli, but several other Gram-negative species also produce bacteriocin-like substances. This chapter presents the basis of a classification of colicins and microcins.

  18. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy to kill Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photo-stimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl₂. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT.

  19. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photostimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl2. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT. PMID

  20. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

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    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Bovine mastitis caused by gram negative bacteria in Mosul

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    S. Y. A. Al-Dabbagh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 90 milk samples were collected from cows with clinical and subclinical mastitis from different areas in Mosul city, in a period from October 2009 to June 2010, for the detection of gram negative bacteriological causative agents. The bacteria were identified using morphological, cultural and biochemical characteristics. thirty tow (35.3% gram negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the total count which included 14 isolates (15.5% for Escherichia coli, 7 isolates (7.7% for Klebsiella spp, 4 isolates (4.4% for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 3 isolates (3.3% for Enterobacter aerogenes ,2 isolates for Serratia marcescens and one isolates (1.1% for each of Aeromonas hydrophila and Pasteurella multocida. Results of antibiotic sensitivity test indicated that most of these isolates were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin following by Gentamycin and Cotrimoxazole, while most of these organisms were resistant to Ampicillin, the isolates showed different percentages of sensitivity to Doxycycline, Tetracycline, Neomycin and Chloramphenicol.

  2. Deacylated lipopolysaccharides inhibit biofilm formation by Gram-negative bacteria.

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    Lee, Kyung-Jo; Lee, Mi-Ae; Hwang, Won; Park, Hana; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2016-08-01

    The extracellular polysaccharides of Vibrio vulnificus play different roles during biofilm development. Among them, the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is crucial for bacterial adherence to surfaces during the initial stage of biofilm formation, on the formation process was examined using various types of LPS extracts. Exogenously added LPS strongly inhibited biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the exogenous addition of a deacylated form of LPS (dLPS) also inhibited biofilm formation. However, an LPS fraction extracted from a mutant not able to produce O-antigen polysaccharides (O-Ag) did not have an inhibitory effect. Furthermore, biofilm formation by several Gram-negative bacteria was inhibited by dLPS addition. In contrast, biofilm formation by Gram-positive bacteria was not influenced by dLPS but was affected by lipoteichoic acid. Therefore, this study demonstrates that O-Ag in LPS is important for inhibiting biofilm formation and may serve an efficient anti-biofilm agent specific for Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Activity of the antiseptic polyhexanide against gram-negative bacteria.

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    Fabry, Werner Hugo Karl; Kock, Hans-Jürgen; Vahlensieck, Winfried

    2014-04-01

    The activity of the antiseptic polyhexanide was tested against 250 gram-negative clinical isolates, that is, 50 isolates each of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were determined by using a serial broth microdilution technique according to DIN 58940. Time-kill studies were performed for reference stains E. coli ATCC 25922, K. pneumoniae ATCC 4352, P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, M. catarrhalis ATCC 43617, and H. influenzae ATCC 49247. All tested isolates had MICs and MBCs within a range of 1-32 mg/L and were regarded as susceptible to polyhexanide. The highest values were found for P. aeruginosa and H. influenzae with MICs and MBCs of 32 mg/L. Addition of up to 4% albumin to the test medium did not change MICs and MBCs. Time-kill studies of the reference strains showed reduction rates from 3 log10 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to more than 5 log10 CFU/ml for 200 and 400 mg/L polyhexanide within 5-30 min. Testing of polyhexanide in combination with antibiotics showed indifference with amoxicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin; no antagonism was found. As no resistance and no antagonism with antibiotics were detected, polyhexanide is regarded as suitable agent for topical eradication of gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in lake waters.

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    Koczura, R; Semkowska, A; Mokracka, J

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the occurrence of integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in the water of four lakes located in Wielkopolski National Park, Poland. Altogether, 17 isolates harbouring class 1 or class 2 integrons were found. The integron-bearing bacteria were identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida and Aeromonas hydrophila. The variable regions of the class 1 integrons contained aadA1 and dfrA1-aadA1 gene cassettes, whereas class 2 integrons carried dfrA1-sat2-aadA1 gene cassette array. The isolates were resistant to 3-20 antimicrobials. One of them produced SHV-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Integrons play a major role in the spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria. They are frequently found in clinical bacterial strains, but are also detected in environmental isolates in sites affected by anthropogenic pressure. Little is known, however, about the presence and characteristics of integrons in bacteria living in water environments in areas of nature preservation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focused on detection and characterization of integrons in bacteria living in water ecosystems in a national park. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide modification in Gram-negative bacteria during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Rita F; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2016-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the outer membrane that plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions with the innate immune system. During infection, bacteria are exposed to a host environment that is typically dominated by inflammatory cells and soluble factors, including antibiotics, which provide cues about regulation of gene expression. Bacterial adaptive changes including modulation of LPS synthesis and structure are a conserved theme in infections, irrespective of the type or bacteria or the site of infection. In general, these changes result in immune system evasion, persisting inflammation and increased antimicrobial resistance. Here, we review the modifications of LPS structure and biosynthetic pathways that occur upon adaptation of model opportunistic pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria, Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella enterica) to chronic infection in respiratory and gastrointestinal sites. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms of these variations and their role in the host-pathogen interaction. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Regulation cascade of flagellar expression in Gram-negative bacteria.

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    Soutourina, Olga A; Bertin, Philippe N

    2003-10-01

    Flagellar motility helps bacteria to reach the most favourable environments and to successfully compete with other micro-organisms. These complex organelles also play an important role in adhesion to substrates, biofilm formation and virulence process. In addition, because their synthesis and functioning are very expensive for the cell (about 2% of biosynthetic energy expenditure in Escherichia coli) and may induce a strong immune response in the host organism, the expression of flagellar genes is highly regulated by environmental conditions. In the past few years, many data have been published about the regulation of motility in polarly and laterally flagellated bacteria. However, the mechanism of motility control by environmental factors and by some regulatory proteins remains largely unknown. In this respect, recent experimental data suggest that the master regulatory protein-encoding genes at the first level of the cascade are the main target for many environmental factors. This mechanism might require DNA topology alterations of their regulatory regions. Finally, despite some differences the polar and lateral flagellar cascades share many functional similarities, including a similar hierarchical organisation of flagellar systems. The remarkable parallelism in the functional organisation of flagellar systems suggests an evolutionary conservation of regulatory mechanisms in Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary DeMars

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial treatments result in the host's enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®, aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin, fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin, classical macrolides (erythromycin, azalides (azithromycin, sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and tetracyclines (tetracycline. Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30 interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Zachary; Biswas, Silpak; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Renter, David G; Volkova, Victoriya V

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host's enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  9. Distribution of Gram Negative Bacteria and Evaluation of Resistance Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Pamukcuoglu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to examine the distributon of Gram negative bacteria isolated from urine cultures of out-patients in Afyonkarahisar State Hospital and evaluate the antimicrobial resistance rates of these pathogens. Material and Method: Urine samples of out-patients which were sent to microbiology laboratory between 2012-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. The isolates were identified using conventional methods and/or automated Vitec 2.0 system. Antibiogram sensitivities were determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method or automated system and interpreted on the basis of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CSI criteria. Double disc sinergy test (DDST or Vitec 2.0 system was used to detect extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL.When conventional methods could%u2019t be clarified according to their colony morphologies, gram staining patterns, biochemical test; automated system has been used. Results: A total of 671 isolates acquired from urine samples were studied. 427 Escherichia coli (63.6 %, 165 Klebsiella spp. (24.6 %, 22 Pseudomonas spp. (3.3 %, nine Acinetobacter spp. (1.3 %, 41 Proteus spp. (6.1 % and seven Serratia (1.0 % strains were identified among isolates. 97 E.coli (22.8 % and 41 Klebsiella (24.8 % isolates were ESBL positive. Most common bacteria were E.coli, 31.1 % of which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 16 % to ciprofloxacin and 3.6 % to nitrofurantoin. Among Enterobacteriaceae, no resistance aganist carbapenems were detected. Moreover, aminoglicoside sensitivity rate was significantly high in this group. Discussion: Microorganisms that have progressively increasing antimicrobial resistance should be considered in the treatment of urinary tract infections. It is also important to use the most appropriate antibiotics to avoid unnecessary usage of these drugs in order to decrease drug resistance rates and ESBL production which may effect the success of the treatment.

  10. Extended-spectrum ß-lactamases in gram negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Rawat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs are a group of plasmid-mediated, diverse, complex and rapidly evolving enzymes that are posing a major therapeutic challenge today in the treatment of hospitalized and community-based patients. Infections due to ESBL producers range from uncomplicated urinary tract infections to life-threatening sepsis. Derived from the older TEM is derived from Temoniera, a patient from whom the strain was first isolated in Greece. ß-lactamases, these enzymes share the ability to hydrolyze third-generation cephalosporins and aztreonam and yet are inhibited by clavulanic acid. In addition, ESBL-producing organisms exhibit co-resistance to many other classes of antibiotics, resulting in limitation of therapeutic option. Because of inoculum effect and substrate specificity, their detection is also a major challenge. At present, however, organizations such as the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (formerly the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards provide guidelines for the detection of ESBLs in Klebsiella pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. In common to all ESBL-detection methods is the general principle that the activity of extended-spectrum cephalosporins against ESBL-producing organisms will be enhanced by the presence of clavulanic acid. Carbapenems are the treatment of choice for serious infections due to ESBL-producing organisms, yet carbapenem-resistant isolates have recently been reported. ESBLs represent an impressive example of the ability of gram-negative bacteria to develop new antibiotic-resistance mechanisms in the face of the introduction of new antimicrobial agents. Thus there is need for efficient infection-control practices for containment of outbreaks; and intervention strategies, e.g., antibiotic rotation to reduce further selection and spread of these increasingly resistant pathogens.

  11. Multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria in clinical isolates from Karachi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saeed, Asma; Khatoon, Hajra; Ansari, Fasihuddin Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    A total of 54 gram-negative bacteria obtained from various pathological labs and hospitals of Karachi were screened for their resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamycin, kanamycin, neomycin...

  12. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid organ transplant recipients with bacteremias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Q Q; Ye, Q F; Yuan, H

    2015-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain as life-threatening complications and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause serious bacteremias in these recipients. Reviews have aimed to investigate MDR Gram-negative bacteremias; however, they were lacking in SOT recipients in the past. To better understand the characteristics of bacteremias due to MDR Gram-negative bacteria, optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies, and improve the outcomes of SOT recipients, this review summarize the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and explores the mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of MDR Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Prediction of lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncker, Agnieszka S; Willenbrock, Hanni; Von Heijne, Gunnar; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, Henrik; Krogh, Anders

    2003-08-01

    A method to predict lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative Eubacteria, LipoP, has been developed. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was able to distinguish between lipoproteins (SPaseII-cleaved proteins), SPaseI-cleaved proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and transmembrane proteins. This predictor was able to predict 96.8% of the lipoproteins correctly with only 0.3% false positives in a set of SPaseI-cleaved, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane proteins. The results obtained were significantly better than those of previously developed methods. Even though Gram-positive lipoprotein signal peptides differ from Gram-negatives, the HMM was able to identify 92.9% of the lipoproteins included in a Gram-positive test set. A genome search was carried out for 12 Gram-negative genomes and one Gram-positive genome. The results for Escherichia coli K12 were compared with new experimental data, and the predictions by the HMM agree well with the experimentally verified lipoproteins. A neural network-based predictor was developed for comparison, and it gave very similar results. LipoP is available as a Web server at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/LipoP/.

  14. Loss of outer membrane integrity in Gram-negative bacteria by silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The antimicrobial activity of NP was investigated against three Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria (Shigella dysentriae, Salmonella infestis and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). The outer membrane ofGram-negative bacteria is a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in nature and provides protection from various stress conditions and ...

  15. Prediction of lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Willenbrock, Hanni; Von Heijne, G.

    2003-01-01

    A method to predict lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative Eubacteria, LipoP, has been developed. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was able to distinguish between lipoproteins (SPaseII-cleaved proteins), SPaseI-cleaved proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and transmembrane proteins. This predictor...... was able to predict 96.8% of the lipoproteins correctly with only 0.3% false positives in a set of SPaseI-cleaved, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane proteins. The results obtained were significantly better than those of previously developed methods. Even though Gram-positive lipoprotein signal peptides differ...

  16. Relationship between Gram negative enteric rods, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and clinical parameters in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Ardila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between Gram negative enteric rods and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in periodontal diseases has received little attention in the literature. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between these organisms and clinical parameters of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: Clinical parameters and occurrence of Gram-negative enteric rods and A. actinomycetemcomitans were examined in 76 patients with chronic periodontitis. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests were used to determine differences in clinical variables versus the presence or absence of both microorganisms. Correlation among both organisms and clinical data were determined using Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Gram-negative enteric rods and A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected in 20 (26.3% and 18 (23.7% individuals, respectively. A total of 14 (18.4% patients harbored both microorganisms studied. There were significantly positive correlations between enteric rods and presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (r=0.652, P<0.0001. Both microorganisms were significant and positively correlated with probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing (P<0.0001. The mean PD (mm of the sampled sites was significantly deeper in patients with presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans and Gram-negative enteric rods. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest a strong positive correlation between Gram-negative enteric rods and A. actinomycetemcomitans in the population studied. This finding must be taken into account when considering the best therapeutic approach, including the utilization of antimicrobials. The adverse clinical outcomes observed in presence of these microorganisms could have implications in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and a possible impact on outcomes after treatment.

  17. Species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-negative aerobic bacteria in hospitalized cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sharif Amany

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial infections pose significant threats to hospitalized patients, especially the immunocompromised ones, such as cancer patients. Methods This study examined the microbial spectrum of gram-negative bacteria in various infection sites in patients with leukemia and solid tumors. The antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolated bacteria were studied. Results The most frequently isolated gram-negative bacteria were Klebsiella pneumonia (31.2% followed by Escherichia coli (22.2%. We report the isolation and identification of a number of less-frequent gram negative bacteria (Chromobacterium violacum, Burkholderia cepacia, Kluyvera ascorbata, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Salmonella arizona. Most of the gram-negative isolates from Respiratory Tract Infections (RTI, Gastro-intestinal Tract Infections (GITI, Urinary Tract Infections (UTI, and Bloodstream Infections (BSI were obtained from leukemic patients. All gram-negative isolates from Skin Infections (SI were obtained from solid-tumor patients. In both leukemic and solid-tumor patients, gram-negative bacteria causing UTI were mainly Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, while gram-negative bacteria causing RTI were mainly Klebsiella pneumoniae. Escherichia coli was the main gram-negative pathogen causing BSI in solid-tumor patients and GITI in leukemic patients. Isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter species were resistant to most antibiotics tested. There was significant imipenem -resistance in Acinetobacter (40.9%, Pseudomonas (40%, and Enterobacter (22.2% species, and noticeable imipinem-resistance in Klebsiella (13.9% and Escherichia coli (8%. Conclusion This is the first study to report the evolution of imipenem-resistant gram-negative strains in Egypt. Mortality rates were higher in cancer patients with nosocomial Pseudomonas infections than any other bacterial infections

  18. Antibacterial activities of selected edible plants extracts against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Djeussi, Doriane E; Noumedem, Jaurès A K; Seukep, Jackson A; Fankam, Aimé G; Voukeng, Igor K; Tankeo, Simplice B; Nkuete, Antoine H L; Kuete, Victor

    2013-01-01

    ...). The phytochemical screening of the studied extracts was performed using described methods whilst the liquid broth micro dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays against 27 Gram-negative bacteria...

  19. Multiparametric Profiling for Identification of Chemosensitizers against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Lôme

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is now a worldwide therapeutic problem. Since the beginning of anti-infectious treatment bacteria have rapidly shown an incredible ability to develop and transfer resistance mechanisms. In the last decades, the design variation of pioneer bioactive molecules has strongly improved their activity and the pharmaceutical companies partly won the race against the clock. Since the 1980s, the new classes of antibiotics that emerged were mainly directed to Gram-positive bacteria. Thus, we are now facing to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, with no therapeutic options to deal with them. These bacteria are mainly resistant because of their double membrane that conjointly impairs antibiotic accumulation and extrudes these molecules when entered. The main challenge is to allow antibiotics to cross the impermeable envelope and reach their targets. One promising solution would be to associate, in a combination therapy, a usual antibiotic with a non-antibiotic chemosensitizer. Nevertheless, for effective drug discovery, there is a prominent lack of tools required to understand the rules of permeation and accumulation into Gram-negative bacteria. By the use of a multidrug-resistant enterobacteria, we introduce a high-content screening procedure for chemosensitizers discovery by quantitative assessment of drug accumulation, alteration of barriers, and deduction of their activity profile. We assembled and analyzed a control chemicals library to perform the proof of concept. The analysis was based on real-time monitoring of the efflux alteration and measure of the influx increase in the presence of studied compounds in an automatized bio-assay. Then, synergistic activity of compounds with an antibiotic was studied and kinetic data reduction was performed which led to the calculation of a score for each barrier to be altered.

  20. Growth ability of Gram negative bacteria in free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, Zuhal; Binay, Ali Rıza

    2014-11-01

    When bacteria and free-living amoebae (FLAs) live both in natural waters and man-made aquatic systems, they constantly interact with each other. Some bacteria can survive and grow within FLAs. Therefore, it has recently been thought that FLAs play an important role in spreading pathogenic bacteria in aquatic systems. In this study we investigated the intracellular growing ability of 7 different Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Aeromonas salmonicida, Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, L. pneumophila serogroup 3, L. pneumophila serogroup 6) in four different FLA isolates (A1-A4). Among these, four bacterial isolates (P. fluorescens, P.putida, P.pneumotropica, A.salmonicida) and two free-living amoebae isolates (A3, A4) were isolated from the tap water in our city (Istanbul). It was found that 4 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A1, 2 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A2, 4 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A3, 1 Gram-negative bacterium could grow in A4. In conclusion, we think that this ability of growth could vary according to the characteristics of both bacteria and FLA isolates. Also, other factors such as environmental temperature, bacterial concentration, and extended incubation period may play a role in these interactions. This situation can be clarified with future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria effect of different kinds of root decoction pieces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Wang, Ya-Ke; Han, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Ya-Qi; Jiang, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Zhi-Jun; Deng, Hai-Ying

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the microbial contamination in Chinese herbal decoction pieces with different functional types by studying the total aerobic microbial count (TAMC), and total yeast and mould count (TYMC) in 40 samples of 8 types of root decoction pieces; further evaluate the contamination load of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and identify the Gram-negative bacteria by using biochemical identification system for Gram-negative bacteria. Our results showed that the TAMC value was more than 1 000 CFU•g⁻¹ in 85% (34/40) samples, and was more than 100 CFU•g⁻¹ in 30% (12/40) samples; the contamination of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria was detected in 45% (18/40) of the samples. The bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria load of seven batches of samples was N>1 000 MPN•g⁻¹. Sixteen bacterium strains including Serratia plymouthensis, Cedecea neteri, Escherichia vulneris, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter amnigenus, E. cloacae, E. sakazakii, Proteus penneri and E. gergoviae were obtained and identified. E. cloacae was the predominant bacterium that was isolated from Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, while E. amnigenus, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was the typical bacterium of Ophiopogonis Radix and Codonopsis Radix, respectively. All these suggested that the contamination of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria was severe for the root decoction pieces in Wuhan city. Microbial species have certain selection specificity for medicinal ingredients, so the type and limit of control bacteria for detection should be formulated according to the pollution type and quantity of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. Bifurcation kinetics of drug uptake by Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, David A; Krishnamoorthy, Ganesh; Wolloscheck, David; Sarkar, Rupa; Zgurskaya, Helen I; Rybenkov, Valentin V

    2017-01-01

    Cell envelopes of many bacteria consist of two membranes studded with efflux transporters. Such organization protects bacteria from the environment and gives rise to multidrug resistance. We report a kinetic model that accurately describes the permeation properties of this system. The model predicts complex non-linear patterns of drug uptake complete with a bifurcation, which recapitulate the known experimental anomalies. We introduce two kinetic parameters, the efflux and barrier constants, which replace those of Michaelis and Menten for trans-envelope transport. Both compound permeation and efflux display transitions, which delineate regimes of efficient and inefficient efflux. The first transition is related to saturation of the transporter by the compound and the second one behaves as a bifurcation and involves saturation of the outer membrane barrier. The bifurcation was experimentally observed in live bacteria. We further found that active efflux of a drug can be orders of magnitude faster than its diffusion into a cell and that the efficacy of a drug depends both on its transport properties and therapeutic potency. This analysis reveals novel physical principles in the behavior of the cellular envelope, creates a framework for quantification of small molecule permeation into bacteria, and should invigorate structure-activity studies of novel antibiotics.

  3. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Nuntra Suwantarat; Karen C Carroll

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN), including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and multidrug-resistant glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters), have emerged and spread throughout Southeast Asia. Methods We reviewed and summarized current critical knowledge on the epidemiology and molecular characterization of MDRGN in Southeast Asia by PubMed searches for publications prior to 10 March 2016 with the term related to “MDRGN definitio...

  4. Widespread Fosfomycin Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Attributable to the Chromosomal fosA Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Ito

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fosfomycin is a decades-old antibiotic which is being revisited because of its perceived activity against many extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. FosA proteins are Mn2+ and K+-dependent glutathione S-transferases which confer fosfomycin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria by conjugation of glutathione to the antibiotic. Plasmid-borne fosA variants have been reported in fosfomycin-resistant Escherichia coli strains. However, the prevalence and distribution of fosA in other Gram-negative bacteria are not known. We systematically surveyed the presence of fosA in Gram-negative bacteria in over 18,000 published genomes from 18 Gram-negative species and investigated their contribution to fosfomycin resistance. We show that FosA homologues are present in the majority of genomes in some species (e.g., Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas they are largely absent in others (e.g., E. coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Burkholderia cepacia. FosA proteins in different bacterial pathogens are highly divergent, but key amino acid residues in the active site are conserved. Chromosomal fosA genes conferred high-level fosfomycin resistance when expressed in E. coli, and deletion of chromosomal fosA in S. marcescens eliminated fosfomycin resistance. Our results indicate that FosA is encoded by clinically relevant Gram-negative species and contributes to intrinsic fosfomycin resistance.

  5. Widespread Fosfomycin Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Attributable to the Chromosomal fosA Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryota; Mustapha, Mustapha M; Tomich, Adam D; Callaghan, Jake D; McElheny, Christi L; Mettus, Roberta T; Shanks, Robert M Q; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Doi, Yohei

    2017-08-29

    Fosfomycin is a decades-old antibiotic which is being revisited because of its perceived activity against many extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. FosA proteins are Mn2+ and K+-dependent glutathione S-transferases which confer fosfomycin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria by conjugation of glutathione to the antibiotic. Plasmid-borne fosA variants have been reported in fosfomycin-resistant Escherichia coli strains. However, the prevalence and distribution of fosA in other Gram-negative bacteria are not known. We systematically surveyed the presence of fosA in Gram-negative bacteria in over 18,000 published genomes from 18 Gram-negative species and investigated their contribution to fosfomycin resistance. We show that FosA homologues are present in the majority of genomes in some species (e.g., Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), whereas they are largely absent in others (e.g., E. coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Burkholderia cepacia). FosA proteins in different bacterial pathogens are highly divergent, but key amino acid residues in the active site are conserved. Chromosomal fosA genes conferred high-level fosfomycin resistance when expressed in E. coli, and deletion of chromosomal fosA in S. marcescens eliminated fosfomycin resistance. Our results indicate that FosA is encoded by clinically relevant Gram-negative species and contributes to intrinsic fosfomycin resistance.IMPORTANCE There is a critical need to identify alternate approaches to treat infections caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative bacteria. Fosfomycin is an old antibiotic which is routinely used for the treatment of urinary tract infections, although there is substantial interest in expanding its use to systemic infections caused by XDR Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we show that fosA genes, which encode dimeric Mn2+- and K+-dependent glutathione S-transferase, are widely distributed in the genomes of

  6. STUDY ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ESBL PRODUCING GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections have been a major problem, because of the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, in particular B - lactamase producing bacteria. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing gram negative organisms pose a great challenge in treatment o f SSI present study is aimed at determining multiple drug resistance in gram negative bacteria & to find out ESBL producers, in correlation with treatment outcome. A total of 120 wound infected cases were studied. Staphylococcus aureus was predominant bact erium - 20.Among gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas species is predominant (14 followed by Escherichia coli (13 , Klebsiella species (12 , Proteus (9 Citrobacter (4 Providencia (2 & Acinetobacter species (2 . Out of 56 gramnegative bacteria isolated, 20 were i dentified as ESBL producers, which was statistically significant. Delay in wound healing correlated with infection by ESBL producers, which alarms the need of abstinence from antibiotic abuse

  7. [Resistant gram-negative bacteria. Therapeutic approach and risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, P; Gilsanz, F; Maseda, E

    2016-09-01

    The rapid spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has become a serious threat, especially in critical care units, thereby prolonging the hospital stay. Enterobacteriaceae have a high capacity to adapt to any environment. Plasmids are the reason behind their expansion. The choice of empiric therapy for intra-abdominal or urinary infections requires knowledge of the intrinsic microbiological variability of each hospital or critical care unit, as well as the source of infection, safety or antibiotic toxicity, interaction with other drugs, the dosage regimen and the presence of risk factors. Carbapenems are the drug of choice in the case of suspected infection by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The new ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam drugs are opening up promising new horizons in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

  8. Antimicrobial compounds targeting Gram-negative bacteria in food: Their mode of action and combinational effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are a major cause of food spoilage and foodborne illnesses. However, finding effective solutions against Gram-negative bacteria are complicated because of increasing consumer demands for more natural, minimally processed, and fresh high quality food products without...... they interact with bacterial cells to exert their mechanism of inhibition or killing. Furthermore, natural antimicrobials are often not potent enough as single compounds, and may cause unwanted sensory side-effects, which limit the quantities that can be applied to food. These problems might be circumvented...... by combining antimicrobials to decrease the concentrations needed without compromising their antimicrobial activity. The work described in this dissertation presents two projects concerning the mechanism of action of selected natural antimicrobial compounds primarily against Gram-negative bacteria, and two...

  9. Antibiotic resistance: What is so special about multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Martin; Bhattacharya, Sanjay; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gebel, Jürgen; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heeg, Peter; Ilschner, Carola; Kramer, Axel; Larson, Elaine; Merkens, Wolfgang; Mielke, Martin; Oltmanns, Peter; Ross, Birgit; Rotter, Manfred; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Sonntag, Hans-Günther; Trautmann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In the past years infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria have dramatically increased in all parts of the world. This consensus paper is based on presentations, subsequent discussions and an appraisal of current literature by a panel of international experts invited by the Rudolf Schülke Stiftung, Hamburg. It deals with the epidemiology and the inherent properties of Gram-negative bacteria, elucidating the patterns of the spread of antibiotic resistance, highlighting reservoirs as well as transmission pathways and risk factors for infection, mortality, treatment and prevention options as well as the consequences of their prevalence in livestock. Following a global, One Health approach and based on the evaluation of the existing knowledge about these pathogens, this paper gives recommendations for prevention and infection control measures as well as proposals for various target groups to tackle the threats posed by Gram-negative bacteria and prevent the spread and emergence of new antibiotic resistances. PMID:28451516

  10. [Antimicrobial therapy in severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyńska, Wiesława

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to patients in healthcare settings, and are especially prevalent and problematic in intensive therapy units. Recently, the emergence of pandrug-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria poses additional concerns. This review examines the clinical impact and epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality among ITU patients. Beta-lactamases, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases play the most important role in resistance to antibiotics. Despite the tendency to increased resistance, carbapenems administered by continuous infusion remain the most effective drugs in severe sepsis. Drug concentration monitoring, albeit rarely used in practice, is necessary to ensure an effective therapeutic effect.

  11. Prevalence of AmpC β-lactamase among Gram-negative bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Infections caused by AmpC-positive bacteria results in high patient morbidity and mortality making their detection clinically important as they cannot be detected in routine susceptibility testing. This study aim to determine the prevalence of AmpC β-lactamase among Gram negative bacteria recovered from clinical ...

  12. Virulence blockers as alternatives to antibiotics: type III secretion inhibitors against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, P; Elofsson, M; Rosell, S; Wolf-Watz, H

    2008-07-01

    In recent years mounting problems related to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have resulted in the prediction that we are entering the preantibiotic era. A way of preventing such a development would be to introduce novel antibacterial medicines with modes of action distinct from conventional antibiotics. Recent studies of bacterial virulence factors and toxins have resulted in increased understanding of the way in which pathogenic bacteria manipulate host cellular processes. This knowledge may now be used to develop novel antibacterial medicines that disarm pathogenic bacteria. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is known to be a potent virulence mechanism shared by a broad spectrum of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria that interact with human, animal and plant hosts by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol of host cells. Diseases, such as bubonic plague, shigellosis, salmonellosis, typhoid fever, pulmonary infections, sexually transmitted chlamydia and diarrhoea largely depend on the bacterial proteins injected by the T3SS machinery. Recently a number of T3SS inhibitors have been identified using screening-based approaches. One class of inhibitors, the salicylidene acylhydrazides, has been subjected to chemical optimization and evaluation in several in vitro and ex vivo assays in multiple bacterial species including Yersinia spp., Chlamydia spp., Salmonella spp. and Pseudotuberculosis aeruginosa. Reports published up to date indicate that T3SS inhibitors have the potential to be developed into novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  13. Outcome of infections due to pandrug-resistant (PDR Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliziotis Ioannis A

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing problem of infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria has led to re-use of polymyxins in several countries. However, there are already clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria that are resistant to all available antibiotics, including polymyxins. Methods We present a case series of patients with infections due to pathogens resistant to all antimicrobial agents tested, including polymyxins. An isolate was defined as pandrug-resistant (PDR if it exhibited resistance to all 7 anti-pseudomonal antimicrobial agents, i.e. antipseudomonal penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and polymyxins. Results Clinical cure of the infection due to pandrug-resistant (PDR Gram-negative bacteria, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Klebsiella pneumoniae was observed in 4 out of 6 patients with combination of colistin and beta lactam antibiotics. Conclusion Colistin, in combination with beta lactam antibiotics, may be a useful agent for the management of pandrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. The re-use of polymyxins, an old class of antibiotics, should be done with caution in an attempt to delay the rate of development of pandrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

  14. Combination Therapy for Treatment of Infections with Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Sara E.; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Combination antibiotic therapy for invasive infections with Gram-negative bacteria is employed in many health care facilities, especially for certain subgroups of patients, including those with neutropenia, those with infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, those with ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the severely ill. An argument can be made for empiric combination therapy, as we are witnessing a rise in infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. The wisdom of continued combination therapy after an organism is isolated and antimicrobial susceptibility data are known, however, is more controversial. The available evidence suggests that the greatest benefit of combination antibiotic therapy stems from the increased likelihood of choosing an effective agent during empiric therapy, rather than exploitation of in vitro synergy or the prevention of resistance during definitive treatment. In this review, we summarize the available data comparing monotherapy versus combination antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of infections with Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22763634

  15. Gram-negative, but not Gram-positive, bacteria elicit strong PGE2 production in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessle, Christina C; Andersson, Bengt; Wold, Agnes E

    2003-12-01

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria induce different cytokine patterns in human mononuclear cells. We have seen that Gram-positives preferentially induce IL-12 and TNF-alpha, whereas Gram-negatives induce more IL-10, IL-6, and IL-8. In this study, we compared the capacity of these two groups of bacteria to induce PGE2. Monocytes stimulated with Gram-negative bacterial species induced much more PGE2 than did Gram-positive bacteria (5600 +/- 330 vs. 1700 +/- 670 pg/mL, p Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We suggest that Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria may stimulate different innate effector functions; Gram-positive bacteria promoting cell-mediated effector functions whereas Gram-negative bacteria inducing mediators inhibiting the same.

  16. Protamine-induced permeabilization of cell envelopes of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Verheul, A.; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    carboxyfluorescein and ATP after 2 to 5 min. Maximum antibacterial activity was reached at alkaline pH and in the absence of divalent cations. The efficient permeabilization of cell envelopes of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria suggests that protamine causes a general disruption of the cell envelope...

  17. Colonization and resistance dynamics of gram-negative bacteria in patients during and after hospitalization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.G. Filius (Margreet); I.C. Gyssens (Inge); I.M. Kershof (Irma); P.J. Roovers (Patty); A. Ott (Alewijn); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.P. Endtz (Hubert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe colonization and resistance dynamics of aerobic gram-negative bacteria in the intestinal and oropharyngeal microfloras of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and general wards were investigated during and after hospitalization. A total of 3,316 specimens were obtained

  18. Antibacterial activities of β-glucan (laminaran) against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamidah, A.; Hardoko, Prihanto, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the antibacterial activity of β-Glucan (laminaran) of LAE and LME extracts from brown algae Sargassum crassifolium using HPMS and Ultrasonication against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli). The highest antibacterial activities of LME extract obtained using the HPMS method against Gram-positive bacteria (B. subtilis and S. aureus) were at 18:10 and 18.80 mm. The ultrasonication method showed a lower inhibition trend than the HPMS method, with MIC and MBC values of 250 mg/ml and 2-8 CFU/ml, respectively, in all Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The results showed that LME extract at a concentration of 250 mg/mL is bacteriostatic against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

  19. Infections Caused by Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria: Epidemiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Keith S; Pogue, Jason M

    2015-10-01

    Infections caused by resistant gram-negative bacteria are becoming increasingly prevalent and now constitute a serious threat to public health worldwide because they are difficult to treat and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In the United States, there has been a steady increase since 2000 in rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, particularly among hospitalized patients with intraabdominal infections, urinary tract infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and bacteremia. Colonization with resistant gram-negative bacteria is common among residents in long-term care facilities (particularly those residents with an indwelling device), and these facilities are considered important originating sources of such strains for hospitals. Antibiotic resistance is associated with a substantial clinical and economic burden, including increased mortality, greater hospital and antibiotic costs, and longer stays in hospitals and intensive care units. Control of resistant gram-negative infections requires a comprehensive approach, including strategies for risk factor identification, detection and identification of resistant organisms, and implementation of infection-control and prevention strategies. In treating resistant gram-negative infections, a review of surveillance data and hospital-specific antibiograms, including resistance patterns within local institutions, and consideration of patient characteristics are helpful in guiding the choice of empiric therapy. Although only a few agents are available with activity against resistant gram-negative organisms, two recently released β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations - ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam - have promising activity against these organisms. In this article, we review the epidemiology, risk factors, and

  20. Breaking barriers: expansion of the use of endolysins as novel antibacterials against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, Yves; Lavigne, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria drives the search for novel classes of antibiotics to replenish our armamentarium against bacterial infections. This is particularly critical for Gram-negative pathogens, which are intrinsically resistant to many existing classes of antibiotics due to the presence of a protective outer membrane. In addition, the antibiotics development pipeline is mainly oriented to Gram-positive pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A promising novel class of antibacterials is endolysins. These enzymes encoded by bacterial viruses hydrolyze the peptidoglycan layer with high efficiency, resulting in abrupt osmotic lysis and cell death. Their potential as novel antibacterials to treat Gram-positive bacteria has been extensively demonstrated; however, the Gram-negative outer membrane has presented a formidable barrier for the use of endolysins against Gram-negatives until recently. This review reports on the most recent advances in the development of endolysins to kill Gram-negative species with a special focus on endolysin-engineered Artilysins(®).

  1. Strategies for the use of bacteriocins in Gram-negative bacteria: relevance in food microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudêncio, Cláudia Vieira; Dos Santos, Miriam Teresinha; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized peptides that have bacteriostatic or bactericidal effects on other bacteria. The use of bacteriocins has emerged as an important strategy to increase food security and to minimize the incidence of foodborne diseases, due to its minimal impact on the nutritional and sensory properties of food products. Gram-negative bacteria are naturally resistant to the action of bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria, which are widely explored in foods. However, these microorganisms can be sensitized by mild treatments, such as the use of chelating agents, by treatment with plant essential oils or by physical treatments such as heating, freezing or high pressure processing. This sensitization is important in food microbiology, because most pathogens that cause foodborne diseases are Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of these treatments is influenced by several factors, such as pH, temperature, the composition of the food and target microbiota. In this review, we comment on the main methods used for the sensitization of Gram-negative bacteria, especially Salmonella, to improve the action of bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria.

  2. СARBAPENEMASE-PRODUCING GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA IN A SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL OF ST. PETERSBURG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Polischouk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Species composition, susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, incidence and type of carbapenemase of carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacteria, isolated in the Russian Research Centre of Radiology and Surgical Technologies from February 2014 to April 2016 were described. Screening of carbapenem-resistant bacteria was conducted by plating biomaterial on the chromogenic medium (“CHROMagar KPC”, DRG, France, species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS on the analyzer VITEK MS (bioMé- rieux, France. The sensitivity of gram-negative bacteria to antimicrobial drugs was determined on the analyzer VITEK-2 (bioMérieux, and the obtained results were interpreted in accordance with EUCAST criteria v.6.0, 2016. Genes encoding carbapenemase of KPC, OXA-48/162, VIM, IMP, NDM, OXA-51, OXA40/24, OXA-23 and OXA-58 groups were detected by multiplex real-time PCR (AmpliSens, Russia. 813 clinically relevant bacteria (602 patients were obtained, including 405 gram-negative, among which 5.2% (21 strain from 16 patients non-susceptible to meropenem and/or imipenem: Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 5, Enterobacter cloacae (n = 2, Serratia marcescens (n = 1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 3, Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 10. Clinical material from 4 patients was infected by up to 3 carbapenem-non-susceptible strains of different species of gram-negative bacteria at the same time. The genes encoding acquired carbapenemases were detected in 84% of the nonsusceptible to carbapenems isolates: in A. baumannii — OXA40/24 (n = 8; in K. pneumoniae — OXA-48 (n = 1, KPC (n = 1 and NDM (n = 2; in P. aeruginosa — VIM (n = 1 and KPC (n = 1; in E. cloacae — KPC (n = 1. OXA-48 carbapenemase was also detected in one carbapenem-sensitive strain of K. pneumonia. All carbapenemase-producing strains had a phenotype of multidrug resistance. The results of the study showed that over the analyzed period, the

  3. Exogenous lytic activity of SPN9CC endolysin against gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Shin, Hakdong; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-06-28

    Concerns over drug-resistant bacteria have stimulated interest in developing alternative methods to control bacterial infections. Endolysin, a phage-encoded enzyme that breaks down bacterial peptidoglycan at the terminal stage of the phage reproduction cycle, is reported to be effective for the control of bacterial pathogenic bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis of the SPN9CC bacteriophage genome revealed a gene that encodes an endolysin with a domain structure similar to those of the endolysins produced by the P1 and P22 coliphages. The SPN9CC endolysin was purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The endolysin was relatively stable and active over a broad temperature range (from 24°C to 65°C). It showed maximal activity at 50°C, and its optimum pH range was from pH 7.5 to 8.5. The SPN9CC endolysin showed antimicrobial activity against only gram-negative bacteria and functioned by cutting the glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan. Interestingly, the SPN9CC endolysin could lyse intact gram-negative bacteria in the absence of EDTA as an outer membrane permeabilizer. The exogenous lytic activity of the SPN9CC endolysin makes it a potential therapeutic agent against gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Gram-negative and -positive bacteria differentiation in blood culture samples by headspace volatile compound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Michael E; Janitza, Silke; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Graßmann-Lichtenauer, Carola; Praun, Siegfried; Denzer, Wolfgang; Schelling, Gustav; Schubert, Sören

    2016-12-01

    Identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures still relies on standard techniques such as Gram staining followed by culturing with definite microorganism identification. Alternatively, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or the analysis of headspace volatile compound (VC) composition produced by cultures can help to differentiate between microorganisms under experimental conditions. This study assessed the efficacy of volatile compound based microorganism differentiation into Gram-negatives and -positives in unselected positive blood culture samples from patients. Headspace gas samples of positive blood culture samples were transferred to sterilized, sealed, and evacuated 20 ml glass vials and stored at -30 °C until batch analysis. Headspace gas VC content analysis was carried out via an auto sampler connected to an ion-molecule reaction mass spectrometer (IMR-MS). Measurements covered a mass range from 16 to 135 u including CO2, H2, N2, and O2. Prediction rules for microorganism identification based on VC composition were derived using a training data set and evaluated using a validation data set within a random split validation procedure. One-hundred-fifty-two aerobic samples growing 27 Gram-negatives, 106 Gram-positives, and 19 fungi and 130 anaerobic samples growing 37 Gram-negatives, 91 Gram-positives, and two fungi were analysed. In anaerobic samples, ten discriminators were identified by the random forest method allowing for bacteria differentiation into Gram-negative and -positive (error rate: 16.7 % in validation data set). For aerobic samples the error rate was not better than random. In anaerobic blood culture samples of patients IMR-MS based headspace VC composition analysis facilitates bacteria differentiation into Gram-negative and -positive.

  5. Bacteremias in liver transplant recipients: shift toward gram-negative bacteria as predominant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nina; Wagener, Marilyn M; Obman, Asia; Cacciarelli, Thomas V; de Vera, Michael E; Gayowski, Timothy

    2004-07-01

    During the 1990s, gram-positive bacteria emerged as major pathogens after liver transplantation. We sought to determine whether the pathogens associated with bacteremias in liver transplant recipients have changed. Patients included 233 liver transplant recipients transplanted between 1989 and 2003. The proportion of all infections due to bacteremias increased significantly over time (P gram-negatives increased from 25% in the period of 1989-1993 to 51.8% in 1998-03, that of gram-positive bacteria decreased from 75% in the period of 1989-93 to 48.2% in the period of 1998-2003. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most frequent pathogens in bacteremic patients. The incidence of bacteremias due to MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa has remained unchanged (P gram-negative bacteria, particularly Klebsiella pneumoniae has increased (P =.02). Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in the current quartile were not clonally related. In conclusion, bacteremias as a proportion of all infections in liver transplant recipients have increased significantly over time, due in part to a decline in infections due to other major pathogens, e.g., fungi, primarily Candida species, and CMV. Gram-negative bacteria have emerged as predominant pathogens in bacteremic liver transplant recipients.

  6. Surface-Exposed Lipoproteins: An Emerging Secretion Phenomenon in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marlena M; Bernstein, Harris D

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are hydrophilic proteins that are anchored to a cell membrane by N-terminally linked fatty acids. It is widely believed that nearly all lipoproteins produced by Gram-negative bacteria are either retained in the inner membrane (IM) or transferred to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM). Lipoproteins that are exposed on the cell surface have also been reported but are generally considered to be rare. Results from a variety of recent studies, however, now suggest that the prevalence of surface-exposed lipoproteins has been underestimated. In this review we describe the evidence that the surface exposure of lipoproteins in Gram-negative bacteria is a widespread phenomenon and discuss possible mechanisms by which these proteins might be transported across the OM. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: current epidemics, antimicrobial susceptibility and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Lee, Wen-Sen; Lam, Carlos; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Chen, Ray-Jade; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenemases, with versatile hydrolytic capacity against β-lactams, are now an important cause of resistance of Gram-negative bacteria. The genes encoding for the acquired carbapenemases are associated with a high potential for dissemination. In addition, infections due to Gram-negative bacteria with acquired carbapenemase production would lead to high clinical mortality rates. Of the acquired carbapenemases, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (Ambler class A), Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (Ambler class B), New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (Ambler class B) and many OXA enzymes (OXA-23-like, OXA-24-like, OXA-48-like, OXA-58-like, class D) are considered to be responsible for the worldwide resistance epidemics. As compared with monotherapy with colistin or tigecycline, combination therapy has been shown to effectively lower case-fatality rates. However, development of new antibiotics is crucial in the present pandrug-resistant era.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and transport at the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandeo, Paola; Martorana, Alessandra M; Polissi, Alessandra

    2017-11-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer containing a unique glycolipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in its outer leaflet. LPS molecules confer to the OM peculiar permeability barrier properties enabling Gram-negative bacteria to exclude many toxic compounds, including clinically useful antibiotics, and to survive harsh environments. Transport of LPS poses several problems to the cells due to the amphipatic nature of this molecule. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the LPS transport machinery, discuss the challenges associated with this process and present the solutions that bacterial cells have evolved to address the problem of LPS transport and assembly at the cell surface. Finally, we discuss how knowledge on LPS biogenesis can be translated for the development of novel antimicrobial therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  10. Microconductometric immunosensor for label-free and sensitive detection of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ichi, Sarra; Leon, Fanny; Vossier, Ludivine; Marchandin, Helene; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Coste, Joliette; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Fournier-Wirth, Chantal

    2014-04-15

    Blood safety is a global health goal. In developed countries, bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates is the highest infectious risk in transfusion despite the current preventive strategies. We aimed to develop a conductometric biosensor for the generic, rapid and sensitive detection of Gram-negative bacteria. Our strategy is based on immunosensors: addressable magnetic nanoparticles coupled with anti-LPS antibodies were used for the generic capture of Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial capture was characterized by impedancemetric and microscopic measurements. The results obtained with conductometric measurements allowed real-time, sensitive detection of Escherichia coli or Serratia marcescens cultures from 1 to 10(3) CFU mL(-1). The ability of the immunosensor to detect Gram negative bacteria was also tested on clinically relevant strains. The conductometric immunosensor allowed the direct detection of 10-10(3) CFU mL(-1) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains that were undetectable using standard immunoblot methods. Results showed that the conductometric response was not inhibited in 1% serum. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Polymicrobial infections involving clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Qu, Yue; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-12-01

    Interactions between fungi and bacteria and their relevance to human health and disease have recently attracted increased attention in biomedical fields. Emerging evidence shows that bacteria and fungi can have synergistic or antagonistic interactions, each with important implications for human colonization and disease. It is now appreciated that some of these interactions may be strategic and helps promote the survival of one or both microorganisms within the host. This review will shed light on clinically relevant interactions between fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Mechanism of interaction, host immune responses, and preventive measures will also be reviewed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Combinatorial events of insertion sequences and ICE in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toleman, Mark A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is incremental and linked to genetic elements that function in a so-called 'one-ended transposition' manner, including ISEcp1, ISCR elements and Tn3-like transposons. The power of these elements lies in their inability to consistently recognize one of their own terminal sequences, while recognizing more genetically distant surrogate sequences. This has the effect of mobilizing the DNA sequence found adjacent to their initial location. In general, resistance in Gram-negatives is closely linked to a few one-off events. These include the capture of the class 1 integron by a Tn5090-like transposon; the formation of the 3' conserved segment (3'-CS); and the fusion of the ISCR1 element to the 3'-CS. The structures formed by these rare events have been massively amplified and disseminated in Gram-negative bacteria, but hitherto, are rarely found in Gram-positives. Such events dominate current resistance gene acquisition and are instrumental in the construction of large resistance gene islands on chromosomes and plasmids. Similar combinatorial events appear to have occurred between conjugative plasmids and phages constructing hybrid elements called integrative and conjugative elements or conjugative transposons. These elements are beginning to be closely linked to some of the more powerful resistance mechanisms such as the extended spectrum β-lactamases, metallo- and AmpC type β-lactamases. Antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is dominated by unusual combinatorial mistakes of Insertion sequences and gene fusions which have been selected and amplified by antibiotic pressure enabling the formation of extended resistance islands. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rationalizing the permeation of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Acosta-Gutierrez, Silvia; Benkerrou, Dehbia; D'Agostino, Tommaso; Malloci, Giuliano; Samanta, Susruta; Bodrenko, Igor; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The increasing level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, together with the lack of new potential drug scaffolds in the pipeline, make the problem of infectious diseases a global challenge for modern medicine. The main reason that Gram-negative bacteria are particularly challenging is the presence of an outer cell-protecting membrane, which is not present in Gram-positive species. Such an asymmetric bilayer is a highly effective barrier for polar molecules. Several protein systems are expressed in the outer membrane to control the internal concentration of both nutrients and noxious species, in particular: (i) water-filled channels that modulate the permeation of polar molecules and ions according to concentration gradients, and (ii) efflux pumps to actively expel toxic compounds. Thus, besides expressing specific enzymes for drugs degradation, Gram-negative bacteria can also resist by modulating the influx and efflux of antibiotics, keeping the internal concentration low. However, there are no direct and robust experimental methods capable of measuring the permeability of small molecules, thus severely limiting our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that ultimately control the permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane. This is the innovation gap to be filled for Gram-negative bacteria. This review is focused on the permeation of small molecules through porins, considered the main path for the entry of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria. A fundamental understanding of how these proteins are able to filter small molecules is a prerequisite to design/optimize antibacterials with improved permeation. The level of sophistication of modern molecular modeling algorithms and the advances in new computer hardware has made the simulation of such complex processes possible at the molecular level. In this work we aim to share our experience and perspectives in the context of a multidisciplinary extended collaboration within the IMI

  14. Emergence of Pan-drug resistance amongst gram negative bacteria! The First case series from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghafur

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increasing prevalence of carbapenem resistant Gram negative bacteria is a serious clinical and public health challenge. Bacteria resistant to all available antibiotics (Pan Drug Resistance herald the onset of post antibiotics era. We hereby report clinical profile of 13 patients with pan drug resistant gram negative isolates. Methods:Retrospective analysis of 13 patients with pan drug resistant gram negative isolates over the last 18 months was done by medical records review. Identification of the isolates and susceptibility testing was done using VITEK auto analyzer in concordance with the corresponding CLSI guidelines. Results:Out of four patients with bacteremic isolates, three patients received colistin based combination therapy. Though two of these patients had microbiologic clearance, all the three died. Out of the 9 patients with non bacteremic isolates, 4 had infection and 5 had colonization. Three (out of four were treated with combination therapy including colistin and one patient received colistin monotherapy. All four patients had microbiological clearance. Three patients had clinical cure and were discharged. One patient later developed bacteremia and died. Conclusion:Infections, particularly blood stream with pan drug resistant organisms has a higher mortality. Urgent studies to reevaluate existing therapeutic options and research into new antibiotic molecules are the need of the hour. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(3: 86-91

  15. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-12-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role.

  16. Metallo- β-lactamases among Multidrug Resistant (MDR Gram Negative Bacteria Isolated from Clinical Specimens during 2009 in Sanandaj, Kurdistan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himen Salimizand

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, there are numerous reports about emerging multi drug resistant gram negative bacteria all around the world, especially in ICUs. Rarely, Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL enzymes are responsible for these cases. Study of MBLs for diagnosing and preventing distribution of the origin of infection are critical issues. In addition, we would like to compare the efficacy of Iranian and foreign- made antibiotic disks. Materials and Methods: During 2009 all entered clinical specimens to the laboratory tested for detecting gram negative bacteria. Isolated bacteria were tested by Kirby-Bauer method to antibiotic susceptibility test by Iranian and foreign (MAST disks. For gram negative carbapenem resistant isolates, PCR technique used to detect VIM, GIM, and SIM variants of MBLs.Results: During one year, 17890 clinical specimens referred Besat laboratory. The most specimen was Urine (8172 followed by blood culture (5190 that in which 1110 gram negative and positives isolated. Out of which, 778 (70% of isolates were gram negatives. MDR gram negatives were 157 (20.2%. Imipenem and meropenem were the most efficient antibiotics (all susceptible and ceftriaxone was the least (19 % susceptible. E. coli was the most prevalent isolate. 79 Gram negative isolates (10.1% were resistant to Iranian-made discs but all susceptible for foreign ones. All 79 isolates were tested by PCR for MBL genes, that, all were negative. Besides, Iranian imipenem and cefepime disks have had distinguishable difference in susceptibility of isolates.Conclusion: Fortunately, none of gram negative isolates were MBL producer, which revealed no colonization of MBL producing bacteria. Iranian-made disks appear efficient except for imipenem and cefepime.

  17. O-antigen protects gram-negative bacteria from histone killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Chaput

    Full Text Available Beyond their traditional role of wrapping DNA, histones display antibacterial activity to Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. To identify bacterial components that allow survival to a histone challenge, we selected resistant bacteria from homologous Escherichia coli libraries that harbor plasmids carrying pieces of the chromosome in different sizes. We identified genes required for exopolysaccharide production and for the synthesis of the polysaccharide domain of the lipopolysaccharide, called O-antigen. Indeed, O-antigen and exopolysaccharide conferred further resistance to histones. Notably, O-antigen also conferred resistance to histones in the pathogens Shigella flexneri and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  18. The structures of lipopolysaccharides from plant-associated gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Antonio; Newman, Mari-Anne; Lanzetta, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) have multiple roles in plant-microbe interactions. LPSs contribute to the low permeabilities of bacterial outer membranes, which act as barriers to protect bacteria from plant-derived antimicrobial substances. Conversely, perception of LPSs...... by plant cells can lead to the triggering of defence responses or to the priming of the plant to respond more rapidly and/or to a greater degree to subsequent pathogen challenge. LPSs are thus key molecules in the interactions between bacteria and plants, either in symbiosis or pathogenesis. Since LPSs...

  19. Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative Bacteria: A Perspective Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem

    2017-01-01

    Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria are spherical membrane-enclosed entities of endocytic origin. Reported in the consortia of different bacterial species, production of OMVs into extracellular milieu seems essential for their survival. Enriched with bioactive proteins, toxins, and virulence factors, OMVs play a critical role in the bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. Emergence of OMVs as distinct cellular entities helps bacteria in adaptating to diverse niches, in competing with other bacteria to protect members of producer species and more importantly play a crucial role in host-pathogen interaction. Composition of OMV, their ability to modulate host immune response, along with coordinated secretion of bacterial effector proteins, endows them with the armory, which can withstand hostile environments. Study of the OMV production under natural and diverse stress conditions has broadened the horizons, and also opened new frontiers in delineating the molecular machinery involved in disease pathogenesis. Playing diverse biological and pathophysiological functions, OMVs hold a great promise in enabling resurgence of bacterial diseases, in concomitance with the steep decline in the efficiency of antibiotics. Having multifaceted role, their emergence as a causative agent for a series of infectious diseases increases the probability for their exploitation in the development of effective diagnostic tools and as vaccines against diverse pathogenic species of Gram-negative origin.

  20. Epidemiological surveillance of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in a solid organ transplantation department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geladari, Anastasia; Karampatakis, Theodoros; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Iosifidis, Elias; Tsiatsiou, Olga; Politi, Lida; Karyoti, Aggeliki; Papanikolaou, Vasilios; Tsakris, Athanassios; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    We assessed the impact of intensified infection control measures (ICM) on colonization and infection caused by carbapenem-resistant (CR) Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii in a solid organ transplantation (SOT) department. A quasi-experimental methodology was followed. The study was divided into three periods: pre-intervention, intervention with implementation of an ICM bundle including active surveillance program (ASP) and gradually enhanced measures, and post-ASP without ASP. The bundle included active surveillance cultures, contact precautions, hand hygiene, education of health care workers (HCWs), monitoring of compliance, and environmental cleaning. Incidence of colonization and infection caused by CR gram-negative bacteria was recorded. Molecular analysis of CR bacteria was performed for a certain period. During the intervention, incidence of colonization reduced from 19% to 9% (Pbacteria increased from 2.8 to 6.9/1000 bed-days (Pgram-negative bacteria are endemic, colonization and infection rates by these bacteria are high among SOT recipients. Implementation of enhanced ICM in all related units of a hospital, although challenging, reduces colonization rates by CR gram-negative bacteria. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Gramicidin S is active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondejewski, L H; Farmer, S W; Wishart, D S; Hancock, R E; Hodges, R S

    1996-06-01

    Four linear and four cyclic analogs of gramicidin S (GS) in which D-Phe was replaced with either D-His, D-Ser, D-Tyr or D-Asn have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis and characterized with respect to antibacterial, antifungal and hemolytic activity. Unlike previous reports, GS and a number of cyclic analogs were found to be active against gram-positive as well as gram-negative bacteria. GS showed MICs ranging from 3 to 12.5 micrograms/mL for gram-negative bacteria, compared to MICs of 3 micrograms/mL for gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, these analogs were also found to exhibit antifungal activity. Unlike the cyclic analogs, all linear analogs were found to be inactive against a wide range of microorganisms tested, and showed low levels of hemolytic activity. The antibacterial activity was found to be highly dependent on the type of assay used, with solution-based assays showing greater activity against gram-negative bacteria than agar-based assays. The GS cyclic analogs were all less toxic than GS itself, with the analog containing the D-Phe to D-Tyr substitution showing the greatest activity of the synthetic analogs. Hemolytic activity in solution against human and sheep red blood cells paralleled antibiotic activity, with those peptides exhibiting greater antibiotic activity generally showing greater hemolytic activity. Membrane destabilization as monitored using the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine was also found to parallel antibacterial and hemolytic activity of cyclic and linear analogs. These results indicate that GS and certain related analogs may have applications as broad-spectrum antibiotics and should be reevaluated for such purposes.

  2. Distribution of multi-resistant Gram-negative versus Gram-positive bacteria in the hospital inanimate environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmen, S W; Häfner, H; Zolldann, D; Stanzel, S; Lütticken, R

    2004-03-01

    We prospectively studied the difference in detection rates of multi-resistant Gram-positive and multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in the inanimate environment of patients harbouring these organisms. Up to 20 different locations around 190 patients were surveyed. Fifty-four patients were infected or colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and 136 with multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. The environmental detection rate for MRSA or VRE was 24.7% (174/705 samples) compared with 4.9% (89/1827 samples) for multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (PGram-positive bacteria were isolated more frequently than Gram-negatives from the hands of patients (PGram-positive and Gram-negative isolates. Our results suggest that the inanimate environment serves as a secondary source for MRSA and VRE, but less so for Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, strict contact isolation in a single room with complete barrier precautions is recommended for MRSA or VRE; however, for multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, contact isolation with barrier precautions for close contact but without a single room seems sufficient. This benefits not only the patients, but also the hospital by removing some of the strain placed on already over-stretched resources.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis for fast detection of heterogeneous population in colistin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautrey, Guillaume; Duval, Raphaël E; Chevalley, Alicia; Fontanay, Stéphane; Clarot, Igor

    2015-10-01

    It has been shown that diverse strains of bacteria can be separated according to their characteristic surface properties by means of CE. We employed here this analytical technique to the study of colistin-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, which involves the selection of mutants with modified outer membrane composition resulting in changes of surface cell properties. In the same way as with molecular entities, we performed firstly the validation of an ITP-based CE method for three common pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria namely Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Secondly, we compared the electrophoretic profiles of bacterial samples from a colistin-susceptible clinical isolate of K. pneumoniae and from the corresponding colistin-resistant derivative. By a simple CE run taking a few minutes, the coexistence of several bacterial subpopulations in the colistin-resistant derivative was clearly evidenced. This work encourages further research that would allow applications of CE in clinical laboratory for a daily monitoring of bacterial population in cared patients when "last-chance" colistin treatment is initiated against multidrug-resistant bacteria. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Several Plant Extracts and Oils against Some Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Al-Mariri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants are considered new resources for producing agents that could act as alternatives to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 28 plant extracts and oils against four Gram-negative bacterial species. Methods: Experimental, in vitro, evaluation of the activities of 28 plant extracts and oils as well as some antibiotics against E. coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae was performed. The activity against 15 isolates of each bacterium was determined by disc diffusion method at a concentration of 5%. Microdilution susceptibility assay was used in order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the plant extracts, oils, and antibiotics. Results: Among the evaluated herbs, only Origanum syriacum L., Thymus syriacus Boiss., Syzygium aromaticum L., Juniperus foetidissima Wild, Allium sativum L., Myristica fragrans Houtt, and Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. essential oils and Laurus nobilis L. plant extract showed anti-bacterial activity. The MIC50 values of these products against the Gram-negative organisms varied from 1.5 (Proteus spp. and K. pneumoniae( and 6.25 µl/ml (Yersinia enterocolitica O9 to 12.5 µl/ml (E. coli O:157. Conclusion: Among the studied essential oils, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. essential oils were the most effective. Moreover, Cephalosporin and Ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics against almost all the studied bacteria. Therefore, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. could act as bactericidal agents against Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Several Plant Extracts and Oils against Some Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Safi, Mazen

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal plants are considered new resources for producing agents that could act as alternatives to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 28 plant extracts and oils against four Gram-negative bacterial species. Experimental, in vitro, evaluation of the activities of 28 plant extracts and oils as well as some antibiotics against E. coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae was performed. The activity against 15 isolates of each bacterium was determined by disc diffusion method at a concentration of 5%. Microdilution susceptibility assay was used in order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the plant extracts, oils, and antibiotics. Among the evaluated herbs, only Origanum syriacum L., Thymus syriacus Boiss., Syzygium aromaticum L., Juniperus foetidissima Wild, Allium sativum L., Myristica fragrans Houtt, and Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. essential oils and Laurus nobilis L. plant extract showed anti-bacterial activity. The MIC50 values of these products against the Gram-negative organisms varied from 1.5 (Proteus spp. and K. pneumoniae( and 6.25 µl/ml (Yersinia enterocolitica O9 ) to 12.5 µl/ml (E. coli O:157). Among the studied essential oils, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. essential oils were the most effective. Moreover, Cephalosporin and Ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics against almost all the studied bacteria. Therefore, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. could act as bactericidal agents against Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Regulatory mechanisms differ in UMP kinases from gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrin, Cécile; Straut, Monica; Slavova-Azmanova, Neli; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian; Assairi, Liliane; Ionescu, Mihaela; Palibroda, Nicolae; Bârzu, Octavian; Gilles, Anne-Marie

    2007-03-09

    In this work, we examined the regulation by GTP and UTP of the UMP kinases from eight bacterial species. The enzyme from Gram-positive organisms exhibited cooperative kinetics with ATP as substrate. GTP decreased this cooperativity and increased the affinity for ATP. UTP had the opposite effect, as it decreased the enzyme affinity for ATP. The nucleotide analogs 5-bromo-UTP and 5-iodo-UTP were 5-10 times stronger inhibitors than the parent compound. On the other hand, UMP kinases from the Gram-negative organisms did not show cooperativity in substrate binding and catalysis. Activation by GTP resulted mainly from the reversal of inhibition caused by excess UMP, and inhibition by UTP was accompanied by a strong increase in the apparent K(m) for UMP. Altogether, these results indicate that, depending on the bacteria considered, GTP and UTP interact with different enzyme recognition sites. In Gram-positive bacteria, GTP and UTP bind to a single site or largely overlapping sites, shifting the T R equilibrium to either the R or T form, a scenario corresponding to almost all regulatory proteins, commonly called K systems. In Gram-negative organisms, the GTP-binding site corresponds to the unique allosteric site of the Gram-positive bacteria. In contrast, UTP interacts cooperatively with a site that overlaps the catalytic center, i.e. the UMP-binding site and part of the ATP-binding site. These characteristics make UTP an original regulator of UMP kinases from Gram-negative organisms, beyond the common scheme of allosteric control.

  7. Adhesins Involved in Attachment to Abiotic Surfaces by Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ducret, Adrien; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V

    2015-08-01

    During the first step of biofilm formation, initial attachment is dictated by physicochemical and electrostatic interactions between the surface and the bacterial envelope. Depending on the nature of these interactions, attachment can be transient or permanent. To achieve irreversible attachment, bacterial cells have developed a series of surface adhesins promoting specific or nonspecific adhesion under various environmental conditions. This article reviews the recent advances in our understanding of the secretion, assembly, and regulation of the bacterial adhesins during biofilm formation, with a particular emphasis on the fimbrial, nonfimbrial, and discrete polysaccharide adhesins in Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. An optimized staining technique for the detection of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria within tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Sandra C; Roy, Daniel C; Sanchez, Carlos J; Christy, Robert J; Burmeister, David M

    2016-04-12

    Bacterial infections are a common clinical problem in both acute and chronic wounds. With growing concerns over antibiotic resistance, treatment of bacterial infections should only occur after positive diagnosis. Currently, diagnosis is delayed due to lengthy culturing methods which may also fail to identify the presence of bacteria. While newer costly bacterial identification methods are being explored, a simple and inexpensive diagnostic tool would aid in immediate and accurate treatments for bacterial infections. Histologically, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Gram stains have been employed, but are far from optimal when analyzing tissue samples due to non-specific staining. The goal of the current study was to develop a modification of the Gram stain that enhances the contrast between bacteria and host tissue. A modified Gram stain was developed and tested as an alternative to Gram stain that improves the contrast between Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria and host tissue. Initially, clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were visualized in vitro and in biopsies of infected, porcine burns using routine Gram stain, and immunohistochemistry techniques involving bacterial strain-specific fluorescent antibodies as validation tools. H&E and Gram stain of serial biopsy sections were then compared to a modification of the Gram stain incorporating a counterstain that highlights collagen found in tissue. The modified Gram stain clearly identified both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and when compared to H&E or Gram stain alone provided excellent contrast between bacteria and non-viable burn eschar. Moreover, when applied to surgical biopsies from patients that underwent burn debridement this technique was able to clearly detect bacterial morphology within host tissue. We describe a modification of the Gram stain that provides improved contrast of Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms within host

  9. The role of intestinal colonization with gram-negative bacteria as a source for intensive care unit-acquired bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostdijk, Evelien A N; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Bonten, Marc J M

    2011-05-01

    Selective digestive tract decontamination aims to eradicate gram-negative bacteria in both the intestinal tract and respiratory tract and is combined with a 4-day course of intravenous cefotaxime. Selective oropharyngeal decontamination only aims to eradicate respiratory tract colonization. In a recent study, selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination were associated with lower day-28 mortality, when compared to standard care. Furthermore, selective digestive tract decontamination was associated with a lower incidence of intensive care unit-acquired bacteremia caused by gram-negative bacteria. We quantified the role of intestinal tract carriage with gram-negative bacteria and intensive care unit-acquired gram-negative bacteremia. Data from a cluster-randomized and a single-center observational study. Intensive care unit in The Netherlands. Patients with intensive care unit stay of >48 hrs that received selective digestive tract decontamination (n = 2,667), selective oropharyngeal decontamination (n = 2,166) or standard care (n = 1,945). Selective digestive tract decontamination or selective oropharyngeal decontamination. Incidence densities (episodes/1000 days) of intensive care unit-acquired gram-negative bacteremia were 4.5, 3.0, and 1.4 during standard care, selective oropharyngeal decontamination, and selective digestive tract decontamination, respectively, and the daily risk for developing intensive care unit-acquired gram-negative bacteria bacteremia increased until days 36, 33, and 31 for selective digestive tract decontamination, standard care, and selective oropharyngeal decontamination and was always lowest during selective digestive tract decontamination. Rectal colonization with gram-negative bacteria was present in 26% and 71% of patient days during selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination, respectively (p gram-negative bacteremia was 4.5 during patient days with

  10. The role of intestinal colonization with gram-negative bacteria as a source for intensive care unit-acquired bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, E.A.; Smet, A.M. de; Kesecioglu, J.; Bonten, M.J.; Kalkman, C.J.; Joore, H.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.; Sturm, P.D.J.; Voss, A.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selective digestive tract decontamination aims to eradicate gram-negative bacteria in both the intestinal tract and respiratory tract and is combined with a 4-day course of intravenous cefotaxime. Selective oropharyngeal decontamination only aims to eradicate respiratory tract

  11. Exploring the redox balance inside gram-negative bacteria with redox-sensitive GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Joris; Vogt, Stefanie L; Reynolds, Lisa A; Peña-Díaz, Jorge; Tupin, Audrey; Aussel, Laurent; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic bacteria are continuously fighting potential oxidative stress due to endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). To achieve this goal, bacteria possess a wide array of defenses and stress responses including detoxifying enzymes like catalases and peroxidases; however until now, the dynamics of the intra-bacterial redox balance remained poorly understood. Herein, we used redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP2) inside a variety of gram-negative bacteria to study real-time redox dynamics immediately after a challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Using this biosensor, we determined the individual contributions of catalases and peroxidases and found that each enzyme contributes more to rapid detoxification or to prolonged catalytic activity. We also found that the total catalytic power is affected by environmental conditions. Additionally, using a Salmonella strain that is devoid of detoxifying enzymes, we examined endogenous ROS production. By measuring endogenous ROS production, we assessed the role of oxidative stress in toxicity of heavy metals and antibiotics. We found that exposure to nickel induced significant oxidative stress whereas cobalt (which was previously implicated to induce oxidative stress) did not induce ROS formation. Since a turbulent debate evolves around oxidative stress as a general killing mechanism by antibiotics (aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and β-lactams), we measured oxidative stress in bacteria that were challenged with these antibiotics. Our results revealed that antibiotics do not induce ROS formation in bacteria thereby disputing a role for oxidative stress as a general killing mechanism. Together, our results expose how the intra-bacterial redox balance in individual microorganisms is affected by environmental conditions and encounters with stress-inducing compounds. These findings demonstrate the significant potential of roGFP2 as a redox biosensor in gram-negative bacteria to investigate redox dynamics under a variety of

  12. Beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin eZeng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Production of beta-lactamases, the enzymes that degrade beta-lactam antibiotics, is the most widespread and threatening mechanism of antibiotic resistance. In the past, extensive research has focused on the structure, function, and ecology of beta-lactamases while limited efforts were placed on the regulatory mechanisms of beta-lactamases. Recently, increasing evidence demonstrate a direct link between beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria. Specifically, expression of beta-lactamase could be induced by the liberated murein fragments, such as muropeptides. This article summarizes current knowledge on cell wall metabolism, beta-lactam, and beta lactamases. In particular, we comprehensively reviewed recent studies on the beta-lactamase induction by muropeptides via two major molecular mechanisms (the AmpG-AmpR-AmpC pathway and BlrAB-like two-component regulatory system in Gram-negative bacteria. The signaling pathways for beta-lactamase induction offer a broad array of promising targets for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs used for combination therapies. Therefore, to develop effective mitigation strategies against the widespread beta-lactam resistance, examination of the molecular basis of beta-lactamase induction by cell wall fragment is highly warranted.

  13. Prevalence and emergence of carbapenemases-producing Gram-negative bacteria in Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathlouthi, Najla; Al-Bayssari, Charbel; Bakour, Sofiane; Rolain, Jean Marc; Chouchani, Chedly

    2017-02-01

    The emergence and the global spread of carbapenemases concern to health services worldwide. Their celestial rise among Gram-negative bacilli has challenged both the scientific and pharmaceutical sectors. Indeed, infections caused by these bacteria have limited treatment options and have been associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Carbapenemase producers are mainly identified among Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii and still mostly in hospital settings and rarely in the community. They are closely related to KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. The encoding genes are mostly plasmid located and associated with various mobile genetic elements. The Mediterranean area is of interest due to a great diversity and population mixing. The prevalence of carbapenemases is particularly high and variant among countries, partially depending on the population exchange relationship between the regions and the possible reservoirs of each carbapenemase. This review described the epidemiology of carbapenemases in this region of the world highlighting the worrisome situation and the need to screen and detect these enzymes to prevent and control their dissemination especially as it is clear that very few novel antibiotics will be introduced in the next few years, making the dissemination of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria of crucial importance worldwide.

  14. Survival and detection of coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and gram-negative bacteria in Greek yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervert, C J; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2017-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of coliforms as indicator bacteria, increasing evidence suggests that the Enterobacteriaceae (EB) and total gram-negative groups more accurately reflect the hygienic status of high-temperature, short-time pasteurized milk and processing environments. If introduced into milk as postpasteurization contamination, these bacteria may grow to high levels and produce a wide range of sensory-related defects. However, limited information is available on the use and survival of bacterial hygiene indicators in dairy products outside of pasteurized fluid milk and cheese. The goal of this study was to (1) provide information on the survival of a diverse set of bacterial hygiene indicators in the low pH environment of Greek yogurt, (2) compare traditional and alternative detection methods for their ability to detect bacterial hygiene indicators in Greek yogurt, and (3) offer insight into optimal hygiene indicator groups for use in low-pH fermented dairy products. To this end, we screened 64 bacterial isolates, representing 24 dairy-relevant genera, for survival and detection in Greek yogurt using 5 testing methods. Before testing, isolates were inoculated into plain, 0% fat Greek yogurt (pH 4.35 to 4.65), followed by a 12-h hold period at 4 ± 1°C. Yogurts were subsequently tested using Coliform Petrifilm (3M, St. Paul, MN) to detect coliforms; Enterobacteriaceae Petrifilm (3M), violet red bile glucose agar and the D-Count (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Étoile, France) to detect EB; and crystal violet tetrazolium agar (CVTA) to detect total gram-negative bacteria. Overall, the non-EB gram-negative isolates showed significantly larger log reductions 12 h after inoculation into Greek yogurt (based on bacterial numbers recovered on CVTA) compared with the coliform and noncoliform EB isolates tested. The methods evaluated varied in their ability to detect different microbial hygiene indicators in Greek yogurt. Crystal violet tetrazolium agar detected the highest

  15. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The bovine acute phase response to endotoxin and Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine

    exposure to LPS were employed: 1) intravenous bolus injection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS inducing systemic inflammation (Papers I-III and Reports I and II), and 2) intramammary inoculation with E. coli inducing infection and local inflammation in the mammary gland (Paper IV). Systemic inflammation...... and inflammation of the mammary gland Six cows were included in this study on the basis of their ability to clear intramammary infection induced by intramammary inoculation of E. coli (mild, intermediate and severe infection). Milk and plasma serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations were measured sequentially (at 0, 6...... aimed at containing infections, eliminating bacteria and restoring homeostasis. However, during infections or disease complexes in which LPS and/or Gram-negative bacteria persist, disease and pathological changes may result from the prolonged inflammatory response. For example, protracted LPS...

  17. Sonodynamic Excitation of Rose Bengal for Eradication of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faina Nakonechny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy based on photosensitizers activated by illumination is limited by poor penetration of visible light through skin and tissues. In order to overcome this problem, Rose Bengal was excited in the dark by 28 kHz ultrasound and was applied for inactivation of bacteria. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the sonodynamic technique is effective for eradication of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. The net sonodynamic effect was calculated as a 3-4 log10 reduction in bacteria concentration, depending on the cell and the Rose Bengal concentration and the treatment time. Sonodynamic treatment may become a novel and effective form of antimicrobial therapy and can be used for low-temperature sterilization of medical instruments and surgical accessories.

  18. Cell wall elongation mode in Gram-negative bacteria is determined by peptidoglycan architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert D; Hurd, Alexander F; Cadby, Ashley; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Cellular integrity and morphology of most bacteria is maintained by cell wall peptidoglycan, the target of antibiotics essential in modern healthcare. It consists of glycan strands, cross-linked by peptides, whose arrangement determines cell shape, prevents lysis due to turgor pressure and yet remains dynamic to allow insertion of new material, and hence growth. The cellular architecture and insertion pattern of peptidoglycan have remained elusive. Here we determine the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics during growth in rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Peptidoglycan is made up of circumferentially oriented bands of material interspersed with a more porous network. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals an unexpected discontinuous, patchy synthesis pattern. We present a consolidated model of growth via architecture-regulated insertion, where we propose only the more porous regions of the peptidoglycan network that are permissive for synthesis.

  19. A new family of lysozyme inhibitors contributing to lysozyme tolerance in gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Callewaert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Lysozymes are ancient and important components of the innate immune system of animals that hydrolyze peptidoglycan, the major bacterial cell wall polymer. Bacteria engaging in commensal or pathogenic interactions with an animal host have evolved various strategies to evade this bactericidal enzyme, one recently proposed strategy being the production of lysozyme inhibitors. We here report the discovery of a novel family of bacterial lysozyme inhibitors with widespread homologs in gram-negative bacteria. First, a lysozyme inhibitor was isolated by affinity chromatography from a periplasmic extract of Salmonella Enteritidis, identified by mass spectrometry and correspondingly designated as PliC (periplasmic lysozyme inhibitor of c-type lysozyme. A pliC knock-out mutant no longer produced lysozyme inhibitory activity and showed increased lysozyme sensitivity in the presence of the outer membrane permeabilizing protein lactoferrin. PliC lacks similarity with the previously described Escherichia coli lysozyme inhibitor Ivy, but is related to a group of proteins with a common conserved COG3895 domain, some of them predicted to be lipoproteins. No function has yet been assigned to these proteins, although they are widely spread among the Proteobacteria. We demonstrate that at least two representatives of this group, MliC (membrane bound lysozyme inhibitor of c-type lysozyme of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also possess lysozyme inhibitory activity and confer increased lysozyme tolerance upon expression in E. coli. Interestingly, mliC of Salmonella Typhi was picked up earlier in a screen for genes induced during residence in macrophages, and knockout of mliC was shown to reduce macrophage survival of S. Typhi. Based on these observations, we suggest that the COG3895 domain is a common feature of a novel and widespread family of bacterial lysozyme inhibitors in gram-negative bacteria that may function as colonization or virulence factors in bacteria

  20. Structural modifications of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that facilitate Gram-negative bacteria evasion of host innate immunity

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    Motohiro eMatsuura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a cell wall component characteristic of Gram-negative bacteria, is a representative pathogen-associated molecular pattern that allows mammalian cells to recognize bacterial invasion and trigger innate immune responses. The polysaccharide moiety of LPS primary plays protective roles for bacteria such as prevention from complement attacks or camouflage with common host carbohydrate residues. The lipid moiety, termed lipid A, is recognized by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/MD-2 complex, which transduces signals for activation of host innate immunity. The basic structure of lipid A is a glucosamine disaccharide substituted by phosphate groups and acyl groups. Lipid A with 6 acyl groups (hexa-acylated form has been indicated to be a strong stimulator of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. This type of lipid A is conserved among a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria, and those bacteria are easily recognized by host cells for activation of defensive innate immune responses. Modifications of the lipid A structure to less-acylated forms have been observed in some bacterial species, and those forms are poor stimulators of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. Such modifications are thought to facilitate bacterial evasion of host innate immunity, thereby enhancing pathogenicity. This hypothesis is supported by studies of Yersinia pestis LPS, which contains hexa-acylated lipid A when the bacterium grows at 27ºC (the temperature of the vector flea, and shifts to contain less-acylated forms when grown at the human body temperature of 37ºC. This alteration of lipid A forms following transmission of Y. pestis from fleas to humans contributes predominantly to the virulence of this bacterium over other virulence factors. A similar role for less-acylated lipid A forms has been indicated in some other bacterial species, such as Francisella tularensis, Helicobacter pylori, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and further studies to explore this concept are

  1. Ubiquitous and persistent Proteobacteria and other Gram-negative bacteria in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2017-05-15

    Drinking water comprises a complex microbiota, in part shaped by the disinfection and distribution systems. Gram-negative bacteria, mainly members of the phylum Proteobacteria, represent the most frequent bacteria in drinking water, and their ubiquity and physiological versatility raises questions about possible implications in human health. The first step to address this concern is the identification and characterization of such bacteria that is the first objective of this study, aiming at identifying ubiquitous or persistent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteobacteria or members of other phyla, isolated from tap water or from its source. >1000 bacterial isolates were characterized and identified, and a selected group (n=68) was further analyzed for the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to antibiotics (amoxicillin and gentamicin) and metals (copper and arsenite). Total DNA extracts of tap water were examined for the presence of putatively acquired antibiotic resistance or related genes (intI1, blaTEM, qnrS and sul1). The ubiquitous tap water genera comprised Proteobacteria of the class Alpha- (Blastomonas, Brevundimonas, Methylobacterium, Sphingobium, Sphingomonas), Beta- (Acidovorax, Ralstonia) and Gamma- (Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas). Persistent species were members of genera such as Aeromonas, Enterobacter or Dechloromonas. Ralstonia spp. showed the highest MIC values to gentamicin and Acinetobacter spp. to arsenite. The genes intI1, blaTEM or sul1 were detected, at densities lower than 2.3×105copies/L, 2.4×104copies/L and 4.6×102copies/L, respectively, in most tap water samples. The presence of some bacterial groups, in particular of Beta- or Gammaproteobacteria (e.g. Ralstonia, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas) in drinking water may deserve attention given their potential as reservoirs or carriers of resistance or as opportunistic pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in febrile neutropenic patients with cancer: current epidemiology and clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trecarichi, Enrico M; Tumbarello, Mario

    2014-04-01

    In the recent years, several studies involving cancer patients have demonstrated a clear trend in the epidemiology of bacterial infections showing a shift in the prevalence from Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria and the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains among Gram-negatives isolated from the blood. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the recent trends in epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negatives recovered from neutropenic cancer patients, with particular emphasis on the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the clinical outcome of severe infections caused by such microorganisms. Overall, from 2007 to date, the rate of Gram-negative bacteria recovery ranged from 24.7 to 75.8% (mean 51.3%) in cancer patient cohorts. Escherichia coli represented the most common species (mean frequency of isolation 32.1%) among the Gram-negatives, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mean frequency of isolation 20.1%). An increasing frequency of Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was also reported. Increased rates of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative strains have been highlighted among Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenting Gram-negative rods, despite discontinuation of fluoroquinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis for neutropenic patients. In addition, antimicrobial resistance and/or the inadequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment have been frequently linked to a worse outcome in cancer patients with bloodstream infections caused by Gram-negative isolates. Sound knowledge of the local distribution of pathogens and their susceptibility patterns and prompt initiation of effective antimicrobial treatment for severe infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are essential in cancer patients.

  3. A General System for Studying Protein-Protein Interactions in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Auberry, Deanna L [ORNL; Buchanan, Michelle V [ORNL; Cannon, Bill [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Foote, Linda J [ORNL; Hervey, IV, William Judson [ORNL; Hooker, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Kennel, Steve J [ORNL; Lankford, Patricia K [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Owens, Elizabeth T [ORNL; Schmoyer, Denise D [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Wiley, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Gilmore, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2008-01-01

    Abstract One of the most promising methods for large-scale studies of protein interactions is isolation of an affinity-tagged protein with its in vivo interaction partners, followed by mass spectrometric identification of the copurified proteins. Previous studies have generated affinity-tagged proteins using genetic tools or cloning systems that are specific to a particular organism. To enable protein-protein interaction studies across a wider range of Gram-negative bacteria, we have developed a methodology based on expression of affinity-tagged bait proteins from a medium copy-number plasmid. This construct is based on a broad-host-range vector backbone (pBBR1MCS5). The vector has been modified to incorporate the Gateway DEST vector recombination region, to facilitate cloning and expression of fusion proteins bearing a variety of affinity, fluorescent, or other tags. We demonstrate this methodology by characterizing interactions among subunits of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex in two metabolically versatile Gram-negative microbial species of environmental interest, Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results compared favorably with those for both plasmid and chromosomally encoded affinity-tagged fusion proteins expressed in a model organism, Escherichia coli.

  4. Biofilms Formed by Gram-Negative Bacteria Undergo Increased Lipid A Palmitoylation, Enhancing In Vivo Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabaev, Sabina; Chauhan, Ashwini; Novikov, Alexey; Iyer, Pavithra; Szczesny, Magdalena; Beloin, Christophe; Caroff, Martine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial biofilm communities are associated with profound physiological changes that lead to novel properties compared to the properties of individual (planktonic) bacteria. The study of biofilm-associated phenotypes is an essential step toward control of deleterious effects of pathogenic biofilms. Here we investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structural modifications in Escherichia coli biofilm bacteria, and we showed that all tested commensal and pathogenic E. coli biofilm bacteria display LPS modifications corresponding to an increased level of incorporation of palmitate acyl chain (palmitoylation) into lipid A compared to planktonic bacteria. Genetic analysis showed that lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms is mediated by the PagP enzyme, which is regulated by the histone-like protein repressor H-NS and the SlyA regulator. While lipid A palmitoylation does not influence bacterial adhesion, it weakens inflammatory response and enhances resistance to some antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, we showed that lipid A palmitoylation increases in vivo survival of biofilm bacteria in a clinically relevant model of catheter infection, potentially contributing to biofilm tolerance to host immune defenses. The widespread occurrence of increased lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms formed by all tested bacteria suggests that it constitutes a new biofilm-associated phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25139899

  5. Biofilms formed by gram-negative bacteria undergo increased lipid a palmitoylation, enhancing in vivo survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabaev, Sabina; Chauhan, Ashwini; Novikov, Alexey; Iyer, Pavithra; Szczesny, Magdalena; Beloin, Christophe; Caroff, Martine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-19

    Bacterial biofilm communities are associated with profound physiological changes that lead to novel properties compared to the properties of individual (planktonic) bacteria. The study of biofilm-associated phenotypes is an essential step toward control of deleterious effects of pathogenic biofilms. Here we investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structural modifications in Escherichia coli biofilm bacteria, and we showed that all tested commensal and pathogenic E. coli biofilm bacteria display LPS modifications corresponding to an increased level of incorporation of palmitate acyl chain (palmitoylation) into lipid A compared to planktonic bacteria. Genetic analysis showed that lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms is mediated by the PagP enzyme, which is regulated by the histone-like protein repressor H-NS and the SlyA regulator. While lipid A palmitoylation does not influence bacterial adhesion, it weakens inflammatory response and enhances resistance to some antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, we showed that lipid A palmitoylation increases in vivo survival of biofilm bacteria in a clinically relevant model of catheter infection, potentially contributing to biofilm tolerance to host immune defenses. The widespread occurrence of increased lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms formed by all tested bacteria suggests that it constitutes a new biofilm-associated phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial communities called biofilms display characteristic properties compared to isolated (planktonic) bacteria, suggesting that some molecules could be more particularly produced under biofilm conditions. We investigated biofilm-associated modifications occurring in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. We showed that all tested commensal and pathogenic biofilm bacteria display high incorporation of a palmitate acyl chain into the lipid A part of LPS. This lipid A palmitoylation is mediated by the PagP enzyme, whose

  6. The lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) machinery: A nonconventional transporter for lipopolysaccharide assembly at the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandeo, Paola; Martorana, Alessandra M; Polissi, Alessandra

    2017-11-03

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative is a unique lipid bilayer containing LPS in its outer leaflet. Because of the presence of amphipathic LPS molecules, the OM behaves as an effective permeability barrier that makes Gram-negative bacteria inherently resistant to many antibiotics. This review focuses on LPS biogenesis and discusses recent advances that have contributed to our understanding of how this complex molecule is transported across the cellular envelope and is assembled at the OM outer leaflet. Clearly, this knowledge represents an important platform for the development of novel therapeutic options to manage Gram-negative infections. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. High resistance rate against 15 different antibiotics in aerobic gram-negative bacteria isolates of cardiology intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Küçükates E

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic gram negative bacteria were isolated and examined microbiologically from various clinical samples of 602 patients hospitalized between January 1997 and December 2000 in surgical and coronary intensive care units (ICUs. A total of 827 isolates were obtained from 602 patients. The majority of microorganisms were isolated from the respiratory tract (50.3% and blood (39.9%. Pseudomonas spp. were the most frequently isolated gram negative species (32.7%, followed by Acinetobacter spp. (24.0% and Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.4%. High resistance rates to all antibiotics studied were observed. Imipenem and meropenem were the most effective antibiotics against gram negatives.

  8. Detection of RTX toxin genes in gram-negative bacteria with a set of specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, P; Heyberger-Meyer, B; Burnens, A P; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1997-06-01

    The family of RTX (RTX representing repeats in the structural toxin) toxins is composed of several protein toxins with a characteristic nonapeptide glycine-rich repeat motif. Most of its members were shown to have cytolytic activity. By comparing the genetic relationships of the RTX toxin genes we established a set of 10 gene probes to be used for screening as-yet-unknown RTX toxin genes in bacterial species. The probes include parts of apxIA, apxIIA, and apxIIIA from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, cyaA from Bordetella pertusis, frpA from Neisseria meningitidis, prtC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, hlyA and elyA from Escherichia coli, aaltA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and lktA from Pasteurella haemolytica. A panel of pathogenic and nonpathogenic gram-negative bacteria were investigated for the presence of RTX toxin genes. The probes detected all known genes for RTX toxins. Moreover, we found potential RTX toxin genes in several pathogenic bacterial species for which no such toxins are known yet. This indicates that RTX or RTX-like toxins are widely distributed among pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. The probes generated by PCR and the hybridization method were optimized to allow broad-range screening for RTX toxin genes in one step. This included the binding of unlabelled probes to a nylon filter and subsequent hybridization of the filter with labelled genomic DNA of the strain to be tested. The method constitutes a powerful tool for the assessment of the potential pathogenicity of poorly characterized strains intended to be used in biotechnological applications. Moreover, it is useful for the detection of already-known or new RTX toxin genes in bacteria of medical importance.

  9. Molecular Structure of Endotoxins from Gram-negative Marine Bacteria: An Update

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    Antonio Molinaro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria are microrganisms that have adapted, through millions of years, to survival in environments often characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, namely pressure, temperature and salinity. The main interest in the research on marine bacteria is due to their ability to produce several biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents. Nonetheless, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, or their portions, from Gram-negative marine bacteria, have often shown low virulence, and represent potential candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock. Besides, the molecular architecture of such molecules is related to the possibility of thriving in marine habitats, shielding the cell from the disrupting action of natural stress factors. Over the last few years, the depiction of a variety of structures of lipids A, core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been given. In particular, here we will examine the most recently encountered structures for bacteria belonging to the genera Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas, of the γ-Proteobacteria phylum, and to the genera Flavobacterium, Cellulophaga, Arenibacter and Chryseobacterium, of the Cytophaga- Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention will be paid to the chemical features expressed by these structures (characteristic monosaccharides, non-glycidic appendages, phosphate groups, to the typifying traits of LPSs from marine bacteria and to the possible correlation existing between such features and the adaptation, over years, of bacteria to marine environments.

  10. Evaluation of post-antibiotic effect in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Tavella

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the postantibiotic effect (PAE is a well recognized phenomenon, the mechanism by which it is induced has not fully elucidated yet. It has been suggested that PAE is the time required by bacteria to synthesize proteins or mRNA characterized by a short half-life that are consumed during antibiotic treatment.This phenomenon is widely studied on Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods, while information about Gram-positive rods and Gram-negative cocci are scanty.To gain new insights on the PAE, this study was addressed to evaluated the time required by Moraxella catarrhalis and Lactobacillus planctarum to resume their physiological growth rate after exposure to various antibiotics. Methods PAE was estimated in accordance with the method of Craig and Gudmundsson using the following drugs: penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefalotin, ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, gentamycin and azithromycin. Log-phase bacteria were exposed to drug at a concentration corresponding to 4 times the MIC value for 1h.The drug was inactivated by 1:1000 dilution. Bacterial counts were determined at time zero, immediately after drug dilution, and at each hour after removal for 6 - 7h by a pour-plate technique. The PAE was defined as the difference in time required by test and control cultures to increase by 1 log in CFU number. Results All drugs tested induced a PAE on the strains studied. M. catarrhalis registered PAE values ranging between 0,5 (gentamycin and 2 (ceftazidime, imipenem and azithromycin.With respect to L. plantarum a PAE between 0,8 (cefalotin and 3 hours (ciprofloxacin were detected. Conclusion. These findings demonstrated that all the drugs tested were able to induce a PAE on the strains tested.This observation differs from that observed on Gram-negative rods characterised by negative PAE values induced by penicillins and cephalosporins.This results might reflect the different target of these compounds on these Gram-positive rods or the

  11. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachimuthu, Ramesh; Subramani, Ramkumar; Maray, Suresh; Gothandam, K M; Sivamangala, Karthikeyan; Manohar, Prasanth; Bozdogan, Bülent

    2016-10-01

    Carbapenem resistance is disseminating worldwide among Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to identify carbapenem-resistance level and to determine the mechanism of carbapenem resistance among clinical isolates from two centres in Tamil Nadu. In the present study, a total of 93 Gram-negative isolates, which is found to be resistant to carbapenem by disk diffusion test in two centres, were included. All isolates are identified at species level by 16S rRNA sequencing. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of isolates for Meropenem were tested by agar dilution method. Presence of blaOXA, blaNDM, blaVIM, blaIMP and blaKPC genes was tested by PCR in all isolates. Amplicons were sequenced for confirmation of the genes. Among 93 isolates, 48 (%52) were Escherichia coli, 10 (%11) Klebsiella pneumoniae, nine (%10) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration results showed that of 93 suspected carbapenem-resistant isolates, 27 had meropenem MICs ≥ 2 μg/ml. The MIC range, MIC50 and MIC90 were 128 μg/ml, 0.12 and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Fig. 1 . Among meropenem-resistant isolates, E. coli were the most common (9/48, 22%), followed by K. pneumoniae (7/9, 77%), P. aeruginosa (6/10, 60%), Acinetobacter baumannii (2/2, 100%), Enterobacter hormaechei (2/3, 67%) and one Providencia rettgeri (1/1, 100%). PCR results showed that 16 of 93 carried blaNDM, three oxa181, and one imp4. Among blaNDM carriers, nine were E. coli, four Klebsiella pneumoniae, two E. hormaechei and one P. rettgeri. Three K. pneumoniae were OXA-181 carriers. The only imp4 carrier was P. aeruginosa. A total of seven carbapenem-resistant isolates were negatives by PCR for the genes studied. All carbapenem-resistance gene-positive isolates had meropenem MICs >2 μg/ml. Our results confirm the dissemination of NDM and emergence of OXA-181 beta-lactamase among Gram-negative bacteria in South India. This study showed the emergence of NDM producer in clinical isolates of E

  12. Bacteriological studies with ampicillin/sulbactam on selected strains of gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, H; del Solar, E; González, C; Garcia, A; Urrea, R; Zemelman, R

    1988-10-01

    Antibacterial activity of sulbactam or ampicillin alone and in combination on ampicillin-resistant, beta-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (Citrobacter freundii and Escherichia coli) was studied. Inhibition of beta-lactamase activity by sulbactam was investigated using intact and disrupted cells. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin were high but decreased significantly in the presence of sulbactam. Similar enzyme inhibition was observed with intact and disrupted bacterial cells, thus indicating efficient penetration by sulbactam into the periplasmic space. Bacterial killing was achieved in approximately 4 hrs with ampicillin/sulbactam at concentrations that neither killed nor inhibited the same strains when the drugs were used alone. Sulbactam was more effective against plasmid-cured strain of E. coli than the same plasmid-containing organism.

  13. Comparison anti-bacterial effect of silver/polystyrene nanocomposites on gram negative and positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Akhtarolmolook; Raftari, Maryam; Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Irajizad, Azam

    2012-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles/polystyrene nanocomposites were prepared via casting the solution of polystyrene in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and acetone containing silver nanoparticles. Colloidal silver nanoparticles in acetone were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of pure bulk silver. Casting the colloidal silver nanoparticles in a solution of polystyrene results in a yellowish transparent polymeric sheet. TEM images show rather spherical nanoparticles with mean diameter of 5 nm. Ag/PS nanocomposites were characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy. In this study, we also investigated the antimicrobial activity of silver nanocomposites against Escherichia coli (E.coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) as a model for Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Antibacterial tests were performed against E. coli and S.aureus, on LB agar plates containing different amount of nanoparticles. Our results showed at all these concentrations, the nanoparticles caused a growth delay of E. coli, increasing the concentration of nanoparticles increased this growth delay.

  14. Motuporamine Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents and Antibiotic Enhancers against Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borselli, Diane; Blanchet, Marine; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Muth, Aaron; Skruber, Kristen; Phanstiel, Otto; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2017-02-01

    Dihydromotuporamine C and its derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities and antibiotic enhancement properties against Gram-negative bacteria and clinical isolates. The mechanism of action of one of these derivatives, MOTU-N44, was investigated against Enterobacter aerogenes by using fluorescent dyes to evaluate outer-membrane depolarization and permeabilization. Its efficiency correlated with inhibition of dye transport, thus suggesting that these molecules inhibit drug transporters by de-energization of the efflux pump rather than by direct interaction of the molecule with the pump. This suggests that depowering the efflux pump provides another strategy to address antibiotic resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. Development and transmission of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-negative bacteria in animals and their public health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerji, Shewli; O'Dea, Mark; Barton, Mary; Kirkwood, Roy; Lee, Terence; Abraham, Sam

    2017-02-28

    Gram-negative bacteria are known to cause severe infections in both humans and animals. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Gram-negative bacteria is a major challenge in the treatment of clinical infections globally due to the propensity of these organisms to rapidly develop resistance against antimicrobials in use. In addition, Gram-negative bacteria possess highly efficient mechanisms through which the AMR can be disseminated between pathogenic and commensal bacteria of the same or different species. These unique traits of Gram-negative bacteria have resulted in evolution of Gram-negative bacterial strains demonstrating resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials. The evergrowing resistance issue has not only resulted in limitation of treatment options but also led to increased treatment costs and mortality rates in humans and animals. With few or no new antimicrobials in production to combat severe life-threatening infections, AMR has been described as the one of the most severe, long-term threats to human health. Aside from overuse and misuse of antimicrobials in humans, another factor that has exacerbated the emergence of AMR in Gram-negative bacteria is the veterinary use of antimicrobials that belong to the same classes considered to be critically important for treating serious life-threatening infections in humans. Despite the fact that development of AMR dates back to before the introduction of antimicrobials, the recent surge in the resistance towards all available critically important antimicrobials has emerged as a major public health issue. This review thus focuses on discussing the development, transmission and public health impact of AMR in Gram-negative bacteria in animals. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Identification of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchak, Jonathan; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

    2011-03-01

    Several type strains of bacteria including Vibrio fischeri, Azotobacter vinelandii, Enterobacter cloacae, and Corynebacterium xerosis, were cultured in the laboratory following standard diagnostic protocol based on their individual metabolic strategies. The bacterial cultures were not further treated and they were studied in their pristine state (pure culture - axenic). The fluorescent studies were applied using a continuous wave and a pulsed excitation light sources. Emission and excitation spectra were recorded for the continuous wave excitation and they all show similar spectral features with the exception of the gram positive bacteria showing vibronic structures. The vibrational modes involved in these vibronic bands have energy typical for carbon-carbon vibrations. The fluorescence is quenched in addition of water, even a very thin layer, which confirms that the observed spectral features originate from the outer parts of the bacteria. These results allow to conclude that the fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a method for studying the membranes of the bacteria and eventually to discriminate between gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The pulsed experiments show that the fluorescence lifetime is in the sub-microsecond range. The results indicate that the observed spectra are superposition of the emission with different lifetimes.

  17. Sorption of lead onto two gram-negative marine bacteria in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Leckie, James O.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory adsorption experiments performed at environmentally significant lead (Pb) and cell concentrations indicate that the marine bacteria examined have significant binding capacities for Pb. However, the behavior governing Pb sorption onto gram-negative bacteria in seawater may be quite complex. The sorption kinetics appear to involve two distinct phases, i.e., a rapid removal of Pb from solution within the first few minutes, followed by a slow but nearly constant removal over many hours. Also, the average binding coefficient, calculated for Pb sorption onto bacteria and a measure of binding intensity, increases with decreasing sorption density (amounts of bacteria-associated Pb per unit bacterial surface) at low cell concentrations (105 cells ml−1), but decreases with decreasing sorption density at higher cell concentrations (107 cells ml−1). The latter effect is apparently due to the production of significant amounts of extra-cellular organics at high cell concentrations that compete directly with bacterial surfaces for available lead. Lead toxicity and active uptake by marine bacteria did not appear significant at the Pb concentrations used.

  18. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntra Suwantarat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and multidrug-resistant glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters, have emerged and spread throughout Southeast Asia. Methods We reviewed and summarized current critical knowledge on the epidemiology and molecular characterization of MDRGN in Southeast Asia by PubMed searches for publications prior to 10 March 2016 with the term related to “MDRGN definition” combined with specific Southeast Asian country names (Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Brunei. Results There were a total of 175 publications from the following countries: Thailand (77, Singapore (35, Malaysia (32, Vietnam (23, Indonesia (6, Philippines (1, Laos (1, and Brunei (1. We did not find any publications on MDRGN from Myanmar and Cambodia. We did not include publications related to Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and Vibrio spp. and non-human related studies in our review. English language articles and abstracts were included for analysis. After the abstracts were reviewed, data on MDRGN in Southeast Asia from 54 publications were further reviewed and included in this study. Conclusions MDRGNs are a major contributor of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in Southeast Asia. The high prevalence of ESBLs has been a major problem since 2005 and is possibly related to the development of carbapenem resistant organisms in this region due to the overuse of carbapenem therapy. Carbapenem–resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is the most common pathogen associated with nosocomial infections in this region followed by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although Southeast Asia is not an endemic area for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE, recently, the rate of CRE detection has been increasing. Limited infection control measures, lack of antimicrobial control, such as the presence of

  19. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Carroll, Karen C

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN), including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and multidrug-resistant glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters), have emerged and spread throughout Southeast Asia. We reviewed and summarized current critical knowledge on the epidemiology and molecular characterization of MDRGN in Southeast Asia by PubMed searches for publications prior to 10 March 2016 with the term related to "MDRGN definition" combined with specific Southeast Asian country names (Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Brunei). There were a total of 175 publications from the following countries: Thailand (77), Singapore (35), Malaysia (32), Vietnam (23), Indonesia (6), Philippines (1), Laos (1), and Brunei (1). We did not find any publications on MDRGN from Myanmar and Cambodia. We did not include publications related to Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and Vibrio spp. and non-human related studies in our review. English language articles and abstracts were included for analysis. After the abstracts were reviewed, data on MDRGN in Southeast Asia from 54 publications were further reviewed and included in this study. MDRGNs are a major contributor of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in Southeast Asia. The high prevalence of ESBLs has been a major problem since 2005 and is possibly related to the development of carbapenem resistant organisms in this region due to the overuse of carbapenem therapy. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is the most common pathogen associated with nosocomial infections in this region followed by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although Southeast Asia is not an endemic area for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), recently, the rate of CRE detection has been increasing. Limited infection control measures, lack of antimicrobial control, such as the presence of active antimicrobial stewardship teams in the hospital, and

  20. Gram-negative bacteria account for main differences between faecal microbiota from patients with ulcerative colitis and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigsnæs, Louise Kristine; Brynskov, J.; Steenholdt, C.

    2012-01-01

    process of the gut mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the faecal microbiota in patients either with UC in remission (n=6) or with active disease (n=6), and in healthy controls (n=6). The composition of Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria was examined. Antigenic structures...... of Gram-negative bacteria such as lipopolysaccharides have been related to the inflammatory responses and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Dice cluster analysis and principal component analysis of faecal microbiota profiles obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative...... PCR, respectively, revealed that the composition of faecal bacteria from UC patients with active disease differed from the healthy controls and that this difference should be ascribed to Gram-negative bacteria. The analysis did not show any clear grouping of UC patients in remission. Even...

  1. Trends of 9,416 multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Decicera Colombo Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: a resistance of hospital-acquired bacteria to multiple antibiotics is a major concern worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate multidrugresistant (MDR bacteria, clinical specimens, origin of specimen and trends, and correlate these with bacterial sensitivity and consumption of antimicrobials. Methods: 9,416 bacteria of nosocomial origin were evaluated in a tertiary hospital, from 1999 to 2008. MDR was defined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB as resistance to two or more classes/groups of antibiotics. Results: GNB MDR increased by 3.7 times over the study period (p<0.001. Acinetobacter baumannii was the most prevalent (36.2%. Over the study period, there were significant 4.8-fold and 14.6-fold increases for A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae (p<0.001, respectively. Sixty-seven percent of isolates of MDR GNB were isolated in intensive care units. The resistance of A. baumannii to carbapenems increased from 7.4 to 57.5% during the study period and concomitant with an increased consumption. Conclusion: that decade showed prevalence of GNB and a gradual increase in MDR GNB. There was an increase in carbapenem resistance of 50.1% during the study.

  2. Trends of 9,416 multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Viviane Decicera Colombo; Rubio, Fernando Góngora; Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo; Nogueira, Mara Corrêa Lelles; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos

    2015-01-01

    a resistance of hospital-acquired bacteria to multiple antibiotics is a major concern worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate multidrugresistant (MDR) bacteria, clinical specimens, origin of specimen and trends, and correlate these with bacterial sensitivity and consumption of antimicrobials. 9,416 bacteria of nosocomial origin were evaluated in a tertiary hospital, from 1999 to 2008. MDR was defined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) as resistance to two or more classes/groups of antibiotics. GNB MDR increased by 3.7 times over the study period (p<0.001). Acinetobacter baumannii was the most prevalent (36.2%). Over the study period, there were significant 4.8-fold and 14.6-fold increases for A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae (p<0.001), respectively. Sixty-seven percent of isolates of MDR GNB were isolated in intensive care units. The resistance of A. baumannii to carbapenems increased from 7.4 to 57.5% during the study period and concomitant with an increased consumption. that decade showed prevalence of GNB and a gradual increase in MDR GNB. There was an increase in carbapenem resistance of 50.1% during the study.

  3. Extended spectrum β-lactamases, carbapenemases and mobile genetic elements responsible for antibiotics resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Salabi, Allaaeddin; Walsh, Timothey R; Chouchani, Chedly

    2013-05-01

    Infectious diseases due to Gram-negative bacteria are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Antimicrobial agents represent one major therapeutic tools implicated to treat these infections. The misuse of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains of Gram-negatives in particular Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters; they have an effect not only on a human but on the public health when bacteria use the resistance mechanisms to spread in the hospital environment and to the community outside the hospitals by means of mobile genetic elements. Gram-negative bacteria have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents. They have developed several mechanisms by which they can withstand to antimicrobials, these mechanisms include the production of Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases, furthermore, Gram-negative bacteria are now capable of spreading such resistance between members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters using mobile genetic elements as vehicles for such resistance mechanisms rendering antibiotics useless. Therefore, addressing the issue of mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance is considered one of most urgent priorities. This review will help to illustrate different resistance mechanisms; ESBLs, carbapenemases encoded by genes carried by mobile genetic elements, which are used by Gram-negative bacteria to escape antimicrobial effect.

  4. Gram-negative bacteria facilitate tumor outgrowth and metastasis by promoting lipid synthesis in lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Maosong; Gu, Xia; Han, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Patients with lung cancer are very frequently present with pulmonary infections, in particular with Gram-negative bacteria. Herein, we investigated the effect of the co-presence of Gram-negative bacteria on outgrowth and metastasis of lung cancer cells in clinical patients. Methods Lung cancer cells were isolated from clinical surgical tissues. Heat-inactivated E. coli was used as Gram-negative bacteria. Tumor outgrowth and invasion in vitro was analyzed with MTT assay and Biocoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber. Tumor growth and metastasis in vivo was evaluated in BALB/c nude mice. Lipid synthesis was evidenced by expressions of FASN and ACC1, as well as BODIPY Fluorophores staining. Block lipid synthesis was performed with C75 as a FAS inhibitor and transfection with ACC1 siRNA. Knockdown of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling was achieved by transfection with specific shRNAs and administration of specific antagonists. Results Gram-negative bacteria significantly promoted lung cancer development including growth and metastasis in dose dependent manner. Mechanistically, Gram-negative bacteria activate TLR4 and TLR9 signaling and enhance lipid synthesis in human lung cancer cells. Knockdown of TLR4 and/or TLR9 was able to block Gram-negative bacteria mediated lipid synthesis and lung cancer development. Interference with lipid synthesis efficiently abrogated Gram-negative-bacteria-induced lung cancer development. In lung cancer patients, higher expressions of innate immune receptors, TLR4 and TLR9, were observed in those with Gram-negative infections and associated with the aberrant lipid synthesis that was observed in vitro. Conclusions Pulmonary infections with Gram-negative bacteria lead to aberrant lipid synthesis through TLR4 and TLR9 signaling in lung cancer patients and result in rapid proliferation and metastasis of lung cancer cells. These findings reveal a new mechanism for pulmonary infection

  5. Gram-negative bacteria facilitate tumor outgrowth and metastasis by promoting lipid synthesis in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Maosong; Gu, Xia; Han, Yang; Jin, Meiling; Ren, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Patients with lung cancer are very frequently present with pulmonary infections, in particular with Gram-negative bacteria. Herein, we investigated the effect of the co-presence of Gram-negative bacteria on outgrowth and metastasis of lung cancer cells in clinical patients. Lung cancer cells were isolated from clinical surgical tissues. Heat-inactivated E. coli was used as Gram-negative bacteria. Tumor outgrowth and invasion in vitro was analyzed with MTT assay and Biocoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber. Tumor growth and metastasis in vivo was evaluated in BALB/c nude mice. Lipid synthesis was evidenced by expressions of FASN and ACC1, as well as BODIPY Fluorophores staining. Block lipid synthesis was performed with C75 as a FAS inhibitor and transfection with ACC1 siRNA. Knockdown of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling was achieved by transfection with specific shRNAs and administration of specific antagonists. Gram-negative bacteria significantly promoted lung cancer development including growth and metastasis in dose dependent manner. Mechanistically, Gram-negative bacteria activate TLR4 and TLR9 signaling and enhance lipid synthesis in human lung cancer cells. Knockdown of TLR4 and/or TLR9 was able to block Gram-negative bacteria mediated lipid synthesis and lung cancer development. Interference with lipid synthesis efficiently abrogated Gram-negative-bacteria-induced lung cancer development. In lung cancer patients, higher expressions of innate immune receptors, TLR4 and TLR9, were observed in those with Gram-negative infections and associated with the aberrant lipid synthesis that was observed in vitro. Pulmonary infections with Gram-negative bacteria lead to aberrant lipid synthesis through TLR4 and TLR9 signaling in lung cancer patients and result in rapid proliferation and metastasis of lung cancer cells. These findings reveal a new mechanism for pulmonary infection-trigged caner development and provide

  6. [Advances in the research of LuxR family protein in quorum-sensing system of gram-negative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Xiang, J

    2016-09-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density-dependent method for information transmission among bacteria, as well as a mechanism for the bacteria to adapt to environment. LuxR family protein plays a key role in gram-negative bacterial QS system as a kind of transcription regulators and participates in a variety of biological behaviors with LuxI protein and signal molecules, such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, virulence factors production, and so on. The advances in the research of LuxR family protein in QS system of gram-negative bacteria were summarized in this review.

  7. The antibiotic pipeline for multi-drug resistant gram negative bacteria: what can we expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Mavroudis, Andreas D; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2016-08-01

    A real concern in the medical community is the increasing resistance of bacteria, especially that of Gram-negative types. New antibiotics are currently under clinical development, promising to tackle severe infections caused, especially, by multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria and broaden the armamentarium of clinicians. We searched PUBMED and GOOGLE databases. Combinations of already approved β-lactams or monobactams with new β-lactamase inhibitors [imipenem-cilastatin/MK-7655 (relebactam), meropenem/RPX7009 (vaborbactam), ceftaroline/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam], new β-lactams (S-649266, BAL30072), aminoglycosides (plazomicin), quinolones (finafloxacin) and tetracyclines (eravacycline) were included in the review. Expert commentary: For the majority of the upcoming antibiotics the currently available data is limited to their microbiology and pharmacokinetics. Their effectiveness and safety against infections due to MDR bacteria remain to be proved. Significant issues are also the impact of these antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota and their possible co-administration with already-known antimicrobial agents in difficult-to-treat-infections; further studies should be conducted for these objectives.

  8. Exploiting quorum sensing interfering strategies in gram-negative bacteria for the enhancement of environmental applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past ten years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture.

  9. Exploiting Quorum Sensing Interfering Strategies in Gram-Negative Bacteria for the Enhancement of Environmental Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs) and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past 10 years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture.

  10. Resistance to antibiotics in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from broiler carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira M.A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and ninety-seven isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, comprising 10 genera, were isolated from poultry carcasses at a processing plant in order to investigate resistance to low levels of antibiotics. The samples were taken just after evisceration and before inspection. Most of the isolates were of Samonella and Escherichia. Other genera present were Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, Kluyvera, Erwinia, Citrobacter, Pseudomonas and Aeromonas. Distinct profiles of antibiotic resistance were detected. Resistance to more than two antibiotics predominated and spanned several classes of antibiotics. Salmonellae and escherichiae were mainly resistant to the aminoglycosides, followed by tetracycline, nitrofuran, sulpha, macrolide, chloramphenicol, quinolones and beta-lactams. Most isolates were sensitive to 30mug/ml olaquindox, the growth promoter in use at the time of sampling. However, many were resistant to a level of 10mug/ml and 13mug/ml olaquindox, levels present in the gut due to the dilution in the feed. The results suggest a possible role of low level administration of antibiotics to broilers in selecting multi-resistant bacteria in vivo.

  11. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  12. Heavy-metal resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from Kongsfjord, Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethu, C S; Mujeeb Rahiman, K M; Saramma, A V; Mohamed Hatha, A A

    2015-06-01

    Isolation and characterization of heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria was carried out from the sediment and water samples collected from Kongsfjord, Arctic. In this study, the potential of Arctic bacteria to tolerate heavy metals that are of ecological significance to the Arctic (selenium (Se), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn)) was investigated. Quantitative assay of 130 isolates by means of plate diffusion and tube dilution methods was carried out by incorporation of different concentrations of metals. Growth in Se and Pb at a concentration of 3000 μg/L was significantly lower (P≤0.0001) than at 2000 μg/L. The minimum inhibitory concentration for Cd and Hg was 50 μg/L (P≤0.0001, F=264.23 and P≤0.0001, F=291.08, respectively) even though in the tube dilution test, Hg-containing tubes showed much less growth, revealing its superior toxicity to Cd. Thus, the level of toxicity of heavy metals was found to be in the order of Hg>Cd>Cu>Zn>Pb>Se. Multiple-metal-resistant isolates were investigated for their resistance against antibiotics, and a positive correlation was observed between antibiotic and metal resistance for all the isolates tested. The resistant organisms thus observed might influence the organic and inorganic cycles in the Arctic and affect the ecosystem.

  13. Tetracycline improved the efficiency of other antimicrobials against Gram-negative multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawabo, Isabelle K; Noumedem, Jaurès A K; Kuiate, Jules R; Kuete, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of infectious diseases with antimicrobials constituted a great achievement in the history of medicine. Unfortunately, the emergence of resistant strains of bacteria to all classes of antimicrobials limited their efficacy. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of combinations of antibiotics on multi-drug resistant Gram-negative (MDRGN) bacteria. A liquid micro-broth dilution method was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 10 different classes of antimicrobials on 20 bacterial strains belonging to six different species. The antimicrobials were associated with phenylalanine β-naphthylamide (PAβN), an efflux pump inhibitor, and with other antimicrobials at their sub-inhibitory concentrations. The effectiveness of each combination was monitored using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC). Most of the antimicrobials tested showed low antibacterial activity with a MIC value of 128 mg/L on a majority of the bacterial strains, justifying their multidrug-resistant (MDR) profile. Synergistic effects were mostly observed (FIC≤0.5) when ampicillin (AMP), cloxacillin (CLX), erythromycin (ERY), chloramphenicol (CHL), kanamycin (KAN) and streptomycin (STR) were combined with tetracycline (TET) at the sub-inhibitory concentration of MIC/5 or MIC/10. The results of the present work suggest that the association of several antimicrobials with TET could improve the fight against MDRGN bacterial species. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influences of graphene oxide on biofilm formation of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chao; Yang, Chun-Miao; Sun, Xue-Fei; Xia, Peng-Fei; Qin, Jing; Guo, Bei-Bei; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2017-11-15

    In this study, we evaluated the influences of graphene oxide (GO) on biofilm formation. Escherichia coli MG1655 and Bacillus subtilis 168 were used as models for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The growth profiles and viability assays indicated that GO exhibited a high antibacterial activity, of which the negative effects on bacteria growth raised with the increasing GO concentration. The antibacterial activity of GO was mainly attributed to the membrane stress and ROS-independent oxidative stress. Moreover, it was worthy to note that the biofilm formation was enhanced in the presence of GO at low dosage whereas inhibited in the high-concentration GO environment. These results could be explained by the roles of the dead cells, which were inactivated by GO. When the concentration of GO was limited, only a part of the cells would be inactivated, which may then serve as a protection barrier as well as the necessary nutrient to the remaining living cells for the formation of biofilm. In contrast, with a sufficient presence of GO, almost all cells can be inactivated completely and thus the formation of biofilm could no longer be triggered. Overall, the present work provides significant new insights on the influence of carbon nanomaterials towards biofilm formation, which has far-reaching implications in the field of biofouling and membrane bioreactor. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  15. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a product of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkey, P M

    2015-04-01

    Global trade and mobility of people has increased rapidly over the last 20 years. This has had profound consequences for the evolution and the movement of antibiotic resistance genes. There is increasing exposure of populations all around the world to resistant bacteria arising in the emerging economies. Arguably the most important development of the last two decades in the field of antibiotic resistance is the emergence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) of the CTX-M group. A consequence of the very high rates of ESBL production among Enterobacteriaceae in Asian countries is that there is a substantial use of carbapenem antibiotics, resulting in the emergence of plasmid-mediated resistance to carbapenems. This article reviews the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, focuses on three particular carbapenemases--imipenem carbapenemases, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase--and highlights the importance of control of antibiotic use. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. RNA degradation in Archaea and Gram-negative bacteria different from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Klug, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Exoribonucleolytic and endoribonucleolytic activities are important for controlled degradation of RNA and contribute to the regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by influencing the half-lives of specific messenger RNAs. The RNA half-lives are determined by the characteristics of the RNA substrates and by the availability and the properties of the involved proteins-ribonucleases and assisting polypeptides. Much is known about RNA degradation in Eukarya and Bacteria, but there is limited information about RNA-degrading enzymes and RNA destabilizing or stabilizing elements in the domain of the Archaea. The recent progress in the understanding of the structure and function of the archaeal exosome, a protein complex with RNA-degrading and RNA-tailing capabilities, has given some first insights into the mechanisms of RNA degradation in the third domain of life and into the evolution of RNA-degrading enzymes. Moreover, other archaeal RNases with degrading potential have been described and a new mechanism for protection of the 5'-end of RNA in Archaea was discovered. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on RNA degradation in the Archaea. Additionally, RNA degradation mechanisms in Rhodobacter capsulatus and Pseudomonas syringae are compared to those in the major model organism for Gram-negatives, Escherichia coli, which dominates our view on RNA degradation in Bacteria.

  17. Metallo- β-lactamases among Multidrug Resistant (MDR) Gram Negative Bacteria Isolated from Clinical Specimens during 2009 in Sanandaj, Kurdistan Province

    OpenAIRE

    Himen Salimizand; Mehri Habibi; Fereshteh Shahcheraghi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Today, there are numerous reports about emerging multi drug resistant gram negative bacteria all around the world, especially in ICUs. Rarely, Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) enzymes are responsible for these cases. Study of MBLs for diagnosing and preventing distribution of the origin of infection are critical issues. In addition, we would like to compare the efficacy of Iranian and foreign- made antibiotic disks. Materials and Methods: During 2009 all entered clinical specimens to the...

  18. Evaluation of the Rapidec Carba NP Test Kit for Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Atul; Garg, Jaya; Upadhyay, G C; Agarwal, Anurag; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-12-01

    Recently, bioMérieux, France, introduced the Rapidec Carba NP test kit for rapid detection of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria. This kit was evaluated in this study, and we report sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 92.6%, 96.2%, 95.83%, and 92.6%, respectively. The test was easy to perform and interpret and relatively inexpensive ($5/Rs 300 per test) and provides a practical solution for early detection of carbapenemase-producing, multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Controversies in guidelines for the control of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in EU countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Mutters, N T; Tacconelli, E; Gikas, A; Holmes, A H

    2015-12-01

    The various guidelines that are available for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are useful, and contain broad areas of agreement. However, there are also important areas of controversy between the guidelines in terms of the details of applying contact precautions, single-room isolation and active surveillance cultures, differences in the approach to environmental cleaning and disinfection, and whether or not to perform staff and patient cohorting, healthcare worker screening or patient decolonization. The evidence-base is extremely limited and further research is urgently required to inform an evidence-based approach to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Multi-drug resistance and extended spectrum beta lactamase producing Gram negative bacteria from chicken meat in Bharatpur Metropolitan, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anil; Bajracharya, Anup Muni; Subedi, Hemraj; Turha, Raju Shah; Kafle, Sachin; Sharma, Saroj; Neupane, Sunil; Chaudhary, Dhiraj Kumar

    2017-11-07

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producer Gram negative bacteria are considered as a major health problem, globally. ESBL enzyme hydrolyses the beta lactam ring of third generation cephalosporins, which alters the structure of the antibiotic. Due to the modification in structure of the antibiotic, bacteria show resistance to these antibiotics. Resistant bacterial strains are transmitted to humans from animals through consumption of uncooked meat, through contact with uncooked meat and meat surfaces. This study aims to assess bacteriological profile and analyze the situation of antibiotic resistance, multidrug resistance, and ESBL producing Gram negative bacteria in chicken meat. A total of 38 chicken meat samples were studied in which 103 Gram negative bacteria were isolated. Species of Gram negative bacteria were identified as Citrobacter spp. (44.7%), Salmonella spp. (26.2%), Proteus spp. (18.4%), Escherichia coli (4.8%), Shigella spp. (3.9%), Pseudomonas spp. (1.9%), and Klebsiella spp. (1.0%). The prevalence of MDR isolates was found to be 79.6%. Total ESBL producer was 36.9% and ESBL producer among MDR was 34.9%. This concludes wide range of antibiotic resistance bacteria is prevalent in raw chicken meat.

  1. Abundance and potential contribution of Gram-negative cheese rind bacteria from Austrian artisanal hard cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Dzieciol, Monika; Nischler, Eva; Schornsteiner, Elisa; Bereuter, Othmar; Mann, Evelyne; Wagner, Martin

    2018-02-02

    Many different Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to be present on cheese rinds. Their contribution to cheese ripening is however, only partially understood until now. Here, cheese rind samples were taken from Vorarlberger Bergkäse (VB), an artisanal hard washed-rind cheese from Austria. Ripening cellars of two cheese production facilities in Austria were sampled at the day of production and after 14, 30, 90 and 160days of ripening. To obtain insights into the possible contribution of Advenella, Psychrobacter, and Psychroflexus to cheese ripening, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of one strain of each genus isolated from VB cheese rinds. Additionally, quantitative PCRs (qPCRs) were performed to follow the abundance of Advenella, Psychrobacter, and Psychroflexus on VB rinds during ripening in both facilities. qPCR results showed that Psychrobacter was most abundant on cheese rinds and the abundance of Advenella decreased throughout the first month of ripening and increased significantly after 30days of ripening (p<0.01). Psychrobacter and Psychroflexus increased significantly during the first 30 ripening days (p<0.01), and decreased to their initial abundance during the rest of the ripening time (p<0.05). Genome sequencing resulted in 17 to 27 contigs with assembly sizes of 2.7 Mbp for Psychroflexus, 3 Mbp for Psychrobacter, and 4.3 Mbp for Advenella. Our results reveal that each genome harbors enzymes shown to be important for cheese ripening in other bacteria such as: Cystathionine/Methionine beta or gamma-lyases, many proteases and peptidases (including proline iminopeptidases), aminotransferases, and lipases. Thus, all three isolates have the potential to contribute positively to cheese ripening. In conclusion, the three species quantified were stable community members throughout the ripening process and their abundance on cheese rinds together with the results from genome sequencing suggest an important contribution of these bacteria to cheese

  2. Functional characterization of Gram-negative bacteria from different genera as multiplex cadmium biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara; Aracic, Sanja; Kannan, Ruban; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley E

    2017-08-15

    Widespread presence of cadmium in soil and water systems is a consequence of industrial and agricultural processes. Subsequent accumulation of cadmium in food and drinking water can result in accidental consumption of dangerous concentrations. As such, cadmium environmental contamination poses a significant threat to human health. Development of microbial biosensors, as a novel alternative method for in situ cadmium detection, may reduce human exposure by complementing traditional analytical methods. In this study, a multiplex cadmium biosensing construct was assembled by cloning a single-output cadmium biosensor element, cadRgfp, and a constitutively expressed mrfp1 onto a broad-host range vector. Incorporation of the duplex fluorescent output [green and red fluorescence proteins] allowed measurement of biosensor functionality and viability. The biosensor construct was tested in several Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Enterobacter. The multiplex cadmium biosensors were responsive to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10µgml -1 , as well as several other heavy metals, including arsenic, mercury and lead at similar concentrations. The biosensors were also responsive within 20-40min following exposure to 3µgml -1 cadmium. This study highlights the importance of testing biosensor constructs, developed using synthetic biology principles, in different bacterial genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The molecular basis of β-lactamase production in Gram-negative bacteria from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezli, Saber; Shibl, Atef M; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-02-01

    Resistance to β-lactams among Gram-negative bacteria is a worldwide issue. Increased prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers and the dissemination of carbapenem-resistance genes are particularly concerning. ESBL-producing strains are common in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, particularly among the Enterobacteriaceae, and carbapenem resistance is on the increase, especially among the non-fermenters. β-lactamase production is a major mechanism of resistance to these agents and although β-lactamase-producing strains have been documented in the Kingdom, relatively few reports characterized the molecular basis of this production. Nevertheless, available data suggest that CTX-M (CTX-M-15 in particular) is the predominant ESBL in the Enterobacteriaceae, with SHV also being prevalent in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Carbapenem resistance in the latter is mainly due to OXA-48 and NDM-1. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, VEB-like enzymes are the most common ESBLs, and VIM is the prevalent metallo-β-lactamase. OXA-10 extended-spectrum enzymes are also frequent. PER and GES ESBLs have been reported in Acinetobacter baumannii, and oxacillinases (OXA-23 in particular) are the dominant carbapanamases in this species. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Interventional strategies and current clinical experience with carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akova, M; Daikos, G L; Tzouvelekis, L; Carmeli, Y

    2012-05-01

    The wide dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negatives (CPGNs), including enterobacterial species and non-fermenters, has caused a public health crisis of global dimensions. These organisms cause serious infections in hospitalized patients, and are associated with increased mortality. Cross-transmission is common, and outbreaks may occur in healthcare facilities where the infection control practices are inadequate. CPGNs exhibit extensive drug-resistant phenotypes, complicate therapy, and limit treatment options. Systematic data on therapy are limited. However, regimens combining two or more active agents seem to be more efficacious than monotherapy in carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. Strict infection control measures, including active surveillance for timely detection of colonized patients, separation of carriers from non-carriers, and contact precautions, are of utmost importance, and may be the only effective way of preventing the introduction and transmission of these bacteria in healthcare settings. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  5. Novel touchdown-PCR method for the detection of putrescine producing gram-negative bacteria in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlichová, Leona; Buňková, Leona; Koutný, Marek; Valenta, Tomáš; Buňka, František

    2013-06-01

    Formation of biogenic amines may occur in food due to metabolic activities of contaminating Gram-negative bacteria. Putrescine is assumed to be the major biogenic amine associated with microbial food spoilage. Gram-negative bacteria can form putrescine by three metabolic pathways that can include eight different enzymes. The objective of this study was to design new sets of primers able to detect all important enzymes involved in the production of putrescine by Gram-negative bacteria. Seven new sets of consensual primers based on gene sequences of different bacteria were designed and used for detection of the speA, adiA, adi, speB, aguA, speC, and speF genes. A newly developed touchdown polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using these primers was successfully applied on several putrescine-producers. Selected PCR products were sequenced and high similarity of their sequences (99-91%) with known sequences of the corresponding genes confirmed high specificity of the developed sets of primers. Furthermore, all the investigated bacteria produced both putrescine and agmatine, an intermediate of putrescine production, which was confirmed by chemical analysis. The developed new touchdown PCR method could easily be used to detect potential foodborne Gram-negative producers of putrescine. The newly developed sets of primers could also be useful in further research on putrescine metabolism in contaminating microbiota. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacteriological Assessment of Pneumonia Caused by Gram-Negative Bacteria in Patients Hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzek, A; Korzeniewski, K; Tomaszewski, D; Rybicki, Z; Zwolińska, E

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results of 11-year study (2005-2015) of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for pneumonia in 2033 mechanically ventilated patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit. Of 8796 biological samples, consisting mainly of bronchial aspirate (97.9 %), 2056 bacterial strains were isolated and subjected to identification. VITEK 2 was used to determine drug susceptibility (classified according to the EUCAST criteria). ESBL, MBL and KPC-producing strains were identified by means of phenotypic methods using appropriate discs. The findings were that the predominant bacteria responsible for infections consisted of Enterobacteriaceae (42.0 %), Acinetobacter baumannii (37.2 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.1 %), and Stenotrophomonas maltophila (4.7 %). We observed a rise in the number of bacteria causing pneumonia throughout the study period, especially in S. maltophila and Enterobacteriaceae ESBL (+). Gram-negative bacilli were 100 % susceptible to colistin, apart from naturally resistant strains such as Proteus mirabilis, Serratia marcescens, whereas Enterobacteriaceae ESBL (+) were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. Acinetobacter baumannii strains exhibited the lowest drug susceptibility. In conclusion, we report an increase in the prevalence of pneumonia associated with Gram-negative bacteria in mechanically ventilated intensive care patients. Colistin remains the most effective drug against the majority of Gram-negative bacteria. Therapeutic problems are common in the course of treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

  7. Identification of a New Lipoprotein Export Signal in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédééric Lauber

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, including commensal organisms and opportunistic pathogens, harbor abundant surface-exposed multiprotein membrane complexes (Sus-like systems involved in carbohydrate acquisition. These complexes have been mostly linked to commensalism, and in some instances, they have also been shown to play a role in pathogenesis. Sus-like systems are mainly composed of lipoproteins anchored to the outer membrane and facing the external milieu. This lipoprotein localization is uncommon in most studied Gram-negative bacteria, while it is widespread in Bacteroidetes. Little is known about how these complexes assemble and particularly about how lipoproteins reach the bacterial surface. Here, by bioinformatic analyses, we identify a lipoprotein export signal (LES at the N termini of surface-exposed lipoproteins of the human pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus corresponding to K-(D/E2 or Q-A-(D/E2. We show that, when introduced in sialidase SiaC, an intracellular lipoprotein, this signal is sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Mutational analysis of the LES in this reporter system showed that the amino acid composition, position of the signal sequence, and global charge are critical for lipoprotein surface transport. These findings were further confirmed by the analysis of the LES of mucinase MucG, a naturally surface-exposed C. canimorsus lipoprotein. Furthermore, we identify a LES in Bacteroides fragilis and Flavobacterium johnsoniae surface lipoproteins that allow C. canimorsus surface protein exposure, thus suggesting that Bacteroidetes share a new bacterial lipoprotein export pathway that flips lipoproteins across the outer membrane.

  8. Penicillin V acylases from gram-negative bacteria degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones and attenuate virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunder, Avinash Vellore; Utari, Putri Dwi; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; van Merkerk, Ronald; Quax, Wim J.; Pundle, Archana

    Virulence pathways in gram-negative pathogenic bacteria are regulated by quorum sensing mechanisms, through the production and sensing of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. Enzymatic degradation of AHLs leading to attenuation of virulence (quorum quenching) could pave the way for the

  9. Activity of cefiderocol (S-649266) against carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria collected from inpatients in Greek hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Skalidis, Tilemachos; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Legakis, Nicholas J

    2017-06-01

    Cefiderocol (S-649266), a siderophore cephalosporin, utilizes a novel mechanism of entry into the periplasmic space of Gram-negative bacteria and is broadly stable to ESBLs and carbapenemases. A collection of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated from clinical specimens in 18 Greek hospitals was tested for susceptibility to cefiderocol, meropenem, ceftazidime, cefepime, ceftazidime/avibactam, ceftolozane/tazobactam, aztreonam, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, colistin and tigecycline. Broth microdilution plates were used to determine MICs. In total 189 non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria (107 Acinetobacter baumannii and 82 Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) and 282 Enterobacteriaceae (including 244 Klebsiella pneumoniae , 14 Enterobacter cloacae and 11 Providencia stuartii ) were studied. For both A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa the MIC 90 of cefiderocol was 0.5 mg/L. For K. pneumoniae , E. cloacae and P. stuartii the MIC 90 of cefiderocol was 1, 1 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. Tigecycline was the second most active antibiotic, followed by colistin. Cefiderocol exhibited greater antimicrobial activity in vitro against carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria than comparator antibiotics.

  10. Dustborne and airborne gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in high versus low ERMI homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home's Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified...

  11. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci : evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of Gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway

  12. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, CJC; van Leeuwen, EMM; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, KPM; van Strijp, JAG

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or

  13. Comparing the harmful effects of nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Taylor-Robinson, David; Waldmann, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To better understand the relative effects of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function decline in cystic fibrosis, we assessed the impact of each infection in a Danish setting. METHODS: Longitudinal registry study of 432 patients with cystic...

  14. Thrombin-Derived Host-Defense Peptides Modulate Monocyte/Macrophage Inflammatory Responses to Gram-Negative Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finja C; Strömdahl, Ann-Charlotte; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    , the effect of GKY25 on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with Gram-negative bacteria was explored. Electron microscopy analysis showed that fibrin slough from non-healing wounds, colonized with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, contains C-terminal thrombin epitopes associated...

  15. Dustborne and Airborne Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in High versus Low ERMI Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Atin; Kettleson, Eric M.; Vesper, Stephen; Kumar, Sudhir; Popham, David L.; Schaffer, Christopher; Indugula, Reshmi; Chatterjee, Kanistha; Allam, Karteek K.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home’s Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified into low (5) ERMI groups based on the average ERMI values as well as 2011 ERMI values. Dust and air samples were collected from the homes in 2011 and all samples were analyzed for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bact...

  16. Discovery of a Novel Class of Boron-Based Antibacterials with Activity against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Vincent; Crépin, Thibaut; Palencia, Andrés; Cusack, Stephen; Akama, Tsutomu; Baker, Stephen J.; Bu, Wei; Feng, Lisa; Freund, Yvonne R.; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Mao, Weimin; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Sheoran, Anita; Zhang, Yanchen; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhou, Yasheen; Nieman, James A.; Anugula, Mahipal Reddy; Keramane, El Mehdi; Savariraj, Kingsley; Reddy, D. Shekhar; Sharma, Rashmi; Subedi, Rajendra; Singh, Rajeshwar; O'Leary, Ann; Simon, Nerissa L.; De Marsh, Peter L.; Mushtaq, Shazad; Warner, Marina; Livermore, David M.; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause approximately 70% of the infections in intensive care units. A growing number of bacterial isolates responsible for these infections are resistant to currently available antibiotics and to many in development. Most agents under development are modifications of existing drug classes, which only partially overcome existing resistance mechanisms. Therefore, new classes of Gram-negative antibacterials with truly novel modes of action are needed to circumvent these existing resistance mechanisms. We have previously identified a new a way to inhibit an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), in fungi via the oxaborole tRNA trapping (OBORT) mechanism. Herein, we show how we have modified the OBORT mechanism using a structure-guided approach to develop a new boron-based antibiotic class, the aminomethylbenzoxaboroles, which inhibit bacterial leucyl-tRNA synthetase and have activity against Gram-negative bacteria by largely evading the main efflux mechanisms in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lead analogue, AN3365, is active against Gram-negative bacteria, including Enterobacteriaceae bearing NDM-1 and KPC carbapenemases, as well as P. aeruginosa. This novel boron-based antibacterial, AN3365, has good mouse pharmacokinetics and was efficacious against E. coli and P. aeruginosa in murine thigh infection models, which suggest that this novel class of antibacterials has the potential to address this unmet medical need. PMID:23295920

  17. Surveillance culture for multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria: Performance in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Villela Soares Oshiro, Isabel Cristina; Bonazzi, Patrícia Rodrigues; Pierrotti, Ligia Câmera; de Oliveira, Larissa Marques; Machado, Anna Silva; Van Der Heijdenn, Inneke Marie; Rossi, Flavia; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; Carneiro D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto; Abdala, Edson

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of infection with multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) after solid-organ transplantation is increasing. Surveillance culture (SC) seems to be an important tool for MDR-GNB control. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of SC for MDR-GNB among liver transplant (LT) recipients. This was a prospective cohort study involving patients who underwent LT between November 2009 and November 2011. We screened patients for extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA), and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB). We collected SC samples immediately before LT and weekly thereafter, until hospital discharge. Samples were collected from the inguinal-rectal area, axilla, and throat. The performance of SC was evaluated through analysis of its sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy. During the study period, 181 patients were evaluated and 4,110 SC samples were collected. The GNB most often identified was CRAB, in 45.9% of patients, followed by CRKP in 40.3%. For all microorganisms, the positivity rate was highest among the inguinal-rectal samples. If only samples collected from this area were considered, the SC would fail to identify 34.9% of the cases of CRAB colonization. The sensitivity of SC for CRKP was 92.5%. The performance of SC was poorest for CRAB (sensitivity, 80.6%). Our data indicate that SC is a sensitive tool to identify LT recipients colonized by MDR-GNB. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of pyogenic spondylitis caused by gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Ji; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Chung-Jong; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-Don; Kim, Nam Joong; Park, Kyung-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    There are limited data describing the clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposing factors and clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB compared to Gram-positive cocci (GPC). We performed a retrospective review of medical records from patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis at four tertiary teaching hospitals over an 8-year period. A total of 344 patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis were evaluated. There were 62 patients (18.0%) with pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (n = 35, 10.2%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 10, 2.9%). Pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB was more frequently associated with the female gender (64.5 vs. 35.5%, P <0.01), preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract infection (32.3 vs. 2.1%, P< 0.01), and intra-abdominal infection (12.9 vs. 0.4%, P< 0.01) compared to patients with GPC. Although pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB presented with severe sepsis more frequently (24.2 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.01), the mortality rate (6.0 vs. 5.2%) and the proportion of patients with residual disability (6.0 vs. 9.0%), defined as grade 3 or 4 (P = 0.78) 3 months after completion of treatment, were not significantly different compared to GPC patients. GNB should be considered as the etiologic organism when infectious spondylitis develops in a patient with preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract and intra-abdominal infection. In addition, the mortality rate and clinical outcomes are not significantly different between pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and GPC.

  19. Dustborne and Airborne Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in High versus Low ERMI Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Atin; Kettleson, Eric M.; Vesper, Stephen; Kumar, Sudhir; Popham, David L.; Schaffer, Christopher; Indugula, Reshmi; Chatterjee, Kanistha; Allam, Karteek K.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home’s Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified into low (5) ERMI groups based on the average ERMI values as well as 2011 ERMI values. Dust and air samples were collected from the homes in 2011 and all samples were analyzed for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using QPCR assays, endotoxin by the LAL assay, and N-acetyl-muramic acid using HPLC. In addition, air samples were analyzed for culturable bacteria. When average ERMI values were considered, the concentration and load of Gram-positive bacteria determined with QPCR in house dust, but not air, were significantly greater in high ERMI homes than in low ERMI homes. Furthermore, the concentration of endotoxin, but not muramic acid, in the dust was significantly greater in high ERMI than in low ERMI homes. In contrast, when ERMI values of 2011 were considered, Gram-negative bacteria determined with QPCR in air, endotoxin in air, and muramic acid in dust were significantly greater in high ERMI homes. The results suggest that both short-term and long-term mold contamination in homes could be linked with the bacterial concentrations in house dust, however, only the current mold status was associated with bacterial concentrations in air. Although correlations were found between endotoxin and Gram-negative bacteria as well as between muramic acid and Gram-positive bacteria in the entire data set, diverging associations were observed between the different measures of bacteria and the home moldiness. It is likely that concentrations of cells obtained by QPCR and concentrations of cell wall components are not equivalent and represent too broad categories to understand the bacterial composition and sources of the home microbiota. PMID:24642096

  20. Activation of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 by gram-negative periodontal bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, R.; Laine, M. L.; Aarden, L. A.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease associated with a gram-negative subgingival microflora. Bacterial components stimulate, among other receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and/or TLR4. Accumulating evidence indicates that both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct

  1. Vitreous System Ag2O –ZnO–B2O3 Action Against Gram Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work the ability of the system xAg2O  (100-x [45ZnO55B2O3] oxide glasses to inhibit the growth of bacteria Eschierchia coli, Pseudomonas and Salmonella was investigated. Using the diffusimetric method there were measured the diameters of inhibition, in order to classify the sensitivity of gram negative bacteria to oxide compounds containing silver, for their use as filters. Vitreous samples were processed as powders with grain between 45 and 75 m and less than 45 m for a large of contact area with the microorgansms and to make possible the study of biological effect of grain addiction. Action of the investigated oxide system against the gram negative bacteria is strictly related to the presence of silver oxide in glass composition.

  2. Prediction of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Causing Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Seejil; Shah, Ansal; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-04-01

    Increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) have limited empirical treatment options for Gram-negative infections, particularly in patients with severe beta-lactam allergy. This case-control study aims to develop a clinical risk score to predict the probability of FQ-R in Gram-negative bloodstream isolates. Adult patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSI) hospitalized at Palmetto Health System in Columbia, South Carolina, from 2010 to 2013 were identified. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for FQ-R. Point allocation in the fluoroquinolone resistance score (FQRS) was based on regression coefficients. Model discrimination was assessed by the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Among 824 patients with Gram-negative BSI, 143 (17%) had BSI due to fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Gram-negative bacilli. Independent risk factors for FQ-R and point allocation in FQRS included male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.97; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.36 to 2.98; 1 point), diabetes mellitus (aOR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.28; 1 point), residence at a skilled nursing facility (aOR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.42 to 3.63; 2 points), outpatient procedure within 30 days (aOR, 3.68; 95% CI, 1.96 to 6.78; 3 points), prior fluoroquinolone use within 90 days (aOR, 7.87; 95% CI, 4.53 to 13.74; 5 points), or prior fluoroquinolone use within 91 to 180 days of BSI (aOR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 6.16; 3 points). The AUC for both final logistic regression and FQRS models was 0.73. Patients with an FQRS of 0, 3, 5, or 8 had predicted probabilities of FQ-R of 6%, 22%, 39%, or 69%, respectively. The estimation of patient-specific risk of antimicrobial resistance using FQRS may improve empirical antimicrobial therapy and fluoroquinolone utilization in Gram-negative BSI. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. A chromatographic approach to distinguish Gram-positive from Gram-negative bacteria using exogenous volatile organic compound metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guízar, Susana; Sykes, Hannah; Perry, John D; Schwalbe, Edward C; Stanforth, Stephen P; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Dean, John R

    2017-06-09

    This paper utilized L-alanine aminopeptidase activity as a useful approach to distinguish between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. This was done using two enzyme substrates, specifically 2-amino-N-phenylpropanamide and 2-amino-N-(4-methylphenyl)propanamide which liberated the volatile compounds aniline and p-toluidine, respectively. Two complementary analytical techniques have been used to identify and quantify the VOCs, specifically static headspace multicapillary column gas chromatography ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS) and headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS). Superior limits of detection were obtained using HS-SPME-GC-MS, typically by a factor of x6 such that the LOD for aniline was 0.02μg/mL and 0.01μg/mL for p-toluidine. In addition, it was also possible to determine indole interference-free by HS-SPME-GC-MS at an LOD of 0.01μg/mL. The approach was applied to a range of selected bacteria: 15 Gram-negative and 7 Gram-positive bacteria. Use of pattern recognition, in the form of Principal Component Analysis, confirmed that it is possible to differentiate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using the enzyme generated VOCs, aniline and p-toluidine. The exception was Stenotrophomonas maltophilia which showed negligible VOC concentrations for both aniline and p-toluidine, irrespective of the analytical techniques used and hence was not characteristic of the other Gram-negative bacteria investigated. The developed methodology has the potential to be applied for clinical and food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gram-negative bacteria account for main differences between faecal microbiota from patients with ulcerative colitis and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigsnæs, L K; Brynskov, J; Steenholdt, C; Wilcks, A; Licht, T R

    2012-12-01

    Detailed knowledge about the composition of the intestinal microbiota may be critical to unravel the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC), a human chronic inflammatory bowel disease, since the intestinal microbes are expected to influence some of the key mechanisms involved in the inflammatory process of the gut mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the faecal microbiota in patients either with UC in remission (n=6) or with active disease (n=6), and in healthy controls (n=6). The composition of Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria was examined. Antigenic structures of Gram-negative bacteria such as lipopolysaccharides have been related to the inflammatory responses and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Dice cluster analysis and principal component analysis of faecal microbiota profiles obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR, respectively, revealed that the composition of faecal bacteria from UC patients with active disease differed from the healthy controls and that this difference should be ascribed to Gram-negative bacteria. The analysis did not show any clear grouping of UC patients in remission. Even with the relatively low number of subjects in each group, we were able to detect a statistically significant underrepresentation of Lactobacillus spp. and Akkermansia muciniphila in UC patients with clinically active disease compared to the healthy controls. In line with previous communications, we have shown that the microbiota in UC patients with active disease differ from that in healthy controls. Our findings indicate that alterations in the composition of the Gram-negative bacterial population, as well as reduced numbers of lactobacilli and A. muciniphila may play a role in UC.

  5. Bactérias gram negativas resistentes a antimicrobianos em alimentos Gram-negative bacteria resistant to antibiotics in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cavalcante de Albuquerque Ribeiro Dias

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de 154 espécimens de alimentos, representados por hortaliças (alface, leite e merenda escolar, obteve-se o isolamento e identificação de 400 amostras de bacilos Gram negativos. Esta amostragem se distribuiu em 339 enterobactérias (Escherichia, Shigella, Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia e Proteus e 61 de gêneros afins (Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, Aeromonas e Pseudomonas. Submetendo-se as culturas aos antimicrobianos: sulfadiazina (Su, estreptomicina (Sm, tetraciclina (Tc, cloranfenicol (Cm, canamicina (Km, ampicilina (Ap, ácido nalidíxico (Nal e gentamicina (Gm, observou-se apenas seis estirpes sensíveis a todas as drogas e sensibilidade absoluta à Gm. A predominância dos modelos Su (27,6% e Su-Ap (39,6% incidiu nas enterobactérias, enquanto que, 18,0% para Ap e 9,8% para Su-Ap foram detectados nos gêneros afins. Para caracterização da resistência foram realizados testes de conjugação e a totalidade das culturas não revelou transferência para o gene que confere resistência ao ácido nalidíxico. Relevantes são as taxas de amostras R+ observadas nos bacilos entéricos, oscilando em torno de 90% (leite e merenda escolar e alface, em torno de 70%From 154 food samples, including vegetables (lettuce, milk and meals served at school it was possible to isolate and identify 400 Gram negative bacilli distributed among 339 enteric bacteria (Escherichia, Shigella, Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia and Proteus and other 61 non enteric bacilli (Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, Aeromonas and Pseudomonas. Submitting this cultures to the drugs sulfadiazine (Su, streptomycin (Sm, tetracycline (Tc, chloramphenicol (Cm, kanamycin (Km, ampicillin (Ap, nalidixic acid (Nal and gentamycin (Gm it was observed only six stocks susceptible to all drugs and total sensibility to Gm. Among enteric bacteria the profiles Su (27,6% and Su-Ap (39,6% predominated, while for the non enteric bacilli percentages of 18.0 for

  6. [A combination of ampicillin and sulbactam: effect on aerobic and anaerobic gram-negative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C; García, A; Urrea, R; del Solar, E; Bello, H; Zemelman, R

    1990-05-01

    The antibacterial activity of the association of ampicillin and sulbactam (2:1) upon strains of aerobic and anaerobic Gram negative agents was assayed. Inhibition of B-lactamases from intact and disrupted cells of some selected strains by sulbactam was also determined. Susceptibility was found in 34% and partial inhibition in 48%; 18% were fully resistant. Synergy between ampicillin and sulbactam was found upon ampicillin susceptible strains. This effect might reflect higher degree of binding of the inhibitor to PBP's in the absence of a trapping effect produced by B-lactamases. Anaerobic microorganisms were found to be highly susceptible to this association of B-lactams. Adequate penetration of the inhibitor into periplasmic space of Gram negative bacilli was deduced by the similar decrease of B-lactamase activity observed in intact and disrupted cells treated with sulbactam.

  7. Immunomodulatory role of leptin treatment in experimental sepsis caused by gram negative bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    KOCA, Cemile; KAVAKLI, Havva ŞAHİN; ALICI, Özlem

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of leptin treatment on circulating inflammatory cytokines and on tissue damage in experimental rat model of gram-negative sepsis. Materials and methods: Adult male Wistar rats, 28 in total, were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 7): sham, leptin, sepsis, and sepsis group treated with leptin (sepsis+leptin). Sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 2 × 1010 CFU of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. Leptin and sepsis+leptin groups received a single dose ip ...

  8. The adhesion GPCR BAI1 mediates macrophage ROS production and microbicidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Emily A.; Lee, Chang Sup; Owen, Katherine A.; D’Souza, Ryan S.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Casanova, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of microbes and initiation of an innate immune response occur through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines and activation of the cellular microbicidal machinery. In particular, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase complex is a critical component of the macrophage bactericidal machinery. We previously characterized brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a member of the adhesion family of G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a PRR that mediates the selective phagocytic uptake of Gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. We showed that BAI1 promoted phagosomal ROS production through activation of the Rho family guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, thereby stimulating NADPH oxidase activity. Primary BAI1-deficient macrophages exhibited attenuated Rac GTPase activity and reduced ROS production in response to several Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in impaired microbicidal activity. Furthermore, in a peritoneal infection model, BAI1-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to death by bacterial challenge because of impaired bacterial clearance. Together, these findings suggest that BAI1 mediates the clearance of Gram-negative bacteria by stimulating both phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase activation, thereby coupling bacterial detection to the cellular microbicidal machinery. PMID:26838550

  9. Structure of a Peptidoglycan Amidase Effector Targeted to Gram-Negative Bacteria by the Type VI Secretion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seemay Chou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The target range of a bacterial secretion system can be defined by effector substrate specificity or by the efficacy of effector delivery. Here, we report the crystal structure of Tse1, a type VI secretion (T6S bacteriolytic amidase effector from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Consistent with its role as a toxin, Tse1 has a more accessible active site than related housekeeping enzymes. The activity of Tse1 against isolated peptidoglycan shows its capacity to act broadly against Gram-negative bacteria and even certain Gram-positive species. Studies with intact cells indicate that Gram-positive bacteria can remain vulnerable to Tse1 despite cell wall modifications. However, interbacterial competition studies demonstrate that Tse1-dependent lysis is restricted to Gram-negative targets. We propose that the previously observed specificity for T6S against Gram-negative bacteria is a consequence of high local effector concentration achieved by T6S-dependent targeting to its site of action rather than inherent effector substrate specificity.

  10. ClubSub-P: Cluster-Based Subcellular Localization Prediction for Gram-Negative Bacteria and Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Linke, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The subcellular localization (SCL) of proteins provides important clues to their function in a cell. In our efforts to predict useful vaccine targets against Gram-negative bacteria, we noticed that misannotated start codons frequently lead to wrongly assigned SCLs. This and other problems in SCL prediction, such as the relatively high false-positive and false-negative rates of some tools, can be avoided by applying multiple prediction tools to groups of homologous proteins. Here we present ClubSub-P, an online database that combines existing SCL prediction tools into a consensus pipeline from more than 600 proteomes of fully sequenced microorganisms. On top of the consensus prediction at the level of single sequences, the tool uses clusters of homologous proteins from Gram-negative bacteria and from Archaea to eliminate false-positive and false-negative predictions. ClubSub-P can assign the SCL of proteins from Gram-negative bacteria and Archaea with high precision. The database is searchable, and can easily be expanded using either new bacterial genomes or new prediction tools as they become available. This will further improve the performance of the SCL prediction, as well as the detection of misannotated start codons and other annotation errors. ClubSub-P is available online at http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/clubsubp/ PMID:22073040

  11. Distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, David Olusoga; Alli, Armstrong Oyebode; Anorue, Michael C; Daini, Oluwole Adebayo; Oluwadun, Afolabi

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, mechanisms of resistance to quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria were believed to be only chromosome encoded. However, emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been reported worldwide. This study investigated distribution of PMQR in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in eastern part of Nigeria. Seventy-one nonduplicate Gram-negative bacterial isolates of eight species were analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility, genotypic detection of various PMQRs, typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and analysis of plasmids present, including replicon typing. The minimum inhibitory concentrations showed MIC90values as high as 256 μg/ml for fluoroquinolones. Carriage of PMQR was found to be 35.2%. Twenty (28.2%) isolates carried various qnr genes, of which seven (9.9%) qnrA1; four (5.6%) qnrB1; eight (11.3%) qnrS1 while one (1.4%) encoded qnrD1. Eighteen (25.4%) isolates were positive for aac(6')-Ib-cr while carriage of multiple genes exists in some strains. Similarly, 13 isolates (18.7%) were found to carry PMQR efflux pump gene, qepA. Conjugation experiments revealed that the plasmids once transferred coded for fluoroquinolone resistance. The transconjugant strains carried a common plasmid estimated to be 65 kb. These plasmids were untypable for replicon/incompatibility. Typing revealed high diversity among all species tested with no identical RAPD pattern seen. This study further confirms high level resistance to many antimicrobials in different species of Gram-negative bacteria including fluoroquinolones and spread of PMQR genes in Southern Nigeria.

  12. Antibiotic resistance of Gram-negative benthic bacteria isolated from the sediments of Kardzhali Dam (Bulgaria)

    OpenAIRE

    Iliev, Ivan; Marhova, Mariana; Gochev, Velizar; Tsankova, Marinela; Trifonova, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to carry out a preliminary assessment for the occurrence of bacterial strains resistant to frequently used antibiotics in the sediments beneath the sturgeon cage farm in Kardzhali Dam (Bulgaria). Samples were taken from the top 2 cm of sediments under a fish farm and from a control station in the aquatory of the reservoir in the period July?October 2011. Surveillance of bacterial susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents was performed for 160 Gram-negative str...

  13. Diversity of culturable Gram-negative bacteria isolated from irrigation water of two rice crop regions in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reche, Maria Helena Lima Ribeiro; Reali, Catiusca; Pittol, Michele; de Athayde Saul, Danilo; Macedo, Vera Regina Mussoi; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Machado, Vilmar; Fiuza, Lidia Mariana

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we assessed the diversity of Gram-negative bacteria found in water used for irrigation of rice crops in two growing areas of southern Brazil. Samples were collected from the main irrigation channel and field drain area. Twenty-two bacterial species were found in Cachoeirinha and 28 in Camaquã. In both areas, the most frequent bacterial families were Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae. Differences in microbial diversity were observed in both study areas. Thirty-five Gram-negative species were identified; however, only 15 were common in both locations. In addition, there were found pathogenic and drug-resistant species, such as Acinetobacter sp., Brucella spp., and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. This study demonstrates the existence of a number of pathogenic species in aquatic ecosystems analyzed in three consecutive crop years, especially water used for rice production.

  14. [THE STRUCTURE AND SOME BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA CONSTITUTING THE MICROSYMBIOCENOSIS OF PROSOBRANCHIA MOLLUSKS (BITHYNIIDAE). COMMUNICATION 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, T F; Kataeva, L V; Bukharin, O V; Perunova, N B; Karpukhina, N F; Vakarina, A A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to study the structure and biological properties (antilysozymic, activity and biofilm formation) of gram-negative bacteria isolated from Bithyniidae mollusks and their habitat (water reservoir waters and soil). A total of 160 gram-negative bacterial strains isolated from the mollusks of the Bithyniidae family and their habitat were the material to be, studied. Psedomonas, Comamonas, and Acinetobacter held the lead in the structure of microbiocenosis of Bithyniidae mollusks, the first intermediate host of Opisthorchis filineus, while Acinetobacter did in the habitat. The antilysozymic activity of the water strains was shown to be an order of magnitude higher than that of the strains isolated from the mollusks.

  15. A general system for studying protein-protein interactions in gram-negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A.; Hurst, G. B.; Foote, Linda J.; Lankford, Patricia K.; McKeown, Cathy K.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Shah, Manesh B.; Hervey IV, W. J.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Hooker, Brian S.; Cannon, William R.; Daly, Don S.; Gilmore, Jason M.; Wiley, H. S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Wang, Yisong; Larimer, Frank; Kennel, S. J.; Doktycz, M. J.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Owens, Elizabeth T.; Buchanan, M. V.

    2008-08-01

    One of the most promising of the emerging methods for large-scale studies of interactions among proteins is co-isolation of an affinity-tagged protein and its interaction partners, followed by mass spectrometric identification of the co-purifying proteins. We describe a methodology for systematically identifying the proteins that interact with affinity-tagged “bait” proteins expressed from a medium copy plasmid, which are based on a broad host range (pBBR1MCS5) vector backbone that has been modified to incorporate the Gateway DEST plasmid multiple cloning region. This construct was designed to facilitate expression of fusion proteins bearing an affinity tag, across a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts. We demonstrate the performance of this methodology by characterizing interactions among subunits of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex in two metabolically versatile Gram negative microbial species of environmental interest, Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results from the RNA polymerase complex from these two species compared favorably with those for both plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded affinity-tagged fusion proteins expressed in a model organism, E. coli.

  16. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  17. Outer Membrane Permeabilization Is an Essential Step in the Killing of Gram-Negative Bacteria by the Lectin RegIII?

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyoshi Miki; Wolf-Dietrich Hardt

    2013-01-01

    The C-type lectin RegIIIβ can kill certain Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility of S. Typhimurium depends on the bacterial growth phase, i.e., bacteria from the logarithmic growth phase do bind RegIIIβ and are subsequently killed. Lipid A is one of the bacterial targets for RegIIIβ. However, at the molecular level, it is not understood how RegIIIβ interacts with and kills Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that RegIIIβ interacts with Gram-negative bacteria in two di...

  18. Cues and regulatory pathways involved in natural competence and transformation in pathogenic and environmental Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Patrick; Blokesch, Melanie

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial genomics is flourishing, as whole-genome sequencing has become affordable, readily available and rapid. As a result, it has become clear how frequently horizontal gene transfer (HGT) occurs in bacteria. The potential implications are highly significant because HGT contributes to several processes, including the spread of antibiotic-resistance cassettes, the distribution of toxin-encoding phages and the transfer of pathogenicity islands. Three modes of HGT are recognized in bacteria: conjugation, transduction and natural transformation. In contrast to the first two mechanisms, natural competence for transformation does not rely on mobile genetic elements but is driven solely by a developmental programme in the acceptor bacterium. Once the bacterium becomes competent, it is able to take up DNA from the environment and to incorporate the newly acquired DNA into its own chromosome. The initiation and duration of competence differ significantly among bacteria. In this review, we outline the latest data on representative naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria and how their competence windows differ. We also summarize how environmental cues contribute to the initiation of competence in a subset of naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria and how the complexity of the niche might dictate the fine-tuning of the competence window. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide profile typing as a technique for comparative typing of gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucken, H M; Pitt, T L

    1993-05-01

    We have applied the technique of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiling in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to the typing of 124 isolates of 12 gram-negative species from suspected outbreaks of infection. LPS was prepared by proteinase K digestion or micro-phenol-water extraction. A total of 11 of the 12 species gave clear ladder band profiles, the exception being Acinetobacter baumannii. When compared with conventional typing for Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens, LPS profile type alone was sufficient to allow relatedness or distinguishability of isolates to be established, and this was corroborated by serotype and phage type data. Serologically nontypeable isolates invariably lacked O repeating units and thus could not be classified by their silver stain profile. We conclude that LPS profiling is useful for the epidemiological investigation of small clusters of isolates in order to determine whether or not cross-infection between patients has occurred.

  20. Determining the Localization of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes Within Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Richard; Inglis, G Douglas; Mosimann, Steven C; Uwiera, Richard R E; Abbott, D Wade

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the subcellular location of secreted proteins is valuable for illuminating their biological function. Although several bioinformatics programs currently exist to predict the destination of a trafficked protein using its signal peptide sequence, these programs have limited accuracy and often require experimental validation. Here, we present a systematic method to fractionate gram-negative cells and characterize the subcellular localization of secreted carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). This method involves four parallel approaches that reveal the relative abundance of protein within the cytoplasm, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular environment. Cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins are fractionated by lysis and osmotic shock, respectively. Outer membrane bound proteins are determined by comparing cells before and after exoproteolytic digestion. Extracellularly secreted proteins are collected from the media and concentrated. These four different fractionations can then be probed for the presence and quantity of target proteins using immunochemical methods such as Western blots and ELISAs, or enzyme activity assays.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Ameer; Ahmed, Arham S; Oves, Mohammad; Khan, Mohammad S; Habib, Sami S; Memic, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanomaterials have unique properties compared to their bulk counterparts. For this reason, nanotechnology has attracted a great deal of attention from the scientific community. Metal oxide nanomaterials like ZnO and CuO have been used industrially for several purposes, including cosmetics, paints, plastics, and textiles. A common feature that these nanoparticles exhibit is their antimicrobial behavior against pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we demonstrate the antimicrobial activity of ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3 nanoparticles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods and results Nanosized particles of three metal oxides (ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3) were synthesized by a sol–gel combustion route and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the single-phase formation of all three nanomaterials. The particle sizes were observed to be 18, 22, and 28 nm for ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3, respectively. We used these nanomaterials to evaluate their antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) bacteria. Conclusion Among the three metal oxide nanomaterials, ZnO showed greatest antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria used in this study. It was observed that ZnO nanoparticles have excellent bactericidal potential, while Fe2O3 nanoparticles exhibited the least bactericidal activity. The order of antibacterial activity was demonstrated to be the following: ZnO > CuO > Fe2O3. PMID:23233805

  2. Benzyl isothiocyanate, a major component from the roots of Salvadora persica is highly active against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abier Sofrata

    Full Text Available Plants produce a number of antimicrobial substances and the roots of the shrub Salvadora persica have been demonstrated to possess antimicrobial activity. Sticks from the roots of S. persica, Miswak sticks, have been used for centuries as a traditional method of cleaning teeth. Diverging reports on the chemical nature and antimicrobial repertoire of the chewing sticks from S. persica led us to explore its antibacterial properties against a panel of pathogenic or commensal bacteria and to identify the antibacterial component/s by methodical chemical characterization. S. persica root essential oil was prepared by steam distillation and solid-phase microextraction was used to sample volatiles released from fresh root. The active compound was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and antibacterial assays. The antibacterial compound was isolated using medium-pressure liquid chromatography. Transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the effect on bacterial cells. The main antibacterial component of both S. persica root extracts and volatiles was benzyl isothiocyanate. Root extracts as well as commercial synthetic benzyl isothiocyanate exhibited rapid and strong bactericidal effect against oral pathogens involved in periodontal disease as well as against other Gram-negative bacteria, while Gram-positive bacteria mainly displayed growth inhibition or remained unaffected. The short exposure needed to obtain bactericidal effect implies that the chewing sticks and the essential oil may have a specific role in treatment of periodontal disease in reducing Gram-negative periodontal pathogens. Our results indicate the need for further investigation into the mechanism of the specific killing of Gram-negative bacteria by S. persica root stick extracts and its active component benzyl isothiocyanate.

  3. Scavengers for bacteria: Rainbow trout have two functional variants of MARCO that bind to gram-negative and -positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynter, Sarah J; Monjo, Andrea L; Micheli, Gabriella; DeWitte-Orr, Stephanie J

    2017-12-01

    Class A scavenger receptors (SR-As) are a family of surface-expressed receptors who bind a wide range of polyanionic ligands including bacterial components and nucleic acids and play a role in innate immunity. Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a SR-A family member that has been studied in mammals largely for its role in binding bacteria. To date there is little information about SR-As in general and MARCO specifically in fish, particularly what ligands individual SR-A family members bind remains largely unknown. In the present study two novel rainbow trout MARCO transcript variants have been identified and their sequence and putative protein domains have been analyzed. When overexpressed in CHSE-214, a cell line that appears to lack functional scavenger receptors, GFP-tagged rtMARCO-1 and rtMARCO-2 were able to bind gram-positive, and gram-negative bacteria of both mammalian and aquatic sources. rtMARCO appears to bind bacteria via its scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain, because SRCR deleted rtMARCO-1 and -2 were unable to bind bacteria. rtMARCO did not show any binding to the yeast cell wall component zymosan or to double-stranded (ds)RNA. This is the first time rainbow trout MARCO sequences have been identified and the first in-depth study exploring their ligand binding profile. This study provides novel insight into the role of rainbow trout MARCO in bacterial innate immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How bacterial cell division might cheat turgor pressure - a unified mechanism of septal division in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Harold P

    2017-08-01

    An important question for bacterial cell division is how the invaginating septum can overcome the turgor force generated by the high osmolarity of the cytoplasm. I suggest that it may not need to. Several studies in Gram-negative bacteria have shown that the periplasm is isoosmolar with the cytoplasm. Indirect evidence suggests that this is also true for Gram-positive bacteria. In this case the invagination of the septum takes place within the uniformly high osmotic pressure environment, and does not have to fight turgor pressure. A related question is how the V-shaped constriction of Gram-negative bacteria relates to the plate-like septum of Gram-positive bacteria. I collected evidence that Gram-negative bacteria have a latent capability of forming plate-like septa, and present a model in which septal division is the basic mechanism in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Human lipoproteins have divergent neutralizing effects on E. coli LPS, N. meningitidis LPS, and complete Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprong, Tom; Netea, Mihai G; van der Ley, Peter; Verver-Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth E H; Stalenhoef, Anton; van der Meer, Jos W M; van Deuren, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    The use of lipoproteins has been suggested as a treatment for Gram-negative sepsis because they inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated cytokine production. However, little is known about the neutralizing effects of lipoproteins on cytokine production by meningococcal LPS or whole Gram-negative bacteria. We assessed the neutralizing effect of LDLs, HDLs, and VLDLs on LPS- or whole bacteria-induced cytokines in human mononuclear cells. A strong inhibition of Escherichia coli LPS-induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-10 by LDL and HDL was seen, whereas VLDL had a less pronounced effect. In contrast, Neisseria meningitidis LPS, in similar concentrations, was neutralized much less effectively than E. coli LPS. Effective neutralization of meningococcal LPS required a longer interaction time, a lower concentration of LPS, or higher concentrations of lipoproteins. The difference in neutralization was independent of the saccharide tail, suggesting that the lipid A moiety accounted for the difference. Minimal neutralizing effects of the lipoproteins were observed on whole E. coli or N. meningitidis bacteria under all conditions tested. These results indicate that efficient neutralization of LPS depends on the type of LPS, but a sufficiently long interaction time, a low LPS concentration, or high lipoprotein concentration also inhibited cytokines by the less efficiently neutralized N. meningitidis LPS. Irrespective of these differences, whole bacteria showed no neutralization by lipoproteins.

  6. RND efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a major issue worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzari, Minakshi; Chetia, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic failures against diseases due to resistant Gram-negative bacteria have become a major threat nowadays as confirmed by surveillance reports across the world. One of the methods of development of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is by means of RND efflux pumps. Inhibition of these pumps might help to combat the antibiotic resistance problem, for which the structure and regulation of the pumps have to be known. Moreover, judicious antibiotic use is needed to control the situation. This paper focuses on the issue of antibiotic resistance as well as the structure, regulation and inhibition of the efflux pumps present in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  7. Occurrence of non-fermenting gram negative bacteria in drinking water dispensed from point-of-use microfiltration devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franza Zanetti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Many devices have been marketed in order to improve the organoleptic characteristics of tap water resulting from disinfection with chlorine derivates. The aim of the presented study was to assess the degree of contamination by non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria (NF-GNB of drinking water dispensed from microfiltration devices at point-of-use. Methods. Water samples were collected from 94 point-of-use water devices fitted with a filter (0.5μm pore size containing powdered activated carbon. The microbiological contamination of water entering and leaving the microfiltered water dispensers was compared. The NF-GNB loads were correlated to Total Heterotrophic Counts (HPCs at 37 and 22 °C, residua chlorine, and some structural and functional features of the devices. Results. NF-GNB were detected from 23% of supply water samples, 33% of still unchilled water, 33% of still chilled water and 18% of carbonated chilled water. The most frequent isolates were Pseudomonadaceae: Steno.maltophilia 30.2% of isolates, Pseudomonas 20.5%, Delftia acidovorans 13.4%, while the species more largely distributed was Ps. aeruginosa recovered from 13% of samples. The distribution of the various NF-GNB was different in the water entering and in that leaving the devices. Ps.aeruginosa and Steno.maltophilia were the predominant species in water leaving the microfiltration dispensers, probably due to their capacity to colonize the circuits and to prevail over the others. Recovery of NF-GNB was favoured by the reduction in residual chlorine of the supply water, occasional use, the absence of a bacteriostatic element in the filter and inadequate disinfection of the water lines. Conclusions. The presence of high concentrations of potentially pathogenic species of NF-GNB (Ps.aeruginosa, Steno. maltophilia, Burkhol.cepacia in the water dispensed from microfiltration devices represents a risk of waterborne infections for vulnerable individuals. When

  8. Occurrence of non-fermenting gram negative bacteria in drinking water dispensed from point-of-use microfiltration devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Franza; de Luca, Giovanna; Leoni, Erica; Sacchetti, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Many devices have been marketed in order to improve the organoleptic characteristics of tap water resulting from disinfection with chlorine derivates. The aim of the presented study was to assess the degree of contamination by non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria (NF-GNB) of drinking water dispensed from microfiltration devices at point-of-use. Water samples were collected from 94 point-of-use water devices fitted with a filter (0.5 μm pore size) containing powdered activated carbon. The microbiological contamination of water entering and leaving the microfiltered water dispensers was compared. The NF-GNB loads were correlated to Total Heterotrophic Counts (HPCs) at 37 and 22 °C, residua chlorine, and some structural and functional features of the devices. NF-GNB were detected from 23% of supply water samples, 33% of still unchilled water, 33% of still chilled water and 18% of carbonated chilled water. The most frequent isolates were Pseudomonadaceae: Steno.maltophilia 30.2% of isolates, Pseudomonas 20.5%, Delftia acidovorans 13.4%, while the species more largely distributed was Ps. aeruginosa recovered from 13% of samples. The distribution of the various NF-GNB was different in the water entering and in that leaving the devices. Ps.aeruginosa and Steno.maltophilia were the predominant species in water leaving the microfiltration dispensers, probably due to their capacity to colonize the circuits and to prevail over the others. Recovery of NF-GNB was favoured by the reduction in residual chlorine of the supply water, occasional use, the absence of a bacteriostatic element in the filter and inadequate disinfection of the water lines. The presence of high concentrations of potentially pathogenic species of NF-GNB (Ps.aeruginosa, Steno. maltophilia, Burkhol.cepacia) in the water dispensed from microfiltration devices represents a risk of waterborne infections for vulnerable individuals. When these devices are used in environments such as hospitals, nursing homes

  9. Glycosaminoglycans are involved in pathogen adherence to corneal epithelial cells differently for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies.

  10. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds Is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Ciotti, Susan M; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J Erby; Baker, James R; Hemmila, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion (NE) formulations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours after burn injury, the wound was inoculated with 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402), NE vehicle, or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were killed 32 hours after burn injury, and skin samples were obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Both NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either P. aeruginosa or S. aureus and decreased median bacterial counts at least three logs when compared with animals with saline applications (p Gram-negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation, and abrogating burn wound progression.

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Endolysin P28 against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongling; Zhu, Chaoyang; Chen, Jingyi; Ye, Xing; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Maltocin P28 is a phage-tail like bacteriocin produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia P28. The ORF8 of maltocin P28 gene cluster is predicted to encode an endolysin and we name it endolysin P28. Sequence analysis revealed that it contains the lysozyme_like superfamily conserved domain. Endolysin P28 has the four consensus motifs as that of Escherichia coli phage lambda gpR. In this study, endolysin P28 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The antibacterial activity of endolysin P28 increased as the temperature rose from 25 to 45°C. Thermostability assays showed that endolysin P28 was stable up to 50°C, while its residual activity was reduced by 55% after treatment at 70°C for 30 min. Acidity and high salinity could enhance its antibacterial activity. Endolysin P28 exhibited a broad antibacterial activity against 14 out of 16 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria besides S. maltophilia. Moreover, it could effectively lyse intact Gram-negative bacteria in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as an outer membrane permeabilizer. Therefore, the characteristics of endolysin P28 make it a potential therapeutic agent against multi-drug-resistant pathogens.

  12. Antibacterial activity of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endolysin P28 against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling eDong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maltocin P28 is a phage-tail like bacteriocin produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia P28. The ORF8 of maltocin P28 gene cluster is predicted to encode an endolysin and we name it endolysin P28. Sequence analysis revealed that it contains the lysozyme_like superfamily conserved domain. Endolysin P28 has the four consensus motifs as that of Escherichia coli phage lambda gpR. In this study endolysin P28 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3 and purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The antibacterial activity of endolysin P28 increased as the temperature rose from 25°C to 45°C. Thermostability assays showed that endolysin P28 was stable up to 50°C, while its residual activity was reduced by 55% after treatment at 70°C for 30 min. Acidity and high salinity could enhance its antibacterial activity. Endolysin P28 exhibited a broad antibacterial activity against 14 out of 16 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria besides S. maltophilia. Moreover, it could effectively lyse intact Gram-negative bacteria in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA as an outer membrane permeabilizer. Therefore, the characteristics of endolysin P28 make it a potential therapeutic agent against multi-drug-resistant pathogens.

  13. Development of a miniaturised microarray-based assay for the rapid identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchelor, Miranda; Hopkins, Katie L; Liebana, Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development of a miniaturised microarray for the detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria. Included on the array are genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and beta-lactams, including extended-spectrum ......We describe the development of a miniaturised microarray for the detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria. Included on the array are genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and beta-lactams, including extended...

  14. Antagonistic activities of some Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from resident infant gastrointestinal microbiota on Gram-negative enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Cristea, Violeta Corina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the consolidation of the anti-infectious barrier against enteric pathogens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Bifidobacterium sp. strains, recently isolated from infant gastrointestinal microbiota on the in vitro growth and virulence features expression of enteropathogenic bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from human feces was examined in vitro against a wide range of Gram negative pathogenic strains isolated from 30 infant patients (3 days to 5 years old) with diarrhea. Both potential probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium ruminantium) and enteropathogenic strains (EPEC, EIEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were identified by MALDI-TOF and confirmed serologically when needed. The bactericidal activity, growth curve, adherence to the cellular HEp-2 substratum and production of soluble virulence factors have been assessed in the presence of different Bifidobacterium sp. cultures and fractions (whole culture and free-cell supernatants). Among the twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains, the largest spectrum of antimicrobial activity against 9 of the 18 enteropathogenic strains was revealed for a B. breve strain recently isolated from infant intestinal feces. The whole culture and free-cell supernatant of B. breve culture decreased the multiplication rate, shortened the log phase and the total duration of the growth curve, with an earlier entrance in the decline phase and inhibited the adherence capacity to a cellular substratum and the swimming/swarming motility too. These results indicate the significant probiotic potential of the B. breve strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Organic and conventional fruits and vegetables contain equivalent counts of Gram-negative bacteria expressing resistance to antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruimy, Raymond; Brisabois, Anne; Bernede, Claire; Skurnik, David; Barnat, Saïda; Arlet, Guillaume; Momcilovic, Sonia; Elbaz, Sandrine; Moury, Frédérique; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Courvalin, Patrice; Guillemot, Didier; Andremont, Antoine

    2010-03-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem which might culminate in outbreaks caused by pathogenic bacteria untreatable by known antibiotics. Most of the genes conferring resistance are acquired horizontally from already resistant commensal or environmental bacteria. Food contamination by resistant bacteria might be a significant source of resistance genes for human bacteria but has never been precisely assessed, nor is it known whether organic products differ in this respect from conventionally produced products. We showed here, on a large year-long constructed sample set containing 399 products that, irrespective of their mode of production, raw fruits and vegetables are heavily contaminated by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) resistant to multiple antibiotics. Most of these bacteria originate in the soil and environment. We focused on non-oxidative GNB resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, because of their potential impact on human health. Among them, species potentially pathogenic for immunocompetent hosts were rare. Of the products tested, 13% carried bacteria producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, all identified as Rahnella sp. which grouped into two phylotypes and all carrying the bla(RAHN) gene. Thus, both organic and conventional fruits and vegetables may constitute significant sources of resistant bacteria and of resistance genes.

  16. Quorum sensing signal molecules (acylated homoserine lactones) in Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, K.F.

    2005-01-01

    and plant-pathogenic bacteria. A total of 59 strains, representing 9 different fish pathogenic species, were tested against 2 AHL monitor bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 [pZLR4] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026) in a well diffusion assay and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Representative...

  17. EFFECT OF AEROSOLIZATION ON CULTURABILITY AND VIABILITY OF GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimations of the bacterial content of air can be more easily made now than a decade ago, with colony formation the method of choice for enumeration of airborne bacteria.However, plate counts are subject to error because bacteria exposed to the air may remain viable yet lose the...

  18. Saponin promotes rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Morici, P; Ghelardi, E; Nibbering, P H; Campa, M

    2013-04-01

    The rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria in clinical blood cultures is crucial to optimise antimicrobial therapy. A previous study involving small sample numbers revealed that the addition of saponin to blood cultures, further referred to as the new method, shortened considerably the turn-around time for the identification and AST of Gram-positive cocci as compared to the current method involving an overnight subculture. Here, we extend previous results and compare the identification and AST of blood cultures containing Gram-negative bacilli by the new and current methods. The identification and AST of 121 Gram-positive and 109 Gram-negative bacteria in clinical monomicrobial blood cultures by the new and current methods and, in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, by direct (no additions) inoculation into an automated system (rapid method) was assessed using the Vitek 2 system. Discrepancies between the results obtained with the different methods were solved by manual methods. The new method correctly identified 88 % of Gram-positive and 98 % of Gram-negative bacteria, and the rapid method correctly identified 94 % of Gram-negative bacteria. The AST for all antimicrobials by the new method were concordant with the current method for 55 % and correct for an additional 9 % of Gram-positive bacteria, and concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 21 % of Gram-negative bacilli. The AST by the rapid method was concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 12 % of Gram-negative bacilli. Together, saponin-treated monomicrobial blood cultures allow rapid and reliable identification and AST of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. [Antimicrobial resistance in gram negative bacteria isolated from intensive care units of Colombian hospitals, WHONET 2003, 2004 and 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, María Consuelo; Pérez, Federico; Zuluaga, Tania; Olivera, María del Rosario; Correa, Adriana; Reyes, Sandra Lorena; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2006-09-01

    Surveillance systems play a key role in the detection and control of bacterial resistance. It is necessary to constantly collect information from all institutions because the mechanisms of bacterial resistance can operate in different ways between countries, cities and even in hospitals in the same area. Therefore local information is important in order to learn about bacterial behaviour and design appropriate interventions for each institution. Between January 2003 and December 2004, the Centro Internacional de Entrenamiento e Investigaciones Médicas (CIDEIM) developed a surveillance project in 10 tertiary hospitals in 6 cities of Colombia. Describe the trends of antibiotic resistance among the isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomona aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Enterobacter cloacae, five of the most prevalent nosocomial Gram negative pathogens. The susceptibility tests were performed by automated methods in 9 hospitals and by Kirby Bauer in 1 hospital. Antibiotics with known activity against Gram negatives, according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines, were selected. The laboratories performed internal and external quality controls. During the study period, the information was downloaded monthly from the databases of each microbiology laboratory and sent to CIDEIM where it was centralized in a database using the system WHONET 5.3. The high resistance rates reported especially for A. baumannii, evidenced the presence of multidrug resistant bacteria in both ICUs and wards at every studied institution. The creation of a national surveillance network to improve our capabilities to detect, follow up, and control the antibiotic resistance in Colombia is urgently needed.

  20. Platelets augment respiratory burst in neutrophils activated by selected species of gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Pytel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils and platelets circulate in blood system and play important physiological roles as part of immunological system. Neutrophils are the first line of host defense against various intruders, and platelets are satellite cells cooperating with other components of defense system. Recent studies report about the cooperation among these types of cells. We analyzed the effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils triggered by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria in vitro. The effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils was measured by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence. Opsonized and non-opsonized bacteria were used as activators. Activation of neutrophils with live non-opsonized and opsonized bacteria in the presence of platelets increased the oxygen burst as compared to the same system without platelets. The gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus were causing higher activation than gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli. This work demonstrate that platelets potentate the response of neutrophils augmenting their respiratory burst in vitro when triggered by bacteria.

  1. Hyperspectral microscope imaging methods to classify gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acousto-optic tunable filter-based hyperspectral microscope imaging method has potential for identification of foodborne pathogenic bacteria from microcolony rapidly with a single cell level. We have successfully developed the method to acquire quality hyperspectral microscopic images from variou...

  2. Classification of gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria with hyperspectral microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical method with hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) has potential for identification of foodborne pathogenic bacteria from microcolonies rapidly with a cell level. A HMI system that provides both spatial and spectral information could be an effective tool for analyzing spectral characteristic...

  3. Concentration-dependency of beta-lactam-induced filament formation in Gram-negative bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, J.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Mouton, J.W.; Wagenvoort, J.H.T.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    Ceftazidime and cefotaxime are beta-lactam antibiotics with dose-related affinities for penicillin-binding protein (PBP)-3 and PBP-1. At low concentrations, these antibiotics inhibit PBP-3, leading to filament formation. Filaments are long strands of non-dividing bacteria that contain enhanced

  4. Antimicrobial effects of positively charged surfaces on adhering Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottenbos, B; Grijpma, DW; van der Mei, HC; Feijen, J; Busscher, HJ

    The infection of biomaterials is determined by an interplay of adhesion and surface growth of the infecting organisms. In this study, the antimicrobial effects on adhering bacteria of a positively charged poly(methacrylate) surface ( potential +12 mV) were compared with those of negatively charged

  5. Loss of outer membrane integrity in Gram-negative bacteria by silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stability of the particles may be due to various phytochemicals of tea that were bound to the surface of reduced silver ions as a capping agent. ... Stress signals are sensed by the membrane-bound sig- nal transduction system in bacteria .... were harvested from 10ml of bacterial culture by centrifu- gation at low speed and the ...

  6. Genome mining reveals unlocked bioactive potential of marine Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Henrique; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Melchiorsen, Jette; Gram, Lone

    2015-03-07

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria spreads quickly, overtaking the pace at which new compounds are discovered and this emphasizes the immediate need to discover new compounds for control of infectious diseases. Terrestrial bacteria have for decades been investigated as a source of bioactive compounds leading to successful applications in pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Marine bacteria have so far not been exploited to the same extent; however, they are believed to harbor a multitude of novel bioactive chemistry. To explore this potential, genomes of 21 marine Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria collected during the Galathea 3 expedition were sequenced and mined for natural product encoding gene clusters. Independently of genome size, bacteria of all tested genera carried a large number of clusters encoding different potential bioactivities, especially within the Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae families. A very high potential was identified in pigmented pseudoalteromonads with up to 20 clusters in a single strain, mostly NRPSs and NRPS-PKS hybrids. Furthermore, regulatory elements in bioactivity-related pathways including chitin metabolism, quorum sensing and iron scavenging systems were investigated both in silico and in vitro. Genes with siderophore function were identified in 50% of the strains, however, all but one harboured the ferric-uptake-regulator gene. Genes encoding the syntethase of acylated homoserine lactones were found in Roseobacter-clade bacteria, but not in the Vibrionaceae strains and only in one Pseudoalteromonas strains. The understanding and manipulation of these elements can help in the discovery and production of new compounds never identified under regular laboratory cultivation conditions. High chitinolytic potential was demonstrated and verified for Vibrio and Pseudoalteromonas species that commonly live in close association with eukaryotic organisms in the environment. Chitin regulation by the ChiS histidine-kinase seems to be a

  7. Morning glory resin glycosides as modulators of antibiotic activity in multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-six microbiologically inactive (MIC > 512 µg/mL) convolvulaceous resin glycosides ( 1- 26) were tested for resistance modulatory activity in vitro against Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami and two nosocomial pathogens, Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri. These compounds exerted a potentiation effect of the clinically useful antibiotics tetracycline, kanamycin, and chloramphenicol against the tested gram-negative bacteria by increasing antibiotic susceptibility up to 32-fold at concentrations of 25 µg/mL. Therefore, the oligosaccharides from the morning glory family (Convolvulaceae) represent metabolites that reverse microbial resistance mechanisms, favoring an increase in the strength and effectiveness of current antibiotics that are not effective in the treatment of refractive infections caused by multidrug-resistant strains. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Amplifiable DNA from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by a low strength pulsed electric field method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Frank; Geiger, Georg; Bisswanger, Hans; Elkine, Bentsian; Brunner, Herwig; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    An efficient electric field-based procedure for cell disruption and DNA isolation is described. Isoosmotic suspensions of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were treated with pulsed electric fields of Pulses had an exponential decay waveform with a time constant of 3.4 µs. DNA yield was linearly dependent on time or pulse number, with several thousand pulses needed. Electrochemical side-effects and electrophoresis were minimal. The lysates contained non-fragmented DNA which was readily amplifiable by PCR. As the method was not limited to samples of high specific resistance, it should be applicable to physiological fluids and be useful for genomic and DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:10734214

  9. Antibacterial Activityof Aqueous And Ethanolic Leaf Extracts Of Vernonia Amygdalina On Selected Species Of Gram Positive And Gram Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Bukar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical screening and antibacterial activity of ethanolic and Methanolic leaves extract of Vernonia amygdalina against five clinical isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Pseudomonas species, Salmonella species and Proteus species was determined using standard method of analysis. The results of the antibacterial activity of ethanol, methanol and aqueous extract of leaves of V. amygdalina have diameters ranging between 0.4 to 10mm. The plant extracts from the plants had profound activities against gram-positive than gram negative bacteria. From the above studies, it has clearly indicated that V. amygdalina extract may represent new sources of antibacterial drug, if the phytoactive components are purified and proper dosage are determined for administration. International Journal of Environment, Volume-2, Issue-1, Sep-Nov 2013, Pages 147-152 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v2i1.9217

  10. Quality Control Testing for Tracking Endotoxin-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria during the Preparation of Polyvalent Snake Antivenom Immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheraba, Norhan S; Diab, Mohamed R; Yassin, Aymen S; Amin, Magdy A; Zedan, Hamdallah H

    2015-01-01

    Snake bites represent a serious public health problem, particularly in rural areas worldwide. Antitoxic sera preparations are antibodies from immunized animals and are considered to be the only treatment option. The purification of antivenom antibodies should aim at obtaining products of consistent quality, safety, efficacy, and adherence to good manufacturing practice principles. Endotoxins are an integral component of the outer cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria. They are common contaminates of the raw materials and processing equipment used in the manufacturing of antivenoms. In this work, and as a part of quality control testing, we establish and examine an environmental monitoring program for identification of potential sources of endotoxin-producing Gram-negative bacteria throughout the whole steps of antivenom preparation. In addition, we follow all the steps of preparation starting from crude plasma till finished product using a validated sterility and endotoxin testing.Samples from air, surface, and personnel were collected and examined through various stages of manufacturing for the potential presence of Gram-negative bacteria. A validated sterility and endotoxin test was carried out in parallel at the different production steps. The results showed that air contributed to the majority of bacterial isolates detected (48.43%), followed by surfaces (37.5%) and then personnel (14%). The most common bacterial isolates detected were Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which together with Burkholderia cepacia were both also detected in cleaning water and certain equipment parts. A heavy bacterial growth with no fungal contamination was observed in all stages of antivenom manufacturing excluding the formulation stage. All samples were positive for endotoxin including the finished product.Implementation and continued evaluation of quality assurance and quality improvement programs in aseptic preparation is essential

  11. Geographical Variability in the Likelihood of Bloodstream Infections Due to Gram-Negative Bacteria: Correlation with Proximity to the Equator and Health Care Expenditure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Perencevich, Eli; Tuite, Ashleigh R.; Mermel, Leonard A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Infections due to Gram-negative bacteria exhibit seasonal trends, with peak infection rates during warmer months. We hypothesized that the likelihood of a bloodstream infection due to Gram-negative bacteria increases with proximity to the equator. We tested this hypothesis and identified geographical, climatic and social factors associated with this variability. Design We established a network of 23 international centers in 22 cities. Setting: De-identified results of positive blood cultures from 2007–2011 and data sources for geographic, climatic and socioeconomic factors were assembled for each center. Participants Patients at the 23 centers with positive blood cultures. Main outcome Due to variability in the availability of total culture volumes across sites, our primary outcome measure was the fraction of positive blood cultures that yielded Gram-negative bacteria; sources of variability in this outcome measure were explored using meta-regression techniques. Results The mean fraction of bacteremia associated with Gram-negative bacteria was 48.4% (range 26.4% to 61.8%). Although not all sites displayed significant seasonality, the overall P-value for seasonal oscillation was significant (PGram-negative bacteria. In multivariable models, only percent of gross domestic product spent on healthcare and distance from the equator (ie. latitude squared) were significantly associated with the fraction of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions The likelihood of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria varies markedly between cities, in a manner that appears to have both geographic (latitude) and socioeconomic (proportion gross domestic product devoted to health spending) determinants. Thus, the optimal approach to initial management of suspected bacteremia may be geographically specific. The rapid emergence of highly antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens may have geographically specific impacts. PMID:25521300

  12. Geographical variability in the likelihood of bloodstream infections due to gram-negative bacteria: correlation with proximity to the equator and health care expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisman, David; Patrozou, Eleni; Carmeli, Yehuda; Perencevich, Eli; Tuite, Ashleigh R; Mermel, Leonard A

    2014-01-01

    Infections due to Gram-negative bacteria exhibit seasonal trends, with peak infection rates during warmer months. We hypothesized that the likelihood of a bloodstream infection due to Gram-negative bacteria increases with proximity to the equator. We tested this hypothesis and identified geographical, climatic and social factors associated with this variability. We established a network of 23 international centers in 22 cities. De-identified results of positive blood cultures from 2007-2011 and data sources for geographic, climatic and socioeconomic factors were assembled for each center. Patients at the 23 centers with positive blood cultures. Due to variability in the availability of total culture volumes across sites, our primary outcome measure was the fraction of positive blood cultures that yielded Gram-negative bacteria; sources of variability in this outcome measure were explored using meta-regression techniques. The mean fraction of bacteremia associated with Gram-negative bacteria was 48.4% (range 26.4% to 61.8%). Although not all sites displayed significant seasonality, the overall P-value for seasonal oscillation was significant (PGram-negative bacteria. In multivariable models, only percent of gross domestic product spent on healthcare and distance from the equator (ie. latitude squared) were significantly associated with the fraction of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria. The likelihood of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria varies markedly between cities, in a manner that appears to have both geographic (latitude) and socioeconomic (proportion gross domestic product devoted to health spending) determinants. Thus, the optimal approach to initial management of suspected bacteremia may be geographically specific. The rapid emergence of highly antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens may have geographically specific impacts.

  13. Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns.

  14. Role of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Their Endotoxins in Rat Death after Heat Stress,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-26

    circulatory collapse and coagulative disorders noted in human heatstroke (2, 9). Furthermore, treatment to reduce gut flora increases length of survival...Table 4). Thus, it is likely that this invasion did not originate iS from the gut but represented multiplication or spread of extra-intestinal bacteria ...pathophysiology of different forms of stress. These findings also do not explain why heat stressed dogs pre-treated to reduce gut flora experienced a

  15. Activity of siderophores against drug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokarn K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Karuna Gokarn,1,2 Ramprasad B Pal1 1Department of Microbiology, Sir Hurkisondas Nurrotumdas Medical Research Society, 2Caius Research Laboratory, St Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India Abstract: Infections by drug-resistant bacteria are life-threatening. As iron is a vital element for the growth of bacteria, iron-chelating agents (siderophores can be used to arrest their multiplication. Exogenous siderophores – exochelin-MS and deferoxamine-B – were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and metallo-β-lactamase producers – Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii – by disc diffusion, micro-broth dilution, and turbidimetric growth assays. The drug-resistant isolates were inhibited by the synergistic activity of siderophores and antibiotics. Minimum inhibitory concentration of exochelin-MS+ampicillin for different isolates was between 0.05 and 0.5 mg/mL. Minimum inhibitory concentration of deferoxamine-B+ampicillin was 1.0 mg/mL and greater. Iron-chelation therapy could provide a complementary approach to overcome drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria. Keywords: iron-chelation, xenosiderophores, exochelin MS, deferoxamine B

  16. Prevalence and molecular characterization of carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacteria from a university hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; Li, Meimei; Chen, Lijiang; Chen, Huale; Yu, Xiao; Ye, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yapei; Ma, Chuanling; Zhou, Tieli

    2016-02-01

    The increasing emergence of carbapenem resistance in gram-negative bacteria associated with carbapenemase prompted the initiation of this study. A total of 3139 gram-negative bacteria were recovered from a 3380-bed university hospital in Wenzhou during 2008 and 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the VITEK2 Compact System and agar dilution method. The phenotype and genotype of carbapenemase were demonstrated using the modified Hodge test, PCR and sequencing. A conjugation experiment was performed to reveal the transferability of resistant genes. The location of the carbapenemase gene was studied by plasmid analysis and southern blot hybridization. Clonal relatedness of the isolates was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Overall, 751 of 3139 isolates (71/2055 Enterobacteriaceae, 510/620 Acinetobacter baumannii and 170/464 Pseudomonas aeruginosa) exhibited resistance to carbapenem. Carbapenemase-encoding genes were detected in 70.4% (50/71) of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, including blaKPC (80%) and blaIMP (20%). All A. baumannii subjected to genotype analysis were positive for blaOXA-51-like and co-harboured blaOXA-23-like (80.4%) and blaIMP (7.8%). ISAba1 was found upstream of blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-51-like. Eight and seven strains of 170 P. aeruginosa carried blaIMP and blaVIM, respectively. PFGE analysis identified at least one dominant genotype in certain species. Four KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae belonged to the same sequence type ST11. The plasmids carrying blaKPC were successfully transferred into recipient strains. This study highlights the challenge of increasing prevalence of carbapenem resistance associated with carbapenemase genes and dissemination of epidemic clones in Wenzhou, China.

  17. The distribution of carbapenem- and colistin-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from the Tamil Nadu region in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Prasanth; Shanthini, Thamaraiselvan; Ayyanar, Ramankannan; Bozdogan, Bulent; Wilson, Aruni; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Nachimuthu, Ramesh; Lopes, Bruno S

    2017-07-01

    The occurrence of carbapenem- and colistin-resistance among Gram-negative bacteria is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to understand the distribution of carbapenem- and colistin-resistance in two areas in Tamil Nadu, India. The clinical isolates (n=89) used in this study were collected from two diagnostic centres in Tamil Nadu, India. The bacterial isolates were screened for meropenem- and colistin-resistance. Further, resistance genes blaNDM-1, blaOXA-48-like, blaIMP, blaVIM, blaKPC, mcr-1 and mcr-2 and integrons were studied. The synergistic effect of meropenem in combination with colistin was assessed. A total of 89 bacterial isolates were studied which included Escherichia coli (n=43), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=18), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), Enterobacter cloacae (n=6), Acinetobacter baumannii (n=5), Klebsiella oxytoca (n=4), Proteus mirabilis (n=2) and Salmonella paratyphi (n=1). MIC testing showed that 58/89 (65 %) and 29/89 (32 %) isolates were resistant to meropenem and colistin, respectively, whereas 27/89 (30 %) isolates were resistant to both antibiotics. Escherichia coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates were blaNDM-1-positive (n=20). Some strains of Escherichia coli, K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca were blaOXA-181-positive (n=4). Class 1, 2 and 3 integrons were found in 24, 20 and 3 isolates, respectively. Nine NDM-1-positive Escherichia coli strains could transfer carbapenem resistance via plasmids to susceptible Escherichia coli AB1157. Meropenem and colistin showed synergy in 10/20 (50 %) isolates by 24 h time-kill studies. Our results highlight the distribution of carbapenem- and colistin-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the Tamil Nadu region in South India.

  18. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, phenotypes, and mechanisms of Gram-negative bacteria from infected patients in upper Egypt.

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    Gamal F Gad

    Full Text Available With the re-emergence of older antibiotics as valuable choices for treatment of serious infections, we studied the aminoglycoside resistance of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with ear, urinary tract, skin, and gastrointestinal tract infections at Minia university hospital in Egypt. Escherichia coli (mainly from urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract infections was the most prevalent isolate (28.57%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.7% (mainly from ear discharge and skin infections. Isolates exhibited maximal resistance against streptomycin (83.4%, and minimal resistance against amikacin (17.7% and intermediate degrees of resistance against neomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Resistance to older aminoglycosides was higher than newer aminoglycosides. The most common aminoglycoside resistance phenotype was that of streptomycin resistance, present as a single phenotype or in combination, followed by kanamycin-neomycin as determined by interpretative reading. The resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were capable of producing aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and using efflux as mechanisms of resistance. Using checkerboard titration method, the most frequently-observed outcome in combinations of aminoglycosides with β-lactams or quinolones was synergism. The most effective combination was amikacin with ciprofloxacin (100% Synergism, whereas the least effective combination was gentamicin with amoxicillin (53.3% Synergistic, 26.7% additive, and 20% indifferent FIC indices. Whereas the studied combinations were additive and indifferent against few of the tested strains, antagonism was never observed. The high resistance rates to aminoglycosides exhibited by Gram-negative bacteria in this study could be attributed to the selective pressure of aminoglycoside usage which could be controlled by successful implementation of infection control measures.

  19. Surfactant proteins A and D inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria by increasing membrane permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huixing; Kuzmenko, Alexander; Wan, Sijue; Schaffer, Lyndsay; Weiss, Alison; Fisher, James H.; Kim, Kwang Sik; McCormack, Francis X.

    2003-01-01

    The pulmonary collectins, surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D), have been reported to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS), opsonize microorganisms, and enhance the clearance of lung pathogens. In this study, we examined the effect of SP-A and SP-D on the growth and viability of Gram-negative bacteria. The pulmonary clearance of Escherichia coli K12 was reduced in SP-A–null mice and was increased in SP-D–overexpressing mice, compared with strain-matched wild-type controls. Purified SP-A and SP-D inhibited bacterial synthetic functions of several, but not all, strains of E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes. In general, rough E. coli strains were more susceptible than smooth strains, and collectin-mediated growth inhibition was partially blocked by coincubation with rough LPS vesicles. Although both SP-A and SP-D agglutinated E. coli K12 in a calcium-dependent manner, microbial growth inhibition was independent of bacterial aggregation. At least part of the antimicrobial activity of SP-A and SP-D was localized to their C-terminal domains using truncated recombinant proteins. Incubation of E. coli K12 with SP-A or SP-D increased bacterial permeability. Deletion of the E. coli OmpA gene from a collectin-resistant smooth E. coli strain enhanced SP-A and SP-D–mediated growth inhibition. These data indicate that SP-A and SP-D are antimicrobial proteins that directly inhibit the proliferation of Gram-negative bacteria in a macrophage- and aggregation-independent manner by increasing the permeability of the microbial cell membrane. PMID:12750409

  20. A possible alternative to the error prone modified Hodge test to correctly identify the carbapenemase producing Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, S S; Balaji, V; Anandan, S; Sahni, R D

    2014-01-01

    The modified Hodge test (MHT) is widely used as a screening test for the detection of carbapenemases in Gram-negative bacteria. This test has several pitfalls in terms of validity and interpretation. Also the test has a very low sensitivity in detecting the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM). Considering the degree of dissemination of the NDM and the growing pandemic of carbapenem resistance, a more accurate alternative test is needed at the earliest. The study intends to compare the performance of the MHT with the commercially available Neo-Sensitabs - Carbapenemases/Metallo-β-Lactamase (MBL) Confirmative Identification pack to find out whether the latter could be an efficient alternative to the former. A total of 105 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to imipenem and meropenem, collected prospectively over a period of 2 years were included in the study. The study isolates were tested with the MHT, the Neo-Sensitabs - Carbapenemases/MBL Confirmative Identification pack and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting the blaNDM-1 gene. Among the 105 isolates, the MHT identified 100 isolates as carbapenemase producers. In the five isolates negative for the MHT, four were found to produce MBLs by the Neo-Sensitabs. The Neo-Sensitabs did not have any false negatives when compared against the PCR. The MHT can give false negative results, which lead to failure in detecting the carbapenemase producers. Also considering the other pitfalls of the MHT, the Neo-Sensitabs--Carbapenemases/MBL Confirmative Identification pack could be a more efficient alternative for detection of carbapenemase production in Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. A possible alternative to the error prone modified Hodge test to correctly identify the carbapenemase producing Gram-negative bacteria

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    S S Jeremiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The modified Hodge test (MHT is widely used as a screening test for the detection of carbapenemases in Gram-negative bacteria. This test has several pitfalls in terms of validity and interpretation. Also the test has a very low sensitivity in detecting the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM. Considering the degree of dissemination of the NDM and the growing pandemic of carbapenem resistance, a more accurate alternative test is needed at the earliest. Aims: The study intends to compare the performance of the MHT with the commercially available Neo-Sensitabs - Carbapenemases/Metallo-β-Lactamase (MBL Confirmative Identification pack to find out whether the latter could be an efficient alternative to the former. Settings and Design: A total of 105 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to imipenem and meropenem, collected prospectively over a period of 2 years were included in the study. Subjects and Methods: The study isolates were tested with the MHT, the Neo-Sensitabs - Carbapenemases/MBL Confirmative Identification pack and polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detecting the blaNDM-1 gene. Results: Among the 105 isolates, the MHT identified 100 isolates as carbapenemase producers. In the five isolates negative for the MHT, four were found to produce MBLs by the Neo-Sensitabs. The Neo-Sensitabs did not have any false negatives when compared against the PCR. Conclusions: The MHT can give false negative results, which lead to failure in detecting the carbapenemase producers. Also considering the other pitfalls of the MHT, the Neo-Sensitabs - Carbapenemases/MBL Confirmative Identification pack could be a more efficient alternative for detection of carbapenemase production in Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Discovery and development of new antibacterial agents targeting Gram-negative bacteria in the era of pandrug resistance: is the future promising?

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    Page, Malcolm G P; Bush, Karen

    2014-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria continue to pose a threat, with many infections caused by these pathogens being virtually untreatable. A number of new antibacterial agents are in late stage clinical development to treat these infections. Drugs in known classes such as new quinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams have been designed to evade many of the known resistance mechanisms, whereas newer drug classes include novel β-lactamase inhibitors in combination with new or approved β-lactams, and a peptidomimetic that have entered full clinical development. The establishment of public-private partnerships and an increase in pharmaceutical interest in antibacterial R&D are encouraging signs for the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  4. Stronger T Cell Immunogenicity of Ovalbumin Expressed Intracellularly in Gram-Negative than in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martner, Anna; Östman, Sofia; Lundin, Samuel; Rask, Carola; Björnsson, Viktor; Telemo, Esbjörn; Collins, L. Vincent; Axelsson, Lars; Wold, Agnes E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether Gram-positive (G+) and Gram-negative (G−) bacteria affect antigen-presenting cells differently and thereby influence the immunogenicity of proteins they express. Lactobacilli, lactococci and Escherichia coli strains were transformed with plasmids conferring intracellular ovalbumin (OVA) production. Murine splenic antigen presenting cells (APCs) were pulsed with washed and UV-inactivated OVA-producing bacteria, control bacteria, or soluble OVA. The ability of the APCs to activate OVA-specific DO11.10 CD4+ T cells was assessed by measurments of T cell proliferation and cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-13, IL-17, IL-10) production. OVA expressed within E. coli was strongly immunogenic, since 500 times higher concentrations of soluble OVA were needed to achieve a similar level of OVA-specific T cell proliferation. Furthermore, T cells responding to soluble OVA produced mainly IL-13, while T cells responding to E. coli-expressed OVA produced high levels of both IFN-γ and IL-13. Compared to E. coli, G+ lactobacilli and lactococci were poor inducers of OVA-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine production, despite efficient intracellular expression and production of OVA and despite being efficiently phagocytosed. These results demonstrate a pronounced difference in immunogenicity of intracellular antigens in G+ and G− bacteria and may be relevant for the use of bacterial carriers in vaccine development. PMID:23741469

  5. Chemical resistance of the gram-negative bacteria to different sanitizers in a water purification system

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    Penna Thereza CV

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purified water for pharmaceutical purposes must be free of microbial contamination and pyrogens. Even with the additional sanitary and disinfecting treatments applied to the system (sequential operational stages, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas picketti, Flavobacterium aureum, Acinetobacter lowffi and Pseudomonas diminuta were isolated and identified from a thirteen-stage purification system. To evaluate the efficacy of the chemical agents used in the disinfecting process along with those used to adjust chemical characteristics of the system, over the identified bacteria, the kinetic parameter of killing time (D-value necessary to inactivate 90% of the initial bioburden (decimal reduction time was experimentally determined. Methods Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas picketti, Flavobacterium aureum, Acinetobacter lowffi and Pseudomonas diminuta were called in house (wild bacteria. Pseudomonas diminuta ATCC 11568, Pseudomonas alcaligenes INCQS , Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 3178, Pseudomonas picketti ATCC 5031, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 937 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 were used as 'standard' bacteria to evaluate resistance at 25°C against either 0.5% citric acid, 0.5% hydrochloric acid, 70% ethanol, 0.5% sodium bisulfite, 0.4% sodium hydroxide, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, or a mixture of 2.2% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and 0.45% peracetic acid. Results The efficacy of the sanitizers varied with concentration and contact time to reduce decimal logarithmic (log10 population (n cycles. To kill 90% of the initial population (or one log10 cycle, the necessary time (D-value was for P. aeruginosa into: (i 0.5% citric acid, D = 3.8 min; (ii 0.5% hydrochloric acid, D = 6.9 min; (iii 70% ethanol, D = 9.7 min; (iv 0.5% sodium bisulfite, D = 5.3 min; (v 0.4% sodium hydroxide, D = 14.2 min; (vi 0.5% sodium

  6. Gram negative bacteria are associated with the early stages of necrotizing enterocolitis.

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    Erica M Carlisle

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC affects 5-10% of infants born weighing less than 1500 g. Most models of NEC recapitulate late-stage disease with gut necrosis and elevated inflammatory mediators. Evaluation of NEC at earlier, less lethal stages of disease will allow investigation of initial disease triggers and may advance our understanding of temporal relationships between factors implicated in NEC pathogenesis. In this manuscript, we describe our investigation of early NEC and test the hypothesis that bacteria and inflammatory mediators differ between animals with early NEC and disease free animals. METHODS: On DOL7 C3HeB/FeJ pups were fed liquid formula with 1×10(4 Streptococcus thoraltensis, Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa every 3 h. To initiate NEC, pups underwent asphyxia (100% N(2 for 90 s and hypothermia (4°C for 10 min after feeding. Pups were euthanized at 72 h. Intestines were collected for histologic NEC scoring and DNA/RNA extraction. Bacterial populations were identified by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and principal component analysis (PCA. RNA isolates underwent QRT-PCR for Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. RESULTS: Despite histologic, intestinal damage in mice with NEC, no gross necrosis was observed suggesting early disease. QRT-PCR yielded no difference between groups in TLR4 or iNOS mRNA levels. PCA demonstrated relative clustering of microbial communities based on presence or absence of NEC. 16S pyrosequencing demonstrated similar phyla between groups (Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominated in all animals. However, the colonic microbiota of animals with NEC had more Citrobacter (p<0.01, Klebsiella (p<0.05, and Tatumella (p<0.05, while that of animals without NEC had more Streptococcus (p<0.01 and Enterococcus (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Citrobacter, Klebsiella, and Tatumella are associated with NEC. Differential colonic bacteria were identified despite the lack of

  7. High-level and novel mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from tertiary hospitals in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, D O; Webber, M A

    2014-05-01

    To determine the occurrence and molecular basis of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from tertiary hospitals in Nigeria, 182 non-duplicate Gram-negative bacterial isolates were investigated for antimicrobial susceptibility, presence of carbapenemases (tested phenotypically and genotypically), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing, plasmid sizing and replicon typing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of carbapenems showed a high degree of resistance, with 67 isolates (36.8%) being resistant to all carbapenems, of which 40 (59.7%) produced enzymes able to hydrolyse imipenem. PCR and sequencing identified only 10 isolates (5.5%) carrying known carbapenemase genes, including bla(NDM), bla(VIM) and bla(GES). The majority of phenotypically carbapenem-resistant and carbapenemase-producing isolates did not carry a known carbapenemase gene. Transconjugant or transformant plasmid sizes were estimated to be 115 kb for bla(NDM)- and 93 kb for bla(VIM)-carrying plasmids. These plasmids were untypeable for replicon/incompatibility and transferred various other genes including plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and bla(CTX-M-15). Typing showed that the isolates in this study were not clonally related. There is a high level of carbapenem resistance in Nigeria. As well as the globally relevant carbapenemases (bla(NDM), bla(VIM) and bla(GES)), there are other unknown gene(s) or variant(s) in circulation able to hydrolyse carbapenems and confer high-level resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. An unusual class of anthracyclines potentiate Gram-positive antibiotics in intrinsically resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-07-01

    An orthogonal approach taken towards novel antibacterial drug discovery involves the identification of small molecules that potentiate or enhance the activity of existing antibacterial agents. This study aimed to identify natural-product rifampicin adjuvants in the intrinsically resistant organism Escherichia coli. E. coli BW25113 was screened against 1120 actinomycete fermentation extracts in the presence of subinhibitory (2 mg/L) concentrations of rifampicin. The active molecule exhibiting the greatest rifampicin potentiation was isolated using activity-guided methods and identified using mass and NMR spectroscopy. Susceptibility testing and biochemical assays were used to determine the mechanism of antibiotic potentiation. The anthracycline Antibiotic 301A(1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of a strain of Streptomyces (WAC450); the molecule was shown to be highly synergistic with rifampicin (fractional inhibitory concentration index = 0.156) and moderately synergistic with linezolid (FIC index = 0.25) in both E. coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Activity was associated with inhibition of efflux and the synergistic phenotype was lost when tested against E. coli harbouring mutations within the rpoB gene. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that other anthracyclines do not synergize with rifampicin and removal of the sugar moiety of Antibiotic 301A(1) abolishes activity. Screening only a subsection of our natural product library identified a small-molecule antibiotic adjuvant capable of sensitizing Gram-negative bacteria to antibiotics to which they are ordinarily intrinsically resistant. This result demonstrates the great potential of this approach in expanding antibiotic effectiveness in the face of the growing challenge of resistance in Gram-negatives. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A GFP-lacZ bicistronic reporter system for promoter analysis in environmental gram-negative bacteria.

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    Rafael Silva-Rocha

    Full Text Available Here, we describe a bicistronic reporter system for the analysis of promoter activity in a variety of gram-negative bacteria at both the population and single-cell levels. This synthetic genetic tool utilizes an artificial operon comprising the gfp and lacZ genes that are assembled in a suicide vector, which is integrated at specific sites within the chromosome of the target bacterium, thereby creating a monocopy reporter system. This tool was instrumental for the complete in vivo characterization of two promoters, Pb and Pc, that drive the expression of the benzoate and catechol degradation pathways, respectively, of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. The parameterization of these promoters in a population (using β-galactosidase assays and in single cells (using flow cytometry was necessary to examine the basic numerical features of these systems, such as the basal and maximal levels and the induction kinetics in response to an inducer (benzoate. Remarkably, GFP afforded a view of the process at a much higher resolution compared with standard lacZ tests; changes in fluorescence faithfully reflected variations in the transcriptional regimes of individual bacteria. The broad host range of the vector/reporter platform is an asset for the characterization of promoters in different bacteria, thereby expanding the diversity of genomic chasses amenable to Synthetic Biology methods.

  10. Nanoparticle targeting of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria for magnetic-based separations of bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hoang D.; Yang, Shirley S.; Wilson, Brian K.; McManus, Simon A.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Prud'homme, Robert K.

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a healthcare problem of increasing significance, and there is increasing interest in developing new tools to address bacterial infections. Bacteria-targeting nanoparticles hold promise to improve drug efficacy, compliance, and safety. In addition, nanoparticles can also be used for novel applications, such as bacterial imaging or bioseperations. We here present the use of a scalable block-copolymer-directed self-assembly process, Flash NanoPrecipitation, to form zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) modified nanoparticles that bind to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with specificity. Particles have tunable surface ligand densities that change particle avidity and binding efficacy. A variety of materials can be encapsulated into the core of the particles, such as optical dyes or iron oxide colloids, to produce imageable and magnetically active bacterial targeting constructs. As a proof-of-concept, these particles are used to bind and separate bacteria from solution in a magnetic column. Magnetic manipulation and separation would translate to a platform for pathogen identification or removal. These magnetic and targeted nanoparticles enable new methods to address bacterial infections.

  11. Cigarette smoke inhibits macrophage sensing of Gram-negative bacteria and lipopolysaccharide: relative roles of nicotine and oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, S K; Paul-Clark, M J; Walters, M; Fleet, M; Anandarajah, J; Sriskandan, S; Mitchell, J A

    2008-02-01

    Smoking cigarettes is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Moreover, smokers are more prone to infections. This has been associated with a suppression of the immune system by smoke. However, it is not clear how cigarette smoke affects the ability of immune cells to sense pathogens. Cigarette smoke contains a large number of molecules which may mediate responses on immune cells and of these, nicotine and oxidants have both been identified as inhibitory for the sensing of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are both induced in macrophages on stimulation with Gram negative bacteria or LPS. We used murine macrophages stimulated with whole heat-killed bacteria or LPS. We measured output of NO (as nitrite) and TNFalpha, NOS protein by Western blotting and cellular oxidant stress. Cigarette smoke extract suppressed the ability of murine macrophages to release NO, but not TNFalpha in response to whole bacteria. Cigarette smoke extract also inhibited nitric oxide synthase II protein expression in response to LPS. The effects of cigarette smoke extract on nitrite formation stimulated by LPS were unaffected by inhibition of nicotinic receptors with alpha-bungarotoxin (100 units ml(-1)). However, the effects of cigarette smoke extract on LPS-induced nitrite formation were mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and reversed by the anti-oxidants N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. We suggest that cigarette smoke exerts its immunosuppressive effects through an oxidant-dependent and not a nicotine-dependent mechanism.

  12. Outcome of Transplantation Using Organs From Donors Infected or Colonized With Carbapenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularoni, A; Bertani, A; Vizzini, G; Gona, F; Campanella, M; Spada, M; Gruttadauria, S; Vitulo, P; Conaldi, P; Luca, A; Gridelli, B; Grossi, P

    2015-10-01

    Donor-derived infections due to multidrug-resistant bacteria are a growing problem in solid organ transplantation, and optimal management options are not clear. In a 2-year period, 30/214 (14%) recipients received an organ from 18/170 (10.5%) deceased donors with infection or colonization caused by a carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria that was unknown at the time of transplantation. Among them, 14/30 recipients (47%) received a transplant from a donor with bacteremia or with infection/colonization of the transplanted organ and were considered at high risk of donor-derived infection transmission. The remaining 16/30 (53%) recipients received an organ from a nonbacteremic donor with colonization of a nontransplanted organ and were considered at low risk of infection transmission. Proven transmission occurred in 4 of the 14 high-risk recipients because donor infection was either not recognized, underestimated, or not communicated. These recipients received late, short or inappropriate posttransplant antibiotic therapy. Transmission did not occur in high-risk recipients who received appropriate and prompt antibiotic therapy for at least 7 days. The safe use of organs from donors with multidrug-resistant bacteria requires intra- and inter-institutional communication to allow appropriate management and prompt treatment of recipients in order to avoid transmission of infection. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Using Chemical Probes to Assess the Feasibility of Targeting SecA for Developing Antimicrobial Agents against Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jinshan; Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Cui, Jianmei; Damera, Krishna; Dai, Chaofeng; Chaudhary, Arpana S; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Cao, Nannan; Jiang, Chun; Vaara, Martti; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C

    2016-11-21

    With the widespread emergence of drug resistance, there is an urgent need to search for new antimicrobials, especially those against Gram-negative bacteria. Along this line, the identification of viable targets is a critical first step. The protein translocase SecA is commonly believed to be an excellent target for the development of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In recent years, we developed three structural classes of SecA inhibitors that have proven to be very effective against Gram-positive bacteria. However, we have not achieved the same level of success against Gram-negative bacteria, despite the potent inhibition of SecA in enzyme assays by the same inhibitors. In this study, we use representative inhibitors as chemical probes to gain an understanding as to why these inhibitors were not effective against Gram-negative bacteria. The results validate our initial postulation that the major difference in effectiveness against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is in the additional permeability barrier posed by the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. We also found that the expression of efflux pumps, which are responsible for multidrug resistance (MDR), have no effect on the effectiveness of these SecA inhibitors. Identification of an inhibitor-resistant mutant and complementation tests of the plasmids containing secA in a secAts mutant showed that a single secA-azi-9 mutation increased the resistance, providing genetic evidence that SecA is indeed the target of these inhibitors in bacteria. Such results strongly suggest SecA as an excellent target for developing effective antimicrobials against Gram-negative bacteria with the intrinsic ability to overcome MDR. A key future research direction should be the optimization of membrane permeability. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Human lipoproteins have divergent neutralizing effects on E. coli LPS, N. meningitidis LPS, and complete Gram-negative bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, T.; Netea, M.G.; Ley, P. van der; Verver-Jansen, T.J.G.; Jacobs, L.E.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Deuren, M. van

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipoproteins has been suggested as a treatment for Gram-negative sepsis because they inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated cytokine production. However, little is known about the neutralizing effects of lipoproteins on cytokine production by meningococcal LPS or whole Gram-negative

  15. Effect of pH and time on the accumulation of heavy metals in Gram-negative bacteria

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    Yamina Benmalek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of heavy metals into our environment is very important and causes an environmental pollution problem. Contamination of the aquatic environment by toxic heavy metals is a serious pollution problem because they can reach water-courses either naturally through a variety of geochemical processes or by direct discharge of municipal, agricultural and industrial wastewater. The bioremediation of heavy metals using microorganisms has received a great deal of attention in recent years because their potential application in industry. Microorganisms uptake metal either actively (bioaccumulation and passively (biosorption. Some bacteria have developed chromosomally or extra-chromosomally controlled detoxification mechanisms to overcome the detrimental effects of heavy metals. In the present work, we have studied resistance to heavy metals and the capacity of a Gram-negative bacteria to accumulate lead and zinc. Results obtained indicated that the bacterial strain exhibited high Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values for metal ions tested ranging from 75 mg/l to 500 mg/l and it was able to accumulate more than 90% of lead and zinc during the active growth cycle. Effect of pH and time on heavy metal removal was also studied properly.

  16. Rapid identification of carbapenemase genes in gram-negative bacteria with an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha D Braun

    Full Text Available Rapid molecular identification of carbapenemase genes in Gram-negative bacteria is crucial for infection control and prevention, surveillance and for epidemiological purposes. Furthermore, it may have a significant impact upon determining the appropriate initial treatment and greatly benefit for critically ill patients. A novel oligonucleotide microarray-based assay was developed to simultaneously detect genes encoding clinically important carbapenemases as well as selected extended (ESBL and narrow spectrum (NSBL beta-lactamases directly from clonal culture material within few hours. Additionally, a panel of species specific markers was included to identify Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii/braakii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. The assay was tested using a panel of 117 isolates collected from urinary, blood and stool samples. For these isolates, phenotypic identifications and susceptibility tests were available. An independent detection of carbapenemase, ESBL and NSBL genes was carried out by various external reference laboratories using PCR methods. In direct comparison, the microarray correctly identified 98.2% of the covered carbapenemase genes. This included blaVIM (13 out of 13, blaGIM (2/2, blaKPC (27/27, blaNDM (5/5, blaIMP-2/4/7/8/13/14/15/16/31 (10/10, blaOXA-23 (12/13, blaOXA-40-group (7/7, blaOXA-48-group (32/33, blaOXA-51 (1/1 and blaOXA-58 (1/1. Furthermore, the test correctly identified additional beta-lactamases [blaOXA-1 (16/16, blaOXA-2 (4/4, blaOXA-9 (33/33, OXA-10 (3/3, blaOXA-51 (25/25, blaOXA-58 (2/2, CTX-M1/M15 (17/17 and blaVIM (1/1]. In direct comparison to phenotypical identification obtained by VITEK or MALDI-TOF systems, 114 of 117 (97.4% isolates, including Acinetobacter baumannii (28/28, Enterobacter spec. (5/5, Escherichia coli (4/4, Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/63, Klebsiella oxytoca (0/2, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12/12, Citrobacter freundii (1/1 and Citrobacter

  17. Evaluation of marine bacteriocinogenic enterococci strains with inhibitory activity against fish-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomrassi, Hamdi; ben Braiek, Olfa; Choiset, Yvan; Haertlé, Thomas; Hani, Khaled; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Ghrairi, Taoufik

    2016-02-11

    Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics may provide an alternative to the use of antibiotics in aquaculture. LAB strains isolated from wild fish viscera and skin were evaluated for bacteriocin production and safety aspects (lack of antibiotic resistance, production of virulence factors). 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed the presence of Enterococcus faecium (13 isolates) and Lactococcus lactis (3 isolates) from fish samples. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses of the 13 enterococci isolates showed that they were all clustered, with greater than 95% similarity. However, RAPD analysis revealed significant molecular diversity between enterococci strains. Six enterococci strains were chosen and evaluated for their antibacterial activities. These strains produced a bacteriocin-like substance and exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against pathogenic bacteria isolated from diseased fish, including Streptococcus parauberis, Vagococcus spp., and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, and in particular against the Gram-negative bacteria Flavobacterium frigidarium, Vibrio pectenicida, V. penaeicida, and Photobacterium damselae. The inhibition activity towards bacterial indicator strains was at a maximum when bacteria were grown at 37°C. However, bacteriocin production was observed at 15°C after 12 h of incubation. Only structural genes of enterocins A and B were detected by PCR in the 6 enterococci strains, suggesting the production of these enterocins. In addition, these strains did not harbor any virulence factors or any significant antibiotic resistance, and they tolerated bile. Our results suggest that enterococci are an important part of the bacterial flora of fish and that some strains have the potential to be used as probiotics.

  18. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  19. Evaluating the resistance pattern of gram-negative bacteria during three years at the nephrology ward of a referral hospital in southwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Iman; Sadeghimanesh, Niloofar; Mirzaee, Mona; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are associated with an increase in rates of antibacterial resistance. In most low- and middle-income countries such as Iran, there is no continuous surveillance system for antibiotic resistance. The purpose of this survey was to determine the pattern of antimicrobial sensitivity of gram-negative bacteria within 3 consecutive years at a nephrology ward of Nemazee hospital in Shiraz. During a 3-year period from 2013 to 2015 at the adult nephrology ward, bacteriological data of all biological samples of hospitalized patients in favor of gram-negative microorganisms were analyzed retrospectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The most common gram negative bacterium isolated from biological samples was Escherichia coli (43.9%). The highest (86.3%-94.1%) antibacterial resistance rate was associated with Acinetobacter spp. The most frequent resistance was seen with cephalosporins. In contrast to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin and aminoglycosides remained their acceptable activity against E. coli. At least three-fourths (75%) of Acinetobacter spp. isolates was resistant to either aminoglycosides or imipenem. All (100%) isolated Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were susceptible to colistin. The rate of Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa resistant to three or more drugs was 81.7% and 74.6%, respectively. The resistant rate of gram negative pathogens to different tested antibacterial agents was considerably high and has increased during the recent three years in our center.

  20. Antibacterial activity and interactions of plant essential oil combinations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of several essential oils (EOs alone and in combination against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria associated with food products. Parsley, lovage, basil, and thyme EOs, as well as their mixtures (1:1, v/v, were tested against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium. The inhibitory effects ranged from strong (thyme EO against E. coli to no inhibition (parsley EO against P. aeruginosa. Thyme EO exhibited strong (against E. coli, moderate (against S. typhimurium and B. cereus, or mild inhibitory effects (against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, and basil EO showed mild (against E. coli and B. cereus or no inhibitory effects (against S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus. Parsley and lovage EOs revealed no inhibitory effects against all tested strains. Combinations of lovage/thyme and basil/thyme EOs displayed antagonistic effects against all bacteria, parsley/thyme EOs against B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli, and lovage/basil EOs against B. cereus and E. coli. Combinations of parsley/lovage and parsley/basil EOs exhibited indifferent effects against all bacteria. The combination of lovage/basil EO showed indifferent effect against S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and S. typhimurium, and the combination parsley/thyme EO against S. typhimurium. Thyme EO has the highest percentage yield and antibacterial potential from all tested formulations; its combination with parsley, lovage, and basil EOs determines a reduction of its antibacterial activity. Hence, it is recommended to be used alone as the antibacterial agent.

  1. Travel-related carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria in Alberta, Canada: the first 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirano, Gisele; Ahmed-Bentley, Jasmine; Fuller, Jeff; Rubin, Joseph E; Pitout, Johann D D

    2014-05-01

    We describe here the characteristics of Alberta, Canada, patients with infections or colonizations with carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria during 2010 to 2013 that were linked to recent travel outside Canada. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution, and isolates were characterized using PCR, sequencing, and multilocus sequencing typing. A broth mating study was used to assess the transferability of resistance plasmids, which were subsequently characterized. All the patients (n=12) included in our study had contact with a health care system while abroad. Most of the patients presented with urinary tract infections (UTIs) and were admitted to hospitals within weeks after their return to Alberta. Secondary spread occurred in 1 case, resulting in the death of another patient. The carbapenemase-producing bacteria (n=17) consisted of Escherichia coli (sequence type 101 [ST101], ST365, ST405, and ST410) with NDM-1, Klebsiella pneumoniae (ST15, ST16, ST147, ST258, ST340, ST512, and ST972) with NDM-1, OXA-181, KPC-2, and KPC-3, Acinetobacter baumannii with OXA-23, Providencia rettgeri with NDM-1, Enterobacter cloacae with KPC-2, and Citrobacter freundii with NDM-1. The blaNDM-1 gene was associated with various narrow- (i.e., IncF) and broad- (i.e., IncA/C and IncL/M) host-range plasmids with different addiction factors. Our results show that NDM-producing K. pneumoniae, belonging to a variety of sequence types with different plasmid scaffolds, are regularly imported from India into Alberta. Clinical microbiology laboratories should remain vigilant in detecting bacteria with carbapenemases.

  2. [An experimental study of the LPS release from gram-negative bacteria induced by antibiotics (Part two)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nengwu; Yuan, Jiancheng; Xiao, Guangxia; Zheng, Jiang; Qin, Xiaojian

    2002-04-01

    To explore the effects of different beta-lactam antibiotics on the inducing of LPS release from gram-negative bacteria and on the protection of infected animals. Wistar rats were employed as the model and were inflicted by 30% TBSA III degree scalding and sepsis caused by PA103. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, i.e. simple antibiotic treatment group (A), treatment after sensitization with galactosamine (GalN) group (G) and treatment after blocking with carrageenan (CGN) group (C). The rats were injected intra-peritoneally with imipenem (IMP, 5 mg) and ceftazidime (CTZ, 10 mg) for single time, respectively. Same amount of aseptic normal saline was injected in the control group, and GalN (50 mg) was added in G and CGN (1 mg) in C groups. The blood bacterial concentration and plasma LPS levels were determined at different time points after the treatment by antibiotics. The mortality was observed in G and C groups at 10 days after treatment. The blood bacterial amount could be decreased by both IMP and CTZ evidently. Large amounts of LPS released from PA103 could be induced by IMP and CTZ during their bactericidal process. But the plasma LPS level in rats treated by CTZ was markedly higher than that by IMP (P CTZ was much higher than that by IMP (P CTZ or IMP was applied (P CTZ. But CTZ was more powerful in inducing LPS release from bacteria than IMP. It was implied by the difference between these two antibiotics that IMP might be better choice in clinical application for burn infection due to its lower potential of inducing LPS release from the bacteria.

  3. Antibacterial activity and interactions of plant essential oil combinations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuc, Cristina Anamaria; Pop, Carmen Rodica; Rotar, Ancuţa Mihaela

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of several essential oils (EOs) alone and in combination against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria associated with food products. Parsley, lovage, basil, and thyme EOs, as well as their mixtures (1:1, v/v), were tested against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium. The inhibitory effects ranged from strong (thyme EO against E. coli) to no inhibition (parsley EO against P. aeruginosa). Thyme EO exhibited strong (against E. coli), moderate (against S. typhimurium and B. cereus), or mild inhibitory effects (against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus), and basil EO showed mild (against E. coli and B. cereus) or no inhibitory effects (against S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus). Parsley and lovage EOs revealed no inhibitory effects against all tested strains. Combinations of lovage/thyme and basil/thyme EOs displayed antagonistic effects against all bacteria, parsley/thyme EOs against B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli, and lovage/basil EOs against B. cereus and E. coli. Combinations of parsley/lovage and parsley/basil EOs exhibited indifferent effects against all bacteria. The combination of lovage/basil EO showed indifferent effect against S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and S. typhimurium, and the combination parsley/thyme EO against S. typhimurium. Thyme EO has the highest percentage yield and antibacterial potential from all tested formulations; its combination with parsley, lovage, and basil EOs determines a reduction of its antibacterial activity. Hence, it is recommended to be used alone as the antibacterial agent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria colonization of healthy US military personnel in the US and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento, Todd J; Cole, David W; Mende, Katrin; Calvano, Tatjana P; Rini, Elizabeth A; Tully, Charla C; Zera, Wendy C; Guymon, Charles H; Yu, Xin; Cheatle, Kristelle A; Akers, Kevin S; Beckius, Miriam L; Landrum, Michael L; Murray, Clinton K

    2013-02-05

    The US military has seen steady increases in multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria (GNB) infections in casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan. This study evaluates the prevalence of MDR GNB colonization in US military personnel. GNB colonization surveillance of healthy, asymptomatic military personnel (101 in the US and 100 in Afghanistan) was performed by swabbing 7 anatomical sites. US-based personnel had received no antibiotics within 30 days of specimen collection, and Afghanistan-based personnel were receiving doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis at time of specimen collection. Isolates underwent genotypic and phenotypic characterization. The only colonizing MDR GNB recovered in both populations was Escherichia coli (p=0.01), which was seen in 2% of US-based personnel (all perirectal) and 11% of Afghanistan-based personnel (10 perirectal, 1 foot+groin). Individuals with higher off-base exposures in Afghanistan did not show a difference in overall GNB colonization or MDR E. coli colonization, compared with those with limited off-base exposures. Healthy US- and Afghanistan-based military personnel have community onset-MDR E. coli colonization, with Afghanistan-based personnel showing a 5.5-fold higher prevalence. The association of doxycycline prophylaxis or other exposures with antimicrobial resistance and increased rates of MDR E. coli colonization needs further evaluation.

  5. Comparing the harmful effects of nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Tavs; Taylor-Robinson, David; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Hansen, Christine Rønne; Mathiesen, Inger Hee; Høiby, Niels; Katzenstein, Terese L; Smyth, Rosalind L; Diggle, Peter J; Pressler, Tania

    2016-05-01

    To better understand the relative effects of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function decline in cystic fibrosis, we assessed the impact of each infection in a Danish setting. Longitudinal registry study of 432 patients with cystic fibrosis contributing 53,771 lung function measures between 1974 and 2014. We used a mixed effects model with longitudinally structured correlation, while adjusting for clinically important covariates. Infections with a significant impact on rate of decline in %FEV1 were Mycobacterium abscessus complex with -2.22% points per year (95% CI -3.21 to -1.23), Burkholderia cepacia complex -1.95% (95% CI -2.51 to -1.39), Achromobacterxylosoxidans -1.55% (95% CI -2.21 to -0.90), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa -0.95% (95% CI -1.24 to -0.66). Clearing M. abscessus complex was associated with a change to a slower decline, similar in magnitude to the pre-infection slope. In a national population we have demonstrated the impact on lung function of each chronic CF pathogen. M. abscessus complex was associated with the worst impact on lung function. Eradication of M. abscessus complex may significantly improve lung function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of antibacterial potential of Pithecellobium dulce root extract against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Muneer Ahmad; Malik, Rayees Ahmad; Prakash, Poonam; Lone, Ali Mohd

    2018-01-10

    In the present study hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of Pithecellobium dulce root were prepared using soxhlet extractor. The extracts were evaluated for antibacterial activity against one Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and three Gram negative (Acetobacter aceti, Acetobacter aceti, Klebsiella pneumoniae) strains. Disc diffusion method revealed promising antibacterial activity of the extracts prepared in polar solvents (ethyl acetate and ethanol) compared to non-polar solvents (hexane and benzene). Ethanolic root extract was found to be most active against Acetobacter aceti, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes bacterial strains. The zone of inhibition of ethanolic root extract against Acetobacter aceti, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes bacterial strains was 15.4, 11.0, 19.0 and 13.0 mm, respectively at 100 mg concentration. Ethyl acetate extract also exhibited good antibacterial activity against Entrobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acetobacter aceti. The zone of inhibition of ethyl acetate root extracts against Entrobacter aerogenes, Acetobacter aceti and Klebsiella pneumonia was 10.5, 18.0 and 10.0 mm, respectively. The benzene extract showed some activity against Acetobacter aceti with the zone of inhibition 10.0 mm. The antibacterial activity of Pithecellobium dulce root hexane extract was found to be negligible against all the four tested strains of bacteria. These findings suggest that ethanolic and ethyl acetate root extracts of Pithecellobium dulce has potential as effective anti-bacterial agent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A New Class of Quorum Quenching Molecules from Staphylococcus Species Affects Communication and Growth of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya-Yun; Nega, Mulugeta; Wölfle, Martina; Plener, Laure; Grond, Stephanie; Jung, Kirsten; Götz, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge that many pathogens rely on cell-to-cell communication mechanisms known as quorum sensing, opens a new disease control strategy: quorum quenching. Here we report on one of the rare examples where Gram-positive bacteria, the ‘Staphylococcus intermedius group’ of zoonotic pathogens, excrete two compounds in millimolar concentrations that suppress the quorum sensing signaling and inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of Gram-negative beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. These compounds were isolated from Staphylococcus delphini. They represent a new class of quorum quenchers with the chemical formula N-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]-urea and N-(2-phenethyl)-urea, which we named yayurea A and B, respectively. In vitro studies with the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) responding receptor LuxN of V. harveyi indicated that both compounds caused opposite effects on phosphorylation to those caused by AHL. This explains the quorum quenching activity. Staphylococcal strains producing yayurea A and B clearly benefit from an increased competitiveness in a mixed community. PMID:24098134

  8. Rapid Discrimination of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Liquid Samples by Using NaOH-Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Solution and Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Atsushi; Kono, Mari; Kawauchi, Sawako; Takagi, Yuri; Morikawa, Takashi; Funakoshi, Kunihiro

    2012-01-01

    Background For precise diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTI), and selection of the appropriate prescriptions for their treatment, we explored a simple and rapid method of discriminating gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in liquid samples. Methodology/Principal Findings We employed the NaOH-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution conventionally used for plasmid extraction from Escherichia coli and the automated urine particle analyzer UF-1000i (Sysmex Corporation) for our novel method. The NaOH-SDS solution was used to determine differences in the cell wall structures between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, since the tolerance to such chemicals reflects the thickness and structural differences of bacterial cell walls. The UF-1000i instrument was used as a quantitative bacterial counter. We found that gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, in liquid culture could easily be lysed by direct addition of equal volumes of NaOH-SDS solution. In contrast, Enterococcus faecalis, which is a gram-positive bacterium, could not be completely lysed by the solution. We then optimized the reaction time of the NaOH-SDS treatment at room temperature by using 3 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative bacterial strains and determined that the optimum reaction time was 5 min. Finally, in order to evaluate the generalizability of this method, we treated 8 gram-positive strains and 8 gram-negative strains, or 4 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative strains incubated in voluntary urine from healthy volunteers in the same way and demonstrated that all the gram-positive bacteria were discriminated quantitatively from gram negative bacteria using this method. Conclusions/Significance Using our new method, we could easily discriminate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in liquid culture media within 10 min. This simple and rapid method may be useful for determining the treatment course of patients with UTIs, especially for those without a prior history of UTIs. The method

  9. Rapid discrimination of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in liquid samples by using NaOH-sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and flow cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Wada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For precise diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTI, and selection of the appropriate prescriptions for their treatment, we explored a simple and rapid method of discriminating gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in liquid samples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed the NaOH-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS solution conventionally used for plasmid extraction from Escherichia coli and the automated urine particle analyzer UF-1000i (Sysmex Corporation for our novel method. The NaOH-SDS solution was used to determine differences in the cell wall structures between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, since the tolerance to such chemicals reflects the thickness and structural differences of bacterial cell walls. The UF-1000i instrument was used as a quantitative bacterial counter. We found that gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, in liquid culture could easily be lysed by direct addition of equal volumes of NaOH-SDS solution. In contrast, Enterococcus faecalis, which is a gram-positive bacterium, could not be completely lysed by the solution. We then optimized the reaction time of the NaOH-SDS treatment at room temperature by using 3 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative bacterial strains and determined that the optimum reaction time was 5 min. Finally, in order to evaluate the generalizability of this method, we treated 8 gram-positive strains and 8 gram-negative strains, or 4 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative strains incubated in voluntary urine from healthy volunteers in the same way and demonstrated that all the gram-positive bacteria were discriminated quantitatively from gram negative bacteria using this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using our new method, we could easily discriminate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in liquid culture media within 10 min. This simple and rapid method may be useful for determining the treatment course of patients with UTIs, especially for those without a prior history

  10. Architecture of class 1, 2 and 3 integrons from Gram negative bacteria recovered among fruits and vegetables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Jones-Dias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria throughout the food chain constitutes a public health concern. To understand the contribution of fresh produce in shaping antibiotic resistance bacteria and integron prevalence in the food chain, 333 antibiotic resistance Gram negative isolates were collected from organic and conventionally produced fruits (pears, apples and strawberries and vegetables (lettuces, tomatoes and carrots. Although low levels of resistance have been detected, the bacterial genera identified in the assessed fresh produce are often described not only as environmental, but mostly as commensals and opportunistic pathogens. The genomic characterization of integron-harboring isolates revealed a high number of mobile genetic elements and clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes, of which we highlight the presence of as mcr-1, qnrA1, blaGES-11, mphA and oqxAB. The study of class 1 (n=8, class 2 (n=3 and class 3 (n=1 integrons, harbored by species such as Morganella morganii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, led to the identification of different integron promoters (PcW, PcH1, PcS and PcWTNG-10 and cassette arrays (containing drfA, aadA, cmlA, estX, sat and blaGES. In fact, the diverse integron backbones were associated with transposable elements (e.g. Tn402, Tn7, ISCR1, Tn2*, IS26, IS1326 and IS3 that conferred greater mobility. This is also the first appearance of In1258, In1259 and In3-13, which should be monitored to prevent their establishment as successfully dispersed mobile resistance integrons. These results underscore the growing concern about the dissemination of acquired resistance genes by mobile elements in the food chain.

  11. Flow cytometric evaluation of physico-chemical impact on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje eFröhling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since heat sensitivity of fruits and vegetables limits the application of thermal inactivation processes, new emerging inactivation technologies have to be established to fulfil the requirements of food safety without affecting the produce quality. The efficiency of inactivation treatments has to be ensured and monitored. Monitoring of inactivation effects is commonly performed using traditional cultivation methods which have the disadvantage of the time span needed to obtain results.The aim of this study was to compare the inactivation effects of peracetic acid (PAA, ozonated water (O3 and cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using flow cytometric methods. E. coli cells were completely depolarized after treatment (15 s with 0.25 % PAA at 10 °C, and after treatment (10 s with 3.8 mg l-1 O3 at 12°C. The membrane potential of CAPP treated cells remained almost constant at an operating power of 20 W over a time period of 3 min, and subsequently decreased within 30 s of further treatment. Complete membrane permeabilization was observed after 10 s O3 treatment, but treatment with PAA and CAPP did not completely permeabilize the cells within 2 min and 4 min, respectively. Similar results were obtained for esterase activity. O3 inactivates cellular esterase but esterase activity was detected after 4 min CAPP treatment and 2 min PAA treatment. L. innocua cells and P. carotovorum cells were also permeabilized instantaneously by O3 treatment at concentrations of 3.8 ± 1 mg l-1. However, higher membrane permeabilization of L. innocua and P. carotovorum than of E. coli was observed at CAPP treatment of 20 W. The degree of bacterial damage due to the inactivation processes is highly dependent on treatment parameters as well as on treated bacteria. Important information regarding the inactivation mechanisms can be obtained by flow cytometric measurements and this enables the definition of critical process

  12. Rapid and reliable identification of Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive cocci by deposition of bacteria harvested from blood cultures onto the MALDI-TOF plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnini, Simona; Ghelardi, Emilia; Brucculeri, Veronica; Morici, Paola; Lupetti, Antonella

    2015-06-18

    Rapid identification of the causative agent(s) of bloodstream infections using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) methodology can lead to increased empirical antimicrobial therapy appropriateness. Herein, we aimed at establishing an easier and simpler method, further referred to as the direct method, using bacteria harvested by serum separator tubes from positive blood cultures and placed onto the polished steel target plate for rapid identification by MALDI-TOF. The results by the direct method were compared with those obtained by MALDI-TOF on bacteria isolated on solid media. Identification of Gram-negative bacilli was 100 % concordant using the direct method or MALDI-TOF on isolated bacteria (96 % with score > 2.0). These two methods were 90 % concordant on Gram-positive cocci (32 % with score > 2.0). Identification by the SepsiTyper method of Gram-positive cocci gave concordant results with MALDI-TOF on isolated bacteria in 87 % of cases (37 % with score > 2.0). The direct method herein developed allows rapid identification (within 30 min) of Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive cocci from positive blood cultures and can be used to rapidly report reliable and accurate results, without requiring skilled personnel or the use of expensive kits.

  13. Type I and Type II mechanisms of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: an in vitro study on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyi; Xuan, Yi; Koide, Yuichiro; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) employs a non-toxic photosensitizer (PS) and visible light, which in the presence of oxygen produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen ((1) O(2), produced via Type II mechanism) and hydroxyl radical (HO(.), produced via Type I mechanism). This study examined the relative contributions of (1) O(2) and HO(.) to APDT killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fluorescence probes, 3'-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-fluorescein (HPF) and singlet oxygen sensor green reagent (SOSG) were used to determine HO(.) and (1) O(2) produced by illumination of two PS: tris-cationic-buckminsterfullerene (BB6) and a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) (PEI-ce6). Dimethylthiourea is a HO(.) scavenger, while sodium azide (NaN(3)) is a quencher of (1) O(2). Both APDT and killing by Fenton reaction (chemical generation of HO(.)) were carried out on Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Conjugate PEI-ce6 mainly produced (1) O(2) (quenched by NaN(3)), while BB6 produced HO(.) in addition to (1) O(2) when NaN(3) potentiated probe activation. NaN(3) also potentiated HPF activation by Fenton reagent. All bacteria were killed by Fenton reagent but Gram-positive bacteria needed a higher concentration than Gram-negatives. NaN(3) potentiated Fenton-mediated killing of all bacteria. The ratio of APDT killing between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was 2 or 4:1 for BB6 and 25:1 for conjugate PEI-ce6. There was a NaN(3) dose-dependent inhibition of APDT killing using both PEI-ce6 and BB6 against Gram-negative bacteria while NaN(3) almost failed to inhibit killing of Gram-positive bacteria. Azidyl radicals may be formed from NaN(3) and HO(.). It may be that Gram-negative bacteria are more susceptible to HO(.) while Gram-positive bacteria are more susceptible to (1) O(2). The differences in Na

  14. Array based detection of antibiotic resistance genes in Gram negative bacteria isolated from retail poultry meat in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Grainne; Naughton, Violetta; Woodward, Martin J; Dooley, James S G; Naughton, Patrick J

    2014-06-02

    The use of antibiotics in birds and animals intended for human consumption within the European Union (EU) and elsewhere has been subject to regulation prohibiting the use of antimicrobials as growth promoters and the use of last resort antibiotics in an attempt to reduce the spread of multi-resistant Gram negative bacteria. Given the inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance there is an increasing need for improved monitoring of our food. Using selective media, Gram negative bacteria were isolated from retail chicken of UK-Intensively reared (n=27), Irish-Intensively reared (n=19) and UK-Free range (n=30) origin and subjected to an oligonucleotide based array system for the detection of 47 clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two integrase genes. High incidences of β-lactamase genes were noted in all sample types, acc (67%), cmy (80%), fox (55%) and tem (40%) while chloramphenicol resistant determinants were detected in bacteria from the UK poultry portions and were absent in bacteria from the Irish samples. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to qualitatively analyse the Gram negative population in the samples and showed the expected diversity based on band stabbing and DNA sequencing. The array system proved to be a quick method for the detection of antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) burden within a mixed Gram negative bacterial population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Methods for detecting acylated homoserine lactones produced by Gram-negative bacteria and their application in studies of AHL- production kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, L.; Christensen, Allan Beck; Molin, Søren

    2001-01-01

    In the process of evaluating the role of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) in food-spoiling Gram-negative bacteria, we have combined a range of bacterial AHL monitor systems to determine the AHL-profile and the kinetics of AHL-production. AHL production from 148 strains of Enterobacteriaceae is...

  16. Comparative activity of tigecycline and tetracycline on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria revealed by a multicentre study in four North European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lennart E; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Vaara, Martti

    2011-01-01

    This study involves a multicentre surveillance of tigecycline and tetracycline activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria from primary care centres (PCCs), general hospital wards (GHWs) and intensive care units (ICUs) in Denmark (n = 9), Finland (n = 10), Norway (n = 7) and Sweden (n...

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and inactivation of gram-negative bacteria by TiO2 nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) and inactivation of Gram-negative bacteria E. coli K12 and P. aeruginosa by TiO2 nanoparticles in aqueous suspension were studied. TiO2 resulted in significant reduction in MB absorption and a shift of MB absorption peak from 664 nm to 658 nm aft...

  18. Predictors of 7- and 30-day mortality in pediatric intensive care unit patients with cancer and hematologic malignancy infected with Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Patrícia de Oliveira; Atta, Elias Hallack; Silva, André Ricardo Araujo da

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Gram-negative bacteria is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors of 7- and 30-day mortality in pediatric patients in an intensive care unit with cancer and/or hematologic diseases and Gram-negative bacteria infection. Data were collected relating to all episodes of Gram-negative bacteria infection that occurred in a pediatric intensive care unit between January 2009 and December 2012, and these cases were divided into two groups: those who were deceased seven and 30 days after the date of a positive culture and those who survived the same time frames. Variables of interest included age, gender, presence of solid tumor or hematologic disease, cancer status, central venous catheter use, previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, infection by multidrug resistant-Gram-negative bacteria, colonization by multidrug resistant-Gram-negative bacteria, neutropenia in the preceding seven days, neutropenia duration ≥3 days, healthcare-associated infection, length of stay before intensive care unit admission, length of intensive care unit stay >3 days, appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment, definitive inadequate antimicrobial treatment, time to initiate adequate antibiotic therapy, appropriate antibiotic duration ≤3 days, and shock. In addition, use of antimicrobial agents, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy in the previous 30 days was noted. Multivariate logistic regression analysis resulted in significant relationship between shock and both 7-day mortality (odds ratio 12.397; 95% confidence interval 1.291-119.016; p=0.029) and 30-day mortality (odds ratio 6.174; 95% confidence interval 1.760-21.664; p=0.004), between antibiotic duration ≤3 days and 7-day mortality (odds ratio 21.328; 95% confidence interval 2.834-160.536; p=0.003), and between colonization by multidrug resistant-Gram-negative bacteria and 30-day mortality (odds ratio 12.002; 95% confidence interval 1

  19. Pathogenic and opportunistic gram-negative bacteria in soil, leachate and air in San Nicolás landfill at Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tena, Francisco J; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma L; Avelar-González, Francisco J; Ramírez-López, E Marcela; Martínez-Saldaña, M Consolación

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of Gram-negative pathogenic and opportunistic species, was studied for two years on air. soil and leachate from the San Nicolás Landfill. Aguascalientes, Mexico. For soil and leachate four samplings were done, two during the dry season and two during the rainy season. For soil there were 15 sampling points, the leachate samples were taken on the leachate tank. For air, twelve sampling were done in three points of the landfill. Twenty pathogenic and/or opportunistic bacteria were identified from air, twenty from soil and eleven from leachate. Most of them were enteric; however respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria were also identified. Pasteurella haemolytica were isolated in all air samples. Nine species were found in the a half of the soil samples. The most frequent species in leachate were Acinetobacter baumanii, Bordetella sp, Brucella sp. and Escherichia coli var II. The occurrence of pathogenic and opportunistic species points out to the nosocomial and domestic clinical wastes discharged in the landfill as a potential risk for public and occupational health.

  20. Expression levels of the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and osteoprotegerin and the number of gram-negative bacteria in symptomatic and asymptomatic periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, E; Parolin, A B; Wichnieski, C; Rosa, E A R; Silva Neto, U X; Westphalen, V P D; Fariniuk, L F; Johann, A C B R

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to verify the potential correlation between the detected amount of gram-negative bacteria and the radiographic sizes of the lesions in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Furthermore, to evaluate whether the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and the RANKL/OPG ratio are differentially regulated in both groups. Twenty patients with periapical lesions were divided into two groups: symptomatic (SYM) n=10 and asymptomatic (ASYM) n=10. After periapical surgery, the lesions were collected and processed for histological examination, and immunohistochemistry. The percentage of RANKL- and OPG-immunopositive areas relative to the total area of the microscopic field was calculated. For gram staining, the number of gram-negative cells per microscopic field was assessed. The radiographs of each patient were processed and measured. The Student's t-test and the Pearson correlation coefficient were performed. The SYM group showed a significantly higher number of gram-negative cells (p=0.007) when compared to the ASYM group. A higher number of gram-negative bacteria occurred more frequently in larger periapical lesions and the SYM group (p=0.03). The expression for RANKL and OPG and the RANKL/OPG ratio were not significantly different between the groups. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of bacteria and OPG levels in the SYM group (p=0.01). The number of bacteria seems to influence the symptoms and the radiographic size of a periapical lesion. Gram-negative bacteria may play an important role in OPG activity in the SYM group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancement of the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of GNU7 against Gram-negative bacteria by fusion with LPS-targeting peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Jang, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun Chang; Cho, Ju Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) provide a potential source of new antimicrobial therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant pathogens. To develop Gram-negative selective AMPs that can inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis, we added various rationally designed LPS-targeting peptides [amino acids 28-34 of lactoferrin (Lf28-34), amino acids 84-99 of bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI84-99), and de novo peptide (Syn)] to the potent AMP, GNU7 (RLLRPLLQLLKQKLR). Compared to our original starting peptide GNU7, hybrid peptides had an 8- to 32-fold improvement in antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Among them, Syn-GNU7 showed the strongest LPS-binding and -neutralizing activities, thus allowing it to selectively eliminate Gram-negative bacteria from within mixed cultures. Our results suggest that LPS-targeting peptides would be useful to increase the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of other AMPs against Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of mortality in bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria: 4 years of collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Jiang, Ting; Zhang, Weihong; Li, Chunyu; Chen, Jun; Xiang, Dandan; Cao, Kejiang; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Wensen; Chen, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The study was undertaken to describe the profile of patients and the characteristics of all multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) and to assess mortality. We examined 138 patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by MDR-GNB. Clinical characteristics, antibiotic therapy, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. Survivor and nonsurvivor subgroups were compared to identify predictors of mortality. The in-hospital mortality rate was 25.4%. Univariate analysis revealed that comorbidities and inadequate initial antimicrobial treatment could increase risk of death. In Cox regression analysis, mortality was independently associated with the age (P = .034), hospitalization in an intensive care unit (ICU) (P = .04), invasive procedures (P < .001), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores (P < .001), whereas combination therapy or monotherapy was not associated with mortality (P = .829). Postantibiogram therapy was associated with hospitalization in an ICU (P = .006), Charlson comorbidity index score (P = .003), and inadequate initial antimicrobial treatment (P < .001). MDR-GNB strains and antimicrobial regimens were not the major risk factors of mortality. Inadequate initial antimicrobial treatment, invasive procedures, high Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, hospitalization in an ICU, and comorbidities were the important factors responsible for mortality. Although there was no difference between combination therapy and monotherapy in mortality, combined treatment may be more effective than monotherapy for patients in an ICU, with a Charlson comorbidity index score < 4, or inadequate initial antimicrobial treatment. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of body mass index on clinical outcomes in patients with gram-negative bacteria bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizza, Bryan D; Rhodes, Nathaniel J; Esterly, John S; Toy, Carolyn; Lopez, Jenna; Scheetz, Marc H

    2016-10-01

    Excess body mass index (BMI) is associated with a higher risk of death in many disease states, yet less is known about the impact of higher BMIs on clinical outcomes of serious bacterial infections. We sought to quantify the risk of all-cause mortality and/or organ failure following Gram negative bacteria bloodstream infections (GNBSI) according to BMI. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with confirmed GNBSI who received ≥48 h of active antimicrobial therapy. Composite and component patient outcomes, including hospital mortality and organ failure, were assessed as a function of BMI. Organ failure was defined using modified consensus Surviving Sepsis Campaign definitions. Multi-variate methods were used to control for baseline confounders. Seventy-six patients met our inclusion criteria, of whom 8 died (10.5%). The majority of GNBSI were Escherichia (41.6%) or Klebsiella species (23.3%). Patients with higher BMI more frequently developed cardiovascular failure (P = 0.032), respiratory failure (P < 0.001), renal failure (P = 0.003), and died (P = 0.009). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that higher BMIs were associated with a greater risk of death and/or organ failure (aOR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.14), respiratory failure (aOR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.17), and renal failure (aOR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.14) after adjusting for relevant covariates. Higher BMIs in patients with GNBSIs were associated with a greater risk of a composite of all-cause mortality and organ failure. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Colistin and tigecycline resistance in carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: emerging resistance mechanisms and detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei Sekyere, J; Govinden, U; Bester, L A; Essack, S Y

    2016-09-01

    A literature review was undertaken to ascertain the molecular basis for tigecycline and colistin resistance mechanisms and the experimental basis for the detection and delineation of this resistance particularly in carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria. Pubmed, Google Scholar and Science Direct were searched with the keywords colistin, tigecycline, resistance mechanisms and detection methods. Trans-complementation and comparative MIC studies, mass spectrometry, chromatography, spectrofluorometry, PCR, qRT-PCR and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were commonly used to determine tigecycline and colistin resistance mechanisms, specifically modifications in the structural and regulatory efflux (acrAB, OqxAB, kpgABC adeABC-FGH-IJK, mexAB-XY-oprJM and soxS, rarA robA, ramRAB marRABC, adeLRS, mexRZ and nfxb) and lipid A (pmrHFIJFKLM, lpxA, lpxC lpxD and mgrB, pmrAB, phoPQ,) genes respectively. Mutations in the ribosomal 16S rRNA operon rrnBC, also yielded resistance to tigecycline through target site modifications. The mcr-1 gene conferring resistance to colistin was identified via WGS, trans-complementation and a murine thigh infection model studies. Common detection methods are mainly antibiotic sensitivity testing with broth microdilution while molecular identification tools are mostly PCR and WGS. Spectrofluorometry, MALDI-TOF MS, micro-array and real-time multiplex PCR hold much promise for the future as new detection tools. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon Nanoparticles Isolated from Natural Sources against Pathogenic Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena Varghese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the isolation of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs from kitchen soot, characterization of the CNPs by UV/visible spectroscopy, SEM and XRD, and their antimicrobial action. The antibacterial activity of the isolated carbon nanoparticles was tested against various pathogenic bacterial strains such as Gram-negative Proteus refrigere and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus haemolyticus. The inhibition zones were measured, and it was found that the carbon nanoparticles isolated from natural sources are active against these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains.

  6. The Immunomodulatory Drug Glatiramer Acetate is Also an Effective Antimicrobial Agent that Kills Gram-negative Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Murphy, Ronan A.; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    formulation for treatment of multiple sclerosis. It contains a large diversity of essentially isomeric polypeptides with the cationic and amphiphilic character of many antimicrobial peptides (AMP). Here, we report that GA is antibacterial, targeting Gram-negative organisms with higher activity towards...

  7. Novel volatiles of skin-borne bacteria inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and affect quorum-sensing controlled phenotypes of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemfack, Marie Chantal; Ravella, Srinivasa Rao; Lorenz, Nicola; Kai, Marco; Jung, Kirsten; Schulz, Stefan; Piechulla, Birgit

    2016-12-01

    The skin microbiota is import for body protection. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles of typical skin-resident corynebacterial and staphylococcal species. The VOC profile of Staphylococcus schleiferi DSMZ 4807 was of particular interest as it is dominated by two compounds, 3-(phenylamino)butan-2-one and 3-(phenylimino)butan-2-one (schleiferon A and B, respectively). Neither of these has previously been reported from natural sources. Schleiferon A and B inhibited the growth of various Gram-positive species and affected two quorum-sensing-dependent phenotypes - prodigiosin accumulation and bioluminescence - of Gram-negative bacteria. Both compounds were found to inhibit the expression of prodigiosin biosynthetic genes and stimulate the expression of prodigiosin regulatory genes pigP and pigS. This study demonstrates that the volatile schleiferons A and B emitted by the skin bacterium S. schleiferi modulate differentially and specifically its interactions with members of diverse bacterial communities. A network of VOC-mediated interspecies interactions and communications must be considered in the establishment of the (skin) microbiome and both compounds are interesting candidates for further investigations to better understand how VOCs emitted by skin bacteria influence and modulate the local microbiota and determine whether they are relevant to antibiotic and anti-virulence therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Faecal Carriage of Gram-Negative Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria among Patients Hospitalized in Two Centres in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baljin, Bayaraa; Baldan, Ganbaatar; Chimeddorj, Battogtokh; Tulgaa, Khosbayar; Gunchin, Batbaatar; Sandag, Tsogtsaikhan; Pfeffer, Klaus; MacKenzie, Colin R; Wendel, Andreas F

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative multidrug-resistant organisms (GN-MDRO) producing β-lactamases (ESBL, plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases and carbapenemases) are increasingly reported throughout Asia. The aim of this surveillance study was to determine the rate of bacterial colonization in patients from two hospitals in the Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar. Rectal swabs were obtained from patients referred to the National Traumatology and Orthopaedics Research Centre (NTORC) or the Burn Treatment Centre (BTC) between July and September 2014, on admission and again after 14 days. Bacteria growing on selective chromogenic media (CHROMagar ESBL/KPC) were identified by MALDI-ToF MS. We performed susceptibility testing by disk diffusion and PCR (blaIMP-1, blaVIM, blaGES, blaNDM, blaKPC, blaOXA-48, blaGIM-1, blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24/40, blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58, blaOXA-143, blaOXA-235, blaCTX-M, blaSHV blaTEM and plasmid-mediated blaAmpC). Carbapenemase-producing isolates were additionally genotyped by PFGE and MLST. During the study period 985 patients in the NTORC and 65 patients in the BTC were screened on admission. The prevalence of GN-MDRO-carriage was 42.4% and 69.2% respectively (p<0.001). Due to the different medical specialities the two study populations differed significantly in age (p<0.029) and gender (p<0.001) with younger and more female patients in the burn centre (BTC). We did not observe a significant difference in colonization rate in the respective age groups in the total study population. In both centres most carriers were colonized with CTX-M-producing E. coli, followed by CTX-M-producing K. pneumoniae and CTX-M-producing E. cloacae. 158 patients from the NTORC were re-screened after 14 days of whom 99 had acquired a new GN-MDRO (p<0.001). Carbapenemases were detected in both centres in four OXA-58-producing A. baumannii isolates (ST642) and six VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (ST235). This study shows a high overall prevalence of GN-MDRO in the study population and

  9. Prevalence and antibacterial resistance patterns of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria isolated from ocular infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshkumar, G; Ramakrishnan, R; Shivkumar, C; Meenakshi, R; Anitha, V; Venugopal Reddy, Y C; Maneksha, V

    2016-04-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) mediated resistance is more prevalent worldwide, especially among Gram-negative bacterial isolates, conferring resistance to the expanded spectrum cephalosporins. As limited data were available on the prevalence of ESBLs in this area, the current study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, antibacterial resistance patterns, and molecular detection and characterization of ESBL encoding resistance genes among ocular Gram-negative bacterial isolates from ocular infections. A prospective study was done on 252 ocular Gram-negative bacterial isolates recovered from ocular infections during a study period from February 2011 to January 2014. All isolates were subjected to detection of ESBLs by cephalosporin/clavulanate combination disc test and their antibacterial resistance pattern was studied. Molecular detection and characterization of ESBL encoding blaTEM -, blaSHV , blaOXA -, and blaCTX-M (phylogenetic groups 1, 2, 9, and 8/25) resistance genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analysis. Of all Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (44%) was the most common strain, followed by Enterobacter agglomerans and Klebsiella pneumoniae each (10%). Among the 252, 42 (17%) were ESBL producers. The major source of ESBL producers were corneal scraping specimens, highest ESBL production was observed in P. aeruginosa 16 (38%) and Escherichia coli 7 (16.6%). Among ESBL-producing genes, the prevalence of blaTEM -gene was the highest (83%) followed by blaOXA -gene (35%), blaSHV -gene (18.5%), and blaCTX-M-1 -gene (18.5%) alone or together. The higher rate of prevalence of ESBLs-encoding genes among ocular Gram-negative bacteria is of great concern, as it causes limitation to therapeutic options. This regional knowledge will help in guiding appropriate antibiotic use which is highly warranted.

  10. Outer membrane permeabilization is an essential step in the killing of gram-negative bacteria by the lectin RegIIIβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Tsuyoshi; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    The C-type lectin RegIIIβ can kill certain Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility of S. Typhimurium depends on the bacterial growth phase, i.e., bacteria from the logarithmic growth phase do bind RegIIIβ and are subsequently killed. Lipid A is one of the bacterial targets for RegIIIβ. However, at the molecular level, it is not understood how RegIIIβ interacts with and kills Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that RegIIIβ interacts with Gram-negative bacteria in two distinct steps. Initially, it binds to surface-exposed lipid A. The lipid A can be shielded by the O-antigen of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as indicated by the exquisite susceptibility of wbaP mutants to RegIIIβ-mediated killing. Increased cell viability after incubation with an anti-lipid A antibody also supports this conclusion. This RegIIIβ-binding permeabilizes the outer membrane to hydrophobic dyes like Ethidium bromide or to bulky bacteriolytic enzymes like lysozyme. Conversely, compromising the outer membrane integrity by the mild detergent Triton X-100 enhances the antibacterial effect of RegIIIβ. Based on our observations, we conclude that RegIIIβ interacts with Gram-negative bacteria in two subsequent steps. Initially, it binds to the outer membrane thus leading to outer membrane permeabilization. This initial step is necessary for RegIIIβ to reach a second, still not well understood target site (presumably localized in the periplasm or the cytoplasmic membrane), thereby triggering bacterial death. This provides novel insights into the outer membrane-step of the bactericidal mechanism of RegIIIβ.

  11. Outer membrane permeabilization is an essential step in the killing of gram-negative bacteria by the lectin RegIIIβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Miki

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin RegIIIβ can kill certain Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility of S. Typhimurium depends on the bacterial growth phase, i.e., bacteria from the logarithmic growth phase do bind RegIIIβ and are subsequently killed. Lipid A is one of the bacterial targets for RegIIIβ. However, at the molecular level, it is not understood how RegIIIβ interacts with and kills Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that RegIIIβ interacts with Gram-negative bacteria in two distinct steps. Initially, it binds to surface-exposed lipid A. The lipid A can be shielded by the O-antigen of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, as indicated by the exquisite susceptibility of wbaP mutants to RegIIIβ-mediated killing. Increased cell viability after incubation with an anti-lipid A antibody also supports this conclusion. This RegIIIβ-binding permeabilizes the outer membrane to hydrophobic dyes like Ethidium bromide or to bulky bacteriolytic enzymes like lysozyme. Conversely, compromising the outer membrane integrity by the mild detergent Triton X-100 enhances the antibacterial effect of RegIIIβ. Based on our observations, we conclude that RegIIIβ interacts with Gram-negative bacteria in two subsequent steps. Initially, it binds to the outer membrane thus leading to outer membrane permeabilization. This initial step is necessary for RegIIIβ to reach a second, still not well understood target site (presumably localized in the periplasm or the cytoplasmic membrane, thereby triggering bacterial death. This provides novel insights into the outer membrane-step of the bactericidal mechanism of RegIIIβ.

  12. Expanding the Use of a Fluorogenic Method to Determine Activity and Mode of Action of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriocins Against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M.; Barboza-Corona, J. Eleazar; Espino Monzón, A. N.; Pacheco Cano, R. D.; Balagurusamy, N.; Bideshi, Dennis K.; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén

    2012-01-01

    Previously we described a rapid fluorogenic method to measure the activity of five bacteriocins produced by Mexican strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against B. cereus 183. Here we standardize this method to efficiently determine the activity of bacteriocins against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It was determined that the crucial parameter required to obtain reproducible results was the number of cells used in the assay, that is, ~4 × 108 cell/mL and ~7 × 108 cell/mL, respectively, for target Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Comparative analyses of the fluorogenic and traditional well-diffusion assays showed correlation coefficients of 0.88 to 0.99 and 0.83 to 0.99, respectively, for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The fluorogenic method demonstrated that the five bacteriocins of B. thuringiensis have bacteriolytic and bacteriostatic activities against all microorganisms tested, including clinically significant bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, Proteus vulgaris, and Shigella flexneri reported previously to be resistant to the antimicrobials as determined using the well-diffusion protocol. These results demonstrate that the fluorogenic assay is a more sensitive, reliable, and rapid method when compared with the well-diffusion method and can easily be adapted in screening protocols for bacteriocin production by other microorganisms. PMID:22919330

  13. Antagonistic activity of isolated lactic acid bacteria from Pliek U against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiti, A. A.; Jamilah, I.; Rusmarilin, H.

    2017-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one group of microbes that has many benefits, notably in food and health industries sector. LAB plays an important role in food fermentation and it has bacteriostatic effect against the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. The research related LAB continued to be done to increase the diversity of potential isolates derived from nature which is indigenous bacteria for biotechnological purposes. This study was aimed to isolate and characterize LAB derived from pliek u sample and to examine the potency to inhibits Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 bacteria growth. A total of 5 isolates were isolated and based on morphological and physiological characteristics of the fifth bacteria, they are allegedly belonging to the genus Bacillus. Result of antagonistic test showed that the five isolates could inhibits the growth of E. coli ATCC 25922. The highest inhibition zone is 8.5 mm was shown by isolates NQ2, while the lowest inhibition is 1.5 mm was shown by isolates NQ3.

  14. Aerobiological Stabilities of Different Species of Gram-Negative Bacteria, Including Well-Known Biothreat Simulants, in Single-Cell Particles and Cell Clusters of Different Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar

    2017-09-15

    The ability to perform controlled experiments with bioaerosols is a fundamental enabler of many bioaerosol research disciplines. A practical alternative to using hazardous biothreat agents, e.g., for detection equipment development and testing, involves using appropriate model organisms (simulants). Several species of Gram-negative bacteria have been used or proposed as biothreat simulants. However, the appropriateness of different bacterial genera, species, and strains as simulants is still debated. Here, we report aerobiological stability characteristics of four species of Gram-negative bacteria (Pantoea agglomerans, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Xanthomonas arboricola) in single-cell particles and cell clusters produced using four spray liquids (H2O, phosphate-buffered saline[PBS], spent culture medium[SCM], and a SCM-PBS mixture). E. coli showed higher stability in cell clusters from all spray liquids than the other species, but it showed similar or lower stability in single-cell particles. The overall stability was higher in cell clusters than in single-cell particles. The highest overall stability was observed for bioaerosols produced using SCM-containing spray liquids. A key finding was the observation that stability differences caused by particle size or compositional changes frequently followed species-specific patterns. The results highlight how even moderate changes to one experimental parameter, e.g., bacterial species, spray liquid, or particle size, can strongly affect the aerobiological stability of Gram-negative bacteria. Taken together, the results highlight the importance of careful and informed selection of Gram-negative bacterial biothreat simulants and also the accompanying particle size and composition. The outcome of this work contributes to improved selection of simulants, spray liquids, and particle size for use in bioaerosol research.IMPORTANCE The outcome of this work contributes to improved selection of simulants, spray

  15. New agents for the treatment of infections with Gram-negative bacteria: restoring the miracle or false dawn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H; Bonomo, R A; Paterson, D L

    2017-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative resistance has developed without a commensurate response in the successful development of antibiotic agents, though recent progress has been made. This review aims to provide a summary of the existing evidence on efficacy, spectrum of activity and the development of resistance of new agents that have been licensed or have completed advanced clinical trials and that possess activity against resistant Gram-negative organisms. A review of the published literature via MEDLINE database was performed. Relevant clinical trials were identified with the aid of the clinicaltrials.gov registry. Further data were ascertained from review of abstracts from recent international meetings and pharmaceutical companies. Data on the mechanism of action, microbiological spectrum, clinical efficacy and development of resistance are reported for new agents that have activity against Gram-negative organisms. This includes the β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations ceftazidime/avibactam, ceftolozane/tazobactam, imipenem/cilastatin/relebactam, meropenem/vaborbactam and aztreonam/avibactam; cefiderocol, a siderophore cephalosporin; plazomicin and eravacycline. The development of new agents with activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens has provided important therapeutic options for clinicians. Polymyxins appear to have been supplanted by new agents as first-line therapy for Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producers. Cefiderocol and ceftazidime/avibactam/aztreonam are promising options for metallo-β-lactamase producers, and cefiderocol and ceftolozane/tazobactam for multiply resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but definitive data showing clinical efficacy is as yet lacking. Reports of the development of resistance early after the release and use of new agents is of concern. Orally administered options and agents active effective against Acinetobacter baumannii are under-represented in clinical development. Copyright © 2017

  16. Gram-Negative Flagella Glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Merino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation.

  17. Removal of bowel aerobic gram-negative bacteria is more effective than immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide and steroids to decrease natural alpha-galactosyl IgG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañez, R; Blanco, F J; Díaz, I; Centeno, A; Lopez-Pelaez, E; Hermida, M; Davies, H F; Katopodis, A

    2001-02-01

    Natural alpha-Galactosyl (Gal) antibodies play an important role in the rejection of pig xenografts by humans and Old World monkeys. In this study we investigate the efficacy of two different strategies to reduce the serum level of natural anti-Gal antibodies. On the one hand, removal of aerobic gram-negative bacteria from the intestinal flora, because anti-Gal antibodies appear to be produced as a result of the continuous sensitization by these microorganisms. On the other hand, we studied the effect on these antibodies of an immunosuppressive regimen of cyclophosphamide and steroids. Ten baboons were treated for three months with norfloxacin (Nor Group; n=6) or cyclophosphamide and steroids (CyP Group; n=4). A further four baboons did not receive any treatment (Control Group). Aerobic gram-negative bacteria became negative in stools of the Nor Group after two weeks of treatment, and remained undetectable until week 7. Thereafter, a gradual increase on the fecal concentration of aerobic gram-negative bacteria was observed despite the norfloxacin treatment. The mean anti-Gal IgG in the Nor Group gradually declined from week 4 to 9 to a mean of 62.7 +/- 18% of the baseline level, and during this period were significantly lower than in the CyP (Premoval of normal aerobic gram-negative bacteria from the intestinal flora is more effective than immunosuppression with CyP and steroids in reducing the level of natural anti-Gal antibodies, although there is no discernible effect on IgM antibodies.

  18. Trends of Bloodstream Infections in a University Greek Hospital during a Three-Year Period: Incidence of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria and Seasonality in Gram-negative Predominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonitsiou, Fevronia; Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Stamouli, Vasiliki; Papakostas, Vasileios; Apostolopoulou, Eleni; Panagiotopoulos, Christos; Marangos, Markos; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Christofidou, Myrto; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2017-07-06

    The aim of the study was to assess the epidemiology, the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and bloodstream infections' (BSIs) seasonality in a university hospital. This retrospective study was carried out in the University General Hospital of Patras, Greece, during 2011-13 y. Blood cultures from patients with clinical presentation suggestive of bloodstream infection were performed by the BacT/ALERT System. Isolates were identified by Vitek 2 Advanced Expert System. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method and E-test. Resistance genes (mecA in staphylococci; vanA/vanB/vanC in enterococci; blaKPC/blaVIM/blaNDM in Klebsiella spp.) were detected by PCR. In total, 4607 (9.7%) blood cultures were positive from 47451 sets sent to Department of Microbiology, representing 1732 BSIs. Gram-negative bacteria (52.3%) were the most commonly isolated, followed by Gram-positive (39.5%), fungi (6.6%) and anaerobes bacteria (1.8%). The highest contamination rate was observed among Gram-positive bacteria (42.3%). Among 330 CNS and 150 Staphylococcus aureus, 281 (85.2%) and 60 (40.0%) were mecA-positive, respectively. From 113 enterococci, eight were vanA, two vanB and two vanC-positives. Of the total 207 carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (73.4%), 202 carried blaKPC, four blaKPC and blaVIM and one blaVIM. A significant increase in monthly BSIs' incidence was shown (R2: 0.449), which may be attributed to a rise of Gram-positive BSIs (R2: 0.337). Gram-positive BSIs were less frequent in spring (P Gram-negative bacteria (P Gram-negative bacteria increased during the study period. The increasing incidence of BSIs can be attributed to an increase of Gram-positive BSI incidence, even though Gram-negative bacteria remained the predominant ones. Seasonality may play a role in the predominance of Gram-negative's BSI.

  19. Meningitis - gram-negative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life-threatening illness. Prevention Prompt treatment of related infections may reduce the risk of meningitis. Alternative Names Gram-negative meningitis Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous ...

  20. Quinolones resistance and R-plasmids of some gram negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of the two hundred and sixty bacteria isolates from clinical specimens obtained from different body sites at the University College Hospital Ibadan, 166 belonged to the family of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonaceae. The isolated gram-negative enteric bacilli consist of Escherichia coli (22), Klebsiella species (65), ...

  1. MALDI-TOF identification of Gram-negative bacteria directly from blood culture bottles containing charcoal: Sepsityper® kits versus centrifugation-filtration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Kathleen; Cruz, Kristian; Shemes, Stephen; Szpunar, Susan; Fishbain, Joel T

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has dramatically altered the way microbiology laboratories identify clinical isolates. Direct blood culture (BC) detection may be hampered, however, by the presence of charcoal in BC bottles currently in clinical use. This study evaluates an in-house process for extraction and MALDI-TOF identification of Gram-negative bacteria directly from BC bottles containing charcoal. Three hundred BC aliquots were extracted by a centrifugation-filtration method developed in our research laboratory with the first 96 samples processed in parallel using Sepsityper® kits. Controls were colonies from solid media with standard phenotypic and MALDI-TOF identification. The identification of Gram-negative bacteria was successful more often via the in-house method compared to Sepsityper® kits (94.7% versus 78.1%, P≤0.0001). Our in-house centrifugation-filtration method was further validated for isolation and identification of Gram-negative bacteria (95%; n=300) directly from BC bottles containing charcoal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria induce different patterns of cytokine production in human mononuclear cells irrespective of taxonomic relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovbjerg, Susann; Martner, Anna; Hynsjö, Lars; Hessle, Christina; Olsen, Ingar; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Tham, Wilhelm; Wold, Agnes E

    2010-01-01

    Upon bacterial stimulation, tissue macrophages produce a variety of cytokines that orchestrate the immune response that clears the infection. We have shown that Gram-positives induce higher levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than do Gram-negatives, which instead induce more of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. Here, we study whether these patterns follows or crosses taxonomic borders. PBMCs from blood donors were incubated with UV-inactivated bacteria representing 37 species from five phyla. IL-12, TNF, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 were measured in the supernatants after 24 h and IFN-gamma after 5 days. Irrespective of phylogenetic position, Gram-positive bacteria induced much more IL-12 (nine times more on average) and IFN-gamma (seven times), more TNF (three times), and slightly more IL-1beta (1.5 times) than did Gram-negatives, which instead induced more IL-6 (1.5 times), IL-8 (1.9 times), and IL-10 (3.3 times) than did Gram-positives. A notable exception was the Gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes, which induced very little IL-12, IFN-gamma, and TNF. The results confirm the fundamental difference in innate immune responses to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which crosses taxonomic borders and probably reflects differences in cell wall structure.

  3. How to Manage Infections Caused by Antibiotic Resistant Gram-negative Bacteria - EBMT Educational Meeting from the Severe Aplastic Anaemia and Infectious Diseases Working Parties, Naples, Italy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, Małgorzata

    2015-02-23

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria are increasingly frequent in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, yet their prevalence is highly variable among transplant centres. Thus, the knowledge of local epidemiology is mandatory for deciding the most appropriate management protocols. Empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia should be individualized. Either escalation or de-escalation strategy could be chosen, based on local epidemiology, individual risk factors for infection due to resistant strains, such as previous infection or colonization with a resistant pathogen, and clinical presentation. De-escalation approach is recommended in case of severe clinical presentation in patients who are at high risk of drug-resistant infection. Targeted therapy of MDR Gram-negatives, in particular carbapenem-resistant strains, calls for a combination treatment, usually including colistin. No large randomized trials exist in this setting. Local epidemiology dictates which resistant bacteria should be routinely screened for, and infection control precautions are mandatory to limit the spread of resistant strains. Antimicrobial stewardship, with the aim of the best possible management of bacterial infections, should be put in place in every transplant centre. In conclusion, infections caused by resistant Gram-negative bacteria in HSCT population warrant currently particular attention in order to limit their negative impact on transplant outcomes.

  4. Impact of Gram-negative bacteria in interaction with a complex microbial consortium on biogenic amine content and sensory characteristics of an uncooked pressed cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbès-Paus, Céline; Pochet, Sylvie; Helinck, Sandra; Veisseire, Philippe; Bord, Cécile; Lebecque, Annick; Coton, Monika; Desmasures, Nathalie; Coton, Emmanuel; Irlinger, Françoise; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2012-05-01

    The impact of Gram-negative bacteria on sensory characteristics and production of volatile compounds as well as biogenic amines (BA) in the core of an uncooked pressed type model cheese was investigated in the presence of a defined complex microbial consortium. Eleven strains of Gram-negative bacteria, selected on the basis of their biodiversity and in vitro BA-production ability, were individually tested in a model cheese. Four out of 6 strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Citrobacter freundii UCMA 4217, Klebsiella oxytoca 927, Hafnia alvei B16 and Proteus vulgaris UCMA 3780) reached counts close to 6 log CFU g⁻¹ in the model cheese. In core of cheeses inoculated with Gram-negative bacteria, only slight differences were observed for microbial counts (Enterococcus faecalis or Lactobacillus plantarum count differences below 1 log CFU g⁻¹), acetate concentration (differences below 200 mg kg⁻¹) and texture (greater firmness) in comparison to control cheeses. Cheese core colour, odour and volatile compound composition were not modified. Although ornithine, the precursor of putrescine, was present in all cheeses, putrescine was only detected in cheeses inoculated with H. alvei B16 and never exceeded 2.18 mmol kg⁻¹ cheese dry matter. Cadaverine was only detected in cheeses inoculated with H. alvei B16, K. oxytoca 927, Halomonas venusta 4C1A or Morganella morganii 3A2A but at lower concentrations (<1.05 mmol kg⁻¹ cheese dry matter), although lysine was available. Only insignificant amounts of the detrimental BA histamine and tyramine, as well as isopentylamine, tryptamine or phenylethylamine, were produced in the cheese model by any of the Gram-negative strains, including those which produced these BA at high levels in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of gram-negative bacteria from critical control points of raw and pasteurized cow milk consumed at Gondar town and its suburbs, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garedew Legesse

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk is highly prone to contamination and can serve as an efficient vehicle for human transmission of foodborne pathogens, especially gram-negative bacteria, as these are widely distributed in the environment. Methods This cross-sectional study of gram-negative staining bacterial contamination of milk meant for human consumption was carried out from October 2010 to May 2011 in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Milk samples were collected from critical control points, from production to consumption, that were hypothesized to be a source of potential contamination. Milk sampling points included smallholder’s milk producers, dairy co-operatives, a milk processing plant, and supermarkets. The hygienic procedures applied during milking, milk collection, transportation, pasteurization, and postpasteurization storage conditions at these specified critical control points were evaluated. Standard bacteriological cultivation and biochemical assays were used to isolate and identify bacterial pathogens in the milk samples. Results The results of the current study showed that conditions for contamination of raw milk at different critical points were due to less hygienic practices in pre-milking udder preparation, sub-optimal hygiene of milk handlers, and poor sanitation practices associated with milking and storage equipments. Among all critical control points considered, transportation containers at milk collection centers and at processing plants were found to be the most heavily contaminated with gram-negative staining bacterial species. Overall, 54 different bacterial species were indentified, and Escherichia coli (29.6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18.5%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.7%, were the most commonly identified gram-negative staining bacterial pathogens. Of particular interest was that no gram-negative staining bacteria were isolated from pasteurized milk samples with varying shelf life. Conclusion This study showed the presence of

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Blood Stream Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Gram Negative Bacteria in a Tertiary Care Cancer Hospital

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    Radha Rani D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial bloodstream infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of the present study was to determine the bacterial profile of bloodstream infections and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern among the clinically diagnosed cases of sepsis in cancer patients. Methods: In the present study, etiological and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of blood cultures over a period of 1 year at a tertiary cancer care hospital was done. Blood culture positive isolates were identified using standard microbiological methods and by Fully automated BD Phoenix 100. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the organisms was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration was done by Fully automated BD Phoenix 100. Results: There were 1178 blood culture samples, of which 327 (27.7% were identified to be culture positive. Out of 327 positive cultures, 299 (91.4% showed bacterial growth, Gram negative were 161 (53.8% and Gram positive were 138 (46.1%. Candida species were isolated from 13 (3.97% of positive samples and 15 samples showed contamination. The most common Gram-negative isolate was. Escherichia coli (37.80% and Gram-positive isolate was coagulasenegative staphylococci (52.80%. Escherichia coli showed highest sensitivity to amikacin (83.60% and sensitivity to piperacillin+ tazobactum and cefaperazone+sulbactam was 54.09% and 52.45% respectively. High degree of resistance was found to cephalosporins and levofloxacin. Conclusion: The results indicate high level of antimicrobial resistance among Gram negative bacilli in septicemic patients. The results warrant continuous monitoring of antimicrobial pattern so as to build geographical epidemiological data.

  7. The warmer the weather, the more gram-negative bacteria - impact of temperature on clinical isolates in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Frank; Gastmeier, Petra; Meyer, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between average monthly temperature and the most common clinical pathogens causing infections in intensive care patients. A prospective unit-based study in 73 German intensive care units located in 41 different hospitals and 31 different cities with total 188,949 pathogen isolates (102,377 Gram-positives and 86,572 Gram-negatives) from 2001 to 2012. We estimated the relationship between the number of clinical pathogens per month and the average temperature in the month of isolation and in the month prior to isolation while adjusting for confounders and long-term trends using time series analysis. Adjusted incidence rate ratios for temperature parameters were estimated based on generalized estimating equation models which account for clustering effects. The incidence density of Gram-negative pathogens was 15% (IRR 1.15, 95%CI 1.10-1.21) higher at temperatures ≥ 20°C than at temperatures below 5°C. E. cloacae occurred 43% (IRR=1.43; 95%CI 1.31-1.56) more frequently at high temperatures, A. baumannii 37% (IRR=1.37; 95%CI 1.11-1.69), S. maltophilia 32% (IRR=1.32; 95%CI 1.12-1.57), K. pneumoniae 26% (IRR=1.26; 95%CI 1.13-1.39), Citrobacter spp. 19% (IRR=1.19; 95%CI 0.99-1.44) and coagulase-negative staphylococci 13% (IRR=1.13; 95%CI 1.04-1.22). By contrast, S. pneumoniae 35% (IRR=0.65; 95%CI 0.50-0.84) less frequently isolated at high temperatures. For each 5°C increase, we observed a 3% (IRR=1.03; 95%CI 1.02-1.04) increase of Gram-negative pathogens. This increase was highest for A. baumannii with 8% (IRR=1.08; 95%CI 1.05-1.12) followed by K. pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and E. cloacae with 7%. Clinical pathogens vary by incidence density with temperature. Significant higher incidence densities of Gram-negative pathogens were observed during summer whereas S. pneumoniae peaked in winter. There is increasing evidence that different seasonality due to physiologic changes underlies host susceptibility to different bacterial pathogens

  8. The warmer the weather, the more gram-negative bacteria - impact of temperature on clinical isolates in intensive care units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigated the relationship between average monthly temperature and the most common clinical pathogens causing infections in intensive care patients. METHODS: A prospective unit-based study in 73 German intensive care units located in 41 different hospitals and 31 different cities with total 188,949 pathogen isolates (102,377 Gram-positives and 86,572 Gram-negatives from 2001 to 2012. We estimated the relationship between the number of clinical pathogens per month and the average temperature in the month of isolation and in the month prior to isolation while adjusting for confounders and long-term trends using time series analysis. Adjusted incidence rate ratios for temperature parameters were estimated based on generalized estimating equation models which account for clustering effects. RESULTS: The incidence density of Gram-negative pathogens was 15% (IRR 1.15, 95%CI 1.10-1.21 higher at temperatures ≥ 20°C than at temperatures below 5°C. E. cloacae occurred 43% (IRR=1.43; 95%CI 1.31-1.56 more frequently at high temperatures, A. baumannii 37% (IRR=1.37; 95%CI 1.11-1.69, S. maltophilia 32% (IRR=1.32; 95%CI 1.12-1.57, K. pneumoniae 26% (IRR=1.26; 95%CI 1.13-1.39, Citrobacter spp. 19% (IRR=1.19; 95%CI 0.99-1.44 and coagulase-negative staphylococci 13% (IRR=1.13; 95%CI 1.04-1.22. By contrast, S. pneumoniae 35% (IRR=0.65; 95%CI 0.50-0.84 less frequently isolated at high temperatures. For each 5°C increase, we observed a 3% (IRR=1.03; 95%CI 1.02-1.04 increase of Gram-negative pathogens. This increase was highest for A. baumannii with 8% (IRR=1.08; 95%CI 1.05-1.12 followed by K. pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and E. cloacae with 7%. CONCLUSION: Clinical pathogens vary by incidence density with temperature. Significant higher incidence densities of Gram-negative pathogens were observed during summer whereas S. pneumoniae peaked in winter. There is increasing evidence that different seasonality due to physiologic changes underlies

  9. Of Men Not Mice: Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein Expressed in Human Macrophages Acts as a Phagocytic Receptor and Modulates Entry and Replication of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; Schnare, Markus; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages as immune cells prevent the spreading of pathogens by means of active phagocytosis and killing. We report here the presence of an antimicrobial protein, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) in human macrophages, which actively participates in engulfment and killing of Gram-negative pathogens. Our studies revealed increased expression of BPI in human macrophages during bacterial infection and upon stimulation with various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, viz., LPS and flagellin. Furthermore, during the course of an infection, BPI interacted with Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in enhanced phagocytosis and subsequent control of the bacterial replication. However, it was observed that bacteria which can maintain an active replicating niche (Salmonella Typhimurium) avoid the interaction with BPI during later stages of infection. On the other hand, Salmonella mutants, which cannot maintain a replicating niche, as well as Shigella flexneri, which quit the endosomal vesicle, showed interaction with BPI. These results propose an active role of BPI in Gram-negative bacterial clearance by human macrophages. PMID:27822215

  10. Rapid detection of Gram-negative bacteria and their drug resistance genes from positive blood cultures using an automated microarray assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eunhee; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Yukyoung; Yu, Jin Kyung; Park, Kang Gyun; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay (CE-IVD version) for identification of Gram-negative (GN) bacteria and detection of resistance genes. A total of 163 GN organisms (72 characterized strains and 91 clinical isolates from 86 patients) were tested; among the clinical isolates, 86 (94.5%) isolates were included in the BC-GN panel. For identification, the agreement was 98.6% (146/148, 95% confidence interval [CI], 92.1-100) and 70% (7/10, 95% CI, 53.5-100) for monomicrobial and polymicrobial cultures, respectively. Of the 48 resistance genes harbored by 43 characterized strains, all were correctly detected. Of the 19 clinical isolates harboring resistance genes, 1 CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli isolated in polymicrobial culture was not detected. Overall, BC-GN assay provides acceptable accuracy for rapid identification of Gram-negative bacteria and detection of resistance genes, compared with routine laboratory methods despite that it has limitations in the number of genus/species and resistance gene included in the panel and it shows lower sensitivity in polymicrobial cultures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test for rapid detection of bacteria and resistance determinants in positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Naoki; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Yamakawa, Hiromi; Yamada, Maiko; Yaguchi, Yuji; Notake, Shigeyuki; Tamai, Kiyoko; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Misawa, Shigeki; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2015-12-01

    The Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN) is a microarray-based assay that enables rapid detection of 9 common Gram-negative bacteria and 6 resistance determinants directly from positive blood cultures. We compared the performance of BC-GN with currently used automated systems, testing 141 clinical blood cultures and 205 spiked blood cultures. For identification of BC-GN target organisms in clinical and spiked blood cultures, the BC-GN assay showed 98.5% (130/132) and 98.9% (182/184) concordance, respectively. Of 140 resistance genes positively detected in clinical and spiked blood cultures with the BC-GN test, 139 (99.3%) were confirmed by PCR, and the detection results were consistent with the resistance phenotypes observed. The BC-GN assay, thus, can potentially improve care for sepsis patients by enabling timely detection and targeted antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Impact of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on the Activity of Selected Non-Antibiotic Medicinal Products against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E. Laudy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential role of non-antibiotic medicinal products in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria has recently been investigated. It is highly likely that the presence of efflux pumps may be one of the reasons for the weak activity of non-antibiotics, as in the case of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, against Gram-negative rods. The activity of eight drugs of potential non-antibiotic activity, active substance standards, and relevant medicinal products were analysed with and without of efflux pump inhibitors against 180 strains of five Gram-negative rod species by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value determination in the presence of 1 mM MgSO4. Furthermore, the influence of non-antibiotics on the susceptibility of clinical strains to quinolones with or without PAβN (Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide was investigated. The impacts of PAβN on the susceptibility of bacteria to non-antibiotics suggests that amitriptyline, alendronate, nicergoline, and ticlopidine are substrates of efflux pumps in Gram-negative rods. Amitriptyline/Amitriptylinum showed the highest direct antibacterial activity, with MICs ranging 100–800 mg/L against all studied species. Significant decreases in the MIC values of other active substances (acyclovir, atorvastatin, and famotidine tested with pump inhibitors were not observed. The investigated non-antibiotic medicinal products did not alter the MICs of quinolones in the absence and in the presence of PAβN to the studied clinical strains of five groups of species.

  13. Top-Down LESA Mass Spectrometry Protein Analysis of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocurek, Klaudia I; Stones, Leanne; Bunch, Josephine; May, Robin C; Cooper, Helen J

    2017-10-01

    We have previously shown that liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry (MS) is a technique suitable for the top-down analysis of proteins directly from intact colonies of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli K-12. Here we extend the application of LESA MS to Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa PS1054 and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus MSSA476, as well as two strains of E. coli (K-12 and BL21 mCherry) and an unknown species of Staphylococcus. Moreover, we demonstrate the discrimination between three species of Gram-positive Streptococcus (Streptococcus pneumoniae D39, and the viridans group Streptococcus oralis ATCC 35037 and Streptococcus gordonii ATCC35105), a recognized challenge for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS. A range of the proteins detected were selected for top-down LESA MS/MS. Thirty-nine proteins were identified by top-down LESA MS/MS, including 16 proteins that have not previously been observed by any other technique. The potential of LESA MS for classification and characterization of novel species is illustrated by the de novo sequencing of a new protein from the unknown species of Staphylococcus. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Top-Down LESA Mass Spectrometry Protein Analysis of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocurek, Klaudia I.; Stones, Leanne; Bunch, Josephine; May, Robin C.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2017-10-01

    We have previously shown that liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry (MS) is a technique suitable for the top-down analysis of proteins directly from intact colonies of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli K-12. Here we extend the application of LESA MS to Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa PS1054 and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus MSSA476, as well as two strains of E. coli (K-12 and BL21 mCherry) and an unknown species of Staphylococcus. Moreover, we demonstrate the discrimination between three species of Gram-positive Streptococcus ( Streptococcus pneumoniae D39, and the viridans group Streptococcus oralis ATCC 35037 and Streptococcus gordonii ATCC35105), a recognized challenge for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS. A range of the proteins detected were selected for top-down LESA MS/MS. Thirty-nine proteins were identified by top-down LESA MS/MS, including 16 proteins that have not previously been observed by any other technique. The potential of LESA MS for classification and characterization of novel species is illustrated by the de novo sequencing of a new protein from the unknown species of Staphylococcus. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. ZL-2, a cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide, has a broad antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jiancheng; Wu, Geping; Zuo, Yun; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Shusheng

    2015-10-01

    Alloferons are a group of naturally occurring peptides primarily isolated from insects that are capable of stimulating mouse and human NK cell cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. In this study, we found that a modified antibacterial peptide had a broad range of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A time-course experiment showed that CFU counts rapidly decreased after ZL-2 treatment, with the bacteria nearly eliminated within 4 h. We also examined the synergy between the peptide and antibiotics. The peptide ZL-2 resulted in a significant synergistic improvement in the potencies of ampicillin, erythromycin and ceftazidime against methicillin-resistant bacteria. In addition, ZL-2 had no detectable cytotoxicity in mouse spleen cells or a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by i.p. inoculation with Escherichia coli, timely treatment of i.p. injection with ZL-2 resulted in 100-fold reduction in bacteria load in blood as well as 80% protection from death in the inoculated animals. In conclusion, we successfully identified a modified peptide with maximal bactericidal activity. This study also provides a potential therapeutic for the treatment of E. coli septicemia by increasing the activity of antimicrobials.

  16. A novel phagocytic receptor (CgNimC) from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas with lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacteria binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Ran; Song, Xuan; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-03-01

    Phagocytosis is an evolutionarily conserved process to ingest the invading microbes and apoptotic or necrotic corpses, playing vital roles in defensing invaders and maintenance of normal physiological conditions. In the present study, a new Nimrod family phagocytic receptor with three EGF-like domains was identified in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgNimC). CgNimC shared homology with other identified multiple EGF-like domain containing proteins. The mRNA transcripts of CgNimC were mainly distributed in mantle and hemocytes. Its relative expression level in hemocytes was significantly (P bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. Different to the NimC in Drosophila and Anopheles gambiae, the recombinant protein of CgNimC (rCgNimC) could bind directly to two gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus, but not to gram-positive bacteria Staphylococci aureus, Micrococcus luteus or fungi Yarrowia lipolytica and Pichia pastoris. The affinity of rCgNimC toward M. luteus and Y. lipolytica was enhanced when the microorganisms were pre-incubated with the cell free hemolymph. rCgNimC exhibited higher affinity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and relatively lower affinity to peptidoglycan (PGN), while no affinity to glucan (GLU). After the CgNimC receptor was blocked by anti-rCgNimC antibody in vitro, the phagocytic rate of hemocytes toward two gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and V. splendidus was reduced significantly (P gram-negative bacteria, was a novel phagocytic receptor involved in immune response of Pacific oyster. Further, it was speculated that receptors of Nimrod family might function as a phagocytic receptor to recognize PAMPs on the invaders and its recognition could be promoted by opsonization of molecules in hemolymph. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lactic Acid Bacteria Inducing a Weak Interleukin-12 and Tumor Necrosis Alpha Response in Human Dendritic Cells Inhibit Strongly Stimulating Lactic Acid Bacteria but Act Synergistically with Gram-Negative Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The development and maintenance of immune homeostasis indispensably depend on signals from the gut flora. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are gram-positive (G+) organisms, are plausible significant players and have received much attention. Gram-negative (G-) commensals, such as members of the f...

  18. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  19. Bactericidal Efficacy of Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Disinfectants Against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria on Stainless Steel Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Castillo, Abel G; González-Rivas, Fabián; Rodríguez-Jerez, José J

    2017-10-01

    In order to develop disinfectant formulations that leverage the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), this study evaluated the bactericidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on stainless steel surfaces. Low concentration of hydrogen peroxide as 0.5% with a cationic polymer, ethoxylated fatty alcohol, and ethyl alcohol had bactericidal efficacy (reductions ≥ 4 log10 CFU/mL) against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus hirae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants were more effective against E. hirae and P. aeruginosa than to S. aureus. However, the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide against catalase positive bacteria such as S. aureus was increased when this compound was formulated with low concentrations of benzalkonium chloride or ethyl alcohol, lactic acid, sodium benzoate, cationic polymer, and salicylic acid. This study demonstrates that the use of hydrogen peroxide with other antimicrobial products, in adequate concentrations, had bactericidal efficacy in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on stainless steel surfaces, enabling to reduce the effective concentration of hydrogen peroxide. In the same way, the use of hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants could reduce the concentrations of traditional disinfectants as quaternary ammonium compounds and therefore a reduction of their chemical residues in the environment after being used. The study of the bactericidal properties of environmentally nontoxic disinfectants such as hydrogen peroxide, sole or in formulations with other disinfectants against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria can enhance the efficacy of various commonly used disinfectant formulations with the hygiene benefits that it entails. Also, the use of hydrogen peroxide formulations can reduce the concentration levels of products that generate environmental residues. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Increased Costs Associated with Bloodstream Infections Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Are Due Primarily to Patients with Hospital-Acquired Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaden, Joshua T; Li, Yanhong; Ruffin, Felicia; Maskarinec, Stacey A; Hill-Rorie, Jonathan M; Wanda, Lisa C; Reed, Shelby D; Fowler, Vance G

    2017-03-01

    The clinical and economic impacts of bloodstream infections (BSI) due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria are incompletely understood. From 2009 to 2015, all adult inpatients with Gram-negative BSI at our institution were prospectively enrolled. MDR status was defined as resistance to ≥3 antibiotic classes. Clinical outcomes and inpatient costs associated with the MDR phenotype were identified. Among 891 unique patients with Gram-negative BSI, 292 (33%) were infected with MDR bacteria. In an adjusted analysis, only history of Gram-negative infection was associated with MDR BSI versus non-MDR BSI (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 2.16; P = 0.002). Patients with MDR BSI had increased BSI recurrence (1.7% [5/292] versus 0.2% [1/599]; P = 0.02) and longer hospital stay (median, 10.0 versus 8.0 days; P = 0.0005). Unadjusted rates of in-hospital mortality did not significantly differ between MDR (26.4% [77/292]) and non-MDR (21.7% [130/599]) groups (P = 0.12). Unadjusted mean costs were 1.62 times higher in MDR than in non-MDR BSI ($59,266 versus $36,452; P = 0.003). This finding persisted after adjustment for patient factors and appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy (means ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.36; P = 0.01). Adjusted analysis of patient subpopulations revealed that the increased cost of MDR BSI occurred primarily among patients with hospital-acquired infections (MDR means ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.82; P = 0.008). MDR Gram-negative BSI are associated with recurrent BSI, longer hospital stays, and increased mean inpatient costs. MDR BSI in patients with hospital-acquired infections primarily account for the increased cost. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Cationized Magnetoferritin Enables Rapid Labeling and Concentration of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Magnetic Cell Separation Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Carreira, S; Spencer, J; Schwarzacher, W; Seddon, A M

    2016-06-15

    In order to identify pathogens rapidly and reliably, bacterial capture and concentration from large sample volumes into smaller ones are often required. Magnetic labeling and capture of bacteria using a magnetic field hold great promise for achieving this goal, but the current protocols have poor capture efficiency. Here, we present a rapid and highly efficient approach to magnetic labeling and capture of both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria using cationized magnetoferritin (cat-MF). Magnetic labeling was achieved within a 1-min incubation period with cat-MF, and 99.97% of the labeled bacteria were immobilized in commercially available magnetic cell separation (MACS) columns. Longer incubation times led to more efficient capture, with S. aureus being immobilized to a greater extent than E. coli Finally, low numbers of magnetically labeled E. coli bacteria (Gram-negative bacteria. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a significant global challenge. Rapid identification of pathogens will retard the spread of AMR by enabling targeted treatment with suitable agents and by reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use. Rapid detection methods based on microfluidic devices require that bacteria are concentrated from large volumes into much smaller ones. Concentration of bacteria is also important to detect low numbers of pathogens with confidence. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic separation columns capture small amounts of bacteria with 100% efficiency. Rapid magnetization was achieved by exposing bacteria to cationic magnetic nanoparticles, and magnetized bacteria were concentrated 7-fold inside the column. Thus, bacterial capture and concentration were achieved within 15 min. This approach could be extended to encompass the capture and concentration of specific pathogens, for example, by functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies or small molecule probes. Copyright © 2016 Correia Carreira et al.

  2. Involvement of both Type I and Type II mechanisms in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria photosensitization by a meso-substituted cationic porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergaieg, Karim; Seux, Rene [Laboratoire d' Etude et de Recherche en Environnement et Sante, National School of Public Health, Av. Pr. Leon Bernard, CS 74312, Rennes 35043 (France); Chevanne, Martine; Cillard, Josiane [Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire et Vegetale, UPRES 3891, UFR des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, University of Rennes 1, 2 Av. Pr. Leon Bernard, CS 34317, Rennes 35043 (France)

    2008-12-15

    A meso-substituted cationic porphyrin (TMPyP) showed a photocytotoxicity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In order to determine the mechanism involved in the phototoxicity of this photosensitizer, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (TEMP), a specific probe for singlet oxygen, and the spin-trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) were carried out with illuminated TMPyP. An EPR signal characteristic of TEMP-singlet oxygen (TEMPO) adduct formation was observed, which could be ascribed to singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) generated by TMPyP photosensitization. The signal for the DMPO spin adduct of superoxide anion (DMPO-OOH) was observed in DMSO solution but not in aqueous conditions. However, an EPR spectrum characteristic of the DMPO-hydroxyl radical spin adduct (DMPO-OH) was observed in aqueous conditions. The obtained results testify a primary hydroxyl radical ({sup .}OH) generation probably from superoxide anion (O{sub 2} {sup x} {sup -})via the Fenton reaction and/or via Haber-Weiss reaction. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria inactivation by TMPyP photosensitization predominantly involved Type II reactions mediated by the formation of {sup 1}O{sub 2}, as demonstrated by the effect of quenchers for {sup 1}O{sub 2} and scavengers for {sup .}OH (sodium azide, thiourea, and dimethylsulphoxide). Participation of other active oxygen species cannot however be neglected since Type I reactions also had a significant effect, particularly for Gram-negative bacteria. For Gram-negative bacteria the photoinactivation rate was lower in the presence of superoxide dismutase, a specific O{sub 2} {sup x} {sup -} scavenger, and/or catalase, an enzyme which specifically eliminates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but was unchanged for Gram-positive bacteria. The generation of {sup 1}O{sub 2}, O{sub 2} {sup x} {sup -} and {sup .}OH by TMPyP photosensitization indicated that TMPyP maintained a photodynamic activity in

  3. Abnormal vaginal colonization by gram-negative bacteria is significantly higher in pregnancy conceived through infertility treatment compared to natural pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Y; Sung, Ji-Hee; Chang, Kylie Hae-Jin; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2017-03-01

    To compare abnormal vaginal colonization between natural pregnancy and pregnancy by infertility treatment in high-risk parturient women and to examine the association between abnormal vaginal colonization and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). The clinical characteristics, vaginal culture result, and delivery outcome of patients who admitted to our high-risk unit between 2005 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and compared. We investigated the prevalence of EONS according to maternal vaginal colonization and examined the concordance between maternal vaginal bacteria and etiologic microorganism causing EONS. Among 1096 pregnancies, the rate of vaginal colonization by gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli was significantly higher in pregnancies by infertility treatment after adjustment of confounding variables (E. coli, OR [95% CI]: 2.47 [1.33-4.57], p = 0.004). The rate of EONS was significantly higher in neonates with maternal abnormal vaginal bacteria colonization (OR [95% CI]: 3.38 [1.44-7.93], p = 0.005) after adjusting for confounding variables. Notably, among microorganisms isolated from maternal vagina, E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were consistent with the results from neonatal blood culture in EONS. Our data implicate a possible association between gram-negative bacteria colonization and infertility treatment and suggest that maternal vaginal colonization may be associated with EONS of neonates in high-risk pregnancy.

  4. Prevalence of Gram-negative bacteria in ventilator-associated pneumonia in neonatal intensive care units: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Yousef; Rasti, Arezoo; Janani, Leila

    2016-10-11

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common and potentially lethal problem among mechanically ventilated neonates in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The main pathogenic bacteria of VAP in NICUs are Gram-negative pathogens, which show a general decline in sensitivities to commonly used antibiotics, but their true prevalence is not known. We aim to provide a systematic review of studies measuring the prevalence of Gram-negative bacteria in VAP in NICUs. We will search PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE and the ISI Web of Science, as well as the Google Scholar search engine with no restriction on language. Full copies of articles will be identified by a defined search strategy and will be considered for inclusion against predefined criteria. Study selection and data extraction will be performed by 2 independent reviewers. Statistical analysis will include the identification of data sources and documentation of estimates, as well as the application of the random-effects and fixed-effects meta-analysis models. This will allow us to aggregate prevalence estimates and account for between-study variability in calculating the overall pooled estimates and 95% CI for the prevalence of Gram-negative bacteria in VAP in NICUs. Heterogeneity will be evaluated using the I2 and χ2 statistical tests to determine the extent of variation in effect estimates due to heterogeneity rather than chance. Publication bias and data synthesis will be assessed by funnel plots and Begg's and Egger's tests using STATA software V.13. This systematic review protocol was prepared according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 Statement. No ethical issues are predicted. These findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at national and international conferences. CRD42016036048. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. The susceptibility to fosfomycin of Gram-negative bacteria isolates from urinary tract infection in the Czech Republic: data from a unicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajfr, Miroslav; Louda, Miroslav; Paterová, Pavla; Ryšková, Lenka; Pacovský, Jaroslav; Košina, Josef; Žemličková, Helena; Broďák, Miloš

    2017-04-26

    Against a background of rapid increase of β-lactamase-producing or multi-resistant pathogenic bacteria and the resulting lack of effective antibiotic treatment, some older antibiotics have been tested for new therapeutic uses. One of these is fosfomycin, to which according to studies these resistant bacteria are very sensitive. Our study was designed because there is no data on the fosfomycin susceptibility rate in the Czech Republic. In this study from January 2013 to June 2014 3295 unique isolates of Gram-negative bacteria which had caused urinary tract infections were examined. The antibiotic susceptibility was measured by disk diffusion test. Both EUCAST and CLSI guidelines criteria (for fosfomycin only) were used for the antibiotic susceptibility evaluation. The most frequently tested bacterial isolates were Escherichia coli (51.3%, n = 1703), Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.4%, n = 643) and Proteus spp. (11.8%, n = 392). Among all isolates 29.0% (n = 963) were resistant to fluoroquinolones, 11.3% (n = 374) produced extended spectrum β-lactamase and 4.2% (n = 141) produced AmpC β-lactamase. The overall in vitro susceptibility was significantly higher for fosfomycin compared to the other tested per-oral antibiotics (nitrofurantoin, ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, ciprofloxacin and cefuroxime) against all tested Gram-negative rod isolates (excluding Morganella morgani and Acinetobacter spp. isolates). Fosfomycin also remained highly active against those isolates with extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production (95.8% in Escherichia coli isolates and 85.3% in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates), unlike other tested per-oral antibiotics, which showed significant (p Gram-negative rods including those producing β-lactamase.

  6. Discrepancy in MALDI-TOF MS identification of uncommon Gram-negative bacteria from lower respiratory secretions in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulWahab A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Atqah AbdulWahab,1,2 Saad J Taj-Aldeen,3 Emad Bashir Ibrahim,3 Eman Talaq,4 Marawan Abu-Madi,4 Rashmi Fotedar5 1Department of Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar; 3Microbiology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 4Department of Health Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 5Biotechnology Center, Ministry of Environment, Doha, Qatar Introduction: Early identification of microbial organisms from respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF is important to guide therapeutic decisions. The objective was to compare the accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS relative to the conventional phenotypic method in identifying common bacterial isolates, including nonfermenting Gram-negative bacteria, in a cohort of patients with CF. Methods: A total of 123 isolates from 50 patients with CF representing 14 bacterial species from respiratory specimens were identified using MALDI-TOF MS in parallel with conventional phenotypic methods. Discrepancies were confirmed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequencing in five Gram-negative isolates. Results: The MALDI-TOF MS managed to identify 122/123 (99.2% bacterial isolates to the genus level and 118/123 (95.9% were identified to the species level. The MALDI-TOF MS results were 100% consistent to the species level with conventional phenotypic identification for isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and other uncommon organisms such as Chryseobacterium gleum and Enterobacter cloacae. The 5/123 (4.6% isolates misidentified were all Gram-negative bacteria. The isolation of E. cloacae and Haemophilus paraphrohaemolyticus may extend the

  7. Physico-Chemical-Managed Killing of Penicillin-Resistant Static and Growing Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Vegetative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Jr., Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Farris, III, Alex F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for the use of compounds from the Hofmeister series coupled with specific pH and temperature to provide rapid physico-chemical-managed killing of penicillin-resistant static and growing Gram-positive and Gram-negative vegetative bacteria. The systems and methods represent the more general physico-chemical enhancement of susceptibility for a wide range of pathological macromolecular targets to clinical management by establishing the reactivity of those targets to topically applied drugs or anti-toxins.

  8. Influence of antimicrobial consumption on gram-negative bacteria in inpatients receiving antimicrobial resistance therapy from 2008-2013 at a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; He, Qian; Wang, Zhiyong; Wei, Min; Yang, Zhangwei; Du, Yin; Wu, Cheng; He, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Irrational use of antimicrobial agents is a major cause of increased antimicrobial resistance. Effective antibiotic stewardship strategies nationwide or in local health care settings are necessary to reduce antibiotic use and bacteria resistance. We evaluated the effectiveness of China's antimicrobial stewardship policy on antimicrobial use and applied time-series analysis methodology to determine the temporal relationship between antibiotic use and gram-negative bacteria resistance at Changhai Hospital from 2008-2013. Isolates investigated included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Consumption of 7 restricted-use antibiotics was dramatically reduced. Resistance to ceftazidime in P aeruginosa and A baumannii and resistance to ciprofloxacin in P aeruginosa significantly decreased. By using cross-correlation analysis, associations between ciprofloxacin resistance in P aeruginosa and fluoroquinolones consumption (r = 0.48; lag = 0; P = .02), ceftazidime resistance in P aeruginosa and third-generation cephalosporins consumption (r = 0.54; lag = -1; P = .01) were identified. No substantial association between other pairs was found. Enhanced nationwide antimicrobial stewardship campaigns launched in 2011 have made great achievements in regard to antibiotic use but have had limited effects on the reversal of gram-negative bacteria resistance in health care settings. Sound infection prevention and control programs to reduce the transmission of resistant pathogens for hospitals in China are urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biocompatible Fe3O4 Increases the Efficacy of Amoxicillin Delivery against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of amoxicillin- functionalized magnetite nanostructures (Fe3O4@AMO, revealing and discussing several biomedical applications of these nanomaterials. Our results proved that 10 nm Fe3O4@AMO nanoparticles does not alter the normal cell cycle progression of cultured diploid cells, and an in vivo murine model confirms that the nanostructures disperse through the host body and tend to localize in particular sites and organs. The nanoparticles were found clustered especially in the lungs, kidneys and spleen, next to the blood vessels at this level, while being totally absent in the brain and liver, suggesting that they are circulated through the blood flow and have low toxicity. Fe3O4@AMO has the ability to be easily circulated through the body and optimizations may be done so these nanostructures cluster to a specific target region. Functionalized magnetite nanostructures proved a great antimicrobial effect, being active against both the Gram positive pathogen S. aureus and the Gram negative pathogen E. coli. The fabricated nanostructures significantly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the active drug. This result has a great practical relevance, since the functionalized nanostructures may be used for decreasing the therapeutic doses which usually manifest great severe side effects, when administrated in high doses. Fe3O4@AMO represents also a suitable approach for the development of new alternative strategies for improving the activity of therapeutic agents by targeted delivery and controlled release.

  10. A scallop C-type lectin from Argopecten irradians (AiCTL5) with activities of lipopolysaccharide binding and Gram-negative bacteria agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Changkao; Song, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Mengqiang; Song, Linsheng; Wang, Chunlin

    2012-05-01

    C-type lectins are a family of calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins. In the present study, a C-type lectin (designated as AiCTL5) was identified and characterized from Argopecten irradians. The full-length cDNA of AiCTL5 was of 673 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 24 bp, a 3' UTR of 130 bp with a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 519 bp encoding a polypeptide of 172 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. A C-type lectin-like domain (CRD) containing 6 conserved cysteines and a putative glycosylation sites were identified in the deduced amino acid sequence of AiCTL5. AiCTL5 shared 11%-27.5% identity with the previous reported C-type lectin from A. irradians. The cDNA fragment encoding the mature peptide of AiCTL5 was recombined into pET-21a (+) with a C-terminal hexa-histidine tag fused in-frame, and expressed in Escherichia coli Origami (DE3). The recombinant AiCTL5 (rAiCTL5) agglutinated Gram-negative E. coli TOP10F' and Listonella anguillarum, but did not agglutinate Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and Micrococcus luteus, and the agglutination could be inhibited by EDTA, indicating that AiCTL5 was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin. rAiCTL5 exhibited a significantly strong activity to bind LPS from E. coli, which conformed to the agglutinating activity toward Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, rAiCTL5 also agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes. These results indicated that AiCTL5 could function as a pattern recognition receptor to protect bay scallop from Gram-negative bacterial infection, and also provide evidence to understand the structural and functional diverse of lectin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. From Farms to Markets: Gram-Negative Bacteria Resistant to Third-Generation Cephalosporins in Fruits and Vegetables in a Region of North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah Zekar, Ferielle; Granier, Sophie A; Marault, Muriel; Yaici, Lydia; Gassilloud, Benoit; Manceau, Charles; Touati, Abdelaziz; Millemann, Yves

    2017-01-01

    The role of food in human exposure to antimicrobial-resistant bacteria is a growing food safety issue. The contribution of fruits and vegetables eaten raw to this exposure is still unclear. The evaluation of contamination levels of fruits, vegetables and the agricultural environment by third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)-resistant Gram-negative bacteria was performed by analyzing 491 samples of fruits and vegetables collected from 5 markets and 7 farms in Bejaia area, north-eastern Mediterranean coast of Algeria. Ninety soil samples and 45 irrigation water samples were also sampled in farms in order to assess them as potential inoculum sources. All samples were investigated at the same time on ceftazidime-containing selective media for 3GC-resistant Gram-negative bacteria detection and on Hektoen media, for Salmonella spp. presence. The bacteria isolated (n = 30) from fruits and vegetables, soil and irrigation water collected in the farms were almost all non-fermenting bacterial species (Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum) except one strain of Enterobacter cloacae and two strains of Citrobacter murliniae, isolated on one cucumber and two tomato samples in the same farm. Greater diversity in bacterial species and antimicrobial resistance profiles was observed at markets: Enterobacteriaceae (n = 41) were as strongly represented as non-fermenting bacteria (n = 37). Among Enterobacteriaceae, E. cloacae (n = 21), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 13) were the most common isolates. Most of the K. pneumoniae isolates were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers (n = 11). No Salmonella spp. was recovered in any sample. This study showed that fruits and vegetables including those which may be eaten up raw constitute a reservoir of 3GC-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and multi-drug resistant-bacteria in general that can be transferred to humans through food. The general public should be informed of this hazard for health in order to encourage

  12. From Farms to Markets: Gram-Negative Bacteria Resistant to Third-Generation Cephalosporins in Fruits and Vegetables in a Region of North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferielle Mesbah Zekar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of food in human exposure to antimicrobial-resistant bacteria is a growing food safety issue. The contribution of fruits and vegetables eaten raw to this exposure is still unclear. The evaluation of contamination levels of fruits, vegetables and the agricultural environment by third-generation cephalosporin (3GC-resistant Gram-negative bacteria was performed by analyzing 491 samples of fruits and vegetables collected from 5 markets and 7 farms in Bejaia area, north-eastern Mediterranean coast of Algeria. Ninety soil samples and 45 irrigation water samples were also sampled in farms in order to assess them as potential inoculum sources. All samples were investigated at the same time on ceftazidime-containing selective media for 3GC-resistant Gram-negative bacteria detection and on Hektoen media, for Salmonella spp. presence. The bacteria isolated (n = 30 from fruits and vegetables, soil and irrigation water collected in the farms were almost all non-fermenting bacterial species (Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum except one strain of Enterobacter cloacae and two strains of Citrobacter murliniae, isolated on one cucumber and two tomato samples in the same farm. Greater diversity in bacterial species and antimicrobial resistance profiles was observed at markets: Enterobacteriaceae (n = 41 were as strongly represented as non-fermenting bacteria (n = 37. Among Enterobacteriaceae, E. cloacae (n = 21, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 13 were the most common isolates. Most of the K. pneumoniae isolates were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producers (n = 11. No Salmonella spp. was recovered in any sample. This study showed that fruits and vegetables including those which may be eaten up raw constitute a reservoir of 3GC-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and multi-drug resistant-bacteria in general that can be transferred to humans through food. The general public should be informed of this hazard for health in order

  13. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria causing intra-abdominal infections during 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawser, Stephen; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert E; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Biedenbach, Douglas; Hackel, Meredith; Morrissey, Ian

    2015-02-01

    The study for monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends (SMART) surveillance program monitors the epidemiology and trends in antibiotic resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to currently used therapies. The current report describes such trends during 2010-2011. A total of 25,746 Gram-negative clinical isolates from intra-abdominal infections were collected and classified as hospital-associated (HA) if the hospital length of stay (LOS) at the time of specimen collection was ≥48 hours, community-associated (CA) if LOS at the time of specimen collection was <48 hours, or unknown (no designation given by participating centre). A total of 92 different species were collected of which the most common was Escherichia coli: 39% of all isolates in North America to 55% in Africa. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the second most common pathogen: 11% of all isolates from Europe to 19% of all isolates from Asia. Isolates were from multiple intra-abdominal sources of which 32% were peritoneal fluid, 20% were intra-abdominal abscesses, and 16.5% were gall bladder infections. Isolates were further classified as HA (55% of all isolates), CA (39% of all isolates), or unknown (6% of all isolates). The most active antibiotics tested were imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, and piperacillin-tazobactam. Resistance rates to all other antibiotics tested were high. Considering the current data set and high-level resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to various antibiotics, further monitoring of the epidemiology of intra-abdominal infections and their susceptibility to antibiotics through SMART is warranted.

  14. Infection with multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in a pediatric oncology intensive care unit: risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Patrícia de Oliveira; Atta, Elias Hallack; Silva, André Ricardo Araújo da

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the predictors and outcomes associated with multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacterial (MDR-GNB) infections in an oncology pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Data were collected relating to all episodes of GNB infection that occurred in a PICU between January of 2009 and December of 2012. GNB infections were divided into two groups for comparison: (1) infections attributed to MDR-GNB and (2) infections attributed to non-MDR-GNB. Variables of interest included age, gender, presence of solid tumor or hematologic disease, cancer status, central venous catheter use, previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, healthcare-associated infection, neutropenia in the preceding 7 days, duration of neutropenia, length of hospital stay before ICU admission, length of ICU stay, and the use of any of the following in the previous 30 days: antimicrobial agents, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Other variables included initial appropriate antimicrobial treatment, definitive inadequate antimicrobial treatment, duration of appropriate antibiotic use, time to initiate adequate antibiotic therapy, and the 7- and 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed significant relationships between MDR-GNB and hematologic diseases (odds ratio [OR] 5.262; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.282-21.594; p=0.021) and healthcare-associated infection (OR 18.360; 95% CI 1.778-189.560; p=0.015). There were significant differences between MDR-GNB and non-MDR-GNB patients for the following variables: inadequate initial empirical antibiotic therapy, time to initiate adequate antibiotic treatment, and inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Hematologic malignancy and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with MDR-GNB infection in this sample of pediatric oncology patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. [Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Gram-negative bacteria isolated in urinary tract infections in Venezuela: Results of the SMART study 2009-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Napoleón; Guzmán, Manuel; Merentes, Altagracia; Rizzi, Adele; Papaptzikos, Juana; Rivero, Narlesky; Oranges, Carmela; Vlllarroel, Héctor; Limas, Yoxsivell

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of pathogens causing urinary tract infection (UTI) is a growing problem, which complicates their effective treatment. Surveillance is needed to guide appropriate empiric therapy. to describe the susceptibility patterns of Gram-negative bacteria isolated of patients with UTI to twelve antibiotics as part of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends in Venezuela. Between 2009-2012 a total of 472 Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from hospitalized patients with UTI. The isolates were sent to Central Laboratory (Central Laboratory of International Health Management Associates) to confirm their identification, and to make susceptibility testing as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Enterobacteriacea comprised 96.6% of the total, where Escherichia coli (76.9%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.6%) were the most frequent. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) was detected in 21.6% of isolates. Top antimicrobial activity were ertapenem, imipenem, and amikacin (> 90.0%), slightly lower for amikacin (85.1%) in ESBL-producing strains. Resistance rates to fluoroquinolones and ampicillin/sulbactam were high (40 y 64%, respectively). These data suggest a necessary revision of the therapeutic regimens for the empirical treatment of UTI in Venezuela.

  16. Specific Clinical Profile and Risk Factors for Mortality in General Surgery Patients with Infections by Multi-Drug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Perez, Ines; Martin-Perez, Elena; Domingo-García, Diego; Garcia-Olmo, Damian

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of gram-negative multi-drug-resistant (MDR) infections is increasing worldwide. This study sought to determine the incidence, clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality of these infections in general surgery patients. All general surgery patients with a clinical infection by gram-negative MDR bacteria were studied prospectively for a period of five years (2007-2011). Clinical, surgical, and microbiologic parameters were recorded, with a focus on the identification of risk factors for MDR infection and mortality. Incidence of MDR infections increased (5.6% to 15.2%) during the study period; 106 patients were included, 69.8% presented nosocomial infections. Mean age was 65 ± 15 years, 61% male. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) Escherichia coli was the most frequent MDR bacteria. Surgical site infections and abscesses were the most common culture locations. The patients presented multiple pre-admission risk factors and invasive measures during hospitalization. Mortality was 15%, and related to older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07), malnutrition (OR 13.5), chronic digestive conditions (OR 4.7), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 3.9), and surgical re-intervention (OR 9.2). Multi-drug resistant infections in the surgical population are increasing. The most common clinical profile is a 65-year-old male, with previous comorbidities, who has undergone a surgical intervention, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and invasive procedures and who has acquired the MDR infection in the nosocomial setting.

  17. Risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in critically ill patients: a multicenter study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tark; Chong, Yong Pil; Park, Seong Yeon; Jeon, Min-Hyok; Choo, Eun Joo; Chung, Jin-Won; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Dong-Min; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Yang Soo

    2014-04-01

    We performed a case-control study to identify risk factors of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGNB) as an increasing cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). The study included critically ill adult patients with HAP whose microbial etiology was identified at eight tertiary centers in Korea between June 2008 and December 2009. Eighty two patients with 86 isolates of CRGNB (62 Acinetobacter baumannii, 14 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 10 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) were included in the case group, and 122 patients with carbapenem-susceptible Gram-negative bacteria were included in the control group. Diabetes mellitus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.25-6.38), radiologic score ≥5 (aOR 4.56, 95% CI 2.36-8.81), prior fluoroquinolone (aOR 2.39. 95% CI = 1.07-5.35), or carbapenem usage (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.75-17.83) were found to be independent risk factors. Fluoroquinolone and carbapenem should be cautiously used to avoid HAP caused by CRGNB. © 2014.

  18. Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria - analysis of the data obtained through a mandatory reporting system in the Rhine-Main region, Germany, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Büttner, Barbara; Hauri, Anja M; Heinmüller, Petra; Hunfeld, Klaus-Peter; Kaase, Martin; Kleinkauf, Niels; Albert-Braun, Sabine; Tessmann, Rolf; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MRGN) and the infections they cause are a serious threat and a challenge to the healthcare system. This particularly applies to carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGN). Currently, the introduction of a nationwide mandatory notification system for CRGN in Germany is under consideration. Against this background, this paper presents an analysis of the mandatory reporting system for CRGN in effect since November 2011 in the federal state of Hesse (Germany). All carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and the detected carbapenemases reported to the public health department of the city of Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany, on the basis of the mandatory notification system were analyzed. 827 CRGN cases were reported to the public health department of Frankfurt/Main between April 2012 and December 2015. The following bacterial species were reported: Pseudomonas spp. (n=268), Acinetobacter spp. (n=183), Klebsiella spp. (n=195), Enterobacter spp. (n=77), Escherichia coli (n=75) and others (n=29). Between 2012 and 2015, a reduction of the CRGN reports was noticed, mainly due to changes in the reporting of Pseudomonas spp. Between 2012 and 2015, the total number of notifications decreased slightly, although the number of reported CRGN in screening samples increased, thus giving no indication of a decreased testing frequency. For 10.5% of the patients, the place of residence was not Germany, 18.0% of the patients had previously stayed in hospitals abroad, often in countries with a high CRGN prevalence. CRGN bacteria were reported from all of Frankfurt's hospitals, and 3.9% were reported from out-patient care facilities. Carbapenemases were detected and reported in 251 CRGN bacteria, including 73 OXA-48, 76 OXA-23, 56 NDM subtypes, and 21 KPC subtypes. There have been no major epidemiological signs of outbreak scenarios. CRGN bacteria are already widespread in patients from hospitals and out-patient care facilities

  19. Identification of UBact, a ubiquitin-like protein, along with other homologous components of a conjugation system and the proteasome in different gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Gilad; Udasin, Ronald G; Livneh, Ido; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2017-02-12

    Systems analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system have been previously identified in Archaea, and Actinobacteria (gram-positive), but not in gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the bioinformatic identification of a novel prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, which we name UBact. The phyletic distribution of UBact covers at least five gram-negative bacterial phyla, including Nitrospirae, Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicroba, Nitrospinae, and Planctomycetes. Additionally, it was identified in seven candidate (uncultured) phyla and one Archaeon. UBact might have been overlooked because only few species in the phyla where it is found have been sequenced. In most of the species where we identified UBact, its neighbors in the genome code for proteins homologous to those involved in conjugation and/or degradation of Pup and Pup-tagged substrates. Among them are PafA-, Dop-, Mpa- and proteasome-homologous proteins. This gene association as well as UBact's size and conserved C-terminal G[E/Q] motif, strongly suggest that UBact is used as a conjugatable tag for degradation. With regard to its C-terminus, UBact differs from ubiquitin and most ubiquitin-like proteins (including the mycobacterial Pup) in that it lacks the characteristic C-terminal di-glycine motif, and it usually ends with the sequence R[T/S]G[E/Q]. The phyla that contain UBact are thought to have diverged over 3000 million years ago, indicating that either this ubiquitin-like conjugation system evolved early in evolution or that its occurrence in distant gram-negative phyla is due to multiple instances of horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibacterial agents and heavy metal resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from seawater, shrimp and sediment in Iskenderun Bay, Turkey

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    Matyar, Fatih [Cukurova University, Faculty of Education, Department of Science and Technology Education, 01330 Balcali, Adana (Turkey)], E-mail: fmatyar@cu.edu.tr; Kaya, Aysenur; Dincer, Sadik [Cukurova University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Biology, 01330 Balcali, Adana (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the level of antibiotic resistance patterns and distribution of heavy metal resistance of bacterial isolates from seawater, sediment and shrimps, and to determine if there is a relationship between antibiotic and heavy metal resistance. We undertook studies in 2007 in the industrially polluted Iskenderun Bay, on the south coast of Turkey. The resistance of 236 Gram-negative bacterial isolates (49 from seawater, 90 from sediment and 97 from shrimp) to 16 different antibiotics, and to 5 heavy metals, was investigated by agar diffusion and agar dilution methods, respectively. A total of 31 species of bacteria were isolated: the most common strains isolated from all samples were Escherichia coli (11.4%), Aeromonas hydrophila (9.7%) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (9.3%). There was a high incidence of resistance to ampicillin (93.2%), streptomycin (90.2%) and cefazolin (81.3%), and a low incidence of resistance to imipenem (16.5%), meropenem (13.9%) and cefepime (8.0%). Some 56.8% of all bacteria isolated from seawater, sediment and shrimp were resistant to 7 or more antibiotics. Most isolates showed tolerance to different concentrations of heavy metals, and minimal inhibition concentrations ranged from 12.5 {mu}g/ml to > 3200 {mu}g/ml. The bacteria from seawater, sediment and shrimp showed high resistance to cadmium of 69.4%, 88.9%, and 81.1% respectively, and low resistance to manganese of 2%, 6.7% and 11.3% respectively. The seawater and sediment isolates which were metal resistant also showed a high resistance to three antibiotics: streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. In contrast, the shrimp isolates which were metal resistant were resistant to four antibiotics: cefazolin, nitrofurantoin, cefuroxime and ampicillin. Our results show that Iskenderun Bay has a significant proportion of antibiotic and heavy metal resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and these bacteria constitute a potential risk for

  1. The phospholipid-repair system LplT/Aas in Gram-negative bacteria protects the bacterial membrane envelope from host phospholipase A2 attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yibin; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Lu, Shuo; Guan, Ziqiang; Margolin, William; Weiss, Jerrold P; Zheng, Lei

    2018-01-18

    Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) are potent components of mammalian innate-immunity antibacterial mechanisms. sPLA2 enzymes attack bacteria by hydrolyzing bacterial membrane phospholipids, causing membrane disorganization and cell lysis. However, most Gram-negative bacteria are naturally resistant to sPLA2. Here we report a novel resistance mechanism to mammalian sPLA2 in Escherichia coli, mediated by a phospholipid repair system consisting of the lysophospholipid transporter LplT and the acyltransferase Aas in the cytoplasmic membrane.  Mutation of lplT or aas gene abolished bacterial lysophospholipid acylation activity and drastically increased bacterial susceptibility to the combined actions of inflammatory fluid components and sPLA2, resulting in bulk phospholipid degradation and loss of colony-forming ability. sPLA2-mediated hydrolysis of the three major bacterial phospholipids exhibited distinctive kinetics and deacylation of cardiolipin to its monoacyl-derivative closely paralleled bacterial death. Characterization of the membrane envelope in lplT- or aas-knockout mutant bacteria revealed reduced membrane packing and disruption of lipid asymmetry with more phosphatidylethanolamine present in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. Moreover, modest accumulation of lysophospholipids in these mutant bacteria destabilized the inner membrane and rendered outer membrane-depleted spheroplasts much more sensitive to sPLA2. These findings indicated that  LplT/Aas inactivation perturbs both the outer and inner membranes by bypassing bacterial membrane maintenance mechanisms in order to trigger specific interfacial activation of sPLA2. We conclude that the LplT/Aas system is important for maintaining the integrity of the membrane envelope in Gram-negative bacteria. Our insights may help inform new therapeutic strategies to enhance host sPLA2 antimicrobial activity. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among gram negative bacteria in sewage and lake water and influence of some physico-chemical parameters of water on conjugation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaie, M R; Jalilzadeh, K A; Yamakanamardi, S M

    2009-01-01

    Transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among gram negative bacteria in sewage and lake water and easy access of these bacteria to the community are major environmental and public health concern. The aim of this study was to determine transfer of the antimicrobial resistance genes from resistant to susceptible gram negative bacteria in the sewage and lake water by conjugation process and to determine the influence of some physico-chemical parameters of sewage and lake water on the transfer of these resistance genes. For this reason, we isolated 20 liter of each sewage and lake water from coconut area within university campus and Lingambudi lake respectively in Mysore city, India, during monsoon season and studied different physical parameters of the water samples like pH, temperature, conductivity turbidity and color as well as chemical parameters like BOD, COD, field DO and total chloride ion. The gram negative bacteria were isolated and identified from the above water samples using microbiological and biochemical methods and their sensitivity to different antibiotics was determined by disc diffusion break point assay. Conjugation between two multiple antibiotic resistant isolates Pseudomonas aeuginosa and E. coli as donor and E. coli Rif(r) (sensitive to antibiotics) as recipient were carried out in 5ml sterile sewage and lake water. All isolates were resistant to Am, moderately resistant to Te and E, while majority were sensitive to Cip, Gm and CAZ antibiotics. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes by conjugation process revealed transfer of Gm, Te and E resistant genes from Ps. aeruginosa to E. coli Rif(r) recipient with mean frequency of +/- 2.3 x 10(-4) in sewage and +/- 2.6 x 10(-6) in lake water respectively Frequency of conjugation in sewage was two fold more as compared to lake water (ptransfer study revealed simultaneous transfer of above resistant markers together to the recipient cells. As the above results indicate, due to selective

  3. Investigation of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecule production in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from cooling tower water and biofilm samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslan, Ezgi; Kimiran-Erdem, Ayten

    2013-09-01

    In this study, 99 Gram-negative rod bacteria were isolated from cooling tower water, and biofilm samples were examined for cell-to-cell signaling systems, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecule types, and biofilm formation capacity. Four of 39 (10 %) strains isolated from water samples and 14 of 60 (23 %) strains isolated from biofilm samples were found to be producing a variety of AHL signal molecules. It was determined that the AHL signal molecule production ability and the biofilm formation capacity of sessile bacteria is higher than planktonic bacteria, and there was a statistically significant difference between the AHL signal molecule production of these two groups (p tower water and biofilm samples produced different types of AHL signal molecules and that there were different types of AHL signal molecules in an AHL extract of bacteria. In the present study, it was observed that different isolates of the same strains did not produce the same AHLs or did not produce AHL molecules, and bacteria known as AHL producers did not produce AHL. These findings suggest that detection of signal molecules in bacteria isolated from cooling towers may contribute to prevention of biofilm formation, elimination of communication among bacteria in water systems, and blockage of quorum-sensing controlled virulence of these bacteria.

  4. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Hess

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity.

  5. New Mouse Model for Chronic Infections by Gram-Negative Bacteria Enabling the Study of Anti-Infective Efficacy and Host-Microbe Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Daniel; Mansour, Sarah C; Wuerth, Kelli; Rahanjam, Negin; Hancock, Robert E W

    2017-02-28

    Only a few, relatively cumbersome animal models enable long-term Gram-negative bacterial infections that mimic human situations, where untreated infections can last for weeks. Here, we describe a simple murine cutaneous abscess model that enables chronic or progressive infections, depending on the subcutaneously injected bacterial strain. In this model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis epidemic isolate LESB58 caused localized high-density skin and soft tissue infections and necrotic skin lesions for up to 10 days but did not disseminate in either CD-1 or C57BL/6 mice. The model was adapted for use with four major Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli This model enabled noninvasive imaging and tracking of lux-tagged bacteria, the influx of activated neutrophils, and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen species at the infection site. Screening antimicrobials against high-density infections showed that local but not intravenous administration of gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem significantly but incompletely reduced bacterial counts and superficial tissue dermonecrosis. Bacterial RNA isolated from the abscess tissue revealed that Pseudomonas genes involved in iron uptake, toxin production, surface lipopolysaccharide regulation, adherence, and lipase production were highly upregulated whereas phenazine production and expression of global activator gacA were downregulated. The model was validated for studying virulence using mutants of more-virulent P. aeruginosa strain PA14. Thus, mutants defective in flagella or motility, type III secretion, or siderophore biosynthesis were noninvasive and suppressed dermal necrosis in mice, while a strain with a mutation in the bfiS gene encoding a sensor kinase showed enhanced invasiveness and mortality in mice compared to controls infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa PA14.IMPORTANCE More than two-thirds of hospital

  6. Extracellular vesicles, especially derived from Gram-negative bacteria, in indoor dust induce neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation associated with both Th1 and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y-S; Choi, E-J; Lee, W-H; Choi, S-J; Roh, T-Y; Park, J; Jee, Y-K; Zhu, Z; Koh, Y-Y; Gho, Y S; Kim, Y-K

    2013-04-01

    Many bacterial components in indoor dust can evoke inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Bacteria secrete nanometre-sized vesicles into the extracellular milieu, but it remains to be determined whether bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles in indoor dust are pathophysiologically related to inflammatory pulmonary diseases. To evaluate whether extracellular vesicles (EV) in indoor air are related to the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammation and/or asthma. Indoor dust was collected from a bed mattress in an apartment. EV were prepared by sequential ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. Innate and adaptive immune responses were evaluated after airway exposure of EV. Repeated intranasal application of indoor-dust-induced neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation accompanied by lung infiltration of both Th1 and Th17 cells. EV 50-200 nm in diameter were present (102.5 μg protein concentration/g dust) in indoor dust. These vesicles were internalized by airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages, and this process was blocked by treatment of polymyxin B (an antagonist of lipopolysaccharide, an outer-membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria). Intranasal application of 0.1 or 1 μg of these vesicles for 4 weeks elicited neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. This phenotype was accompanied by lung infiltration of both Th1 and Th17 cells, which were reversed by treatment of polymyxin B. Serum dust EV-reactive IgG1 levels were significantly higher in atopic children with asthma than in atopic healthy children and those with rhinitis or dermatitis. Indoor dust EV, especially derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a possible causative agent of neutrophilic airway diseases. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Novel Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Hospital-Acquired and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Caused by Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, James M; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2018-02-07

    Introduction Hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) are among the most prevalent infections in hospitalized patients, particularly those in the intensive care unit. Importantly, the frequency of multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative (GN) bacteria as the bacteriologic cause of HABP/VABP is increasing. These include MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and carbapenem resistant Enterobactericeae (CRE). Few antibiotics are currently available when such MDR Gram-negatives are encountered and older agents such as polymyxin B, colistin (polymyxin E), and tigecycline have typically performed poorly in HABP/VABP. Areas Covered In this review, the authors summarize novel antibiotics which have reached phase 3 clinical trials including patients with HABP/VABP. For each agent, the spectrum of activity, pertinent pharmacological characteristics, clinical trial data, and potential utility in the treatment of MDR-GN HABP/VABP is discussed. Expert opinion Novel antibiotics currently available, and those soon to be, will expand opportunities to treat HABP/VABP caused by MDR-GN organisms and minimize the use of more toxic, less effective drugs. However, with sparse clinical data available, defining the appropriate role for each of the new agents is challenging. In order to maximize the utility of these antibiotics, combination therapy and the role of therapeutic drug monitoring should be investigated.

  8. Comparison of four phenotypic methods for detection of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria in rural teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Chinjal A; Oza, Sweta Sunil; Mehta, Sanjay J

    2017-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing bacteria lead to resistance to carbapenem an antibiotic that used as the last resort for treatment of multidrug-resistant bacteria, extended spectrum beta-lactamases, and AmpC β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The emergence of MBL-producing GNB is challenge to microbiology laboratories because there are no standardized guidelines available to detect them. The aim of this study was to compare four phenotypic methods to detect MBL production in GNB and to determine antibiotic sensitivity of MBL-producing isolates. A total of 107 clinical isolates of GNB were tested for MBL production. Imipenem (IPM)-resistant GNB were taken as positive for MBL screening. MBL detection was done using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) as MBL inhibitor. Four phenotypic methods were evaluated: (1) Combined disk synergy test (CDST) with 0.5M EDTA (CDST-0.5 M EDTA), (2) CDST with 0.1 M EDTA (CDST-0.1 M EDTA), (3) double-disk synergy test (DDST) with 0.5M EDTA (DDST-0.5 M EDTA), and (4) DDST with 0.1 M EDTA (DDST-0.1 M EDTA). Out of 107 GNB, 30 were resistant to IPM considered as screening positive. Out of 30, 21 (70%) isolates were MBL positive by CDST-0.1 M EDTA, 19 (63.33%) by CDST-0.5M EDTA, 17 (56.67%) by DDST-0.1 M EDTA, and 16 (53.33%) by DDST-0.5M EDTA. All MBL-producing Gram-negative Bacilli were resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam. Polymyxin B was found to be the most sensitive drug. CDST-0.1 M EDTA is the most sensitive method MBL detection. The detection of MBL-producing GNB is very important to control spread of the resistance.

  9. Incidence of multiple antibiotic resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated from surface and underground water sources in south western region of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluyege, J O; Dada, A C; Odeyemi, A T

    2009-01-01

    In most rural and urban settlements, particularly in Nigeria, wells, spring, streams or rivers and lakes serves as major sources of water supply for drinking and other domestic purposes. Unfortunately, many of the available water sources are not potable without some form of treatment which is seldom available in most settings. The use of untreated surface water sources for drinking and for domestic purposes remains a major threat to public health as these could serve as reservoirs the for transfer of antibiotic resistant pathogens. The incidence of resistant bacteria isolated from surface and underground water in six rural settlements in Ekiti State Nigeria was thus investigated. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from wells, streams and boreholes in six rural settlements in Ekiti State Nigeria between January and April, 2006 and the prevalence of organisms exhibiting multiple antibiotic resistance to tetracycline, amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, nitofurantoin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and ofloxacin was observed. Gram-negative bacterial isolates comprised Escherichia coli (22.7%), Enterobacter aerogenes (2.5%), Salmonella spp. (13.3%), Shigella spp. (19.3%), Proteus spp. (18.5%), Klebsiella spp. (19.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.2%). Over 10% of the bacteria were resistant to four or more antibiotic. Antibiotic resistance was highest in members of the genera Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Proteus. Given the prevalence of appalling sanitary facilities and inappropriate public antibiotic use, the possibility of antibiotic resistance selection, faecal dissemination and subsequent contamination of local water sources available for rural residents of the developing world is highlighted. The implication for clinical practice of infections caused by antibiotic resistant strains especially among immunodeficient individuals is also discussed.

  10. FUNCTIONAL MSBB ACYLTRANSFERASE OF PHOTORHABDUS LUMINESCENS, REQUIRED FOR SECONDARY LIPID A ACYLATION IN GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA, CONFERS RESISTANCE TO ANTI-MICROBIAL PEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Abi Khattar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abi Khattar Z., S. Gaudriault and A. Givaudan. 2016. A functional msbB acyltransferase of Photorhabdus luminescens, required for secondary lipid a acylation in gram-negative bacteria, confers resistance to anti-microbial peptides. Lebanese Science Journal, 17(1: 47-58. Lipid A is a potent endotoxin, and its fatty acids (lauric, myristic, and sometimes palmitic acid anchors lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria. The highly anionic charge of the glucosamine lipid A moiety makes the LPS a powerful attractant for cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. AMPs are major component of innate immunity that kill bacteria by permeabilization of lipid bilayers. Secondary lipid A acylation of Klebsiella pneumoniae, involving the acyltransferase LpxM (formally, msbB or WaaN that acylates (KDO2-(lauroyl-lipid IV-A with myristate during lipid A biosynthesis, has been associated with bacterial resistance to AMPs contributing to virulence in animal models. We investigated here the role of the msbB gene of the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens in AMP resistance, by functional complementation of the AMP susceptible K. pneumoniae lpxM mutant with the P. luminescens msbB gene. We showed that msbB (lpxM gene of P. luminescens is able to enhance polymyxin B, colistin and cecropin A resistance of K. pneumoniae lpxM mutant, compared to the non-complemented mutant. However, we could not obtain any msbB mutant of Photorhabdus by performing allelic exchange experiments based on positive selection of sucrose highly resistant mutants. We thus suggest that msbB-mediated Photorhabdus lipid A acylation is essential for outer membrane low-permeability and that modification of lipid A composition, fluidity and osmosis-resistance have an important role in the ability of Photorhabdus to grow in sucrose at high concentrations.

  11. From Evolution to Pathogenesis: The Link Between β-Barrel Assembly Machineries in the Outer Membrane of Mitochondria and Gram-Negative Bacteria

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    Jhih-Hang Jiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available β-barrel proteins are the highly abundant in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and the mitochondria in eukaryotes. The assembly of β-barrels is mediated by two evolutionary conserved machineries; the β-barrel Assembly Machinery (BAM in Gram-negative bacteria; and the Sorting and Assembly Machinery (SAM in mitochondria. Although the BAM and SAM have functionally conserved roles in the membrane integration and folding of β-barrel proteins, apart from the central BamA and Sam50 proteins, the remaining components of each of the complexes have diverged remarkably. For example all of the accessory components of the BAM complex characterized to date are located in the bacterial periplasm, on the same side as the N-terminal domain of BamA. This is the same side of the membrane as the substrates that are delivered to the BAM. On the other hand, all of the accessory components of the SAM complex are located on the cytosolic side of the membrane, the opposite side of the membrane to the N-terminus of Sam50 and the substrate receiving side of the membrane. Despite the accessory subunits being located on opposite sides of the membrane in each system, it is clear that each system is functionally equivalent with bacterial proteins having the ability to use the eukaryotic SAM and vice versa. In this review, we summarize the similarities and differences between the BAM and SAM complexes, highlighting the possible selecting pressures on bacteria and eukaryotes during evolution. It is also now emerging that bacterial pathogens utilize the SAM to target toxins and effector proteins to host mitochondria and this will also be discussed from an evolutionary perspective.

  12. The 3-hydroxy fatty acids as biomarkers for quantification and characterization of endotoxins and Gram-negative bacteria in atmospheric aerosols in Hong Kong

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    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Chan, Chak K.; Fang, Ming; Lau, Arthur P. S.

    Endotoxins from Gram-negative bacteria have received much attention because they could elicit strong pro-inflammatory responses in the human respiratory tract. In this study, 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) with carbon chain lengths from 10 to 18 (C10-C18) were employed as biomarkers to quantify and characterize the endotoxins and Gram-negative bacterial community in atmospheric aerosols. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was utilized for quantification of this biomarker in fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particulates collected by high volume samplers simultaneously at a rural and an urban site in Hong Kong. The geometric mean concentrations of the endotoxins were 5.5 and 1.35 ng m -3 in fine and coarse particulates at the rural site, respectively. At the urban site, the corresponding concentrations were 9.4 and 2.80 ng m -3 in fine and coarse particulates, respectively. It is found that 70-80% of the total endotoxins are associated with the fine particulates. Significant higher endotoxin levels at the urban site were observed throughout the 8-month study period. This could possibly relate to the heavier human activities in the urban areas. The distribution patterns of the 3-OH FAs with respect to carbon number are similar between the rural and urban sites regardless of particle sizes. The C10 and C16 were predominant and accounted for about 40-50% of the total 3-OH FAs. Furthermore, the odd carbon chain length 3-OH FAs constituted a non-negligible fraction (15-25%) of the total 3-OH FAs. The biologically active endotoxins estimated as the sum of C12 and C14 portions in this study ranged from 0.6-3.7 and 1.9-4.8 ng m -3 at the rural and urban sites, respectively. Applying the biomarker-to-microbial mass conversion factors, the dry mass loading of the Gram-negative bacteria are in the order of 10-10 2 ng m -3 in atmospheric aerosol. This study also demonstrates that the biomarker (3-OH FAs) approach yields much more quantitative information such as

  13. Heavy metal resistant Arthrobacter sp.--a tool for studying conjugational plasmid transfer between gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

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    Margesin, R; Schinner, F

    1997-01-01

    The role of two heavy metal-resistant strains of the Gram-positive genus Arthrobacter sp. as a tool in studying conjugational plasmid transfer between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is described. The high nickel resistance and the cobalt resistance of Arthrobacter sp. strain RM1/6 could be transferred to Arthrobacter sp. strain WS14. IncQ plasmids (pKT240, pKT240::czc, pML10) could be mobilized from E. coli into Arthrobacter spp. strains; antibiotic (Km, Ap, Tc) and heavy metal (Co) resistance genes were expressed in the recipient stains. IncQ plasmid pKT240 could be mobilized between Arthrobacter spp. strains. IncP plasmid RP4::Tn4371 was transferred from A. eutrophus to Arthrobacter sp., RP4-mediated antibiotic resistance to Km was expressed in the recipient strain.

  14. Antibacterial activity of the Antarctic bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. SMN 33.6 against multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

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    Geraldine Asencio

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The ethanolic extract of Janthinobacterium sp. SMN 33.6 possesses antibacterial activity against a chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase-producing strain of Serratia marcescens, an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and also against carbapenemase-producing strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This becomes a potential and interesting biotechnological tool for the control of bacteria with multi-resistance to commonly used antibiotics.

  15. Combination Inhibition Activity of Nisin and Ethanol on the Growth Inhibition of Pathogenic Gram Negative Bacteria and Their Application as Disinfectant Solution.

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    Phongphakdee, Komsan; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2015-10-01

    Nisin and ethanol have been used as antimicrobial agents in food industry. However, nisin alone could not inhibit the growth of gram-negative bacteria, except in combination with a chelating agent, EDTA, or organic acid. This research aimed to study the survival of Escherichia coli O157: H7, Salmonella Typhimurium TISTR 292 and Salmonella Enteritidis DMST 17368 after treatment with nisin at 100, 200, 300, 500, 800, or 1000 IU/mL and ethanol at 70%, 50%, 30%, 20%, or 10% (v/v) alone and in combination. None of all nisin concentrations could reduce the growth of target strains. While 20% ethanol (v/v) having no negative effect on human health, could slightly reduce the growth of target strains. However, the combination of nisin at 500, 800 or 1000 IU/mL and 20% ethanol displayed significant growth reduction at 15 min were below 1 log CFU/mL. Thus, the minimum inhibitory concentration of nisin and ethanol was 500 IU/mL and 20% (v/v), respectively. The release of fatty acid, genetic materials and scanning electron microscope suggested that nisin-ethanol treated cells have altered permeability causing bacterial growth inhibition. Comparison treatment of combined solution and commercial chloride based sanitizer were done for all target strains on stainless steel surface. Survivals of three target strains were below 1 log CFU/mL. The result suggested that combined solution of nisin and ethanol may be a beneficial sanitizer for food industry to inhibit the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella sp. The combination of nisin and ethanol, first report, could inhibit growth of Gram negative bacteria under the mild condition and short time. This combination solution could be used as a sanitizer solution for food industry and reduce the risk of consumer directly contacting on strong chemical agents. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. New structures simultaneously harboring class 1 integron and ISCR1-linked resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

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    Cheng, Cancan; Sun, Jingjing; Zheng, Fen; Lu, Wenting; Yang, Qiu; Rui, Yongyu

    2016-04-21

    The connection structure of class 1 integron and insertion sequence common region 1 (ISCR1) is called "complex class 1 integrons" or "complex sul1-type integrons", which is also known to be associated with many resistance genes. This structure is a powerful gene-capturing tool kit that can mobilize antibiotic resistance genes. In order to look for and study the structure among clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative isolates, 63 isolates simultaneously harbored class 1 integron and ISCR1-linked resistance genes were isolated from 2309 clinical non-redundant MDR Gram-negative isolates in Nanfang Hospital in 2008-2013. The connecting regions between the class 1 integrons and ISCR1 were examined using PCR and DNA sequencing to determine the structures in these isolates. The two elements (the variable regions of the class 1 integron structures and the ISCR1-linked resistance genes) are connected in series among 63 isolates according to long-extension PCR and DNA sequencing. According to the kinds and permutations of resistance genes in the structure, 12 distinct types were identified, including 8 types that have never been described in any species. Several types of these structures are similar with the structures of other reports, but not entirely same. This study is the first to determine the structure simultaneously harboring class 1 integron and ISCR1-linked resistance genes by detecting the region connecting class 1 integrons and ISCR1 in a large number of MDR bacteria. These structures carrying various resistance genes were closely associated with multidrug resistance bacteria in Southern China.

  17. Nosocomial Outbreak of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase-1-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria in South Africa: A Case-Control Study.

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    de Jager, Pieter; Chirwa, Tobias; Naidoo, Shan; Perovic, Olga; Thomas, Juno

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)-producing Gram-negative bacteria have spread globally and pose a significant public health threat. There is a need to better define risk factors and outcomes of NDM-1 clinical infection. We assessed risk factors for nosocomial infection with NDM-1-producers and associated in-hospital mortality. A matched case-control study was conducted during a nosocomial outbreak of NDM-1-producers in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in South Africa. All patients from whom NDM-1-producers were identified were considered (n=105). Cases included patients admitted during the study period in whom NDM-1 producing Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from clinical specimens collected ≥48 hours after admission, and where surveillance definitions for healthcare-associated infections were met. Controls were matched for age, sex, date of hospital admission and intensive-care admission. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for NDM-1 clinical infection and associated in-hospital mortality. 38 cases and 68 controls were included. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common NDM-1-producer (28/38, 74%). Cases had longer mean hospital stays (44.0 vs. 13.3 days; P cases was significantly higher than controls (55.3% vs. 14.7%; AOR, 11.29; P Cases had a significantly higher likelihood of in-hospital mortality when the NDM-1-producer was Klebsiella pneumoniae (AOR, 16.57; P = 0.007), or when they had a bloodstream infection (AOR, 8.84; P = 0.041). NDM-1 infection is associated with significant in-hospital mortality. Risk factors for hospital-associated infection include the presence of co-morbid disease, mechanical ventilation and piperacillin/tazobactam exposure.

  18. Isolation and Molecular Detection of Gram Negative Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Patients Referred to Shahrekord Hospitals, Iran

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    Tajbakhsh, Elahe; Tajbakhsh, Sara; Khamesipour, Faham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), and their complications, cause serious health problems, which affect millions of people every year. Infections of the urinary tract are the second most common type of infection in the body and approximately 20% of women are especially prone to UTIs for reasons not yet well understood. Urinary Tract Infections in men are not as common as in women yet can be very serious when they do occur. Accurate identification of bacterial isolates is an essential task of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and variety of the causative microbial agents of UTIs in patients who had referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 147 urine samples of patients (urine test results were positive for UTIs) were examined during April to September 2013. A total of 147 urine samples of patients with clinical symptoms of UTI who had been referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord (Iran), were collected and processed immediately for laboratory analysis. Results: Escherichia coli was identified as the most common causative agent of UTIs (51.70% of total isolates in both sexes), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. Pneumoniae) (16.32%). Frequency of Proteus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Entrobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Providencia spp. was 10.88%, 6.12%, 5.44%, 4.08%, 3.40% and 2.04%, respectively. Statistical analysis by Fisher exact test showed that there was no significant relationship between the type of bacteria and gender (P > 0.05). Chi square test showed that there was no significant relationship between the type of bacteria and the use of catheter and age group (P > 0.05). However, there was a significant relationship between the type of bacteria and the history of hospitalization (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Our

  19. Radical scavenging and antibacterial activity of caffemides against gram positive, gram negative and clinical drug resistance bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Kaushik; Maity, Himadri Sekhar; Nag, Ahindra; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-12-15

    A new series of caffemide were synthesized and their antioxidant and antibacterial activities were explored. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities were measured of different structures of caffemide containing different functional groups. Anti-oxidative caffemides 1b and 1g showed significantly higher activity against different bacteria with MIC values less than 50μg/ml. These anti-oxidative and antibacterial properties of caffemides might be helpful for the treatment of secondary infections and discovery of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibacterial and antibiotic resistance modulatory activities of leaves and bark extracts of Recinodindron heudelotii (Euphorbiaceae) against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankam, Aimé Gabriel; Kuiate, Jules-Roger; Kuete, Victor

    2017-03-24

    Recinodindron heudelotii (Euphorbiaceae) is a plant used in Africa, particularly in Cameroon to treat various ailments including bacterial infections. In this study, we evaluated the extracts of the leaves (RHL) and bark (RHB) of R. heudelotii for their antibacterial and antibiotic resistance modulating activities against 29 Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotypes. The broth micro-dilution assay was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity, and the antibiotic resistance modulating effects of the plant extracts. RHL displayed the most important spectrum of activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values ranging from 256 to 1024 μg/mL against 75.86% of the 29 tested bacteria strains while RHB was not active. RHL also showed killing effects with minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) ranging from 256 to 1024 μg/mL. The activities of tetracycline and kanamycin associated with RHL were improved on 88.89% and 77.78% of the tested MDR bacteria, at MIC/2 at MIC/4 respectively, with 2 to 16-folds decreasing of MIC. This suggests the antibiotic resistance modulating effects of these antibiotics. The present study provides data indicating a possible use of the leaves extract of Recinodindron heudelotii alone or in association with common antibiotics in the fight against bacterial infections including those involving MDR bacteria.

  1. Anti-bacterial performance of azithromycin nanoparticles as colloidal drug delivery system against different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

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    Morteza Azhdarzadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Azithromycin (AZI is a new macrolide antibiotic with a better activity against intracellular gram negative bacteria in comparison with Erythromycin. The purpose of this research was to prepare AZI nanoparticles (NPs using PLGA polymer and to compare the effectiveness of prepared nanoparticles with untreated AZI solution. Methods: AZI NPs were prepared by Modified Quasi-Emulsion Solvent Diffusion method. The antibacterial activities of prepared NPs in comparison with AZI solution were assayed against indicator bacteria of Escherichia coli (PTCC 1330, Haemophilus influenzae (PTCC 1623 and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PTCC 1240 using agar well diffusion. Inhibition zone diameters (IZD of nano-formulation were compared to the corresponding untreated AZI. Mean Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values of AZI were also determined using serial dilution method in nutrient broth medium. Results: Mean IZD of nano-formulations for all indicator bacteria were significantly higher than that of untreated AZI (P<0.01. The enhanced antibacterial efficacy was more dominant in the gram positive species. The MIC values of NPs against the tested bacteria were reduced 8 times in comparison to those of untreated AZI. Conclusion: These results indicated an improved potency of AZI NPs which could be attributed to the modified surface characteristics as well as increased drug adsorption and uptake.

  2. Charge effect on the photoinactivation of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by cationic meso-substituted porphyrins

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    Tomé Augusto C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent times photodynamic antimicrobial therapy has been used to efficiently destroy Gram (+ and Gram (- bacteria using cationic porphyrins as photosensitizers. There is an increasing interest in this approach, namely in the search of photosensitizers with adequate structural features for an efficient photoinactivation process. In this study we propose to compare the efficiency of seven cationic porphyrins differing in meso-substituent groups, charge number and charge distribution, on the photodynamic inactivation of a Gram (+ bacterium (Enterococcus faecalis and of a Gram (- bacterium (Escherichia coli. The present study complements our previous work on the search for photosensitizers that might be considered good candidates for the photoinactivation of a large spectrum of environmental microorganisms. Results Bacterial suspension (107 CFU mL-1 treated with different photosensitizers concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μM were exposed to white light (40 W m-2 for a total light dose of 64.8 J cm-2. The most effective photosensitizers against both bacterial strains were the Tri-Py+-Me-PF and Tri-Py+-Me-CO2Me at 5.0 μM with a light fluence of 64.8 J cm-2, leading to > 7.0 log (> 99,999% of photoinactivation. The tetracationic porphyrin also proved to be a good photosensitizer against both bacterial strains. Both di-cationic and the monocationic porphyrins were the least effective ones. Conclusion The number of positive charges, the charge distribution in the porphyrins' structure and the meso-substituent groups seem to have different effects on the photoinactivation of both bacteria. As the Tri-Py+-Me-PF porphyrin provides the highest log reduction using lower light doses, this photosensitizer can efficiently photoinactivate a large spectrum of environmental bacteria. The complete inactivation of both bacterial strains with low light fluence (40 W m-2 means that the photodynamic approach can be applied to wastewater treatment

  3. [i]Legionella spp[/i]., amoebae and not-fermenting Gram negative bacteria in an Italian university hospital water system

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    Pasqualina Laganà

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction. [/b]In hospital and other health care facilities, contamination of water systems by potentially infectious microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and protozoa, is a source of nosocomial infections, which may originate fromcolonization of water pipes, cooling towers, spa pools, taps, showers and water supplies. [b]Objective. [/b]The study focuses on the occurrence of [i]Legionella spp.[/i], free-living amoebae and non-fermenting Gram-negative microorganisms in a University hospital water system located in the town of Messina (Sicily, Italy, which had never been examined previously. Materials and Methods. From January 2008 – March 2009, hot tap water samples were collected from 10 wards.[i] Legionella spp[/i]. recovered on selective culture medium were identified by microagglutination latex test; free-living amoebae were cultured using [i]Escherichia coli [/i]as a food source. Non-fermenting Gram negative microorganisms were identified by API 20 NE strips. [b]Results.[/b] [i]Legionella spp.[/i] were found in 33.33% of the samples. [i]L. pneumophila[/i] serogroup 1 was recovered from the Laboratory Diagnostic and Anaesthesia-Neurology Wards, with a peak of 3.5 × 10[sup]4[/sup] cfu/L in May 2008. [i]L. pneumophila[/i] serogroups 2–14 were found in the Othorhinolaryngology, Pathologic Anatomy, Paediatrics and Surgery Wards, and peaked (4 × 10[sup]4[/sup] cfu/L in April 2008. Pseudomonadaceae and Hyphomycetes were also detected. Legionella spp. were recovered from samples positive for non-pathogenic amoebae [i]Hartmannella spp[/i]. [b]Conclusion.[/b] This first study of a Messina hospital water system suggested potential health risks related to the detection of [i]Hartmannella spp[/i]., as reservoirs for[i] Legionella spp.[/i], and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram negative non-fermenting bacterium frequently causing nosocomial pneumonia. The urgent need for monitoring programmes and prevention measures to ensure hospital water

  4. Mortality burden related to infection with carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria among haematological cancer patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andria, Nizar; Henig, Oryan; Kotler, Offer; Domchenko, Alexander; Oren, Ilana; Zuckerman, Tsila; Ofran, Yishai; Fraser, Drora; Paul, Mical

    2015-11-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGNB) pose a clinical challenge. We attempted to estimate the mortality burden of CRGNB among haematological cancer patients. This was a retrospective cohort study. We included adult patients hospitalized in the haemato-oncological/bone marrow transplantation departments for chemotherapy, between 2008 and 2014, with Gram-negative aerobic bacteraemia. We compared patients with CRGNB and carbapenem-susceptible Gram-negative bacteraemia (CSGNB). The primary outcome was 14 day all-cause mortality. In addition, we assessed 1 year survival. Multivariable logistics regression analysis and adjusted Cox regression analysis were conducted. Analyses were adjusted to the propensity for CRGNB bacteraemia. The cohort included mostly young patients (mean age 50.1 years) with acute leukaemia (264/423, 62.4%) and the median absolute neutrophil count at bacteraemia onset was 0 × 10(9)/L. The unadjusted 14 day mortality rate was higher for patients with CRGNB compared with CSGNB [45.6% (47/103) versus 15% (48/320), respectively (P < 0.001)]. Adjusting to baseline prognostic factors, infection characteristics and the propensity score retained a significant association between CRGNB and 14 day mortality (OR 5.14, 95% CI 2.32-11.38). Including only the first bacteraemic episode per patient, 1 year mortality was 74.7% (68/91) for patients with CRGNB versus 49.8% (119/239) for patients with CSGNB (P < 0.001). Adjusting for risk factors associated with 1 year mortality, the HR for mortality with CRGNB was 1.48 (95% CI 1-2.2). CRGNB bacteraemia was associated with several risk factors for mortality, including inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment and less effective definitive antibiotics. This study demonstrated a significant adjusted association between CRGNB and mortality up to 1 year among haemato-oncological patients receiving chemotherapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  5. LiF Reduces MICs of Antibiotics against Clinical Isolates of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

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    H. C. Syed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem yet the development of new antibiotics has slowed to a trickle, giving rise to the use of combination therapy to eradicate infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined inhibitory effect of lithium fluoride (LiF and commonly used antimicrobials on the growth of the following bacteria: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphyloccoccus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The in vitro activities of ceftazidime, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, streptomycin, erythromycin, amoxicillin, and ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, alone or combined with LiF were performed by microdilution method. MICs were determined visually following 18–20 h of incubation at 37°C. We observed reduced MICs of antibiotics associated with LiF ranging from two-fold to sixteen-fold. The strongest decreases of MICs observed were for streptomycin and erythromycin associated with LiF against Acinetobacter baumannii and Streptococcus pneumoniae. An eight-fold reduction was recorded for streptomycin against S. pneumoniae whereas an eight-fold and a sixteen-fold reduction were obtained for erythromycin against A. baumannii and S. pneumoniae. This suggests that LiF exhibits a synergistic effect with a wide range of antibiotics and is indicative of its potential as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy.

  6. Interaction of protamine with gram-negative bacteria membranes: possible alternative mechanisms of internalization in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Pink, David A; Hasan, Fida M; Quinn, Bonnie E; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mohan, Mukund; Gill, Tom A

    2014-04-01

    This study was concerned with the interaction between the cationic antimicrobial peptide, protamine (Ptm) and the cytoplasmic membranes of the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The objective of the study was to explain the observed paradox of internalization without permanent disruption of the cell envelope. We carried out Monte Carlo computer simulation of Ptm in an aqueous environment in the presence of ~100 mM NaCl and model membranes consisting of either (65:35) or (75:25) PE:PG molar ratios. The (75:25) model, representative of the gram-negative cytoplasmic membrane, showed that the Ptm center of mass remained at least 7 nm from the membrane surface leading to the prediction that Ptm would not internalize via disruption of the inner membrane. By using immunoelectron microscopy of Ptm-treated cells, we showed that Ptm internalization to the cytoplasm took place rapidly in the presence or absence of the outer envelope. Ultrastructural examination revealed no obvious morphological changes to cells that were treated with subinhibitory or bactericidal levels of Ptm. Reconstituted phospholipid bilayers were constructed and were unperturbed by Ptm treatment over a wide range of concentrations and applied transmembrane voltages. We conclude that in the cases of the cell envelopes of E. coli, S. typhimurium and P. aeruginosa, Ptm internalized by means independent of the phospholipid bilayer, most likely mediated by one or more membrane proteins such as cation-selective barrel-like proteins. Work is currently underway to test this hypothesis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Peptide Science published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Intestinal carriage of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in preterm-infants during hospitalization in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Ahmad Kamar, Azanna; Chong, Chun Wie; Yap, Ivan Kok Seng; Thong, Kwai Lin; Choo, Yao Mun; Md Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of intestinal carriage of Gram-negative bacteria among preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia were determined. A total of 34 stool specimens were obtained from preterm infants upon admission and once weekly up to two weeks during hospitalization. The presumptive colonies of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were selected for identification, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and subtyping by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Out of 76 Gram-negative isolates, highest resistance was detected for amoxicillin/clavulanate (30.8%, n = 16), ceftriaxone (42.3%, n = 22), ceftazidime (28.8%, n = 15), cefoxitin (28.8%, n = 15), aztreonam (36.5%, n = 19), and polymyxin B (23.1%, n = 12). Three colistin resistant K. pneumoniae have also been detected based on E-test analysis. Thirty-nine isolates of K. pneumoniae and 20 isolates of E. coli were resistant to more than three antimicrobial classes and were categorized as multidrug resistant (MDR). PFGE analysis revealed a higher diversity in pulsotypes for K. pneumoniae (18 pulsotypes) in comparison to E. coli (four pulsotypes). In addition, a total of fifteen pulsotypes was observed from 39 MDR K. pneumoniae. The risk factors for antibiotic resistance were assessed using random forest analysis. Gender was found to be the most important predictor for colistin resistant while length, OFC, and delivery mode were showing greater predictive power in the polymyxin B resistance. This study revealed worrying prevalence rates of intestinal carriage of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae and E. coli of hospitalized preterm infants in Malaysia, particularly high resistance to polymyxins.

  8. Restriction of cephalosporins and control of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing gram negative bacteria in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Jonnala, Sravanthi; Mohammed, Faheemuddin; Reddy, Anupama

    2010-09-01

    This interventional study with historical controls was conducted to study the effect of cephalosporin restriction on the incidence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) gram negative infections in neonates admitted to intensive care unit. All gram negative isolates from the blood were evaluated for beta lactamase production. The incidence of ESBL production was compared before (year 2007) and after cephalosporin restriction (year 2008). Thirty two neonates (3% of NICU admissions) in the year 2007 and fifty six (5.2%) in the year 2008, had gram negative septicemia. The incidence of ESBL gram negatives decreased by 22% (47% to 25%, P=0.03). Restriction of all class of cephalosporins significantly decreased the incidence of ESBL gram negative infections.

  9. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  10. Antibacterial activity of Acinetobacter baumannii phage ϕAB2 endolysin (LysAB2) against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Jiun; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Hu, Anren; Soo, Po-Chi; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chen, Long-Hui; Chang, Kai-Chih

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the nature and origin of the antibacterial activity of the lytic phage ϕAB2 toward Acinetobacter baumannii, we successfully isolated and characterized a novel phage lysozyme (endolysin) from ϕAB2 and named it LysAB2. To analyze antibacterial activity of LysAB2, the complete LysAB2 and two deletion derivatives were constructed, purified and characterized. Zymographic assays showed that only the intact LysAB2 could lyse the peptidoglycan of A. baumannii and the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall. Antibacterial analysis also showed that only the intact LysAB2 retained the complete bactericidal activity. When applied exogenously, LysAB2 exhibited a broad bacteriolytic activity against a number of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Thermostability assays indicated that LysAB2 was stable at 20∼40 °C. Its optimal pH was 6.0, and it was active from pH 4 to 8. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that exposure to 500 μgml(-1) LysAB2 for up to 60 min caused a remarkable modification of the cell shape of the bacteria. Treating bacteria with LysAB2 clearly enhanced permeation of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicate that LysAB2 is an effective lysozyme against bacteria, and they suggest that it is a good candidate for a therapeutic/disinfectant agent to control nosocomial infections caused by multiple drug-resistant bacteria. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  11. Investigation of antifouling and disinfection potential of chitosan coated iron oxide-PAN hollow fiber membrane using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Munmun; De, Sirshendu

    2017-06-01

    Chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles were impregnated into polyacrylonitrile based hollow fiber membrane. The molecular weight cut off was varied in the range of 120 to 145kDa with the concentration of nanoparticles. Incorporation of nanoparticles improved the permeability, mechanical property and hydrophilicity of the membrane. The contact angle of the membrane decreased from 80° to 51° and the permeability increased by 31% at 0.5wt% nanoparticles concentration. The antibacterial and antifouling property of the membrane were investigated with two biofilm causing Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The damage of cell membrane was directly confirmed by release of cellular constituent absorbing in 260nm. The cellular deformation on the membrane surface was evident by direct microscopic observation in FESEM. This damage was likely caused by electrostatic interaction between NH3+ group of nanoparticles and anionic components of phosphoryl group of bacteria. The hollow fiber membrane shows promising antibiofouling property even after long experimental run as evident by 95% flux recovery ratio. The effect of operating conditions on rejection and flux profile was investigated during long experimental run. The result indicated that there was no detectable iron in the permeate sample that could impose adverse health hazard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The microbial contamination and the presence of β-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria in the water and on the surfaces of public recreation water facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godič Torkar, Karmen; Dražetić, Mirjana

    2017-08-01

    The microbiological quality of bathing water and the surfaces of the surrounding pool platforms of two pools was estimated. ESBL- and MBL-producing Gram-negative bacteria isolated from water and surface samples were also studied. The water samples were satisfactory in 31 (86.1 %) out of 36 cases. Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as Escherichia coli were identified in only 2 (5.5 %) cases. There were no correlations between the HPC and number of enterobacteria in the pool water and those found in the surface samples. Isolated strains were resistant to ticarcillin with clavulanic acid in 52.3 % of cases; all of them were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. The sequences for blaCTX-M were found in 21.6 % of strains, mostly from the groups blaCTX-M9 and blaCTX-M25, whilst the genes for chosen carbapenemases were noted in 15 (17.0 %) of strains. It is necessary to implement new approaches to monitoring resistant bacteria, not only clinical ones but also those found in other public environments.

  13. Predicting late-onset sepsis by routine neonatal screening for colonisation by gram-negative bacteria in neonates at intensive care units: a protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Thomas; Seidel, Juliane; Eckmanns, Tim; Weiss, Bettina; Haller, Sebastian

    2017-03-29

    Hospitals conduct extensive screening procedures to assess colonisation of the body surface of neonates by gram-negative bacteria to avoid complications like late-onset sepsis. However, the benefits of these procedures are controversially discussed. Until now, no systematic review has investigated the value of routine screening for colonisation by gram-negative bacteria in neonates for late-onset sepsis prediction. We will conduct a systematic review, considering studies of any design that include infants up to an age of 12 months. We will search MEDLINE and EMBASE (inception to 2016), reference lists and grey literature. Screening of titles, abstracts and full texts will be conducted by two independent reviewers. We will extract data on study characteristics and study results. Risk of bias will be assessed using Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) and Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) tools. Subgroup analyses are planned according to characteristics of studies, participants, index tests and outcome. For quantitative data synthesis on prognostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of screening to detect late-onset sepsis will be calculated. If sufficient data are available, we will calculate summary estimates using hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics and bivariate models. Applying a risk factor approach, pooled summary estimates will be calculated as relative risk or OR, using fixed-effects and random-effects models. I-squared will be used to assess heterogeneity. All calculations will be performed in Stata V14.1 (College Station, Texas, USA). The results will be used to calculate positive and negative predictive value and number needed to be screened to prevent one case of sepsis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) will be used to assess certainty in the evidence. The protocol follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA

  14. Nosocomial Outbreak of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase-1-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria in South Africa: A Case-Control Study.

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    Pieter de Jager

    Full Text Available New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-producing Gram-negative bacteria have spread globally and pose a significant public health threat. There is a need to better define risk factors and outcomes of NDM-1 clinical infection. We assessed risk factors for nosocomial infection with NDM-1-producers and associated in-hospital mortality.A matched case-control study was conducted during a nosocomial outbreak of NDM-1-producers in an adult intensive care unit (ICU in South Africa. All patients from whom NDM-1-producers were identified were considered (n=105. Cases included patients admitted during the study period in whom NDM-1 producing Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from clinical specimens collected ≥48 hours after admission, and where surveillance definitions for healthcare-associated infections were met. Controls were matched for age, sex, date of hospital admission and intensive-care admission. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for NDM-1 clinical infection and associated in-hospital mortality.38 cases and 68 controls were included. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common NDM-1-producer (28/38, 74%. Cases had longer mean hospital stays (44.0 vs. 13.3 days; P < 0.001 and ICU stays (32.5 vs. 8.3 days; P < 0.001. Adjusting for co-morbid disease, the in-hospital mortality of cases was significantly higher than controls (55.3% vs. 14.7%; AOR, 11.29; P < 0.001. Higher Charlson co-morbidity index score (5.2 vs. 4.1; AOR, 1.59; P = 0.005, mechanical ventilation days (7.47 vs. 0.94 days; AOR, 1.32; P = 0.003 and piperacillin/tazobactam exposure (11.03 vs. 1.05 doses; AOR, 1.08; P = 0.013 were identified as risk factors on multivariate analysis. Cases had a significantly higher likelihood of in-hospital mortality when the NDM-1-producer was Klebsiella pneumoniae (AOR, 16.57; P = 0.007, or when they had a bloodstream infection (AOR, 8.84; P = 0.041.NDM-1 infection is associated with significant in-hospital mortality

  15. Differential regulation of polysaccharide-specific antibody responses to isolated polysaccharides, conjugate vaccines, and intact Gram-positive versus Gram-negative extracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are major virulence factors and are key targets in a number of licensed anti-bacterial vaccines. Their major characteristics are their large molecular weight and expression of repeating antigenic epitopes that mediate multivalent B cell receptor cross-linking. In addition, since the majority of these antigens cannot associate with MHC-II they fail to recruit CD4+ T cell help and are referred to as T cell-independent antigens. In this review I will discuss a series of studies from my laboratory that have underscored the importance of understanding polysaccharide-specific antibody responses within the context in which the PS is expressed (i.e. in isolation, as a component of conjugate vaccines, and expressed naturally by intact bacteria). We have shown that multivalent B cell receptor crosslinking, as mediated by polysaccharides, uniquely determines the qualitative response of the B cell to subsequent stimuli, but by itself is insufficient to induce antibody secretion or class switching. For these latter events to occur, second signals must act in concert with primary signals derived from the B cell receptor. The co-expression of polysaccharide and protein within intact bacteria promotes recruitment of CD4+ T cell help for the associated PS-specific IgG response, in contrast to isolated polysaccharides. Further, the particulate nature of extracellular bacteria confers properties to the polysaccharide-specific IgG response that makes it distinct immunologically from soluble conjugate vaccines. Finally, the underlying biochemical and/or structural differences that distinguish Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria appear to play critical roles in differentially regulating the associated polysaccharide-specific IgG responses to these groups of pathogens. These studies have a number of implications for the understanding and future design of polysaccharide-based vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of melittin and colistin, alone and in combination with antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosler, Sibel; Karaaslan, Elif; Alev Gerceker, A

    2016-04-01

    In vitro antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs) - melittin and colistin - both alone and in combination with antibiotics were evaluated against clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index were determined by the microbroth dilution and chequerboard techniques, respectively. The time-kill curve (TKC) method was used for determining the bactericidal activities of AMPs alone and in combination. Measurements of anti-biofilm activities were performed spectrophotometrically for both inhibition of attachment and 24-hour biofilm formation at MIC or subMIC. According to MIC90 values, the most active agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were colistin, imipenem and ciprofloxacin, respectively. In combination studies, synergistic effects were mostly seen with colistin-imipenem against E. coli and K. pneumoniae (50 and 54%, respectively), colistin-ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa (77%). In TKC studies, synergism was observed with almost all expected combinations, even more frequently than chequerboard method. All of the antimicrobial agents were able to inhibit attachment and 24-hour biofilm formation between 0-57% at 1/10 × MIC and 7-73% at 1 × or 1/10 × MIC, respectively. AMPs seem to be a good candidate for antimicrobial chemotherapy with their antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities as a single agent or in combination with antibiotics.

  17. Effects of Single Amino Acid Substitution on the Biophysical Properties and Biological Activities of an Amphipathic α-Helical Antibacterial Peptide Against Gram-Negative Bacteria

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    Juanjuan Tan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An antimicrobial peptide, known as V13K, was utilized as the framework to study the effects of charge, hydrophobicity and helicity on the biophysical properties and biological activities of α-helical peptides. Six amino acids (Lys, Glu, Gly, Ser, Ala, and Leu were individually used to substitute the original hydrophobic valine at the selected sixteenth location on the non-polar face of V13K. The results showed that the single amino acid substitutions changed the hydrophobicity of peptide analogs as monitored by RP-HPLC, but did not cause significant changes on peptide secondary structures both in a benign buffer and in a hydrophobic environment. The biological activities of the analogs exhibited a hydrophobicity-dependent behavior. The mechanism of peptide interaction with the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. We demonstrated that this single amino acid substitution method has valuable potential for the rational design of antimicrobial peptides with enhanced activities.

  18. Impact of hospital length of stay on the distribution of Gram negative bacteria and likelihood of isolating a resistant organism in a Canadian burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanis, Marsail; Walker, Sandra A N; Daneman, Nick; Elligsen, Marion; Palmay, Lesley; Simor, Andrew; Cartotto, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The impact of hospital length of stay (LOS) on the distribution and susceptibility of Gram negative bacteria (GNB) causing infection in burn patients remains unexplored. Knowledge of causative pathogens is important in guiding empiric antibiotic therapy. To characterize the distribution of GNB causing infection and to identify changes in susceptibility with LOS in a tertiary care burn center. A retrospective review of all admissions to the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre with clinical cultures yielding GNB (duplicates excluded) between March 12, 2010 to July 17, 2013 was completed. Positive cultures were categorized into 5 clinically relevant time periods (in days) based on specimen collection date relative to the patient's date of admission: 0-7, 7-14, 14-21, 21-28, >28. Chi-square for proportions was used to compare the time periods. The proportion of patients with clinical cultures for P. aeruginosa increased with hospital LOS (0-7 days: 8% vs. >28 days: 55%; p28 days: 0.7%; p28 days: 38%; p28 days]; p<0.05). This study provides objective data documenting changes in species and resistance patterns of GNB causing infection in patients admitted to a burn center as a function of hospital LOS; which may support delaying the use of broad spectrum antibiotics (e.g. carbapenems and beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors) in clinically stable patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of an automated rapid diagnostic assay for detection of Gram-negative bacteria and their drug-resistance genes in positive blood cultures.

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    Masayoshi Tojo

    Full Text Available We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA, an automated multiplex assay for rapid identification of positive blood cultures caused by 9 Gram-negative bacteria (GNB and for detection of 9 genes associated with β-lactam resistance. The BC-GN assay can be performed directly from positive blood cultures with 5 minutes of hands-on and 2 hours of run time per sample. A total of 397 GNB positive blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GN assay. Of the 397 samples, 295 were simulated samples prepared by inoculating GNB into blood culture bottles, and the remaining were clinical samples from 102 patients with positive blood cultures. Aliquots of the positive blood cultures were tested by the BC-GN assay. The results of bacterial identification between the BC-GN assay and standard laboratory methods were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (39 isolates for the BC-GN assay/39 for the standard methods, Citrobacter spp. (7/7, Escherichia coli (87/87, Klebsiella oxytoca (13/13, and Proteus spp. (11/11; Enterobacter spp. (29/30; Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/72; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (124/125; and Serratia marcescens (18/21; respectively. From the 102 clinical samples, 104 bacterial species were identified with the BC-GN assay, whereas 110 were identified with the standard methods. The BC-GN assay also detected all β-lactam resistance genes tested (233 genes, including 54 bla(CTX-M, 119 bla(IMP, 8 bla(KPC, 16 bla(NDM, 24 bla(OXA-23, 1 bla(OXA-24/40, 1 bla(OXA-48, 4 bla(OXA-58, and 6 blaVIM. The data shows that the BC-GN assay provides rapid detection of GNB and β-lactam resistance genes in positive blood cultures and has the potential to contributing to optimal patient management by earlier detection of major antimicrobial resistance genes.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from Patients Hospitalized with Pneumonia in U.S. Medical Centers, 2011 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Helio S; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial isolates were collected from patients hospitalized with pneumonia (PHP), including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), from 76 U.S. medical centers in 2011 to 2015. The Gram-negative organisms (n = 11,185, including 1,097 from VAP) were tested for susceptibility to ceftazidime-avibactam and comparators by the broth microdilution method. β-Lactamase-encoding genes were screened using a microarray-based assay on selected isolates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. were the most common Gram-negative bacteria isolated from PHP and VAP. Ceftazidime-avibactam was very active against P. aeruginosa (n = 3,402; MIC50/MIC90, 2 and 4 μg/ml; 96.6% susceptible), including isolates nonsusceptible to meropenem (86.3% susceptible to ceftazidime-avibactam), piperacillin-tazobactam (85.6% susceptible), or ceftazidime (80.6% susceptible). Ceftazidime-avibactam was also highly active against Enterobacteriaceae (MIC50/MIC90, 0.12 and 0.5 μg/ml; 99.9% susceptible), including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) (n = 189; MIC50/MIC90, 0.5 and 2 μg/ml; 98.0% susceptible) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) (n = 674; MIC50/MIC90, 0.25 and 1 μg/ml; 98.8% susceptible) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) (n = 156; MIC50/MIC90, 0.5 and 2 μg/ml; 98.1% susceptible) Enterobacteriaceae isolates, as well as Klebsiella species isolates showing an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) screening-positive phenotype (n = 433; MIC50/MIC90, 0.25 and 1 μg/ml; 99.5% susceptible). Among Enterobacter spp. (24.8% ceftazidime nonsusceptible), 99.8% of the isolates, including 99.4% of ceftazidime-nonsusceptible isolates, were susceptible to ceftazidime-avibactam. The most common β-lactamases detected among Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-like and CTX-M-15, respectively. Only 8 of 6,209 Enterobacteriaceae isolates (0.1%) were ceftazidime-avibactam nonsusceptible, three NDM-1-producing strains with ceftazidime-avibactam MIC values

  1. Evaluation of an automated rapid diagnostic assay for detection of Gram-negative bacteria and their drug-resistance genes in positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Masayoshi; Fujita, Takahiro; Ainoda, Yusuke; Nagamatsu, Maki; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Sakurai, Aki; Masui, Yoshinori; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA), an automated multiplex assay for rapid identification of positive blood cultures caused by 9 Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and for detection of 9 genes associated with β-lactam resistance. The BC-GN assay can be performed directly from positive blood cultures with 5 minutes of hands-on and 2 hours of run time per sample. A total of 397 GNB positive blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GN assay. Of the 397 samples, 295 were simulated samples prepared by inoculating GNB into blood culture bottles, and the remaining were clinical samples from 102 patients with positive blood cultures. Aliquots of the positive blood cultures were tested by the BC-GN assay. The results of bacterial identification between the BC-GN assay and standard laboratory methods were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (39 isolates for the BC-GN assay/39 for the standard methods), Citrobacter spp. (7/7), Escherichia coli (87/87), Klebsiella oxytoca (13/13), and Proteus spp. (11/11); Enterobacter spp. (29/30); Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/72); Pseudomonas aeruginosa (124/125); and Serratia marcescens (18/21); respectively. From the 102 clinical samples, 104 bacterial species were identified with the BC-GN assay, whereas 110 were identified with the standard methods. The BC-GN assay also detected all β-lactam resistance genes tested (233 genes), including 54 bla(CTX-M), 119 bla(IMP), 8 bla(KPC), 16 bla(NDM), 24 bla(OXA-23), 1 bla(OXA-24/40), 1 bla(OXA-48), 4 bla(OXA-58), and 6 blaVIM. The data shows that the BC-GN assay provides rapid detection of GNB and β-lactam resistance genes in positive blood cultures and has the potential to contributing to optimal patient management by earlier detection of major antimicrobial resistance genes.

  2. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Canarium schweinfurthii and four other Cameroonian dietary plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzotam, Joachim K; Touani, Francesco K; Kuete, Victor

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial infections are among the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of five Cameroonian edible plants namely Colocasia esculenta, Triumfetta pentandra, Hibiscus esculentus, Canarium schweinfurthii and Annona muricata against a panel of 19 multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains. The liquid broth microdilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the extracts. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts was conducted according to the standard phytochemical methods. Results showed that all extracts contained compounds belonging to the classes of polyphenols, triterpenes and steroids, other classes of chemicals being selectively distributed. Canarium schweinfurthii extract showed the best activity with MIC values ranging from 64 to 1024 μg/mL against 89.5% of the 19 tested bacteria strains. MIC values below or equal to 1024 μg/mL were also recorded with Triumfetta pentandra, Annona muricata, Colocasia esculenta and Hibiscus esculentus extracts respectively against 15/19 (78.9%), 11/19 (57.9%), 10/19 (52.6%) and 10/19 (52.6%) tested bacteria. Extract from C. schweinfurthii displayed the lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL) against Escherichia coli AG100ATet. Finally, the results of this work provide baseline information for the use of C. esculenta, T. pentandra, H. esculentus, C. schweinfurthii and A. muricata in the treatment of bacterial infections including multidrug resistant phenotypes.

  3. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Canarium schweinfurthii and four other Cameroonian dietary plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim K. Dzotam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are among the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of five Cameroonian edible plants namely Colocasia esculenta, Triumfetta pentandra, Hibiscus esculentus, Canarium schweinfurthii and Annona muricata against a panel of 19 multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains. The liquid broth microdilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC of the extracts. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts was conducted according to the standard phytochemical methods. Results showed that all extracts contained compounds belonging to the classes of polyphenols, triterpenes and steroids, other classes of chemicals being selectively distributed. Canarium schweinfurthii extract showed the best activity with MIC values ranging from 64 to 1024 μg/mL against 89.5% of the 19 tested bacteria strains. MIC values below or equal to 1024 μg/mL were also recorded with Triumfetta pentandra, Annona muricata, Colocasia esculenta and Hibiscus esculentus extracts respectively against 15/19 (78.9%, 11/19 (57.9%, 10/19 (52.6% and 10/19 (52.6% tested bacteria. Extract from C. schweinfurthii displayed the lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL against Escherichia coli AG100ATet. Finally, the results of this work provide baseline information for the use of C. esculenta, T. pentandra, H. esculentus, C. schweinfurthii and A. muricata in the treatment of bacterial infections including multidrug resistant phenotypes.

  4. Prevention and Control of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria in Adult Intensive Care Units: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawattanapong, Nattawat; Kengkla, Kirati; Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Saokaew, Surasak; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-05-15

    This study evaluated the relative efficacy of strategies for the prevention of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) in adult intensive care units (ICUs). A systematic review and network meta-analysis was performed; searches of the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) included all randomized controlled trials and observational studies conducted in adult patients hospitalized in ICUs and evaluating standard care (STD), antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP), environmental cleaning (ENV), decolonization methods (DCL), or source control (SCT), simultaneously. The primary outcomes were MDR-GNB acquisition, colonization, and infection; secondary outcome was ICU mortality. Of 3805 publications retrieved, 42 met inclusion criteria (5 randomized controlled trials and 37 observational studies), involving 62068 patients (median age, 58.8 years; median APACHE [Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation] II score, 18.9). The majority of studies reported extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MDR Acinetobacter baumannii. Compared with STD, a 4-component strategy composed of STD, ASP, ENV, and SCT was the most effective intervention (rate ratio [RR], 0.05 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .01-.38]). When ENV was added to STD+ASP or SCT was added to STD+ENV, there was a significant reduction in the acquisition of MDR A. baumannii (RR, 0.28 [95% CI, .18-.43] and 0.48 [95% CI, .35-.66], respectively). Strategies with ASP as a core component showed a statistically significant reduction the acquisition of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (RR, 0.28 [95% CI, .11-.69] for STD+ASP+ENV and 0.23 [95% CI, .07-.80] for STD+ASP+DCL). A 4-component strategy was the most effective intervention to prevent MDR-GNB acquisition. As some strategies were differential for certain bacteria, our study highlighted the need for further evaluation of the most effective prevention strategies.

  5. Revisiting the Gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVullo, Eric D; Wright, Lori F; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F; Pavelka, Martin S

    2015-05-01

    The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. INFLUENCE OF HIGH VERSUS LOW INTESTINAL CONCENTRATION OF GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA AND ENDOTOXIN ON THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MURINE MYELOPOIESIS IN BONE-MARROW AND SPLEEN TO CYTOSTATIC TREATMENT WITH ARA-C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAENEN, S; GORIS, H; DEBOER, F; HALIE, MR; VANDERWAAIJ, D

    1992-01-01

    The haematopoietic recovery after i.v. cytarabine was studied in C3H/Law mice as a measure for stem cell susceptibility in relation to the intestinal Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and endotoxin. Reduction or elevation of GNB and endotoxin was induced by either polymyxin or bacitracin, both

  7. Emergency (clonal spread) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended spectrum (ESBL)--and AmpC beta-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria infections at Pediatric Department, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunović, Selma; Bedenić, Branka; Budimir, Ana; Kamberović, Farah; Ibrahimagić, Amir; Delić-Bikić, Sabina; Sivec, Sara; Meštrović, Tomislav; Varda Brkić, Dijana; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2014-12-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria in children. Antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA and beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria was determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods according to CLSI guidelines. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by the presence of mecA gene by PCR. The genetic characterization of S. aures was performed using spa-typing and the algorithm based upon repeat pattern (BURP). Double-disk synergy test was used to screen for ESBL production. PCR was used to detect bla ESBL alleles. Genetic relatedness of the strains was tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among 23 MRSA, 12 (52.2 %) were obtained from newborns. MLST CC152 (spa-CC 355-595) (Balkan clone) was the most prevalent, 20 (87 %) cases. Among 24 beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria, 10 (41.7 %) were obtained from each newborns and one-year-old children; 14 (58.3 %) were from urine. Among 11 Klebsiella strains isolated from urine eight (73 %) produced CTX-M-15, and one CTX-M-3 beta-lactamase. Twenty (83 %) of CTX-M producers were coproduced by other types of beta-lactamases. Fifteen (65.2 %) MRSA isolates were clonally related. Five clones among 13 K. pneumoniae isolates were detected by PFGE suggesting clonal spread of β-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria. Pediatric infections caused by clonal spread of MRSA and beta-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria are of major concern. Proper infection control measures should be implemented in order to avoid the transmission and major outbreaks.

  8. Genetic characterisation of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the University Hospital Mohamed Boudiaf in Ouargla, southern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoubat, Mounira; Ould El-Hadj-Khelil, Aminata; Malki, Ali; Bakour, Sofiane; Touati, Abdelaziz; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology and the genetic support of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter spp. isolates collected in the University Hospital of Ouargla, southern Algeria. A total of 99 Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were collected from stool samples of colonised patients and from inanimate surfaces in the hospital environment between December 2014 and August 2015. Selected Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter spp. isolates with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems were subjected to phenotypic study, including antibiotic susceptibility testing according to CA-SFM-EUCAST 2015 guidelines and modified Carba NP test. Genes encoding carbapenemases, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and AmpC β-lactamases were screened by PCR and sequencing. Clonal relatedness was determined by multilocus sequencing typing (MLST). Of the 99 GNB isolates, 10 (10.1%) showed reduced susceptibility to carbapenems were studied further, including 7 Acinetobacter baumannii, 1 Acinetobacter nosocomialis, 1 Escherichia coli and 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae. PCR and sequencing showed that four A. baumannii isolates and the single A. nosocomialis isolate harboured blaNDM-1. In addition, blaOXA-23 was observed in three A. baumannii isolates, and blaOXA-48 was detected in the two Enterobacteriaceae isolates. MLST assigned the K. pneumoniae to ST999 and the E. coli to ST38. The seven A. baumannii isolates belonged to ST85 and ST2. This study describes the epidemiology of carbapenemases produced by Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter spp. in southern Algeria and reports the first description of metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1-producing A. nosocomialis in Algeria. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, induce emphysema mainly via IL-17A-mediated neutrophilic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Won-Hee; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Jun-Pyo; Heo, Young Joo; Gho, Yong Song; Jee, Young-Koo; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that Gram-negative bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in indoor dust can evoke neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, which is a key pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Escherichia coli is a ubiquitous bacterium present in indoor dust and secretes nanometer-sized vesicles into the extracellular milieu. In the current study, we evaluated the role of E. coli-derived EVs on the development of COPD, such as emphysema. E. coli EVs were prepared by sequential ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. COPD phenotypes and immune responses were evaluated in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT), IFN-γ-deficient, or IL-17A-deficient mice after airway exposure to E. coli EVs. The present study showed that indoor dust from a bed mattress harbors E. coli EVs. Airway exposure to E. coli EVs increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, the repeated inhalation of E. coli EVs for 4 wk induced neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema, which are associated with enhanced elastase activity. Emphysema and elastase activity enhanced by E. coli EVs were reversed by the absence of IFN-γ or IL-17A genes. In addition, during the early period, lung inflammation is dependent on IL-17A and TNF-α, but not on IFN-γ, and also on TLR4. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ is eliminated by the absence of IL-17A, whereas IL-17A production is not abolished by IFN-γ absence. Taken together, the present data suggest that E. coli-derived EVs induce IL-17A-dependent neutrophilic inflammation and thereby emphysema, possibly via upregulation of elastase activity. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Surveillance of Gram-negative bacteria: impact of variation in current European laboratory reporting practice on apparent multidrug resistance prevalence in paediatric bloodstream isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, J A; Cromwell, D A; Johnson, A; Planche, T; Sharland, M

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluates whether estimated multidrug resistance (MDR) levels are dependent on the design of the surveillance system when using routine microbiological data. We used antimicrobial resistance data from the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children (ARPEC) project. The MDR status of bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was defined using European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)-endorsed standardised algorithms (non-susceptible to at least one agent in three or more antibiotic classes). Assessment of MDR status was based on specified combinations of antibiotic classes reportable as part of routine surveillance activities. The agreement between MDR status and resistance to specific pathogen-antibiotic class combinations (PACCs) was assessed. Based on all available antibiotic susceptibility testing, the proportion of MDR isolates was 31% for E. coli, 30% for K. pneumoniae and 28% for P. aeruginosa isolates. These proportions fell to 9, 14 and 25%, respectively, when based only on classes collected by current ECDC surveillance methods. Resistance percentages for specific PACCs were lower compared with MDR percentages, except for P. aeruginosa. Accordingly, MDR detection based on these had low sensitivity for E. coli (2-41%) and K. pneumoniae (21-85%). Estimates of MDR percentages for Gram-negative bacteria are strongly influenced by the antibiotic classes reported. When a complete set of results requested by the algorithm is not available, inclusion of classes frequently tested as part of routine clinical care greatly improves the detection of MDR. Resistance to individual PACCs should not be considered reflective of MDR percentages in Enterobacteriaceae.

  11. National epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated from blood samples in China in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, A; Zheng, B; Xu, Y-C; Huang, Z-G; Zhong, N-S; Zhuo, C

    2016-03-01

    Although antimicrobial resistance poses a great challenge to clinicians in China, there are limited antimicrobial resistance data on Gram-negative bacteria nationwide. We investigated the phenotypic characteristics of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) as well as extensively drug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDRPA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) isolated from blood cultures in China. Data were collected on 24113 isolates from the China surveillance of antimicrobial resistance program in 2013, which comprised 208 hospitals located in all seven administrative regions of China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for common antimicrobials were determined by commercial automated systems available at local hospitals, and associations with geographic and clinical distributions was further studied. The overall prevalence of CREC, CRKP, XDRAB and XDRPA strains was 1.0, 5.5, 13.7 and 4.2%, respectively. Except for CREC, which did not differ greatly by region, the prevalence of the remaining three strains varied significantly across regions. The highest prevalence of CRKP (10.6%) and XDRAB (13.1%) were found in the pediatric group, and higher prevalence of all four target strains was found in the intensive care unit. For imipenem, 55.8% of CREC and 22.9% of CRKP strains had MICs of ≤4 μg/mL, while 97.4% XDRAB and 84% XDRPA isolates had MICs of ≥16 μg/mL. All CREC, CRKP and 81.2% of XDRAB strains were susceptible to tigecycline, with MIC90 values of 0.5, 2 and 4 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, a high prevalence of CRKP and XDRAB has emerged in China, especially in children and in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Burdock (Arctium lappa Leaf Extracts Increase the In Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of Common Antibiotics on Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirvu Lucia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to study the potential effects of four Arctii folium extracts, 5 mg gallic [GAE] acid equivalents per 1 mL sample, on six antibiotics (Ampicillin/AM, Tetracycline/TE, Ciprofloxacin/CIP, Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim/SXT, Chloramphenicol/C and Gentamicin/CN tested on four Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 and five Gram-negative (Proteus mirabilis ATCC 29245, Escherichia coli ATCC 35218, E. coli ATCC 11229, E. coli ATCC 8739, and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778 bacteria. Arctii folium extracts were the whole ethanol extract/W and subsequent ethyl acetate/EA, aqueous/AQ, and chloroform/CHL fractions. Chemical qualitative analysis (HPTLC method emphasized five main polyphenol compounds in Arctii folium polar extracts: chlorogenic acid (Rf≈0.52/0.55 and its isomer, 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (Rf≈0.90/0.92, plus cynarin (Rf≈0.77, hyperoside (Rf≈0.68/0.64 and isoquercitrin (Rf≈0.69/0.71. Microbiological screening indicated Arctii folium polar extracts (AQ and W efficacy on S. epidermidis ATCC 12228; the MIC values were in the range of common antibiotics, being 32 and 128 μg GAE per mL sample respectively. The unpredictable effects (stimulatory or inhibitory of Arctii folium extracts in combination with typical antibiotics as well as a potential use of the whole ethanol extract/W for restoring the antimicrobial potency of susceptible antibiotics have also been evidenced.

  13. Prevalence of Device-associated Nosocomial Infections Caused By Gram-negative Bacteria in a Trauma Intensive Care Unit in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Zorgani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Device-associated nosocomial infections (DANIs have a major impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Our study aimed to determine the distribution rate of DANIs and causative agents and patterns of antibiotic resistance in the trauma-surgical intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: Our study was conducted at Abusalim Trauma Hospital in Tripoli, Libya. All devices associated with nosocomial infections, including central venous catheters (CVC, endotracheal tubes (ETT, Foley’s urinary catheters, chest tubes, nasogastric tubes (NGT, and tracheostomy tubes, were removed aseptically and examined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB. Results: During a one-year study period, 363 patients were hospitalized; the overall mortality rate was 29%. A total of 79 DANIs were identified, the most common site of infection was ETT (39.2%, followed by urinary catheters (19%, NGTs (18%, tracheostomy tubes (11%, CVCs (10%, and chest tubes (3%. The most frequently isolated organisms were Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%, 20%, and 14%, respectively. Extremely high resistance rates were observed among GNB to ampicillin (99%, cefuroxime (95%, amoxicillin-clavulante (92%, and nitrofurantoin (91%. Lower levels of resistance were exhibited to amikacin (38%, imipenem (38%, and colistin (29%. About 39% of the isolates were defined as multi-drug resistant (MDR. Overall, extended spectrum β-lactmase producers were expressed in 39% of isolates mainly among K. pneumonia (88%. A. baumannii isolates exhibited extremely high levels of resistance to all antibiotics except colistin (100% sensitive. In addition, 56.3% of A. baumannii isolates were found to be MDR. P. aeruginosa isolates showed 46%–55% effectiveness to anti-pseudomonas antibiotics. Conclusion: High rates of DANI’s and the emergence of MDR organisms poses a serious threat to patients. There is a need to strengthen infection control within the ICU environment

  14. 15d-prostaglandin J2 reduces multiple organ failure caused by wall-fragment of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Laura; Collin, Marika; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2004-09-13

    Septic shock is still the major cause of death in surgical intensive care units. Both gram-positive (G+) and gram-negative (G-) bacteria have been isolated in the blood of a large portion of septic patients, and these polymicrobial infections often have a higher mortality than infections due to a single organism. Cell wall fragments from G+ and G- bacteria synergise to cause shock and multiple organ dysfunction in vivo (G+/G- shock). Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received a coadministration of wall fragments from G+ and G- bacteria, Staphilococcus aureus (S. aureus) peptidoglycan [0.3 mg/kg, intravenously (i.v.)] and Escherichia coli (E. coli) lipopolysaccharide (1 mg/kg, i.v.) or vehicle (saline, 1 ml/kg, i.v.). G+/G- shock for 6 h resulted in an increase in serum levels of creatinine (indicator of renal dysfunction), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), bilirubin (markers for hepatic injury and dysfunction) and creatine kinase (CK, an indicator of neuromuscular, skeletal muscle or cardiac injury). Pretreatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonist 15d-prostaglandin J2 (0.3 mg/kg, i.v., 30 min prior to G+/G-) reduced the multiple organ injury/dysfunction caused by coadministration of peptidoglycan+lipopolysaccharide. The selective PPAR-gamma antagonist GW9662 (2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzanilide) (1 mg/kg, i.v., given 45 min prior to G+/G-) abolished the protective effects of 15d-prostaglandin J2. 15d- prostaglandin J2 did not affect the biphasic fall in blood pressure or the increase in heart rate caused by administration of peptidoglycan+lipopolysaccharide. The mechanism(s) of the protective effect of this cyclopentenone prostaglandin are-at least in part-PPAR-gamma dependent, as the protection afforded by 15d-prostaglandin J2 was reduced by the PPAR-gamma antagonist GW9662. We propose that 15d-prostaglandin J2 or other ligands for PPAR

  15. Identification of a new family of enzymes with potential O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase activity in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Anthony J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of the rigid bacterial cell wall heteropolymer peptidoglycan is a dynamic process requiring continuous biosynthesis and maintenance involving the coordination of both lytic and synthetic enzymes. The O-acetylation of peptidoglycan has been proposed to provide one level of control on these activities as this modification inhibits the action of the major endogenous lytic enzymes, the lytic transglycosylases. The O-acetylation of peptidoglycan also inhibits the activity of the lysozymes which serve as the first line of defense of host cells against the invasion of bacterial pathogens. Despite this central importance, there is a dearth of information regarding peptidoglycan O-acetylation and nothing has previously been reported on its de-acetylation. Results Homology searches of the genome databases have permitted this first report on the identification of a potential family of O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterases (Ape. These proteins encoded in the genomes of a variety of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including a number of important human pathogens such as species of Neisseria, Helicobacter, Campylobacter, and Bacillus anthracis, have been organized into three families based on amino acid sequence similarities with family 1 being further divided into three sub-families. The genes encoding these proteins are shown to be clustered with Peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferases (Pat and in some cases, together with other genes involved in cell wall metabolism. Representative bacteria that encode the Ape proteins were experimentally shown to produce O-acetylated peptidoglycan. Conclusion The hypothetical proteins encoded by the pat and ape genes have been organized into families based on sequence similarities. The Pat proteins have sequence similarity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgI, an integral membrane protein known to participate in the O-acetylation of the exopolysaccaride, alginate. As none of the bacteria

  16. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Canarium schweinfurthii and four other Cameroonian dietary plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dzotam, Joachim K.; Touani, Francesco K; Kuete, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are among the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of five Cameroonian edible plants namely Colocasia esculenta, Triumfetta pentandra, Hibiscus esculentus, Canarium schweinfurthii and Annona muricata against a panel of 19 multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains. The liquid broth microdilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concen...

  17. Effect of silver/copper and copper oxide nanoparticle powder on growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and their toxicity against the normal human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peszke, Jerzy; Nowak, Anna, E-mail: ana.maria.nowak@gmail.com; Szade, Jacek; Szurko, Agnieszka; Zygadło, Dorota; Michałowska, Marlena [University of Silesia, A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics (Poland); Krzyściak, Paweł [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Mycology Chair of Microbiology (Poland); Zygoń, Patrycja [Czestochowa University of Technology, Institute of Materials Engineering (Poland); Ratuszna, Alicja [University of Silesia, A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics (Poland); Ostafin, Marek M. [Department of Microbiology University of Agriculture (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Engineered nanomaterials, especially metallic nanoparticles, are the most popular system applied in daily life products. The study of their biological and toxicity properties seems to be indispensable. In this paper, we present results of biological activity of Ag/Cu nanoparticles. These nanoparticles show more promising killing/inhibiting properties on Gram-negative bacteria than for Gram-positive ones. The Gram-negative bacteria show strong effect already at the concentration of 1 ppm after 15 min of incubation. Moreover, in vitro tests of toxicity made on normal human dermal fibroblast cultures showed that after 72 h of incubation with Ag/Cu nanoparticles, they are less toxic then Cu{sub 2}O/CuO nanoparticles.

  18. Effect of silver/copper and copper oxide nanoparticle powder on growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and their toxicity against the normal human dermal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peszke, Jerzy; Nowak, Anna; Szade, Jacek; Szurko, Agnieszka; Zygadło, Dorota; Michałowska, Marlena; Krzyściak, Paweł; Zygoń, Patrycja; Ratuszna, Alicja; Ostafin, Marek M.

    2016-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials, especially metallic nanoparticles, are the most popular system applied in daily life products. The study of their biological and toxicity properties seems to be indispensable. In this paper, we present results of biological activity of Ag/Cu nanoparticles. These nanoparticles show more promising killing/inhibiting properties on Gram-negative bacteria than for Gram-positive ones. The Gram-negative bacteria show strong effect already at the concentration of 1 ppm after 15 min of incubation. Moreover, in vitro tests of toxicity made on normal human dermal fibroblast cultures showed that after 72 h of incubation with Ag/Cu nanoparticles, they are less toxic then Cu2O/CuO nanoparticles.

  19. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing gram negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESBL)-producing Gram- negative bacteria (GNB), particularly in Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have increased all over the world. ESBLs are characterized by their ability to hydrolyze β-lactams, ...

  20. In-Vitro, Anti-Bacterial Activities of Aqueous Extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo Against Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashtdar Mehrab

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluations of the in-vitro anti-bacterial activities of aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and Shilajita mumiyo against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa are reasonable since these ethnomedicinal plants have been used in Persian folk medicine for treating skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders for ages. Methods: The well diffusion method (KB testing with a concentration of 250 μg/disc was used for evaluating the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC. Maximum synergistic effects of different combinations of components were also observed. Results: A particular combination of Acacia catechu (L.F. Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo extracts possesses an outstanding anti-bacterial activity. It's inhibiting effect on microorganisms is significant when compared to the control group (P < 0.05. Staphylococcus aureus was the most sensitive microorganism. The highest antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia or gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was exerted by formula number 2 (Table 1 Conclusion: The results reveal the presence of antibacterial activities of Acacia catechu, Castanea sativa husk, Ephedra sp. and Mumiyo against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Synergistic effects in a combined formula, especially in formula number 2 (ASLANⓇ can lead to potential sources of new antiseptic agents for treatment of acute or chronic skin ulcers. These results considering the significant antibacterial effect of the present formulation, support ethno-pharmacological uses against diarrheal and venereal diseases and demonstrate use of these plants

  1. Microbial Adhesion to Processing Lines for Fish Fillets and Cooked Shrimp: Influence of Stainless Steel Surface Finish and Presence of Gram-Negative Bacteria on the Attachment of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjörleifur Einarsson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Microflora adhering to surfaces of processing lines in a shrimp factory and a fish processing plant was identified in situ and adhesion of mixed culture of Listeria monocytogenes and Gram-negative bacteria on stainless steel surfaces (untreated, polished and glass beaded was studied ex situ. The predominant genus attached to the surfaces was Pseudomonas spp. (66 % in the shrimp factory and Enterobacteriaceae (27 % in the fish factory. Shrimp juice was used as an enrichment broth during the study of adhered bacteria. Three different Gram-negative strains and a mixture of Pseudomonas spp. were selected to study their attachment together with L. monocytogenes to stainless steel surfaces. Highest numbers of the attached bacteria were obtained after the contamination with a mixed culture of L. monocytogenes and Serratia liquefaciens. A lower number of bacteria adhered to stainless steel surfaces when mixed cultures of L. monocytogenes and Pseudomonas fluorescens or Aeromonas spp. were tested. No significant differences (p<0.05 were observed in the bacteria attached to differently treated steel surfaces with different roughness (Ra=0.1–0.8 m. Bacterial adhesion increased with longer contact time. Colonisation of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces was significantly enhanced only in the presence of mixed Pseudomonas spp. These results indicate that smooth surfaces do not necessarily provide hygiene benefits over rougher surfaces.

  2. Performance Evaluation of the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture Test for Direct Identification of Bacteria and Their Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Cultures in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Gilman K H; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ng, T K; Lee, Rodney A; Fung, Kitty S C; To, Sabrina W C; Wong, Barry K C; Cheung, Sherman; Wong, Ivan W F; Tam, Marble M P; Lee, Swing S W; Yam, W C

    2015-01-01

    A multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance and the time to identifcation of the Verigene Blood Culture Test, the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, to identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and their drug resistance determinants directly from positive blood cultures collected in Hong Kong. A total of 364 blood cultures were prospectively collected from four public hospitals, in which 114 and 250 cultures yielded Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and were tested with the BC-GP and BC-GN assay respectively. The overall identification agreement for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were 89.6% and 90.5% in monomicrobial cultures and 62.5% and 53.6% in polymicrobial cultures, respectively. The sensitivities for most genus/species achieved at least 80% except Enterococcus spp. (60%), K.oxytoca (0%), K.pneumoniae (69.2%), whereas the specificities for all targets ranged from 98.9% to 100%. Of note, 50% (7/14) cultures containing K.pneumoniae that were missed by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as K.variicola. Approximately 5.5% (20/364) cultures contained non-target organisms, of which Aeromonas spp. accounted for 25% and are of particular concern. For drug resistance determination, the Verigene test showed 100% sensitivity for identification of MRSA, VRE and carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter, and 84.4% for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae based on the positive detection of mecA, vanA, blaOXA and blaCTXM respectively. Overall, the Verigene test provided acceptable accuracy for identification of bacteria and resistance markers with a range of turnaround time 40.5 to 99.2 h faster than conventional methods in our region.

  3. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum (ESBL)- and plasmid-mediated AmpC ß-lactamase -producing Gram-negative bacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections in hospital and community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunović, Selma; Bedenić, Branka; Budimir, Ana; Ibrahimagić, Amir; Kamberović, Farah; Fiolić, Zlatko; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the characteristics of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum (ESBL), and plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in hospital and outpatient settings of Zenica-Doboj Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disc-diffusion and broth microdillution methods according to CLSI guidelines. MecA gene was detected by PCR, and genetic characterization of MRSA was performed using spa-typing and the algorithm based upon repeat patterns (BURP). Double-disk-synergy test was used to screen for ESBLs. PCR was used to detect blaESBL alleles. Genetic relatedness of the strains was tested by PFGE. Seventeen in-patients with MRSA, 13 with ESBL-producing Gram-negative bacteria and three patients co-infected with both, were detected. Five MRSA and 16 ESBL-producing Gram-negative bacteria were found in outpatient samples. Klebsiella spp. was isolated in 11 in- and seven outpatients. MLST CC152 was the most prevalent MRSA. Seven (38.9%) Klebsiella spp. yielded amplicons with primers specific for SHV, TEM-1 and CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Eight K. pneumonia (44.4%) and 16 (64%) MRSA (including the in- and outpatient) strains were clonally related. The presence of MRSA and ESBL-producing organisms causing SSTIs in the community poses a substantial concern, due to the high morbidity and mortality associated with possible consequent hospital infections. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  4. Prevalence and Characteristics of Surgical Site Infections Caused by Gram-negative Rod-shaped Bacteria from the Family Enterobacteriacae and Gram-positive Cocci from the Genus Staphylococcus in Patients who Underwent Surgical Procedures on Selected Surgical Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska-Kowalska, Małgorzata; Kołomecki, Krzysztof; Wieloch-Torzecka, Maria

    2016-10-01

    Surgical site infections on surgical wards are the most common cause of postoperative complications. Prevalence of surgical site infections depends on the surgical specialization. Analysis of the causes of surgical site infections allows to conclude that microorganisms from the patient's own microbiota - Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria from the family Enterobacteriacae and from the patient's skin microbiota - Gram-positive cocci - Staphylococcus are the most common agents inducing surgical site infections. The aim of the study was to assess prevalence and characteristics of surgical site infections caused by Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria from the family Eneterobacteriacae and Gram-positive cocci from the genus Staphylococcus in patients who underwent surgical procedures at the Regional Specialist Hospital named after M. Copernika in Łódź on selected surgical wards. The study was performed based on retrospective analysis of medical documentation of the treated patients. The study included 195 patients of the Regional Specialist Hospital named after M. Copernik in Łódź who were treated between 2012 and 2014 on the wards of: Vascular, General and Oncological Surgery, Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Neosurgery and Nervous System Tumors and the Ward of Endocrine Surgery - in the Clinic of Endocrine Surgery. The study included 84 women and 111 men. Mean age was 59 years (18 - 94 years old). \\ Results. Surgical site infections caused by Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria from the family Enterobacteriacae were reported in 84 out of 195 patients (43.08% of the study group) and by Gram-positive cocci from the genus Staphylococcus were reported in 52 patients (26.67% of the study group). Mixed microbiota was an etiological agent of surgical site infections in four patients (2.5% of the study group). Etiological agent of surgical site infections depends on the ward profile, surgical field cleanliness and a form of surgical site infection.

  5. CRP-ductin, the mouse homologue of gp-340/deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1), binds gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and interacts with lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Tornøe, Ida; Nielsen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    amplified from uterus, salivary gland, thymus, thyroid gland, pancreas and testis. We conclude that CRP-ductin is the mouse homologue of human gp-340 and that its capacity to bind SP-D as well as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria suggests a role in mucosal immune defense.......-ductin and SP-D expression by reverse transcription-PCR. The pancreas was the main site of synthesis of CRP-ductin, but transcripts were also readily amplified from salivary gland, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, testis, uterus and lung. Lung was the main site of synthesis of SP-D, but transcripts were also...

  6. Intestinal MMC-related electric fields and pancreatic juice control the adhesion of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to the gut epithelium--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, A; Wrzesinski, M; Laubitz, D; Kazimierczak, W; Skrzypek, H; Bardowski, J; Zabielski, R; Grzesiuk, E

    2008-12-01

    The adhesion of six different Lactobacillus and Lactococcus and three pathogenic Escherichia and Salmonella strains was studied using Caco-2 cell line. In this in vitro model system the influence of weak electric field (EF) on bacterial adhesion was tested. The EF source was the in vitro reconstruction of spiking potentials recorded in the duodenum of a healthy calf during one myoelectrical migration complex (MMC) cycle. The ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells of bacteria belonging to two groups, Gram-positive lactobacilli and lactococci, and Gram-negative Escherichia and Salmonella differed considerably. The pathogenic bacteria adhered better to well-differentiated Caco-2 cells whereas lactobacilli and lactococci displayed better adhesion to non-differentiated Caco-2 cells. In the presence of MMC-related EF an increased adhesion of Lactobacillus and Lactococcus but not of Salmonella enterica s. Enteritidis and E. coli 269 to Caco-2 cells was observed. Two later strains adhered even less in the presence of EF. The same tendency was found in the presence of pancreatic juice in a cell medium. In conclusion, the myoelectric component of the small intestinal motility, the MMC-related EF, and pancreatic juice may increase the ability of lactic acid bacteria to adhere to GI epithelial cells, creating better environmental conditions for colonization of the intestine and competition with Gram-negative pathogens.

  7. In-Vitro, Anti-Bacterial Activities of Aqueous Extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo Against Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtdar, Mehrab; Dashtdar, Mohammad Reza; Dashtdar, Babak; Shirazi, Mohammad Khabaz; Khan, Saeed Ahmad

    2013-06-01

    Evaluations of the in-vitro anti-bacterial activities of aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and Shilajita mumiyo against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are reasonable since these ethnomedicinal plants have been used in Persian folk medicine for treating skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders for ages. The well diffusion method (KB testing) with a concentration of 250 μg/disc was used for evaluating the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Maximum synergistic effects of different combinations of components were also observed. A particular combination of Acacia catechu (L.F.) Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo extracts possesses an outstanding anti-bacterial activity. It's inhibiting effect on microorganisms is significant when compared to the control group (PCastanea sativa husk, Ephedra sp. and Mumiyo against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Synergistic effects in a combined formula, especially in formula number 2 (ASLAN(Ⓡ)) can lead to potential sources of new antiseptic agents for treatment of acute or chronic skin ulcers. These results considering the significant antibacterial effect of the present formulation, support ethno-pharmacological uses against diarrheal and venereal diseases and demonstrate use of these plants to treat infectious diseases.

  8. Broad-Host-Range Expression Reveals Native and Host Regulatory Elements That Influence Heterologous Antibiotic Production in Gram-Negative Bacteria

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    Jia Jia Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterologous expression has become a powerful tool for studying microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs. Here, we extend the transformation-associated recombination cloning and heterologous expression platform for microbial BGCs to include Gram-negative proteobacterial expression hosts. Using a broad-host-range expression platform, we test the implicit assumption that biosynthetic pathways are more successfully expressed in more closely related heterologous hosts. Cloning and expression of the violacein BGC from Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea 2ta16 revealed robust production in two proteobacterial hosts, Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404, but very little production of the antibiotic in various laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, despite their closer phylogenetic relationship. We identified a nonclustered LuxR-type quorum-sensing receptor from P. luteoviolacea 2ta16, PviR, that increases pathway transcription and violacein production in E. coli by ∼60-fold independently of acyl-homoserine lactone autoinducers. Although E. coli harbors the most similar homolog of PviR identified from all of the hosts tested, overexpression of various E. coli transcription factors did not result in a statistically significant increase in violacein production, while overexpression of two A. tumefaciens PviR homologs significantly increased production. Thus, this work not only introduces a new genetic platform for the heterologous expression of microbial BGCs, it also challenges the assumption that host phylogeny is an accurate predictor of host compatibility.

  9. Sub-MICs of Mentha piperita essential oil and menthol inhibits AHL mediated quorum sensing and biofilm of Gram negative bacteria

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    Fohad Mabood Husain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial quorum sensing (QS is a density dependent communication system that regulates the expression of certain genes including production of virulence factors in many pathogens. Bioactive plant extract/compounds inhibiting QS regulated gene expression may be a potential candidate as antipathogenic drug. In this study anti-QS activity of peppermint (Mentha piperita oil was first tested using the Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26 biosensor. Further, the findings of the present investigation revealed that peppermint oil at sub-MICs strongly interfered with acyl homoserine lactone (AHL regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila. The result of molecular docking analysis attributed the quorum sensing inhibitory activity exhibited by peppermint oil to menthol. Assessment of ability of menthol to interfere with quorum sensing systems of various Gram-negative pathogens comprising diverse AHL molecules revealed that it reduced the AHL dependent production of violacein, virulence factors and biofilm formation indicating broad-spectrum anti-QS activity. Using two E. coli biosensors, MG4/pKDT17 and pEAL08-2, we also confirmed that menthol inhibited both the las and pqs quorum sensing systems. Further, findings of the in vivo studies with menthol on nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans showed significantly enhanced survival of the nematode. Our data identified menthol as a novel broad spectrum quorum sensing inhibitor.

  10. ETX2514 is a broad-spectrum β-lactamase inhibitor for the treatment of drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria including Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Réville, Thomas F; Guler, Satenig; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Chen, Brendan; Bifulco, Neil; Huynh, Hoan; Lahiri, Sushmita; Shapiro, Adam B; McLeod, Sarah M; Carter, Nicole M; Moussa, Samir H; Velez-Vega, Camilo; Olivier, Nelson B; McLaughlin, Robert; Gao, Ning; Thresher, Jason; Palmer, Tiffany; Andrews, Beth; Giacobbe, Robert A; Newman, Joseph V; Ehmann, David E; de Jonge, Boudewijn; O'Donnell, John; Mueller, John P; Tommasi, Rubén A; Miller, Alita A

    2017-06-30

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections are a serious threat to public health. Among the most alarming resistance trends is the rapid rise in the number and diversity of β-lactamases, enzymes that inactivate β-lactams, a class of antibiotics that has been a therapeutic mainstay for decades. Although several new β-lactamase inhibitors have been approved or are in clinical trials, their spectra of activity do not address MDR pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii. This report describes the rational design and characterization of expanded-spectrum serine β-lactamase inhibitors that potently inhibit clinically relevant class A, C and D β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins, resulting in intrinsic antibacterial activity against Enterobacteriaceae and restoration of β-lactam activity in a broad range of MDR Gram-negative pathogens. One of the most promising combinations is sulbactam-ETX2514, whose potent antibacterial activity, in vivo efficacy against MDR A. baumannii infections and promising preclinical safety demonstrate its potential to address this significant unmet medical need.

  11. Exploring the epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in west London and the utility of routinely collected hospital microbiology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, R; Moore, L S P; Charlett, A; Donaldson, H; Holmes, A H

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify carbapenem-resistant organisms using routinely collected local microbiology data and describe the epidemiology of carbapenem resistance in two London teaching hospitals. Data on inpatients infected or colonized with Gram-negative organisms between March 2009 and February 2012 were extracted. A computer algorithm was developed incorporating internationally recognized criteria to distinguish carbapenem-resistant organisms. Multivariable analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with infection or colonization with carbapenem-resistant organisms. Binomial regression was performed to detect changes in resistance trends over time. Yearly incidence of carbapenem resistance was observed to be increasing, with significant increasing trends in Acinetobacter baumannii (47.1% in 2009-10 to 77.2% in 2011-12; P<0.001) and Enterobacter spp. (2.2% in 2009-10 to 11.5% in 2011-12; P<0.001). Single-variable and multivariable analysis demonstrated differences in the proportion of carbapenem-resistant isolates across all variables investigated, including age, sex and clinical specialty; in the latter organism-specific niches were identified. Patients in the youngest age group (16-24 years old) had the highest odds of being infected or colonized with carbapenem-resistant isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, proportions of carbapenem-resistant organisms differed between the hospitals. Carbapenem resistance is an emerging problem within the UK inpatient healthcare setting. This is not an issue confined to the Enterobacteriaceae and fine-resolution surveillance is needed to identify at-risk groups. Regular analysis of routinely collected data can provide insight into the evolving carbapenem-resistance threat, with the ability to inform efforts to prevent the spread of resistance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  12. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in early diagnosis of sepsis caused by either Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H H; Zhang, M W; Guo, J B; Li, J; Su, L

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are well-known predictors of sepsis. Serum PCT levels are associated with blood culture positivity in patients with sepsis, but the magnitude of elevation of PCT and CRP levels at the onset of sepsis is unknown in Gram-negative (GN) bacteremia and in Gram-positive (GP) bacteremia. To evaluate the PCT and CRP levels in 72 h at the onset of sepsis in GN and GP bacteremia. We retrospectively analyzed the data from 648 blood-positive specimens from three integrated teaching hospitals in Xiamen, China. One hundred and forty-seven adult patients with sepsis within 72 h enrolled in the study. Serum PCT and CRP level were assessed according GN or GP bacteremia. A total of 147 (22.68 %) patients were eligible for inclusion in the study, including 56 GP sepsis and 91 GN sepsis. PCT, but not CRP levels, was significantly higher in patients in the GP group than in the GN group (23.64 vs 6.18 ng/mL, p < 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve of PCT was 0.73 (95 % confidence interval 0.65-0.81) and that under the ROC curve of CRP was 0.52 (95 % confidence interval 0.43-0.62). A positive predictive value of 72.5 % and a negative predictive value of 67.9 % were achieved with a PCT cutoff value of 2.1 ng/ml. Serum PCT levels are higher in GN sepsis than GP sepsis in 72 h. There are not differences in CRP. The separation of PCT and CRP phenomenon is helpful for early diagnosis of GP sepsis.

  13. Multi-functional characteristics of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III needle-tip protein, PcrV; comparison to orthologs in other gram negative bacteria

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    Hiromi eSato

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS to intoxicate host cells and evade innate immunity. This virulence-related machinery consists of a molecular syringe and needle assembled on the bacterial surface, which allows delivery of T3 effector proteins into infected cells. To accomplish a one-step effector translocation, a tip protein is required at the top end of the T3 needle structure. Strains lacking expression of the functional tip protein fail to intoxicate host cells.P. aeruginosa encodes a T3S that is highly homologous to the proteins encoded by Yersinia species. The needle tip proteins of Yersinia, LcrV, and P. aeruginosa, PcrV, share 37% identity and 65% similarity. Other known tip proteins are AcrV (Aeromonas, IpaD (Shigella, SipD (Salmonella, BipD (Burkholderia, EspA (EPEC, EHEC, Bsp22 (Bordetella, with additional proteins identified from various Gram negative species, such as Vibrio and Bordetella. The tip proteins can serve as a protective antigen or may be critical for sensing host cells and evading innate immune responses. Recognition of the host microenvironment transcriptionally activates synthesis of T3SS components. The machinery appears to be mechanically controlled by the assemblage of specific junctions within the apparatus. These junctions include the tip and base of the T3 apparatus, the needle proteins and components within the bacterial cytoplasm. The tip proteins likely have chaperone functions for translocon proteins, allowing the proper assembly of translocation channels in the host membrane and completing vectorial delivery of effector proteins into the host cytoplasm. Multifunctional features of the needle-tip proteins appear to be intricately controlled. In this review, we highlight the functional aspects and complex controls of T3 needle-tip proteins with particular emphasis on PcrV and LcrV.

  14. Non-susceptibility trends among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria from bacteraemias in the UK and Ireland, 2001-06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, David M; Hope, Russell; Brick, Geraldine; Lillie, Mark; Reynolds, Rosy

    2008-11-01

    Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. are important opportunists, notorious for resistance. Pseudomonas spp. are collected in the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) bacteraemia surveillance, with Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia well represented in the 'other Gram-negatives' group. Data for collected isolates were reviewed together with LabBase bacteraemia reports to the Health Protection Agency (HPA). Isolates with unusual resistances were subjected to molecular investigation. From 2001 to 2006, the BSAC surveillance collected 1226 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 240 Acinetobacter spp.-125 of them Acinetobacter calcoaceticus/baumannii (Acb) complex-and 165 S. maltophilia. Among P. aeruginosa, non-susceptibility rates to beta-lactams and gentamicin fluctuated, without trend, below 10%; those to ciprofloxacin ranged from 16% to 22%. One P. aeruginosa isolate from 2001 had VIM-2 metallo-beta-lactamase. For Acb, the BSAC data indicated frequent non-susceptibility, except to imipenem, where only five non-susceptible isolates were collected, all after 2003, four of them belonging to the OXA-23 clone 1 lineage which is prevalent in Southeast England. Reports to the HPA indicated rising imipenem non-susceptibility in Acb (P /=16 mg/L for Acb OXA-23 clone 1. Ceftobiprole had higher MICs than ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa, but 81% of the isolates were inhibited at

  15. Taxonomic study of anaerobic, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria from breweries: emended description of Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus and description of Pectinatus frisingensis sp. nov., Selenomonas lacticifex sp. nov., Zymophilus raffinosivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., and Zymophilus paucivorans sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, K H; Leuteritz, M; Weiss, N; Ludwig, W; Kirchhof, G; Seidel-Rüfer, H

    1990-01-01

    A collection of 47 strains of obligately anaerobic, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that were isolated mainly from spoiled beer and pitching yeast was studied to learn more about their taxonomic positions. A new species of the genus Pectinatus, Pectinatus frisingensis, a new species of the genus Selenomonas, Selenomonas lacticifex, and a new genus comprising two species, Zymophilus raffinosivorans and Zymophilus paucivorans, are described. All of the strains contained directly cross-linked meso-diaminopimelic acid-containing peptidoglycan and in addition the diamine cadaverine or (rarely) putrescine. The diamine was covalently linked to the alpha-carboxyl group of D-glutamic acid in the peptide subunit of peptidoglycan. Lipid F was also found as a characteristic cellular compound. The phylogenetic relationships of members of these new species were examined by reverse transcriptase sequencing of 16S rRNA or by DNA-DNA hybridization studies or both. All of the organisms belong to the subdivision containing species with gram-negative cell walls within the phylum of gram-positive bacteria. This finding is in good agreement with the presence of a peptidoglycan that contains diamine.

  16. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis Silver Nanoparticles as Antibacterial ‎Against Escherichia coli and Staphlococcus ‎aurous as a Model of Gram- negative and ‎ Gram- Positive Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Anfal Ali Shakir; Iman fadhil Abdul-Husin; Rawa'a Safaa Abbas; Walaa Farhan Obiad

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria multidrug-resistance (MDR) pathogens led to increasing hospital and community – acquired infections, for which current antibiotic therapies are not effective which represent a growing problem, its well-known that the silver ion and silver nanoparticles have strong effect against microbial. In this study we prepare silver Np in chemical reduction methods and tested it on two type of multidrug resistance bacteria :E-coli and S.aureus. The result showed that the sliver Np has a strong e...

  18. Tandem mass spectrometry determination of the putative structure of a heterogeneous mixture of Lipid As isolated from the lipopolysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacteria Aeromonas liquefaciens SJ-19a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almostafa, Mervt; Allehyane, Bashaeer; Egli, Stefana; Bottaro, Christina; Fridgen, Travis D; Banoub, Joseph

    2016-04-30

    We report herein the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry analysis (CID-MS/MS) of a mixture of lipid As isolated from the rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the mutant wild strain of the Gram-negative bacteria Aeromonas liquefaciens (SJ-19a, resistant) grown in the presence of phages. The interaction between the phages and the Gram-negative bacteria regulates host specificity and the heterogeneity of the lipid A component of the LPS. The heterogeneous mixture of lipid As was isolated by the aqueous phenol method from the LPS of the rough wild strain of Gram-negative bacteria Aeromonas liquefaciens (SJ-19a). Hydrolysis of the LPS was with 1% acetic acid, and purification was by chromatography using Sephadex G-50 and Sephadex G-15. ESI-MS and low-energy CID-MS/MS analyses were performed with a triple-quadrupole (QqQ) and a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Preliminary analysis of the lipid As mixture was conducted by ESI-MS in the negative ion mode and the spectrum obtained suggested that the lipid A SJ-19a was composed of a heterogeneous mixture of different lipid A molecules. CID-MS/MS experiments confirmed the identities of the various mono-phosphorylated β-D-GlcpN-(1→6)-α-D-GlcpN disaccharide entities. This lipid As mixture was asymmetrically substituted with fatty acids such as ((R)-14:0(3-OH)), (14:0(3-(R)-(O-12:0)) and (14:0(3-(R)-O-(14:0)) located on the O-3, O-3', N-2 and N-2' positions, respectively. Low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry in-space (QqQ-MS/MS) and in-time (FTICR-MS/MS) allowed the exact determination of the fatty acid acylation positions on the H2 PO3 →4-O'-β-D-GlcpN-(1→6)-α-D-GlcpN disaccharide backbones of this heterogeneous mixture of lipid As , composed inter alia of seven different substituted lipid As , formed from the incomplete biosynthesis of their respective LPS. Copyright

  19. Antibacterial and antibiotic-modifying activities of three food plants (Xanthosoma mafaffa Lam., Moringa oleifera (L.) Schott and Passiflora edulis Sims) against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzotam, Joachim K; Touani, Francesco K; Kuete, Victor

    2016-01-11

    The present study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extract of three edible plants, namely Xanthosoma mafaffa, Moringa oleifera and Passiflora edulis and their synergistic effects with some commonly used antibiotics against MDR Gram-negative bacteria expressing active efflux pumps. Broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the extracts, as well as those of antibiotics in association with the extracts. The phytochemical test indicate that all tested crude extracts contained polyphenols, triterpenes and steroids whilst other phytochemical classes were selectively distributed. Extracts showed antibacterial activities with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 128-1024 μg/mL on the majority of the 19 tested Gram-negative bacterial strains. Extract from the pericarp of P. edulis inhibited the growth of 89.5% of the 19 tested bacterial strains, the lowest minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 128 μg/mL being recorded against Escherichia coli AG100 strain. In the presence of Phenylalanine-Arginine β-Naphtylamide (PAβN)], an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI), the activity of the extract from X. mafaffa increased on 40% of tested strains. In combination with antibiotics, extracts of X. mafaffa, M. oleifera and pericarp of P. edulis showed synergistic effects with some antibiotics against more than 75% of the tested bacteria. The results of the present study indicate that the tested plants may be used in the treatment of bacterial infections including the multi-resistant bacteria.

  20. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  1. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio L Valle

    Full Text Available Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE, extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn. Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant

  2. Does flow cytometry have a role in preliminary differentiation between urinary tract infections sustained by gram positive and gram negative bacteria? An Italian polycentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessoni, Gianluca; Saccani, Graziella; Valverde, Sara; Manoni, Fabio; Caputo, Marco

    2015-02-02

    Urine culture is the most frequently requested test for a Microbiology Lab. A reliable screening tool would be of paramount importance both to clinicians and laboratorians, provided that it could get fast and accurate negative results in order to rule-out urinary tract infection (UTI). We evaluated 1907 consecutive urine samples from outpatients. Culture was performed on chromogenic agar with 1μL loop, using 10(5)CFU/mL as a limit of positive growth. Using Sysmex Uf-1000i analyzer we evaluated bacteria forward scatter (B_FSC) and fluorescent light scatter (B_FLH) in a preliminary discrimination step for UTI caused by Gram+ or Gram- bacteria. We got 512 positive samples. A mono-microbial infection was observed in 490 samples; two bacterial strains were isolated in 22 samples, so 534 bacterial strains were found: 392 Gram-, 133 Gram+ and 9 yeasts. Comparing Gram+ and Gram- bacteria we observed a statistically significant difference for B_FSC but not for B_FLH. In this application experimental cut-off value for B_FSC was 25ch. Using this cut-off to perform a presumptive identification of UTI sustained by Gram-+ bacteria, we observed a SE 0.68, SP 0.84. Our data although preliminary suggest that B_FSC could be useful in presumptive exclusion of UTI caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Inhibitory and Lethal Effects of Aqueous, Ethanolic and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of Aerial Parts of Salvia chorassanica against Some Gram-negative and Gram-positive Bacteria in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Mehraban

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to an increased tendency to development of new more effective and non-toxic antimicrobial compounds. In this study, the inhibitory and lethal effects of aqueous, ethanolic, and hydroalcoholic extracts of aerial parts of Salvia chorassanica were evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, and Escherichia coli O:157. Methods: In this study, Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion method was used to evaluate antimicrobial activity. In this method, bacteria were cultivated as grass culture in Mueller Hinton Agar (MHA media. To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration, micro-dilution method with ELISA and addition of phenyl tetrazolium chloride reagent, were used. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan’s test at the significance level of p<0.05. Results: The highest diameter of inhibition in agar diffusion method was related to hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts of Salvia chorassanica against Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus cereus. The amount of calculated MIC of hydro-alcoholic extract for Gram-positive bacteria was 30mg/ml. This amount was the lowest among other measured MIC. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, Gram-negative bacteria showed more resistance to different extracts of aerial parts of Salvia chorassanica as compared to Gram-positive bacteria, so that Salmonella typhi was found to be the most resistant bacterium among the tested bacteria.

  4. Comparison of two rapid biochemical tests and four chromogenic selective media for detection of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinić, Vladimira; Amrein, Ivo; Stammler, Sabrina; Heckendorn, Judith; Meinel, Dominik; Frei, Reno; Egli, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated RAPIDEC® CARBA NP, Neo-Rapid CARB, chromID® CARBA SMART (CARB/OXA), Brilliance™ CRE/ESBL, ChromArt CRE and BBL™ CHROMagar™ CPE for the detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria. The analytical sensitivity of RAPIDEC® CARBA NP was better than that of Neo-Rapid CARB. A combination of carbapenemase and ESBL screening plates could be advantageous. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Gram Negative Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection (UTI and Detection New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1 Producing Isolates in Ahwaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Afrugh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI is the commonest bacterial infectious disease in worldwide (especially in developing countries with a high rate of morbidity and financial cost. The management of UTI infections has been jeopardized by increase in immergence of antimicrobial drug resistance. Knowledge of the local bacterial etiology and susceptibility patterns is required to trace any change that might have occurred in time so that updated recommendation for optimal empirical therapy of UTI can be made. The aim of this investigation was distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of gram negative bacteria causing urinary tract infection (UTI and detection NDM-1 (new-delhi-metallo-beta-lactamase-1 producing isolates in Ahwaz. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done during a period of one year from April 2013 to March 2014. Clean catch midstream urine samples were collected from suspected patients to UTI. The isolates were identified based on morphological and biochemical testes. Culture was performed on routine microbiological media. Susceptibility testing was performed according CLSI (2013 guidelines. Detection of carbapenemase producing isolates was performed by modified hodge test (MHT. Metallo-beta-lactamase isolates were detected by imipenem-EDTA combined disc test (CDT. Results: In this study 708 gram negative organisms were isolated from urine samples. E.coli was the most common isolated bacteria (67% followed by Klebsiella spp. (26.5% and Enterobacter spp. (2.5%. In antibiotic susceptibility testing more than 90% of isolates were sensitive to tetracycline, ceftazidime, meropenem, amikacin, cefotaxime, imipenem, and cefepime. Isolates were more resistant to cephalothin (32%, co-trimoxazol (30.5%, and nalidixic acid (25%. Conclusion: In our results isolated organisms from outpatients showed very high sensitivity to common antibiotics. Continuous and regular monitoring of susceptibility pattern of

  6. A multidisciplinary intervention to reduce infections of ESBL- and AmpC-producing, gram-negative bacteria at a University Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Inge Jenny Dahl; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2014-01-01

    /AmpC-producing and other resistant bacteria, in addition to their use in severe sepsis/septic shock. Piperacillin-tazobactam ± gentamicin was recommended for empiric treatments of most febrile conditions. The intervention also included education and guidance on infection control, as well as various other surveillances...... led to a sustained change in antimicrobial consumption, and the incidence of patients infected with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae decreased significantly (presistant Pseudomonas...... intervention led to a statistically significant decrease in the incidence of ESBL/AmpC-resistant K. pneumoniae infections, as well as in the incidences of other typical hospital-associated bacterial infections....

  7. Genetic and functional characterization of a yet-unclassified rhizobial Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region from a ubiquitous plasmid conjugal system present in Sinorhizobium meliloti, in Sinorhizobium medicae, and in other nonrhizobial Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, María de los Ángeles; Pistorio, Mariano; Lozano, Mauricio J; Tejerizo, Gonzalo A Torres; Salas, María Eugenia; Martini, María Carla; López, José Luis; Draghi, Walter O; Del Papa, María Florencia; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan; Lagares, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that live in soils and associate with leguminous plants to establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses. The ability of these bacteria to undergo horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to be one of the main features to explain both the origin of their symbiotic life-style and the plasticity and dynamics of their genomes. In our laboratory we have previously characterized at the species level the non-pSym plasmid mobilome in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of Medicago spp., and have found a high incidence of conjugal activity in many plasmids (Pistorio et al., 2008). In this work we characterized the Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region of one of those plasmids, pSmeLPU88b. This mobilization region was found to represent a previously unclassified Dtr type in rhizobia (hereafter type-IV), highly ubiquitous in S. meliloti and found in other genera of Gram-negative bacteria as well; including Agrobacterium, Ochrobactrum, and Chelativorans. The oriT of the type-IV Dtr described here could be located by function within a DNA fragment of 278 bp, between the divergent genes parA and mobC. The phylogenetic analysis of the cognate relaxase MobZ indicated that this protein groups close to the previously defined MOB(P3) and MOB(P4) type of enzymes, but is located in a separate and novel cluster that we have designated MOB(P0). Noteworthy, MOB(P0) and MOB(P4) relaxases were frequently associated with plasmids present in rhizospheric soil bacteria. A comparison of the nod-gene locations with the phylogenetic topology of the rhizobial relaxases revealed that the symbiotic genes are found on diverse plasmids bearing any of the four Dtr types, thus indicating that pSym plasmids are not specifically associated with any particular mobilization system. Finally, we demonstrated that the type-IV Dtr promoted the mobilization of plasmids from S. meliloti to Sinorhizobium medicae as well as from these rhizobia to other bacteria by means of their own

  8. Anticancer and antibacterial secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. CAM64 against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouda, Jean-Bosco; Tamokou, Jean-de-Dieu; Mbazoa, Céline Djama; Sarkar, Prodipta; Bag, Prasanta Kumar; Wandji, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug resistance bacteria has become a major threat and thus calls for an urgent need to search for new effective and safe anti-bacterial agents. This study aims to evaluate the anticancer and antibacterial activities of secondary metabolites from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus associated with leaves of Garcinia nobilis. The culture filtrate from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. was extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the major metabolites were isolated and identified by spectroscopic analyses and by comparison with published data. The antibacterial activity of the compounds was assessed by broth microdilution method while the anticancer activity was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The fractionation of the crude extract afforded penialidin A-C (1-3), citromycetin (4), p-hydroxyphenylglyoxalaldoxime (5) and brefelfin A (6). All of the compounds tested here showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 0.50 - 128 µg/mL) against Gramnegative multi-drug resistance bacteria, Vibrio cholerae (causative agent of dreadful disease cholera) and Shigella flexneri (causative agent of shigellosis), as well as the significant anticancer activity (LC 50 = 0.88 - 9.21 µg/mL) against HeLa cells. The results obtained indicate that compounds 1-6 showed good antibacterial and anticancer activities with no toxicity to human red blood cells and normal Vero cells.

  9. Adhesion and inactivation of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria on photoreactive TiO2/polymer and Ag-TiO2/polymer nanohybrid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallósy, Szabolcs Péter; Janovák, László; Nagy, Elisabeth; Deák, Ágota; Juhász, Ádám; Csapó, Edit; Buzás, Norbert; Dékány, Imre

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop photoreactive surface coatings, possessing antibacterial properties and can be activated under visible light illumination (λmax = 405 nm) using LED-light source. The photocatalytically active titanium dioxide (TiO2) was functionalized with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and immobilized in polyacrylate based nanohybrid thin film in order to facilitate visible light activity (λAg/TiO2,max = 500 nm). First, the photocatalytic activity was modelled by following ethanol vapor degradation. The plasmonic functionalization resulted in 15% enhancement of the activity compared to pure TiO2. The photoreactive antimicrobial (5 log reduction of cfu in 2 h) surface coatings are able to inactivate clinically relevant pathogen strains (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) within short time (60-120 min) due to the formed and quantified reactive oxygen species (ROS). The existence of electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged bacteria (from -0.89 to -3.19 μeq/109 cfu) and positively charged photocatalyst particles (in the range of +0.38 and +12.3 meq/100 g) was also proven by charge titration measurements. The surface inactivation of the bacteria and the photocatalytic degradation of the cell wall component were also confirmed by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopic observations, respectively. According to the results an effective sterilizing system and prevention strategy can be developed and carried out against dangerous microorganisms in health care.

  10. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity of acorn herbal extract against some Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebi, Reza; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Sekawi, Zamberi; Khosravi, Afra; Galehdari, Elham Abouali; Hushmandfar, Reza; Ranjbar, Reza; Maleki, Abbas; Mohammadzadeh, Mona; Rahbar, Mohammad; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2011-01-01

    The search for safe and effective antimicrobial agents, which treat, therapeutically and prophylactically, a wide variety of bacterial infections still represents a top priority for the biomedical field. This study was undertaken to investigate the antimicrobial properties of herbal extract (acorn) against bacterial pathogens in intestinal tract infections in in vitro and in vivo conditions and to study the effect of herbal extracts against bacteria in comparison with current antibiotics. Ethanol extraction of acorn herb (Jaft) were evaluated against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeroginosa in in vitro and in vivo conditions. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was 10 microg/ml, 10 microg/ml, 5 microg/ml, 15 microg/ml and 15 microg/ml for K. pneumoniae, E. coli, S. typhi, S. aureus and P. aeroginosa, respectively. The in vivo results showed that the experimental infection produced by K. pneumoniae, E. coli, S. typhi and P. aeroginosa was totally inhibited in rats treated by the acorn extraction, while positive control rats died after five days. The finding revealed that acorn extract has great potential as antimicrobial compounds against pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, acorn extract can be used in the treatment of infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria.

  11. Drug-resistant gram-negative uropathogens: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnood, Saeed; Heidary, Mohsen; Mirnejad, Reza; Bahramian, Aghil; Sedighi, Mansour; Mirzaei, Habibollah

    2017-10-01

    Urinary tract infection(UTI) caused by Gram-negative bacteria is the second most common infectious presentation in community medical practice. Approximately 150 million people are diagnosed with UTI each year worldwide. Drug resistance in Gram-negative uropathogens is a major global concern which can lead to poor clinical outcomes including treatment failure, development of bacteremia, requirement for intravenous therapy, hospitalization, and extended length of hospital stay. The mechanisms of drug resistance in these bacteria are important due to they are often not identified by routine susceptibility tests and have an exceptional potential for outbreaks. Treatment of UTIs depends on the access to effective drugs, which is now threatened by antibiotic resistant Gram-negative uropathogens. Although several effective antibiotics with activity against highly resistant Gram-negatives are available, there is not a unique antibiotic with activity against the high variety of resistance. Therefore, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, correlation between clinicians and laboratories, development of more rapid diagnostic methods, and continuous monitoring of drug resistance are urgent priorities. In this review, we will discuss about the current global status of drug-resistant Gram-negative uropathogens and their mechanisms of drug resistance to provide new insights into their treatment options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Inactivation of Gram-Negative Bacteria by Low-Pressure RF Remote Plasma Excited in N2-O2 Mixture and SF6 Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Al-Mariri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of low-pressure RF plasma in the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Enterobacter sakazakii using N2-O2 and SF6 gases was assessed. 1×109 colony-forming units (CFUs of each bacterial isolate were placed on three polymer foils. The effects of pressure, power, distance from the source, and exposure time to plasma gases were optimized. The best conditions to inactivate the four bacteria were a 91%N2-9%O2 mixture and a 30-minute exposure time. SF6 gas was more efficient for all the tested isolates in as much as the treatment time was reduced to only three minutes. Therefore, low-pressure plasma could be used to sterilize heat and/or moisture-sensitive medical instruments.

  13. A multidisciplinary intervention to reduce infections of ESBL- and AmpC-producing, gram-negative bacteria at a University Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Dahl Knudsen

    Full Text Available In response to a considerable increase in the infections caused by ESBL/AmpC-producing Klebsiella pneumonia in 2008, a multidisciplinary intervention, with a main focus on antimicrobial stewardship, was carried out at one university hospital. Four other hospitals were used as controls. Stringent guidelines for antimicrobial treatment and prophylaxis were disseminated throughout the intervention hospital; cephalosporins were restricted for prophylaxis use only, fluoroquinolones for empiric use in septic shock only, and carbapenems were selected for penicillin-allergic patients, infections due to ESBL/AmpC-producing and other resistant bacteria, in addition to their use in severe sepsis/septic shock. Piperacillin-tazobactam ± gentamicin was recommended for empiric treatments of most febrile conditions. The intervention also included education and guidance on infection control, as well as various other surveillances. Two year follow-up data on the incidence rates of patients with selected bacterial infections, outcomes, and antibiotic consumption were assessed, employing before-and-after analysis and segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series, using the other hospitals as controls. The intervention led to a sustained change in antimicrobial consumption, and the incidence of patients infected with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae decreased significantly (p<0.001. The incidences of other hospital-associated infections also declined (p's<0.02, but piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium infections increased (p's<0.033. In wards with high antimicrobial consumption, the patient gut carrier rate of ESBL-producing bacteria significantly decreased (p = 0.023. The unadjusted, all-cause 30-day mortality rates of K. pneumoniae and E. coli were unchanged over the four-year period, with similar results in all five hospitals. Although not statistically significant, the 30-day mortality rate of patients

  14. Chemical constituents of Helichrysum italicum (Roth G. Don essential oil and their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, filamentous fungi and Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouzid Djihane

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aerial parts of Helichrysum italicum (Roth G. Don were subjected to hydrodistillation to obtain essential oils which had been analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and tested for antimicrobial activity against 12 bacteria, two yeasts and four fungi by agar diffusion method. The essential oil yielded 0.44% (v/w and 67 compounds accounting for 99.24% of the oil were identified with a high content of oxygenated sesquiterpenes (61.42%. The most oxygenated sesquiterpene compounds were α-Cedrene (13.61%, α-Curcumene (11.41%, Geranyl acetate (10.05%, Limonene (6.07%, Nerol (5.04%, Neryl acetate (4.91% and α-Pinene (3.78%. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was assayed by using the disk diffusion method on Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 4352, Enterococcus cereus ATCC 2035, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10876, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9372, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 49452, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 35659, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313 and yeasts Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 9763 and fungi, Fusarium solani var. coeruleum, Aspergillus niger, Alternaria alternata, Ascochyta rabiei. H. italicum inhibited the growth of all the tested microorganisms except three bacteria, E. coli ATCC 25922, K. pneumonia ATCC 4352 and L. monocytogenes ATCC 15313. The most sensitive bacterium was E. cereus ATCC 2035 with minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of 0.79 μg ml−1. A minimum fungistatic and fungicide concentration of 6.325 μg ml−1 and 12.65 μg ml−1 respectively was obtained with C. albicans ATCC 10231 and S. cerevisiae ATCC 9763. However the four fungi were more resistant with fungistatic minimum concentration ranging from 6.325 μg ml−1 to 50.6 μg ml−1 and a fungicide minimum

  15. Silver nanoparticles as an antimicrobial agent: A case study on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as models for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2017-03-17

    The current research was focused on the characterization and antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) produced by Bacillus licheniformis NM120-17. The synthesis was initially observed by a colour change from pale yellow to brown which was further confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were characterized using TEM, EDAX and FTIR. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical and uniformly distributed with a size in the range of 9-27.5 nm. The antibacterial activities and acting mechanism of AgNPs were studied with respect to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by measuring the growth curves, protein and reducing sugar leakage, respiratory chain dehydrogenase activity, as well as the formation of bactericidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). The experimental results indicated that 50 mg/ml AgNPs could completely inhibit the growth of bacterial cells and destroy the permeability of bacterial membranes and depress the activity of some membranous enzymes, which cause bacteria to die eventually. These nontoxic nanomaterials, which can be prepared in a simple and cost-effective manner, may be suitable for the formulation of new types of bactericidal materials.

  16. Antimicrobial Effect of the Triterpene 3β,6β,16β-Trihydroxylup-20(29-ene on Planktonic Cells and Biofilms from Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Flávio Vasconcelos Evaristo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antimicrobial effect of 3β,6β,16β-trihydroxylup-20(29-ene (CLF1, a triterpene isolated from Combretum leprosum Mart., in inhibiting the planktonic growth and biofilms of Gram positive bacteria Streptococcus mutans and S. mitis. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC. The antibiofilm potential was determined by quantifying total biomass and enumerating biofilm-entrapped viable bacteria. In addition, the acute toxicity of CLF1 on Artemia sp. nauplii was also determined. The results showed that CLF1 was able in inhibiting the growth of S. mutans and S. mitis with MIC and MBC of 7.8 μg/mL and 15.6 μg/mL, respectively. CLF1 was highly effective on biofilms of both bacteria. Only 7.8 μg/mL CLF1 was enough to inhibit by 97% and 90% biomass production of S. mutans and S. mitis, respectively. On the other hand, such effects were not evident on Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella oxytoca. The toxicity tests showed that the LC50 of CLF1 was 98.19 μg/mL. Therefore, CLF1 isolated from C. leprosum may constitute an important natural agent for the development of new therapies for caries and other infectious diseases caused by S. mutans and S. mitis.

  17. Occurrence of unusual non-fermentative gram negative bacilli in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) other than Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter species have emerged as nosocomial pathogens. No much data is currently available concerning the occurrence of these types of bacteria in Zagazig University Hospitals (ZUHs). In this study, the occurrence as well as the ...

  18. Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases in Gram Negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial drug resistance seen among many gram-negative bacteria, especially those expressing the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes that hydrolyze the expandedspectrum cephalosporins has been on the increase. This has compromised treatment options and thus a threat to the containment of ...

  19. Ecological and aromatic impact of two Gram-negative bacteria (Psychrobacter celer and Hafnia alvei) inoculated as part of the whole microbial community of an experimental smear soft cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlinger, Françoise; Yung, Stéphane Ah Yuen In; Sarthou, Anne-Sophie; Delbès-Paus, Céline; Montel, Marie-Christine; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Helinck, Sandra

    2012-02-15

    The impact of the growth of two Gram-negative bacteria, Psychrobacter celer and Hafnia alvei, inoculated at 10(2) and 10(6) cfu/g, on the dynamics of a multispecies community as well as on volatile aroma compound production during cheese ripening was investigated. Results showed that P. celer was able to successfully implant itself in cheese, regardless of its inoculation level. However, when it was inoculated at a high level, the bacterial biodiversity was drastically lowered from day 25 to the end of ripening. Overall, the presence of P. celer led to the higher production of volatile aroma compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and sulfur compounds. Regardless of its inoculation level, H. alvei barely affected the growth of the bacterial community and was subdominant at the end of ripening. It influenced total volatile aroma compound production with volatile sulfur compounds being the most abundant. Overall, these two bacteria were able to implant themselves in a cheese community and significantly contributed to the aromatic properties of the cheese. Their role in flavoring and their interactions with the technological microorganisms must be considered during cheese ripening and should be further investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The target of daptomycin is absent from Escherichia coli and other gram-negative pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Christopher P; Mariner, Katherine R; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J

    2013-01-01

    Antistaphylococcal agents commonly lack activity against Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli owing to the permeability barrier presented by the outer membrane and/or the action of efflux transporters. When these intrinsic resistance mechanisms are artificially compromised, such agents almost invariably demonstrate antibacterial activity against Gram negatives. Here we show that this is not the case for the antibiotic daptomycin, whose target appears to be absent from E. coli and other Gram-negative pathogens.

  1. Potential strategies for the eradication of multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Huwaitat, Rawan; McCloskey, Alice P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.; Laverty, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the leading threats to society. The increasing burden of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infection is particularly concerning as such bacteria are demonstrating resistance to nearly all currently licensed therapies. Various strategies have been hypothesized to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections including: targeting the Gram-negative outer membrane; neutralization of lipopolysaccharide; inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps and prevention of ...

  2. A Gestalt approach to Gram-negative entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Lynn L

    2016-12-15

    A major obstacle confronting the discovery and development of new antibacterial agents to combat resistant Gram-negative (GN) organisms is the lack of a rational process for endowing compounds with properties that allow (or promote) entry into the bacterial cytoplasm. The major permeability difference between GN and Gram-positive (GP) bacteria is the GN outer membrane (OM) which is a permeability barrier itself and potentiates efflux pumps that expel compounds. Based on the fact that OM-permeable and efflux-deleted GNs are sensitive to many anti-GP drugs, recent efforts to approach the GN entry problem have focused on ways of avoiding efflux and transiting or compromising the OM, with the tacit assumption that this could allow entry of compounds into the GN cytoplasm. But bypassing the OM and efflux obstacles does not take into account the additional requirement of penetrating the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) whose sieving properties appear to be orthogonal to that of the OM. That is, tailoring compounds to transit the OM may well compromise their ability to enter the cytoplasm. Thus, a Gestalt approach to understanding the chemical requirements for GN entry seems a useful adjunct. This might consist of characterizing compounds which reach the cytoplasm, grouping (or binning) by routes of entry and formulating chemical 'rules' for those bins. This will require acquisition of data on large numbers of compounds, using non-activity-dependent methods of measuring accumulation in the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and the correlated inactivation of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Robert J.; Molina, Rodrigo; Xu Jianbin [Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science (United Kingdom); Dobson, Peter J. [Begbroke Directorate, Oxford University Begbroke Science Park (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian P., E-mail: Ian.Thompson@eng.ox.ac.uk [Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are important photocatalysts and as such have been extensively studied for the removal of organic compounds from contaminated air and water and for microbial disinfection. Despite much research on the effect of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles on different bacterial species, uncertainties remain about which bacteria are more sensitive to these compounds. Very few studies have directly compared the toxicity of ZnO to TiO{sub 2} under both light and dark conditions. In addition, authors investigating the photocatalytic inactivation of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles on bacteria have failed to investigate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of the nanoparticles, making it difficult to correlate killing action with the generation of ROS. In this study, three types of metal nanoparticle (ZnO < 50 nm, ZnO < 100 nm and TiO{sub 2}) have been characterised and ROS production assessed through the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic killing potential of three nanoparticle concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1 g/L) was then assessed on four representative bacteria: two gram-positive (S. aureus and B. subtilis) and two gram-negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). Results showed that out of the three nanoparticles tested, the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles generated more ROS than the ZnO nanoparticles, corresponding to a greater photocatalytic inactivation of three of the four species of bacteria examined. The MB decomposition results correlated well with the bacterial inactivation results with higher TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle concentrations leading to greater ROS production and increased loss of cell viability. Although producing less ROS than the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles under ultraviolet light, the ZnO nanoparticles were toxic to two of the bacterial species even under dark conditions. In this study, no correlation between cell wall type and bacterial inactivation was observed for any of the

  4. Comparison of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and the correlated inactivation of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Robert J.; Molina, Rodrigo; Xu, Jianbin; Dobson, Peter J.; Thompson, Ian P.

    2013-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are important photocatalysts and as such have been extensively studied for the removal of organic compounds from contaminated air and water and for microbial disinfection. Despite much research on the effect of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles on different bacterial species, uncertainties remain about which bacteria are more sensitive to these compounds. Very few studies have directly compared the toxicity of ZnO to TiO2 under both light and dark conditions. In addition, authors investigating the photocatalytic inactivation of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles on bacteria have failed to investigate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of the nanoparticles, making it difficult to correlate killing action with the generation of ROS. In this study, three types of metal nanoparticle (ZnO blue (MB). The photocatalytic killing potential of three nanoparticle concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1 g/L) was then assessed on four representative bacteria: two gram-positive ( S. aureus and B. subtilis) and two gram-negative ( E. coli and P. aeruginosa). Results showed that out of the three nanoparticles tested, the TiO2 nanoparticles generated more ROS than the ZnO nanoparticles, corresponding to a greater photocatalytic inactivation of three of the four species of bacteria examined. The MB decomposition results correlated well with the bacterial inactivation results with higher TiO2 nanoparticle concentrations leading to greater ROS production and increased loss of cell viability. Although producing less ROS than the TiO2 nanoparticles under ultraviolet light, the ZnO nanoparticles were toxic to two of the bacterial species even under dark conditions. In this study, no correlation between cell wall type and bacterial inactivation was observed for any of the nanoparticles tested although both gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to ROS production. P. aeruginosa cells were resistant to all types of treatment and highlight a

  5. Gram-negative diabetic foot osteomyelitis: risk factors and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose L

    2013-03-01

    Osteomyelitis frequently complicates infections in the feet of patients with diabetes. Gram-positive cocci, especially Staphylococcus aureus, are the most commonly isolated pathogens, but gram-negative bacteria also cause some cases of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO). These gram-negatives require different antibiotic regimens than those commonly directed at gram-positives. There are, however, few data on factors related to their presence and how they influence the clinical picture. We conducted a retrospective study to determine the variables associated with the isolation of gram-negative bacteria from bone samples in cases of DFO and the clinical presentation of these infections. Among 341 cases of DFO, 150 had a gram-negative isolate (alone or combined with a gram-positive isolate) comprising 44.0% of all patients and 50.8% of those with a positive bone culture. Compared with gram-positive infections, wounds with gram-negative organisms more often had a fetid odor, necrotic tissue, signs of soft tissue infection accompanying osteomyelitis, and clinically severe infection. By multivariate analysis, the predictive variables related to an increased likelihood of isolating gram-negatives from bone samples were glycated hemoglobin gram-negatives had a statistically significantly higher prevalence of leukocytosis and higher white blood cell counts than those without gram-negatives. In conclusion, gram-negative organisms were isolated in nearly half of our cases of DFO and were associated with more severe infections, higher white blood cell counts, lower glycated hemoglobin levels, and wounds of traumatic etiology.

  6. Active surveillance scheme in three Romanian hospitals reveals a high prevalence and variety of carbapenamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: a pilot study, December 2014 to May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofte, Dorina; Panzaru, Carmen Valentina; Maciuca, Iuliana Elena; Dan, Maria; Mare, Anca Delia; Man, Adrian; Toma, Felicia

    2016-06-23

    We report the findings of an active surveillance scheme for detection of asymptomatic carriers with carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (CP-GNB) in Romanian hospitals. During a pilot study from December 2014 to May 2015, faecal cultures were screened in three hospitals (two large, one medium-size) for patients newly admitted to selected wards or inpatients transferred from other wards to an intensive-care unit. The study revealed a high prevalence of CP-GNB detected in 22/27 and 28/38 of the carbapenem non-susceptible isolates from Hospitals 1 and 3, respectively. CP-GNB identified through faecal screening included NDM-1-producing Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumoniae, OXA-48-producing K. pneumoniae and OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii. The distribution of the CP-GNB varied between the hospitals, with NDM-1-producing S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae being prevalent in the north-central part of the country and OXA-23/24-producing A. baumannii, OXA-48-producing K.pneumoniae, Morganella morganii and VIM-2-producing Escherichia coli/Pseudomonas aeruginosa detected in the north-east of the country. Conjugation studies showed that carbapenem resistance was transferable and PCR-based replicon typing identified blaNDM-1 on IncFIIs in S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae from Hospital 1 and blaOXA-48 on IncL plasmids in all Klebsiella spp. isolates from Hospitals 1 and 3. Our findings underline the importance of active surveillance for detection of CP-GNB asymptomatic faecal carriers and suggest a likely endemic spread of CP-GNB in Romania. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  7. Emerging quinolones resistant transfer genes among gram-negative bacteria, isolated from faeces of HIV/AIDS patients attending some Clinics and Hospitals in the City of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enabulele IO

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 1431 gram-negative bacilli from June 2001 to September 2005 were obtained from the faeces of 920 HIV/AIDS patients attending some Clinics and Hospitals in Benin City, Nigeria, were screened for quinolones resistance gene. The HIV/AIDS patients CD4 cells range was ≤14/mm3 ≥800/mm3 of blood. Out of the 1431 isolates, 343 (23.9% were resistance to quinolones with a MIC ≥4μg/ml for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin while a MIC of ≥32 µg/ml for nalidixic acid. The screened isolates include Pseudomonas aeruginosa 64(18.7%, E coli 92(26.8%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 53(15.4%, Salmonella typhi 39(11.4%, Shigella dysenteriae 36(10.5%, Proteus mirabilis 34(9.9% and Serratia marcescens 25(7.3%. The average resistance of the isolates to the various quinolones ranged from 42.7% to 66.7%. Klebsiella were the most resistant isolates with a mean resistance of 66.7% while Proteus were the less resistant isolates with a mean resistance of 42.7%. Most isolates were resistant to Nalidixic acid followed by norfloxacin while the less resistant were to the pefloxacin. The frequency of qnr genes transfer to EJRifr as recipient ranged from 2 x 10-2 to 6 x 10-6 with an average of 2 plasmids per cell. The molecular weight of the plasmids ranged from <2.9kbp to <5.5 kbp. This indicated that plasmids allowed the movement of genetic materials including qnr resistant genes between bacteria species and genera in Benin City, Nigeria.

  8. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Exhibit Hall B 505 Effects of Green Tea Polyphenols on Endospore Germination in Bacillus cereus, B. megaterium, and B. subtilis N. Laskar’, H. Tahir’, T...versus Cultivated Origanum ehrenberjii against Enteric Bacteria · T. A. Kumosani’, E. K. Barbour’, S. K. Dankar’!, H. A. Shaib’, E. I. Azhar’, A. P

  9. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Our findings have major

  10. Retrospective observational study to assess the clinical management and outcomes of hospitalised patients with complicated urinary tract infection in countries with high prevalence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria (RESCUING).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Evelyn; Addy, Ibironke; Stoddart, Margaret; Vank, Christiane; Grier, Sally; Wiegand, Irith; Leibovici, Leonard; Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen; MacGowan, Alasdair; Carratalà, Jordi; Pujol, Miquel

    2016-07-29

    The emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), including carbapenemase-producing strains, has become a major therapeutic challenge. These MDR isolates are often involved in complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI), and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. The study has been designed to gain insight into the epidemiology, clinical management, outcome and healthcare cost of patients with cUTI, especially in countries with high prevalence of MDR GNB. This multinational and multicentre observational, retrospective study will identify cases from 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2014 in order to collect data on patients with cUTI as a cause of hospital admission, and patients who develop cUTI during their hospital stay. The primary end point will be treatment failure defined as the presence of any of the following criteria: (1) signs or symptoms of cUTI present at diagnosis that have not improved by days 5-7 with appropriate antibiotic therapy, (2) new cUTI-related symptoms that have developed within 30 days of diagnosis, (3) urine culture taken within 30 days of diagnosis, either during or after completion of therapy, that grows ≥10(4) colony-forming unit/mL of the original pathogen and (4) death irrespective of cause within 30 days of the cUTI diagnosis. 1000 patients afford a power of 0.83 (α=0.05) to detect an absolute difference of 10% in the treatment failure rate between MDR bacteria and other pathogens. This should allow for the introduction of about 20 independent risk factors (or their interaction) in a logistic regression model looking at risk factors for failure. Approval will be sought from all relevant Research Ethics Committees. Publication of this study will be considered as a joint publication by the participating investigator leads, and will follow the recommendations of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). NCT02641015; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  11. Antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacilli in the sewage of the City of Concepcion, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M; Mondaca, M A; Zemelman, R

    1994-01-01

    Counts of total and of antibiotic-resistant heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria were performed in samples collected from the main sewage effluent of the city of Concepcion, Chile, during an eleven month period in 1991-1992. Antibiotic resistance patterns (ARP) were determined and antibiotic resistance indexes (ARI) were calculated for some fermenting and nonfermenting strains of resistant bacteria. Ampicillin-resistant strains were the most frequent among fermenting bacteria, whereas those cephalothin-resistant were the most frequent among nonfermenting bacilli. These results correlate with the frequency of clinical use of both antibiotics in the community of Concepción. Higher values of ARI for nonfermenting bacilli are probably due to the natural intrinsic resistance of these microorganisms to several beta-lactam compounds. Since plasmid-coded resistance is frequent among enteric bacilli, the large number of resistant bacilli in sewage may be important in the natural dis-

  12. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, D.; Holt, L.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2004-01-01

    of the Toll-like receptor-4 accessory protein MD-2 as well as endogenous IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, demonstrating similar capabilities of these bacteria to induce proximal NF-kappaB signalling. However, B. vulgatus failed to trigger IkappaBalpha degradation and NF-kappaB transcriptional activity...... in the presence of PBMC. Interestingly, B. vulgatus- and E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharide-induced similar IL-8 mRNA expression in epithelial cells after basolateral stimulation of HT-29/PBMC cocultures. Although luminal enteric bacteria have adjuvant and antigenic properties in chronic intestinal inflammation...

  13. Veillonella, Firmicutes: Microbes disguised as Gram negatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesth, Tammi; Ozen, Aslı; Andersen, Sandra C; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Bohlin, Jon; Nookaew, Intawat; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2013-12-20

    The Firmicutes represent a major component of the intestinal microflora. The intestinal Firmicutes are a large, diverse group of organisms, many of which are poorly characterized due to their anaerobic growth requirements. Although most Firmicutes are Gram positive, members of the class Negativicutes, including the genus Veillonella, stain Gram negative. Veillonella are among the most abundant organisms of the oral and intestinal microflora of animals and humans, in spite of being strict anaerobes. In this work, the genomes of 24 Negativicutes, including eight Veillonella spp., are compared to 20 other Firmicutes genomes; a further 101 prokaryotic genomes were included, covering 26 phyla. Thus a total of 145 prokaryotic genomes were analyzed by various methods to investigate the apparent conflict of the Veillonella Gram stain and their taxonomic position within the Firmicutes. Comparison of the genome sequences confirms that the Negativicutes are distantly related to Clostridium spp., based on 16S rRNA, complete genomic DNA sequences, and a consensus tree based on conserved proteins. The genus Veillonella is relatively homogeneous: inter-genus pair-wise comparison identifies at least 1,350 shared proteins, although less than half of these are found in any given Clostridium genome. Only 27 proteins are found conserved in all analyzed prokaryote genomes. Veillonella has distinct metabolic properties, and significant similarities to genomes of Proteobacteria are not detected, with the exception of a shared LPS biosynthesis pathway. The clade within the class Negativicutes to which the genus Veillonella belongs exhibits unique properties, most of which are in common with Gram-positives and some with Gram negatives. They are only distantly related to Clostridia, but are even less closely related to Gram-negative species. Though the Negativicutes stain Gram-negative and possess two membranes, the genome and proteome analysis presented here confirm their place within the

  14. Potential strategies for the eradication of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwaitat, Rawan; McCloskey, Alice P; Gilmore, Brendan F; Laverty, Garry

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the leading threats to society. The increasing burden of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infection is particularly concerning as such bacteria are demonstrating resistance to nearly all currently licensed therapies. Various strategies have been hypothesized to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections including: targeting the Gram-negative outer membrane; neutralization of lipopolysaccharide; inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps and prevention of protein folding. Silver and silver nanoparticles, fusogenic liposomes and nanotubes are potential strategies for extending the activity of licensed, Gram-positive selective, antibiotics to Gram-negatives. This may serve as a strategy to fill the current void in pharmaceutical development in the short term. This review outlines the most promising strategies that could be implemented to solve the threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  15. Will new antimicrobials overcome resistance among Gram-negatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Matteo; Ginocchio, Francesca; Mikulska, Małgorzata; Taramasso, Lucia; Giacobbe, Daniele Roberto

    2011-10-01

    The spread of resistance among Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria represents a growing challenge for the development of new antimicrobials. The pace of antibiotic drug development has slowed during the last decade and, especially for Gram-negatives, clinicians are facing a dramatic shortage in the availability of therapeutic options to face the emergency of the resistance problem throughout the world. In this alarming scenario, although there is a shortage of compounds reaching the market in the near future, antibiotic discovery remains one of the keys to successfully stem and maybe overcome the tide of resistance. Analogs of already known compounds and new agents belonging to completely new classes of antimicrobials are in early stages of development. Novel and promising anti-Gram-negative antimicrobials belong both to old (cephalosporins, carbapenems, β-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, aminoglycosides, polymyxin analogues and tetracycline) and completely new antibacterial classes (boron-containing antibacterial protein synthesis inhibitors, bis-indoles, outer membrane synthesis inhibitors, antibiotics targeting novel sites of the 50S ribosomal subunit and antimicrobial peptides). However, all of these compounds are still far from being introduced into clinical practice. Therefore, infection control policies and optimization in the use of already existing molecules are still the most effective approaches to reduce the spread of resistance and preserve the activity of antimicrobials.

  16. Combating multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ze-Qi; Flavin, Michael T; Flavin, John

    2014-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, especially those caused by Gram-negative pathogens, have emerged as one of the world's greatest health threats. The development of novel antibiotics to treat MDR Gram-negative bacteria has, however, stagnated over the last half century. This review provides an overview of recent R&D activities in the search for novel antibiotics against MDR Gram-negatives. It provides emphasis in three key areas. First, the article looks at new analogs of existing antibiotic molecules such as β-lactams, tetracyclines, and aminoglycoside as well as agents against novel bacterial targets such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and peptide deformylase. Second, it also examines alternative strategies to conventional approaches including cationic antimicrobial peptides, siderophores, efflux pump inhibitors, therapeutic antibodies, and renewed interest in abandoned treatments or those with limited indications. Third, the authors aim to provide an update on the current clinical development status for each drug candidate. The traditional analog approach is insufficient to meet the formidable challenge brought forth by MDR superbugs. With the disappointing results of the genomics approach for delivering novel targets and drug candidates, alternative strategies to permeate the bacterial cell membrane, enhance influx, disrupt efflux, and target specific pathogens via therapeutic antibodies are attractive and promising. Coupled with incentivized business models, governmental policies, and a clarified regulatory pathway, it is hoped that the antibiotic pipeline will be filled with an effective armamentarium to safeguard global health.

  17. Incidence of Carbapenem-Resistant Gram Negatives in Italian Transplant Recipients: A Nationwide Surveillance Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Lanini; Alessandro Nanni Costa; Vincenzo Puro; Francesco Procaccio; Paolo Antonio Grossi; Francesca Vespasiano; Andrea Ricci; Sergio Vesconi; Ison, Michael G.; Yehuda Carmeli; Giuseppe Ippolito

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections remain a challenge to solid organ transplantation. Due to the alarming spread of carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria, these organisms have been frequently recognized as cause of severe infections in solid organ transplant recipients. Methods and Findings Between 15 May and 30 September 2012 we enrolled 887 solid organ transplant recipients in Italy with the aim to describe the epidemiology of gram negative bacteria spreading, to explore potential risk f...

  18. Incidence of carbapenem-resistant gram negatives in Italian transplant recipients: a nationwide surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Lanini

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections remain a challenge to solid organ transplantation. Due to the alarming spread of carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria, these organisms have been frequently recognized as cause of severe infections in solid organ transplant recipients.Between 15 May and 30 September 2012 we enrolled 887 solid organ transplant recipients in Italy with the aim to describe the epidemiology of gram negative bacteria spreading, to explore potential risk factors and to assess the effect of early isolation of gram negative bacteria on recipients' mortality during the first 90 days after transplantation. During the study period 185 clinical isolates of gram negative bacteria were reported, for an incidence of 2.39 per 1000 recipient-days. Positive cultures for gram negative bacteria occurred early after transplantation (median time 26 days; incidence rate 4.33, 1.67 and 1.14 per 1,000 recipient-days in the first, second and third month after SOT, respectively. Forty-nine of these clinical isolates were due to carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria (26.5%; incidence 0.63 per 1000 recipient-days. Carbapenems resistance was particularly frequent among Klebsiella spp. isolates (49.1%. Recipients with longer hospital stay and those who received either heart or lung graft were at the highest risk of testing positive for any gram negative bacteria. Moreover recipients with longer hospital stay, lung recipients and those admitted to hospital for more than 48h before transplantation had the highest probability to have culture(s positive for carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria. Forty-four organ recipients died (0.57 per 1000 recipient-days during the study period. Recipients with at least one positive culture for carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria had a 10.23-fold higher mortality rate than those who did not.The isolation of gram-negative bacteria is most frequent among recipient with hospital stays >48 hours prior to transplant

  19. Incidence of carbapenem-resistant gram negatives in Italian transplant recipients: a nationwide surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanini, Simone; Costa, Alessandro Nanni; Puro, Vincenzo; Procaccio, Francesco; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Vespasiano, Francesca; Ricci, Andrea; Vesconi, Sergio; Ison, Michael G; Carmeli, Yehuda; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a challenge to solid organ transplantation. Due to the alarming spread of carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria, these organisms have been frequently recognized as cause of severe infections in solid organ transplant recipients. Between 15 May and 30 September 2012 we enrolled 887 solid organ transplant recipients in Italy with the aim to describe the epidemiology of gram negative bacteria spreading, to explore potential risk factors and to assess the effect of early isolation of gram negative bacteria on recipients' mortality during the first 90 days after transplantation. During the study period 185 clinical isolates of gram negative bacteria were reported, for an incidence of 2.39 per 1000 recipient-days. Positive cultures for gram negative bacteria occurred early after transplantation (median time 26 days; incidence rate 4.33, 1.67 and 1.14 per 1,000 recipient-days in the first, second and third month after SOT, respectively). Forty-nine of these clinical isolates were due to carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria (26.5%; incidence 0.63 per 1000 recipient-days). Carbapenems resistance was particularly frequent among Klebsiella spp. isolates (49.1%). Recipients with longer hospital stay and those who received either heart or lung graft were at the highest risk of testing positive for any gram negative bacteria. Moreover recipients with longer hospital stay, lung recipients and those admitted to hospital for more than 48h before transplantation had the highest probability to have culture(s) positive for carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria. Forty-four organ recipients died (0.57 per 1000 recipient-days) during the study period. Recipients with at least one positive culture for carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria had a 10.23-fold higher mortality rate than those who did not. The isolation of gram-negative bacteria is most frequent among recipient with hospital stays >48 hours prior to transplant and in those

  20. Gram-negative bacteraemia in haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Eleanor C; Marek, Aleksandra; Thomson, Peter C; Coia, John E

    2015-07-01

    Patients on renal replacement therapy experience higher rates of morbidity and mortality, infection being the second commonest cause of death. In our haemodialysis population, we identify the pathogens, sensitivity patterns, sources of infection and outcomes of Gram-negative bacteraemia. Data from the NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde and NHS Forth Valley haemodialysis population were collected July 2011 to April 2014 through an interrogation of the renal unit electronic patient record, and confirmed by an independent search of the Microbiology database. Over 544 377 haemodialysis days, 84 patients experienced 95 Gram-negative bacteraemia events, a rate of 0.175 events per 1000 haemodialysis days, which varied with dialysis modality: non-tunnelled central venous catheters 4.77, arteriovenous grafts 0.24, tunnelled central venous catheters 0.21, and arteriovenous fistulae 0.11 per 1000 haemodialysis days. The commonest sources of bacteraemia were central venous catheters (CVCs) (16.8%, n = 16), infected ulcers (14.7%, n = 14), urinary (10.5%, n = 10), biliary (9.5%, n = 9) and intra-abdominal (9.5%, n = 9).The principal organisms were Escherichia coli (49.5%, n = 47), Enterobacter spp. (13.1%, n = 13), Klebsiella spp. (11.1%, n = 11), Proteus mirabilis (6.1%, n = 6) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.1%, n = 5). Of the Enterobacteriaceae (n = 84), 88% were sensitive to gentamicin, 81% to ciprofloxacin, 91% to piperacillin-tazobactam and 100% were sensitive to meropenem.Three-month case mortality was 25.3% (n = 24). Ten patients (11.9%) had more than one Gram-negative bacteraemia; of these, nine patients (90.0%) were the same causative organism, predominantly E. coli. CVCs and diabetic foot ulcers remain significant risk factors for Gram-negative bacteraemia, highlighting the importance of vascular access planning. Despite good levels of antibiotic sensitivity, the early mortality following Gram-negative bacteraemia remains high, supporting aggressive treatment of such

  1. Gram-negative folliculitis. A rare problem or is it underdiagnosed? Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra-Téllez Daniela, Ponce-Olivera Rosa María, Tirado-Sánchez Andrés

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGram-negative folliculitis may be the result of prolonged antibacterial treatments in patients with acne and rosacea. It is caused by alteration of facial skin flora and the nasal mucous, a decrease of Gram-positive bacteria and a proliferation of Gram-negative bacteria (for example Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella sp. and Proteus mirabilis. It should be considered in patients with acne who have not had a clinical improvement after 3-6 months of treatment with tetracyclines. The disease is underestimated, probably because bacteriological studies are rarely requested and the increased use of oral isotretinoin for acne management. One of the most effective treatments for Gram-negative folliculitis is oral isotretinoin (0.5-1 mg / kg / day for 4-5 months. We report the case of Gram negative folliculitis successfully treated with oral isotretinoin.

  2. The Target of Daptomycin Is Absent from Escherichia coli and Other Gram-Negative Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Christopher P.; Mariner, Katherine R.; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J.

    2013-01-01

    Antistaphylococcal agents commonly lack activity against Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli owing to the permeability barrier presented by the outer membrane and/or the action of efflux transporters. When these intrinsic resistance mechanisms are artificially compromised, such agents almost invariably demonstrate antibacterial activity against Gram negatives. Here we show that this is not the case for the antibiotic daptomycin, whose target appears to be absent from E. coli and othe...

  3. Water quality indicators: bacteria, coliphages, enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Johnson; Ganesh, Atheesha

    2013-12-01

    Water quality through the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms may affect human health. Coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and coliphages are normally used as indicators of water quality. However, the presence of above-mentioned indicators do not always suggest the presence of human enteric viruses. It is important to study human enteric viruses in water. Human enteric viruses can tolerate fluctuating environmental conditions and survive in the environment for long periods of time becoming causal agents of diarrhoeal diseases. Therefore, the potential of human pathogenic viruses as significant indicators of water quality is emerging. Human Adenoviruses and other viruses have been proposed as suitable indices for the effective identification of such organisms of human origin contaminating water systems. This article reports on the recent developments in the management of water quality specifically focusing on human enteric viruses as indicators.

  4. Multiplex identification of sepsis-causing Gram-negative pathogens from the plasma of infected blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Boram; Park, Chulmin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Shin, Juyoun; Shin, Sun; Yim, Seon-Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Chung, Yeun-Jung

    2017-11-28

    Early and accurate detection of bacterial pathogens in the blood is the most crucial step for sepsis management. Gram-negative bacteria are the most common organisms causing severe sepsis and responsible for high m