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Sample records for enteral nutrition therapy

  1. Osmolality and pH in handmade enteral diets used in domiciliary enteral nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Simeone HENRIQUES

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients who need prolonged domiciliary enteral nutritional therapy may benefit from handmade diets. However, the preparation of such diets might cause insecurity with regard to their nutritional composition and physical-chemical properties. Current study analyzes the osmolality and Hydrogen-Ion concentration (pH on handmade enteral diets. To this purpose, six formulas and two juices, prescribed on discharge from hospital, were analyzed physically and chemically. Osmolality and pH were respectively determined by cryoscopy and potentiometry. Most formulations were classified as isosmolar (with less than 400 mOsm/kg solvent, and only one was classified as slightly hyperosmolar, with rates ranging from 356.7 to 403.5 mOsm/kg solvent. On average, the standard formula presented higher osmolality than similar ones prepared for hyperglycemia. Among the juices, only one registered hyperosmolar concentration of 595.54 mOsm/kg solvent. All formulas presented pH rates classified as low acidity, ranging between 6.1 and 6.6, while the two juices had the lowest results, 4.73 and 4.66 each. The blend of ingredients used in handmade formulas and juices studied presented acceptable osmolality and pH rates for a safe administration and absence of gastrointestinal complications. Data showed here are consistent with an appropriate and healthy diet and contributed towards success in domiciliary enteral nutritional therapy.

  2. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Improved by Enteral Nutritional Therapy according to the Controlling Nutritional Status Score

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    Kazuhiro Takehara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS is a relatively rare disease that involves bowel obstruction symptoms, such as vomiting and gastric distension, owing to the compression of the third portion of the duodenum from the front by the superior mesenteric artery (SMA and from the rear by the abdominal aorta and the spine. SMAS is diagnosed on the basis of an upper gastrointestinal examination series indicating the obstruction of the third portion of the duodenum or a computed tomography scan indicating the narrowing of the branch angle between the aorta and the SMA (i.e., the aorta-SMA angle. Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old woman diagnosed with SMAS after a laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for cecal cancer, whose condition was improved by enteral nutritional therapy. We used her controlling nutritional status (CONUT score as a nutrition assessment and noted the changes in the aorta-SMA angle over the course of the disease. This patient appeared to develop SMAS, on the basis of a worsened CONUT score and a decreased aorta-SMA angle, owing to the inflammation resulting from the intraoperative dissection of the tissues around the SMA and prolonged postoperative fasting. After the initiation of enteral nutritional therapy, the patient exhibited body weight gain and an improved aorta-SMA angle and CONUT score. Hence, assessment of the aorta-SMA angle and CONUT score is an important preoperative consideration.

  3. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make t...

  4. Home Enteral Nutrition therapy: Difficulties, satisfactions and support needs of caregivers assisting older patients.

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    Jukic P, Nikolina; Gagliardi, Cristina; Fagnani, Donata; Venturini, Claudia; Orlandoni, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to comprehend and describe the views, experiences and adaptations of caregivers who assist older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition. The objective was to gather empirical evidence to improve the delivery of Home Enteral Nutrition for old patients taking into account the caregivers' support needs. A qualitative methodology with focus groups as data collection method was used to collect the testimonies of 30 informal and formal caregivers of older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition by the Clinical Nutrition Service of INRCA (Ancona) during 2014. Quantitative methodology was used to collect socio-demographic data. Partially modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist" was used to identify training needs. The constant comparison method was used to code and categorize data and to develop themes of focus groups. Simple descriptive statistics were used to summarize questionnaires. Five main themes were identified from focus groups: acceptance of the therapy, skill acquisition process, need for psychological and practical support at home from healthcare professionals, lifestyle adaptation, affirmation of life and family. All caregivers testified the initial fear and refusal to manage the nutrition pump and the therapy. They expressed the need to be trained gradually, starting during a patient's hospitalization, and continuing in the community. With reference to their overall QoL, it emerged that informal caregivers suffered mostly from the reduction of their free time while formal caregivers suffered social isolation and psychological burden. For both groups the monthly home visit was the most important element of the HEN service. Informal caregivers highlighted the importance of having their loved ones at home. Unsatisfied training needs were identified by the modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist". This qualitative study underlined the challenges and adaptations of

  5. Effectiveness of Enteral Nutritional Therapy in the Healing Process of Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review

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    Gisely Blanc

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutritional therapy (ENT in the healing process of pressure ulcers (PU in adults and the elderly. METHOD A systematic review whose studies were identified through the databases of Cochrane, MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and manual searches. It included randomized clinical trials (RCTs without delimiting the period or language of publication, which addressed adults and elderly patients with pressure ulcers in a comparative treatment of enteral nutritional therapy and placebo or between enteral nutritional therapy with different compositions and dosages. RESULTS We included ten studies that considered different interventions. It resulted in more pressure ulcers healed in the groups that received the intervention. The included studies were heterogeneous with regard to patients, the type of intervention, the sample and the follow-up period, all of which made meta-analysis impossible. CONCLUSION Although the enteral nutritional therapy demonstrates a promotion of pressure ulcer healing, sufficient evidence to confirm the hypothesis was not found.

  6. Enteral nutrition in surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucha, R.; Lichvarova, I.; Duchon, R.; Dolnik, J.; Pindak, D.

    2011-01-01

    Enteral feeding provides physiologic, metabolic, safety, and cost benefits over parenteral nutrition. There are various ways enteral nutritional is administered and scheduled. The method of administration must be individualized to each patient's specific needs. Enteral nutrition is not only the supply of exogenous substrates and to prevent depletion of endogenous sources. Today the enteral nutrition becomes part of a therapeutic strategy to influence the severity of the disease to affect the function of GIT, and to modulate immune responses of the gut and the whole organism. Early enteral nutrition in the postoperative period reduces the risk of infectious complications. (author)

  7. Immediate preoperative enteral nutrition (preoperative enteral nutrition

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    Lađević Nebojša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional support of surgical patients is a necessary part of the treatment. It alone cannot cure the disease but it significantly affects the recovery of patients and supports surgical interventions. Patients in malnutrition have shown to have significantly more postoperative infectious and non-infectious complications. This significantly prolongs treatment time and increases costs. However, there is one fact that cannot be expressed in money, which is the patient's impression of the surgical intervention. Adequate preoperative patient support, based on the intake of liquid nutritive solutions, reduces preoperative stress and deflects the metabolic response. Now, it is recommended for adults and children older than one year to drink clear liquid up to 2 hours before induction in anesthesia. Appropriate enteral nutrition has a significant place in the postoperative recovery of patients. Enteral nutrition is reducing complications, mainly infectious complications because the function of the digestive system as one large immune system is preserved. Perioperative enteral nutrition is a necessary part of the modern treatment of surgical patients. In addition to the significant effect on the occurrence of postoperative complications, it is also important that this type of diet improves the psychological status of patients.

  8. Effectiveness of Enteral Nutritional Therapy in the Healing Process of Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc, Gisely; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Stocco, Janislei Giseli Dorociaki; Roehrs, Hellen; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutritional therapy (ENT) in the healing process of pressure ulcers (PU) in adults and the elderly. METHOD A systematic review whose studies were identified through the databases of Cochrane, MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and manual searches. It included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) without delimiting the period or language of publication, which addressed adults and elderly patients with pressure ulcers ...

  9. What Is Enteral Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of feeding tubes. Enteral Nutrition Fact Sheet Twitter Tweets by ASPENWEB ASPEN 8401 Colesville Road, Suite ... Staff Find a Clinician Press Room Career Center Advertising and Sponsorship Related Websites BPS NBNSC NBPNS Connect ...

  10. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  11. [Nutrition and health--enteral nutrition in intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, F.M. van; Oudemans-van Straaten, H.M.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.; Tepaske, R.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional therapy in the intensive care unit exerts favourable effects on morbidity and mortality. Enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. Only perforation or total obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, proven mesenteric ischaemia and toxic megacolon are absolute

  12. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000164.htm Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems To use the sharing features ... trouble breathing, call 911. References Mcclave SA. Enteral nutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  13. [Indications and practice of enteral nutrition].

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    Hallay, Judit; Nagy, Dániel; Fülesdi, Béla

    2014-12-21

    Malnutrition in hospitalised patients has a significant and disadvantageous impact on treatment outcome. If possible, enteral nutrition with an energy/protein-balanced nutrient should be preferred depending on the patient's condition, type of illness and risk factors. The aim of the nutrition therapy is to increase the efficacy of treatment and shorten the length of hospital stay in order to ensure rapid rehabilitation. In the present review the authors summarize the most important clinical and practical aspects of enteral nutrition therapy.

  14. Enteral Nutrition and Acid-Suppressive Therapy in the PICU: Impact on the Risk of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia.

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    Albert, Ben D; Zurakowski, David; Bechard, Lori J; Priebe, Gregory P; Duggan, Christopher P; Heyland, Daren K; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2016-10-01

    Enteral nutrition has been implicated as a risk factor for ventilator-associated pneumonia. We explored the prevalence of ventilator-associated pneumonia and its association with clinical and nutrition-related therapies in mechanically ventilated children. Prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Fifty-nine PICU in 15 countries. Children less than 18 years old, mechanically ventilated for more than 48 hours. None. Multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Data are presented as median (interquartile range) or counts (%). We enrolled 1,245 subjects (45% women; 42% surgical), age 20 months (4-84 mo), and duration of mechanical ventilation 7 days (3-13 d). Culture-positive ventilator-associated pneumonia was diagnosed in 80 patients (6.4%); duration of mechanical ventilation for this subgroup was 17 days (8-39 d). Enteral nutrition was delivered in 985 patients (79%), initiated within 48 hours in 592 patients (60%), and via postpyloric route in 354 patients (36%). Acid-suppressive agents were used in 763 patients (61%). The duration of enteral nutrition (p = 0.21), route (gastric vs postpyloric) of delivery (p = 0.94), severity of illness (p = 0.17), and diagnostic category on admission (p = 0.31) were not associated with ventilator-associated pneumonia. After adjusting for enteral nutrition days, illness severity, and site, ventilator-associated pneumonia was significantly associated with mechanical ventilation more than 10 days (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.2-6.5; p associated pneumonia was diagnosed in 6.5% of mechanically ventilated children in a heterogeneous multicenter cohort. We did not find a link between enteral nutrition duration or route of delivery and ventilator-associated pneumonia. In addition to duration of mechanical ventilation and length of PICU stay, the use of acid-suppressive therapy independently increased the likelihood of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia in this population

  15. Neutromat-Pfrimmer, a new transporting system for the enteral nutrition therapy of tumor patients before, during and after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Tumor patients generally suffer from malnutrition which is still aggravated by radiotherapy and its side effects. Therefore the accompanying alimentary guidance and treatment are very important factor. A plan comprising several degrees from dietary guidance, forced oral and enteral nutrition to intravenous hyperalimentation has proved to be practicable. For the ambulatory radiotherapy of our ORL-patients, we have recently been applying a Nutromat-Pfrimmer, a promoter system operating according to the Bakey pump system and serving for continuous or discontinuous enteral nutrition therapy with formula or elementary diets. The authors describe principle and function of the device and present their first experiences. By using early and consequently this device for our irradiated patients, we hope to prevent or heal malnutrition, ameliorate the tolerance of tumor therapy, reduce the incidence of complications, re-establish the immunocompetence, and improve the life quality of the patients. (orig.) [de

  16. Recent Advances in Enteral Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the provision of enteral nutrition support in the acute and community healthcare settings. Enteral nutrition is beneficial to individuals who have functional guts but may not be able to meet their nutritional requirements via a normal diet. Most of these people have neurological conditions such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and dementia which could impact on swallowing reflexes, leading to dysphagia [1]. Others may have cancer, intellectual disability o...

  17. Enteral nutrition access devices.

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    Kwon, Richard S; Banerjee, Subhas; Desilets, David; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kaul, Vivek; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Song, Louis-Michel Wong Kee; Tierney, William M

    2010-08-01

    The ASGE Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, performing a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but, in many cases, data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such situations, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the ASGE Governing Board. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through August 2009 for articles related to endoscopy in patients requiring enteral feeding access by using the keywords "endoscopy," "percutaneous," "gastrostomy," "jejunostomy," "nasogastric," "nasoenteric," "nasojejunal," "transnasal," "feeding tube," "enteric," and "button." Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. Copyright 2010 American Society

  18. Standard versus rapid food reintroduction after exclusive enteral nutritional therapy in paediatric Crohn's disease.

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    Faiman, Abi; Mutalib, Mohamed; Moylan, Alexander; Morgan, Natalie; Crespi, Daniel; Furman, Mark; Kader, Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    In paediatric Crohn's disease (PCD), 6-8 weeks of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is effective in 60-80% cases. EEN is followed by gradual food reintroduction over variable (1-5 weeks) periods. Currently, there is no recommended duration or method for food reintroduction. The rationale for slow reintroduction is unclear and may be because of concerns about food intolerance or to maintain longer remission. The aims of this study were as follows: to compare relapse rates following standard and rapid reintroduction of food after EEN in PCD and to determine the duration of maintained remission in two groups of PCD patients. Two groups with PCD were compared: group A received standard food reintroduction over 5 weeks and group B received rapid reintroduction over 3 days. Data were collected over two consecutive time periods: group A (2005-2009) and group B (2009-2011). Only patients with a new diagnosis of PCD were included. Those with strictures and those on steroids or biologicals during EEN were excluded. The minimum duration of follow-up was 1 year. Group A included 20 patients and group B included 19 patients. In these groups, EEN led to clinical remission in 80% of the patients in group A and in 76% of the patients in group B. At 6 months, one-third of the patients from each group had developed relapse and a year after EEN, 50% of the patients in group A and 47% of the patients in group B developed relapse. Time to first relapse was 188 days (group A) and 136 days (group B). None of these results were statistically significant. In PCD, rapid food reintroduction following 6-week EEN is safe and equally effective as longer food reintroduction. We propose that a rapid food reintroduction schedule be recommended as the most tolerable approach for food reintroduction. Relapse rate and duration of remission are uninfluenced by the type of food reintroduction.

  19. Evolução antropométrica e sintomas gastrointestinais em pacientes que receberam suplementos nutricionais ou nutrição enteral Anthropometric evolution and gastrointestinal complaints in oral nutritional supplementation and enteral nutritional therapy

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    Juliana Maria Faccioli Sicchieri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Em pacientes hospitalizados, comparar a evolução de variáveis antropométricas e a ocorrência de efeitos adversos relacionados ao consumo de suplementos nutricionais e infusão de nutrição enteral. MÉTODOS: 10 pacientes que recebiam suplementos nutricionais (Grupo SN e 20 em nutrição enteral (Grupo NE, pareados para o gênero, idade (50 ± 21 vs 49 ± 23 anos e afecções de base foram submetidos à avaliação antropométrica ao início e término da terapêutica. Diariamente, foi aplicado um questionário semi-estruturado referente às queixas gastrointestinais. Determinaram-se as diferenças estatísticas obtidas entre o início e o final da terapêutica (teste t para amostras dependentes e entre os grupos de estudo (teste t para amostras independentes. RESULTADOS: A circunferência muscular do braço aumentou nos pacientes do Grupo NE (80 ± 15 vs 85 ± 15% de adequação, p = 0,009 e diminuiu no Grupo SN (96 ± 14 vs 92 ± 14% de adequação, p = 0,04. Náuseas e vômitos foram mais frequentes no Grupo SN (60 vs 10%, p = 0,01 e as queixas relacionadas ao sabor dos produtos ocorreram em 30% dos casos. CONCLUSÃO: Os pacientes que receberam suplementos nutricionais apresentaram maior ocorrência de queixas gastrointestinais e evolução desfavorável dos parâmetros antropométricos. Os dados obtidos no estudo não evidenciam o benefício da suplementação nutricional de rotina em pacientes hospitalizados.OBJECTIVE: To compare the evolution of anthropometric variables and the occurrence of adverse effects related to the ingestion of nutritional food supplements and enteral diet administration in hospitalized patients. METHODS: The study was performed in the Clinical Medicine wards of the Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, USP, with 10 patients receiving nutrition supplements, and 20 patients under enteral nutrition therapy, paired by gender, age (50 ± 21 vs 49 ± 23 years and basic afflictions. All

  20. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B. W. M.; Bruno, M. J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  1. [Pharmaceutical care for patients with enteral nutrition].

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    Gago Sánchez, A I; Garzas Martín de Almagro, C; Cárdenas Aranzana, M; Calañas Continente, A; Calleja Hernández, M A

    2006-01-01

    To detect potential complications and interactions between drugs and enteral nutrition (EN) as to describe the interventions carried out by the pharmacist in those circumstances and to propose strategies of improvement. Prospective assessment of patients admitted to hospital candidates to receive EN. The pharmacist worked as part of the team of Endocrinology and Nutrition for one month. A data collection form was designed for the study in which the following information had to be recorded: NE indications, nutrition characteristics (type, route of administration, infusion rate), pharmacological therapy, drug/EN interaction and complications. The study included 14 patients (mean age of 50 +/- 13 years) in which digestive (35.7%) and neurological (28.6%) complications were the most frequent indications for EN. Eleven patients (78.57%) reported complications associated to EN, mostly digestive (57.14%). The main cause for consultation was related to the administration of drugs via NGT (nasogastric tube). A total of 77 drugs were prescribed, 23 of which were administered in this way, so a guidelines for the administration of drugs via nasogastric tube was prepared. The hospital pharmacist can actively cooperate with nutritional support units, given the need to assess the nutritional support administered and to manage potential complications and interactions between nutritional status, drugs and artificial nutrition. The pharmacist also plays a significant role in the prevention and identification of problems related to the administration of drugs via NGT.

  2. ESPEN Guidelines on Enteral Nutrition: Geriatrics.

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    Volkert, D; Berner, Y N; Berry, E; Cederholm, T; Coti Bertrand, P; Milne, A; Palmblad, J; Schneider, St; Sobotka, L; Stanga, Z; Lenzen-Grossimlinghaus, R; Krys, U; Pirlich, M; Herbst, B; Schütz, T; Schröer, W; Weinrebe, W; Ockenga, J; Lochs, H

    2006-04-01

    Nutritional intake is often compromised in elderly, multimorbid patients. Enteral nutrition (EN) by means of oral nutritional supplements (ONS) and tube feeding (TF) offers the possibility to increase or to insure nutrient intake in case of insufficient oral food intake. The present guideline is intended to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of ONS and TF in geriatric patients. It was developed by an interdisciplinary expert group in accordance with officially accepted standards and is based on all relevant publications since 1985. The guideline was discussed and accepted in a consensus conference. EN by means of ONS is recommended for geriatric patients at nutritional risk, in case of multimorbidity and frailty, and following orthopaedic-surgical procedures. In elderly people at risk of undernutrition ONS improve nutritional status and reduce mortality. After orthopaedic-surgery ONS reduce unfavourable outcome. TF is clearly indicated in patients with neurologic dysphagia. In contrast, TF is not indicated in final disease states, including final dementia, and in order to facilitate patient care. Altogether, it is strongly recommended not to wait until severe undernutrition has developed, but to start EN therapy early, as soon as a nutritional risk becomes apparent.

  3. [Supplemental parenteral nutrition for intensive care patients: a logical combination with enteral nutrition].

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    Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Thibault, Ronan; Berger, Mette M; Pichard, Claude

    2009-12-09

    Undernutrition is a widespread problem in the intensive care and is associated with a worse clinical outcome. Enteral nutrition is the recommended nutritional support in ICU patients. However, enteral nutrition is frequently insufficient to cover protein-energy needs. The initiation of supplemental parenteral nutrition, when enteral nutrition is insufficient, could optimize the nutritional therapy. Such a combination could allow reducing morbidity, length of stay and recovery, as well as improving quality of life and health care costs. Prospective studies are currently underway to test this hypothesis.

  4. Nutritional Therapy.

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    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [de

  6. [Enteral nutrition in the multiple trauma patient].

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    Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    The hypermetabolism that develops in patients with severe polytraumatism has led to the need for an aggressive metabolic-nutritional support from the start. Parenteral Nutrition is the preferred technique in many instances, due to the doubts on the effectiveness of enteral nutrition in the control of the metabolic response and to problems of gastrointestinal tolerance derived from its administration. However, the role of enteral nutrition as an important factor which limits the development of bacterial translocation and the chain of events leading to multiorganic failure appears to be more and more well-established and is an important argument for justifying the early administration of enteral nutrition in these patients. In accordance with the accumulated experience of several authors over the past few years, enteral nutrition may be administered early in polytraumatized patients. This is not only accompanied by the evidence of acceptable gastrointestinal tolerance to the diet, but also by additional advantages compared to parenteral nutrition, such as the maintenance of trophism and immunocompetence of the digestive mucosa, the reduction of septic complications and also greater nutritional effectiveness which can be evaluated by the behaviour of the seric proteins used as nutritional evolution markers. The interest of the different diet formulae which exist at present, for example diets enriched with branched-chain amino acids, diets with added fibre, peptidic diets, specific pulmonary diets or "euglycaemic diets" is evaluated in this review. All these diets may mean an increase in the effectiveness and/or tolerance of enteral nutrition in polytraumatized patients, and also contribute to the handling of specific problems such as "stress" hyperglycaemia or the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation support. The use of specific nutrients for the digestive mucosa, such as glutamine or short chain fatty acids seems to be an important factor in the reduction of

  7. Effect Of Oligomeric Enteral Nutrition On Symptoms Of Acute Radiation Enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinsky, P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic tumours is frequently associated with acute radiation enteritis. Predominant symptoms include diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. There are very few effective interventions available for this condition. Enteral oligomeric nutrition has been used in bowel diseases with functional failure similar to radiation enteritis. The aim of presented work was to observe occurrence of symptoms of radiation enteritis in patients undergoing abdominal or pelvic radiotherapy. Apart from diet and pharmacological therapy, oral oligomeric enteral nutrition (Peptisorb Powder Nutricia) at the dose of 1000 - 2000 ml per day was administered for minimum of 4 days. Planned period of administration was 14 days and longer. Symptoms of radiation enteritis were evaluated at the beginning and in the end of administration. Prevalence of all evaluated symptoms of radiation enteritis was decreased and difference was statistically significant for diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The use of evaluated oligomeric nutritional support might, in conjunction with pharmacotherapy and diet, alleviate symptoms of acute radiation enteritis and maintain nutritional status of patients. (author)

  8. [Exclusive enteral nutrition continues to be first line therapy for pediatric Crohn's disease in the era of biologics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-López, V M; Blasco-Alonso, J; Lacasa Maseri, S; Girón Fernández-Crehuet, F; Serrano Nieto, M J; Vicioso Recio, M I; Sierra Salinas, C

    2015-07-01

    Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) has been to be more effective than corticosteroids in achieving mucosal healing without their side effects. To determine the efficacy of EEN in terms of inducing clinical remission in newly diagnosed CD children and to study the efficacy of this therapeutic approach in improving the degree of intestinal mucosa inflammation. The medical records of patients with newly diagnosed Crohn's disease treated with EEN were reviewed retrospectively. The degree of mucosal inflammation was assessed by fecal calprotectin (FC). Remission was defined as a PCDAI<10. Forty patients (24 males) were included, the age at diagnosis was 11.6 ± 3.6 years. Of the 34 patients who completed the EEN period, 32 (94% per-protocol analysis) achieved clinical remission. This percentage fell to 80% in the intention-to-treat analysis. The compliance rate was 95%. Duration of EEN was 6.42 weeks (IQR 6.0-8.14). FC was significantly higher in patients with moderate and severe disease. Median baseline FC levels (680 μg/g) decreased significantly to 218 μg/g (P<0.0001) after EEN. We found a statistically significant correlation between FC and PCDAI (rho=0.727; P<0.0001). Early use of thiopurines (< 8 weeks) versus subsequent use was not associated with improved outcomes during the follow-up. EEN administered for 6-8 weeks is effective for inducing clinical remission and decreasing the degree of mucosal inflammation. We did not find differences in terms of maintenance of remission in patients treated early with thiopurines. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831

  10. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Brooke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  11. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nilesh M; Skillman, Heather E; Irving, Sharon Y; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Vermilyea, Sarah; Farrington, Elizabeth Anne; McKeever, Liam; Hall, Amber M; Goday, Praveen S; Braunschweig, Carol

    2017-07-01

    This document represents the first collaboration between two organizations, American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Society of Critical Care Medicine, to describe best practices in nutrition therapy in critically ill children. The target of these guidelines is intended to be the pediatric (> 1 mo and clinical trials and 925 citations for cohort studies. The EMBASE search for clinical trials culled 1,661 citations. In total, the search for clinical trials yielded 1,107 citations, whereas the cohort search yielded 925. After careful review, 16 randomized controlled trials and 37 cohort studies appeared to answer one of the eight preidentified question groups for this guideline. We used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria to adjust the evidence grade based on assessment of the quality of study design and execution. These guidelines are not intended for neonates or adult patients. The guidelines reiterate the importance of nutritional assessment, particularly the detection of malnourished patients who are most vulnerable and therefore potentially may benefit from timely intervention. There is a need for renewed focus on accurate estimation of energy needs and attention to optimizing protein intake. Indirect calorimetry, where feasible, and cautious use of estimating equations and increased surveillance for unintended caloric underfeeding and overfeeding are recommended. Optimal protein intake and its correlation with clinical outcomes are areas of great interest. The optimal route and timing of nutrient delivery is an area of intense debate and investigations. Enteral nutrition remains the preferred route for nutrient delivery. Several strategies to optimize enteral nutrition during critical illness have emerged. The role of supplemental parenteral nutrition has been highlighted, and a delayed approach appears to be beneficial. Immunonutrition cannot be currently recommended. Overall, the pediatric

  12. [Artificial nutrition in children (I): enteral access].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate nutritional support is crucial in the therapeutic approach of multiple conditions, which justifies the frequent and increasing use of specific access routes for enteral and parenteral nutrition. This article reviews the relevant literature concerning indications, procedures, effectiveness and complications of enteral access routes in children. The decision between gastric and postpyloric access, and between nasogastric tube and gastrostomy is thoroughly discussed. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is the most commonly used technique when a long-term gastric access is required, given its efficacy and safety although the associated morbidity is not negligible;laparoscopic gastrostomy emerges as a potentially advantageous alternative.

  13. Aspects of enteral nutrition in cancer chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jitske Martha

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with several aspects of the influences of intensive cancer chemotherapy on the nutritional status, the metabolism, and the gastrointestinal tract of the host and describes whether these results can be influenced by enteral hyperalimentation, We studied these aspects in patients

  14. [ENTERAL NUTRITION ON THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escortell Sánchez, Raquel; Reig García-Galbis, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    to identify what effect causes enteral nutrition on nutritional status of cancer. a search was performed using the keywords "Cancer" AND "Enteral Nutrition" AND "Supplementation" in four document databases: Pubmed, EBSCO, ProQuest, and Web of Science. age of the sample, major than 18 years; submitted to surgery for cancer; that the intervention program was including diet and employment or not of nutritional Supplementation; clinical trials published between January 2004 and December 2014, in scientific journals indexed. we analyzed 660 articles, of which only 2% has been included. 58% of intervention programs are applied outside Spain; 84% of the interventions was carried out in a hospitable ambient; 58% of the sample is formed by adults older than 54 years; 33% of the interventions were multidisciplinary and its duration ranges between 1 and 4 years. we found just a few national interventions in cancer participants and there two types of interventions: by exclusive polymeric enteral formula or mixed with immunonutrition. enteral nutrition shows against the parenteral and its introduction at an early stage, it helps to improve nutritional status of the patient; polymeric formulas next immunonutrition, it helps to reduce the time of hospitalization; the analytical parameters are shown as a measurement pattern when assessing the improvement in nutritional status in cancer. It is recommended to increase the research in this field, especially in children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical and nutritional implications of radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, W.H.; Fan, A.; Halsted, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and nutritional significance of radiation enteritis was assessed in eight patients with chronic diarrhea which followed curative doses of radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Steatorrhea, found in seven malnourished patients, was ascribed to ileal disease or previous surgery, or to bacterial contamination of the small intestine. Lactose intolerance, assessed by breath hydrogen excretion after oral lactose and by jejunal lactase levels, was found in six patients. In a subgroup of five patients, the administration of two different defined formula liquid diets by nasoduodenal infusion decreased fecal fluid and energy losses by about one-half. Compared to Vivonex-HN, the infusion of Criticare-HN was associated with greater likelihood of intestinal gas production but a three-fold greater utilization of protein. Intestinal malabsorption and malnutrition in radiation enteritis has diverse etiologies. Whereas nutritional support by liquid diet limits fecal fluid and energy losses, these diets differ significantly in clinical tolerance and biologic value.

  16. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nilesh M; Skillman, Heather E; Irving, Sharon Y; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Vermilyea, Sarah; Farrington, Elizabeth Anne; McKeever, Liam; Hall, Amber M; Goday, Praveen S; Braunschweig, Carol

    2017-07-01

    This document represents the first collaboration between 2 organizations-the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Society of Critical Care Medicine-to describe best practices in nutrition therapy in critically ill children. The target of these guidelines is intended to be the pediatric critically ill patient (>1 month and 2-3 days in a PICU admitting medical, surgical, and cardiac patients. In total, 2032 citations were scanned for relevance. The PubMed/MEDLINE search resulted in 960 citations for clinical trials and 925 citations for cohort studies. The EMBASE search for clinical trials culled 1661 citations. In total, the search for clinical trials yielded 1107 citations, whereas the cohort search yielded 925. After careful review, 16 randomized controlled trials and 37 cohort studies appeared to answer 1 of the 8 preidentified question groups for this guideline. We used the GRADE criteria (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to adjust the evidence grade based on assessment of the quality of study design and execution. These guidelines are not intended for neonates or adult patients. The guidelines reiterate the importance of nutrition assessment-particularly, the detection of malnourished patients who are most vulnerable and therefore may benefit from timely intervention. There is a need for renewed focus on accurate estimation of energy needs and attention to optimizing protein intake. Indirect calorimetry, where feasible, and cautious use of estimating equations and increased surveillance for unintended caloric underfeeding and overfeeding are recommended. Optimal protein intake and its correlation with clinical outcomes are areas of great interest. The optimal route and timing of nutrient delivery are areas of intense debate and investigations. Enteral nutrition remains the preferred route for nutrient delivery. Several strategies to optimize enteral nutrition during critical illness have emerged. The

  17. Sobrevida e complicações em idosos com doenças neurológicas em nutrição enteral Occurrence of complications and survival rates in elderly with neurological disorders undergoing enteral nutrition therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Stangherlin Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a sobrevida e complicações de pacientes idosos com doenças neurológicas em uso de nutrição enteral (NE. MÉTODOS: Avaliaram-se pacientes acima de 60 anos acompanhados pelo serviço de atenção domiciliar de um plano de saúde de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil. A avaliação ocorreu no domicílio após a alta hospitalar com NE, após três e seis meses e ao término do estudo. Foram realizadas avaliação nutricional, coleta de dados em prontuários e entrevistas com familiares ou cuidadores. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 79 pacientes, idade 82,9 ± 10,4 anos, 49,4% com demência e 50,6% com outros diagnósticos neurológicos, 100% com elevado grau de dependência avaliada pelo índice de Katz. A maioria dos pacientes (91,2% apresentou complicações (pneumonia, perda da sonda, diarreia, constipação, vômito, extravasamento periostomia, obstrução da sonda, refluxo e miíase. Pneumonia foi a mais frequente, ocorrendo em 55,9%. A mortalidade foi de 15,2% aos três meses, 22,8% aos 6 meses e 43% ao término do estudo. A mediana de sobrevida após iniciada a NE foi de 364 dias. Não se observaram diferenças entre mortalidade e diagnóstico neurológico, vias de acesso de NE e complicações. A sobrevida foi menor em pacientes com estado nutricional inadequado e albumina OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence of complications, as well as the survival rates, in elderly people having neurological diseases and undergoing enteral nutrition therapy (ENT. METHODS: Patients aged over 60 years, assisted by a home medical service from a healthcare plan in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were thoroughly evaluated. The mentioned evaluation occurred at their homes after hospital discharge with enteral nutrition (EN after a three-month period, a six-month period, and at the end of the study. A nutritional assessment was performed along with data collection performed on the patients' electronic medical records, and interviews

  18. Adequação calórico-proteica da terapia nutricional enteral em pacientes cirúrgicos Protein-calorie adequacy of enteral nutrition therapy in surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Freire Isidro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a adequação calórico-proteica da terapia nutricional enteral (TNE empregada em pacientes cirúrgicos. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, realizado em pacientes cirúrgicos que receberam TNE de março a outubro de 2011. Os pacientes foram avaliados antropometricamente e pela avaliação subjetiva global (ASG. Os valores de calorias e proteínas prescritos e administrados e as causas de interrupção da dieta foram registrados diariamente. O valor de 90% foi utilizado como referencial de adequação. A diferença entre o prescrito e o administrado foi verificada pelo teste t de Student. RESULTADOS: Uma amostra de 32 pacientes, com idade de 55,8 ± 14,9 anos, apresentou 40,6 a 71,9% de desnutrição dependendo da ferramenta utilizada. A neoplasia gástrica e as gastrectomias foram o diagnóstico e as cirurgias mais frequentes. Dos pacientes, 50% conseguiram atingir suas necessidades calórico-proteicas. A adequação da dieta recebida em relação à prescrita foi de 88,9 ± 12,1% e de 87,9 ± 12,2% para calorias e proteínas, respectivamente, com um déficit significativo (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the protein-calorie adequacy of enteral nutrition therapy (ENT in surgical patients. METHODS: A prospective study was performed in surgical patients who received ENT from March to October 2011. Patients were evaluated anthropometrically and by subjective global assessment (SGA. The amount of calories and protein prescribed and administered were recorded daily, as well as the causes of discontinuation of the diet. A 90% value was used as the adequacy reference. The difference between the prescribed and administered amount was verified by Student's t-test. RESULTS: A sample of 32 patients, aged 55.8 ± 14.9 years, showed a malnutrition rate of 40.6% to 71.9%, depending on the assessment tool used. Gastric cancer and gastrectomy were the most common diagnosis and surgery, respectively. Of the patients, 50% were able to meet their caloric and

  19. [Our experience with ambulatory enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduña, R M; Giménez Martínez, R; Valdivia Garvayo, M; Ruiz Santa-Olalla, A T; Roca Fernández-Castanys, E; Pérez de la Cruz, A

    1995-01-01

    Enteral nutrition in the home of the patient, has gained interest in recent years. In our health care area, we do not have a Unit of at Home Hospitalization, which has not prevented the implementation of this therapeutic modality in certain types of patients. 89 cases who have undergone enteral Nutrition in their home after the last hospital admission, were reviewed. According to the basic pathology, 41.6% (37 patients) correspond to neurological patients; 51.7% correspond to neoplasmic patients, and 6.7% are classified as miscellaneous. The average age is 64 years (18 months-92 years); the mean caloric ingestion is 1,520 Kcal/day (500-2,500), and the duration is a mean of 315 days (7-1,560). The complications observed through ambulatory visits of the patient and/or the family, accounted for a total of 36, of which 30 (83%) were digestive, and were corrected with the usual methods. In 8 cases (22%), it involved mechanical complications, and only 2 cases involved metabolic complications. Only 1 serious complication (massive bronchoaspiration) could have been avoided. The results indicate a good degree of acceptance, with similar results to those described by other authors, and with a low incidence of severe complications.

  20. [Sensory evaluation of enteral nutritional supplements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell Vidal, Lina; Sánchez Juan, Carlos; Alfonso García, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is indicated in patients who, although they may not eat enough food, maintain a sufficient function to receive, digest and absorb nutrients digestive system. Oral Nutritional Supplements (SON) are nutritionally complete or incomplete formulas (depending on whether or not provide all the nutrients needed to serve as the sole source of nutrients), which supplement inadequate oral diet. This study aims to evaluate the organoleptic characteristics of hyperproteic, normoproteic and fiber-enriched oral SON. SON test, carried out at the Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition Consortium Hospital General Universitario de Valencia from October 2012 to February 2013. 137 SON were evaluated in total, of which 47 were hyperproteic, 46 normoproteic and 44 enriched in fiber. Of the SON evaluated in the group of hyperproteic the following 3 SON obtained the best scores: Fresenius Prot Energy Drink® (21,27, vanilla flavor), Avant Standard Nut® (20.3 , strawberry flavor) and Resource® Protein (20.01, chocolate flavor) In the group of normoproteic SON the 3 best rated were: Ensure Plus® (22.3, banana flavor), Ensure Plus® (21.9, peach flavor) and Fresubin Energy Drink® (21, strawberry flavor) In the group of fiber-enriched the 3 SON most appreciated were: 2 Kcal Fresubin Fibre Drink® (23.78, vanilla flavor), Ensure Plus® TwoCal (22.9, banana flavor) and Fortimel Compact® (21.5, strawberry flavor) The study aims to guide clinicians on what SON may be more acceptable to the patient, so that the SON serve their purpose and restore or improve nutritional status, as the SON intervention is safe and cost - effective, since they improve both the functionality and quality of life. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Early enteral nutrition compared to outcome in critically ill trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The benefit of an early enteral nutrition start in critical ill patients is widely accepted. However, limited published data focus on trauma patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of early enteral nutrition initiation on length of stay and mortality in an intensive care unit (ICU), as well as explore if enteral ...

  2. Introductory to the ESPEN guidelines on enteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochs, H.; Allison, S.P.; Meier, R.

    2006-01-01

    The ESPEN guidelines on enteral nutrition are the first evidence-based European recommendations for enteral nutrition. They were established by European experts for a variety of disease groups. During guideline development it became evident that terms and definitions in clinical nutrition have been...

  3. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    OpenAIRE

    Torović Ljilja; Grujičić Maja; Pavlović-Trajković Ljiljana; Jovičić Jelena; Novaković Budimka; Balać Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered diet...

  4. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R. [Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Rostock Univ. (Germany)]|[Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen Univ. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Der Ernaehrungsstatus von Tumorpatienten ist haeufig bereits vor jeder antitumoroesen Therapie reduziert und kann sich durch die notwendige Radio(chemo)therapie weiter verschlechtern. Methode: Im Rahmen dieses Uebersichtsartikels werden die Moeglichkeiten und Risiken der enteralen und parenteralen Ernaehrung waehrend einer Radiotherapie besprochen. Die Indikationen der enteralen Ernaehrung werden anhand von eigenen Ergebnissen begruendet. Ergebnisse: Die Langzeiternaehrung wird am besten ueber einen enteralen Zugang durchgefuehrt. In einer prospektiven, nichtrandomisierten Studie konnten wir zeigen, dass eine enterale Ernaehrung mittels perkutaner endoskopisch kontrollierter Gastrostomie (PEG) nicht nur die anthropometrischen und biochemischen Parameter waehrend einer Radio(chemo)therapie verbessert, sondern auch die Lebensqualitaet. Eine weitere Moeglichkeit besteht in der

  5. Enteral Nutrition in Pancreaticoduodenectomy: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Buscemi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD is considered the gold standard treatment for periampullory carcinomas. This procedure presents 30%–40% of morbidity. Patients who have undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy often present perioperative malnutrition that is worse in the early postoperative days, affects the process of healing, the intestinal barrier function and the number of postoperative complications. Few studies focus on the relation between enteral nutrition (EN and postoperative complications. Our aim was to perform a review, including only randomized controlled trial meta-analyses or well-designed studies, of evidence regarding the correlation between EN and main complications and outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy, as delayed gastric emptying (DGE, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF, postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH, length of stay and infectious complications. Several studies, especially randomized controlled trial have shown that EN does not increase the rate of DGE. EN appeared safe and tolerated for patients after PD, even if it did not reveal any advantages in terms of POPF, PPH, length of stay and infectious complications.

  6. Nutrition therapy in the critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Heather E; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2012-04-01

    Malnutrition and obesity are prevalent in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. Nutritional deterioration secondary to suboptimal nutrient delivery can adversely affect outcomes during pediatric critical illness. This review highlights the recent investigations of nutrition assessment, energy balance, indirect calorimetry, nutrition therapy, barriers to nutrient delivery, monitoring during enteral feeding, and the role of nutrition guidelines in critically ill children. Critically ill children are at high risk for energy and protein imbalance. Indirect calorimetry remains the only accurate method to assess energy requirements in this population. Intensive insulin therapy to achieve glycemic control may reduce morbidity and mortality in adults, but risks hypoglycemia in critically ill children. Early enteral nutrition improves nutrition outcomes and adherence to nutrition guidelines can overcome barriers to optimal nutrition therapy. Timely and adequate nutrition therapy is essential to improve nutrition outcomes in critically ill children. Further research is required to determine clinical outcome benefits with indirect calorimetry and enteral nutrition guidelines, and to identify optimal glucose targets.

  7. [Home enteral nutrition. Annual report 1999. NADYA-SENPE Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Candela, C; Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C; Planas Vilá, M; Castellá, M; García Luna, P P; Parejo, J; Chamorro Quirós, J; Irles Rocamora, J A; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Carbonell, M D; Parés Marimón, R M; Gómez Enterría, P; Salas, J; Mancha, A; Ferrón Vidán, F; Celador Almaraz, A; Bobis, M A; Martín Peña, G; Martí Bonmatí, E; Morejón, E; Jiménez Sanz, M; Martínez, I; Muñoz, A; de la Rubia Nieto, A; Ordóñez González, J; Tusón Rovira, C; Carrera Macazaga, J A

    2002-01-01

    During 1999, as in previous years, the NADYA-SENPE Group has maintained an annual register of patients with Artificial Nutrition at Home in order to keep up to date our available knowledge of this therapy. The present paper analyzes the results of the sixth National Register of patients under treatment with Enteral Nutrition at Home corresponding to 1999, produced with the co-operation of twenty-three centres in the Spanish national health network. The data were collected through a closed questionnaire included on our web site (www.nadya-senpe.com). Apart from epidemiological information, the form includes the indication that led to the prescription of nutrition, nutritional treatment, access path, complications and admissions to hospital, follow-up of the treatment, patients' quality of life and progress. All of the data are processed by the co-ordinating team. The Nutrition Unit at La Paz Teaching Hospital in Madrid has acted as the group co-ordinator. During 1999, a total of 2,262 patients at the twenty-three collaborating centres followed treatment with Home Enteral Nutrition (NED in its Spanish acronym). The mean age was 63.6 (19.67 years (males: 57.6%; females: 42.3%). The mean time with nutritional treatment is 5.89 (4.25 months. The neurological alterations (37.5%) and neoplasias (36.8%) were the most frequent indications for NED. Most patients used oral administration (50.7%), the use of artificial routes is less frequent, with 5NG being used on 27.9% and PEG on 12.7%. The polymeric formulas are the ones most commonly used (87.7%). The number of complications recorded amounted to 1,403 episodes, representing 0.62 complications per patient per year, of which 40.8% were gastro-intestinal (0.26 complications per patient per year) and 18.7% were mechanical complications, with only 9 recorded cases of bronchoaspiration. It was necessary to admit patients to hospital on 836 occasions (0.38 admissions per patient), albeit generally for causes not associated with

  8. Nutrition and Hyperglycemia Management in the Inpatient Setting (Meals on Demand, Parenteral, or Enteral Nutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drincic, Andjela T; Knezevich, Jon T; Akkireddy, Padmaja

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide the latest evidence and expert recommendations for management of hospitalized patients with diabetes or hyperglycemia receiving enteral (EN), parenteral (PN) nutrition support or, those with unrestricted oral diet, consuming meals on demand. Patients with and without diabetes mellitus commonly develop hyperglycemia while receiving EN or PN support, placing them at increased risk of adverse outcomes, including in-hospital mortality. Very little new evidence is available in the form of randomized controlled trials (RCT) to guide the glycemic management of these patients. Reduction in the dextrose concentration within parenteral nutrition as well as selection of an enteral formula that diminishes the carbohydrate exposure to a patient receiving enteral nutrition are common strategies utilized in practice. No specific insulin regimen has been shown to be superior in the management of patients receiving EN or PN nutrition support. For those receiving oral nutrition, new challenges have been introduced with the most recent practice allowing patients to eat meals on demand, leading to extreme variability in carbohydrate exposure and risk of hypo and hyperglycemia. Synchronization of nutrition delivery with the astute use of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy to match the physiologic action of insulin in patients receiving nutritional support should be implemented to improve glycemic control in hospitalized patients. Further RCTs are needed to evaluate glycemic and other clinical outcomes of patients receiving nutritional support. For patients eating meals on demand, development of hospital guidelines and policies are needed, ensuring optimization and coordination of meal insulin delivery in order to facilitate patient safety.

  9. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Journals and Publications Donate Today! Support Nutrition Research Twitter Tweets by ASPENWEB Advertisement Events Webinar: Parenteral Nutrition ... Staff Find a Clinician Press Room Career Center Advertising and Sponsorship Related Websites BPS NBNSC NBPNS Connect ...

  10. Complications relating to enteral and parenteral nutrition in trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the incidence of complications in patients receiving enteral and parenteral nutrition (PN), and review how the early initiation of enteral feeding and early achievement of caloric goal would affect the incidence of complications. Design: The design was a retrospective audit of ...

  11. [National registry of home enteral nutrition in Spain 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo Pérez, L M; Chicharro, M L; Cuerda, C; García Luna, P P; Rabassa Soler, A; Romero, A; Irles, J A; Penacho, M A; Camarero, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; Calañas, A; Parés, R M; Lecha, M; Gómez Candela, C; Zapata, A; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Luis, D de; Wanden-Berghe, C; Cantón, A; Laborda, L; Matía, P; Martí, E

    2009-01-01

    To communicate the results from the registry of Home-Based Enteral Nutrition of the NADYASENPE group in 2007. We included every patient in the registry with home enteral nutrition any time from January 1st to December 31st of 2007. The number of patients with home enteral nutrition in 2007 was 5,107 (52% male) from 28 different hospitals. 95.4% of them were 15 yr or older, with a mean age of 67.96 +/- 18.12, and 4.2 +/- 3.38 among patients aged 14 yr or less. The most common underlying diseases were neurological (37.8%) and neoplastic diseases (29.3%). Enteral nutrition was administered p.o. in most patients (63.5%), followed by nasogastric tube (25.9%), while gastrostomy was only used in 9.2%. The mean time in enteral nutrition support was 9.4 months and the most common reasons for withdrawal were death (58.7%) and switching to oral intake (32%). Activity was limited in 31.4% of patients and 36.01% were house-bound. Most patients needed partial (26.51%) or total (37.68%) care assistance. Enteral formula was provided by hospitals to 69.14% of patients and by pharmacies to 30.17% of them, while disposable material was provided by hospitals to 81.63% and by Primary Care to the remaining patients. In 2007, there has been an increase of more than 30% of patients registered with home enteral nutrition comparing with 2006, without any big difference in other data, but a higher proportion of patients with enteral nutrition p.o.

  12. Nutritional therapy in cirrhosis or alcoholic hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fialla, Annette D; Israelsen, Mads; Hamberg, Ole

    2015-01-01

    with 329 allocated to enteral (nine trials) or intravenous (four trials) nutrition and 334 controls. All trials were classed as having a high risk of bias. Random-effects meta-analysis showed that nutritional therapy reduced mortality 0.80 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.99). The result was not confirmed in sequential......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis are often malnourished and have a superimposed stress metabolism, which increases nutritional demands. We performed a systematic review on the effects of nutritional therapy vs. no intervention for patients with cirrhosis...... or alcoholic hepatitis. METHODS: We included trials on nutritional therapy designed to fulfil at least 75% of daily nutritional demand. Authors extracted data in an independent manner. Random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses were performed and the results expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence...

  13. IODINE CONTENT OF ENTERAL AND PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Devina L; Young, Lorraine S; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2017-07-01

    Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis, and iodine deficiency may result in thyroid disorders including goiter and hypothyroidism. Patients on long-term enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) may be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The recommended daily allowance for iodine intake is 150 μg for nonpregnant adults. However, there is no current consensus among scientific societies regarding the quantity of iodine to be added in adult EN and PN formulations. The objective of this study was to determine the iodine content of U.S. adult enteral and parenteral nutrition solutions. This study also aimed to determine whether adult patients in the United States who are receiving long-term artificial nutrition may be at risk for iodine deficiency. Ten enteral nutrition solutions and 4 parenteral nutrition solutions were evaluated. The iodine contents of these solutions were measured spectrophotometrically and compared to the labeled contents. Measured and labeled EN iodine contents were similar (range 131-176 μg/L and 106-160 μg/L, respectively). In contrast, PN formulas were found to contain small, unlabeled amounts of iodine, averaging 27 μg/L. Typical fluid requirements are 30 to 40 mL/kg/day for adults receiving either total EN (TEN) or total PN (TPN). Adults on long-term TEN likely consume enough servings to meet their daily iodine requirements. However, patients on long-term TPN would require on average 5.6 L PN/day to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine. This volume of PN is far in excess of typical consumption. Thus, U.S. patients requiring long-term TPN may be at risk for iodine deficiency. EN = enteral nutrition; PN = parenteral nutrition; TEN = total enteral nutrition; TPN = total parenteral nutrition; UIC = urinary iodine concentration.

  14. Proteins and peptides in enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Augustin, O; Martínez de Victoria Muñoz, E

    2006-05-01

    A protein is an essential macronutrient for the growth and maintenance of corporal structures. An important concept in proteic nutrition is the protein's quality, mainly determined by the profile and proportion of the amino acids making up the protein, although other factors such as solubility and degree of glycosylation may be involved. There are different ways to evaluate protein quality that can be classified as chemical, biological and microbiological. Currently Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAAS) is routinely used. Protein quality can be altered by the technological and culinary processes to which food is subjected and also by the presence in food of anti-nutritional factors affecting the bioavailability of amino acids. Protein complementation through the formulation of low-quality protein mixtures lets us improve bioavailability, and therefore the quality of this protein mix. In the past few years, nutrition and food technology are undergoing a profound transformation due to the development of the concept of functional and nutraceutic foods. Functional proteins and bioactive peptides are gaining in importance since, in addition to their nutritional role as a source of amino acids, they are capable of exerting different biological effects on the immune system, the cardiovascular system or the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, these peptides and proteins have been described as having anticancer, antibacterial or antiviral effects. This paper reviews the most relevant functional proteins and bioactive peptides from a functional standpoint, with special emphasis on those coming from milk, eggs and soy.

  15. Iodine in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Crill, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) has multiple adverse effects on growth and development due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Methods for assessment of iodine nutrition in individuals include the urinary iodine concentration (UI), thyroid size and thyroid function tests. The UI measured in several

  16. The Use of Enteral Nutrition in the Management of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of enteral nutrition in the management of stroke. Stroke is a major source of disability, including dysphagia. The clinical manifestation of swallowing difficulties in stroke patients may lead to malnutrition which has implications for health status and clinical outcomes including morbidity, mortality and cost to the health service. The prevalence of malnutrition following an acute stroke could range from 8% to 34%. Therefore, the need to develop and implement the use of enteral nutrition support in stroke patients becomes pertinent. A range of enteral feeding tubes and feeding methods may be used to support stroke patients who are unable to meet their nutritional requirements through oral intake alone, although each of these approaches has its merits and limitations. Based on this review, there is evidence that enteral nutrition support is a useful method of providing nutrition for patients with dysphagia following a stroke in order to enhance their nutritional status and promote their health. However, there are challenges in the use of enteral tube feeding in these patients.

  17. [Current views of nutritional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogozheva, A V; Kaganov, B S

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies in the Research Institute of Nutrition showed that dietary patterns of the Russian population are on the whole at variance with the balanced feeding formula largely due to excessive consumption of animal fat, insufficient consumption of proteins, vitamins, micro- and macroelements, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and dietary fibers. It is estimated that over 70% of total lethality in this country is due to diseases directly related to improper feeding (the so-called alimentary-dependent diseases), cardiovascular disorders, some neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, etc. Dietary therapy adjusted to specific pathogenetic features, clinical picture, stage of the disease, character of metabolic disorders in individual patients is an important factor having versatile beneficial effects on the patient's health, correcting metabolic problems, and improving quality of life. Decree No 330 of August 5, 2003 "On measures to improve nutritional therapy in medical institutions of the Russian Federation" introduced a new nomenclature of standard diets based on chemical composition of separate foods and the previously used system of numbered diets. Modern dietary therapy includes not only standard and special diets but also specific products to be used in concrete clinical conditions, enteral and parenteral nutrition, biologically active food additives, etc.

  18. [Early enteral nutrition in gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghesquière, F; Olivero de Rubiana, J P; Mourot, N; Garen, C; Wulverick, M; Viars, P

    1980-01-01

    In a series of twenty similar patients, having a healthy small intestine and having undergone elective surgery, two protocols of alimentation were studied. Beginning from the 8th post-operative hour, enteral alimentation is carried out by means of access to the jejunum and continued for ten days. The volume of liquid in the alimentary canal is progressively increased allowing the intravenous route to be stopped on average after 3,9 days. The high amount of the nitrogen and calory supply limits the post-operative nitrogen catabolism and rapidly restores a positive nitrogen balance. In other respects the weight loss is less than 2%, the biological constants are stable and no serious complications are linked with this technique. The early use of GI tract deals with the alimentational and electrolyte needs of the post-operative patient and diminishes the risks of iatrogenic complications of long term intravenous infusions. Relying on experimental data proving the absence of cessation of peristalsis of the small intestine in the immediate post-operative period and also the continuation of its capacity for absorption, this work demonstrates the possibility of early enteral alimentation. A better knowledge of the indications and contra-indications of this technique of feeding, of its methods of administration, and of the capabilities of absorption of the alimentary canal, must extend its indications to the high risk operative patients.

  19. Influence of enteric bacteria and parasite infection and nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of enteric bacteria and parasite infection and nutritional status on diarrhoea occurrence in six to 60 month old children admitted at Morogoro ... Other factors found to significantly (p<0.05) influence diarrhoea occurrence included age when breastfeeding stopped, food(s) given, feeding utensils and the child´s toilet.

  20. Document of standardization of enteral nutrition access in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Lorena; Frías, Laura; Creus, Gloria; Parejo, Juana; Urzola, Carmen; Ashbaugh, Rosana; Pérez-Portabella, Cleofé; Cuerda, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The group of standardization and protocols of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) published in 2011 a consensus document SENPE/SEGHNP/ANECIPN/SECP on enteral access for paediatric nutritional support. Along the lines of this document, we have developed another document on adult patients to homogenize the clinical practice and improve the quality of care in enteral access in this age group. The working group included health professionals (nurses, dietitians and doctor) with extensive experience in enteral nutrition and access. We tried to find scientific evidence through a literature review and we used the criteria of the Agency for Health-care Research and Quality (AHRQ) to classify the evidence (Grade of Recommendation A, B or C). Later the document was reviewed by external experts to the group and requested the endorsement of the Scientific and Educational Committee (CCE) and the group of home artificial nutrition (NADYA) of the SENPE. The full text will be published as a monograph number in this journal. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Polypharmacy and enteral nutrition in patients with complex chronic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Jiménez, Rosa Mª; Ortega Navarro, Cristina; Cuerda Compés, Cristina

    2017-05-08

    Oral medications are often administered through enteral feeding tubes in patients with complex chronic diseases. It is important to consider possible interactions between drugs and enteral nutrition that might lead to unsuccessful treatment or tube occlusion. These patients become subjects for higher risk of problems and errors such as drug incompatibility with enteral nutrition and inappropriate dosage form selection. It is possible to minimize the risk of tube occlusion and incompatibilities problems by recognizing potential medication errors, selecting the most appropriate drug and dosage form and using appropriate administration techniques. In this context, high-alert medications for patients with chronic diseases deserve special attention. Furthermore, risk exposure should be considered among healthcare professionals and patient caregivers handling hazardous drugs. Therefore, main incompatibility problems between drugs and enteral nutrition have been reviewed, including general recommendations for administration of oral medications through enteral feeding tubes and safe handling of hazardous drugs. Specific recommendations for administration of high-alert medications for patients with chronic diseases are also included.

  2. Permissive or Trophic Enteral Nutrition and Full Enteral Nutrition Had Similar Effects on Clinical Outcomes in Intensive Care: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Camila F A; de Vasconcelos, Simone G; da Silva, Thales A; Silva, Flávia M

    2018-01-26

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the effect of permissive underfeeding/trophic feeding on the clinical outcomes of critically ill patients. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials to evaluate the mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation duration in patients randomized to either hypocaloric or full-energy enteral nutrition was performed. Data sources included PubMed and Scopus and the reference lists of the articles retrieved. Two independent reviewers participated in all phases of this systematic review as proposed by the Cochrane Handbook, and the review was reported according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A total of 7 randomized clinical trials that included a total of 1,717 patients were reviewed. Intensive care unit length of stay and mechanical ventilation duration were not statistically different between the intervention and control groups in all randomized clinical trials, and mortality rate was also not different between the groups. In conclusion, hypocaloric enteral nutrition had no significantly different effects on morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients when compared with full-energy nutrition. It is still necessary to determine the safety of this intervention in this group of patients, the optimal amount of energy provided, and the duration of this therapy. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Estudo comparativo da adequação das prescrições e ofertas protéicas a pacientes em uso de terapia nutricional enteral = Comparative study on the adequacy of protein prescription and supply to patients undergoing enteral nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Taís Nozaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi de avaliar as prescrições e ofertas protéicas a pacientes em uso de terapia nutricional enteral em dois hospitais da região metropolitana de Maringá, Estado do Paraná. Como metodologia utilizou-se os valores prescritos e o consumo de proteínas pelos pacientes foram obtidos dos prontuários médicos e comparados com as recomendações de consumo diário de proteínas por quilo de peso corporal para cada patologia. Os principais resultados dessa pesquisa foram que apenas 11,43% das dietas prescritas no Hospital A e 22,22% das dietas prescritas no Hospital B estavam corretas com relação à quantidade recomendada de proteínas. Nos dois hospitais, apenas 11% dos pacientes ingeriram a quantidade diária recomendada de proteínas. Pode-se concluir que a terapia nutricional enteral inadequada foi encontrado nos dois hospitais. Este estudodemonstrou a necessidade de melhoras nos serviços de nutrição enteral. Isto pode ser conseguido adotando-se procedimentos de padronização e avaliação regulares dos pacientes.The aim of this study was to evaluate protein prescription and supply to patients undergoing enteral nutritional therapy at two general hospitals in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. How methodology used isthe prescribed protein values and protein intake of each patient were obtained from medical records, and compared with the recommended daily protein intake per kilogram of body weight for each pathology. The main results of this survey were that only 11.43% of theprescribed diets in Hospital A and 22.22% of the prescribed diets in Hospital B were correct with respect to recommended protein amounts. In both hospitals, only 11% of all patients ingested the daily recommended amount of protein. It was concluded inadequate enteralnutritional therapy was found in both hospitals. The study demonstrates a need for improvement in enteral nutrition practices. This can be accomplished through the adoption of

  4. Role of FODMAP content in enteral nutrition-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmos, Emma P

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea are common complications of enteral nutrition (EN); however, the cause is unclear. Mode of EN delivery that alters digestion and possibly absorption is suggested to contribute to the high incidence of diarrhea; however, enteral formula is frequently blamed. Most research has focused on fiber-supplemented EN, with a meta-analysis showing that fiber reduces the incidence of diarrhea in non-intensive care unit studies. Other hypotheses include formula osmolality and FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) content. FODMAPs are poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates that exert an osmotic effect. Dietary FODMAPs have been shown to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, in those with irritable bowel syndrome and, given a high-enough dose, will induce a laxative effect in most people. As FODMAPs are commonly added to enteral formula and EN is frequently used as the main source of nutrition, it is reasonable to hypothesize that EN provides more FODMAPs than usual dietary intake and increases risk for developing diarrhea. This hypothesis was assessed through a retrospective study showing that the standard-use enteral formula Isosource 1.5 had a protective effect of developing diarrhea. The only characteristic unique to Isosource 1.5 was the lower FODMAP content as determined through methodologies previously validated for food analysis. Methodologies for application to enteral formulas are currently undergoing formal validation. Once confirmed for application in enteral formula, future directions include FODMAP analysis of specific ingredients to increase understanding of potential problems associated with enteral formula and a randomized, controlled trial investigating the role of formula FODMAP content. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Enteral Nutrition for Feeding Severely Underfed Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriella Gentile

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe undernutrition nearly always leads to marked changes in body spaces (e.g., alterations of intra-extracellular water and in body masses and composition (e.g., overall and compartmental stores of phosphate, potassium, and magnesium. In patients with severe undernutrition it is almost always necessary to use oral nutrition support and/or artificial nutrition, besides ordinary food; enteral nutrition should be a preferred route of feeding if there is a functional accessible gastrointestinal tract. Refeeding of severely malnourished patients represents two very complex and conflicting tasks: (1 to avoid “refeeding syndrome” caused by a too fast correction of malnutrition; (2 to avoid “underfeeding” caused by a too cautious rate of refeeding. The aim of this paper is to discuss the modality of refeeding severely underfed patients and to present our experience with the use of enteral tube feeding for gradual correction of very severe undernutrition whilst avoiding refeeding syndrome, in 10 patients aged 22 ± 11.4 years and with mean initial body mass index (BMI of 11.2 ± 0.7 kg/m2. The mean BMI increased from 11.2 ± 0.7 kg/m2 to 17.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2 and the mean body weight from 27.9 ± 3.3 to 43.0 ± 5.7 kg after 90 days of intensive in-patient treatment (p < 0.0001. Caloric intake levels were established after measuring resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry, and nutritional support was performed with enteral feeding. Vitamins, phosphate, and potassium supplements were administered during refeeding. All patients achieved a significant modification of BMI; none developed refeeding syndrome. In conclusion, our findings show that, even in cases of extreme undernutrition, enteral feeding may be a well-tolerated way of feeding.

  6. Aspectos clínicos e hematológicos em cães submetidos à fluidoterapia intravenosa, nutrição enteral e parenteral Clinical and hematological aspects in dogs allotted to intravenous fluid therapy, enteral and parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Valadares

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se peso vivo, temperatura retal, comportamento, escore fecal e hemograma em 20 cães, sem raça definida, distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos experimentais com cinco animais cada, duas fêmeas e três machos, submetidos ao arraçoamento padrão (grupo I - controle, à fluidoterapia intravenosa (grupo II, à nutrição enteral por gastrostomia (grupo III e à nutrição parenteral total (grupo IV. Os tratamentos duraram sete dias, precedidos por dois dias de jejum alimentar. Os animais do grupo II apresentaram a maior perda de peso (P0,05. Os animais do grupo II apresentaram valores abaixo dos de referência para hemácias, hemoglobina e hematócrito, sugerindo anemia normocítica normocrômica. A fixação da sonda gástrica, via endoscopia, levou a alterações no número total de leucócito (PBody weight, rectal temperature, behavior, fecal score and hemogram were evaluated in 20 crossbred dogs, randomly alloted in four experimental groups, being five animals in each group, two females and three males. Those animals were alloted to standard feeding (group I - control, intravenous fluid therapy (group II, enteral nutrition through gastrotomy (group III and total parenteral nutrition (group IV. The treatments lasted seven days, preceded by two days of fasting. The animals of group II showed the highest weigth loss (P0.05, however, the animals of group II showed lower values of erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit, suggesting normocytic normochromic anemia. The gastric tube placement, through endoscopy, led to alteration of the total number of leukocytes (P<0.05, causing a regenerative left shift in the animals of group II. The administration rate of the parenteral nutrition solution must be monitored when a peripheral venous access is used.

  7. Enteral nutrition in person with Dementia: Indication, effects and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This systematic literature review aims to clarify indications for the use of enteral feeding in patients with dementia. Difficulties in feeding patients with dementia may arise at any stage of the disease and may include malnutrition, weight loss, decreased quality of life, among others. Enteral tube feeding by tube may be a way of mitigating the effects, but its benefits are under discussion. Methods: Eight qualitative studies were included: 5 primary sources, 3 systematic literature reviews, published in the 2008-2013 period. Results: Enteral tube feeding in patients with dementia may affect survival/mortality rate (no evidence of benefit, nutritional status (no improvement, functional status and cognitive development (no improvement, aspiration (does not reduce the risk of aspiration, pressure ulcers (no evidence of benefit in ulcers incidence and progression, and quality of life (without hard data in most studies. Conclusion: Evidence on benefits of enteral tube feeding in patients with dementia was not conclusive and may even have the opposite effect. We lack data on the adverse effects of these interventions. Keywords: Palliative care; Dementia; Enteral feeding; Therapeutic use.

  8. Nutrition accesses among patients receiving enteral treatment in the home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajder, Janusz; Ślefarska-Wasilewska, Marta; Wójcik, Piotr

    2017-10-31

    Enteral feeding in the home environment is connected with creating access to digestive tract, and thanks to that, this kind of treatment is possible. The gold standard in enteral nutrition is PEG, other types of access are: nasogastric tube, gastronomy and jejunostomy. In the article 851 patients who were treated nutritionally in the home environment, in the nutrition clinic, Nutrimed Górny Śląsk, were analyzed. It was described how, in practice, the schedule of nutrition access looks like in the nutrition clinic at a time of qualifying patients to the treatment (PEG 47,35%, gastronomy 18,91%, nasogastric tube 17,39%,jejunostomy 16,33%) and how it changes among patients treated in the nutrition clinic during specific period of time - to the treatment there were qualified patients with at least three-month period of therapy ( second evaluation: PEG 37,01%, gastrostomy 31,13%, nasogastric tube 16,98%, jejunostomy 15,86%). The structure of changes was described, also the routine and the place in what exchanging or changing nutrition access was analyzed. The biggest changes in quantity, among all groups of ill people concerned patients with PEG and gastronomy. In most cases the intervention connected with exchanging access to the digestive tract could be implemented at patient's home.

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Home Enteral Nutrition Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Dinenage

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1 prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2 effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3 balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient’s home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  10. Development and evaluation of a home enteral nutrition team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinenage, Sarah; Gower, Morwenna; Van Wyk, Joanna; Blamey, Anne; Ashbolt, Karen; Sutcliffe, Michelle; Green, Sue M

    2015-03-05

    The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF) at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN) can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1) prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2) effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3) balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient's home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  11. Enteral immunonutrition versus enteral nutrition for gastric cancer patients undergoing a total gastrectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Juan; Zhan, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    Background Nutrition support is a common means for patients with gastric cancer, especially for those undergoing elective surgery. Recently, enteral immunonutrition (EIN) was increasingly found to be more effective than enteral nutrition (EN) in enhancing the host immunity and eventually improving the prognosis of gastric cancer patients undergoing gastrectomy. However, the results reported were not consistent. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the impact of EIN for patients with GC on bioch...

  12. The role of nutritional assessment and early enteral nutrition for combined pancreas and kidney transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Sally; Asderakis, Argiris; Ilham, Adel; Elker, Doruk; Chapman, Dawn; Ablorsu, Elijah

    2017-02-01

    Early post-operative enteral nutrition is an important part of perioperative management and is strongly supported by ESPEN Guidelines. However, there is limited evidence into the use of Early Enteral Nutrition (EEN) after combined Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation (PKT). We know malnutrition in type-1 diabetics with end stage renal failure (ESRF) is a common problem and a significant risk factor. Therefore, we introduced EEN in our patients. We monitored and recorded nutritional data on 29 PKT recipients who underwent transplantation between Oct 2007 and Jan 2010 without a nutritional assessment or EEN [Monitored Group (MG)] and on 30 PKT recipients between Feb 2010 and Dec 2013 who received a nutritional assessment and EEN (Naso-jejunal feed or oral intake with supplementation, according to their nutritional status) [Fed Group (FG)]. The end-point was to assess patients' daily post-transplant nutritional intake. This was calculated as a percentage of estimated nutritional requirements using the Schofield equation with a 25% added stress factor and relevant activity factor. Following a literature search and realistic targets our aim was to reach >60% requirements: achievement of ≥60% energy requirements by day-7 (7d-60%) and at the time of discharge (total-60%) [13,14]. There was no significant difference between MG and FG patients in cold ischemic time (CIT), recipient-age and donor-age, Length of Stay and donor-creatinine. In contrast, FG patients were less frequently in predialysis status 41.4% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.001; and had higher incidence of BMI patients more frequently achieved a higher average % of nutritional requirements in the first week 39.69% vs. 22.37%, p = patient stay 57.24% vs. 44.43%, p = nutritional requirements. Most important, the need for parenteral nutrition within the FG was significantly lower, 7.1% vs. 20.7%, p patients benefit from planned EEN and receive better nutritional support when compared to the patients managed with the

  13. Hospital to home paediatric enteral nutrition--parents need support.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortall, C

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the provision of education and support to parents of children on home enteral nutrition (HEN), current dietetic support available and perceived challenges facing parents and carers. From the 39 responses (13%), 29 (83%, n = 35) parents suggested services for HEN need improvement. 29 (74%, n = 39) parents wanted more structured follow up and 22 (56%) would like one person to co-ordinate HEN, education and discharge. 7 parents (18%) reported a need for further education of health care professionals (HCP). Hospital dietitians were the most common HCPs reported to provide support to patients following discharge. Specialist paediatric HEN dietetic services working in a dedicated HEN team, who would provide accurate training and education and liaise with both parents and community care services post discharge should be in place. This would facilitate transfer to community care, reduce hospital re-admissions, outpatient department attendances and costs.

  14. Intensive Medical Nutrition Therapy: Methods to Improve Nutrition Provision in the Critical Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Sheean, Patricia M.; Peterson, Sarah J.; Zhao, Weihan; Gurka, David P.; Braunschweig, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Patients requiring mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit commonly fail to attain enteral nutrition (EN) infusion goals. We conducted a cohort study to quantify and compare the percentage of energy and protein received between standard care (n=24) and intensive medical nutrition therapy (MNT) (n=25) participants; to assess the percentage of energy and protein received varied by nutritional status, and to identify barriers to EN provision. Intensive MNT entailed providing energy at 1...

  15. Enteral nutrition prolongs delayed gastric emptying in patients after Whipple resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignoni, M E; Friess, H; Sell, F; Ricken, L; Shrikhande, S; Kulli, C; Büchler, M W

    2000-07-01

    Delayed gastric emptying is one of the most frequent postoperative complications after Whipple resection. In the present study we evaluated the role of enteral nutrition in the development of delayed gastric emptying after Whipple resection. Between January 1996 and June 1998, 64 patients (30 female, 34 male) underwent a classic (n = 27) or pylorus-preserving (n = 37) Whipple resection. Two patients were excluded; 30 patients received enteral and 32 patients received no-enteral nutrition. Delayed gastric emptying occurred significantly more in patients with enteral (17 of 30, 57%) than in patients with no-enteral nutrition (5 of 32, 16%) (P nasogastric tube for a significantly (Pindications.

  16. [Efficacy of nutrition support therapy in children with chronic diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luo-Jia; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of nutrition support therapy in children with chronic diarrhea. A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 48 children with chronic diarrhea who were hospitalized between July 2012 and July 2014. These children were divided into children) and ≤1 year group (21 children). Twenty-seven of these patients, who had malnutrition, were divided into enteral nutrition (EN) group (10 children), partial parenteral nutrition (PPN)+EN group (16 children), and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group (1 child). The therapeutic process and outcome were compared between different age groups and children receiving different treatments. Among the 48 children, short bowel syndrome, viral enteritis, a history of intestinal surgery, and malabsorption syndrome were common causes of chronic diarrhea, and 24 children (50%) had unknown causes. In the aspect of nutritional assessment on admission, the children with moderate underweight than the ≤1 year group (Pdiarrhea were relieved after treatment. Among 27 children receiving nutritional therapy, 4 were not improved, and the other children achieved remission of symptoms and improvements in nutritional status. Besides etiological treatment, nutrition support therapy can be applied as part of multimodality therapy in children with chronic diarrhea. This can effectively improve nutritional status and relieve the symptoms of diarrhea.

  17. Nutritional Therapy in Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hammad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy malnourishment is commonly encountered in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo liver transplantation. Malnutrition may further increase morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. The importance of carefully assessing the nutritional status during the work-up of patients who are candidates for liver replacement is widely recognized. The metabolic abnormalities induced by liver failure render the conventional assessment of nutritional status to be challenging. Preoperative loss of skeletal muscle mass, namely, sarcopenia, has a significant detrimental impact on post-transplant outcomes. It is essential to provide sufficient nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation. Oral nutrition is preferred, but tube enteral nutrition may be required to provide the needed energy intake. Herein, the latest currently employed perioperative nutritional interventions in liver transplant recipients are thoroughly illustrated including synbiotics, micronutrients, branched-chain amino acid supplementation, immunonutrition formulas, fluid and electrolyte balance, the offering of nocturnal meals, dietary counselling, exercise and rehabilitation.

  18. Nutritional analysis of blenderized enteral diets in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mary M; Sorreda-Esguerra, Pearl; Platon, Maria Bernadette; Castro, Cynthia G; Chou, Nancy R; Shott, Susan; Comer, Gail M; Alarcon, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the nutritional quality and viscosity of blenderized enteral tube feedings (BTFs) from four hospitals in the Philippines. Samples of two different BTFs (one standard and one modified) were collected from each hospital on three separate occasions and analyzed for macronutrients, micronutrients, and viscosity. There was considerable variation among the BTFs for the concentrations of most nutrients measured. For standard BTF samples, the caloric density ranged from 66-123 kcal/100g and the percentages of total weight for protein, carbohydrate, and fat ranged from 1.5-4.0%, 8.6-21.4%, and 0.27-3.40%, respectively. Levels of specific vitamins were undetectable in 10 standard and 15 modified BTF samples. In samples where vitamin levels were detectable, results were: vitamin A, 625-8850 IU/kg; riboflavin, 0.40-5.00 mg/kg; and pyridoxine, 0.14-3.00 mg/kg. Mineral concentrations also varied greatly (eg calcium, 64-524 mg/kg; sodium, 148-886 mg/kg; iron, 3.0-13.7 mg/kg; and zinc, 1.8- 11.5 mg/kg). Correlation coefficients were statistically significant only for carbohydrate (r = 0.48, P = 0.017). Measured values tended to be lower than expected values for all nutrients, although the difference was statistically significant only for calories (P = 0.023). The viscosity of BTF samples ranged from 2.3-45,060 centipoise, excluding three samples that were too viscous for analysis. This study demonstrates that hospital prepared blenderized enteral tube feedings render unpredictable levels of micronutrients and macronutrients and appear likely to deliver less than the desired amounts of nutrients. Additionally, the viscosity of these feedings may be unsuitable for infusion through feeding tubes.

  19. Nutritional support as an adjunct to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with malignancies which are treated with therapeutic radiation are at risk for nutritional problems, both from their underlying malignancy as well as from their treatment. These effects may be acute or chronic and relate to the site of the tumor and regions irradiated. There is a large experience with nutritional intervention in irradiated patients, including oral feedings and enteral and parenteral nutritional support. The indications for the specific administration of nutritional support during radiotherapy depend on the nutritional status of the patient and the area irradiated, as well as the individual prognosis. Patients who are malnourished at the time of treatment are most likely to profit from nutritional intervention. To date, prospective randomized trials of nutritional support in patients undergoing radiotherapy fail to show a benefit of routine adjuvant nutritional intervention in terms of improved response and tolerance to treatment, improved local control or survival rates, or reduction of complications from therapy

  20. Enteral Nutrition in the Management of Pediatric and Adult Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawnya Hansen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are thought to profoundly influence the pathophysiology of Crohn’s disease (CD. Changes in dietary and hygiene patterns affect the interactions between the immune system and environment. The gut microbiome is responsible for mediating host immune response with significant dysbiosis observed in individuals with CD. Diet therapy using exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN has been studied as primary therapy for the management of CD. EEN may cultivate the presence of beneficial microbiota, improve bile acid metabolism, and decrease the number of dietary microparticles possibly influencing disease and immune activity. In this review, we will address the current evidence on EEN in the management of adult and pediatric CD. In adults, EEN appears to be moderately beneficial for the induction of remission of CD; however, its use is understudied and underutilized. Stronger evidence is in place to support the use of EEN in pediatric CD with the added benefit of nutrition support and steroid-sparing therapy during the growth phase. Overall, EEN is an established therapy in inducing CD remission in the pediatric population while its role as primary therapy of adult Crohn’s disease remains to be defined.

  1. Clinical guidelines from the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: best practice recommendations for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Ainsley

    2014-01-01

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) is an interdisciplinary society whose vision is to ensure that every patient receives safe, efficacious, and high-quality nutrition care. The society has produced clinical guidelines to assist practitioners in enteral and parenteral nutrition decision making. A.S.P.E.N. clinical guideline development has evolved through the years, and recently has incorporated a rigorous and transparent development process using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. This article will examine A.S.P.E.N.'s guideline development process, discuss current population- and disease-specific practice guidelines, and highlight recommendations useful for the clinician involved in nutrition therapy decision making.

  2. Enteral vs. parenteral nutrition for the critically ill patient: a combined support should be preferred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Darmon, Patrice; Pichard, Claude

    2008-08-01

    Current recommendations suggest starting enteral feeding as soon as possible whenever the gastrointestinal tract is functioning. The disadvantage of enteral support is that insufficient energy and protein coverage can occur. This review focuses on some recent findings regarding the nutritional support of critically ill patients and evaluates the data presented. An increasing nutritional deficit during a long ICU stay is associated with increased morbidity (infection rate, wound healing, mechanical ventilation, length of stay, duration of recovery), and costs. Evidence shows that enteral nutrition can result in underfeeding and that nutritional goals are frequently reached only after 1 week. Contrary to former beliefs, recent meta-analyses of ICU studies showed that parenteral nutrition is not related to a surplus mortality and may even be associated with improved survival. Early enteral nutrition is recommended for critically ill patients. Supplemental parenteral nutrition combined with enteral nutrition can be considered to cover the energy and protein targets when enteral nutrition alone fails to achieve the caloric goal. Whether such a combined nutritional support provides additional benefit on the overall outcome has to be proven in further studies on clinical outcome, including physical and cognitive functioning, quality of life, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility.

  3. Should early enteral nutrition be used in the trauma intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    optimal timing of the initiation of parenteral nutrition, all agree that the enteral route should be used as the first option, provided that the gut is functional.2,4-8 The concept of early enteral feeding (EEF) refers to the initiation of enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 hours post injury.4-9 Advantages of this approach include a ...

  4. Short-term clinical, nutritional, and functional effects of continuous elemental enteral alimentation in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, J M; Morin, C L; Lasalle, R; Patrick, J; Coates, A L

    1984-01-01

    Ten children with cystic fibrosis, aged 3.5 to 12 years, whose weights were lower than 90% of the expected weight for height, received high-calorie elemental enteral alimentation for four weeks. Clinical, anthropometric, and biochemical evaluations as well as blood gas analyses and chest radiograph scoring were performed in all. Pulmonary function tests were performed in the five older children, and progressive exercise tests in three. These evaluations were done before, immediately after, and two months after termination of therapy. Nutritional therapy resulted in an increase of caloric intake and in dramatic weight gain, which persisted only for a short time and was mainly related to adipose tissue accretion. No functional improvement accompanied the amelioration in nutritional status. This short-term nutritional therapy in malnourished children with cystic fibrosis was effective in increasing relative weight and energy stores, but there was no evidence of any long-term functional benefit.

  5. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs. Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials and Methods: Sixty questionnaires were distributed and the results analyzed. A database was prepared and the audit was done. Results: Forty-two (70% questionnaires were filled and returned. A majority (38 of staff nurses expressed awareness of nutrition guidelines. A large number (32 of staff nurses knew about nutrition protocols of the ICU. Almost all (40 opined enteral nutrition to be the preferred route of nutrition unless contraindicated. All staff nurses were of opinion that enteral nutrition is to be started at the earliest (within 24-48 h of the ICU stay. Everyone opined that the absence of bowel sounds is an absolute contraindication to initiate enteral feeding. Passage of flatus was considered mandatory before starting enteral nutrition by 86% of the respondents. Everyone knew that the method of Ryle′s tube feeding in their ICU is intermittent boluses. Only 4 staff nurses were unaware of any method to confirm Ryle′s tube position. The backrest elevation rate was 100%. Gastric residual volumes were always checked, but the amount of the gastric residual volume for the next feed to be withheld varied. The majority said that the unused Ryle′s tube feed is to be discarded after 6 h. The most preferred (48% method to upgrade their knowledge of enteral nutrition was from the ICU protocol manual. Conclusion: Information generated from this study can be helpful in identifying nutrition practices that are lacking and may be used to review and revise enteral feeding

  6. White paper on guidelines concerning enteric nervous system stem cell therapy for enteric neuropathies⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alan J.; Goldstein, Allan M.; Newgreen, Donald F.; Stamp, Lincon; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Metzger, Marco; Hotta, Ryo; Young, Heather M.; Andrews, Peter W.; Thapar, Nikhil; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Bondurand, Nadege; Bornstein, Joel C.; Chan, Wood Yee; Cheah, Kathryn; Gershon, Michael D.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Hofstra, Robert M.W.; Just, Lothar; Kapur, Raj P.; King, Sebastian K.; McCann, Conor J.; Nagy, Nandor; Ngan, Elly; Obermayr, Florian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Sham, Mai Har; Tam, Paul; Berghe, Pieter Vanden

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing focus on the development of novel stem cell based therapies for the treatment of disorders and diseases affecting the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract (so-called enteric neuropathies). Here, the idea is that ENS progenitor/stem cells could be transplanted into the gut wall to replace the damaged or absent neurons and glia of the ENS. This White Paper sets out experts’ views on the commonly used methods and approaches to identify, isolate, purify, expand and optimize ENS stem cells, transplant them into the bowel, and assess transplant success, including restoration of gut function. We also highlight obstacles that must be overcome in order to progress from successful preclinical studies in animal models to ENS stem cell therapies in the clinic. PMID:27059883

  7. Complications relating to enteral and parenteral nutrition in trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-01

    Nov 1, 2014 ... critically ill with the objective of preserving lean body mass, often referred to as nutritional .... mild trauma, scores from 10-15 being intermediate, and scores > 15 as severe trauma.29-31 The AIS is determined per organ in a standard fashion. While it is not a ..... Current trends in critical care nutrition. Curr.

  8. Central venous catheter infections in home parenteral nutrition patients: Outcomes from Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vicki M; Guenter, Peggi; Corrigan, Mandy L; Kovacevich, Debra; Winkler, Marion F; Resnick, Helaine E; Norris, Tina L; Robinson, Lawrence; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-12-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a high-cost, complex nutrition support therapy that requires the use of central venous catheters. Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are among the most serious risks of this therapy. Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care (Sustain registry) provides the most current and comprehensive data for studying CLABSI among a national cohort of HPN patients in the United States. This is the first Sustain registry report detailing longitudinal data on CLABSI among HPN patients. To describe CLABSI rates for HPN patients followed in the Sustain registry from 2011-2014. Descriptive, χ 2 , and t tests were used to analyze data from the Sustain registry. Of the 1,046 HPN patients from 29 sites across the United States, 112 (10.7%) experienced 194 CLABSI events during 223,493 days of HPN exposure, for an overall CLABSI rate of 0.87 episodes/1,000 parenteral nutrition-days. Although the majority of patients were female (59%), adult (87%), white (75%), and with private insurance or Medicare (69%), CLABSI episodes per 1,000 parenteral nutrition-days were higher for men (0.69 vs 0.38), children (1.17 vs 0.35), blacks (0.91 vs 0.41), and Medicaid recipients (1.0 vs 0.38 or 0.39). Patients with implanted ports or double-lumen catheters also had more CLABSIs than those with peripherally inserted or central catheters or single-lumen catheters. Staphylococci were the most commonly reported pathogens. These data support findings of smaller studies about CLABSI risk for children and by catheter type and identify new potential risk factors, including gender, race, and insurance type. Additional studies are needed to determine effective interventions that will reduce HPN-associated CLABSI. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial translocation and enteral nutrition in humans: an outsider looks in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, T O

    1995-01-01

    To assess the literature documenting the existence of bacterial translocation in humans, the effects of enteral nutrition on bacterial translocation in humans, and the hypothesis that enteral nutrition prevents bacterial translocation in humans. Sources included Medline search, references from review articles, and references from animal and human studies. The goal was to include all animal and human studies directly addressing questions of bacterial translocation and nutritional status or nutritional support. An attempt was made to briefly summarize methodology and findings of relevent studies. No general attempt was made to assess quality of individual studies. Bacterial translocation is a well documented phenomenon in animal models. Starvation and malnutrition of themselves do not induce bacterial translocation, but may facilitate translocation in the presence of other systemic insults. Parenteral nutrition and many forms of enteral nutrition may induce and/or facilitate bacterial translocation. Chow and certain fiber sources seem protective. Moderate direct and several lines of indirect evidence support the existence of bacterial translocation in humans. There is no direct evidence and questionable indirect evidence suggesting that enteral nutrition prevents or modifies bacterial translocation in humans. The hypothesis relating enteral nutrition and bacterial translocation in critically ill patients remains attractive, but unproven.

  10. Home enteral nutrition in children: a 10 year experience with 304 pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrón-Giner, C.; Calderón Garrido, Caterina; Martínez-Zazo, A.; Cañedo-Villaroya, E.; Malillos González, P.; Sesmero-Lillo, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & aims: Home enteral nutrition is used increasingly in pediatric populations. Our objective was to describe the profile of pediatric patients requiring this treatment. Material and methods: All patients under 18 years old requiring treatment with home enteral nutrition between January 1995 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: 304 patients were studied (157 boys). The mean age at the start of treatment was 4.02 ± 4.09 years, median of 2.5 years; 28% of all patie...

  11. Patient needs and research priorities in the enteral nutrition market - a quantitative prioritization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weenen, T C; Jentink, A; Pronker, E S; Commandeur, H R; Claassen, E; Boirie, Y; Singer, P

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative systematic identification and prioritization of unmet needs and research opportunities in relation to enteral nutrition was conducted by means of a tailor-made health research prioritization process. The research objectives were reached by conducting qualitative interviews followed by quantitative questionnaires targeting enteral nutrition key opinion leaders (KOLs). (1) Define disease areas that deserve more research attention; (2) Rank importance of product characteristics of tube feeding (TF) and oral nutritional supplements (ONS); (3) Assess involvement of KOLs in enteral nutrition R&D process. KOLs ranked three product characteristics and three disease areas that deserve additional research attention. From these, overall priority scores were calculated by multiplying ranks for both product characteristics and disease areas. 17 qualitative interviews were conducted and 77 questionnaires (response rate 35%) were completed and returned. (1) Disease areas in ONS and TF with highest priorities are: ONS: general malnutrition & geriatrics, TF: intensive care. (2) TF product characteristics with highest priorities are: composition and clinical evidence from a KOL perspective; tolerance and ease of use from a patient perspective. ONS product characteristics with highest priorities are: composition, clinical evidence and taste from a KOL perspective; taste from a patient perspective. We find a high discrepancy between product characteristic prioritization from a KOL and patient perspective. (3) Although 62% of all KOLs give advice to enteral nutrition companies on patient needs, they under-influence the setting of research priorities by enteral nutrition companies. This study provides a systematic approach to achieve research prioritization in enteral nutrition. In addition to providing new directions for enteral nutrition research and development, this study highlights the relevance of involving KOLs in the identification of research priorities as they

  12. Oesophageal bezoar as a complication of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. Two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Almagro, Fernanda; Carmona-Monge, Francisco Javier

    2016-02-01

    Enteral nutrition has a relatively low incidence of major complications. The most common complications are mechanical problems, bronchoaspiration and diarrhoea. A rare complication associated with the use of enteral nutrition is oesophageal bezoar. A bezoar is a body of undigested and partially digested matter in the gastrointestinal tract. The main risks factors are gastric motility dysfunction and the use of opiates or sucralfate. The aim of this paper was to present two cases of oesophageal obstruction resulting from the formation of bezoars due to enteral nutrition. Both patients experienced prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and were receiving enteral nutrition, and both cases involved an obstruction of the nasogastric tube and the regurgitation of solid chunks of enteral nutrition through the mouth and the nose. Impactions of solidified enteral nutrition in the distal parts of the oesophagus were confirmed with gastroscopies. Enzymatic complexes containing papain, cellulose, pancreatin, pepsin and diastase were used to successfully dissolve the bezoars in both cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction in diarrhea incidence by soluble fiber in patients receiving total or supplemental enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, H H; Kemen, M; Fuessenich, C; Senkal, M; Zumtobel, V

    1994-01-01

    Gastrointestinal side effects, particularly diarrhea, are still the main reasons for discontinuation of enteral nutrition. Although the causes of diarrhea are diverse, the enteral nutrition solution is frequently suspected of playing a leading role in causing diarrhea. Our randomized, prospective, double-blind trial with 100 patients assessed the effects of feeding a standard diet (Nutrodrip Standard) vs the same diet supplemented with 20 g of soluble fiber, containing partially hydrolyzed guar gum (Sunfiber), per 1000 mL. Thirty patients received total enteral nutrition postoperatively, and 70 patients received enteral supplementation. The patients receiving total enteral nutrition with soluble fiber had decreased diarrhea but increased flatulence. In none of these patients did enteral feeding have to be discontinued because of gastrointestinal side effects, whereas in four patients who were on a standard diet, enteral feeding had to be interrupted because of diarrhea (p < .05). Similar observations were made in patients receiving enteral supplementation. In both groups, the incidence of diarrhea decreased significantly with the soluble fiber diet compared with the standard diet (6 vs 15, p < .05). Enteral feeding with a formula supplemented with partially hydrolyzed guar gum reduces the incidence of diarrhea in patients receiving total enteral nutrition as well as in those receiving enteral supplementation, regardless of the cause of diarrhea. The increased hydrogen production and the significantly higher rate of flatulence are likely to result from fermentation of the soluble fiber in the colon, with concomitant production of short-chain fatty acids, which leads to increased absorption of short-chain fatty acids, sodium, and water by the colonocytes. This effect, together with the observed cholecystokinin-mediated decrease in colonic transit time with partially hydrolyzed guar gum, may explain the reduction in the incidence of diarrhea in this study.

  14. Taurine Concentrations Decrease in Critically Ill Patients With Shock Given Enteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; van Stijn, Mireille F. M.; Visser, Marlieke; Lemmens, Stéphanie M. P.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition studies in the intensive care unit (ICU) have shown that adequate enteral nutrition (EN) support has clinical benefits. However, the course of amino acid concentrations in plasma has never been investigated in patients admitted with shock receiving EN. We hypothesized that plasma

  15. Guidelines for parenteral and enteral nutrition support in geriatric patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junmin; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Mingwei; Cao, Weixin; Wang, Xinying; Shi, Hanping; Dong, Birong; Sun, Jianqin; Chen, Huaihong; Zhou, Yeping; Zhou, Suming; Xu, Jingyong

    2015-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of geriatric patients is much higher than for younger patients, especially when critically ill. This may be attributed to a lower reserve capacity in most organs and systems, reduced ability to deal with physical stress and the presence of acute or chronic co-mobidities. Parenteral and enteral nutrition support can improve the clinical condition of the elderly patient and result in better outcomes, such as lower mortality, reduced hospital stay and reduced medical costs. There is a need to standardize nutrition screening and assessment, and the implementation of appropriate evidence based nutritional support of geriatric patients in China. The Chinese Medical Association's Group of Geriatric Nutrition Support has developed guidelines by researching the present situation in Chinese hospitals and by referring to the guidelines from both American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN).

  16. Enteral nutrition is superior to total parenteral nutrition for pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changli; Du, Zhi; Lou, Cheng; Wu, Chenxuan; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Jun; Shu, Guiming; Wang, Yijun

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition (EN) on biochemical and clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. From the year 2006 to 2008, 60 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy in Tianjin Third Central Hospital were enrolled in this study. They were randomly divided into the EN group and the TPN group. The biochemical and clinical parameters were recorded and analyzed between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the nutritional status, liver and kidney function, and blood glucose levels between the TPN and EN groups on the preoperative day, the 1st and 3 rd postoperative days. However, on the 7th postoperative day, there was significant difference between the two groups in 24 h urinary nitrogen, serum levels of, total protein (TP), transferrin (TF), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and γ-glutamyl transpeptadase (GGT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr). On the 14th postoperative day, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of urinary levels of 24 h nitrogen, TP, TF, retinol binding protein, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, BUN, Cr, and glucose. The incidence of delayed gastric emptying in the EN and TPN groups was 0% and 20%, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of pancreatic fistulas and hemorrhages in the EN group were 3.6% and 3.6%, versus 26.7% and 30% in the TPN group, respectively. EN is better than TPN for pancreatic cancer patients who received pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  17. Influence of enteric bacteria and parasite infection and nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While nutritional, microbiological and immunological factors have been implicated in childhood diarrhoea in many countries, there is limited aetiological information in Morogoro Region of Tanzania. A case-control study was conducted to establish whether diarrhoea in 6-60 months old children admitted at a Regional ...

  18. Nutritional therapy and infectious diseases: a two-edged sword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donabedian Haig

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The benefits and risks of nutritional therapies in the prevention and management of infectious diseases in the developed world are reviewed. There is strong evidence that early enteral feeding of patients prevents infections in a variety of traumatic and surgical illnesses. There is, however, little support for similar early feeding in medical illnesses. Parenteral nutrition increases the risk of infection when compared to enteral feeding or delayed nutrition. The use of gastric feedings appears to be as safe and effective as small bowel feedings. Dietary supplementation with glutamine appears to lower the risk of post-surgical infections and the ingestion of cranberry products has value in preventing urinary tract infections in women.

  19. Importance of nutritional status in recovery from acute cholecystitis: benefit from enteral nutrition supplementation including medium chain triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yukinobu; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Wakabayashi, Takao; Okushima, Kazumu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Miyoshi, Hironao; Nakamura, Yuta

    2007-09-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the importance of nutritional status in patients with acute cholecystitis, and also evaluate whether they benefited from enteral nutrition supplementation, including medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), during the convalescent stage. Patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to our hospital between April 1994 and March 2002 were classified into a poor nutrition group (n=40; total serum proteinnutrition group (n=71; >5.0 g/dl). Patients with poor nutrition were significantly more elderly than those with fair nutrition, and had significantly higher serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. The two groups did not differ significantly with respect to other laboratory data, gender distribution, or medical treatment. We supplemented ordinary meals with enteral nutrition including MCT in 16 patients during the convalescent stage (MCT group). We compared their length of hospital stay and days required to recovery to pre-admission functional status for activities of daily living (ADL) with the same intervals in 16 patients without supplementation (non-MCT group) selected to match for age, gender, and fair or poor nutritional status from among 111 patients. Hospitalizations were significantly longer in the poor nutrition group (43.0+/-2.2 days) than in the fair nutrition group (27.0+/-8.2 days). Significantly more days were required to recover ADL status in the poor nutrition group (12.0+/-7.2 days) than in the fair group (9.4+/-5.2 days). Hospitalizations were significantly shorter in the MCT group (20.1+/-15 days) than in the non-MCT group (35.4+/-12.8 days). Significantly fewer days were required to recover ADL status in the MCT group (10.9+/-7 days) than in the non-MCT group (13.1+/-6.8 days). Administration of enteral nutrition including MCT during convalescence from acute cholecystitis thus appears to promote functional recovery shorten hospital stay.

  20. Evolution of diabetes medical nutrition therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, M; Warshaw, H; Daly, A; Green-Pastors, J; Arnold, M; Bantle, J

    2003-01-01

    Research supports the importance of medical nutrition therapy in achieving diabetes treatment goals. For persons requiring insulin therapy, the first priority is to integrate an insulin regimen into the patient's lifestyle. For type 2 diabetes, the priority is to focus on lifestyle strategies (that is, nutrition and exercise) that will improve metabolic outcomes at diagnosis and as the disease progresses. Patients with diabetes need nutrition recommendations that are supported by scientific e...

  1. Application of spiral nasointestinal tube in enteral nutrition support for patients with extensive burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Ping Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of spiral nasointestinal tube on enteral nutrition support in patients with extensive burn. Methods: A total of 60 patients with extensive burn who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2014 to June, 2015 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group with 30 cases in each group according to different catheter indwelling methods. The patients in the observation group were given spiral nasointestinal tube for enteral nutrition support, while the patients in the control group were given routine gastric tube for enteral nutrition support. The nutrition status and the occurrence rate of complications before catheter indwelling, 3, 6, and 10 d after catheter indwelling in the two groups were recorded. Results: The levels of ALB, HB, PA, and Scr 6, 10 d after catheter indwelling in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05. The occurrence rate of complications during the treatment period in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: The spiral nasointestinal tube can provide the patients with extensive burn a better effective enteral nutrition support and improve the nutrition support, with a lower occurrence rate of complications, which is beneficial for the patients’ rehabilitation.

  2. Complications relating to enteral and parenteral nutrition in trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-01

    Nov 1, 2014 ... and infectious complications; and metabolic complications relating to PN, including hepatobiliary complications, i.e. cholestasis. Insulin therapy in patients receiving PN may prevent cholestasis.9. ESPEN suggests the early start of supplementary PN on day 2-3, while the American Society for Parenteral and ...

  3. Clinical use of enteral immune nutrition in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-cheng ZHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the use of enteral immune nutrition preparation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, regard its efficacy in improving nutritional status, and its influence on immunity and the status of acute inflammatory reaction of the patients. Methods Sixty-two AECOPD patients requiring mechanical ventilation in ICU of our hospital were randomly divided into two groups: immune nutrition group [study group, n=32, receiving Ruineng (a product of Huarui Pharmaceutical Ltd., which contained essential fatty acids, Omega-3 fatty acids, and energy 1.3 kcal/ml] and conventional nutrition group (control group, n=30, receiving the hospital self-made homogenized diet with 1.2 kal/ml. Patients in the two groups took enteral nutrition of equal calorie, and it was given by nasointestinal tube. On the day of admission and the 14th and 18th after admission, venous blood was obtained for the determination of serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6. At the same time upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC was measured at the bed side. The 14-day off-respirator rate and mechanical ventilation time within 28 days were compared between the two groups. Results The 14-day off-respirator rate was higher in study group than in control group (P0.05. Conclusions Compared with homogenized diet, immune enteral nutrition could better improve the nutritional status and immune function, lower the acute inflammatory response level, increase the success rate of early off-respirator in AECOPD patients, therefore, enteral immune nutrition preparation is a better nutrition support solution for AECOPD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.17

  4. Minimal Enteral Nutrition to Improve Adaptation After Intestinal Resection in Piglets and Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Qvist, Niels; Sangild, Per Torp

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) may induce a diet-dependent stimulation of gut adaptation following intestinal resection. Bovine colostrum is rich in growth factors, and we hypothesized that MEN with colostrum would stimulate intestinal adaptation, compared with formula, and would......, enteral colostrum supplementation was well tolerated, and no infants developed clinical signs of cow's milk allergy. CONCLUSION: Minimal enteral nutrition feeding with bovine colostrum and formula induced similar intestinal adaptation after resection in piglets. Colostrum was well tolerated by newly...... be well tolerated in patients with short bowel syndrome. METHODS: In experiment 1, 3-day-old piglets with 50% distal small intestinal resection were fed parenteral nutrition (PN, n = 10) or PN plus MEN given as either colostrum (PN-COL, n = 5) or formula (PN-FORM, n = 9) for 7 days. Intestinal nutrient...

  5. Impact of antitumor therapy on nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokal, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    The treatment of the cancer patient by surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy can impose significant nutritional disabilities on the host. The nutritional disabilities seen in the tumor-bearing host from antitumor therapy are produced by factors which either limit oral intake or cause malabsorption of nutrients. The host malnutrition caused as a consequence of surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy assumes even more importance when one realizes that many cancer patients are already debilitated from their disease

  6. Program of gastrointestinal rehabilitation and early postoperative enteral nutrition: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Benítez, Frank Daniel; Gutiérrez-Noyola, Anarelys; Soto-García, Andrés; González-Martínez, Iraida; Betancourt-Plaza, Ilionanys

    2018-02-10

    Nutritional depletion is commonly observed in patients undergoing surgical treatment for a gastrointestinal malignancy. An appropriate nutritional intervention could be associated with improved postoperative outcomes. The study was aimed to determine the effect of a program of gastrointestinal rehabilitation and early postoperative enteral nutrition upon complications and clinical outcomes in patients who experienced gastrointestinal surgery for cancer. This is a prospective study (2013 January-2015 December) of 465 consecutive patients submitted to gastrointestinal surgery for cancer and admitted to an Oncological Intensive Care Unit. The program of gastrointestinal rehabilitation and early postoperative enteral nutrition consisted on: (1) general rules: pain relive, early mobilization, antibiotic prophylaxis, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis and respiratory physiotherapy; and (2) gastrointestinal rules: gastric protection, control of postoperative nausea and vomiting, early nasogastric tube remove and early enteral nutrition. The most frequent surgical sites were colorectal (44.9%), gynecological with intestinal suturing (15.7%) and esophagus/stomach (11.0%). Emergency surgery was performed in 12.7% of patients. The program of intestinal rehabilitation and early postoperative enteral nutrition reduced major complications (19.2 vs. 10.2%; p = 0.030), respiratory complications (p = 0.040), delirium (p = 0.032), infectious complications (p = 0.047) and gastrointestinal complications (p < 0.001). Intensive care unit mortality (p = 0.018), length of intensive care unit stay (p < 0.001) and length of hospitalization (p < 0.001) were reduced as well. A program of gastrointestinal rehabilitation and early postoperative enteral nutrition is associated with reduced postoperative complications and improved clinical outcomes in patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery for cancer.

  7. Home enteral nutrition in children: a 10 year experience with 304 pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrón-Giner, C; Calderón, C; Martínez-Zazo, A; Cañedo Villaroya, E; Malillos González, P; Sesmero-Lillo, M Á

    2012-01-01

    Home enteral nutrition is used increasingly in pediatric populations. Our objective was to describe the profile of pediatric patients requiring this treatment. All patients under 18 years old requiring treatment with home enteral nutrition between January 1995 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. 304 patients were studied (157 boys). The mean age at the start of treatment was 4.02 ± 4.09 years, median of 2.5 years; 28% of all patients were under 1 year. The main indications were oncological disease in 91 patients (29.9%) and digestive diseases in 84 (27.6%). There were significant differences depending on the clinical diagnosis for the start age, type of access, infusion regime and formula prescribed. Nutrients were delivered by nasogastric tube in 218 patients (71.7%). Overnight enteral nutrition was the preferred infusion regime in 155 patients (51%). Adult or pediatric polymeric formulas were mostly prescribed in 190 patients (62.5%). The mean treatment duration was 306 ± 544 days. In our series, enteral support usually begins at an early age. Its characteristics varied depending on patient pathology. Knowledge of the pediatric patient profile is important to design the most effective strategy for home enteral nutrition.

  8. MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY IN MANAGEMENT OF EATING DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Pavlović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of eating disorders demands a comprehensive medical approach, where a dietitian has an important role, primarily due to numerous instances of malnutrition. The objective of this paper was to recapitulate the research findings and clinical evidence which show the importance of medical nutrition therapy in the treatment of eating disorders; furthermore, they present significant guidelines for clinical practice. The research methods have entailed a thorough exploration of literature available at research data bases. The results of the research studies published so far have unambiguously pointed out that, when eating disorders are concerned, there is an urgent need for a diet therapy in order for the patient to restore the appropriate body weight as well as normal eating habits. On the one hand, certain authors suggest returning to normal nutritional habits immediately, whereas, on the other hand, certain others advocate a diet therapy program, that is, a gradual process of recovery. Patients incapable of oral food intake receive enteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is applied for recovering the lost electrolytes and fluids, but it should be applied rarely, primarily in states of urgency. For patients suffering from eating disorders the increase in weight indicates good chances of recovery; therefore, the patient’s nutritional status should be carefully and continuously noted. Finally, it is important that our country, too, should adopt a carefully prescribed and conducted diet therapy as an obligatory step in the treatment of patients with eating disorders.

  9. Parenteral nutrition versus enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis Nutrição parenteral versus enteral em pacientes com pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiel Paiva Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effect of parenteral versus enteral nutritional support in severe acute pancreatitis, with respect to efficacy, safety, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. METHODS: The study was comprised of 31 patients, divided into a parenteral group (n=16 and an enteral group (n=15, who met severity criteria for abdominal tomography (Balthazar classes C, D, and E. The patients were compared by demographics, disease etiology, antibiotic prophylaxis, use or not of somatostatin, nutritional support, complications and disease progression. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in the average duration of nutritional support, somatostatin, or antibiotics in the two groups. Imipenem was the drug of choice for prophylaxis of pancreatic infections in both groups. More complications occurred in the parenteral group, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.10. Infectious complications, such as catheter sepsis and infections of the pancreatic tissue, were significantly more frequent in the parenteral group (p=0.006. There was no difference in average length of hospitalization in the two groups. There were three deaths in the parenteral group and none in the enteral group. CONCLUSION: Enteral nutritional support is associated with fewer septic complications compared to parenteral nutritional support.OBJETIVO: Comparar o efeito do suporte nutricional parenteral versus enteral, em pancreatite aguda grave, com relação à eficácia, à segurança, à morbi-mortalidade e ao tempo de internação. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 31 pacientes distribuídos em grupo parenteral (n=16, no período de 1995 a 1998 e grupo enteral (n=15, no período de 1999 a 2002, que preencheram os critérios de gravidade pela tomografia de abdome (Balthazar C,D,E. Os pacientes foram comparados quanto aos dados demográficos, etiologia, antibioticoprofilaxia, somatostatina, suporte nutricional, complicações e evolução. RESULTADOS

  10. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. [Registry of home-based enteral nutrition in Spain for the year 2006 (NADYA-SENPE Group)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda, C; Chicharro, M L; Frías, L; García Luna, P P; Cardona, D; Camarero, E; Penacho, M A; Calañas, A; Parés, R M; Martínez Olmos, M A; Zapata, A; Rabassa Soler, A; Gómez Candela, C; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Lecha, M; Luis, D de; Luengo, L M; Wanden-Berghe, C; Laborda, L; Matía, P; Cantón, A; Martí, E; Irles, J A

    2008-01-01

    To communicate the results obtained from the registry of Home-Based Enteral Nutrition (HBEN) of the NADYA-SENPE group for the year 2006. Recompilation of the data from the HBEN registry of the NADYA-SENPE group from January 1st to December 31st of 2006. During the year 2006, 3,921 patients (51% men) from 27 hospital centers were registered. Ninety-seven percent were older than 14 years. The mean age for those or = 14 years, it was 68.5 +/- 18.2 years. The most common underlying disease was neurological pathology (42%), followed by cancer (28%). Enteral nutrition was administered p.o. in 44% of the patients, through nasogastric tube in 40%, gastrostomy in 14%, and jejunostomy in 1%. The average time of nutritional support was 8.8 months. The most common reasons for ending the therapy were patient's death (54%) and switching to oral feeding (32%). Thirty-one percent of the patients presented a limited activity and 40% were confined to bed/coach. Most of the patients required partial (25%) or total (43%) care assistance. The nutritional formula was provided by the hospital in 62% of the cases and from the reference pharmacy in 27%. The fungible material was provided by the hospital in 80% of the cases and by primary care in the remaining patients. Although the number of registered patients is slightly higher than that from the last years, there are no important changes in the patients characteristics, or way of administration and duration of enteral nutrition.

  12. High-protein enteral nutrition enriched with immune-modulating nutrients vs standard high-protein enteral nutrition and nosocomial infections in the ICU: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Arthur R H; Sztark, François; Kaisers, Udo X; Zielmann, Siegfried; Felbinger, Thomas W; Sablotzki, Armin R; De Waele, Jan J; Timsit, Jean-François; Honing, Marina L H; Keh, Didier; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Zazzo, Jean-Fabien; Fijn, Harvey B M; Petit, Laurent; Preiser, Jean-Charles; van Horssen, Peter J; Hofman, Zandrie

    2014-08-06

    Enteral administration of immune-modulating nutrients (eg, glutamine, omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, and antioxidants) has been suggested to reduce infections and improve recovery from critical illness. However, controversy exists on the use of immune-modulating enteral nutrition, reflected by lack of consensus in guidelines. To determine whether high-protein enteral nutrition enriched with immune-modulating nutrients (IMHP) reduces the incidence of infections compared with standard high-protein enteral nutrition (HP) in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. The MetaPlus study, a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, was conducted from February 2010 through April 2012 including a 6-month follow-up period in 14 intensive care units (ICUs) in the Netherlands, Germany, France, and Belgium. A total of 301 adult patients who were expected to be ventilated for more than 72 hours and to require enteral nutrition for more than 72 hours were randomized to the IMHP (n = 152) or HP (n = 149) group and included in an intention-to-treat analysis, performed for the total population as well as predefined medical, surgical, and trauma subpopulations. High-protein enteral nutrition enriched with immune-modulating nutrients vs standard high-protein enteral nutrition, initiated within 48 hours of ICU admission and continued during the ICU stay for a maximum of 28 days. The primary outcome measure was incidence of new infections according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definitions. Secondary end points included mortality, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores, mechanical ventilation duration, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, and subtypes of infections according CDC definitions. There were no statistically significant differences in incidence of new infections between the groups: 53% (95% CI, 44%-61%) in the IMHP group vs 52% (95% CI, 44%-61%) in the HP group (P = .96). No statistically significant differences were

  13. The Effects of Pre-Operative Enteral Nutrition from Nasal Feeding Tubes on Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Su-Yong; Dai, Qi-Bao; Hua, Jin; Chen, Shao-Qin

    2017-04-10

    We examined gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) patients who received two weeks of strengthening pre-operative enteral nutrition therapy (pre-EN) through a nasal-jejenal feeding tube placed under a gastroscope to evaluate the feasibility and potential benefit of pre-EN compared to parenteral nutrition (PN). In this study, 68 patients confirmed to have GOO with upper-gastrointestinal contrast and who accepted the operation were randomized into an EN group and a PN group. The differences in nutritional status, immune function, post-operative complications, weight of patients, first bowel sound and first flatus time, pull tube time, length of hospital stay (LOH), and cost of hospitalization between pre-operation and post-operation were all recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi square test and t -test; statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. The success rate of the placement was 91.18% (three out of 31 cases). After pre-EN, the levels of weight, albumin (ALB), prealbumin (PA), and transferrin (TNF) in the EN group were significantly increased by pre-operation day compared to admission day, but were not significantly increased in the PN group; the weights in the EN group were significantly increased compared to the PN group by pre-operation day and day of discharge; total protein (TP), ALB, PA, and TNF of the EN group were significantly increased compared to the PN group on pre-operation and post-operative days one and three. The levels of CD3+, CD4+/CD8+, IgA, and IgM in the EN group were higher than those of the PN group at pre-operation and post-operation; the EN group had a significantly lower incidence of poor wound healing, peritoneal cavity infection, pneumonia, and a shorter first bowel sound time, first flatus time, and post-operation hospital stay than the PN group. Pre-EN through a nasal-jejunum feeding tube and placed under a gastroscope in GOO patients was safe, feasible, and beneficial to the nutrition status, immune function

  14. Parenteral and enteral nutrition for pediatric oncology in low- and middle-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    K Viani

    2015-01-01

    Although nutritional therapy is essential for the treatment of childhood cancer, it remains a challenge, especially within the developing world, where there are many barriers to optimizing treatment. The oral route is the first approach to nutritional support, however challenging this might be in children with cancer. Oral supplements are indicated in moderate evaluated nutritional risk patients and its use should consider the family's social conditions and access to industrialized oral suppl...

  15. Continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition induces metabolic dysfunction in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoll, Barbara; Puiman, Patrycja Jolanta; Cui, Liwei

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that parenteral nutrition (PN) compared with formula feeding results in hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in neonatal pigs. The current aim was to test whether the route of feeding (intravenous [IV] vs enteral) rather than other feeding modalities (diet, pattern) had...

  16. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs re...

  17. Enteral nutrition during bone marrow transplantation in patients with pediatric cancer: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Garófolo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT often require nutritional therapy due to treatment toxicities. The aim here was to evaluate the use of tube feeding and its applicability, indications, contraindications and complications in these patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective observational study conducted at a public university in São Paulo between January 2002 and August 2007. METHODS: The patients were followed up daily in the BMT unit by a research dietitian. Tube feeding was indicated when oral supplementation proved to be insufficient, when the patient had severe malnutrition or there was an impediment to use of oral feeding. It was contraindicated in the presence of gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 3 and 4 or other conditions that implied a risk or hindered its use or placement. Complications of tube feeding were divided into minor and major, according to whether they had life-threatening implications. RESULTS: Forty-two (47.2% patients had indications for tube feeding: the main reasons were transplantation inadequate food and supplement intake, insufficient intake with malnutrition or weight loss, severe malnutrition or need for oral fasting. Thirty-one (73.8% received tube feeding: 11 autologous and 20 allogenic patients (P = 0.04. The main contraindications were severe gastrointestinal toxicities and sinusitis. Minor complications from tube feeding were more prevalent in patients with allogenic BMT, but no major complications were observed. CONCLUSION: Enteral nutrition is a feasible procedure in patients undergoing BMT and should be encouraged. The main difficulty in BMT patients, in relation to tube feeding, is gastrointestinal toxicities.

  18. Early enteral nutrition as a part of intencive care of abdominal surgical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurupii, Dmytro

    Patients with abdominal surgical pathology always have gastrointestinal failure. Under such conditions, the enteral administration of nutrients may be started by trophic nutrition; however, starting nutritional mixtures for it have not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was optimization of energetic and plastic supply of patients with abdominal surgical pathology by studying the efficacy of the clinical nutrition means. An observational analytical observational prospective case-control study of clinical nutrition efficacy has been conducted in 112 patients aged 18 to 45, who underwent intencive care after urgent abdominal surgical interventions. The patients were divided into two groups: in the treatment group (n=64), trophic nutrition by a semi-elemental nutritional formula was initiated within 12 hours after completion of surgery, and in the control group (n=48), the conventional clinical nutrition tactics was used. The levels of serum albumin, glycosaminoglycans, alkaline phosphatase and urine diastase activities were assessed; the lengths of patients' stay in the intensive care unit was recorded. The application of early enteral nutrition in the regimen of trophic nutrition with the use of a semi-elemental nutritional formula allowed to improve protein provision (serum albumin level - 38.68±1.55 g/l vs 32.04±1.5 g/l) (?alkaline phosphatase activity 620.6± 6.22 nmol/s/l vs 723±7.2 nmol/s/l (?<0.05), to achieve relative functional rest of the pancreas (44.5±1.7 g/(h x l) vs 62.6±2.1 g/(h x l)) (?<0.05) and allowed to decrease the length of patients' stay in the intensive care unit (115.9±2.69 hours vs 130.8±3.06 hours) (?<0.05).

  19. The effect of fibers on coagulation of casein-based enteral nutrition in an artificial gastric digestion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhold, J.; Norren, van K.; Minor, M.; Buijs, N.; Braak, van den C.C.M.; Ludwig, T.; Abrahamse, E.; Rijna, H.; Leeuwen, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    A serious complication seen in critically ill patients is the solidification of enteral nutrition causing gastrointestinal obstruction. It has been suggested that enteral nutrition enriched with insoluble fibers may increase the risk of this complication. Therefore, we investigate the effect of

  20. Influence of postoperative enteral nutrition on cellular immunity. A random double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier-Holgersen, R; Brandstrup, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover if the cellular immunological response is different in patients receiving early postoperative enteral nutrition compared to patients who only receive "water".......The aim of this study was to discover if the cellular immunological response is different in patients receiving early postoperative enteral nutrition compared to patients who only receive "water"....

  1. Weight loss and body composition changes following three sequential cycles of ketogenic enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Cappello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ketogenic enteral nutrition (KEN is a modification of the protein sparing modified fast in which a protein solution is introduced with a continuous infusion through a nasogastric tube over 10-days cycles. The aim of the study was to perform a retrospective analysis of the safety, compliance, weight loss and body composition changes after 3 sequential 10-days cycles of KEN therapy. Materials and Methods: From a large number of patients who underwent KEN therapy in our department over a 5-year period, we selected 188 patients who participated in 3 KEN cycles with 10-13 days of break between them. Before and after the treatment cycles, body composition was analyzed by bioelectric impedance; a final assessment was made 10 days after the end of last cycle. During each rest period all the patients were on a low-carbohydrate, normal caloric diet. Results: Most patients (97% successfully tolerated the nasogastric treatment and lost an average of 14.4 kg of body weight, 10.6 kg of fat mass and 3.4 kg of body cell mass. Adverse effects were recorded as mild gastric hypersecretion (2% and constipation (5%. Patients continued to lose fat during the 10-day follow up period after the end of each KEN Cycle. This effect may be explained by abnormality of water distribution during the rapid weight loss inducing the observed change in fat mass. Conclusion: Ten-days KEN treatment cycles can induce rapid weight loss and reduction of fat mass in obese patients. Furthermore, preservation of lean mass can be achieved by infusing 1.9 g of protein/kg of BCM.

  2. [The detection of the bronchial aspiration of enteral nutrition in the ICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Cárdenas, M D; Ayuso Murillo, D; Fernández Hernández, A I; Conde Alonso, M; Ruiz Ruiz, B; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    Description of a comparative study in order to evaluate the sensitivity and reliability of two techniques described in literature used to detect the bronchoaspiration of enteral nutrition. Technique A consists of measuring the glucose in bronchial secretions by strips reactive to glucose-oxidase, and Technique B consists of staining the enteral diets with Methylene Blue, and then watching for the possible presence of colouring in the bronchial secretions. Our study is a contribution to the possible enhancing of the detection of bronchoaspiration, by combining both techniques. A series of 38 patients (Series A) was analyzed, who were subjected to Technique A and a further 32 patients (Series B) were subjected to both Techniques. A comparative study was made on both techniques, based on days of enteral nutrition, and it was observed that the incidence of bronchoaspiration for Series A during the first day of enteral nutrition was 25.7%, and on the following days 9.9%. In Series B, for the first day (Technique A) the percentage of 20% compared to 0% (Technique B), during the following days, 7.2% and 0.93% respectively. We related other variables, in view of their direct handling by the nursing department, such as the pressure used to inflate the pneumoplugging, amount of gastric drainage, administration of antiemetics, the correct position of the nasogastric tube and the presence of peristaltism. The statistical correlation for glucose in bronchial secretions with these variables was not significant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. What Is Nutrition Support Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheet Related Links: Nutrition Support Patient Data Twitter Tweets by ASPENWEB ASPEN 8401 Colesville Road, Suite ... Staff Find a Clinician Press Room Career Center Advertising and Sponsorship Related Websites BPS NBNSC NBPNS Connect ...

  4. [Safety and efficacy of enteral nutritional suspension (TPF-FOS) JEVITY in acute stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bin; Su, Ying-ying; Cui, Li-ying; Wang, Shao-shi; Guan, Yang-tai; Zhou, Dong; Zhao, He-qing

    2011-10-11

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of enteral nutritional suspension (TPF-FOS) JEVITY in acute stroke patients. A multicenter, prospective, post-marketing observational study was conducted. A total of 103 acute stroke patients with dysphagia received a 10-day regimen of enteral nutritional suspension (TPF-FOS) JEVITY via nasal gastric tube feeding. The parameters of serum prealbumin, serum albumin and percentage of abnormal blood glucose were evaluated and compared. The incidence of adverse events was recorded. The data were analyzed by paired t-test. At the end of the study in comparison with the baselines, the serum prealbumin increased significantly (213 mg/L ± 56 mg/L vs 219 mg/L ± 66 mg/L) and serum albumin decreased markedly (38 g/L ± 5 g/L vs 36 g/L ± 5 g/L) but stayed stable during tube feeding. No significant changes were found in percentage of abnormal blood glucose (40.78% vs 38.76%), body mass index (23.1 kg/m(2) ± 3.0 kg/m(2) vs 22.8 kg/m(2) ± 2.9 kg/m(2)) and C-reactive protein (13 mg vs 14 mg). Only 18 adverse events were related with the study product. And most of them were gastrointestinal reactions. Enteral nutritional suspension (TPF-FOS) JEVITY may increase the level of serum prealbumin in acute stroke patients and improve the patient nutritional status. With a low incidence of adverse events, it is a preferred option for enteral nutrition formulas in stroke.

  5. Regional Comparison of Enteral Nutrition-Related Admission Policies in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgermaster, Marissa; Slattery, Eoin; Islam, Nafeesa; Ippolito, Paul R; Seres, David S

    2016-06-01

    Nursing home admission policies are one driver of increased and earlier gastrostomy placement, a procedure that is not always medically or ethically indicated among patients needing short-term nutrition support. This important clinical decision should be based upon patient prognosis, goals, and needs. We compared nursing home enteral nutrition-related admission policies in New York City and other regions of the United States. We also explored motivations for these policies. We conducted a telephone survey with skilled nursing facility administrators in New York City and a random sample of facilities throughout the United States about enteral nutrition-related admission policies. Survey data were matched with publically available data about facility characteristics from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The relationship between facility location and admission policies was described with regression models. Reasons for these policies were thematically analyzed. New York City nursing homes were significantly less likely to admit patients with nasogastric feeding tubes than were nursing homes nationwide, after we controlled for facility characteristics (odds ratio = 0.111; 95% CI, 0.032-0.344). Reasons for refusing nasogastric tubes fell into 5 categories: safety, capacity, policy, perception of appropriate level of care, and patient quality of life. Our findings indicate that enteral nutrition-related admission policies vary greatly between nursing homes in New York City and nationwide. Many administrators cited safety and policy as factors guiding their institutional policies and practices, despite a lack of evidence. This gap in research, practice, and policy has implications for quality and cost of care, length of hospital stay, and patient morbidity and mortality. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  6. Enteral Nutrition Is a Risk Factor for Airway Complications in Subjects Undergoing Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogo, Mariko; Nagata, Kazuma; Morimoto, Takeshi; Ito, Jiro; Sato, Yuki; Teraoka, Shunsuke; Fujimoto, Daichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Tomii, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    Early enteral nutrition is recommended for mechanically ventilated patients in several studies and guidelines. In contrast, the effects of early enteral nutrition on noninvasive ventilation (NIV) have not been investigated extensively. The lack of an established method of airway protection suggests that enteral nutrition administration to these patients could increase airway complications and worsen outcomes. Between January 2007 and January 2015, 150 patients were admitted to our respiratory department for acute respiratory failure and received NIV for >48 h. Of these, 107 subjects incapable of oral intake were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical background and complications were compared in subjects who did and did not receive enteral nutrition. Sixty of the 107 subjects (56%) incapable of oral intake who received NIV also received enteral nutrition. Serum albumin concentration was significantly lower in subjects who received enteral nutrition than in those who did not (mean 2.7 ± 0.68 mg/dL vs 3.0 ± 0.75 mg/dL, P = .048). The rate of airway complications was significantly higher (53% [32/60] vs 32% [15/47], P = .03), and median NIV duration was significantly longer (16 [interquartile range 7-43] d vs 8 [5-20] d, P = .02) in subjects who received enteral nutrition than in those who did not. Multivariate analysis showed that enteral nutrition was unrelated to in-hospital mortality. Among subjects receiving NIV, enteral nutrition was associated with increased risk of airway complications but did not affect mortality. Enteral nutrition should be carefully considered in these patients. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. The Comparison of Continuous and Intermittent Enteral Nutrition In Cerebrovascular Patients

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    Levent Güngör

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Dysphagia and malnutrition are not so rare in stroke patients, and have an unfavorable influence on recovery. Nutritional support may reduce infections, duration of hospital stay and mortality. However, there is no clear evidence about the modality of nasogastric nutrition. In this study, intermittent and continuous enteral nutrition is compared by means of pulmonary infections and gastrointestinal tolerance, among acute cerebrovascular patients. METHODS: Sixty two acute cerebrovascular patients with dysphagia were included the study. The same volume of nutrition product was infused 4 times daily to 31 patients, and continuously for 24 hours to the remaining 31. After 10 days of follow-up, the rates of pulmonary infections, diarrhea, increased gastric residual volumes, vomiting and tube occlusion were compared between two groups. RESULTS: Twenty patients developed pneumonia (32% and 8 diarrhea (13%. Mortality due to complications associated with tube feeding was 6%. Aspiration and related pneumonia was present in 11 patients in the intermittent nutrition group (35%, and in 9 patients in the continuous nutrition group (29%. The rate of pulmonary infection was not statistically different between two groups (p>0.05. Diarrhea was observed in 7 intermittently fed patients (23%, while was present only in 1 patient (3% in the continuously fed group. Diarrhea was more common in the intermittent nutrition group, just at the statistical border (p=0.05. None of the patients developed tube occlusion, vomiting and gastric retention. The rate of mortality and the interruption of feeding was not significantly different between two groups (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Diarrhea and pulmonary infections are more prevalent with intermittent tube feeding with respect to continuous enteral nutrition, though the difference is not so conspicuous. The reason may be contamination of the equipments and the feeding solution because of frequent manipulation and

  8. Nutritional status and adequacy of enteral nutrition in pediatric cancer patients at a reference center in northeastern Brazil.

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    Maciel Barbosa, J; Pedrosa, F; Coelho Cabral, P

    2012-01-01

    Individualized nutritional support is important to pediatric cancer patients and should be integrated to the overall treatment of these patients. Analyze the nutritional status of cancer patients submitted to enteral nutrition (EN) and assess the adequacy of this form of nutrition. A case series study was carried out at the Pediatric Oncology Unit of the Institute of Integrative Medicine Professor Fernando Figueira (IMIP, Brazil, Recife-PE) between January and December 2009. Clinical and anthropometric data were obtained from medical charts and nutritional follow-up charts. Z scores for height for age, weight for age and body mass index for age indicators (H/A, W/A and BMI/A, respectively) were calculated using the AnthroPlus program. Caloric and protein requirements were calculated based on the recommendations of the Brazilian National Council of Oncologic Nutrition. At the beginning of EN, 32.4% of the sample had short stature and 23.9% were underweight based on the BMI/A indicator. The assessment of EN adequacy demonstrated that 49.3% reached the caloric requirements and 76.1% reached the protein requirements, with maximal intakes of 65.6 Kcal/Kg/day and 1.95 g of protein/kg/day. Malnourished patients had greater mean Z scores for W/A and BMI/A at the end of EN, whereas no significant changes were found among patients with adequate nutritional status and significant reductions in these indicators were found among those with overweight or obesity. The patients either maintained or achieved a significant improvement in nutritional status, which demonstrates the importance of nutritional support and follow up during hospitalization.

  9. Nutritional/Growth Status in a Large Cohort of Medically Fragile Children Receiving Long-Term Enteral Nutrition Support.

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    Khan, Zahra; Marinschek, Sabine; Pahsini, Karoline; Scheer, Peter; Morris, Nicholas; Urlesberger, Berndt; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional status and growth of medically fragile children receiving long-term enteral nutritional support (ENS). A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted at a tertiary-level pediatric hospital. Growth features and nutritional intake of children (n = 287) receiving ENS were evaluated. During a period of 5 years (2009-2013), study patients in the age group of 1 to 36 months had been referred for the explicit reason of tube weaning. Data were documented with the help of ARCHIMED (version 46.2) and analyzed using SPSS for Windows version 21. Nutritional/growth status was determined by using World Health Organization growth standard tables. Anthropometric parameters of children were compared with World Health Organization standards, and the prevalence of underweight, wasting, and stunting was very high despite being exclusively or predominantly on ENS. Results revealed that the age of a child, inadequate amount of caloric supply/day, the diagnosis of small-for-gestational age, and the type of tube (nasogastric tube) were significantly associated with growth/nutritional status (P growth outcomes. In medically fragile children, ENS does not ensure adequate growth per se. ENS requires highly specialized and individually tailored management and in many cases regular adjustments. Long-term tube feeding plans often seem unable to ensure the required amount of nutritional support, which surely compromise the individual efficacy of ENS.

  10. Enteral immunonutrition versus enteral nutrition for gastric cancer patients undergoing a total gastrectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Juan; Zhan, Zhen

    2018-01-16

    Nutrition support is a common means for patients with gastric cancer, especially for those undergoing elective surgery. Recently, enteral immunonutrition (EIN) was increasingly found to be more effective than enteral nutrition (EN) in enhancing the host immunity and eventually improving the prognosis of gastric cancer patients undergoing gastrectomy. However, the results reported were not consistent. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the impact of EIN for patients with GC on biochemical, immune indices and clinical outcomes. Four electronical databases (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane library) were used to search articles in peer-reviewed, English-language journals. Mean difference (MD), Relative risk (RR), or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Heterogeneity was assessed by Cochrane Q and I 2 statistic combined with corresponding P-value. The analysis was carried out with RevMan 5.3. Seven studies involving 583 patients were eligible for the pooled analysis. EIN, when beyond a 7-day time-frame post-operatively (D ≥ 7), increased level of CD4 + (SMD = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.65-1.33; P SMD = 0.34; 95% CI, 0.02-0.67; P = 0.04), the IgM (SMD = 1.15; 95% CI, 0.11-2.20; P = 0.03), the IgG (SMD = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.55-1.42; P SMD = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.32-1.06; P = 0.0003), and the proalbumin (SMD = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.33-1.14; P = 0.0004). However, those increased effects were not obvious within a 7-day time-frame post-operatively (D infection and length of hospitalization (LHS) were not improved no matter what time after surgery. EIN was found to improve the cellular immunity, modulate inflammatory reaction and reduce postoperative complication for GC patients undergoing radical gastrointestinal surgery. Exclusion of grey literature and non-English language studies was the key limitation in this study.

  11. [Nutritional therapy in Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Iára Kallyanna Cavalcante

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to approach the main necessary aspects for the accomplishment of safety and efficient nutritional therapy to the critically ill patient. Bibliographical survey with didactic books and scientific articles was made in Portuguese, English and Spanish with results of the last 20 years. Nutritional support is an integrant part in the care of patients in intensive care units. The success of the nutritional therapy involves the stages of nutritional assessment, determines the route of diet infusion and the calories and nutrients needs. The use of nutrients with immune function (immunonutrients) is each more frequents, however, its use is not well established for critical illness. More clinical studies are necessary to establish the best form to nourish the critical ill patient.

  12. Medical nutrition therapy of overweight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copperman, Nancy; Jacobson, Marc S

    2003-02-01

    The long-term goal of medical nutrition therapy for adolescents who are overweight or at risk for becoming overweight is to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors. These behaviors will, in turn, improve metabolic parameters and self-esteem while helping the adolescent achieve and maintain a desirable body weight. The identification of anthropometric, metabolic, nutritional, and environmental risk factors present in the child and family will help formulate the medical nutrition intervention. A well-balanced diet that supports growth and development, aerobic exercise, and cognitive behavioral strategies are essential components of an intervention program. Frequent and long-term monitoring by a registered dietitian and pediatrician will reinforce lifestyle changes and support the adolescent and family in achieving realistic goals of weight loss or weight maintenance. This article covers the assessment and interventions necessary for successful nutrition therapy for obese and superobese adolescents.

  13. A survey of the enteral nutrition practices in patients with neurological disorders in the tertiary hospitals of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying-Ying; Gao, Dai-Quan; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Sha, Rui-Juan; Niu, Xiao-Yuan; Wang, Chang-Qing; Zhou, Dong; Jiang, Wen; Cui, Fang; Yang, Yi; Pan, Su-Yue; Zhang, Xu; Li, Lian-Di; Gao, Liang; Peng, Bin; Zhong, Chun-Long; Liu, Zhen-Chuan; Li, Li-Hong; Tan, Hong; Lv, Pei-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of enteral nutrition in patients with neurological disorders in China, related guidelines were published in 2011. The Chinese Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition conducted a survey to evaluate the status quo of enteral nutrition practices in these patients. This multicenter prospective investigation was conducted from April 2012 to April 2013 and involved 18 tertiary hospitals in China. The survey using standardized questionnaires sought information about the basic protocols for enteral nutrition (devices and staffing) and specific information about patients with neurological conditions who received nutrition by way of enteral feeding. In the 18 hospitals from 13 provinces, 83.3% patients were configured with an enteral nutrition infusion pump, 77.8% had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) device, and 88.9% had a clinical nutrition support group. Four hundred four patients participated in this survey (259 men, 145 women; mean age 61.3±14.7 years), 85.7% had suffered a stroke, 83.9% had impaired consciousness, and 98.0% had dysphagia. Of the 10 guidelines for enteral nutrition practices, setting the energy target, choosing the enteral nutrition tube, and monitoring the patient received unsatisfactory ratings were in poor compliance (56.2%, 30.0% and 38.9%, respectively); the remaining seven guidelines were in good compliance (each >75%). The survey suggested that configuration of the enteral nutritional devices and staffing was adequate in China's tertiary hospitals. However, some associated practices had not yet reached the desired levels of competency, indicating a need for this to be understood and for improved training.

  14. [Application of microbiological and immunological enteral nutrition in patients with gastrointestinal cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng; Yang, Cheng-gang; Liu, Xin; Yang, Dao-gui

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effects of microbiological and immunological enteral nutrition using composition of probiotics, glutamine, fish oil, and peptisorb on patients with gastrointestinal cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus. From January 2007 to October 2010, 67 patients with gastrointestinal cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus were admitted to the Liaocheng People's Hospital of Shandong Province and were randomized into the treatment group(n=33, enteral nutrition with probiotics, glutamine, and fish oil) and the routine group(n=34, regular enteral nutrition). Fasting blood glucose(FBG), insulin(FINS), number of lymphocytes(including CD3(+)T cell, CD4(+)T cell, CD8(+)T cell, CD4(+)/CD8(+)) and natural killer (NK) cells of the two groups were detected on the day before surgery and postoperative day 3 and 7. Insulin resistance index (InHOMA-IR) was calculated by using the homeostasis model assessment(HOMA). The incidence of nosocomial infections and intestinal function recovery time, and length of hospital stay were collected. On postoperative day 7, FINS[(8.4±3.7) mU/L vs. (13.7±5.4) mU/L, P0.05] and intestinal function recovery time[(69.3±9.5) h vs. (70.1±11.6) h, P>0.05] between the two groups. However, the length of hospital stay [(17±3.8) d vs. (21±4.2) d, P<0.05] was significantly shorter in the treatment group. For patients with gastrointestinal cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus, microbiota enteral nutrition can reduce insulin resistance, improve the immune status, and promote postoperative recovery.

  15. The Obesity Paradox Is Not Observed in Critically Ill Patients on Early Enteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kimberley; Zhou, Jiachen; Liu, Xinggang; Hassan, Erkan; Badawi, Omar

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the association between body mass index and mortality in a large, ICU population and determine if the relationship is observed among a subgroup of patients ordered early enteral nutrition. Retrospective cohort study within a national clinical mixed ICU database of patients admitted between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2015. Initial ICU admissions among patients monitored by tele-ICU programs and recorded in the Philips eICU Research Institute database. A total of 1,042,710 adult patient stays with ICU length of stay more than 24 hours, of which 74,771 were ordered enteral nutrition within the first 48 hours. None. Patient stays from 409 ICUs were included. The average age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV score, and hospital mortality were 63.6 years, 56.7, and 9.0%, respectively. Hospital mortality among body mass index categories was estimated by multivariable modified Poisson regression models. Compared with the body mass index category 25.0-29.9 kg/m, hospital mortality was higher among underweight (body mass index, obese (body mass index, ≥ 50.0; relative risk, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.05-1.15). However, the risk was not statistically different from patients with body mass index 30.0-49.9 kg/m. Among patients ordered early enteral nutrition, the risk of mortality in the body mass index category 25.0-29.9 kg/m was not statistically different from those in the normal weight or extremely obese groups. A survival advantage for overweight and obese patients was observed in this large cohort of critically ill patients. However, among those ordered early enteral nutrition, the survival disadvantage for body mass index categories less than 25.0 kg/m was minimal or unobservable when compared with higher body mass index categories.

  16. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs(1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchart-Thevret, Caroline; Stoll, Barbara; Benight, Nancy M; Olutoye, Oluyinka; Lazar, David; Burrin, Douglas G

    2013-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs received partial enteral nutrition (25%) as milk-based formula supplemented with MSG at 0, 1.7, 3.0, and 4.3 times the basal protein-bound glutamate intake (468 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) from d 4 to 8 of life (n = 5-8). Whole-body respiratory calorimetry and (13)C-octanoic acid breath tests were performed on d 4, 6, and 8. Body weight gain, stomach and intestinal weights, and arterial plasma glutamate and glutamine concentrations were not different among the MSG groups. Arterial plasma glutamate concentrations were significantly higher at birth than after 8 d of partial enteral nutrition. Also at d 8, the significant portal-arterial concentration difference in plasma glutamate was substantial (∼500 μmol/L) among all treatment groups, suggesting that there was substantial net intestinal glutamate absorption in preterm pigs. MSG supplementation dose-dependently increased gastric emptying time and decreased breath (13)CO2 enrichments, (13)CO2 production, percentage of (13)CO2 recovery/h, and cumulative percentage recovery of (13)C-octanoic acid. Circulating glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) concentration was significantly increased by MSG but was not associated with an increase in intestinal mucosal growth. In contrast to our hypothesis, our results suggest that adding MSG to partial enteral nutrition slows the gastric emptying rate, which may be associated with an inhibitory effect of increased circulating GLP-2.

  17. Supplementing Monosodium Glutamate to Partial Enteral Nutrition Slows Gastric Emptying in Preterm Pigs123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchart-Thevret, Caroline; Stoll, Barbara; Benight, Nancy M.; Olutoye, Oluyinka; Lazar, David; Burrin, Douglas G.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs received partial enteral nutrition (25%) as milk-based formula supplemented with MSG at 0, 1.7, 3.0, and 4.3 times the basal protein-bound glutamate intake (468 mg·kg−1·d−1) from d 4 to 8 of life (n = 5–8). Whole-body respiratory calorimetry and 13C-octanoic acid breath tests were performed on d 4, 6, and 8. Body weight gain, stomach and intestinal weights, and arterial plasma glutamate and glutamine concentrations were not different among the MSG groups. Arterial plasma glutamate concentrations were significantly higher at birth than after 8 d of partial enteral nutrition. Also at d 8, the significant portal-arterial concentration difference in plasma glutamate was substantial (∼500 μmol/L) among all treatment groups, suggesting that there was substantial net intestinal glutamate absorption in preterm pigs. MSG supplementation dose-dependently increased gastric emptying time and decreased breath 13CO2 enrichments, 13CO2 production, percentage of 13CO2 recovery/h, and cumulative percentage recovery of 13C-octanoic acid. Circulating glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) concentration was significantly increased by MSG but was not associated with an increase in intestinal mucosal growth. In contrast to our hypothesis, our results suggest that adding MSG to partial enteral nutrition slows the gastric emptying rate, which may be associated with an inhibitory effect of increased circulating GLP-2. PMID:23446960

  18. Bronchopulmonary complications associated to enteral nutrition devices in patients admitted to internal medicine departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, J; Barba, R; Lázaro, M; Matía, P; Plaza, S; Canora, J; Zapatero, A

    2013-01-01

    Enteral nutrition using feeding devices such as nasogastric (NG) tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is an effective feeding method subject that may give rise to complications. We have studied the relationship between enteral nutrition feeding devices in patients admitted to the Internal Medicine Departments and the development of pulmonary complications (bronchial aspiration and aspiration pneumonia). All of the patients discharge between 2005 and 2009 from the Internal Medicine (IM) Departments of the public hospitals of the National Health System in Spain were analyzed. The data of patients with bronchial aspiration or aspiration pneumonia who also were carriers of NG tubes or PEG, were obtained from the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS). From a total of 2,767,259 discharges, 26,066 (0.92%) patients with nasogastric tube (NG tube) or percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) were identified. A total of 21.5% of patients with NG tube and 25.9% of patients with PEG had coding for a bronchopulmonary aspiration on their discharge report versus 1.2% of patients without an enteral feeding tube. In the multivariate analysis, the likelihood of suffering bronchoaspiration was 9 times greater in patients with SNG (OR: 9.1; 95% CI: 8.7-9.4) and 15 greater in subjects with PEG (OR: 15.2; 95% CI: 14.5-15.9) than in subjects without SNG or PEG. Mean stay (9.2 and 12.7 more days), diagnostic complexity and costs were much higher in patients with SNG or PEG compared to patients in hospital who did not require these devices. An association was found between SNG and PEG for enteral feeding and pulmonary complications. Mean stay, diagnostic complexity and cost per admission of these patients was higher in patients who did not require enteral nutrition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Feeding tube-related complications and problems in patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition

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    Vasileios Alivizatos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term complications and problems related to gastrostomy and jejunostomy feeding tubes used for home enteral nutrition support and the effect these have on health care use. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 31 patients having gastrostomy (27 patients and jejunostomy (4 feeding tubes inserted in our Department were retrospectively studied. All were discharged on long-term (>3 months enteral nutrition and followed up at regular intervals by a dedicated nurse. Any problem or complication associated with tube feeding as well as the intervention, if any, that occurred, was recorded. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for a mean of 17.5 months (4-78. The most frequent tube-related complications included inadvertent removal of the tube (broken tube, plugged tube; 45.1%, tube leakage (6.4%, dermatitis of the stoma (6.4%, and diarrhea (6.4%. There were 92 unscheduled health care contacts, with an average rate of such 2.9 contacts over the mean follow-up time of 17.5 months. Conclusion: In patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition, feeding tube-related complications and problems are frequent and result in significant health care use. Further studies are needed to address their optimal prevention modalities and management.

  20. Home enteral nutrition in children: an 11-year experience with 416 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveluy, Walter; Guimber, Dominique; Mention, Karine; Lescut, Dominique; Michaud, Laurent; Turck, Dominique; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2005-02-01

    We report our experience of paediatric home enteral nutrition, as there is little detailed evidence published. All patients younger than 18 years commencing treatment between January 1990 and December 2000 were included in this retrospective study. The study covered 416 children and adolescents, corresponding to a total of 243,844 days of home enteral nutrition (HEN). The mean (+/-SD) age of patients commencing treatment was 5.4+/-5.3 years (range 0.1-17.8). Indications were digestive disorders in 35% of patients, neurological and muscular disorders in 35%, malignancy in 11%, failure to thrive in 8%, and miscellaneous ailments in 9%. Enteral feeding comprised commercially available paediatric industrial diets in 36%, adult-type diet in 35% and infant formulas in 29%. Children received enteral feeding by nasogastric tube (53%), or gastrostomy (41%). A mechanical pump was used in 98% of the patients. The mean duration of treatment was 595+/-719 days. HEN can be used while treating a large group of chronic diseases of children. It can be started very early in life and is often prolonged over several years.

  1. Modulation of intestinal inflammation by minimal enteral nutrition with amniotic fluid in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Bering, Stine Brandt; Jensen, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a severe inflammatory disorder, associated with the difficult transition from parenteral to enteral feeding after preterm birth. We hypothesized that minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) with amniotic fluid (AF), prior to enteral formula feeding, would...... improve resistance to NEC in preterm pigs. Methods: Experiment 1: IEC-6 cells were incubated with porcine (pAF) and human AF (hAF) to test AF-stimulated enterocyte proliferation and migration in vitro. Experiment 2: Cesarean-delivered, preterm pigs were fed parenteral nutrition and MEN with pAF, h......AF, or control fluid (MEN-pAF, MEN-hAF, or MEN-CTRL; all n = 9) for 2 days before tissue collection. Experiment 3: Preterm pigs were fed MEN diets as in experiment 2, but followed by 2 days of enteral formula feeding, which predisposes to NEC (NEC-pAF, NEC-hAF, or NEC-CTRL; n = 10–12). Results: Both pAF and h...

  2. A Survey of Home Enteral Nutrition Practices and Reimbursement in the Asia Pacific Region

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    Alvin Wong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Literature regarding the use of home enteral nutrition (HEN and how it is reimbursed in the Asia Pacific region is limited. This research survey aims to determine the availability of HEN, the type of feeds and enteral access used, national reimbursement policies, the presence of nutrition support teams (NSTs, and clinical nutrition education in this region. An electronic questionnaire was sent to 20 clinical nutrition societies and leaders in the Asia Pacific region in August 2017, where thirteen countries responded. Comparison of HEN reimbursement and practice between countries of different income groups based on the World Bank’s data was investigated. Financial support for HEN is only available in 40% of the countries. An association was found between availability of financial support for HEN and health expenditure (r = 0.63, p = 0.021. High and middle-upper income countries use mainly commercial supplements for HEN, while lower-middle income countries use mainly blenderized diet. The presence of NSTs is limited, and only present mainly in acute settings. Sixty percent of the countries indicated an urgent need for funding and reimbursement of HEN. This survey demonstrates the varied clinical and economic situation in the Asia Pacific region. There is a lack of reimbursement, clinical support, and inadequate educational opportunities, especially for the lower-middle income countries.

  3. Tolerance and efficacy of nasogastric enteral nutrition for severe acute pancreatitis: a metaanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-fen FENG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the tolerance and efficacy of nasogastric enteral nutrition (NGEN in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Methods  PUBMED, Web of Science and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1966 to 2011 (up to October and Chinese Journals Full-text Database (CNKI, Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP and Wanfang Digital Journal Full-text Database from 1978 to 2011 (up to October were retrieved to collect clinical randomized controlled trials of NGEN to compare with nasojejunal enteral nutrition (NJEN in the treatment of SAP. Two reviewers independently screened the literature for eligibility and evaluated the quality with confirmation of cross-check. Different opinions would be decided by the third party. Statistical analysis was performed by meta-analysis using Review Manager 4.2. Results  Three randomized controlled trails including 159 patients with SAP met the inclusion criteria, involving 82 patients in NGEN group and 77 in NJEN group. There was no significant difference between NGEN and NJEN group in the risk of mortality of SAP (RR=0.69, 95%CI: 0.37-1.29, P=0.25, conversion to surgery (RR=2.09, 95% CI: 0.55-7.92, P=0.28, diarrhea subsequent to enteral nutrition (RR=1.43, 95% CI: 0.59-3.45, P=0.43, rate of tube displacement (RR=0.42, 95%CI: 0.08-2.17, P=0.30 and pain related with enteral nutrition (RR=0.94, 95%CI: 0.32-2.70, P=0.90. While compared with NJEN, the risk of infectious complications was lower than NGEN (RR=0.64, 95%CI: 0.42-0.99, P=0.04. Conclusion  In enteral nutrition support of SAP, NGEN is comparable to NJEN in efficacy and tolerance, but the former has the lower rate of infectious complications and easier to operate, and there is a tendency of NEGN to replace the latter.

  4. Australasian Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines for supplementation of trace elements during parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Emma J; Ali, Azmat; Isenring, Elizabeth; Ball, Patrick; Davis, Melvyn; Gillanders, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    This work represents the first part of a progressive review of AuSPEN's 1999 Guidelines for Provision of Micronutrient Supplementation in Adult Patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition, in recognition of the developments in the literature on this topic since that time. A systematic literature review was undertaken and recommendations were made based on the available evidence and with consideration to specific elements of the Australian and New Zealand practice environment. The strength of evidence underpinning each recommendation was assessed. External reviewers provided feedback on the guidelines using the AGREE II tool. Reduced doses of manganese, copper, chromium and molybdenum, and an increased dose of selenium are recommended when compared with the 1999 guidelines. Currently the composition of available multi-trace element formulations is recognised as an obstacle to aligning these guidelines with practice. A paucity of available literature and limitations with currently available methods of monitoring trace element status are acknowledged. The currently unknown clinical impact of changes to trace element contamination of parenteral solutions with contemporary practices highlights need for research and clinical vigilance in this area of nutrition support practice. Trace elements are essential and should be provided daily to patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Monitoring is generally only required in longer term parenteral nutrition, however should be determined on an individual basis. Industry is encouraged to modify existing multi-trace element solutions available in Australia and New Zealand to reflect changes in the literature outlined in these guidelines. Areas requiring research are highlighted.

  5. Randomised clinical trial: enteral nutrition does not improve the long-term outcome of alcoholic cirrhotic patients with jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, B; Dao, T; Joubert, C; Dupont-Lucas, C; Gloro, R; Nguyen-Khac, E; Beaujard, E; Mathurin, P; Vastel, E; Musikas, M; Ollivier, I; Piquet, M-A

    2012-05-01

    Malnutrition and jaundice are independent prognostic factors in cirrhosis. To assess the impact of enteral nutrition on the survival of alcoholic cirrhotic patients with jaundice but without acute alcoholic hepatitis. The study was a multicentre prospective randomised controlled trial comparing effects of enteral nutrition vs. a symptomatic support in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and jaundice (bilirubin ≥51 µmol/L) but without severe acute alcoholic hepatitis. A total of 99 patients were randomised to receive either the conventional symptomatic treatment (55 patients) or the symptomatic support associated with 35 kcal/Kg/day of enteral nutrition during 4 weeks followed by an oral nutritional support during 2 months (44 patients). Randomisation was stratified on nutritional status. One-year survival curves were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Logrank test. Populations in both arms were similar. One-year survival was similar in the overall population (27/44 patients (61.4%) in the enteral nutrition arm vs. 36/55 (65.5%) in the control arm; Logrank P = 0.60) and in the subgroup suffering from malnutrition [18/29 patients (62.1%) in the enteral nutrition arm vs. 20/32 (62.5%) in the control arm; Logrank P = 0.99]. There was no statistical difference for bilirubin, prothrombin rate, Child-Pugh score, albumin or nutritional assessment. Complications during treatment (bleeding, encephalopathy, infection) occurred in 23% of patients in the enteral nutrition group (10/44) vs. 16% (9/55) of the control patients (P = 0.59). Enteral nutrition does not improve the survival and hepatic or nutritional parameters of cirrhotic patients with jaundice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Improving Nutrition Outcomes for Infants Grams With a Progressive, Evidenced-Based Enteral Feeding Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoene, Melissa K; Lyden, Elizabeth; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2018-03-30

    Growth is essential for very low birth weight infants. The purpose of this retrospective chart review was to evaluate the impact of a new standardized, evidenced-based feeding protocol for infants born < 1500 g in correlation with growth and clinical outcomes. Growth and nutrition data was reviewed from 2 groups of infants born < 1500 g within a level III newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Epoch 1 infants (N = 32) received care following initial implementation of a standardized enteral feeding protocol. Epoch 2 infants (N = 32) received care following aggressive modification of this initial protocol based on newly available literature that promotes earlier initiation and advancement of enteral feedings. Epoch 2 infants weighed more at 36 weeks (2562 vs 2304 g) with higher discharge weight percentiles (32nd vs 15th percentile). Epoch 2 infants started and achieved full enteral feedings earlier (day of life 1 vs 4; 7 vs 22, P < 0.0001) and required less days of parenteral nutrition (5.5 vs 17.5 days, P < 0.0001), with indwelling central line for parenteral access (6 vs 17.5). There were no differences in retinopathy of prematurity (17% control vs 19% study), oxygen requirement at 36 weeks (22% epoch 1 vs 43%), necrotizing enterocolitis (3% epoch 1 vs 0%), intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3-4, periventricular leukomalacia, or death. In this sample of very low birth weight infants, a progressive standardized, evidence-based feeding protocol was associated with improved growth without increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for enteral nutrition in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, L; Hauge, T

    2003-09-01

    The use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for enteral nutrition in patients admitted for stroke is difficult, varying and needs specific consideration. There is therefore need for more data on this patient group. We examined the indications, survival, tube removal and time with PEG in stroke patients and in other patients with PEG with the aim of providing guidance for the management of enteral nutrition via PEG in stroke patients. Retrospective assessment of data from all stroke patients and patients with other diseases (control group) who had received PEG for enteral nutrition during a period of 8.5 years. Eighty-three stroke patients with dysphagia received PEG after unsuccessful use of nasogastric tubes or long-term tube feeding. Early mortality rate was 19% in the stroke group, 26% in the older group (>74 years) and 12% in the younger group (60-74 years). The PEG tubes were later removed due to swallowing recovery in 20% of the older group and in 31% of the younger group. At 90 days, 50%-60% still needed PEG. The stroke patients were older compared to the control group (n = 115); 30-day mortality was similar but more patients recovered the ability to swallow. Stroke patients are older than other patients who receive PEG; 27% have swallowing recovery and more than 75% have long-term need for PEG. Nasogastric tubes often fail, and the need for early PEG placement (within 2 weeks) must be assessed in appropriate patients. The patient's prognosis, the objective of nutritional treatment, duration of dysphagia, age and comorbidity should all be taken into consideration.

  8. Formulações com alimentos convencionais para nutrição enteral ou oral Formulations for enteral or oral nutrition using conventional foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edma M. Araújo

    2006-09-01

    were determined. The F1 and F2 formulations presented lower viscosities than FCM and improved caloric distribution (14% protein, 33% fat, 53% carbohydrate, food fibre content (8.16 g/2 L and caloric density (1 kcal/mL than FCM (19% protein, 33% fat, 48% carbohydrate, caloric density of 0.87 kcal/mL and food fibre content of 4.68 g/2 L. The formulations F1 and F2 were more fluid than FCM, dripped at 60-80 drips/minute and showed isotonic osmolalities. The addition of corn grits, Soymilk® and Nidex® improved the nutritive value and flow properties, making it possible to administer more in less time. The formulations represent options to individualise normal enteral diets in home therapy.

  9. The Effects of Glucose Therapy Agents-Apple Juice, Orange Juice, and Cola-on Enteral Tube Flow and Patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Daphna J; Montreuil, Jasmine; Santoro, Andrea L; Zettas, Antonia; Lowe, Julia

    2016-06-01

    To develop evidence-based hypoglycemia treatment protocols in patients receiving total enteral nutrition, this study determined the effect on enteral tube flow of glucose therapy agents: apple juice, orange juice, and cola, and it also examined the effects of tube type and feed type with these glucose therapy agents. For this study, 12 gastrostomy tubes (6 polyethylene and 6 silicone) were set at 50 mL/h. Each feeding set was filled with Isosource HN with fibre or Novasource Renal. Each tube was irrigated with 1 glucose therapy agent, providing approximately 20 g of carbohydrate every 4 h. Flow-rate measurements were collected at 2 h intervals. The results showed that the glucose therapy agent choice affected flow rates: apple juice and cola had higher average flow rates than orange juice (P = 0.01). A significant difference was found between tube type and enteral formula: polyethylene tubes had higher average flow rates than silicone tubes (P juice and cola have less tube clogging potential than orange juice, and thus may be considered as primary treatment options for hypoglycemia in enterally fed patients. Polyethylene tubes and Isosource HN with fibre were less likely to clog than silicone tubes and Novasource Renal.

  10. Enteral nutrition for preterm infants: by bolus or continuous? An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Bozzetti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of nutritional management of preterm infants is crucial for achievement of their long-term health. Enteral nutrition is preferred to total parenteral nutrition (TPN because the former avoids complications related to vascular catheterization, sepsis, adverse effects of TPN, and fasting. Due to the lack of ability of preterm infants to coordinate suckling, swallowing, and breathing, tube feeding is necessary for most infants less than 1500 g to ensure sufficient feeding tolerance, to support optimal growth and to reduce the risk of aspiration. Therefore, feeding by orogastric or nasogastric tube using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery of formula or human milk is common practice for these infants. Theoretical risks and benefits of both continuous nasogastric milk feeding and intermittent bolus milk feeding have been proposed. According to the literature, continuous nutrition could be preferred in smaller infants (as those with a birthweight below 1250 g or hemodynamically impaired infants; in stable growing infants nutrition can be administered intermittently as in healthy term infants.

  11. Challenges to nutrition therapy in the pediatric critically ill obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Enid E; Ariagno, Katelyn; Arriola, Aldis; Lara, Kattina; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2015-06-01

    Obesity has been associated with poor clinical outcomes in critically ill children. The optimal approach to nutrition therapy in this vulnerable cohort is unclear. We report the nutrition management of 2 obese patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We focus on their nutrition assessment, energy requirements, and macronutrient delivery. Case 1 describes a 19-year-old male, body mass index (BMI) 52.4 kg/m(2), who was admitted after emergent orthopedic surgery. Case 2 describes a 13-year-old male, BMI 31.5 kg/m(2), who was admitted with respiratory distress. Average PICU length of stay was 2 months. Nutrition assessments, including weight and height, were obtained early and regularly. Skinfold measurements were challenging. Estimated energy expenditure by predictive equations was significantly higher compared with measured resting energy expenditure (MREE) by indirect calorimetry in both cases. The Mifflin St-Jeor equation (in case 1) overestimated MREE by 681 kcal/d; the Schofield equation (in case 2) overestimated MREE by 662 kcal/d. Both patients had barriers to enteral nutrition and prolonged periods of time when they received no enteral nutrition, requiring parenteral nutrition for 28% and 75% of their PICU stay, respectively. Average daily protein delivered was 0.8 g/kg and 1 g/kg, below adult recommended protein intake for obese patients and pediatric recommendations for age. These cases were notable for (1) challenges to anthropometric assessments, (2) inaccurate estimates of energy requirements, (3) suboptimal enteral nutrition delivery, (4) need for supplemental parenteral nutrition, and (5) suboptimal protein intake. Research is needed to determine the best approach to nutrition therapy in this cohort. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Nutritional therapies for mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Karen F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4 out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. Major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD are among the most common mental disorders that currently plague numerous countries and have varying incidence rates from 26 percent in America to 4 percent in China. Though some of this difference may be attributable to the manner in which individual healthcare providers diagnose mental disorders, this noticeable distribution can be also explained by studies which show that a lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to the development of mental disorders. Notably, essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids are often deficient in the general population in America and other developed countries; and are exceptionally deficient in patients suffering from mental disorders. Studies have shown that daily supplements of vital nutrients often effectively reduce patients' symptoms. Supplements that contain amino acids also reduce symptoms, because they are converted to neurotransmitters that alleviate depression and other mental disorders. Based on emerging scientific evidence, this form of nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for controlling major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD, addiction, and autism. The aim of this manuscript is to emphasize which dietary supplements can aid the treatment of the four most common mental disorders currently affecting America and other developed countries: major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. Most antidepressants and other prescription drugs cause severe side effects, which usually discourage patients from taking their medications. Such

  13. Gastrointestinal tract access for enteral nutrition in critically ill and trauma patients: indications, techniques, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, M; Latifi, R; El-Menyar, A; Al Thani, H

    2013-06-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is a widely used, standard-of-care technique for nutrition support in critically ill and trauma patients. To review the current techniques of gastrointestinal tract access for EN. For this traditional narrative review, we accessed English-language articles and abstracts published from January 1988 through October 2012, using three research engines (MEDLINE, Scopus, and EMBASE) and the following key terms: "enteral nutrition," "critically ill," and "gut access." We excluded outdated abstracts. For our nearly 25-year search period, 44 articles matched all three terms. The most common gut access techniques included nasoenteric tube placement (nasogastric, nasoduodenal, or nasojejunal), as well as a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Other open or laparoscopic techniques, such as a jejunostomy or a gastrojejunostomy, were also used. Early EN continues to be preferred whenever feasible. In addition, evidence is mounting that EN during the early phase of critical illness or trauma trophic feeding has an outcome comparable to that of full-strength formulas. Most patients tolerate EN through the stomach, so postpyloric tube feeding is not needed initially. In critically ill and trauma patients, early EN through the stomach should be instituted whenever feasible. Other approaches can be used according to patient needs, available expertise, and institutional guidelines. More research is needed in order to ensure the safe use of surgical tubes in the open abdomen.

  14. Minimal Enteral Nutrition to Improve Adaptation After Intestinal Resection in Piglets and Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Qvist, Niels; Sangild, Per T; Vegge, Andreas; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker; Eriksen, Thomas; Husby, Steffen; Thymann, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) may induce a diet-dependent stimulation of gut adaptation following intestinal resection. Bovine colostrum is rich in growth factors, and we hypothesized that MEN with colostrum would stimulate intestinal adaptation, compared with formula, and would be well tolerated in patients with short bowel syndrome. In experiment 1, 3-day-old piglets with 50% distal small intestinal resection were fed parenteral nutrition (PN, n = 10) or PN plus MEN given as either colostrum (PN-COL, n = 5) or formula (PN-FORM, n = 9) for 7 days. Intestinal nutrient absorption and histomorphometry were performed. In experiment 2, tolerance and feasibility of colostrum supplementation were tested in a pilot study on 5 infants who had undergone intestinal resection, and they were compared with 5 resected infants who served as controls. In experiment 1, relative wet-weight absorption and intestinal villus height were higher in PN-COL vs PN (53% vs 23% and 362 ± 13 vs 329 ± 7 µm, P milk allergy. Minimal enteral nutrition feeding with bovine colostrum and formula induced similar intestinal adaptation after resection in piglets. Colostrum was well tolerated by newly resected infants, but the clinical indication for colostrum supplementation to infants subjected to intestinal resection remains to be determined.

  15. Intermittent and continuous enteral nutrition in critically ill dogs: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, M; Abood, S; Hauptman, J; Koenigsknecht, C; Brown, A

    2010-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in critically ill dogs and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in human medicine. Enteral nutrition (EN) delivery methods have been evaluated in humans to determine which is most effective in achieving caloric goals. To compare continuous infusion and intermittent bolus feeding of EN in dogs admitted to a critical care unit. Fifty-four dogs admitted to the critical care unit and requiring nutritional support with a nasoenteric feeding tube. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Dogs were randomized to receive either continuous infusion (Group C) or intermittent bolus feeding (Group I) of liquid EN. The percentage of prescribed nutrition delivered (PPND) was calculated every 24 hours. Frequencies of gastrointestinal (GI), mechanical, and technical complications were recorded and gastric residual volumes (GRVs) were measured. PPND was significantly lower in Group C (98.4%) than Group I (100%). There was no significant difference in GI or mechanical complications, although Group C had a significantly higher rate of technical complications. GRVs did not differ significantly between Group C (3.1 mL/kg) and Group I (6.3 mL/kg) and were not correlated with the incidence of vomiting or regurgitation. There was a statistically significant difference in the PPND between continuously and intermittently fed dogs, but this difference is unlikely to be clinically relevant. Critically ill dogs can be successfully supported with either continuous infusion or intermittent bolus feeding of EN with few complications. Increased GRVs may not warrant termination of enteral feeding.

  16. Fistuloclysis Improves Liver Function and Nutritional Status in Patients with High-Output Upper Enteric Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to determine the efficacy of fistuloclysis in patients with high-output upper enteric fistula (EF. Methods. Patients were assigned into the fistuloclysis group (n=35, receiving fistuloclysis plus total enteral nutrition (TEN and the control group (n=60, receiving TEN. Laboratory variables were measured during the four-week treatment. Results. At baseline, variables were similar between the two groups. Delta value was defined as the changes from baseline to day 28. Compared with the control group, the fistuloclysis group showed greater improvements in liver function (Delta total bilirubin (TB: 20.3±9.7 in the fistuloclysis group versus 15.6±6.3 in the control group, P=0.040; Delta direct bilirubin (DB: 12.5±3.4 versus 10.0±3.6, P=0.011; Delta alkaline phosphatase (ALP: 98.4±33.5 versus 57.6±20.9, P<0.001; nutritional status (Delta total protein: 21.8±8.7 versus 10.7±2.1, P<0.001; Delta albumin: 11.3±2.5 versus 4.2±1.3, P<0.001. In the fistuloclysis subgroups, biliary fistula patients had the maximum number of variables with the greatest improvements. Conclusions. Fistuloclysis improved hepatic and nutritional parameters in patients with high-output upper EF, particularly in biliary fistula patients.

  17. Fistuloclysis improves liver function and nutritional status in patients with high-output upper enteric fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yin; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Zhou, Bo; Ding, Chao; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Song; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Background. We aimed to determine the efficacy of fistuloclysis in patients with high-output upper enteric fistula (EF). Methods. Patients were assigned into the fistuloclysis group (n = 35, receiving fistuloclysis plus total enteral nutrition (TEN)) and the control group (n = 60, receiving TEN). Laboratory variables were measured during the four-week treatment. Results. At baseline, variables were similar between the two groups. Delta value was defined as the changes from baseline to day 28. Compared with the control group, the fistuloclysis group showed greater improvements in liver function (Delta total bilirubin (TB): 20.3 ± 9.7 in the fistuloclysis group versus 15.6 ± 6.3 in the control group, P = 0.040; Delta direct bilirubin (DB): 12.5 ± 3.4 versus 10.0 ± 3.6, P = 0.011; Delta alkaline phosphatase (ALP): 98.4 ± 33.5 versus 57.6 ± 20.9, P nutritional status (Delta total protein: 21.8 ± 8.7 versus 10.7 ± 2.1, P nutritional parameters in patients with high-output upper EF, particularly in biliary fistula patients.

  18. Gastrointestinal obstruction caused by solidification and coagulation of enteral nutrition: pathogenetic mechanisms and potential risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonello G

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Grazia Leonello,1 Antonio Giacomo Rizzo,1 Viviane Di Dio,2 Antonio Soriano,3 Claudia Previti,3 Grazia Giulia Pantè,3 Claudio Mastrojeni,1 Sebastiano Pantè1 1Department of Human Pathology of Adults and Evolutive Era “Gaetano Barresi”, University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 2Health Research Institute Bonino Pulejo, Piemonte Hospital, Messina, Italy; 3Department of Medical and Surgery Science, University of Messina, Messina, Italy Abstract: Enteral nutrition (EN is preferred in order to provide nutrition and reduce catabolism in critically ill patients. Recent studies suggest that the use of EN is successful and complications are rare. However, an underestimated mechanical complication of tube feedings seen in critically ill patients is the coagulation and solidification of the EN causing gastrointestinal obstruction. This report describes two clinical cases (1.23% of all cases seen at our clinic of obstruction and perforation of the small bowel secondary to the solidification of EN. The understanding and early recognition of this potential complication are essential for the prevention and successful treatment of this condition. Keywords: enteral nutrition, gastrointestinal contents, intestinal obstruction, small-bowel bezoar

  19. [An analysis of an enteral nutrition guideline in patients with cancer of the ORL area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Alvarez, J A; Mouriño Ramos, B; Quintela Vázquez, P; Martínez Fernández, M L; Muñoz Leira, V; Camarero González, E

    1995-01-01

    The result was assessed of the enteral nutrition guideline prescribed in 50 patients using internationally accepted parameters as indicators of the nutritional state. Fifty patients were selected at random with an ORL zone neoplasm, they were prescribed enteral nutrition according to our Section's procedure, involving the administration of a commercialized enteral diet whose composition is a homogenization of natural foods administered in 6 sessions at three-hour intervals during the day, begun with 100 cc of diet per session up to a total of 400 (2400 kcal/day), and with the addition of 100 cm of water in each administration. The average age was 59.58 +/- 11.2 years (range 30-81), the average duration of nutrition was 34.02 +/- 32.1 days (range, 3-201 days). The following were taken in all cases: Weight (W), Size (S), Tricipital fold (TF), brachial circumference, urinary creatinin, seric albumin (A), seric transferrin (T), total lymphocytes (Lt) and retarded cutaneous sensitivity, using Multitest IMC (M), and these data were used to calculate muscular circumference (MC) and the creatinin size index (CSI). Two nutritional valuations (NV) were analyzed, the first one taken (NV1) and the one prior to discharge (V2). Analytical calculations were done by our Center's Analytical Laboratory. We used Wilcoxon's test included in the SX statistical package for statistical analysis. On the fifty patients selected, only thirty had a second NV. Comparison of the two calculations gave the following results: A statistically significant rise of A (A1: 3.6 +/- 0.8, vs A: 3.8 +/- 0.7; p 0.05). MC (MC1: 23.93 +/- 2.5 vs MC2: 23.58 +/- 1.9; P > 0.05). CSI (CSI1: 8.5 +/- 8 vs CSI2: 6.9 +/- 2.9; p > 0.05). L (L1: 1855 +/- 760.5 vs L2: 1808 +/- 769.1; p > 0.05). M (M1: 12.58 +/- 7.8 vs M2: 14.01 +/- 8.5; p > 0.05). It is deduced from the results that the guideline used is useful in maintaining the nutritional state of patients prior to their treatment, despite weight-loss, since the

  20. Aging in Community Nutrition, Diet Therapy, and Nutrition and Aging Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Peggy Schafer; Wellman, Nancy S.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette; Elfenbein, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    Using content analysis, this study evaluated the aging content and context in 11 nutrition sub-specialty textbooks: community nutrition (n = 3), diet therapy (n = 4), and nutrition and aging (n = 4). Pages with paragraphs on aging were identified in community nutrition and diet therapy textbooks, and 10% random samples of pages were evaluated in…

  1. Enteral nutrition within 48 hours of admission improves clinical outcomes of acute pancreatitis by reducing complications: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-Yao; Yu, Tao; Chen, Guang-Cheng; Yuan, Yu-Hong; Zhong, Wa; Zhao, Li-Na; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2013-01-01

    Enteral nutrition is increasingly advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitis, but its timing is still controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to find out the feasibility of early enteral nutrition within 48 hours of admission and its possible advantages. We searched PubMed, EMBASE Databases, Web of Science, the Cochrane library, and scholar.google.com for all the relevant articles about the effect of enteral nutrition initiated within 48 hours of admission on the clinical outcomes of acute pancreatitis from inception to December 2012. Eleven studies containing 775 patients with acute pancreatitis were analyzed. Results from a pooled analysis of all the studies demonstrated that early enteral nutrition was associated with significant reductions in all the infections as a whole (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.21-0.68, P0.05). The stratified analysis based on the severity of disease revealed that, even in predicted severe or severe acute pancreatitis patients, early enteral nutrition still showed a protective power against all the infection complications as a whole, catheter-related septic complications, pancreatic infection complications, and organ failure that was only reported in the severe attack of the disease (all P<0.05). Enteral nutrition within 48 hours of admission is feasible and improves the clinical outcomes in acute pancreatitis as well as in predicted severe or severe acute pancreatitis by reducing complications.

  2. Nutrient Intake and Contribution of Home Enteral Nutrition to Meeting Nutritional Requirements after Oesophagectomy and Total Gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Melanie L; Halliday, Vanessa; Robinson, Pauline; Smith, Karen; Bowrey, David J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study evaluated nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection and the influence of home jejunostomy feeding in the six months after surgery. Subjects/Methods Data on nutritional intake and physiologic measures were collected as part of a randomised trial with measurements taken before and up to six months after surgery. Results 41 participants (32 oesophagectomy, 9 total gastrectomy) received home jejunostomy feeding (n=18) or usual care without feeding (n=23). At hospital discharge, oral intakes were adequate for energy and protein in 9% and 6% respectively. By three and six months, these values had increased to 61% & 55%, 94% & 77% respectively. Six participants (26%) who received usual care required rescue feeding. Six weeks after hospital discharge, energy intakes were met in those who received jejunal feeding due to the contribution of enteral nutrition. Jejunal feeding did not affect oral intake, being similar in both groups (fed: 77% estimated need, usual care: 79%). At three months, inadequate micronutrient intakes were seen in over one third. Compared to baseline values, six weeks after surgery, weight loss exceeding 5% was seen in 5/18 (28%) who received feeding, 14/17 (82%) who received usual care and 5/6 (83%) of those who required rescue feeding, p=0.002. Weight loss averaged 4.1% (fed), 10.4% (usual care) and 9.2% (rescue fed), p=0.004. These trends persisted out to six months. Conclusions Supplementary jejunostomy feeding made an important contribution to meeting nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection. Importantly, oral nutritional intake was not compromised dispelling the assertion that jejunal feeding deincentivises patients from eating. PMID:28656968

  3. Self-insertion of a nasogastric tube for home enteral nutrition: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilliot, Didier; Zallot, Camille; Malgras, Aurélie; Germain, Adeline; Bresler, Laurent; Ayav, Ahmet; Bigard, Marc-André; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Ziegler, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    Enteral tube feeding can be a source of discomfort and reluctance from patients. We evaluated for the first time the tolerability of self-insertion of a nasogastric (NG) tube for home enteral nutrition (EN). All patients requiring enteral tube feeding for chronic diseases were enrolled in a therapeutic patient education (TPE) program at Nancy University Hospital. In our department, between November 2008 and August 2012, 66 patients received EN with an NG tube. Twenty-nine of 66 had self-insertion of the NG tube (median age, 44 years), 17 had an anatomical contraindication, and 20 were excluded because of cognitive disability or language barrier or refusal. Twenty-eight of 29 patients completed the TPE program. One patient died of pancreatic cancer in palliative care during the study. Median follow-up was 20 months (interquartile range [IQR], 4-31). Median gain weight was 3.1 kg (IQR, 1.8-6.0) (P = .0002). Median duration of self-insertion of the NG tube was 3 months (IQR, 2-5), and it was well tolerated by all 29 patients. Two patients described minor adverse events: abdominal pain and nausea for 1 patient and epistaxis leading to temporary discontinuation of EN for another patient. A group of 10 consecutive patients previously had a long-term NG tube for EN. If they had the choice between a self-inserted NG tube and a long-term NG tube, all 10 patients reported they would prefer to start again with the self-inserted NG tube. This pilot study suggests that self-insertion of an NG tube may be efficacious and well tolerated in patients receiving EN for chronic conditions. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Nutritional analysis and microbiological evaluation of commercially available enteral diets for cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantil, Lori R; Markovich, Jessica E; Heinze, Cailin R; Linder, Deborah E; Tams, Todd R; Freeman, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of nutrients less than or greater than accepted standards in commercially available enteral diets for cats, and to identify contamination incidence in enteral diets for cats. Prospective cross-sectional study. University teaching hospital. Seven commercial enteral diets for cats. Labels were evaluated to determine if diets were intended to be nutritionally complete and balanced. One diet under storage techniques partially representative of clinical conditions was sampled on days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 of storage for aerobic bacterial culture. All 7 diets were analyzed for key nutrients and results were compared to Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) Nutrient Profiles for Adult Cats for maintenance and National Research Council recommended allowance (NRC-RA). From label information, 4 diets were classified as complete and balanced and 3 diets were classified as not complete and balanced. All 7 diets had at least 1 nutrient less than the AAFCO minimums and the NRC-RA. The total number of nutrients less than AAFCO minimums ranged from 3 to 9 (median = 4), with iron, potassium, and manganese being the most common. Concentrations of some nutrients were undetectable. None of the samples tested had a positive aerobic culture at baseline (day 0) or on subsequent samples from days 1, 3, 5, and 7 under any storage condition. None of the diets analyzed met all of the minimum nutrient concentrations. While short-term feeding may not be of concern for an individual patient, clinicians should be aware of potential nutritional limitations when feeding enteral diets to ill or injured cats. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  5. Enteral Tube Feeding Nutritional Protein Hydrolysate Production Under Different Factors By Enzymatic Hydrolysis

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    Nguyen ThiQuynhHoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrolysis of proteins involves the cleavage of peptide bonds to give peptides of varying sizes and amino acid composition. There are a number of types of hydrolysis enzymatic acid or alkali hydrolysis. Chemical hydrolysis is difficult to control and reduces the nutritional quality of products destroying L-form amino acids and producing toxic substances such as lysino-alanine. Enzymatic hydrolysis works without destructing amino acids and by avoiding the extreme temperatures and pH levels required for chemical hydrolysis the nutritional properties of the protein hydrolysates remain largely unaffected. In this research we investigate the fat removal and protein hydrolysis from pork meat to produce the enteral tube feeding nutritional protein hydrolysate for patient. Our results are as follows meat moisture 75.1 protein 22.6 lipid 1.71 ash 0.5 vitamin B1 1.384mg100g n hexantreatment at 80oCin 45 minutes and drying 30 minutes in 90oC.Viscosity of the hydrolysate is very low 2.240 0.092 cPand high degree of hydrolysis 31.390 0.138 . The final protein powder has balance nutritional components and acid amines low microorganisms which are safety for human consumption.

  6. [Nutritional study in geriatric patients (older than 65 years of age) with ambulatory enteral nutrition: correlation between underlying disease, nutritional support, and drug treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Vázquez, M J; Piñeiro Corrales, G; Martínez Olmos, M

    2002-01-01

    To identify the current status of out-patient enteral nutrition among elderly patients in Galicia: indications, access routes, forms of administration, types of diet, complications, disability status. Assessment of nutritional status and concomitant pharmacological treatment. Prospective, observational, multi-centric study lasting for one month. Data capture by means of a questionnaire regarding: age, sex, diagnosed pathology leading to nutritional analysis, disability status, current nutritional status, type of diet, months under treatment with NEA (out-patient enteral nutrition in its Spanish acronym), form of administration, complications, concomitant medication. The statistical methodology included a descriptive analysis and a study of the correlations between the different variables. For the comparison of both groups, Student's t test or Mann-Whitney's U test was used for quantitative variables and chi-squared, Yate's correction or Fisher's exact test was used for qualitative variables. 469 patients were studied, corresponding to 13 publicly-funded centres. Age: 81.15 years (95% CI 80.8-82.3), women (70.6%). neurological disorders (46.1%), cerebrovascular accidents (27.5%), neoplasia (12.4%) and others (14.1%). 45.2% presented a bedbound disability status and 53.5% presented communication difficulties. Standard diet was the most common (39.4%). DURATION OF THE NUTRITION: > 1 year in 36.7% of cases, between 6 months and 1 year for 21.3%, between 3 and 6 months for 10.9% and Nasogastric tube was the route for administration in 55.2%. Patients with nutrition treatment lasting over 1 year presented a significantly lower rate of malnutrition (p nasogastric tube. The most frequent interaction was digoxin-fibre (29.6%) and incorrect administration was observed with omeprazol and medication to combat Parkinson's disease.

  7. Evaluating predictive factors for determining enteral nutrition in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: A retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangar, Stephen; Slevin, Nicholas; Mais, Kathleen; Sykes, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify objective pre-treatment clinical parameters that could be used to predict for patients at high risk of requiring enteral tube feeding prior to head and neck radiotherapy. Patients and methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 160 consecutive patients attending for radiotherapy assessment. Regression analysis was used to determine various pre-treatment nutritional and tumour specific parameters associated with the use of enteral nutrition either before (prophylactic) or during (reactive) radiotherapy (RT). The significant parameters identified were then selected into categorical variables and compared between those who needed reactive enteral nutrition and the remainder of the group who did not. These results were used to generate predictive factors that could be used to identify those at high risk of malnutrition during RT for whom early or prophylactic enteral nutrition should be considered. Results: Fifty patients required enteral feeding of which 60% required this prior to radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis identified the following factors to be significant-body mass index, performance status (PS), advanced stage, pre-treatment weight loss, low serum albumin and protein, age, and smoking. The most significant categorical predictive parameters for reactive enteral feeding were stage 3-4 disease, PS 2-3, and smoking >20/day. The combination of these factors predicted a 75% chance of needing enteral nutrition. Conclusion: Nutritional assessment is important prior to radiotherapy and is multifactorial. Using a combination of relatively simple and objective parameters (performance status, smoking and disease stage) it is possible to identify those at high risk of needing enteral nutrition prior to starting RT

  8. Effects of preoperative and postoperative enteral nutrition on postoperative nutritional status and immune function of gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dayong; Feng, Ye; Song, Bin; Gao, Shuohui; Zhao, Jisheng

    2015-03-01

    Effects of preoperative one week enteral nutrition (EN) support on the postoperative nutritional status, immune function and inflammatory response of gastric cancer patients were investigated. 106 cases of gastric cancer patients were randomly divided into preoperative one week EN group (trial group) and early postoperative EN group (control group), which were continuously treated with EN support until the postoperative 9th day according to different treatment protocols. All the patients were checked for their body weight, skinfold thickness, upper arm circumference, white blood cell count (WBC), albumin (ALB), prealbumin (PA), C-reactive protein (CRP), humoral immunity (IgA, IgG), T cell subsets (CD4, CD8 and CD4/CD8), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), etc. on the preoperative and the postoperative 1st and 10th day, respectively. PA and IgG levels of the experimental group were higher than those of the control group on the postoperative 10th day, whereas IL-6 level of the experimental group was lower than that of the control group. EN support for preoperative gastric cancer patients will improve the postoperative nutritional status and immune function, alleviate inflammatory response, and facilitate the recovery of patients.

  9. [Pharmaconutrition: pharmacological approach to nutrition therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Télessy, István

    2014-12-21

    Reviewing the literature of nutrition therapy one can conclude that during the last decade the pharmacological action of several nutrients has been demonstrated. However, research activity is still at the beginning and it could be verified in a restricted number of nutrients only that in which conditions (illnesses), dose and duration we can expect therapeutic effect in addition to nutrition. The examples of glutamine, arginine, taurine, leucine, ω-3 fatty acids, however, support the possibility that complex reactions and treatment results observed in certain patients are not purely due to nutritional support but the consequence of additional pharmacological action as well. Evaluation of results of therapeutic intervention is especially difficult because in the everyday practice physicians try to use several therapeutic modalities that can be beneficial for the patient. Therefore, retrospective separation of beneficial components of the therapeutic agents is almost impossible. Only well designed, randomized and multicentric studies can verify specific therapeutic action of certain ingredients ie. nutrients.

  10. Consensus statement of the academy of nutrition and dietetics/american society for parenteral and enteral nutrition: Characteristics recommended for the identification and documentation of adult malnutrition (undernutrition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic characteristics be used to identify and document adult malnutrition in routine clinical practice. An etiologically based diagno...

  11. Effect of glutamine enteral nutrition on the postoperative nutrition status and immune function in elderly patients with gastrointestinal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Sheng Tao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the clinical efficacy of glutamine enteral nutrition in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor in elderly patients and the effect in improving the nutrition and immunity. Methods: A total of 92 elderly patients with gastrointestinal tumor who were admitted in our hospital from June, 2014 to March, 2016 were included in the study and randomized into the control group (n=46 and the treatment group (n=46. The patients in the two groups were given adjuvant chemotherapy 2 weeks after operation and routine enternal nutrition 1 d after operation. On the basis of routine enternal nutrition, the patients in the treatment group were given glutamine granules for intensive treatment. The patients in the two groups were continuously given 10 d nutrition support. The gastrointestinal function recovery and intestinal mucosal barrier recovery before and after operation in the observation group were compared. The levels of related nutrition and immune indicators before and after operation in the two groups were detected and compared. Results: The first exhaust and first defecation time after operation in the treatment group was significantly shortened when compared with the control group. When compared with before operation, L/M and plasma DAO level 1 d and 10 d after operation in the control group were significantly elevated. L/M and plasma DAO level 1 d after operation in the treatment group were significantly elevated, while those 10 d after operation were significantly reduced when compared with before operation. L/M and plasma DAO level 1 d and 10 d after operation in the treatment group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The serum TP, Alb, PA, and TRF levels 1 d and 10 d after operation in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and those in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group. When compared with before operation, the plasma Ig

  12. An evaluation of enteral nutrition practices and nutritional provision in children during the entire length of stay in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Jackie; Gentles, Emma; Alfheeaid, Hani A; Diamantidi, Krystalia; Spenceley, Neil; Davidson, Mark; Young, David; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-21

    Provision of optimal nutrition in children in critical care is often challenging. This study evaluated exclusive enteral nutrition (EN) provision practices and explored predictors of energy intake and delay of EN advancement in critically ill children. Data on intake and EN practices were collected on a daily basis and compared against predefined targets and dietary reference values in a paediatric intensive care unit. Factors associated with intake and advancement of EN were explored. Data were collected from 130 patients and 887 nutritional support days (NSDs). Delay to initiate EN was longer in patients from both the General Surgical and congenital heart defect (CHD) Surgical groups [Median (IQR); CHD Surgical group: 20.3 (16.4) vs General Surgical group: 11.4 (53.5) vs Medical group: 6.5 (10.9) hours; p ≤ 0.001]. Daily fasting time per patient was significantly longer in patients from the General Surgical and CHD Surgical groups than those from the Medical group [% of 24 h, Median (IQR); CHD Surgical group: 24.0 (29.2) vs General Surgical group: 41.7 (66.7) vs Medical group: 9.4 (21.9); p ≤ 0.001]. A lower proportion of fluids was delivered as EN per patient (45% vs 73%) or per NSD (56% vs 73%) in those from the CHD Surgical group compared with those with medical conditions. Protein and energy requirements were achieved in 38% and 33% of the NSDs. In a substantial proportion of NSDs, minimum micronutrient recommendations were not met particularly in those patients from the CHD Surgical group. A higher delivery of fluid requirements (p nutritional" fluids whenever this is possible.

  13. [Enteral nutrition in neurological patients: is there enough vitamin D content in commonly used formulas?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella Romero, F; Alfaro Martínez, J J; Luna López, V; Galicia Martín, I

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency produces inadequate bone mineralization, proximal muscle weakness, abnormal gait and increased risk of falls and fractures. Moreover, in epidemiological studies, has been associated with increased risk of cancer, autoimmune diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and depression. When synthesis through the skin by sun exposure is not possible and the patient can not eat by mouth, as in the advanced stages of various neurological diseases, the supply of vitamin D has to be done by enteral nutrition. The aim of this study is to review the role of vitamin D in a common group of neurological conditions that often require artificial nutrition and analyze whether the vitamin D of different enteral nutrition formulas is adequate to meet the needs of this group of patients. Numerous studies have shown the association between vitamin D deficiency and increased incidence of dementia, stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. Interventions aimed to increase levels of vit. D and its effects on functional (falls, pain, quality of life) and cardiovascular goals (cardiovascular death, stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular risk factors) have obtained as highlight data a clear reduction of falls and fractures, while the evidence for the other parameters studied is still limited and inconsistent. The content of calcium and vitamin D of enteral formulas is legislated in our country. The total amount of vitamin D for a daily intake of 1,500-2,000 kcal ranges between 300 and 1,600 IU/d (mean ± SD: 32.9 ± 8.5 mg/100 kcal) in the complete formulas for enteral nutrition most commonly used. 50% of the diets studied, for an intake of 2,000 kcal/d, and 90% for an intake of 1,500 kcal/d, provide less than 600 IU/d of vitamin D. Some revised recently guidelines published recommendations of daily intake of vitamin D. The document published by the U.S. Institute of Medicine

  14. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial proliferation, and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs on parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnvad, Charlotte R.; Thymann, Thomas; Deutz, Nicolaas E.

    2008-01-01

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food is introduced. Conversely,delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions were first...... recorded in preterm pigs fed enterally (porcine colostrum, bovine colostrum, or formula for 20–40 h), with or without a preceding 2- to 3-day TPN period (n 435). Mucosal mass increased during TPN and further after enteral feeding to reach an intestinal mass similar to that in enterally fed pigs without TPN...... (60–80% relative to birth). NEC developed only after enteral feeding but more often after a preceding TPN period for both sow’s colostrum (26 vs. 5%) and formula (62 vs. 39%, both P 0.001, n 43–170). Further studies in 3-day-old TPN pigs fed enterally showed that formula feeding decreased villus...

  15. The Effects of Early Post-Operative Soluble Dietary Fiber Enteral Nutrition for Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined colon cancer patients who received soluble dietary fiber enteral nutrition (SDFEN to evaluate the feasibility and potential benefit of early SDFEN compared to EN. Sixty patients who were confirmed as having colon cancer with histologically and accepted radical resection of colon cancer were randomized into an SDFEN group and an EN group. The postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOH, days for first fecal passage, and the difference in nutritional status, immune function and inflammatory reaction between pre-operation and post-operation were all recorded. The statistical analyses were performed using the t-test and the chi square test. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. After the nutrition support, differences in the levels of albumin, prealbumin and transferrin in each group were not statistically significant (p > 0.05; the levels of CD4+, IgA and IgM in the SDFEN group were higher than that of the EN group at seven days (p < 0.05; the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the SDFEN group were lower than that of the EN group at seven days (p < 0.05; and patients in the SDFEN group had a significantly shorter first flatus time than the EN group (p < 0.05. Early post-operative SDFEN used in colon cancer patients was feasible and beneficial in immune function and reducing inflammatory reaction, gastrointestinal function and speeding up the recovery.

  16. Intensive medical nutrition therapy: methods to improve nutrition provision in the critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheean, Patricia M; Peterson, Sarah J; Zhao, Weihan; Gurka, David P; Braunschweig, Carol A

    2012-07-01

    Patients requiring mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit commonly fail to attain enteral nutrition (EN) infusion goals. We conducted a cohort study to quantify and compare the percentage of energy and protein received between standard care (n=24) and intensive medical nutrition therapy (MNT) (n=25) participants; to assess the percentage of energy and protein received varied by nutritional status, and to identify barriers to EN provision. Intensive MNT entailed providing energy at 150% of estimated needs, using only 2.0 kcal/cc enteral formula and 24-hour infusions. Estimated energy and protein needs were calculated using 30 kcal/kg and 1.2 g protein/kg actual or obesity-adjusted admission body weight. Subjective global assessment was completed to ascertain admission intensive care unit nutritional status. Descriptive statistics and survival analyses were conducted to examine time until attaining 100% of feeding targets. Patients had similar estimated energy and protein needs, and 51% were admitted with both respiratory failure and classified as normally nourished (n=25/49). Intensive MNT recipients achieved a greater percentage of daily estimated energy and protein needs than standard care recipients (1,198±493 vs 475±480 kcal, respectively, Pcare unit stays. Cox proportional hazards models showed that intensive MNT patients were 6.5 (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 29.0) and 3.6 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 15.9) times more likely to achieve 100% of estimated energy and protein needs, respectively, controlling for confounders. Malnourished patients (n=13) received significantly less energy (P=0.003) and protein (P=0.004) compared with normally nourished (n=11) patients receiving standard care. Nutritional status did not affect feeding intakes in the intensive MNT group. Clinical management, lack of physician orders, and gastrointestinal issues involving ileus, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and EN delivery were the most frequent clinical impediments

  17. Effects of Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition of Esophageal Cancer Surgical Patients Receiving Enteral Nutrition: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Ping Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Olive oil-based lipid emulsion (LE and medium chain triglyceride/long chain triglyceride (MCT/LCT emulsion are both LEs with low ω-6 polyunsaturated fat acids (PUFAs content. However, which one of these LEs is associated with a lower infection risk in patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN remains unclear. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the two LEs in PN in esophageal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods: Patients with resectable esophageal carcinoma were recruited and allocated randomly to two groups. The test group was given enteral nutrition (EN with PN containing olive oil-based LE after tumor resection for ≥7 days, and the patients in the control group were supported by EN with MCT/LCT emulsion-based PN after surgery for the same time period. Immunological markers and inflammatory indicators were tested and perioperative clinical outcomes were determined. The trial was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Register, number ChiCTR-TRC-13003562. 94 Patients were recruited, and grouped (olive oil-based LE, n = 46 and MCT/LCT, n = 48, matched for sex, age, body mass index, histological type, TNM stage, and nutrition risk screening (NRS 2002 score. Results: There were no differences in perioperative fever (>38 °C, infectious complications, length of hospital stay (>14 days, length of critical care stay (>2 days, time for oral food intake, and in-hospital mortality between the two groups. The test group showed a higher increase in IgG level compared with the MCT/LCT group (p = 0.028. There was no difference in other immunological markers and inflammatory indicators between the two groups. Conclusion: PN containing olive oil-based or MCT/LCT LEs had similar effects on perioperative outcome, cell-mediated immune function and inflammatory response in esophageal cancer patients who had undergone surgery and were receiving EN.

  18. Nutritional and biochemical therapies for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington and Alzheimer’s disease are characterized by neuronal death and loss in different areas of the brain. Downstream signaling mechanisms associated to cellular death/survival are altered, where mitochondrial damage and inflammation, dysfunctional autophagy process, and accumulation of toxins proteins play a central role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The disabling effects of these diseases on health system are high and greatly affect the health and daily lifestyle of patients. In this context, pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies, which are used in palliative and preventive treatments, have been widely assessed in human patients, as well as animal and cellular models in the last decades. However, the genetics and epigenetics factors of any disease can cause different paths in its progression. Nutritional and biochemical therapy approaches by activation or manipulation of different transcription factors such as Nrf2, PPARα, CREB and TEFB in animal and cellular models have shown protective effects against neurodegeneration. Some of these therapies include caloric restriction diet, use of glutathione precursors and Mediterranean diet. This work highlights the evidences of different nutritional and biochemical approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and how novel research approaches, such as the use of systems biology, will allow a better comprehension of key processes and biological responses involved in these diseases.

  19. Diet-Dependent Effects of Minimal Enteral Nutrition on Intestinal Function and Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted; Boye, Mette; Thymann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background: A rapid advance in enteral feeding is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants. Therefore, minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) combined with parenteral nutrition (PN) is common clinical practice, but the effects on NEC and intestinal function remain poorly...... characterized. It was hypothesized that a commonly used MEN feeding volume (16-24 mL/kg/d) prevents NEC and improves intestinal structure, function, and microbiology in preterm pigs. Methods: After preterm birth pigs were stratified into 4 nutrition intervention groups that received the following treatments: (1......) PN followed by full enteral formula feeding (OF group, n = 12); (2) PN supplemented with formula MEN and followed by full formula feeding (FF, n = 12); (3) PN plus colostrum MEN followed by formula feeding (CF, n = 12); (4) PN plus colostrum MEN followed by colostrum feeding (CC, n = 10). Results...

  20. Enteral fluid therapy through nasogastric tube in rumen cannulated goats

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    Katia Atoji-Henrique

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of fluid therapy in goats through nasogastric route with an electrolyte solution composed by concentrations of sodium, potassium and chloride similar to goat plasma (140mmol/L of Na+, 4.5mmol/L of K+, 110mmol/L of Cl-. Four Alpine Chamoisee goats, two of them with evident leakage of the rumen cannulas, were used in a crossover experimental design of two periods and two groups. In one group the two goats were submitted to a treatment protocol to induce dehydration before the fluid therapy, whereas the other group was not. Fluid therapy consisted supplying 10mL/kg/h of the electrolyte solution during 8 hours. No signs of discomfort or stress were observed. The dehydration model employed caused a mild dehydration indicated by decrease in feces humidity, body weight and abdominal circumference, and increase in plasma total solids concentration. During fluid therapy globular volume and plasma total solids decreased, whereas % body weight and abdominal circumference increased. No signs of hyperhydration were observed and serum electrolytes (Na+, Cl-, K+ presented no significant alterations in both groups. Fluid therapy proposed in this study was efficient to treat dehydration, even for rumen cannulated animals with evident leakage, and can be administrated safely with no electrolyte imbalance.

  1. Transition from parenteral to enteral nutrition induces immediate diet-dependent gut histological and immunological responses in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggers, Jayda; Sangild, Per T.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2011-01-01

    -six preterm pigs were fed total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 48 h followed by enteral feeding for 0, 8, 17, or 34 h with either colostrum (Colos, n = 20) or formula (Form, n = 31). Macroscopic NEC lesions were detected in Form pigs throughout the enteral feeding period (20/31, 65%), whereas most Colos pigs...... bacterial groups (Clostridium, Enterococcus, Streptococcus species) increased with time. We conclude that a switch from parenteral to enteral nutrition rapidly induces diet-dependent histopathological, functional, and proinflammatory insults to the immature intestine. Great care is required when introducing......Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants develops very rapidly from a mild intolerance to enteral feeding into intestinal mucosal hemorrhage, inflammation, and necrosis. We hypothesized that immediate feeding-induced gut responses precede later clinical NEC symptoms in preterm pigs. Fifty...

  2. Detecting Enteral Nutrition Residues and Microorganism Proliferation in Feeding Tubes via Real-Time Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Ippei; Kagawa, Tomohiro; Mizugai, Kazuya; Ebisu, Goro

    2017-04-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) residues that persist in feeding tubes provide substrates for microorganisms to proliferate and occlude the tubes. Visible EN residues in tubes are easily identified, but smaller residues can persist. We developed a new imaging technique to visualize EN residues and proliferation of microorganisms in feeding tubes. (1) Feeding tubes containing EN labeled with fluorescent dye and either with or without various types or amounts of thickeners were flushed once with water and then seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen05 with recombinant luciferase DNA. (2) Because EN fluoresces intrinsically, EN in the feeding tubes without fluorescent dye was repeatedly flushed until the intrinsic fluorescence levels reached background levels. Fluorescent images of EN residues and bioluminescent images of microorganisms were acquired via an optical imaging system. (1) Fluorescence images showed that the amount of EN residues increased at various sites in tubes depending on EN viscosity and the thickening agent, and bioluminescence images showed that microorganism proliferation was associated with a commensurate increase in EN residues. (2) The intrinsic fluorescence of EN also enabled the detection of EN residues in tubes even in the absence of fluorescence dye. Higher EN viscosity required more flushes to reach undetectable levels. EN residues and microorganism proliferation in enteral feeding tubes were detected on fluorescence and bioluminescence images, respectively. This simplified approach allowed the real-time visualization of EN residues and microorganisms in feeding tubes.

  3. Effect of nephrotic enteral nutrition preparation on the nutritional status and microinflammatory state in patients with maintenance hemodialysis complicated by malnutrition

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    Chuan-Ying Lan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of nephrotic enteral nutrition preparation on the nutritional status and microinflammatory state in patients with maintenance hemodialysis complicated by malnutrition. Methods: A total of 68 patients who received maintenance hemodialysis and had malnutrition in our hospital between January 2013 and July 2016 were collected and divided into control group (n=34 and observation group (n=34 according to random number table. Control group received regular dietary intervention, and observation group received nephrotic enteral nutrition preparation based on routine intervention. Nutritional status and microinflammatory state before and after intervention were compared between two groups of patients. Results: Before intervention, the differences in peripheral blood levels of protein indexes and trace elements as well as serum levels of inflammatory factors were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After intervention, peripheral blood nutrition-related proteins TP, ALB, PA, Hb and TRF levels of observation group were higher than those of control group; peripheral blood trace elements Zn and Fe levels were higher than those of control group while Ca level was lower than that of control group; serum inflammatory factors IL-6, hs-CRP and TNF-α levels were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Nephrotic enteral nutrition preparation can effectively optimize the nutritional status and reduce the microinflammation degree in patients with maintenance hemodialysis complicated by malnutrition.

  4. Enhanced vaccination effect against influenza by prebiotics in elderly patients receiving enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Nagafuchi, Shinya; Kurihara, Rina; Okuda, Kenji; Kanesaka, Takeshi; Ogawa, Norihiro; Kanematsu, Takayoshi; Takasugi, Satoshi; Yamaji, Taketo; Takami, Masao; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Ohara, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effect of prebiotics on the immunological response after influenza vaccination in enterally fed elderly individuals. The intervention group was given an enteral formula containing lactic acid bacteria-fermented milk products. In addition, two different types of other prebiotics, galacto-oligosaccharide and bifidogenic growth stimulator, were also given. The two prebiotics improved intestinal microbiota differently. In a control group, a standard formula without prebiotics was given. An enteral formula with (intervention group [F]) or without (control group [C]) prebiotics was given through percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy to elderly participants for 10 weeks. Influenza vaccine was inoculated at week 4. Nutritional and biochemical indices, intestinal micro bacteria and immunological indices were analyzed. The Bifidobacterium count in groups F and C at week 0 was 6.4 ± 1.9 and 6.6 ± 3.0 (log10 [count/g feces]), respectively. Although the count in group C decreased at week 10, the count in group F increased. The Bacteroides count in group F increased from 10.7 ± 0.9 to 11.4 ± 0.5, but decreased in group C from 11.2 ± 0.2 to 10.7 ± 0.4. Although the enhanced titers of H1N1, H3N2 and B antigens against the vaccine decreased thereafter in group C, these enhanced titers in group F could be maintained. Our findings suggest that prebiotics affect the intestinal microbiota and might maintain the antibody titers in elderly individuals. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Design and development of a manual pump for bolus enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano-García, Judit; Fernández-Morera, Juan Luis

    2018-02-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is based on administration of liquid solutions into the gastrointestinal tract using a tube. After identifying unsolved practical difficulties in administration of EN using volume syringes, a new device to overcome such technical difficulties was proposed. Specific technologies (CAD, 3D printing) were used in collaboration with the PRODINTEC Foundation (Gijón, Asturias). Clarke Modet, a law firm specialized in intellectual property, provided legal advice on formulas for legal protection of the invention. The resulting device is a manual pump for infusion of EN to patients that solves previously identified problems and is highly functional and compact. It would allow for comfortable and safe administration of solutions. Integration of a bottle into the device itself and pump dimensions facilitate transport and patient mobility. According to the described configuration, this invention has many advantages over the previously known procedures, such as a simpler administration within the field of intermittent EN, improving the standard nutritional support technique, which in this case is use of volume syringes. This would facilitate the work of caregivers while promoting patient self-care and autonomy. The pump was accredited novelty of design, inventive activity and industrial exploitation potential by the European Patent Office (EPO), to which a patent has been requested. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effects of Early Post-Operative Soluble Dietary Fiber Enteral Nutrition for Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Ding, Zhi; Zhao, Ping; Tang, Lingchao; Tang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Shuomeng

    2016-09-21

    We examined colon cancer patients who received soluble dietary fiber enteral nutrition (SDFEN) to evaluate the feasibility and potential benefit of early SDFEN compared to EN. Sixty patients who were confirmed as having colon cancer with histologically and accepted radical resection of colon cancer were randomized into an SDFEN group and an EN group. The postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOH), days for first fecal passage, and the difference in nutritional status, immune function and inflammatory reaction between pre-operation and post-operation were all recorded. The statistical analyses were performed using the t -test and the chi square test. Statistical significance was defined as p 0.05); the levels of CD4+, IgA and IgM in the SDFEN group were higher than that of the EN group at seven days ( p < 0.05); the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the SDFEN group were lower than that of the EN group at seven days ( p < 0.05); and patients in the SDFEN group had a significantly shorter first flatus time than the EN group ( p < 0.05). Early post-operative SDFEN used in colon cancer patients was feasible and beneficial in immune function and reducing inflammatory reaction, gastrointestinal function and speeding up the recovery.

  7. La nutrición enteral precoz en el enfermo grave Early enteral nutrition in the critically-ill patient

    OpenAIRE

    B. García Vila; T. Grau

    2005-01-01

    La nutrición enteral se ha demostrado como un método eficaz y seguro de nutrir a los enfermos graves ingresados en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos. Aunque se desconoce cuánto tiempo puede estar un enfermo grave sin nutrición, el catabolismo acelerado y el ayuno pueden ser deletéreos en el enfermo grave y la recomendación más frecuente es la de empezar la nutrición artificial cuando se prevea un período de ayuno superior a los siete días. Las ventajas de la nutrición enteral sobre la nutrici...

  8. [The Spanish Home Enteral Nutrition registry of the year 2009: from the NADYA-SENPE group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanden-Berghe, C; Puiggrós, J C; Calañas, A; Cuerda, C; García-Luna, P P; Rabassa-Soler, A; Irles, J A; Romero, A; Martínez-Olmos, M A; Camarero, E; Lecha, M; Gómez-Candela, C; Vidal, A; Laborda, L; Zapata, A; Luengo, L M; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Penacho, M A; De Luis, D; Parés, R M; García, Y; Suárez, P; Sánchez-Migallón, J M; Apezetxea, A; Matía, P; Martínez, C; Martí, E; Garde, C; Muñoz, A; Cánovas, B; Bobis, M A; Ordóñez, J

    2010-01-01

    To describe the Home Enteral Nutrition Characteristics (HEN) recorded by the group NADYA-SENPE during 2009. collection and analysis of the data voluntary recorded in the HEN registry from the NADYA-SENPE group from January 1st to December 31st. 6.540 HEN patients were registered, 5.11% more than the previous year and 6,649 episodes (3,135 in women, 47,93%) from 32 different hospitals. 6,238 of them (95,38%) were over 14 years. The mean age of the patients under 14 yr was 3,67 ± 2,86 and it was 72,10 ± 16,89 in those over 14 yr group. The base illness registered more frequently was the neurological disorders in 2,732 (41,77%) patients, followed by cancer patients in 1,838; 28,10%. The enteral access route was registered in 1,123 (17,17%) of the episodes, being more frequent the administration by nasogastric tube 562 (50,04%). The mean length of nutritional treatment by episode was 323 days (10,77 months). 606 episodes of HEN ended, being the principal reasons for discontinuing treatment the patient death in 295 (48,68%) occasions. The transition to oral feeding occurred in 219 (36,14%) cases. Patients maintained normal activity in 2162 (32,55%) HEN episodes and 2,468 (37,13%) cases were living "bed-couch". The level of dependence was "total" in 2,598 (39,07%) of the episodes recorded. The nutritional formula was provided by the hospital in 4,183 (62,91%) cases and by the reference pharmacy in 2,262 (el 34,02%). Consumables were provided by the hospital in 3,531 (53,11%) cases. The number of HEN patients recorded increased from the year 2008, continuing the gradual growth increase since the start of registration. The characteristics of the patients remain in the same profile as in previous years.

  9. Anesthesiologists’ Choice of Nutritional Therapy of Intensive Care Patients: A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Şen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Providing adequate nutrition to critical patients as early as possible following internalization is important. Hospitalized patients are among the highest risk groups for malnutrition. Material and Method: A questionnaire including 21 questions about clinician’s demographics and nutritional therapies in intensive care units was e-mailed to anesthesiologists only. Partially answered questionnaires were not included in the analysis. Results: A total of 121 questionnaires were analyzed. Every three out of four clinician reported application of nutritional therapy in intensive care unit, and according to the guidelines. While 75% of the clinicians following the guidelines were routinely evaluating nutritional status of their patients, this ratio was only 19% in clinicians not following the guidelines (p=0.0003. Enteral nutrition was the first choice of all clinicians, and majority of the clinicians (90, 74.4% preferred central venous catheter for parenteral nutrition. The most important criteria for the choice of parenteral nutritional solution were reported as calories per volume and presence of the solution at the hospital by all clinicians. Among the clinicians following the guidelines, 70% were administering fish oil, 95% were administering glutamin to their patients. Among the clinicians not following the guidelines, these ratios were 44% and 80%, respectively (p=0.01 and 0.02. Conclusion: We are in opinion that following the guidelines instead of the clinician’s individual forecasts may improve the nutritional therapy.

  10. Comparison of the effects of enteral feeding with continuous and intermittent parenteral nutrition on hepatic triglyceride secretion in human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isabel-Martinez, L.; Skinner, C.; Parkin, A.; Hall, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride turnover was measured during steady-state conditions in 22 postoperative patients. Nine had received nutritional support with an enteral regimen, seven had received an equivalent regimen as continuous parenteral nutrition, and six received the same parenteral regimen as a cyclical infusion. After 5 days of nutritional support, each patient received an intravenous bolus of tritiated glycerol. Plasma radiolabeled triglyceride content was measured during the subsequent 24 hours. The data were analyzed by means of a simple deterministic model of plasma triglyceride kinetics and compared with the results obtained by stochastic analysis. The rates of hepatic triglyceride secretion obtained by deterministic analysis were higher than those obtained by the stochastic approach. However, the mode of delivery of the nutritional regimen did not affect the rate of hepatic triglyceride secretion regardless of the method of analysis. The results suggest that neither complete nutritional bypass of the gastrointestinal tract nor interruption of parenteral nutrition in an attempt to mimic normal eating has any effect on hepatic triglyceride secretion. Any beneficial effect that enteral feeding or cyclical parenteral nutrition may have on liver dysfunction associated with standard parenteral nutrition appears to be unrelated to changes in hepatic triglyceride secretion

  11. Effects of Delayed Enteral Nutrition on Inflammatory Responses and Immune Function Competence in Critically Ill Patients with Prolonged Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning; Geng, Yanxia; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Juanjuan; Jun, Tanshan; Lin, Zhiliang; Li, Weiqin; Zhu, Weiming; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou

    2014-05-01

    Although different studies suggest that early enteral nutrition (EEN) has benefits in reducing infectious complications, there is no data that addresses whether delayed enteral nutrition (EN) is detrimental and if it may have effects on inflammatory responses and immune function. Forty-five critically ill patients with long fasting were randomly allocated in two groups according to the type of nutritional support. The first group included patients assuming a standard enteral nutrition (EN, n = 22) and the second group assuming a parenteral nutrition (PN, n = 23). The daily nutritional amount was 25 kcal (105 kJ)/kg for all patients. The inflammatory markers white blood cells (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-α, IL-1-β, IL-6, IL-4, IL- 10 and the immune T-lymphocyte sub-populations CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and HLA-DR+ were evaluated at day 1, and after 2, 3 and 7 days. IL-4, IL-10, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio were not statistically different between the two groups. WBC and TNF-α in EN patients were higher than those in PN after 3 and 7 days (P fasting increased systemic inflammatory responses, whereas EN could modify immune function, therefore reducing hospital stay and costs.

  12. Nutrition therapy of the severely obese, critically ill patient: summation of conclusions and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClave, Stephen A; Kushner, Robert; Van Way, Charles W; Cave, Matt; DeLegge, Mark; Dibaise, John; Dickerson, Roland; Drover, John; Frazier, Thomas H; Fujioka, Ken; Gallagher, Dympna; Hurt, Ryan T; Kaplan, Lee; Kiraly, Lazlo; Martindale, Robert; McClain, Craig; Ochoa, Juan

    2011-09-01

    This report compiles the conclusions and recommendations for nutrition therapy of the obese, critically ill patient derived by the group of experts participating in this workshop on obesity in critical care nutrition. The recommendations are based on consensus opinions of the group after review of the current literature. Obesity clearly adds to the complexity of nutrition therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU). Obesity alters the incidence and severity of comorbidities, tolerance of the prescribed regimen, and ultimately patient outcome through the course of hospitalization. Although the basic principles of critical care nutrition apply to the obese ICU patient, a high-protein, hypocaloric regimen should be provided to reduce the fat mass, improve insulin sensitivity, and preserve lean body mass. The ideal enteral formula should have a low nonprotein calorie to nitrogen ratio and have a variety of pharmaconutrient agents added to modulate immune responses and reduce inflammation.

  13. Caring for patients on home enteral nutrition: Reported complications by home carers and perspectives of community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Ling; Yong, Bei Yi Paulynn; Mar, Mei Qi Maggie; Ang, Shin Yuh; Chan, Mei Mei; Lam, Madeleine; Chong, Ngian Choo Janet; Lopez, Violeta

    2018-03-08

    To explore the experiences of community nurses and home carers, in caring for patients on home enteral nutrition. The number of patients on home enteral nutrition is on the increase due to advancement in technology and shift in focus of providing care from acute to community care settings. A mixed-method approach was adopted. (i) A face-to-face survey design was used to elicit experience of carers of patients on home enteral nutrition. (ii) Focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses. Ninety-nine carers (n = 99) were recruited. Patient's mean age that they cared for was aged 77.7 years (SD = 11.2), and they had been on enteral feeding for a mean of 29 months (SD = 23.0). Most were bed-bound (90%) and required full assistance with their feeding (99%). Most were not on follow-up with dietitians (91%) and dentists (96%). The three most common reported gastrointestinal complications were constipation (31%), abdominal distension (28%) and vomiting (22%). Twenty community nurses (n = 20) were recruited for the focus group interviews. Four main themes emerged from the analysis: (i) challenge of accessing allied health services in the community; (ii) shorter length of stay in the acute care setting led to challenges in carers' learning and adaptation; (iii) transition gaps between hospital and home care services; and (iv) managing expectations of family. To facilitate a better transition of care for patients, adequate training for carers, standardising clinical practice in managing patients with home enteral nutrition and improving communication between home care services and the acute care hospitals are needed. This study highlighted the challenges faced by community home care nurses and carers. Results of this study would help to inform future policies and practice changes that would improve the quality of care received by patients on home enteral nutrition. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A novel protein mixture containing vegetable proteins renders enteral nutrition products non-coagulating after in vitro gastric digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, van den C.C.M.; Klebach, M.; Abrahamse, E.; Minor, M.; Knol, J.; Hofman, Z.; Ludwig, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Non-coagulation of protein from enteral nutrition (EN) in the stomach is considered to improve gastric emptying and may result in reduced upper gastrointestinal complications such as reflux and aspiration pneumonia. For the development of a new EN protein mixture with reduced

  15. Parenteral nutrition results in impaired lactose digestion and hexose absorption when enteral feeding is initiated in infant pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burrin, Douglas G.; Stoll, Barbara; Chang, Xiaoyan; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Fujii, Hisao; Hutson, Susan M.; Reeds, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    Preterm infants often receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral feeding. Although TPN has been linked to mucosal atrophy, its effects on intestinal digestion, absorption, and metabolism are unknown. Our aim was to determine the effects of TPN on rates of intestinal nutrient absorption

  16. Differences in outcomes over time with exclusive enteral nutrition compared to steroids in children with mild to moderate Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen-Dolev, Noa; Sladek, Malgorata; Hussey, Seamus

    2018-01-01

    Background: Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) and corticosteroids (CS) both induce similar rates of remission in mild to moderate pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), but differ with regard to mucosal healing. Our goal was to evaluate if EEN at diagnosis was superior to CS for improving long term...

  17. Limited effects of preterm birth and the first enteral nutrition on cerebellum morphology and gene expression in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kaalund, Sanne S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    three ages but the proportion of white matter increased postnatally, relative to term pigs. Early initiation of enteral nutrition had limited structural or molecular effects. The Sonic Hedgehog pathway was unaffected by preterm birth. Few differences in expression of the selected genes were found...

  18. [Spanish home enteral nutrition (HEN) registry of the year 2008 from the NADYA-SENPE group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrón-Giner, C; Puiggrós, C; Calañas, A; Cuerda, C; García-Luna, P P; Irles, J A; Romero, A; Rabassa-Soler, A; Camarero, E; Martínez-Olmos, M A; Lecha, M; Penacho, M A; Gómez Candela, C; Parés, R M; Zapata, A; Laborda, L; Vidal, A; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Luengo, L M; de Luis, D; Wanden-Berghe, C; Suárez, P; Sánchez-Migallón, J M; Matía, P; García, Y; Martí, E; Muñoz, A; Martínez, C; Bobis, M A; Garde, C; Ordóñez, J; Cánovas, B

    2010-01-01

    To present the results of the Spanish home enteral nutrition (HEN) registry of the year 2008 from the NADYA-SENPE group. We recorded the HEN registry data from January 1st to December 31st 2008. The number of patients registered in this period was 6206 (51% male) with up to 6,279 episodes of HEN, from 31 Spanish hospitals. Most of the patients (95%) were older than 14 yr. Mean age was 4.83±3.29 yr in the children group, and 70.75±18.14 yr in the adult group (older than 14 yr). Neurological disorders (39%) and cancer (27%) were the two most prevalent diagnoses. The oral route was the most frequently used (43,4%), followed by nasogastric tube (40,4%), and gastrostomy tube (14,7%). Mean length of treatment was 305,36 days (10 months). The principal reasons for discontinuing treatment were death (43%) and progress to oral diet (40%). Only 33% of the patients had a normal activity level, being limited in different grades in the rest of the patients. Most of the patients required partial (25%) or total help (38%). The enteral formula was provided by the hospital in 65% of the cases and by private pharmacies in 32%. The disposables were provided by the hospital (82,4%) and primary care services (17,2%). The number and the age of the patients registered have increased comparing to previous years, with little variations in the rest of analyzed variables. The increase in the length of treatment could reflect misreporting of the weaning process in the registry.

  19. Transition from intravenous insulin to subcutaneous long-acting insulin in critical care patients on enteral or parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Analía; Zapata, Lluis; Vera, Paula; Betbese, Antoni J; Pérez, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    The optimal initial dose of subcutaneous (SC) insulin after intravenous (IV) infusion is controversial, especially in patients receiving continuous enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The aim of this study was to evaluate the strategy used at our hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in patients switched from IV insulin to SC insulin glargine while receiving EN or TPN. A retrospective analysis was made of 27 patients on EN and 14 on TPN switched from IV infusion insulin to SC insulin. The initial dose of SC insulin was estimated as 50% of the daily IV insulin requirements, extrapolated from the previous 12h. A corrective dose of short-acting insulin (lispro) was used when necessary. Mean blood glucose (BG) level during SC insulin treatment was 136±35mg/dL in the EN group and 157±37mg/dL in the TPN group (p=0.01). In the TPN group, mean BG was >180mg/dL during the first three days after switching, and a 41% increase in the glargine dose was required to achieve the target BG. In the EN group, mean BG remained <180mg/dL throughout the days of transition and the dose of glargine remained unchanged. In the transition from IV to SC insulin therapy, initial insulin glargine dose estimated as 50% of daily IV insulin requirements is adequate for patients on EN, but inadequate in those given TPN. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Successful Treatment of Septic Shock due to Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation 96 Hours after Onset by Drainage and Enteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Yamashita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous esophageal perforation is relatively uncommon, but carries a high mortality rate if diagnosis or treatment is delayed. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with spontaneous esophageal perforation who was successfully treated over 96 h after onset by thoracic drainage and jejunostomy for enteral nutrition. He vomited after drinking alcohol, soon followed by epigastralgia. Heart failure was suspected on admission to another hospital. Spontaneous esophageal perforation was diagnosed 48 h after admission. Chest tube drainage was performed, but his general condition deteriorated and he was transferred to our hospital. Emergent surgery was performed and esophageal perforation combined with pyothorax and mediastinitis was identified on the left side of the lower esophagus. The left thoracic cavity was rinsed and thoracic drainage was performed. Feeding jejunostomy was performed for postoperative enteral nutrition. Effective drainage and sufficient nutrition management appear extremely valuable in treating spontaneous esophageal perforation.

  1. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64 Section 414.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee...

  2. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical...

  3. Nutritional support of bone marrow transplant recipients: a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing total parental nutrition to an enteral feeding program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeluga, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) have been associated with nutritionally-depleting side effects. Total parental nutrition (TPN) has become the standard, but it has not been demonstrated that TPN is the appropriate method of nutritional support. Therefore, in a prospective, randomized clinical trial TPN and enteral feeding were compared for their effectiveness in maintaining the nutritional status of patients through the first 29 post-transplant days. Nutritional assessment included measurement of serum proteins, body weight, anthropometry and isotope dilution analysis of body composition. Total body water (TBW) and extracellular fluid (ECF) were quantified by standard radioisotope dilution techniques using tritiated water and /sup 169/ytterbium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, respectively as the tracers. Consenting patients 10-58 years of age were stratified by type of BMT (autologous or allogeneic) and randomized to either TPN plus ad libitum oral feeding or the individualized enteral feeding program (EFP), which included one-on-one counseling, meal-by-meal menu selection, special snacks and tube feeding. There were no differences in the rate of hematologic recovery, incidence of graft-versus-host disease, organ toxicity, length of hospitalization or survival. Therefore, the observed changes in body composition were not clinically significant. Even allowing for increased dietary service, the EFP was only half as expensive as TPN. It was concluded that TPN is not superior to the EFP and therefore, TPN should be reserved for patients who demonstrate intolerance to enteral feeding.

  4. Optimal nutrition therapy in paediatric critical care in the Asia-Pacific and Middle East: a consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jan Hau; Rogers, Elizabeth; Chor, Yek Kee; Samransamruajkit, Rujipat; Koh, Pei Lin; Miqdady, Mohamad; Al-Mehaidib, Ali Ibrahim; Pudjiadi, Antonius; Singhi, Sunit; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2016-12-01

    Current practices and available resources for nutrition therapy in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the Asia Pacific-Middle East region are expected to differ from western countries. Existing guidelines for nutrition management in critically ill children may not be directly applicable in this region. This paper outlines consensus statements developed by the Asia Pacific-Middle East Consensus Working Group on Nutrition Therapy in the Paediatric Critical Care Environment. Challenges and recommendations unique to the region are described. Following a systematic literature search from 2004-2014, consensus statements were developed for key areas of nutrient delivery in the PICU. This review focused on evidence applicable to the Asia Pacific-Middle East region. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were rated according to the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Enteral nutrition (EN) is the preferred mode of nutritional support. Feeding algorithms that optimize EN should be encouraged and must include: assessment and monitoring of nutritional status, selection of feeding route, time to initiate and advance EN, management strategies for EN intolerance and indications for using parenteral nutrition (PN). Despite heterogeneity in nutritional status of patients, availability of resources and diversity of cultures, PICUs in the region should consider involvement of dieticians and/or nutritional support teams. Robust evidence for several aspects of optimal nutrition therapy in PICUs is lacking. Nutritional assessment must be implemented to document prevalence and impact of malnutrition. Nutritional support must be given greater priority in PICUs, with particular emphasis in optimizing EN delivery.

  5. Early versus late enteral nutrition in intensive care units. Analysis of results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bermejo de las Heras

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malnutrition is particularly prevalent in Intensive Care Units (ICU and associated with poor clinical outcomes. Enteral nutrition (EN has multiple benefits in critically ill patients, particularly when started early at the ICU. A series of studies corroborate this fact; however, other studies present conflicting results. Objective: To assess the clinical results of ICU patients receiving EN, according to EN starting time (early versus late. Patients and method: Basic variables were recorded in all ICU patients who received NE along the study period, as well as time from ICU admission to the start of EN, ICU length of stay, characteristic gastrointestinal complications of EN (gastric residue, constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, regurgitation, abdominal distension and bronchoaspiration and mortality. Results: There was a significant association between early EN and mortality reduction. However, there were no differences in ICU length of stay according to EN starting time. The most frequent complications in the sample were high gastric residue (17.9%, abdominal distension (22.5% and constipation (42.2%. However, no significant differences were observed as a function of the EN starting time. Discussion: Our results, although discrepant at times, do not contradict with those of other studies. EN has shown to be effective as a therapeutic strategy. Therefore, it is recommended the early start of EN in the ICU.

  6. Metodología para la implementación del soporte nutricional enteral personalizado como alternativa de la nutrición enteral domiciliaria Methodology for implementation of personalized enteral nutritional support as an alternative for enteral nutrition at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Jiménez García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la nutrición enteral domiciliaria se realiza en la casa del paciente, y permite que disminuyan los costos hospitalarios como consecuencia de largas estadías para lograr la recuperación o mejorar el estado nutricional y su reingreso al medio familiar. Objetivo: mostrar una metodología para la implementación del soporte nutricional enteral personalizado en el hogar con recursos centralizados, como una alternativa para la nutrición domiciliaria en pediatría. Métodos: a partir del diseño de la metodología para las Unidades de Nutrición Enteral Pediátrica con objetivos de actuación de los Grupos de Apoyo Nutricional Hospitalarios, se diseñó una metodología, que, a través de acciones concretas, logra la integración entre los niveles clínico-facultativos y gerenciales. Resultados: la metodología diseñada está basada en la integración de la atención primaria de salud con la secundaria, en una relación de carácter recíproco (desde y hacia, en la que el control centralizado de los recursos permite, no solo economizarlos, sino, a la vez, su registro para organizar la demanda por la estructura administrativa. El diseño metodológico crea, a su vez, un espacio para las funciones educativas de los padres y el control sistemático del soporte, lo cual, a su vez, le da una connotación preventiva acorde con los objetivos de la medicina comunitaria. Conclusiones: la metodología propuesta por nuestro grupo de trabajo constituye una alternativa en pediatría para el desarrollo de la nutrición enteral domiciliaria, como prestación de los servicios nutricionales, con una mayor integración entre los niveles primario y secundario de salud.Introduction: home enteral nutrition is provided at the patient's house and allows reducing the hospital costs derived from long lengths of stay at hospital to attain the recovery or the improvement of the nutritional status of the patient and his/her return to the family environment

  7. Parenteral lipids and partial enteral nutrition affect hepatic lipid composition but have limited short term effects on formula-induced necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Rapid transition from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to enteral feeding is a risk factor for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants. We hypothesized that partial enteral nutrition with colostrum, increased proportion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or exclusion of lipid...

  8. Toward Enteral Nutrition in the Treatment of Pediatric Crohn Disease in Canada: A Workshop to Identify Barriers and Enablers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Van Limbergen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment armamentarium in pediatric Crohn disease (CD is very similar to adult-onset CD with the notable exception of the use of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN [the administration of a liquid formula diet while excluding normal diet], which is used more frequently by pediatric gastroenterologists to induce remission. In pediatric CD, EEN is now recommended by the pediatric committee of the European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition as a first-choice agent to induce remission, with remission rates in pediatric studies consistently >75%. To chart and address enablers and barriers of use of EEN in Canada, a workshop was held in September 2014 in Toronto (Ontario, inviting pediatric gastroenterologists, nurses and dietitians from most Canadian pediatric IBD centres as well as international faculty from the United States and Europe with particular research and clinical expertise in the dietary management of pediatric CD. Workshop participants ranked the exclusivity of enteral nutrition; the health care resources; and cost implications as the top three barriers to its use. Conversely, key enablers mentioned included: standardization and sharing of protocols for use of enteral nutrition; ensuring sufficient dietetic resources; and reducing the cost of EEN to the family (including advocacy for reimbursement by provincial ministries of health and private insurance companies. Herein, the authors report on the discussions during this workshop and list strategies to enhance the use of EEN as a treatment option in the treatment of pediatric CD in Canada.

  9. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A., E-mail: koyfmas@ccf.org [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  10. Alterations of nutritional status: impact of chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.; Lenon, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The nutritional status of a cancer patient may be affected by the tumor, the chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy directed against the tumor, and by complications associated with that therapy. Chemotherpay-radiotherapy is not confined exclusively to malignant cell populations; thus, normal tissues may also be affected by the therapy and may contribute to specific nutritional problems. Impaired nutrition due to anorexia, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may be dependent upon the specific chemotherapeutic agent, dose, or schedule utilized. Similar side effects from radiation therapy depend upon the dose, fractionation, and volume irradiated. When combined modality treatment is given the nutritional consequences may be magnified. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are underway to investigate the efficacy of nutritional support during chemotherapy-radiotherapy on tolerance to treatment, complications from treatment, and response rates to treatment. Preliminary results demonstrate that the administration of total parenteral nutrition is successful in maintaining weight during radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but that weight loss occurs after discontinuation of nutritional support. Thus, longterm evaluation is mandatory to learn the impact of nutritional support on survival, diease-free survival, and complication rates, as well as on the possible prevention of morbidity associated with aggressive chemotherapy-radiation therapy

  11. Update on metabolism and nutrition therapy in critically ill burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, E; Burghi, G; Manzanares, W

    2017-09-23

    Major burn injury triggers severe oxidative stress, a systemic inflammatory response, and a persistent hypermetabolic and hypercatabolic state with secondary sarcopenia, multiorgan dysfunction, sepsis and an increased mortality risk. Calorie deficit, negative protein balance and antioxidant micronutrient deficiency after thermal injury have been associated to poor clinical outcomes. In this context, personalized nutrition therapy with early enteral feeding from the start of resuscitation are indicated. Over the last four decades, different nutritional and pharmacological interventions aimed at modulating the immune and metabolic responses have been evaluated. These strategies have been shown to be able to minimize acute malnutrition, as well as modulate the immunoinflammatory response, and improve relevant clinical outcomes in this patient population. The purpose of this updating review is to summarize the most current evidence on metabolic response and nutrition therapy in critically ill burn patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Home enteral nutrition recipients: patient perspectives on training, complications and satisfaction

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boland, Karen

    2016-10-01

    The equitable provision of home enteral nutrition (HEN) in the community can have a transformative effect on patient experience and family life for adults and children alike. While optimising quality of life in HEN patients can be challenging, the initiation of HEN positively impacts this measure of healthcare provision.1 Quality of life scores have been shown to improve in the weeks after hospital discharge, and HEN is physically well tolerated. However, it may be associated with psychological distress, and sometimes reluctance among HEN patients to leave their homes.2 Globally, HEN can attenuate cumulative projected patient care costs through a reduction in hospital admission and complications including hospital acquired infections.3 In an era where the cost of disease related malnutrition and associated prolonged hospital stay is being tackled in our healthcare systems, the role of HEN is set to expand. This is a treatment which has clear clinical and social benefits, and may restore some independence to patients and their families. Rather than the indications for HEN being focused on specific diagnoses, the provision of months of quality life at home for patients is adequate justification for its prescription.4 Previously, a review of HEN service provision in 39 cases demonstrated that patients want structured follow-up after hospital discharge, and in particular, would like one point of contact for HEN education and discharge.5 Management structures, funding challenges and the need for further education, particularly within the primary care setting may limit optimal use of HEN. The Irish Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (IrSPEN) aims to develop a national guideline document, drawing on international best practice, forming a template and standards for local policy development in the area of HEN service provision, training and follow-up. The first step in guideline development was to investigate patient experience for adults and children alike. Care

  13. Pediatric parenteral nutrition: Clinical practice guidelines from the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE), the Spanish Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SEGHNP) and the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH)

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrón Giner, Consuelo; Cuervas-Mons Vendrell, Margarita; Galera Martínez, Rafael; Gómez López, Lilianne; Gomis Muñoz, Pilar; Irastorza Terradillos, Iñaki; Martínez Costa, Cecilia; Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Pérez-Portabella Maristany, Cleofé; Pozas del Río, M. Teresa; Redecillas Ferreiro, Susana E.; Prieto Bozano, Gerardo; Balmaseda Serrano, Elena; Cañedo Villarroya, Elvira; Gutiérrez Junquera, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Parenteral nutrition (PN) in childhood is a treatment whose characteristics are highly variable depending on the age and pathology of the patient. Material and methods: The Standardization and Protocols Group of the Spanish Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) is an interdisciplinary group formed by members of the SENPE, the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Pediatric Nutrition (SEGHNP) and the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH) that in...

  14. Glutamine granule-supplemented enteral nutrition maintains immunological function in severely burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Yan, Hong; You, Zhongyi; Wang, Pei; Wang, Shiliang

    2006-08-01

    Glutamine is an important energy source for immune cells. It is a necessary nutrient for cell proliferation, and serves as specific fuel for lymphocytes, macrophages, and enterocytes when it is present in appropriate concentrations. The purpose of this clinical study was to observe the effects of enteral nutrition supplemented with glutamine granules on immunologic function in severely burned patients. Forty-eight severely burned patients (total burn surface area 30-75%, full thickness burn area 20-58%) who met the requirements of the protocol joined this double-blind randomized controlled clinical trail. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: burn control group (B group, 23 patients) and glutamine treated group (Gln group, 25 patients). There was isonitrogenous and isocaloric intake in both groups, Gln and B group patents were given glutamine granules or placebo (glycine) at 0.5 g/kgd for 14 days with oral feeding or tube feeding, respectively. The plasma level of glutamine and several indices of immunologic function including lymphocyte transformation ratio, neutrophil phagocytosis index (NPI), CD4/CD8 ratio, the content of immunoglobulin, complement C3, C4 and IL-2 levels were determined. Moreover, wound healing rate of burn area was observed and then hospital stay was recorded. The results showed significantly reduced plasma glutamine and damaged immunological function after severe burn Indices of cellular immunity function were remarkably decreased from normal controls. After taking glutamine granules for 14 days, plasma glutamine concentration was significantly higher in Gln group than that in B group (607.86+/-147.25 micromol/L versus 447.63+/-132.38 micromol/L, P0.05). In addition, wound healing was better and hospital stay days were reduced in Gln group (46.59+/-12.98 days versus 55.68+/-17.36 days, Pfeeding or tube feeding abate the degree of immunosuppression, improve immunological function especially cellular immunity function, ameliorate wound

  15. Nutrition therapy in critically ill infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Heather E; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infants and children are susceptible to the profound metabolic effects of critical illness. In addition, preexisting malnutrition and obesity have adverse consequences during the intensive care unit stay. Early enteral and parenteral feeding can improve nutrition deficits, but neither has been sufficiently studied to show an effect on clinical outcomes in pediatric critical care. Indirect calorimetry is a useful technique that identifies patients receiving inadequate or excessive nutrition, but this technique is underused.

  16. Early enteral nutrition in critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability: an evidence-based review and practical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuofei; Wu, Xingjiang; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou

    2014-02-01

    Early enteral nutrition (EEN) in critically ill patients is associated with significant benefit as well as elevated risk of complications. Concomitant use of EEN with vasopressors has been associated with nonocclusive bowel necrosis in critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability. The decision when to initiate enteral nutrition in hemodynamically unstable patients that require vasoactive substances remains a clinical dilemma. This review summarizes the effect of EEN and vasoactive agents on gastrointestinal blood flow and perfusion in critically ill patients, based on current evidence. Animal and clinical data involving simultaneous administration of EEN and vasoactive agents for hemodynamic instability are reviewed, and the factors related to the safety and effectiveness of EEN support in this patient population are analyzed. Moreover, practical recommendations are provided. Additional randomized clinical trials are warranted to provide cutting-edge evidence-based guidance about this issue for practitioners of critical care.

  17. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... growth marked by weight and villus/crypt ratio was significantly reduced in the TPN group compared with the EN group, and CDCA treatment increased both parameters. These results suggest that decreased circulating FGF19 during TPN may contribute to PNALD. Moreover, we show that enteral CDCA not only...

  18. Consensus statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: indicators recommended for the identification and documentation of pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Patricia; Carney, Liesje Nieman; Corkins, Mark R; Monczka, Jessica; Smith, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan E; Spear, Bonnie A; White, Jane V

    2015-02-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), utilizing an evidence-informed, consensus-derived process, recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic indicators be used to identify and document pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition) in routine clinical practice. The recommended indicators include z scores for weight-for-height/length, body mass index-for-age, or length/height-for-age or mid-upper arm circumference when a single data point is available. When 2 or more data points are available, indicators may also include weight gain velocity (Dietetics.

  19. Improved Outcomes with an Outpatient Multidisciplinary Intensive Feeding Therapy Program Compared with Weekly Feeding Therapy to Reduce Enteral Tube Feeding Dependence in Medically Complex Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caitlin; VanDahm, Kelly; Stevens, Lindsay M; Khan, Soofia; Urich, Jennifer; Iurilli, Janet; Linos, Elizabeth; Williams, Dana I

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of feeding disorders in medically complex children is estimated to be as high as 80%. Enteral tube nutrition (ETN) is commonly used for nutritional support in children with feeding disorders. Adverse consequences of ETN include medical complications, psychosocial problems, and higher healthcare costs. We used a retrospective cohort controlled study design to compare outcomes of our outpatient multidisciplinary intensive feeding therapy (IFT) program to our traditional therapy (TT) of single-discipline, once weekly feeding therapy to reduce ETN dependence in medically complex young children. Children in the IFT cohort experienced a median reduction in ETN dependence of 49% (34.5-58.5%) compared with a median reduction of 0% (0-25%) for TT (p > 0.0001). Almost half of the IFT cohort no longer required ETN by the conclusion of the 5-week program. Medically complex young children (median age 26 months) successfully reduce or eliminate ETN in an outpatient multidisciplinary intensive feeding program.

  20. Assessment of vitamin and trace element supplementation in severely burned patients undergoing long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perro, G; Bourdarias, B; Cutillas, M; Higueret, D; Sanchez, R; Iron, A

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of an oral supplement of vitamins and trace elements during a longterm artificial parenteral and enteral nutrition was investigated for 3 months in patients with extensive burns. Thirty severely burned patients (22 male, 8 female, age 41 +/- 18 years, range 23-59 years, 33 +/- 12% total body surface area burn, 22% +/- 8 full thickness burn surface area) were included. Every 10 days, from day 10 until day 90, we determined serum levels of: *vitamins B1, B12, A, E, *folic acid, *copper, zinc, iron, *transferrin, albumin, prealbumin, total proteins, *fibronectin, retinol binding protein (RBP), *calcium, *phosphorus, *triglycerides, *total cholesterol, *C reactive protein (CRP), *erythrocyte folic acid. The mean daily nutritional support was 60 Kcals and 0.4 g N per kg of body weight, 70% enterally and 30% parenterally administered, with enteral vitamin and trace element supplementation. On day 10, there was a decrease of the serum level of 19/20 parameters. For 8 parameters (vitamin A, total cholesterol, iron, transferrin, fibronectin, phosphorus, RBP, total proteins), the level was lower than usual. Between day 10 and day 20, a significant normalization of 6 of them was noted, the average levels of transferrin and iron remaining below normal values until day 50. There was a significant decrease in C-reactive protein levels, however above normal limits. No deficiency in vitamins or trace elements was found. Cyclic variations of serum levels occurred which may be more related to volemic, hydroelectrolytic, endocrine and inflammatory disorders than to nutritional problems.

  1. Paradigm Shifts in Nutrition Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satoru

    2017-09-26

    Currently, the low-energy diet is the only recognized nutrition therapy for type 2 diabetes in Japan. However, in recent decades, many foreign scientific organizations have accepted various nutritional approaches to manage diabetes, such as the low-carbohydrate diet, the Mediterranean diet, diet approaches to stop hypertension (DASH), and the vegetarian diet. Moreover, growing evidence has called into question classical nutritional approaches such as the low-fat diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and the low-protein diet for the prevention of diabetic kidney disease. Similarly, the recommended nutrition therapy for diabetes may change in near future. Such changes in nutrition therapy must be dynamic and based on not only scientific evidence but also each patient's narrative.

  2. A pilot study to assess tolerability of early enteral nutrition via esophagostomy tube feeding in dogs with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, C S; James, F E; Steiner, J M; Suchodolski, J S; Robertson, I D; Hosgood, G

    2011-01-01

    The putative role of the gut in amplification of systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis is gaining credence, and intraluminal nutrition has been shown to decrease inflammation in experimental models of pancreatitis. Prepyloric feeding often is used in people with acute pancreatitis, but has not been evaluated in dogs. Early intervention with enteral nutrition (EN) delivered proximal to the pylorus will be well tolerated in dogs with acute pancreatitis and provide justification for further larger trials. Ten dogs with severe acute pancreatitis in an open-label, prospective pilot study. Dogs were treated with plasma transfusion and standard care, and then consecutively assigned to receive either EN via esophagostomy tube feeding or parenteral nutrition (PN). Outcome was used to determine optimal study size for future studies, and complications were compared between the 2 groups. A significantly greater number of vomiting or regurgitating episodes occurred in dogs receiving PN. The dogs receiving EN did not demonstrate any noticeable postprandial pain. There were more catheter-related complications in the PN group. There was no difference in outcome between the 2 treatments, and 43 dogs for each treatment would be required in future studies to determine a difference in outcome. Early EN delivered proximal to the pylorus is well tolerated in dogs with severe pancreatitis and resulted in fewer complications than PN. Prospective trials in a larger cohort are justified to fully establish the potential benefit of early EN, preferably compared with minimal enteral nutrition. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. A qualitative study of the perceived value of membership in The Oley Foundation by home parenteral and enteral nutrition consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopy, Katelyn; Winkler, Marion; Schwartz-Barcott, Donna; Melanson, Kathleen; Greene, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Support and educational organizations have been shown to improve quality of life of consumers of home nutrition support. One such organization, The Oley Foundation, offers resources for the home parenteral and enteral nutrition (HPEN) consumer. While research has shown proven benefits to HPEN consumers affiliated with The Oley Foundation, no studies have investigated the perceived value of membership to the consumer or the way in which consumers are introduced to the organization. Qualitative methodology was used to gain a deeper understanding of the perceived value of membership in The Oley Foundation. Audiotaped, in-depth, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted to explore participants' experiences with The Oley Foundation and HPEN. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze data and identify themes associated with membership value. The value of The Oley Foundation lies in programs and resources and the competency, inspiration, normalcy, and advocacy gained from membership, helping individuals adjust to life with HPEN dependency. More than half of participants found the organization through self-initiated Internet searches, but all participants clearly expressed the desire "I wish I knew about it sooner." This study identifies the value of membership in The Oley Foundation and the important role the organization has in the lives of HPEN-dependent consumers. Nutrition support clinicians should introduce the organization to patients when the need for HPEN is established and prior to hospital discharge. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. [Home enteral nutrition in Spain. Results of the register of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition in 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, J M; Pedrón Giner, C; Martínez Costa, C; Oliveros Leal, L; Galera Peinado, A P; Rosell Camps, A; Gómez López, L; Marugán de Miguelsanz, J M

    2006-03-01

    The number of children receiving prolonged home enteral nutrition (HEN) is increasing. However, precise information on the incidence and prevalence of HEN in Spain is lacking. Consequently, the Spanish Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition created a patients' register (NEPAD). The aim of the present study was to analyze the results of the first year of the NEPAD register (2003). The NEPAD is an on-line register that gathers information on the indications for HEN, route of access, type of diet and duration of nutritional support. Quantitative data are expressed as mean and standard deviation, and qualitative data as percentages. In 2003, 124 children from 6 hospitals were registered. The mean age at the beginning of HEN was 3.6 years. The underlying disease was gastrointestinal in 20%, neurological or mental retardation in 20%, cystic fibrosis in 14.5%, tumor in 11%, innate error of metabolism in 10%, congenital cardiac disease in 6%, severe primary malnutrition in 6%, and other causes in 13%. A nasogastric tube was used as the first route of access in 56%, and gastrostomy was used in 42%. Sixty percent of the children received continuous nocturnal enteral nutrition and 90% used an infusion pump. The type of feeding consisted of blenderized natural food in 14%, polymeric pediatric formula in 50%, and infant formulae in 18%. On December 31st, 84 children continued to receive enteral nutrition (68%). Despite the efforts made to maintain the on-line national register, it has been underused in its first year of existence (2003). Patients with gastrointestinal or neurological diseases constitute the main group of patients in the register. There is a slight preference for the use of nasogastric tube over gastrostomy.

  5. Nutrition Therapy in Elderly with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minidian Fasitasari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is an important health element for elderly people and influence aging process. Malnutrition prevalence is increasing in this population. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is one of the chronic diseases in elderly that is related to malnutrition. The association between malnutrition and pulmonary disease (including COPD has been known for a long time. Malnutrition has negative impacts on pulmonary structure, elasticity, and function, strength and endurance of respiratory muscles, pulmonary immunity defense mechanism, and breath control. Inversely, pulmonary disease (including COPD will increase energy need and may reduce dietary intake. Nutrition intervention in COPD patient is intended for regulating anorexia, improving pulmonary function, and controlling weight loss. Nutrient requirements will be calculated according to the results of nutrition assessment. This article will discuss about nutrition therapy in elderly with COPD. It describes respiratory system in aging, association COPD and nutrition, and nutrition assessment, as well as nutrition intervention in elderly people with COPD.

  6. [Characteristics of patients admitted with enteral nutrition in a service of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, Gerardo A; Gómez, Jaime; Yorio, Marcelo A

    2005-01-01

    When a patient is unable to swallow enough calories by mouth and has his digestive tube working normally, the Enteral Nutrition (EN) is prescribed. Our aims was identify the patient who requires EN by sounding at Clinical Medical admission. From 11/2001 to 11/ 2002; 331 patients were attended in common rooms. 50 of them (15%) required EN. Retrospective descriptive study was made, evaluating: demographic data, diagnoses, comorbilities, self-validity, staying, nosocomial complications, studies, medicaments, inter-consulting and mortality as well. In 50 patients under EN, 56 % were men, with an age rate of 65 years Standar Error (SE) 2.37 and daily life activity medium rate was 2 (SE) 0.35. Diagnoses at admission: Strocke 22%, acute pneumonia of community 22%, pneumonia by bronchoaspiration 10 %, acute confusional syndrome 10%, etc. Comorbilities: 54% presented 3 or more concurrent diseases, Hypertension 60 %, Dementia 28%, type 2 Diabetes and strocke 26%, iskemic cardiopathy 14%, etc. Admission time rate: 6 days (SE) 2.02, staying at intensive care unit 40%. Nosocomial complications came up in 34%, 76% ACS, 11.7% urinary tract infection, pneumonia and endovascular infection 1 each. 4 labs were required in rate (SE) 1.14, and 3 complementary studies per patient (SE) of 0.24. In ambulatory treatment they used 3 drugs as an average (SE) 0.37. The highest prescription day approached 7 as average (SE) of 0.61. At discharge they left with an average of 4 (SE) 0.39. In every case kinesiotherapy and phonoaudiology were used as well. Ther was interconsulting regarding infectology in 24%, general surgery 16%. Mortality 22%. EN is usual in clinical admission. It regards an elderly patient with lacking self-validity, who over 50% of cases presents more than three comorbilities (mostly hypertension). Facts of admission usually registered: neurological pathologies and infections. Admission length was the same as general settlers. Almost half of them needed intensive care

  7. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Early enteral and parenteral nutritional support after hepatectomy in patients with hepatic carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao LB

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lin-Ben Gao,1* He Tian,2* Xing-Guang Wang,3 Xiao-Fei Yu,4 Yan Guan,2 Ming-Lu Chen,5 Jian Zhang6 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Haiyang People’s Hospital, Haiyang, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong Province Tumor Hospital, Jinnan, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinnan, 4Department of Emergency, Haiyang People’s Hospital, Haiyang, 5Department of Nuclear Radiology, Shandong Province Tumor Hospital, Jinnan, 6Department of Gastroenterology, Haiyang People’s Hospital, Haiyang, People’s Republic of China *These two authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study sought to conduct a systematic review providing a comparative analysis of enteral nutrition (EN and parenteral nutrition (PN after hepatectomy. Methods: PubMed, Embase, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for publications describing randomized controlled trials that compared early EN and PN after hepatectomy. The time period for this search was from January 1990 to December 2013. In accordance with the inclusion criteria of this study, two researchers independently screened the retrieved literature, extracted data, and assessed methodological quality. A meta-analysis of the included publications was then performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results: The meta-analysis results indicated statistically significant differences between the group that received EN and the group that received PN during the early stages after hepatectomy with respect to average total bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase levels after nutrition, prealbumin levels, incidence of diarrhea and abdominal bloating, time to flatus, and average cost of nutrition. To varying degrees, better results were observed in the EN group than in the PN group for these metrics. Conclusion: During the early stages after hepatectomy, EN has obvious advantages relative to PN; thus, EN merits more widespread promotion

  9. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Sanz-Paris

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001, days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001 and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001. Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001 during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026. In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  10. Consensus statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: indicators recommended for the identification and documentation of pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Patricia J; Nieman Carney, Liesje; Corkins, Mark Richard; Monczka, Jessica; Smith, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan Elizabeth; Spear, Bonnie A; White, Jane V

    2014-12-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, utilizing an evidence-informed, consensus-derived process, recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic indicators be used to identify and document pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition) in routine clinical practice. The recommended indicators include z scores for weight for height/length, body mass index for age, length/height for age, or mid-upper arm circumference when a single data point is available. When two or more data points are available, indicators may also include weight-gain velocity (younger than 2 years of age), weight loss (2 to 20 years of age), deceleration in weight for length/height z score, and inadequate nutrient intake. The purpose of this consensus statement is to identify a basic set of indicators that can be used to diagnose and document undernutrition in the pediatric population (ages 1 month to 18 years). The indicators are intended for use in multiple settings, such as acute, ambulatory care/outpatient, residential care, etc. Several screening tools have been developed for use in hospitalized children. However, identifying criteria for use in screening for nutritional risk is not the purpose of this paper. Clinicians should use as many data points as available to identify and document the presence of malnutrition. The universal use of a single set of diagnostic parameters will expedite the recognition of pediatric undernutrition, lead to the development of more accurate estimates of its prevalence and incidence, direct interventions, and promote improved outcomes. A standardized diagnostic approach will also inform the prediction of the human and financial responsibilities and costs associated with the prevention and treatment of undernutrition in this vulnerable population, and help to further ensure the provision of high-quality, cost-effective, nutrition care. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American

  11. The nutritional intake supplied by enteral formulae used in older children (aged 7-12 years) on home tube feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S; Daly, A; Davies, P; MacDonald, A

    2009-10-01

    In the UK, patients aged 6-12 years contribute more than one-third of children on home enteral tube feeds (HETF). Many enteral feeds are given to this age group. The present study aimed to investigate the formula with the best nutritional composition for children aged 7-12 years on HETF by comparing the nutrient intake of three feed types; a paediatric feed (PF) for 1-6 year olds, an adult feed (AF), and a feed for children (OCF) aged 7-12 years. Twenty-five HETF children aged 7-14 years (median 10 years) were given a 6.3 kJ mL(-1) enteral feed designed for 7-12 year olds (or weighing 21-45 kg) for 9 months. Nutrient intakes on the 7-12-year-old feed were compared with baseline feed (paediatric n = 10; or adult n = 15). At baseline, the PF failed to meet 100% of the reference nutrient intake (RNI) for three of 19 (16%) of the nutrients studied, whereas AF provided in excess of 250% of the RNI for six of 19 (32%) of the nutrients. During the trial, the nutrients on the OCF were two of 19 (11%) 250% of the RNI. Only seven of 10 (70%) children on a PF met at least 100% of the UK RNI for calcium, compared to 17 of 19 (89%) on the OCF. It is important to offer older children an enteral feed that provides an optimal level of nutrients to meet their nutritional requirements. Feeds designed for 7-12-year-old children more closely meet nutrient requirements than paediatric or adult formulae, but require further modification to fully meet the nutritional needs of this group.

  12. Enteral nutritional support in prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Rebecca J; Ek, Anna-Christina; Engfer, Meike; Moore, Zena; Rigby, Paul; Wolfe, Robert; Elia, Marinos

    2005-08-01

    There have been few systematic reviews and no meta-analyses of the clinical benefits of nutritional support in patients with, or at risk of developing, pressure ulcers. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to address the impact of enteral nutritional support on pressure ulcer incidence and healing and a range of other clinically relevant outcome measures in this group. Fifteen studies (including eight randomised controlled trials (RCTs)) of oral nutritional supplements (ONS) or enteral tube feeding (ETF), identified using electronic databases (including Pub Med and Cochrane) and bibliography searches, were included in the systematic review. Outcomes including pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer healing, quality of life, complications, mortality, anthropometry and dietary intake were recorded, with the aim of comparing nutritional support versus routine care (e.g. usual diet and pressure ulcer care) and nutritional formulas of different composition. Of these 15 studies, 5 RCTs comparing ONS (4 RCTs) and ETF (1 RCT) with routine care could be included in a meta-analysis of pressure ulcer incidence. Meta-analysis showed that ONS (250-500 kcal, 2-26 weeks) were associated with a significantly lower incidence of pressure ulcer development in at-risk patients compared to routine care (odds ratio 0.75, 95% CI 0.62-0.89, 4 RCTs, n=1224, elderly, post-surgical, chronically hospitalised patients). Similar results were obtained when a combined meta-analysis of ONS (4 RCT) and ETF (1 RCT) trials was performed (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.62-0.88, 5 RCTs, n=1325). Individual studies showed a trend towards improved healing of existing pressure ulcers with disease-specific (including high protein) versus standard formulas, although robust RCTs are required to confirm this. Although some studies indicate that total nutritional intake is improved, data on other outcome measures (quality of life) are lacking. This systematic review shows enteral nutritional

  13. The Potential Association of Later Initiation of Oral/Enteral Nutrition on Euthyroid Sick Syndrome in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Pérez-Guisado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to determine if early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition in burn patients minimizes the drop in fT3 levels, reduces the potential for euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS, and shortens the length of hospital stay (LHS. Subjects and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated the statistical association of serum fT3, fT4, and TSH at the first (2nd–5th day and second sample collection (9th–12th day after the burn injury in 152 burn patients. Three groups were established depending on time of initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition: 48 h after the injury (Group 3. Results. They were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. We found that LHS and the fT3 levels were statistically different in the 3 groups. The LHS (in days was, respectively, in each group, 16.77±4.56, 21.98±4.86, and 26.06±5.47. Despite the quantifiable drop in fT3, ESS was present only at the first sample collection (2.61±0.92 days in Group 3, but there was no group with ESS at the second sample collection (9.89±1.01 days. Our data suggest that early initiation of nutritional supplementation decreases the length of hospitalization and is associated with decreasing fT3 serum concentration depression. Conclusion. Early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition counteracts ESS and improves the LHS in burn patients.

  14. The Potential Association of Later Initiation of Oral/Enteral Nutrition on Euthyroid Sick Syndrome in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M.; Rioja, Luis F.; DeRosier, Leo C.; de la Torre, Jorge I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine if early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition in burn patients minimizes the drop in fT3 levels, reduces the potential for euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), and shortens the length of hospital stay (LHS). Subjects and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated the statistical association of serum fT3, fT4, and TSH at the first (2nd–5th day) and second sample collection (9th–12th day) after the burn injury in 152 burn patients. Three groups were established depending on time of initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition: 48 h after the injury (Group 3). Results. They were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. We found that LHS and the fT3 levels were statistically different in the 3 groups. The LHS (in days) was, respectively, in each group, 16.77 ± 4.56, 21.98 ± 4.86, and 26.06 ± 5.47. Despite the quantifiable drop in fT3, ESS was present only at the first sample collection (2.61 ± 0.92 days) in Group 3, but there was no group with ESS at the second sample collection (9.89 ± 1.01 days). Our data suggest that early initiation of nutritional supplementation decreases the length of hospitalization and is associated with decreasing fT3 serum concentration depression. Conclusion. Early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition counteracts ESS and improves the LHS in burn patients. PMID:23401683

  15. Phase Angle and Handgrip Strength Are Sensitive Early Markers of Energy Intake in Hypophagic, Non-Surgical Patients at Nutritional Risk, with Contraindications to Enteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Caccialanza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of nutritional intakes during hospitalization is crucial, as it is known that nutritional status tends to worsen during the hospital stay, and this can lead to the negative consequences of malnutrition. International guidelines recommend the use of parenteral nutrition (PN in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. However, to date, there are no published data regarding either energy intake or objective measurements associated with it in this patient population. The aim of the present exploratory methodological study was to evaluate whether phase angle (PhA and handgrip strength normalized for skeletal muscle mass (HG/SMM are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. We evaluated 30 eligible patients, who were treated with personalized dietary modifications and supplemental PN for at least one week during hospitalization. In a liner regression model adjusted for age, gender, basal protein intake and the basal value of each variable, a trend toward improvement of PhA and preservation of HG/SMM was observed in patients satisfying the estimated calorie requirements (N = 20, while a significant deterioration of these parameters occurred in those who were not able to reach the target (N = 10. The mean adjusted difference and 95% CI were +1.4° (0.5–2.3 (p = 0.005 for PhA and +0.23 (0.20–0.43 (p = 0.033 for HG/SMM. A significant correlation between PhA and HG/SMM variations was also observed (r = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.23–0.77; p = 0.0023. PhA and HG/SMM were able to distinguish between hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk who satisfied their estimated caloric requirements and those who did not after a one-week personalized nutritional support. Clinical studies are warranted, in order to verify these preliminary observations and to validate the role of Ph

  16. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  17. Effect of three different doses of arginine enhanced enteral nutrition on nutritional status and outcomes in well nourished postsurgical cancer patients: a randomized single blinded prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luis, D A; Izaola, O; Terroba, M C; Cuellar, L; Ventosa, M; Martin, T

    2015-01-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing surgery have a high occurrence of postoperative complications. The aim of our study was to investigate whether postoperative nutrition of head and neck cancer patients, using an enhanced enteral formula with three different doses of arginine could improve nutritional variables as well as clinical outcome, depending of arginine dose. A population of 84 patients with oral and laryngeal cancer was enrolled. At surgery patients were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups, each one containing at less 28 patients. Group I (28 patients) received an enteral diet supplements with a low physiological dose of arginine (5.7 g per day), group II (28 patients) received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous enteral formula with a medium dose of arginine (12.3 g per day) and group III (28 patients) received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous enteral formula with a high dose of arginine (18.9 g per day). The length of postoperative stay had a trend to be better with high dose of arginine received (31.9 ± 17.2 days in group I vs 27.8 ± 15.2 days in group II vs 24.8 ± 18.3 days in group III: p = 0.034). No differences were detected in postoperative infections complications and diarrhea. Fistula was less frequent in groups II and III than I (10.7% group I vs 3.6% group II vs 3.6% group III: p = 0.033), The length of postoperative stay had a trend to be better with high dose of arginine received (31.9 ± 17.2 days in group I vs 27.8 ± 15.2 days in group II vs 24.8 ± 18.3 days in group III: p = 0.034). Our results suggest that these patients could benefit from a high dose of arginine enhanced enteral formula to decrease length of hospital stay and fistula wound complications.

  18. Diet and enteral nutrition in patients with chronic kidney disease not on dialysis: a review focusing on fat, fiber and protein intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Alice; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Gandolfini, Ilaria; Delsante, Marco; Fani, Filippo; Gregorini, Maria Cristina; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2017-12-01

    The clinical data available on dietary requirements of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not on dialysis are limited and largely inconclusive in terms of the renal, cardiovascular and nutritional outcomes achievable through dietary modifications. Restriction of protein intake during the early stages of CKD may in fact slow its progression, but at the same time this approach may also lead to protein-energy wasting, if energy intake is not adequate and properly monitored. Unfortunately, compliance to dietary recommendations is traditionally low in this patient population. A switch from saturated to mono- and polyunsaturated fats is generally recognized as advantageous for cardiac health; however, the benefits in term of renal function are largely unknown. Similarly, the association between dietary fiber intake and kidney disease is largely unknown. In fact, while there is evidence on the positive health effects of dietary fibers in the general population, nutritional guidelines for CKD lack formal recommendations concerning fiber intake. This paper reviews data and evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses on renal and cardiovascular outcomes related to modifications in protein, fat and fiber intake. Suggestions for maintaining nutritional status through patient-oriented dietary patterns and enteral supplementation in CKD patients on conservative therapy are also presented.

  19. Effect of early enteral nutrition (EN) on endotoxin in serum and intestinal permeability in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Q-X; Xu, G-X; Shen, M-H

    2017-06-01

    This work aimed at studying the effect of early enteral nutrition (EN) on serum endotoxin and intestinal permeability in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. 70 cases of patients with severe acute pancreatitis were cured in our hospital from April 2015 to January 2016. Patients selected were randomly divided into two groups including a group of patients having parenteral nutrition (group PN) and that had enteral nutrition (group EN). The results were assessed by: 1) the differences of serum endotoxin level; 2) the differences of the lactulose/mannitol ratio of urine, before intervention and one and two weeks after the intervention. Before the intervention, both groups had similar levels of serum endotoxin and the same lactulose/mannitol excretion rate of urine (p>0.05). One and two weeks after the intervention, the serum endotoxin level and the lactulose/mannitol excretion rate of urine of the group PN were significantly higher than the group EN (pEN has a bigger effect on serum endotoxin and intestinal permeability in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. EN can better promote the elimination of serum endotoxin and reduce intestinal permeability. Therefore, EN deserves clinical expansion.

  20. Impact of Early Enteral Nutrition on Nutritional and Immunological Outcomes of Gastric Cancer Patients Undergoing Gastrostomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikniaz, Zeinab; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Nagashi, Shahnaz; Nikniaz, Leila

    2017-07-01

    The present systematic review and meta-analysis study evaluated the impact of early enteral nutrition (EN) on postoperative nutritional and immunological outcomes of gastric cancer (GC) patients. The databases of PubMed, Embase, Springer, and Cochrane library were searched till September 2016 to identify studies which evaluated the effects of EN compared with parenteral nutrition (PN) on postoperative immunological and nutritional status and hospitalization time in GC patients. Mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) was calculated and I-square statistic test was used for heterogeneity analysis. The present systematic review and meta-analysis have consisted of seven trials, containing 835 GC patients. According to the result of meta-analysis, compared with PN, EN significantly resulted in more increase in the level of albumin [MD = 2.07 (0.49, 3.64)], prealbumin [MD = 9.41 (049, 33.55)], weight [MD = 1.52 (0.32, 2.72)], CD3+ [SMD = 1.96 (1.50, 2.43)], CD4+ [SMD = 2.45 (1.97, 2.93)], natural killers [MD = 5.80 (3.75, 7.85)], and also a decrease in the hospitalization time [MD=-2.39 (-2.74, -2.03)]. The results demonstrated that early administration of EN is more effective in improving postsurgical nutrition status and immune index in GC patients. So, based on these results, postoperative early administration of EN is recommended for GC patients where possible.

  1. [Medical nutrition prevention and medical nutrition therapy of lipid metabolism disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaković, Budimka; Grujicić, Maja; Trajković-Pavlović, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    High energetic density of nutrition, insufficient physical activity and smoking are the most common causes of obesity and lipid metabolism disorders (hyperlipoproteinemia and dyslipoproteinemia). Hyperlipoproteinemia and dislipoproteinemia are mass noncommunicable diseases and at the same time they are main causes of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases and cerebrovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, hepatic diseases and some localization of malignant diseases. Cardiovascular diseases and malignant diseases are the leading causes of mortality in the world. Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health Nutrition and The Second European Action Plan for Food and Nutrition Policy represent the World Health Organisation approach in prevention of risks of development, and treatment of mass noncommunicable diseases, first of all for hyperlipoproteinemia, cardiovascular diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. According to the previously mentioned health programmes, medical nutrition therapy of hyperlipoproteinemia and dislipoproteinemia should be applied on whole population and individual level as well. Medical nutrition therapy is managed on individual level. Eminent international organizations, such as the European Society of Atherosclerosis and the American Heart Association, give priority to medical nutrition prevention and medical nutrition therapy in their guides for prevention and therapy of hyperlipoproteinemia, cardiovascular diseases and cerebrovascular diseases.

  2. Nutrition Therapy for Liver Diseases Based on the Status of Nutritional Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Yasutake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dietary intake of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is generally characterized by high levels of carbohydrate, fat, and/or cholesterol, and these dietary patterns influence hepatic lipid metabolism in the patients. Therefore, careful investigation of dietary habits could lead to better nutrition therapy in NAFLD patients. The main treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC is interferon-based antiviral therapy, which often causes a decrease in appetite and energy intake; hence, nutritional support is also required during therapy to prevent undernourishment, treatment interruption, and a reduction in quality of life. Moreover, addition of some nutrients that act to suppress viral proliferation is recommended. As a substitutive treatment, low-iron diet therapy, which is relatively safe and effective for preventing hepatocellular carcinoma, is also recommended for CHC patients. Some patients with liver cirrhosis (LC have decreased dietary energy and protein intake, while the number of LC patients with overeating and obesity is increasing, indicating that the nutritional state of LC patients has a broad spectrum. Therefore, nutrition therapy for LC patients should be planned on an assessment of their complications, nutritional state, and dietary intake. Late evening snacks, branched-chain amino acids, zinc, and probiotics are considered for effective nutritional utilization.

  3. Nutrition therapy in a pediatric intensive care unit: indications, monitoring, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamberlan, Patrícia; Delgado, Artur Figueiredo; Leone, Cláudio; Feferbaum, Rubens; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2011-07-01

    Nutrition therapy (NT) is essential for the care of critically ill children. Inadequate feeding leads to malnutrition and may increase the patient's risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to describe the NT used in a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The authors evaluated NT administered to 90 consecutive patients who were hospitalized for 7 days in the PICU of Instituto da Criança, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. NT was established according to the protocol provided by the institution's NT team. NT provided a balance of fluids and nutrients and was monitored with a weekly anthropometric nutrition assessment and an evaluation of complications. NT was initiated, on average, within 72 hours of hospitalization. Most children (80%) received enteral nutrition (EN) therapy; of these, 35% were fed orally and the rest via nasogastric or postpyloric tube. There were gastrointestinal complications in patients (5%) who needed a postpyloric tube. Parenteral nutrition (PN) was used in only 10% of the cases, and the remaining 10% received mixed NT (EN + PN). The average calorie and protein intake was 82 kcal/kg and 2.7 g/kg per day. Arm circumference and triceps skinfold thickness decreased. The use of EN was prevalent in the tertiary PICU, and few clinical complications occurred. There was no statistically significant change in most anthropometric indicators evaluated during hospitalization, which suggests that NT probably helped patients maintain their nutrition status.

  4. Early Trophic Enteral Nutrition Is Associated With Improved Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Septic Shock: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayshil J; Kozeniecki, Michelle; Biesboer, Annie; Peppard, William; Ray, Ananda S; Thomas, Seth; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Nanchal, Rahul; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines provide weak recommendations for starting enteral nutrition (EN) in patients with septic shock (on vasopressor support). Outcomes of patients receiving EN in septic shock on vasopressor support have not been well studied. We hypothesize that early trophic EN in mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock is associated with improved outcomes. Single-center retrospective study of mechanically ventilated patients admitted with septic shock to identify patients receiving (1) no EN, (2) septic shock, those receiving septic shock. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. [Impact of microbial immune enteral nutrition on postoperative insulin resistance and infectious complication of patients with abdominal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng; Yang, Daogui

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effect of microbial immune enteral nutrition composed of probiotics, deep sea fish oil, glutamine and nutrison on postoperative immune status, insulin resistance and infectious complication morbidity in patients with abdominal infection. From September 2010 to April 2013 in Shandong Liaocheng City Hospital, 96 patients with upper gastrointestinal perforation were prospectively randomized into the treatment group (microbial immune enteral nutrition, n=48) and the control group(conventional enteral nutrition, n=48). Number of T cell subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)/CD8(+)) and natural killer (NK) cell, procalcitonin (PCT), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FINS), insulin resistance index (InHOMA-IR) calculated by the homeostasis model assessment(HOMA) were detected before operation and on days 3 and 7 after operation and compared between the two groups. The incidence of postoperative infectious complication was collected and compared as well. There were no significant differences in immune indexes and insulin resistance-associated indexes between the two groups before operation and on the day 3 after operation(all P>0.05). On postoperative day 7, CD4(+), CD4(+)/CD8(+) and NK cells in treatment group were significantly higher than those in control group [(39.1±4.3)% vs. (30.1±5.7)%, P=0.043; 1.76±0.21 vs. 1.36±0.12, P=0.038; (19.3±4.8)% vs. (13.3±3.2)%, P=0.032], while FINS, lnHOMA-IR and PCT in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group [(7.3±1.7) mU/L vs. (10.2±2.1) mU/L, P=0.041; 0.60±0.05 vs. 0.88±0.06, P=0.039; (0.12±0.07) μg/L vs. (0.35±0.12) μg/L, P=0.028]. Postoperative infectious complication morbidity was significantly lower in treatment group as compared to control group [18.8%(9/48) vs. 39.6%(19/48), P=0.025]. Microbial immune enteral nutrition composed of probiotics, deep sea fish oil, glutamine and nutrison can improve the immune status, decrease the level of insulin resistance

  6. Glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants. Design of a double-blind randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN73254583

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Fetter, Willem P. F.

    2004-01-01

    Enteral feeding of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants is a challenge, since metabolic demands are high and administration of enteral nutrition is limited by immaturity of the gastrointestinal tract. The amino acid glutamine plays an important role in maintaining functional integrity of the gut. In

  7. The Role of the Enteral Route and the Composition of Feeds in the Nutritional Support of Malnourished Surgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Gianotti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In surgical patients, malnutrition is an important risk factor for post-operative complications. In undernourished patients undergoing major gastrointestinal procedures, preoperative enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred whenever feasible. It may be given either orally or by feeding tubes, depending on patient compliance. Early oral intake after surgery should be encouraged, but if an insufficient postoperative oral intake is anticipated, tube feeding should be initiated as soon as possible. The use of immunomodulating formulas offers significant advantages when compared to standard feeds and the positive results on postoperative complications seem independent from the baseline nutritional status. In malnourished patients, the optimal timing and dose of immunonutrition is unclear, but consistent data suggest that they should be treated peri-operatively for at least two weeks.

  8. Endoscopic gastrostomy for enteral nutrition in neurogenic dysphagia: Application of a nasogastric tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitines, Gennaro; Ugenti, Ippazio; Memeo, Riccardo; Clemente, Nicola; Iambrenghi, Onofrio Caputi

    2009-01-01

    Enteral nutrition can be administered via a nasogastric tube or, in selected patients, via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. In patients with neurogenic dysphagia, the choice of nutritional administration, and above all the timing, are crucial. Our aim was to retrospectively assess the impact of new guidelines for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion adopted since January 2002 and compare them with our previous experience. From January 1992 to June 2007, 285 gastrostomies (168 M, 117 F) were positioned in our institute. We analysed 232 patients (139 M, 93 F) in whom a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was applied for neurogenic dysphagia: Group A (from January 1992 to December 2001) consisting of 174 patients; Group B (from January 2002 to June 2007) consisting of 58 patients. The percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was positioned in all the cases with neurogenic dysphagia after a period of not less than 3 weeks of nutrition by nasogastric tube. A total of 6 major complications (2.3 %) occurred, almost all in group A. The mortality rate (3 patients, 2%) correlated with the complications in group A. In cases of neurogenic dysphagia we believe that greater methodological rigour in the multidisciplinary decision-making process, and a period of about 6-8 weeks' nutrition by nasogastric tube after the acute neurological damage may be useful to ensure a better prognostic evaluation of the patient and hence of the indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  9. A method for implementation of nutritional therapy in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Kondrup, Jens; Staun, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background & aims: Many barriers make implementation of nutritional therapy difficult in hospitals. In this study we investigated whether, a targeted plan made by the staff in different departments could improve nutritional treatment within selected quality goals based on the ESPEN screening...... to study including the use of screening of nutritional risk (NRS-2002), whether a nutrition plan was made, and monitoring was documented in the records. (2) Intervention: multidisciplinary meeting for the ward staff using a PC-based meeting system for detecting barriers in the department concerning...... nutrition, elaboration of an action plan and implementation of the plan. (3) Re-measurement: as in (1) based on information from records and patient interviews, and an evaluation based on focus group interview with the staff. Patients who gave informed consent to participate in the study (>14 years) were...

  10. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue sampl...

  11. Nutrition therapy: Integral part of liver transplant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastácio, Lucilene Rezende; Davisson Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson

    2016-01-28

    Managing malnutrition before liver transplantation (LTx) while on the waiting list and, excessive weight gain/metabolic disturbances in post-surgery are still a challenge in LTx care. The aim of this review is to support an interdisciplinary nutrition approach of these patients. Cirrhotic patients are frequently malnourished before LTx and this is associated with a poor prognosis. Although the relation between nutritional status versus survival, successful operation and recovery after LTx is well established, prevalence of malnutrition before the operation is still very high. Emerging research has also demonstrated that sarcopenia pre and post-transplant is highly prevalent, despite the weight gain in the postoperative period. The diagnosis of the nutritional status is the first step to address the adequate nutritional therapy. Nutritional recommendations and therapy to manage the nutritional status of LTx patients are discussed in this review, regarding counseling on adequate diets and findings of the latest research on using certain immunonutrients in these patients (branched chain amino-acids, pre and probiotics). Nutrition associated complications observed after transplantation is also described. They are commonly related to the adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs, leading to hyperkalemia, hyperglycemia and weight gain. Excessive weight gain and post-transplant metabolic disorders have long been described in post-LTx and should be addressed in order to reduce associated morbidity and mortality.

  12. Psychometric properties of DAPonDEN: definitions, attitudes and practices in relation to diarrhea during enteral nutrition questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Hazreen A; Bin Sidek, Muhamad Adam; Chinna, Karuthan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the psychometric properties of the developed 21 item questionnaire to measure definitions, attitudes and management practices in relation to diarrhea during enteral nutrition (DAPonDEN). Data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis from a cross sectional study of 102 nurses aged 18 and over, conducted from December 2011 to February 2012 in Malaysia. Face and content validity of DAPonDEN were first evaluated by few expert panels and patients. For this study, adult nurses were recruited from the adult wards. In the final model, three items in DAPonDEN were dropped. In the exploratory factor analysis, five factors were extracted that explained a total of 55% of the variation in the remaining 18 items. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) value was 0.723. For definition, there were two underlying factors: 'Key items in defining diarrhea' and 'non-key items in defining diarrhea'. For attitude there was a single factor. For practice, there were two underlying factors: 'enteral nutrition (EN) related' and 'awareness related'. The items in each of the underlying dimensions seem to measure the respective concepts for definition, attitude and practices adequately. The 18-items DAPonDEN instrument can be a suitable education tool to be used in relation to diarrhea during EN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Effects of continuous early enteral nutrition on the gut barrier function in dogs with acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing-Peng; Liu, Pi; Wu, Ka; Xu, Min; Yu, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Gen-Sheng

    2004-10-17

    To evaluate the effects of continuous early enteral nutrition on the gut barrier function in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Thirty mongrel dogs underwent laparotomy and 5% mixed solution of sodium taurocholate with trypsin was infused into the pancreatic ducts so as to induce model of ANP. Permanent duodenal and jejunal fistulas were retained. Then the 30 dogs were randomly divided into 6 groups of 5 dogs: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group, normal saline (NS) group, duodenal nutrison multifibre (DN) group, duodenal PEPTI-2000Varient (DP) group, jejunal nutrison multifibre (JN) group, and jejunal PEPTI-2000Varient (JP) group, the last 4 groups being called enteral nutrition (EN) group together. Infusion of nutritional solutions was performed via the duodenal or jejunal fistulas, beginning 24 hours after the operation and lasting for 5 days. The levels of endotoxin and D-(-)-lactate in the peripheral plasma were measured every day. On the days 2 and 5 after the operation test solution to measure the enteral permeability, containing lactulose and mannitol, was infused via the fistulas and then urine within 6 hours thereafter was collected to detect the concentrations of lactulose and mannitol and calculate the lactulose/mannitol ratio. Seven days after the operation the dogs were killed to take the pancreas and intestines to be examined by microscopy. Feces was collected. ERIC-PCR fingerprint method was used to examine the structure and distribution of ERIC series of the microbial communities in the gut. The plasma D-(-)-lactate of the NS group gradually increased and peaked on the 5th day after the operation, and that of the TPN group gradually increased too, however, lower than that of the NS group at any time points and was significantly lower on the 5th day (P dogs. However, the makeup and distribution of intestinal microbial in the TPN groups were quite different from those of the normal dogs. EN helps maintain gut mucosal barrier, decreases endotoxin

  14. Nutrição enteral: diferenças entre volume, calorias e proteínas prescritos e administrados em adultos Enteral nutrition: differences between volume, energy and protein prescribed and administered in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelli Cristina Silva de Assis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Diferentes condições determinam que pacientes críticos recebam volumes, aportes energéticos e protéicos de nutrição enteral menores que o prescrito. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a diferença entre a nutrição enteral prescrita e administrada a adultos internados em centro de terapia intensiva. MÉTODOS: Durante 30 dias de 2009, pacientes foram acompanhados do início do uso de nutrição enteral até a sua suspensão, ou até a alta do centro de terapia intensiva. Foram usados testes paramétricos e não paramétricos para identificar diferenças entre o prescrito e administrado. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 85 pacientes, com 58,6±18,0 anos, sendo 40% do sexo masculino, que permaneceram internados por 29,5 dias (IQ: 15,2 - 48,7 e utilizaram nutrição enteral por 10 (IQ: 4,2 - 27,5 dias. Os pacientes receberam menos volume (-428±243 ml/dia, calorias (-665±412 Kcal/dia e proteínas (-30±19 g de proteína/dia do que prescrito. Quando avaliadas as diferenças diárias entre o prescrito e o administrado para cada paciente, observou-se que cerca de 40% do volume não foi administrado. Os principais motivos para interrupção da dieta foram: náuseas e vômitos, distensão abdominal, constipação e complicações clínicas (52%; realização de procedimentos diagnósticos (41,6%; e transição para via oral (5,6%. CONCLUSÃO: Pacientes internados em centro de terapia intensiva recebem menos nutrição enteral que o prescrito. A rotina de cuidados e a ocorrência de complicações do trato gastrointestinal motivam interrupções da nutrição enteral, contribuindo para que pacientes de centro de terapia intensiva recebam menor aporte calórico do que prescrito.OBJECTIVES: Different conditions require that critically ill patients to receive lower than prescribed enteral nutrition volumes, energy and protein. This study objective was to evaluate the prescribed versus administered enteral nutrition difference in adults

  15. Nutrition in children posttransplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    early posttransplant nutritional therapy facilitates wound healing, decreases infectious complications and shortens ventilation time. Parenteral nutrition is needed if there is prolonged postoperative ileus or if gastrointestinal complications of surgery limit enteral feeding. All transplant patients require nutritional follow up to ...

  16. Tratamento nutricional da bulimia nervosa Nutritional therapy for bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marle dos Santos Alvarenga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A bulimia nervosa é um transtorno alimentar caracterizado por compulsões alimentares e métodos compen-satórios recorrentes. Os pacientes apresentam ingestão alimentar inadequada e comportamentos alimentares disfuncionais. O adequado tratamento do transtorno requer uma equipe multiprofissional e terapia nutricional especializada. Compreender as características desse transtorno, os padrões de consumo e o comportamento alimentar, bem como atentar para as atitudes alimentares dos pacientes, é fundamental para o planejamento e para a adequada condução da abordagem nutricional. A terapia nutricional para esse transtorno é diferenciada, exigindo do nutricionista maiores habilidades de aconselhamento nutricional. Educação nutricional e acon-selhamento nutricional, com ênfase na abordagem de atitudes alimentares e insatisfação corporal, são o foco da terapia nutricional. Para o atendimento eficaz desses pacientes e o sucesso no tratamento nutricional, é importante que o profissional se mantenha atualizado sobre nutrição e transtornos alimentares e procure especialização e experiência nessa área do conhecimento.Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating and compensatory behaviors. The patients present inappropriate food intake and dysfunctional eating behaviors. Proper treatment of this disorder requires a multidisciplinary team and specialized nutrition therapy. It is fundamental to understand the characteristics of this disorder, the intake patterns and the eating behavior, and be attentive to the eating attitudes of these patients to plan and conduct a nutritional approach properly. The nutrition therapy for this disorder is specific and demands greater skillfulness in nutrition counseling from the dietician. Nutrition therapy focuses on nutrition education and nutrition counseling, mainly addressing eating attitudes and dissatisfaction with body image. The professional must keep abreast on nutrition and

  17. Improving the Process of Enteral Nutrition Preparation With Milk Technicians: Perceptions of Cost, Time, and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Whitney W; Cunningham, Craig A; Brandon, Debra H; Hoehn, Valerie; Carter, Brigit

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal intensive care nurses have historically been responsible for preparing enteral feedings--a costly and time-consuming process that may require leaving the bedside. To address these concerns, the Milk Technician Program was implemented at a major military treatment facility. Milk technicians were specially trained and responsible for handling, storing, and preparing enteral feeds. To determine effectiveness of the Milk Technician Program, changes in length of time required to first attain full feeds, cost of feeding preparation, adherence to feeding preparation procedures, and nurse and milk technician role variables were evaluated. A pre-/postdesign was used to compare length of time to full enteral feedings and cost. A plan-do-study-act design was used to evaluate protocol adherence and to identify and evaluate nurse and milk technician role variables. Data were collected via surveys, direct observations, and retrospective chart reviews to determine the overall effectiveness of this intervention. The average time for extremely and very preterm infants (milk technician adherence to preparation procedures was 95.5%. Most nurses reported that the program saved time (97%) and all milk technicians reported improved job satisfaction. Nurses expressed concerns about accuracy and safety of preparation. Milk technicians reported concerns with communication, supplies, and lack of perceived support. Milk technicians offer significant benefit to infants and nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit, including reducing time for infants to reach full feeds, saving nurses' time, and reducing costs. Further research is needed to identify ideal educational backgrounds for milk technicians and to directly measure the effect of milk technicians on hospital length of stay and infant growth parameters.

  18. Nutrition therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and related nutritional complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Amanda Carla; Bezerra, Olívia Maria de Paula Alves

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible airway obstruction. The innumerable complications that occur during the progression of the disease can affect the nutritional state of patients suffering from this illness. The objective of this study was to present a brief review of the literature regarding the nutrition therapy used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To that end, we performed a bibliographic search for related articles published within the last 18 years and indexed for the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and Medline databases. Malnutrition is associated with a poor prognosis for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, since it predisposes such patients to infections, as well as reducing respiratory muscle force, exercise tolerance and quality of life. Despite the fact that such malnutrition is extremely common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, it should be recognized as an independent risk factor, since it can be modified through appropriate and efficacious diet therapy and monitoring. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nutrition therapy is initiated after the evaluation of the nutritional state of the patient, which identifies nutritional risk, thereby allowing the proper level of treatment to be established. In this evaluation, anthropometric and biochemical markers, as well as indicators of dietary consumption and body composition, should be used. The prescribed diet should contain appropriate proportions of macronutrients, micronutrients and immunonutrients in order to regain or maintain the proper nutritional state and to avoid complications. The physical characteristics of the diet should be tailored to the individual needs and tolerances of each patient. In the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  19. [The registry of home artificial nutrition and ambulatory of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition; SWOT analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanden-Berghe, C; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Lobo Tamer, G; Calleja Fernández, A; Gómez Candela, C; Zugasti Murillo, A; Apezetxea Celaya, A; Torres Corts, A; Moreno Villarés, J M; de Luis, D; Penacho, Ma Á; Laborda, L; Burgos, R; Irles, J A; Cuerda Compes, C; Virgili Casas, Ma N; Martínez Olmos, M A; García Luna, P P

    2012-01-01

    To evidence by means of a SWOT-R analysis performed by an expert consensus the most worrying characteristics of the register on Home-based and Outpatient Artificial Nutrition. SWOT-R analysis with expert consensus. We requested the participation of the active members of the NADYA group within the last 5 years with the premise of structuring the SWOT-R based on the characteristics of the NADYA registry from its beginning. 18 experts from hospitals all over Spain have participated. The internal analysis seems to be positive, presenting the registry as having important resources. The external analysis did not show a great number of threats, there are very potent factors, "the voluntariness" of the registry and the "dependence on external financing". The opportunities identified are important. The recommendations are aimed at stabilizing the system by decreasing the threats as one of the main focus of the strategies to develop as well as promoting the items identified as opportunities and strengths. The analysis shows that the NADYA register shows a big potentiality for improvement. The proposed recommendations should be structured in order to stay on the track of development and quality improvement that has characterized the NADYA register from the beginning.

  20. Nutrition Therapy for Liver Diseases Based on the Status of Nutritional Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Yasutake, Kenichiro; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Nakashima, Manabu; Kotoh, Kazuhiro; Nakamuta, Makoto; Enjoji, Munechika

    2012-01-01

    The dietary intake of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is generally characterized by high levels of carbohydrate, fat, and/or cholesterol, and these dietary patterns influence hepatic lipid metabolism in the patients. Therefore, careful investigation of dietary habits could lead to better nutrition therapy in NAFLD patients. The main treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is interferon-based antiviral therapy, which often causes a decrease in appetite and energy intake;...

  1. Use of nicotine replacement therapy in young people entering custody in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haysom, Leigh; Lawrence, Dianne; Mellish, Donna; Burns, Peter; Khale, Pariza; Arulampalam, Ariana; Stapylton, Catherine

    2017-07-01

    To describe the prevalence of nicotine dependence and acceptance of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in young people entering custody, where smoking is not allowed. Cross-sectional study in 2013. All New South Wales Juvenile Justice Centres. Incarcerated youth, aged 12-21 years. gender, age, ethnicity, cannabis use. rates of smoking, cannabis use, nicotine dependence, NRT acceptance. Data were collected from 252 Initial Reception Assessments (90.1% male, 56.3% Aboriginal, mean age 16.6 years ± 1.2 standard deviation). According to Fagerstrom screening, 207 (82.1%) young people smoked cigarettes immediately prior to their current incarceration, and of the smokers, 78 (38.4%) were nicotine dependent. Most young people (76.4%) were also daily cannabis users, with 85.6% of cigarette smokers also using cannabis daily. NRT (as 24-h nicotine patches prescribed for 2 weeks) was offered to 54 nicotine dependent and 7 non-dependent young people. Only 13 (21.3%) young people accepted NRT (all daily cannabis-using males), and only 2 young people completed the full prescription. Reasons for refusing or not completing NRT were a fear of 'weird dreams', sleeping issues or that it was no longer needed. Many young people entering custody are nicotine-dependent cigarette smokers and daily cannabis users, and are at high risk of nicotine withdrawal on abstinence. NRT as patch therapy has poor acceptance in this group, except in young men who are daily cannabis users. Screening for nicotine dependence in high-risk young people should include questions about cannabis use, and alternatives to patch therapy deserve further research. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Inadvertent exaggerated anticoagulation following use of bismuth subsalicylate in an enterally fed patient receiving warfarin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Angela L; Brown, Rex O; Dickerson, Roland N

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of an inadvertent increase in the international normalized ratio (INR) after the addition of bismuth subsalicylate for the treatment of diarrhea in an enterally fed patient receiving warfarin therapy. A 56-year-old Caucasian female presented to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) with multiple lower extremity fractures. Warfarin was initiated for deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis due to the patient's inability to ambulate. The target INR was 2-3. Continuous intragastric enteral feeding was withheld 1 hour before and 1 hour after intragastric administration of warfarin. Bismuth subsalicylate 30 mL every 4 hours was prescribed for diarrhea. Within 3 days after starting bismuth subsalicylate therapy, the patient's INR increased from 2.56 to 3.54 and minor bleeding was noted from the patient's tracheostomy site. No significant change in warfarin dosage, variability in vitamin K intake, or medications that potentially alter warfarin metabolism were present during the unexpected rise in INR. When the bismuth subsalicylate was discontinued, the patient's INR stabilized into the target range on the same warfarin dose given at the time of the supratherapeutic INR. Salicylate displaces warfarin from plasma protein binding sites and may result in a significant increase in INR secondary to redistribution of warfarin to the free active form. Evaluation of this case report using the Drug Interaction Probability Scale and Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale yielded scores consistent with a probable adverse drug interaction. Bismuth subsalicylate exaggerates warfarin's anticoagulant response and its concurrent use during warfarin therapy should be avoided.

  3. Retrospective evaluation of the impact of early enteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in dogs with pancreatitis: 34 cases (2010-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica P; Parnell, Nolie K; Griffith, Emily H; Saker, Korinn E

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of early enteral nutritional therapy on time to return to voluntary intake, maximum food consumption, incidence of gastrointestinal intolerance (GI), and total hospitalization time for dogs with acute pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of dogs with pancreatitis at a veterinary teaching hospital between 2010 and 2013. Thirty-four client-owned dogs diagnosed with acute or acute-on-chronic pancreatitis. Medical records of dogs evaluated for inappetence, anorexia, and GI for which a diagnosis of pancreatitis was recorded were reviewed. The time to initiation of food offerings since hospitalization were recorded in addition to signalment, historical medical conditions, chief complaint, physical examination findings, diagnostic results, treatments provided, timing of food offering (within 48 h of hospitalization, early feeding group (EFG) versus delayed feeding group (DFG), diet therapy (low fat versus high fat), caloric intake (% resting energy requirement), incidence of GI (%), and length of hospitalization (LOH) (days). A Clinical Severity Index Score (CSIS) was determined for each patient. Dogs in the EFG demonstrated a decreased time to return of voluntary intake (2.1 days, EFG versus 2.7 days, DFG; P = 0.05) and time (days) to maximum intake (3, EFG versus 3.4 DFG) as compared to the DFG dogs. The DFG exhibited more GI versus EFG irrespective of CSIS grouping (60% versus 26%, P = 0.04). A CSIS ≥ 7 was associated with prolonged LOH (P = 0.004); however, time to initiation of feeding and diet selection did not impact LOH (P = 0.8). Results of the study suggested that feeding within 48 hours of hospitalization for canine pancreatitis has a positive impact on return to voluntary intake and decreases the frequency of GI in these patients, independent of CSIS. The traditional protocol of withholding food during hospitalization may not be necessary nor yield the most benefit for patient recovery; subsequently early enteral refeeding should be

  4. A disease-specific enteral nutrition formula improves nutritional status and functional performance in patients with head and neck and esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy: results of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietkau, Rainer; Lewitzki, Victor; Kuhnt, Thomas; Hölscher, Tobias; Hess, Clemens-F; Berger, Bernhard; Wiegel, Thomas; Rödel, Claus; Niewald, Marcus; Hermann, Robert M; Lubgan, Dorota

    2013-09-15

    In patients with head and neck and esophageal tumors, nutritional status may deteriorate during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of enteral nutrition enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on body composition and nutritional and functional status. In a controlled, randomized, prospective, double-blind, multicenter study, 111 patients with head and neck and esophageal cancer undergoing concurrent CRT received either an enteral standard nutrition (control group) or disease-specific enteral nutrition Supportan®-containing EPA+DHA (experimental group) via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. The primary endpoint was the change of body cell mass (BCM) following CRT at weeks 7 and 14 compared with the baseline value. Secondary endpoints were additional parameters of body composition, anthropometric parameters, and nutritional and functional status. The primary endpoint of the study, improvement in BCM, reached borderline statistical significance. Following CRT, patients with experimental nutrition lost only 0.82 ± 0.64 kg of BCM compared with 2.82 ± 0.77 kg in the control group (P = .055). The objectively measured nutritional parameters, such as body weight and fat-free mass, showed a tendency toward improvement, but the differences were not significant. The subjective parameters, in particular the Kondrup score (P = .0165) and the subjective global assessment score (P = .0065) after follow-up improved significantly in the experimental group, compared with the control group. Both enteral regimens were safe and well tolerated. Enteral nutrition with EPA and DHA may be advantageous in patients with head and neck or esophageal cancer by improving parameters of nutritional and functional status during CRT. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  5. Fermented liquid feed - Microbial and nutritional aspects and impact on enteric diseases in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canibe, Nuria; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2012-01-01

    , an interesting feeding strategy; (3) the policies aiming at increasing production of renewable biofuel with a corresponding increase in liquid co-products from the bioethanol industry, suitable for liquid feeding; (4) environmental policies aiming at decreasing disposal of waste, for example, liquid co......The use of liquid feed in pig nutrition has recently gained interest due to several reasons: (1) the political wish of decreasing the use of antibiotics in pig production; (2) the current fluctuations in feed prices what makes liquid feed, with the possibility of using cheap liquid ingredients......-products from the food/pharmaceutical/biofuel industry, that can be included in liquid feeding. In order to obtain fermented liquid feed (FLF) of good microbial quality, that is, biosafe, fresh feed and water are mixed with material from a previous successful fermentation, which acts as inoculum for the new...

  6. The Effect of Emodin-Assisted Early Enteral Nutrition on Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Secondary Hepatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP characterized by atrocious progression and numerous complications often leads to a high mortality rate due to hypermetabolism, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, and multiple organs dysfunction syndrome (MODS. Studies have revealed that both early enteral nutrition (EEN and emodin are potent agents in the management of SAP. However, whether the combined strategy is rational and more effective than either one alone remains unknown. In this regard, Wistar rats were treated with emodin-assisted EEN (EAEEN through enteral nutrient tubes after induction of SAP by retrograde infusion of 5.0% sodium taurocholate into the common pancreatic duct. Serum levels of amylase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, angiotensin II (AngII, maleic dialdehyde (MDA, glutamic pyruvic transaminase (ALT, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (AST and C-reactive protein (CRP, intestinal secretory IgA (SIgA, pancreatic and hepatic myeloperoxidase (MPO activity as well as plasma levels of D-lactate and endotoxin were measured. In addition, pathologic alterations of pancreas and liver were observed microscopically. We found that EAEEN could significantly ameliorate these parameters and prevent pancreas and liver from serious damage. In conclusion, Our results indicated that EAEEN could exert beneficial effects on experimental SAP and obviously abate the severity of secondary hepatic injury. The combined strategy was safe and more effective than either one alone in the acute stage of SAP. This study also provided an experimental base for the clinical treatment of SAP patients with EAEEN.

  7. Effect of exclusive enteral nutrition on health-related quality of life for adults with active Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Wu, Rong; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-08-01

    Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is an effective and safe remission induction treatment for Crohn's disease in adults. Its influence on adults' health-related quality of life remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of EEN on health-related quality of life in adults with active Crohn's disease. Patients recruited were treated with a polymeric enteral feed that was taken orally in the daytime and via a self-intubated nasogastric tube at night for 4 weeks. Prospective evaluation of disease activity (Crohn's Disease Activity Index, CDAI) and health-related quality of life (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, IBDQ) were performed at enrollment and after 4 weeks of treatment. Patients' feelings about EEN were also investigated through 2 questions. Thirteen patients were treated with 4-week EEN. They had a significant improvement in total IBDQ score (P disease relapsed. The IBDQ correlated significantly with the CDAI at 4 weeks. A 4-week treatment of EEN improves health-related quality of life significantly in adults with active Crohn's disease and was acceptable by most patients.

  8. Malassezia Pneumonia: A Rare Complication of Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richelle M; Stegink, Ryan J; Manaloor, John J; Schmitt, Bryan H; Stevens, John C; Christenson, John C

    2016-11-01

    Malassezia species (formerly known as Pityrosporum) are part of normal human skin flora and have been associated with benign dermatologic conditions, such as seborrheic dermatitis and tinea versicolor. In rare cases, however, Malassezia has been associated with systemic disease in immunocompromised patients and infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Malassezia species require long-chain fatty acids for growth and therefore have a known predilection for individuals receiving lipid containing intravenous parenteral nutrition (PN). Systemic infections are characterized by prolonged fevers and illness but can include nonspecific signs and symptoms. We present the diagnosis and management of a rare case of an immunocompetent, nonneonatal, PN-dependent child with Malassezia furfur pneumonia. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Preoperative Enteral Nutritional Support in Patients Undergoing Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hui; Bian, Xiaojie; Mao, Liang; Zi, Xuejian; Yan, Xiaopeng; Qiu, Yudong

    2015-11-01

    To compare the short-term outcomes between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with and those without preoperative nutrition on the basis of postoperative enteral nutrition.HCC patients with postoperative enteral nutrition who underwent liver resection between February 2010 and December 2014 in Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital were considered for the study: 43 patients with and 36 patients without preoperative nutrition. Primary endpoint was the incidence of overall complications. Secondary endpoints were infectious and major complications.In the preoperative enteral nutrition group, shorter length of postoperative hospital stay (10.5 ± 2.7 versus 13.7 ± 6.3 days, P = 0.007), less exogenous albumin infusion (10.2 ± 22.4 versus 47.8 ± 97.7 g, P = 0.030), earlier first exhaust time (2.7 ± 0.8 versus 3.0 ± 0.9 days, P = 0.043), and first defection time (3.5 ± 0.9 versus 4.4 ± 1.4 days, P = 0.001) were observed. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of overall complications (32.6% versus 52.8%, P = 0.070), infectious complications (7.0% versus 8.3%, P = 1), and major complications (14.0% versus 11.1%, P = 0.969) between the preoperative enteral nutrition and control group.Preoperative enteral nutrition could improve short-term outcomes of HCC patients via accelerating the recovery of gastrointestinal function and shortening the length of postoperative hospital stay.

  10. MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY IN MANAGEMENT OF EATING DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Miloš Pavlović; Maja Nikolić; Milica M. Vojinović

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of eating disorders demands a comprehensive medical approach, where a dietitian has an important role, primarily due to numerous instances of malnutrition. The objective of this paper was to recapitulate the research findings and clinical evidence which show the importance of medical nutrition therapy in the treatment of eating disorders; furthermore, they present significant guidelines for clinical practice. The research methods have entailed a thorough exploration of literatu...

  11. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal permeability in very-low-birth-weight infants : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; Fetter, Willem P. F.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Vegt, Ina M.; van der Molen, Hilda R. A.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on intestinal integrity. The lower infection rate in VLBW infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may originate from improved intestinal integrity, as

  12. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal permeability in very-low-birth-weight infants: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; Fetter, Willem P. F.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Vegt, Ina M.; van der Molen, Hilda R. A.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on intestinal integrity. The lower infection rate in VLBW infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may originate from improved intestinal integrity, as

  13. Quality evaluation of Persian nutrition and diet therapy websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Zahra; Papi, Ahmad; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays websites are among the most important information sources used by most people. With the spread of websites, especially those related to health issues, the number of their visitors also increases, more than half of which are about nutritional information. Therefore, quality analysis of nutrition and diet therapy websites is of outmost importance. This study aims to evaluate the quality of Persian nutrition and diet therapy websites. The current work is a survey study and uses an applied study method. The statistical population consists of 51 Persian websites about nutrition and diet therapy and census method was used in order to study them. Data gathering was done using a checklist and with direct visit to each website. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyse the gathered data with the help of SPSS 21 software. Findings showed that content (66.7%), organization (82.4%), user friendly interfaces (52.9%) and total quality (70.6%) of most websites had a mediocre score while the design score for most of the websites (70.6%) was acceptable also organizational websites had better design, organization and quality compared to private websites. The three websites with the highest general quality score were the websites of "Novel Diet Therapy," "Behsite" and "Dr. BehdadiPour" (jointly) and "Dr. Kermani" respectively. Also in the dimension of content the factors of goal, relevance and credibility, in the dimension of design the factors of color, text and sound, pictures and videos, in the dimension of organization the factors of stability and indexing and in the dimension of user friendliness the factors of confidentiality, credibility and personalization had the highest scores. The results showed that the design score was higher than other scores. Also the general quality score of the websites was mediocre and was not desirable. Also websites didn't have suitable scores in every factor. Since most people search the internet for nutritional and diet

  14. Effects of the Exclusive Enteral Nutrition on the Microbiota Profile of Patients with Crohn’s Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Simona; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Franceschini, Elisa; Annibali, Roberta; Albano, Veronica; De Angelis, Maria; Lionetti, Maria Elena; Catassi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the efficacy of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) in Crohn’s disease (CD) remain poorly understood, despite the high rate of treatment response. Evidence accumulated in the last 20 years suggests that a positive shift of the disrupted microbiota is one of the treatment effects. The purpose of this study was to critically review and summarize data reporting the microbiological effects of EEN in patients with CD. Fourteen studies were considered in the review, overall involving 216 CD patients on EEN. The studies were heterogeneous in methods of microbiota analysis and exclusion criteria. The most frequently reported effect of EEN was a reduction in microbiota diversity, reversible when patients returned to a normal diet. The effect of EEN on specific bacteria was very variable in the different studies, partially due to methodological limitations of the mentioned studies. The EEN seem to induce some metabolomic changes, which are different in long-term responder patients compared to patients that relapse earlier. Bacterial changes can be relevant to explaining the efficacy of EEN; however, microbiological data obtained from rigorously performed studies and derived from last generation techniques are largely inconsistent. PMID:28777338

  15. [Preferences for the attributes of home enteral nutrition (HEN) in Spain. Do caregivers know their patients' preferences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira, Gabriel; Martínez-Olmos, Miguel Ángel; Fernández de Bobadilla, Belén; Ferrer, Mercedes; Virgili, Nuria; Vega, Belén; Blanco, Mercedes; Layola, Miquel; Lizán, Luis; Aceituno, Susana

    2017-10-24

    Establishing a home enteral nutrition (HEN) that is adapted to the patient's needs and preferences can improve their quality of life and adherence, contributing to a higher treatment efficiency, better prognosis and cost reduction. As in most cases, patients need total or partial help from their caregivers, and there is a need for evaluating how well do caregivers know their patients' priorities. Exploring patients' preferences for HEN characteristics in Spain, and the concordance between patients and caregivers. A cross-sectional observational study based on the discrete choice experiment methodology. A set of eight choice scenarios generated from six attributes with two levels each was presented along with an ad hoc questionnaire on the importance and satisfaction with HEN. The relative importance (RI) of each attribute and the patient-caregiver concordance was estimated in every question. One hundred and forty-eight patients participated, and in 77 cases both the patient and the caregiver took the survey. The most important attributes (RI) for HEN were adaptation to comorbidities (33%), tolerability (33%), nutrients and calories (26%) and package characteristics (8%). Patients showed a high degree of satisfaction with the assistance received. Concordance between patient and caregiver was found in every question, being it moderate to good. According to patients, an ideal HEN product would be adaptable to comorbidities, easy to tolerate, providing the necessary nutrients and calories, with an easy to handle package. Caregivers know well their patients' preferences.

  16. Nutritional therapy for the management of diabetic gastroparesis: clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiya A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Amena SadiyaLifestyle Clinic, Rashid Centre for Diabetes and Research, Ministry of Health, Ajman, United Arab EmiratesAbstract: Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP, or slow emptying of the stomach, is a well-established complication of diabetes mellitus and is typically considered to occur in individuals with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical consequences of DGP include induction of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (early satiety, abdominal distension, reflux, stomach spasm, postprandial nausea, vomiting, alteration in drug absorption, and destabilization of glycemic control (due to mismatched postprandial glycemic and insulin peaks. Effective nutritional management not only helps in alleviating the symptoms, but also in facilitating better glycemic control. Although there have been no evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the nutrition care process of the DGP, the current dietary recommendations are based on expert opinions or observational studies. The dietary management of gastroparesis needs to be tailored according to the severity of malnutrition and kind of upper GI symptom by changing the volume, consistency, frequency, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates in the meal. Small frequent meals, using more liquid calories, reducing high fat or high fiber, consuming bezoar forming foods, and adjusting meal carbohydrates based on medications or insulin helps in improving the upper GI symptoms and glycemic control. Enteral nutrition can be an option for patients who fail to stabilize their weight loss, or for those who cannot gain weight with oral feedings, while total parenteral nutrition is rarely necessary for the patient with gastroparesis.Keywords: diabetic gastroparesis, delayed gastric emptying, diabetes mellitus, bezoar, GI symptoms, glycemic control

  17. Nutrición enteral total vs. nutrición parenteral total en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave Total enteral nutrition vs. total parenteral nutrition in patients with severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Casas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar la eficacia de la instauración precoz de nutrición enteral total (NET frente a nutrición parenteral total (NPT en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave (PAG. Métodos: estudio prospectivo aleatorio. Se incluyeron consecutivamente 22 pacientes con PAG aplicando los criterios APACHE II, valores de PCR y graduación de Balthazar en la TC. El grupo I (n = 11 recibió NPT y el grupo II (n = 12 NET. Se valoró la respuesta inflamatoria (PCR, TNF-alfa, IL-6, las proteínas viscerales (pre-albúmina, albúmina, la tasa de complicaciones (síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica, fallo multiorgánico, infecciones, las intervenciones quirúrgicas, la estancia hospitalaria y la mortalidad. Resultados: no hubo diferencias significativas en los primeros 10 días entre los dos grupos en la evolución de los criterios APACHE II, en las concentraciones de PCR, TNF-alfa e IL-6 ni tampoco en los valores de pre-albúmina y albúmina. Siete pacientes del grupo I presentaron complicaciones graves frente a 4 del grupo II. Requirieron intervención quirúrgica 3 pacientes del grupo I. La estancia hospitalaria fue similar en los dos grupos. Dos pacientes del grupo I fallecieron. Conclusiones: se ha observado una tendencia a una mejor evolución de los pacientes con PAG que utilizaron NET frente a los que utilizaron NPT.Objective: to compare the efficacy of early total enteral nutrition (TEN vs. total parenteral nutrition (TPN in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Methods: a total of 22 consecutive patients with SAP were randomized to receive TPN (group I or TEN (group II. SAP was defined applying APACHE II score, C-reactive protein (CRP measurements and/or Balthazar CT scan score. Acute inflammatory response (CRP, TNF-alpha, IL-6, visceral proteins (pre-albumin, albumin, complications (systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiorgan failure, infections, surgical interventions, length of hospital stay and mortality were

  18. Effects of enteral and intravenous fluid therapy, magnesium sulfate, and sodium sulfate on colonic contents and feces in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marco A F; White, Nathaniel A; Donaldson, Lydia; Crisman, Mark V; Ward, Daniel L

    2004-05-01

    To assess changes in systemic hydration, concentrations of electrolytes in plasma, hydration of colonic contents and feces, and gastrointestinal transit in horses treated with IV fluid therapy or enteral administration of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), sodium sulfate (NaSO4), water, or a balanced electrolyte solution. 7 horses with fistulas in the right dorsal colon (RDC). In a crossover design, horses alternately received 1 of 6 treatments: no treatment (control); IV fluid therapy with lactated Ringer's solution; or enteral administration of MgSO4, Na2SO4, water, or a balanced electrolyte solution via nasogastric intubation. Physical examinations were performed and samples of blood, RDC contents, and feces were collected every 6 hours during the 48 hour-observation period. Horses were muzzled for the initial 24 hours but had access to water ad libitum. Horses had access to hay, salt, and water ad libitum for the last 24 hours. Enteral administration of a balanced electrolyte solution and Na2SO4 were the best treatments for promoting hydration of RDC contents, followed by water. Sodium sulfate was the best treatment for promoting fecal hydration, followed by MgSO4 and the balanced electrolyte solution. Sodium sulfate caused hypocalcemia and hypernatremia, and water caused hyponatremia. Enteral administration of a balanced electrolyte solution promoted hydration of RDC contents and may be useful in horses with large colon impactions. Enteral administration of either Na2SO4 or water may promote hydration of RDC contents but can cause severe electrolyte imbalances.

  19. Additional oligofructose/inulin does not increase faecal bifidobacteria in critically ill patients receiving enteral nutrition: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Hazreen A; Cole, Jayne; Emery, Peter W; Whelan, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    Patients with diarrhoea during enteral nutrition (EN) have been shown to have low faecal bifidobacteria concentrations. Oligofructose/inulin selectively stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria in healthy humans. This study investigates the effect of additional oligofructose/inulin on the gastrointestinal microbiota, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and faecal output in patients receiving EN. Adult patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who were starting EN with a formula containing fibre were randomised to receive 7 g/d of additional oligofructose/inulin or an identically packaged placebo (maltodextrin). A fresh faecal sample was collected at baseline and following at least 7 days of supplementation. Faecal microbiota were analysed using fluorescent in-situ hybridisation and faecal output was monitored daily. Twenty-two patients (mean age 71 years) completed at least 7 days of intervention (mean 12 days). At the end of the intervention, there were no significant differences in the concentrations of bifidobacteria between the groups, after adjusting for baseline values (oligofructose/inulin 6.9 + 1.4, placebo 7.8 + 1.3 log10 cells/g dry faeces, P > 0.05), but there were significantly lower concentrations of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (7.0 + 1.0 vs. 8.4 + 1.3 log10 cells/g, P = 0.01) and Bacteroides-Prevotella (9.1 + 1.0 vs. 9.9 + 0.9 log10 cells/g, P = 0.05) in patients receiving additional oligofructose/inulin. There were no differences in faecal concentrations of any SCFA, secretory IgA, daily faecal score or incidence of diarrhoea between the two groups. Additional oligofructose/inulin did not increase faecal bifidobacteria in critically ill patients receiving EN, although it did result in lower concentrations of F. prausnitzii and Bacteroides-Prevotella. This trial is registered at http://controlled-trials.com. Identifier: ISRCTN06446184. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All

  20. Medical nutrition therapy in chronic kidney disease; from dialysis to transplant: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Leal-Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease has direct implications in nutritional status, causing anorexia and muscular catabolism. These situations are frequent in kidney renal replacement therapy in which nutritional disorders and inflammatory mechanisms associated with therapy often lead to the development of protein-energy wasting. Nutrition therapy has shown an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat metabolic alterations, reducing surgical and nutritional complication risks in kidney transplantation patients. The current case reports nutritional intervention on a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient who was subsequently prescribed to automatic peritoneal dialysis and, finally, kidney transplant from a living donor.

  1. In vitro evaluation, in vivo quantification, and microbial diversity studies of nutritional strategies for reducing enteric methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Louvandini, Helder; Sallam, Sobhy Mohamed Abdallah Hassan; Bueno, Ives Cláudio da Silva; Tsai, Siu Mui; Figueira, Antonio Vargas de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study nutritive strategies for lessening the CH(4) formation associated to ruminant tropical diets. In vitro gas production technique was used for evaluating the effect of tannin-rich plants, essential oils, and biodiesel co-products on CH(4) formation in three individual studies and a small chamber system to measure CH(4) released by sheep for in vivo studies was developed. Microbial rumen population diversity from in vitro assays was studied using qPCR. In vitro studies with tanniniferous plants, herbal plant essential oils derived from thyme, fennel, ginger, black seed, and Eucalyptus oil (EuO) added to the basal diet and cakes of oleaginous plants (cotton, palm, castor plant, turnip, and lupine), which were included in the basal diet to replace soybean meal, presented significant differences regarding fermentation gas production and CH(4) formation. In vivo assays were performed according to the results of the in vitro assays. Mimosa caesalpineaefolia, when supplemented to a basal diet (Tifton-85 hay Cynodon sp, corn grain, soybean meal, cotton seed meal, and mineral mixture) fed to adult Santa Ines sheep reduced enteric CH(4) emission but the supplementation of the basal diet with EuO did not affect (P > 0.05) methane released. Regarding the microbial studies of rumen population diversity using qPCR with DNA samples collected from the in vitro trials, the results showed shifts in microbial communities of the tannin-rich plants in relation to control plant. This research demonstrated that tannin-rich M. caesepineapholia, essential oil from eucalyptus, and biodiesel co-products either in vitro or in vivo assays showed potential to mitigate CH(4) emission in ruminants. The microbial community study suggested that the reduction in CH(4) production may be attributed to a decrease in fermentable substrate rather than to a direct effect on methanogenesis.

  2. Enteral nutrition supplemented with L-glutamine in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to pulmonary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Ana Augusta Monteiro; Campelo, Márcio Wilker Soares; de Vasconcelos, Marcelo Pinho Pessoa; Ferreira, Camila Marques; Guimarães, Sergio Botelho; Garcia, José Huygens Parente; de Vasconcelos, Paulo Roberto Leitão

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of enteral nutrition (EN) supplemented with l-glutamine on glycolytic parameters, inflammation, immune function, and oxidative stress in moderately ill intensive care patients with sepsis. Thirty patients received EN. Fifteen patients received EN supplemented with glutamine (30 g; GLN group) for 2 d followed by EN supplemented with calcium caseinate (30 g, CAS group), also over 2 d. The other 15 patients received EN with calcium caseinate (30 g; CAS group) for 2 d followed by EN with glutamine (30 g; GLN group), also over 2 days. One washout day with only EN was provided between every 2-d period of EN plus supplementation to all patients. Blood samples were taken before and after supplementation. There were no changes in glycolytic parameters in either group. Leukocytes decreased in the two groups (from 13 650 to 11 500 in the CAS group, P = 0.019; from 12.850 to 11.000 in the GLN group, P = 0.046). Lymphocytes increased in the GLN group (from 954 to 1916, P < 0.0001) and were more numerous after glutamine supplementation (from 1916 to 1085, P < 0.0001, GLN versus CAS). No significant changes were observed in interleukin levels, but urea levels were higher in the GLN compared with the CAS group (50.0-47.0, P = 0.030). Glutathione plasma concentrations did not differ significantly between the groups. No significant changes were observed in the plasma glutamine and glutamate concentrations. The EN supplemented with glutamine increased the lymphocyte count and helped to decrease lipid peroxidation but presented no effect on the antioxidant glutathione capacity and on cytokine concentrations or glycolytic parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkman, Adam S; Murali, Sangita G; Hitt, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that shows promise for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Our objective was to investigate how combination GLP-2 + enteral nutrients (EN) affects intestinal adaption in a rat model that mimics severe...... human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral...

  4. Enteric neurospheres are not specific to neural crest cultures : Implications for neural stem cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, E. (Ellen); D. Natarajan (Dipa); J.E. Cooper (Julie E.); Kronfli, R. (Rania); Cananzi, M. (Mara); J.-M. Delalande (Jean-Marie); C. Mccann; A.J. Burns (Alan); N. Thapar (Nikhil)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Enteric neural stem cells provide hope of curative treatment for enteric neuropathies. Current protocols for their harvesting from humans focus on the generation of 'neurospheres' from cultures of dissociated gut tissue. The study aims to better understand the derivation,

  5. Early parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients with short-term relative contraindications to early enteral nutrition: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Gordon S; Simpson, Fiona; Sweetman, Elizabeth A; Finfer, Simon R; Cooper, D Jamie; Heighes, Philippa T; Davies, Andrew R; O'Leary, Michael; Solano, Tom; Peake, Sandra

    2013-05-22

    Systematic reviews suggest adult patients in intensive care units (ICUs) with relative contraindications to early enteral nutrition (EN) may benefit from parenteral nutrition (PN) provided within 24 hours of ICU admission. To determine whether providing early PN to critically ill adults with relative contraindications to early EN alters outcomes. Multicenter, randomized, single-blind clinical trial conducted between October 2006 and June 2011 in ICUs of 31 community and tertiary hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Participants were critically ill adults with relative contraindications to early EN who were expected to remain in the ICU longer than 2 days. Random allocation to pragmatic standard care or early PN. Day-60 mortality; quality of life, infections, and body composition. A total of 1372 patients were randomized (686 to standard care, 686 to early PN). Of 682 patients receiving standard care, 199 patients (29.2%) initially commenced EN, 186 patients (27.3%) initially commenced PN, and 278 patients (40.8%) remained unfed. Time to EN or PN in patients receiving standard care was 2.8 days (95% CI, 2.3 to 3.4). Patients receiving early PN commenced PN a mean of 44 minutes after enrollment (95% CI, 36 to 55). Day-60 mortality did not differ significantly (22.8% for standard care vs 21.5% for early PN; risk difference, -1.26%; 95% CI, -6.6 to 4.1; P = .60). Early PN patients rated day-60 quality of life (RAND-36 General Health Status) statistically, but not clinically meaningfully, higher (45.5 for standard care vs 49.8 for early PN; mean difference, 4.3; 95% CI, 0.95 to 7.58; P = .01). Early PN patients required fewer days of invasive ventilation (7.73 vs 7.26 days per 10 patient × ICU days, risk difference, -0.47; 95% CI, -0.82 to -0.11; P = .01) and, based on Subjective Global Assessment, experienced less muscle wasting (0.43 vs 0.27 score increase per week; mean difference, -0.16; 95% CI, -0.28 to -0.038; P = .01) and fat loss (0.44 vs 0.31 score increase

  6. Nutritional Therapies in Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Witters

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of more than 130 inborn errors of metabolism affecting N-linked, O-linked protein and lipid-linked glycosylation. The phenotype in CDG patients includes frequent liver involvement, especially the disorders belonging to the N-linked protein glycosylation group. There are only a few treatable CDG. Mannose-Phosphate Isomerase (MPI-CDG was the first treatable CDG by high dose mannose supplements. Recently, with the successful use of d-galactose in Phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1-CDG, other CDG types have been trialed on galactose and with an increasing number of potential nutritional therapies. Current mini review focuses on therapies in glycosylation disorders affecting liver function and dietary intervention in general in N-linked glycosylation disorders. We also emphasize now the importance of early screening for CDG in patients with mild hepatopathy but also in cholestasis.

  7. Swallowing rehabilitation with nutrition therapy improves clinical outcome in patients with dysphagia at an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masako; Higashibeppu, Naoki; Arioka, Yasutaka; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with nutritional deficits and increased risk of aspiration pneumonia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of nutrition therapy for the patients with dysphagia at an acute care hospital. We also tried to clarify the factors which improve swallowing function in these patients. Seventy patients with dysphagia were included in the present study. Multidisciplinary nutrition support team evaluated swallowing function and nutrition status. Most patients were fed by parenteral or enteral nutrition at the time of the first round. Of these 70 patients, 36 became able to eat orally. The improvement of swallowing function was associated with higher BMI in both genders and higher AMC in men. Mortality was high in the patients with lower BMI and %AMC, suggesting importance of maintaining muscle mass. Thirteen (38.2%) of 34 patients who did not show any improvement in swallowing function died, but no patients who showed improvement died (pdysphagia and poor outcome, compared to those with about>22 kcal/kg/day. These results suggest that it is important to maintain nutritional status to promote rehabilitation in patients with dysphagia even in an acute care hospital.

  8. Nutritional management of a critically injured patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key considerations in the nutritional therapy of ICU patients include route of feeding (parenteral, enteral or both), when to feed (within. 24-48 hours, and preferably early enteral nutrition), and what to feed. (standard feeds or feeds with pharmaconutrients).1. From admission, the dietitian was involved in the patient's care.

  9. Arginine-supplemented enteral nutrition in critically ill diabetic and obese rats: a dose-ranging study evaluating nutritional status and macrophage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Sandra; Belabed, Linda; Blanc, Marie-Céline; Neveux, Nathalie; Cynober, Luc; Darquy, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill diabetic and obese patients are at high risk of complications. Arginine availability is lowered in diabetes and in stress situations, yet arginine is necessary for immune response, mainly by its action through nitric oxide (NO). These facts argue for arginine-supplemented diets in critically ill patients. However, studies have raised concerns about possible adverse effects of such diets in intensive-care patients. We therefore analyzed the metabolic and immunologic effects of an arginine-enriched diet in stressed diabetic-obese rats. Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats (fa/fa) were made endotoxemic by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide and then fed 4-d enteral nutrition enriched with arginine (ARG group) or a non-essential amino acid mix (NEAA group). The two groups each were subdivided into three subgroups: the ARG subgroups received 0.5 g (ARG0.5), 2 g (ARG2), and 5 g (ARG5) of arginine per kilogram daily, and the NEAA groups were made isonitrogenous with the corresponding ARG subgroups (NEAA0.5, NEAA2, and NEAA5). Plasma and urinary biomarkers were measured. Cytokine and NO production levels and inducible NO synthase and arginase protein levels were determined from peritoneal macrophages. The survival rate was lower in the ARG5 and NEAA5 subgroups than in all the other subgroups. The nitrogen balance was higher in the ARG5 group than in the NEAA5 group. Plasma triacylglycerol levels were lower in the ARG2 group than in the NEAA2 group. Interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and NO production in the macrophages decreased and arginase-1 was upregulated in the ARG-treated rats. In this model, mortality was increased by the nitrogen burden rather than by arginine per se. Arginine improved nitrogen balance and had an anti-inflammatory action on macrophages by regulating NO production, probably through arginase-1 expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Malnutrition risk predicts recovery of full oral intake among older adult stroke patients undergoing enteral nutrition: Secondary analysis of a multicentre survey (the APPLE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Shinta; Okamoto, Takatsugu; Takayama, Masako; Urushihara, Maki; Watanabe, Misuzu; Kiriya, Yumiko; Shintani, Keiko; Nakagomi, Hiromi; Kageyama, Noriko

    2017-08-01

    Whether malnutrition risk correlates with recovery of swallowing function of convalescent stroke patients is unknown. This study was conducted to clarify whether malnutrition risks predict achievement of full oral intake in convalescent stroke patients undergoing enteral nutrition. We conducted a secondary analysis of 466 convalescent stroke patients, aged 65 years or over, who were undergoing enteral nutrition. Patients were extracted from the "Algorithm for Post-stroke Patients to improve oral intake Level; APPLE" study database compiled at the Kaifukuki (convalescent) rehabilitation wards. Malnutrition risk was determined by the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index as follows: severe (malnutrition risks (≥98). Swallowing function was assessed by Fujishima's swallowing grade (FSG) on admission and discharge. The primary outcome was achievement of full oral intake, indicated by FSG ≥ 7. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictive factors, including malnutrition risk, for achieving full oral intake. Estimated hazard risk was computed by Cox's hazard model. Of the 466 individuals, 264 were ultimately included in this study. Participants with severe malnutrition risk showed a significantly lower proportion of achievement of full oral intake than lower severity groups (P = 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, binary logistic regression analysis showed that patients with severe malnutrition risk were less likely to achieve full oral intake (adjusted odds ratio: 0.232, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.047-1.141). Cox's proportional hazard model revealed that severe malnutrition risk was an independent predictor of full oral intake (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.374, 95% CI: 0.166-0.842). Compared to patients who did not achieve full oral intake, patients who achieved full oral intake had significantly higher energy intake, but there was no difference in protein intake and weight change. Severe malnutrition risk independently

  11. Comparative effects of enteric-coated pancreatin microsphere therapy after conventional and pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruno, M. J.; Borm, J. J.; Hoek, F. J.; Delzenne, B.; Hofmann, A. F.; de Goeij, J. J.; van Royen, E. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; de Wit, L. T.; Gouma, D. J.; van Leeuwen, D. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A comparative study was performed between patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after conventional pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure) and pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD). In these patients the pharmacodynamics of 2-mm enteric-coated pancreatin

  12. Malnutrition Identified by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Consensus Criteria and Other Bedside Tools Is Highly Prevalent in a Sample of Individuals Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulasi, Urvashi; Vock, David M; Kuchnia, Adam J; Jha, Gautam; Fujioka, Naomi; Rudrapatna, Venkatesh; Patel, Manish R; Teigen, Levi; Earthman, Carrie P

    2018-01-01

    Using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (Academy/ASPEN) Consensus malnutrition definition, we estimated malnutrition prevalence in a sample of individuals with head and neck cancer (HNC) and compared it with the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA). We also investigated the utility of the 50-kHz phase angle (PA) and 200-kHz/5-kHz impedance ratio (IR) to identify malnutrition. Nineteen individuals (18 males, 1 female) scheduled to undergo chemoradiotherapy were seen at 5 time points during and up to 3 months after treatment completion. Multiple-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, PG-SGA, nutrition-focused physical examination, anthropometry, dietary intake, and handgrip strength data were collected. Using the Consensus, 67% were found to be malnourished before treatment initiation; these criteria diagnosed malnutrition with overall good sensitivity (94%) and moderate specificity (43%) compared with PG-SGA. Over all pooled observations, "malnourished" (by Consensus but not PG-SGA category) had a lower mean PA (5.2 vs 5.9; P = .03) and higher IR (0.82 vs 0.79; P = .03) than "well-nourished" categorizations, although the clinical relevance of these findings is unclear. PA and IR were correlated with higher PG-SGA score (r = -0.35, r = 0.36; P nutrition status or muscle loss. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Effects of continuous versus bolus infusion of enteral nutrition in critical patients Efeitos da administração contínua versus intermitente da nutrição enteral em pacientes críticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Faria Serpa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Enteral alimentation is the preferred modality of support in critical patients who have acceptable digestive function and are unable to eat orally, but the advantages of continuous versus intermittent administration are surrounded by controversy. With the purpose of identifying the benefits and complications of each technique, a prospective controlled study with matched subjects was conducted. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight consecutive candidates for enteral feeding were divided into 2 groups (n = 14 each that were matched for diagnosis and APACHE II score. A commercial immune-stimulating polymeric diet was administered via nasogastric tube by electronic pump in the proportion of 25 kcal/kg/day, either as a 1-hour bolus every 3 hours (Group I, or continuously for 24 hours (Group II, over a 3-day period. Anthropometrics, biochemical measurements, recording of administered drugs and other therapies, thorax X-ray, measurement of abdominal circumference, monitoring of gastric residue, and clinical and nutritional assessments were performed at least once daily. The principal measured outcomes of this protocol were frequency of abdominal distention and pulmonary aspiration, and efficacy in supplying the desired amount of nutrients. RESULTS: Nearly half of the total population (46.4% exhibited high gastric residues on at least 1 occasion, but only 1 confirmed episode of pulmonary aspiration occurred (3.6%. Both groups displayed a moderate number of complications, without differences. Food input during the first day was greater in Group II (approximately 20% difference, but by the third day, both groups displayed similarly small deficits in total furnished volume of about 10%, when compared with the prescribed diet. CONCLUSIONS: Both administration modalities permitted practical and effective administration of the diet with frequent registered abnormalities but few clinically significant problems. The two groups were similar in this regard

  14. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  15. Terapia nutricional no diabetes gestacional Nutritional therapy in gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Carvalho Padilha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma revisão da literatura científica sobre a terapia nutricional no Diabetes Mellitus Gestacional, sem restrição de data e com fontes primárias indexadas nas bases de dados SciELO, PubMed, Medline. Os resultados desta revisão apontam a intervenção nutricional como uma importante aliada no controle do Diabetes Mellitus Gestacional, trazendo potenciais benefícios à saúde materno-fetal. Na avaliação do estado nutricional materno devem ser empregados os indicadores antropométricos, dietéticos, bioquímicos, clínicos e funcional. Neste sentido, a avaliação dietética deve ser detalhada, com atenção para o fracionamento e composição das refeições, e grupos de alimentos presentes. No planejamento nutricional a distribuição de macronutrientes em relação ao consumo energético diário deve ser 45-65% de carboidratos, 15-20% de proteínas e 20-35% de lipídeos. Quanto a recomendação dos edulcorantes, são liberados para gestantes acesulfame K, aspartame, neotame, sacarina e sucralose. A atividade física também deve fazer parte da estratégia de tratamento do Diabetes Mellitus Gestacional, embora o impacto do exercício nas complicações neonatais ainda mereça ser rigorosamente testado. Ademais, estudos associam a habilidade de aconselhamento nutricional com a melhorara na adesão ao cuidado nutricional. Diante desses achados, para sucesso no controle do DMG são necessários: a participação da equipe inter e multidisciplinar, o cuidado pré-natal precoce, com assistência nutricional oportuna e a garantia da assistência de qualidade ao longo da gestação.This is a scientific literature review about nutritional therapy in gestational diabetes mellitus, without date restriction and using the SciELO, PubMed and Medline databases. The results of this review show that nutritional intervention is an important tool for managing gestational diabetes mellitus, and potentially benefits the mother's and fetal health

  16. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): cardiac patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Jiménez, F J; Cervera Montes, M; Blesa Malpica, A L

    2011-11-01

    Patients with cardiac disease can develop two types of malnutrition: cardiac cachexia, which appears in chronic congestive heart failure, and malnutrition due to the complications of cardiac surgery or any other type of surgery in patients with heart disease. Early enteral nutrition should be attempted if the oral route cannot be used. When cardiac function is severely compromised, enteral nutrition is feasible, but supplementation with parenteral nutrition is sometimes required. Sustained hyperglycemia in the first 24 hours in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome, whether diabetic or not, is a poor prognostic factor for 30-day mortality. In critically-ill cardiac patients with stable hemodynamic failure, nutritional support of 20-25 kcal/kg/day is effective in maintaining adequate nutritional status. Protein intake should be 1.2*-1.5 g/kg/day. Routine polymeric or high protein formulae should be used, according to the patient's prior nutritional status, with sodium and volume restriction according to the patient's clinical situation. The major energy source for myocytes is glutamine, through conversion to glutamate, which also protects the myocardial cell from ischemia in critical situations. Administration of 1 g/ day of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) in the form of fish oil can prevent sudden death in the treatment of acute coronary syndrome and can also help to reduce hospital admission for cardiovascular events in patients with chronic heart failure. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-08-03

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Bacterial translocation, the levels of lysozyme, mucin 2 (MUC2), and IAP were analyzed. The composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Compared with chow, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) resulted in a dysfunctional mucosal barrier, as evidenced by increased bacterial translocation (p < 0.05), loss of lysozyme, MUC2, and IAP, and changes in the gut microbiota (p < 0.001). Administration of 20% EN supplemented with PN significantly increased the concentrations of lysozyme, MUC2, IAP, and the mRNA levels of lysozyme and MUC2 (p < 0.001). The percentages of Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes were significantly lower in the 20% EN group than in the TPN group (p < 0.001). These changes were accompanied by maintained barrier function in bacterial culture (p < 0.05). Supplementation of PN with 20% EN preserves gut barrier function, by way of maintaining innate immunity, IAP and intestinal microbiota.

  18. Selection of quality indicators for nutritional therapy in pediatrics: a cross-sectional study conducted in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bertoldi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Quality indicators for nutritional therapy (QINT are important in assessing care and monitoring of resources. Among the 30 indicators proposed by International Life Sciences Institute, Brazil, there is still no evaluation of the most pertinent for Pediatrics. Objective To list the 10 main quality indicators for nutritional therapies (QINTs for Pediatrics. Methods This was a two-phase cross-sectional study. Firstly, a questionnaire was answered by physicians, nutritionists, nurses, and pharmacists, all with having experience in nutritional therapy (NT with Pediatrics, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Participants assessed four attributes of QINT by using the Likert scale. A Top 10 ranked QINT list for Pediatrics was established. To verify the consistency of the questionnaire, Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient was calculated. Secondly, the opinions of the participants on the results that were obtained were requested and the percentages of the positive responses were calculated. Results A total of 33 professionals participated in the first phase and 92% (n = 23 of 25 in the second phase approved the results of the selected indicators. Among the Top 10 QINTs, the three main ones were: #1: “Frequency of diarrhea in those patients on enteral nutrition” (mean = 13.194; α = 0.827; #2: “Frequency of dietary nutritional prescriptions upon the hospital discharge of the NT patients” (mean = 12.871; α = 0.822; #3: “Frequency of the NT patients who recovered their oral intake” (mean = 12.839; α = 0.859. Conclusion When considering the consistency and the concordance that were obtained, it can be suggested that the list of Top 10 QINTs as proposed in this study will help in the evaluation of NT quality indicators for Pediatrics.

  19. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalnins D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Daina Kalnins,1 Michael Wilschanski21Clinical Dietetics, Respiratory Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Hadassah University Hospitals, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, nutrition, fat-soluble vitamins, pancreatic enzymes

  20. Improving the provision of enteral nutrition in the intensive care unit: a description of a multifaceted intervention tailored to overcome local barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Naomi E; Murch, Lauren; Cook, Deborah; Heyland, Daren K

    2014-02-01

    Tailoring interventions to address identified barriers to change may be an effective strategy to implement guidelines and improve practice. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of a tailored intervention to overcome barriers to enterally feeding critically ill patients. A before-after study was conducted in 5 hospitals in North America. We adopted a pragmatic stepwise approach to developing and implementing a tailored intervention-namely, (1) formation of a guideline implementation team, (2) identification of barriers to the provision of enteral nutrition (ie, guideline-practice gap analysis, staff survey, focus group with key stakeholders), (3) focus group to prioritize these barriers, (4) brainstorming to select interventions to overcome the prioritized barriers, (5) a 12-month implementation phase including bimonthly progress meetings, and (6) evaluation of the tailored intervention. All sites identified and prioritized barriers to target for change and developed a tailored action plan. Three of the 22 potential barriers were prioritized by all sites, resulting in common components to the action plans. However, barriers and interventions that were unique to specific sites were also identified. All sites were successful in implementing most of the selected strategies during the implementation phase, although the degree of implementation varied depending on the type of strategy and the site. This stepwise process to developing and implementing an intervention tailored to barriers is promising and could be considered by dietitians and other providers seeking to improve nutrition practice.

  1. A retrospective review of enteral nutrition support practices at a tertiary pediatric hospital: A comparison of prolonged nasogastric and gastrostomy tube feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuto, Amanda; Baird, Robert; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Despite the frequent use of tube-mediated enteral feeding, there is little evidence clarifying best practices pertaining to prolonged nasogastric and gastrostomy tube use in children. At the Montreal Children's Hospital, tube feeding practices are non-standardized and highly variable, with many patients remaining on protracted nasogastric feeds. We aimed to characterize enteral nutrition practices at our institution and to compare prolonged nasogastric and gastrostomy tube use, hypothesizing that earlier gastrostomy improves outcomes, particularly the development of food refusal. In this retrospective cohort study, we reviewed the charts of children beginning long-term (>3 months) nasogastric or gastrostomy feeds at our institution between January 2007 and December 2011, with follow-up until May 2013. Patient demographics, anthropometric parameters, swallowing assessment, tube feeding duration and complications were recorded. Among 166 patients, the median total tube feeding duration was 24.9 (3.0-75.6) months and varied with underlying disease and swallowing assessment. The median duration of nasogastric tube use was 7.8 (0.7-45.3) months. Food refusal was significantly associated with nasogastric tube exposure >3 months (RR 3.3, p nasogastric group. Prolonged nasogastric feeding is common at our institution. Its association with increased food refusal and less favorable anthropometric outcomes may warrant earlier gastrostomy placement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Autologous human cytomegalovirus-specific cytotoxic T cells as rescue therapy for ulcerative enteritis in primary immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Comoli, Patrizia; Gallia, Alessandra; Basso, Sabrina; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Patients affected by primary immunodeficiency usually undergo a wide range of infections, including reactivation of latent ones. Here we report two cases suffering from late-onset combined immunodeficiency in which ulcerative enteritis due to human Cytomegalovirus caused a life-threatening malabsorption syndrome. The assessment of the viral load was carried out on both blood and mucosal samples by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The generation of autologous virus-specific cytotoxic T cell lines was performed according to Good Manufacturing Practice protocol after peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected through a single leukapheresis. In both patients, the viral load resulted negligible in peripheral blood, but very high in mucosal specimens (range 1.064 - 1.031.692 copies/10(5) cells). After two rounds of antiviral therapy proved unsuccessful, the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T cell lines was carried out despite severe lymphopenia, and their infusion resulted safe and durably effective in healing intestinal ulcerations and resetting the viral load. Virus-specific cellular therapy was useful in reconstituting specific immunity and treating severe human Cytomegalovirus-related enteritis in patients with primary immunodeficiency.

  3. Lipid-rich enteral nutrition regulates mucosal mast cell activation via the vagal anti-inflammatory reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Jacco J.; Hadfoune, M.'hamed; Lubbers, Tim; Hodin, Caroline; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Ito, Akihiko; Verbaeys, Isabelle; Skynner, Michael J.; Cailotto, Cathy; van der Vliet, Jan; de Jonge, Wouter J.; Greve, Jan-Willem M.; Buurman, Wim A.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional stimulation of the cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK-1R) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated vagal reflex was shown to reduce inflammation and preserve intestinal integrity. Mast cells are important early effectors of the innate immune response; therefore modulation of

  4. A novel protein mixture containing vegetable proteins renders enteral nutrition products non-coagulating after in vitro gastric digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Braak, Claudia C M; Klebach, Marianne; Abrahamse, Evan; Minor, Marcel; Hofman, Zandrie; Knol, Jan; Ludwig, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Non-coagulation of protein from enteral nutrition (EN) in the stomach is considered to improve gastric emptying and may result in reduced upper gastrointestinal complications such as reflux and aspiration pneumonia. For the development of a new EN protein mixture with reduced gastric coagulation, the coagulating properties of individual proteins, a novel blend of four proteins (P4 protein blend) and commercial EN products were investigated. A semi-dynamic, computer controlled setup was developed to mimic gastric digestion. The coagulation behaviour of 150 ml protein solutions and EN products was investigated. These were heat-treated calcium caseinate, sodium caseinate, whey, soy and pea protein, and the P4 protein blend comprising of the latter four (all solutions 6% w/v protein), four new enteral nutrition product varieties (New Nutrison® .0 or 1.5 kcal/ml, with and without MultiFibre MF6™) based on the P4 protein blend and two other commercially available casein dominant EN products (T1 and T2). Calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate yielded a total wet coagulate of 43.5 ± 0.7 g and 52.7 ± 6.2 g, respectively. Whey, soy, pea and the P4 protein blend did not produce any measurable coagulate. T1 and T2 resulted in a total wet coagulate of 37.5 ± 0.8 g and 57.3 ± 0.8 g, respectively, while all new EN product varieties based on the P4 protein blend did not produce any measurable coagulate. The P4 protein blend renders EN product varieties non-coagulating after in vitro gastric digestion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Short-term restorative nutrition in malnourished patients: pro's and con's of intravenous and enteral alimentation using compositionally matched nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiannos, S N; Renaut, A J; Goode, A W

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective controlled clinical study 30 patients with moderate degree of malnutrition, normal liver and kidneys, and a functioning gastrointestinal tract were randomized to receive a free amino acid and small peptide enteral diet (15 patients) or an isonitrogenous isocaloric parenteral support for at least 10 days (total energy: 2900 kcal, nitrogen: 14.5 g, carbohydrates: 380 g, fat: 112 g, N/non protein calories: 1/175). The parenteral and enteral diets had the same protein/lipid/carbohydrate composition. The data indicated that both routes led to positive nitrogen balance. Nitrogen equilibrium was achieved by day 3 in the TPN group and by day 5 in the enteral group. There were no significant changes in serum albumin within either group. Serum level of transferrin reached a significant increase in both groups (p = 0.003). Thyroxine-binding prealbumin rose significantly in both groups as well (p = 0.019 and 0.004 respectively). Statistically significant rises in lymphocyte counts (p = 0.003 and 0.001 respectively), in levels of C3 (p = 0.009 and 0.001 respectively), IgA (p = 0.002), IgG (p = 0.004 and 0.003 respectively) and IgM (p = 0.004) occurred in either treatment group. There was a high incidence of negative skin tests at the start of the study in the enteral group (73.3%) and the TPN group (60%). By the end of the study the incidence of negative results for this test was 40.0% and 26.6% respectively. Despite maintenance of similar glucose levels in both groups, TPN led to significantly (p = 0.000) higher serum insulin levels. The serum insulin increased almost linearly over the study period, and eventually prevented fat mobilization and lipolysis, so that free fatty acid levels had fallen significantly (p = 0.000). A significant elevation of the liver enzymes over the study period occurred in the TPN group, but not in the enterally fed patients. The present findings provide no evidence that semi-elemental diets are in any way inferior to isonitrogenous

  6. Hospital and homecare malnutrition and nutritional therapy in Brazil. Strategies for alleviating it: a position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky; De Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Dias, Maria Carolina Gonçalves; Pinho, Nivaldo; Moura, Robson; Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson Davisson

    2017-07-28

    Malnutrition in hospitalized patients is not evaluated frequently. However, it is a critical issue given that it has been related to a high rate of infectious complications and increased mortality rates. There is a high prevalence of patients with nutritional impairment in the home environment, which favors their clinical worsening, the increase of re-hospitalizations and, consequently, the increase in public health expenditures. Nutrition experts have thoroughly discussed and written this positioning paper on hospital and homecare malnutrition to describe the prevalence of malnutrition in Brazil. Best practice recommendations for nutrition therapy of patients in hospital and homecare, in particular the use of oral nutritional supplements (ONS), to those who are at risk of malnutrition or malnourished were evaluated, and the impact on clinical and economic data were assessed. In addition, they emphasize that investments in oral nutritional supplementation are also important in the homecare environment (home or nursing homes). Selected scientific articles on disease-related malnutrition, especially those carried out in Brazil, were assessed. Data on prevalence, clinical outcomes, and economic burdens were reviewed. Several studies have shown the importance of in-hospital nutritional assessment for early detection of malnutrition and early intervention with nutrition therapy, in particular with oral nutritional therapy. Unfortunately, hospital malnutrition remains high in Brazil, with severe consequences for patients. The implementation of universal nutritional screening and diagnosis as well as the therapeutic approach of malnutrition, particularly with the use, when possible, of oral nutrition supplements as the first step to address this condition is still low, and demands the investment in educational resources to change practices. Routine use of nutritional therapy in hospital and homecare settings improves clinical outcomes, is cost effective, and would be

  7. A Framework for Adapted Nutritional Therapy for Children With Cancer in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Report From the SIOP PODC Nutrition Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, Elena J; Arora, Brijesh; Howard, Scott C; Rogers, Paul C; Mosby, Terezie T; Barr, Ronald D

    2016-08-01

    The utilization of adapted regimens for the treatment of pediatric malignancies has greatly improved clinical outcomes for children receiving treatment in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Nutritional depletion has been associated with poorer outcomes, increased abandonment of therapy, and treatment-related toxicities. Surveys have found that nutritional intervention is not incorporated routinely into supportive care regimens. Establishing nutritional programs based upon institutional resources may facilitate the incorporation of nutritional therapy into clinical care in a way that is feasible in all settings. We present a framework for establishing and monitoring of nutritional care based on the infrastructure of institutions in LMIC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichvarova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  9. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): patient with polytrauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa Malpica, A L; García de Lorenzo y Mateos, A; Robles González, A

    2011-11-01

    Patients with polytrauma can be viewed as paradigmatic of the critically-ill patient. These previously healthy patients undergo a life-threatening aggression leading to an organic response that is no different from that in other types of patients. The profile of trauma patients has changed and currently corresponds to patients who are somewhat older, with a higher body mass index and greater comorbidity. Severe injuries lead to intense metabolic stress, posing a risk of malnutrition. Therefore, early nutritional support, preferentially through the enteral route, with appropriate protein intake and glutamine supplementation, provides advantages over other routes and types of nutritional formula. To avoid overnutrition, reduced daily calorie intake can be considered in obese patients and in those with medullary lesions. However, little information on this topic is available in patients with medullary lesions. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Essential amino acid enriched high-protein enteral nutrition modulates insulin-like growth factor-1 system function in a rat model of trauma-hemorrhagic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng Xia

    Full Text Available Nutrition support for critically ill patients supplemented with additional modular protein may promote skeletal muscle protein anabolism in addition to counteracting acute nitrogen loss. The present study was designed to investigate whether the essential amino acid (EAA enriched high-protein enteral nutrition (EN modulates the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 system and activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR anabolic signaling pathway in a trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T-HS rat model.Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 90, 278.18 ± 0.94 g were randomly assigned to 5 groups: (1 normal control, (2 pair-fed, (3 T-HS, (4 T-HS and standard EN, and (5 T-HS and EAA enriched high-protein EN. Six animals from each group were harvested on days 2, 4, and 6 for serum, gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus sample collection. T-HS significantly reduced muscle mass. Nutrition support maintained muscle mass, especially the EAA enriched high-protein EN. Meanwhile, a pronounced derangement in IGF-1-IGFBPs axis as well as impaired mTOR transduction was observed in the T-HS group. Compared with animals receiving standard EN, those receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN presented 18% higher serum free IGF-1 levels following 3 days of nutrition support and 22% higher after 5 days. These changes were consistent with the concomitant elevation in serum insulin and reduction in corticosterone levels. In addition, phosphorylations of downstream anabolic signaling effectors - including protein kinase B, mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 - increased significantly in rats receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN.Our findings firstly demonstrate the beneficial effect of EAA enriched high-protein EN on the metabolic modulation of skeletal muscle protein anabolism by regulating the IGF-1 system and downstream anabolic signaling transduction.

  11. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health.

  12. Sistema aberto ou fechado de nutrição enteral para adultos críticos: há diferença? Open versus closed enteral nutrition systems for critically ill adults: is there a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Marys Rigatti Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o volume, calorias totais e proteínas recebidos pelos pacientes críticos quando utilizada nutrição enteral (NE por sistema aberto (SA e sistema fechado (SF; identificar os principais motivos para interrupção da NE. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte em que foram acompanhados adultos internados no Centro de Terapia Intensiva (CTI em dois períodos: em novembro de 2009, quando se adotava SA de NE para a totalidade dos pacientes (n = 85; e entre outubro de 2010 e abril de 2011, quando foi utilizado SF de NE (n = 170. Foram utilizados testes paramétricos e não paramétricos para comparação das variáveis respeitando-se sua distribuição. RESULTADOS: Os grupos assemelharam-se quanto às características clínicas e demográficas. Diferenças de mínima magnitude matemática e de nenhuma relevância clínica foram observadas entre os grupos: mais calorias/quilo foram prescritas ao grupo SA (p OBJECTIVE: To compare the volume, total calories, and protein received by critically ill patients between open and closed enteral nutrition (EN systems and identify the main reasons for EN discontinuation. METHODS: A cohort study in which adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU were followed-up in two periods: throughout November 2009 with all patients (n = 85 receiving EN using the open system (OS group; and from October 2010 to April 2011 with patients (n = 170 receiving EN using the closed system (CS group. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used to compare the variables, taking into account their distribution. RESULTS: Demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. There were minor differences with no statistical significance between groups: more calories/kg were prescribed to the OS group (p < 0.001, and a higher volume (mL/kg, p = 0.002 and protein (g/kg, p = 0.001 were prescribed to the CS group. Fasting, enteral feeding or gastrointestinal problems, and performance of procedures and ICU

  13. Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locks, Lindsey M; Mwiru, Ramadhani S; Mtisi, Expeditho; Manji, Karim P; McDonald, Christine M; Liu, Enju; Kupka, Roland; Kisenge, Rodrick; Aboud, Said; Gosselin, Kerri; Gillman, Matthew; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Duggan, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    To assess whether growth and biomarkers of environmental enteric dysfunction in infancy are related to health outcomes in midchildhood in Tanzania. Children who participated in 2 randomized trials of micronutrient supplements in infancy were followed up in midchildhood (4.6-9.8 years of age). Anthropometry was measured at age 6 and 52 weeks in both trials, and blood samples were available from children at 6 weeks and 6 months from 1 trial. Linear regression was used for height-for-age z-score, body mass index-for-age z-score, and weight for age z-score, and blood pressure analyses; log-binomial models were used to estimate risk of overweight, obesity, and stunting in midchildhood. One hundred thirteen children were followed-up. Length-for-age z-score at 6 weeks and delta length-for-age z-score from 6 to 52 weeks were associated independently and positively with height-for-age z-score and inversely associated with stunting in midchildhood. Delta weight-for-length and weight-for-age z-score were also positively associated with midchildhood height-for-age z-score. The 6-week and delta weight-for-length z-scores were associated independently and positively with midchildhood body mass index-for-age z-score and overweight, as was the 6-week and delta weight-for-age z-score. Delta length-for-age z-score was also associated with an increased risk of overweight in midchildhood. Body mass index-for-age z-score in midchildhood was associated positively with systolic blood pressure. Serum anti-flagellin IgA concentration at 6 weeks was also associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Anthropometry at 6 weeks and growth in infancy independently predict size in midchildhood, while anti-flagellin IgA, a biomarker of environmental enteric dysfunction, in early infancy is associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Interventions in early life should focus on optimizing linear growth while minimizing excess weight gain and environmental enteric

  14. The Adjunctive Role of Nutritional Therapy in the Management of Phlegmon in Two Children with Crohn’s Disease

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    Andrew S. Day

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease may be complicated by the development of penetrating (fistulizing or structuring complications. The presentation of an intra-abdominal phlegmon or abscess with or without an associated fistula has traditionally required surgical intervention. This series of two cases illustrates a beneficial role of non-surgical management, with parenteral and then enteral nutrition playing central roles. This report further elaborates the potential adjunctive role of enteral nutrition in the management of this complication of CD.

  15. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues Bachur

    Full Text Available Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482 and HAART (Group 2; n = 100 eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis - 30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001, Ascaris lumbricoides - 15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001, hookworms - 13.7% and 2% (p<0.0001, Trichuris trichiura - 13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001, Hymenolepis nana - 0 and 1% (p = 0.1718, Giardia duodenalis - 7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar - 3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301, Isospora belli - 4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993, Cryptosporidium sp. - 8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007, and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001. In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575, as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08, and diarrhea (36% of the patients; lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626; and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41% than women (19.04% of Group 1 (p = 0.018, a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites.

  16. Nutritional Evaluation of Raw Materials Entering the Structure to Mixed Fodder for the Specie Poecilia reticulata (Guppy

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    Adrian Gruber

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the ornamental pisciculture is a especial emphasis on the exterior shape and color to the fishes, issues that are dependent directly to the structure of compound feeds in relation to the nutritional characteristics of the raw materials.Own research or focused on analyzing the crude chemical composition with Weende scheme (water content and dry matter, crude ash, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, SEN of raw materials can be used in the structure of a compound feeds for the Poecilia reticulata (guppy species, for most of these materials there are no current data in the literature.These materials were analyzed: gelatin, wheat flour, sunflower meal, soybean meal, meal Spirulina platensis, carrot (Daucus carota, Pangasius fillet, Daphnia pulex, grount dandelion (Taraxacum officinale, grount nettle (Urtica dioica and yeast.

  17. Nutrition therapy: Integral part of liver transplant care

    OpenAIRE

    Anastácio, Lucilene Rezende; Davisson Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson

    2016-01-01

    Managing malnutrition before liver transplantation (LTx) while on the waiting list and, excessive weight gain/metabolic disturbances in post-surgery are still a challenge in LTx care. The aim of this review is to support an interdisciplinary nutrition approach of these patients. Cirrhotic patients are frequently malnourished before LTx and this is associated with a poor prognosis. Although the relation between nutritional status versus survival, successful operation and recovery after LTx is ...

  18. Is There a Role for the Enteral Administration of Serum-Derived Immunoglobulins in Human Gastrointestinal Disease and Pediatric Critical Care Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Arsdall, Melissa; Haque, Ikram; Liu, Yuying; Rhoads, J Marc

    2016-05-01

    Twenty years ago, there was profound, international interest in developing oral human, bovine, or chicken egg-derived immunoglobulin (Ig) for the prevention and nutritional treatment of childhood malnutrition and gastrointestinal disease, including acute diarrhea and necrotizing enterocolitis. Although such Ig products were shown to be effective, with both nutritional and antidiarrheal benefits, interest waned because of their cost and because of the perceived risk of bovine serum encephalitis (BSE). BSE is no longer considered a barrier to use of oral Ig, because the WHO has declared the United States to be BSE-free since the early 2000s. Low-cost bovine-derived products with high Ig content have been developed and are regulated as medical foods. These new products, called serum bovine Igs (SBIs), facilitate the management of chronic or severe gastrointestinal disturbances in both children and adults and are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. Well-established applications for use of SBIs include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated enteropathy and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, SBIs and other similar products could potentially become important components of the treatment regimen for other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, by aiding in disease control without immunosuppressive side effects. In addition, SBIs may be helpful in conditions associated with the depletion of circulating and luminal Igs and could potentially play an important role in critical care nutrition. The rationale for their use is to facilitate intraluminal microbial antibody coating, an essential process in immune recognition in the gut which is disturbed in these conditions, thereby leading to intestinal inflammation. Thus, oral Ig may emerge as an important "add-on" therapy for a variety of gastrointestinal and nutritional problems during the next decade. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Relationship between social support and the nutritional status of patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulliam, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to ascertain if there is a relationship between social support and the nutritional status of patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer. The data collection instruments used included the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ), the Personal Characteristics Form, the abbreviated Health History, the Flow Sheet for Nutritional Data, and the Interview Schedule. For the analysis of data descriptive statistics were utilized to provide a profile of subjects, and correlational statistics were used to ascertain if there were relationships among the indicators of nutritional status and the social support variables. A convenience sample was comprised of 50 cancer patients deemed curable by radiation therapy. Findings included significant decreases in anthropometric measurements and biochemical tests during therapy. Serial assessments of nutritional status, therefore, are recommended for all cancer patients during therapy in order to plan and implement strategies for meeting the self-care requisites for food and water. No statistically significant relationships were found between the social support variables as measured by the NSSQ and the indicators of nutritional status. This suggests that nurses can assist patients by fostering support from actual and potential nutritional confidants

  20. Effects of a novel method for enteral nutrition infusion involving a viscosity-regulating pectin solution: A multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Isao; Tsuchida, Shigeru; Akashi, Tetsuro; Ookubo, Katsuichiro; Hosoda, Satoru; Furukawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Yoshiko

    2018-02-01

    The initial complications associated with infusion of enteral nutrition (EN) for clinical and nutritional care are vomiting, aspiration pneumonia, and diarrhea. There are many recommendations to prevent these complications. A novel method involving a viscosity-regulating pectin solution has been demonstrated. In Japan, this method along with the other so-called "semi-solid EN" approaches has been widely used in practice. However, there has been no randomized clinical trial to prove the efficiency and safety of a viscosity-regulating pectin solution in EN management. Therefore, we planned and initiated a multicenter randomized controlled trial to determine the efficiency and safety. This study included 34 patients from 7 medical institutions who participated. Institutional review board (IRB) approval was obtained from all participating institutions. Patients who required EN management were enrolled and randomly assigned to the viscosity regulation of enteral feeding (VREF) group and control group. The VREF group (n = 15) was managed with the addition of a viscosity-regulating pectin solution. The control group (n = 12) was managed with conventional EN administration, usually in a gradual step-up method. Daily clinical symptoms of pneumonia, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea; defecation frequency; and stool form were observed in the 2 week trial period. The dose of EN and duration of infusion were also examined. A favorable trend for clinical symptoms was noticed in the VREF group. No significant differences were observed in episodes of pneumonia, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea between the 2 groups. An apparent reduction in infusion duration and hardening of stool form were noted in the VREF group. The novel method involving a viscosity-regulating pectin solution with EN administration can be clinically performed safely and efficiently, similar to the conventional method. Moreover, there were benefits, such as improvement in stool form, a short time for EN infusion

  1. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically ill-patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): obese patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesejo, A; Sánchez Álvarez, C; Arboleda Sánchez, J A

    2011-11-01

    As a response to metabolic stress, obese critically-ill patients have the same risk of nutritional deficiency as the non-obese and can develop protein-energy malnutrition with accelerated loss of muscle mass. The primary aim of nutritional support in these patients should be to minimize loss of lean mass and accurately evaluate energy expenditure. However, routinely-used formulae can overestimate calorie requirements if the patient's actual weight is used. Consequently, the use of adjusted or ideal weight is recommended with these formulae, although indirect calorimetry is the method of choice. Controversy surrounds the question of whether a strict nutritional support criterion, adjusted to the patient's requirements, should be applied or whether a certain degree of hyponutrition should be allowed. Current evidence suggested that hypocaloric nutrition can improve results, partly due to a lower rate of infectious complications and better control of hyperglycemia. Therefore, hypocaloric and hyperproteic nutrition, whether enteral or parenteral, should be standard practice in the nutritional support of critically-ill obese patients when not contraindicated. Widely accepted recommendations consist of no more than 60-70% of requirements or administration of 11-14 kcal/kg current body weight/day or 22-25 kcal/kg ideal weight/day, with 2-2.5 g/kg ideal weight/day of proteins. In a broad sense, hypocaloric-hyperprotein regimens can be considered specific to obese critically-ill patients, although the complications related to comorbidities in these patients may require other therapeutic possibilities to be considered, with specific nutrients for hyperglycemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. However, there are no prospective randomized trials with this type of nutrition in this specific population subgroup and the available data are drawn from the general population of critically-ill patients. Consequently, caution should be exercised when

  2. Impacto da adequação da oferta energética sobre a mortalidade em pacientes de UTI recebendo nutrição enteral Impact of the adequacy of energy intake on intensive care unit mortality in patients receiving enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Sanchez Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    .OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between adequacy of energy intake and intensive care unit mortality in patients receiving exclusive enteral nutrition therapy. METHODS: Observational and prospective study conducted during 2008 and 2009. Patients above 18 years with exclusive enteral nutrition therapy for at least 72 hours were included. The adequacy of energy intake was estimated by the administered/prescribed ratio. Non-conditional logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between predictive variables (adequacy of energy intake, APACHE II, gender, age, and intensive care unit length of stay and intensive care unit mortality. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients (mean 58 years, 27% mortality were included, 47.6% of whom received more than 90% of the energy prescribed (mean adequacy 88.2%. Mean energy balance was -190 kcal/day. Significant associations between death in the intensive care unit and the variables age and intensive care unit length of stay were observed, after removing the variables adequacy of energy intake, APACHE II, gender and age during the modeling process. CONCLUSION: In our study, adequacy of energy intake did not affect intensive care unit mortality. Carefully followed enteral nutrition protocols, resulting in an administered/prescribed ratio above 70%, are apparently not sufficient to impact the mortality rates in the intensive care unit. Therefore, it may not be necessary to achieve 100% of the targeted energy, considering the high frequency of enteral feeding interruptions due to gastrointestinal intolerance and fasting for tests and procedures. Additional research is needed to identify the optimal energy intake for improved outcomes and reduced costs.

  3. [Syndrome of excessive bacterial growth and disruption of the digestive and absorption: pathogenetic nutritional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardatskaia, M D

    2009-01-01

    The colon contains literally billions of bacteria. These bacteria protect us from pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi that might otherwise penetrate the mucosal membrane. The bacteria of the colon are also known as intestinal flora. Also they are very impotent when we try to use enteral nutrition. Diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth of the bowel may be recognized by special methods of definition of fecal short-chain fatty acids, which are the pathology biomarkers of the gut failure.

  4. Nutritional status in children with cancer: Before, during and after therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R D

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in children with cancer at diagnosis, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where the great majority of children live. It is associated with an added burden of morbidity and mortality. Answers were sought to the best measure of nutritional status in LMIC, the impact of anti-neoplastic therapy, effective interventions to achieve normal nutritional status and the impact of these on clinical outcomes. Arm anthropometry offers reasonable estimates of fat mass and lean body mass that are both impacted adversely by treatment. Nutritional supplementation, including the use of simple local resources, is beneficial and can improve survival. Long-term survivors may continue to exhibit perturbed nutritional status. The prevalence and severity of malnutrition in children with cancer in LMIC demand attention. Opportunities exist to conduct studies in India to examine the effects of nutritional interventions, including on the overall well-being of survivors.

  5. Impact of enteral supplements enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and/or omega-6 fatty acids, arginine and ribonucleic acid compounds on leptin levels and nutritional status in active Crohn's disease treated with prednisolone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.A.; Nielsen, J.N.; Grønbæk, Henning

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) often develop malnutrition due to disease activity. We aimed to assess the effect of two different enteral supplements of Impact(R) Powder (IP; Novartis, Switzerland) on leptin levels and nutritional status in active CD patients during prednisolone...... treatment and tapering. METHODS: Thirty-one CD patients were randomized to IP Extra (group 1) or IP Standard (group 2). Leptin levels, nutritional, clinical and biochemical markers were studied at inclusion, after 5 and after 9 weeks of the study. RESULTS: Leptin levels, body mass index (BMI) and total...... to improve nutritional status in CD patients....

  6. Nutritional support as an obligatory component of accompanying therapy for head and neck tumors during radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Boyko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers supportive therapy in patients with head and neck tumors during radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Special attention is given to nutritional support on every stage of patient care. The main methods of evaluation of nutritional status and risks are presented, as well as principles of clinical nutrition selection.

  7. Validation of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Recommendations for Caloric Provision to Critically Ill Obese Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Kris M; Andrew, Benjamin Y; Corona, Jasmine C; Robinson, Malcolm K

    2016-07-01

    The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) recommend that obese, critically ill patients receive 11-14 kcal/kg/d using actual body weight (ABW) or 22-25 kcal/kg/d using ideal body weight (IBW), because feeding these patients 50%-70% maintenance needs while administering high protein may improve outcomes. It is unknown whether these equations achieve this target when validated against indirect calorimetry, perform equally across all degrees of obesity, or compare well with other equations. Measured resting energy expenditure (MREE) was determined in obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m(2)), critically ill patients. Resting energy expenditure was predicted (PREE) using several equations: 12.5 kcal/kg ABW (ASPEN-Actual BW), 23.5 kcal/kg IBW (ASPEN-Ideal BW), Harris-Benedict (adjusted-weight and 1.5 stress-factor), and Ireton-Jones for obesity. Correlation of PREE to 65% MREE, predictive accuracy, precision, bias, and large error incidence were calculated. All equations were significantly correlated with 65% MREE but had poor predictive accuracy, had excessive large error incidence, were imprecise, and were biased in the entire cohort (N = 31). In the obesity cohort (n = 20, BMI 30-50 kg/m(2)), ASPEN-Actual BW had acceptable predictive accuracy and large error incidence, was unbiased, and was nearly precise. In super obesity (n = 11, BMI >50 kg/m(2)), ASPEN-Ideal BW had acceptable predictive accuracy and large error incidence and was precise and unbiased. SCCM/ASPEN-recommended body weight equations are reasonable predictors of 65% MREE depending on the equation and degree of obesity. Assuming that feeding 65% MREE is appropriate, this study suggests that patients with a BMI 30-50 kg/m(2) should receive 11-14 kcal/kg/d using ABW and those with a BMI >50 kg/m(2) should receive 22-25 kcal/kg/d using IBW. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Application of Glutamine-enriched nutrition therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueqin; Zhang, Fengzhi; Wang, Jinshen; Zhu, Yanping; Dai, Jianhua; Bu, Yueqing; Yang, Qiaozhi; Xiao, Yingying; Sun, Xiaojing

    2016-07-11

    We investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln)-enriched nutritional therapy during chemotherapy on the nutritional status and immune function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We enrolled 48 children who were newly diagnosed with ALL in our department during the period of 2013.1-2014.12. The patients (follow random number table) were randomly divided into the control group (peptamen) and the treatment group (peptamen + glutamine), 24 cases in each group. The remission induction regimens were all based on VDLP (D) chemotherapy (VCR (Vincrisstine), DNR (Daunomycin), L-ASP (L-Asparagiase), Prednisolone and Dexamethasone). The treatment group received Gln-enriched nutritional therapy every day during the full course of chemotherapy,and the control group is as same as the treatment group except without glutamine. The indicators of general nutritional status, such as weight, height, and triceps skinfold thickness, and the indicators of biochemical tests, such as serum albumin, prealbumin, creatinine-height index, retinol binding protein, and urinary hydroxyproline index, were compared between the two groups at the end of the first, second, third and the fourth week when the chemotherapy was completed. And in the fourth week, flow cytometry was applied to detect the levels of T cell subsets and the activities of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of the two groups. 1. after 4 weeks nutritional therapy, there is no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the two groups of children in weight, height and other indicators. 2. At the end of 2 weeks treatment, the level of prealbumin (PA) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) is higher in treatment group than that in the control group (P nutritional therapy can effectively improve the systemic nutritional status of children with leukemia, improve immune function.

  9. Treatment of radiation enteritis: a comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loiudice, T.A.; Lang, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with severe radiation injury to the small bowel seen over a 4-year period were randomized to four treatment groups: 1) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po, 2) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, 3) total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, and 4) Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po. Patients received nothing by mouth except water in groups II and III, and only Vivonex-HN in groups I and IV. Patients were treated for 8-wk periods. Improvement was gauged by overall nutritional assessment measurements, nitrogen balance data and by radiological and clinical parameters. No significant difference between groups I, II, III, and IV could be found for age, sex, mean radiation dosage, time of onset after radiation therapy, or initial nutritional assessment data. Differences statistically could be found between groups II and III and I and IV regarding nutritional assessment data, nitrogen balance, radiographic and clinical parameters after therapy, with marked improvement noted in groups II and III. We conclude that a treatment regimen consisting of total parenteral nutrition and bowel rest is beneficial in the treatment of radiation enteritis. Methylprednisolone appears to enhance this effect and indeed, may be responsible for a longer lasting response

  10. Evidence-based diabetes nutrition therapy recommendations are effective: the key is individualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marion J Franz,1 Jackie L Boucher,2 Alison B Evert3 1Nutrition Concepts by Franz, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, 2Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, 3Diabetes Care Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Current nutrition therapy recommendations for the prevention and treatment of diabetes are based on a systematic review of evidence and answer important nutrition care questions. First, is diabetes nutrition therapy effective? Clinical trials as well as systematic and Cochrane reviews report a ~1%–2% lowering of hemoglobin A1c values as well as other beneficial outcomes from nutrition therapy interventions, depending on the type and duration of diabetes and level of glycemic control. Clinical trials also provide evidence for the effectiveness of nutrition therapy in the prevention of diabetes. Second, are weight loss interventions important and when are they beneficial? Modest weight loss is important for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and early in the disease process. However, as diabetes progresses, weight loss may or may not result in beneficial glycemic and cardiovascular outcomes. Third, are there ideal percentages of macronutrients and eating patterns that apply to all persons with diabetes? There is no ideal percentage of macronutrients and a variety of eating patterns has been shown to be effective for persons with diabetes. Treatment goals, personal preferences (eg, tradition, culture, religion, health beliefs, economics, and the individual's ability and willingness to make lifestyle changes must all be considered by clinicians and/or educators when counseling and educating individuals with diabetes. A healthy eating pattern emphasizing nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes, regular physical activity, and support are priorities for all individuals with diabetes. Reduced energy intake for persons with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes as well as matching insulin to planned

  11. Enteral fluid therapy through nasogastric tube in rumen cannulated goats Fluidoterapia enteral por via nasogástrica em cabras fistuladas no rúmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Atoji-Henrique

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of fluid therapy in goats through nasogastric route with an electrolyte solution composed by concentrations of sodium, potassium and chloride similar to goat plasma (140mmol/L of Na+, 4.5mmol/L of K+, 110mmol/L of Cl-. Four Alpine Chamoisee goats, two of them with evident leakage of the rumen cannulas, were used in a crossover experimental design of two periods and two groups. In one group the two goats were submitted to a treatment protocol to induce dehydration before the fluid therapy, whereas the other group was not. Fluid therapy consisted supplying 10mL/kg/h of the electrolyte solution during 8 hours. No signs of discomfort or stress were observed. The dehydration model employed caused a mild dehydration indicated by decrease in feces humidity, body weight and abdominal circumference, and increase in plasma total solids concentration. During fluid therapy globular volume and plasma total solids decreased, whereas % body weight and abdominal circumference increased. No signs of hyperhydration were observed and serum electrolytes (Na+, Cl-, K+ presented no significant alterations in both groups. Fluid therapy proposed in this study was efficient to treat dehydration, even for rumen cannulated animals with evident leakage, and can be administrated safely with no electrolyte imbalance.Este estudo relata os efeitos da fluidoterapia em cabras que receberam, por via nasogástrica, uma solução eletrolítica com concentrações de sódio, potássio e cloreto similares às verificadas no plasma de caprinos (140mmol/L of Na+, 4.5mmol/L of K+, 110mmol/L of Cl-. Foram utilizadas quatro cabras da raça Parda Alpina, sendo duas com cânulas ruminais apresentando vazamento evidente, em um delineamento experimental crossover com dois períodos e dois grupos. Em um grupo, as cabras eram submetidas a um protocolo terapêutico para induzir a desidratação antes da fluidoterapia enquanto o outro grupo não passava por este

  12. The spectrum of radiation enteritis: surgical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, G.K.; Grodsinsky, C.; Allen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation therapy, often used to treat gynecologic and urologic pelvic malignancies, has varying, adverse effects on the bowel. Radiation enteritis may occur from one month to 20 years after irradiation, and disabling symptoms may require surgery in 10 to 20 per cent of patients. From our experience with 20 patients who required surgery for radiation enteritis and who were followed for up to 20 years, we were able to identify three clinical groups. Patients in the first group need only medical treatment for their symptoms, and observation, whereas patients in the second group may present with acute, debilitating, life-threatening symptoms that may require emergency surgery. Patients in the third group have a long-standing history of intermittent bowel obstruction and/or enteric fistulas that are best treated with adequate nutritional support followed by timely surgical intervention

  13. Medical Nutrition Therapy based on Nutrition Intervention for a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Seung Hee

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, and according to statistics from the World Health Organization, COPD is the fourth leading cause of death overall in the face of decades, and expected to be increased. In 2005, the reported prevalence of COPD in Korea was 17.2% of adults over the age of 45. Malnutrition is a common problem in papatients with COPD. And several nutritional intervention studies showed a significant improvement in physical and functional...

  14. Malnutrition Identified by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Is Associated With More 30-Day Readmissions, Greater Hospital Mortality, and Longer Hospital Stays: A Retrospective Analysis of Nutrition Assessment Data in a Major Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren; Chittams, Jesse; Griffith, Cody; Compher, Charlene

    2018-01-31

    Few studies have compared malnutrition identified by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (AND/ASPEN) consensus criteria with clinical outcomes. Our goal was to compare 30-day readmissions (primary outcome), hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS) in survivors, and time to discharge alive (TDA) in all patients assessed as malnourished or not malnourished using these criteria in fiscal year 2015. We hypothesized more frequent admissions, greater mortality, longer LOS, and less likely shorter TDA in the malnourished patients. Demographic variables, clinical outcomes, and malnutrition diagnosis for all initial patient admissions were obtained retrospectively from the electronic medical record. Logistic regression was used to compare categorical and Cox proportional hazards for TDA in unadjusted and adjusted (age, sex, race, medical/surgical admission, Charlson Comorbidity Index) models. Of the 3907 patients referred for nutrition assessment, 66.88% met criteria for moderate or severe malnutrition. Malnourished patients were older (61 vs 58 years, P 2-day stay. The AND/ASPEN criteria identified malnourished patients in a high-risk population who had more adverse clinical outcomes. Further studies are needed to determine whether optimal provision of nutrition support can improve these outcomes. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Surgery and transplantation – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland-Cunz, S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In surgery, indications for artificial nutrition comprise prevention and treatment of catabolism and malnutrition. Thus in general, food intake should not be interrupted postoperatively and the re-establishing of oral (e.g. after anastomosis of the colon and rectum, kidney transplantation or enteral food intake (e.g. after an anastomosis in the upper gastrointestinal tract, liver transplantation is recommended within 24 h post surgery. To avoid increased mortality an indication for an immediate postoperatively artificial nutrition (enteral or parenteral nutrition (PN also exists in patients with no signs of malnutrition, but who will not receive oral food intake for more than 7 days perioperatively or whose oral food intake does not meet their needs (e.g. less than 60–80% for more than 14 days. In cases of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, there is an indication for total PN (TPN such as in chronic intestinal obstruction with a relevant passage obstruction e.g. a peritoneal carcinoma. If energy and nutrient requirements cannot be met by oral and enteral intake alone, a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition is indicated. Delaying surgery for a systematic nutrition therapy (enteral and parenteral is only indicated if severe malnutrition is present. Preoperative nutrition therapy should preferably be conducted prior to hospital admission to lower the risk of nosocomial infections. The recommendations of early postoperative re-establishing oral feeding, generally apply also to paediatric patients. Standardised operative procedures should be established in order to guarantee an effective nutrition therapy.

  16. The Prediction of Deterioration of Nutritional Status during Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Sofia C M; Witvliet-van Nierop, Jill E; Ottens-Oussoren, Karen; van der Peet, Donald L; de van der Schueren, Marian A E

    2018-01-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer are at high risk of developing malnutrition during neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT), which in turn is associated with postoperative morbidity. The aim of the study is to explore whether parameters of a complete pre-treatment nutritional status may predict deterioration of nutritional status during CRT in patients with esophageal cancer. In this prospective cohort study, 101 patients with esophageal cancer treated with CRT were included. Data of patient characteristics, tumor classification, performance score, %weight change, body mass index, fat (free) mass index, phase angle, handgrip strength, energy- and protein intake, and use of (additional) dietary supplements were collected. A prediction model was constructed to identify predictive parameters for deterioration in nutritional status (defined as weight loss of >5% and/or decline in fat free mass of ≥1.4 kg) during CRT. Nutritional status deteriorated in 49 patients (49%) during CRT. The only predictor for deterioration in nutritional status was fat free mass index (OR 1.21 (90% CI: 1.03 - 1.42)). Patients with a higher fat free mass index are at increased risk of deterioration in nutrition status during CRT. Results suggest that all patients should be carefully supervised during CRT, regardless of their nutritional status before start of CRT.

  17. Structured lipid emulsion as nutritional therapy for the elderly patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Yan, Jing; Cai, Guo-Long; Xu, Qiang-Hong; Gong, Shi-Jin; Dai, Hai-Wen; Yu, Yi-Hua; Li, Li

    2013-06-01

    The nutritional support is one of the important therapeutic strategies for the elderly patients with severe sepsis, but there is controversial in choosing a parenteral nutrition formulation. This study was designed to compare the therapeutic effects of structured lipid emulsion, physically mixed medium, and long-chain fat emulsion in the treatment of severe sepsis in elderly patients. A total number of 64 elder patients with severe sepsis were enrolled in the study. After a week of enteral nutritional support, the patients were randomly divided into research (structured lipid emulsion as parenteral alimentation) and control groups (physically mixed medium and long-chain fat emulsion as parenteral alimentation). The alterations of plasma albumin, lipid metabolism, and blood glucose level were recorded after parenteral alimentation and were compared between the two groups. The plasma levels of albumin, prealbumin, cholesterol, and triglyceride were decreased in all the patients after one week of enteral nutritional support treatment (t = 7.78, P = 0.000; t = 10.21, P = 0.000; t = 7.99, P = 0.000; and t = 10.99, P = 0.000). Further parenteral alimentation with different lipid emulsions had significant effects on the serum prealbumin and albumin (t = 3.316, P = 0.002; t = 3.200, P = 0.002), whilst had no effects on the blood glucose and triglyceride level (t = 7.78, P = 0.000; t = 4.228, P = 0.000). In addition, the two groups had a significantly different Apache II score, ventilator time, and hospital stay time (t = -2.213, P = 0.031; t = 2.317, P = 0.024; t = 2.514, P = 0.015). The structured lipid emulsion was safe as parenteral nutrition for elderly patients with severe sepsis. It was demonstrated to be superior to the physically mixed medium and long-chain fat emulsion with respect to the protein synthesis and prognosis.

  18. NUTRITIONAL THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORROSIVE INTOXICATION IN ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibishev, Andon; Markoski, Velo; Smokovski, Ivica; Shikole, Emilija; Stevcevska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute intoxications with corrosive substances can cause severe chemical injuries of the upper gastrointestinal tract, most often located in the mouth, pharynx, esophagus, stomach and duodenum. If a patient survives the acute phase of intoxication, regenerative response may result in esophageal and/or gastric stenosis, and increased risk of esophageal and gastric cancer. Such intoxication may be fatal due to perforation or tracheal necrosis. Enteral nutrition is a nutritional method when nutritional substances are administered through specially designed tubing placed through the nose or percutaneously, directly into the GIT. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the methods of artificial nutrition in patients with acute corrosive intoxications and the importance of nutritional support in the treatment of these intoxications. Discussion: Nutrition in the treatment of acute corrosive intoxications is one of the most important therapeutic processes that largely contribute to faster recovery of the post-corrosive injuries of upper GIT, stabilization of biologic, immunologic and metabolic parameters, and reduction of length of stay in hospital Aim of the treatment of acute corrosive intoxications is to prevent perforation and progressive fibrosis, and esophageal and gastric stenosis. There are different and often conflicting positions, on the conservative treatment of acute corrosive intoxications in adults. Such treatment mainly consists of anti-secretory treatment, antibiotics and intensive hyper-alimentation, aiming to prevent late post-corrosive intoxications. Conclusion: It is considered that nutritional support plays a major role in maintenance of metabolic processes and prevention of severe metabolic complications that could additionally aggravate the condition and impair the treatment. PMID:27047272

  19. Enteric glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühl, A; Nasser, Y; Sharkey, K A

    2004-04-01

    The enteric nervous system is composed of both enteric neurones and enteric glia. Enteric glial cells were first described by Dogiel and are now known to outnumber neurones approximately 4 : 1. In the past, these cells were assumed to subserve a largely supportive role; however, recent evidence indicates that enteric glial cells may play a more active role in the control of gut function. In transgenic mouse models, where enteric glial cells are selectively ablated, the loss of glia results in intestinal inflammation and disruption of the epithelial barrier. Enteric glia are activated specifically by inflammatory insults and may contribute actively to inflammatory pathology via antigen presentation and cytokine synthesis. Enteric glia also express receptors for neurotransmitters and so may serve as intermediaries in enteric neurotransmission. Thus, enteric glia may serve as a link between the nervous and immune systems of the gut and may also have an important role in maintaining the integrity of the mucosal barrier and in other aspects of intestinal homeostasis.

  20. A multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early nutritional support via the parenteral versus the enteral route in critically ill patients (CALORIES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sheila E; Parrott, Francesca; Harrison, David A; Sadique, M Zia; Grieve, Richard D; Canter, Ruth R; McLennan, Blair Kp; Tan, Jermaine Ck; Bear, Danielle E; Segaran, Ella; Beale, Richard; Bellingan, Geoff; Leonard, Richard; Mythen, Michael G; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2016-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in critically ill patients in UK NHS critical care units. Early nutritional support is therefore recommended to address deficiencies in nutritional state and related disorders in metabolism. However, evidence is conflicting regarding the optimum route (parenteral or enteral) of delivery. To estimate the effect of early nutritional support via the parenteral route compared with the enteral route on mortality at 30 days and on incremental cost-effectiveness at 1 year. Secondary objectives were to compare the route of early nutritional support on duration of organ support; infectious and non-infectious complications; critical care unit and acute hospital length of stay; all-cause mortality at critical care unit and acute hospital discharge, at 90 days and 1 year; survival to 90 days and 1 year; nutritional and health-related quality of life, resource use and costs at 90 days and 1 year; and estimated lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness. A pragmatic, open, multicentre, parallel-group randomised controlled trial with an integrated economic evaluation. Adult general critical care units in 33 NHS hospitals in England. 2400 eligible patients. Five days of early nutritional support delivered via the parenteral (n = 1200) and enteral (n = 1200) route. All-cause mortality at 30 days after randomisation and incremental net benefit (INB) (at £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year) at 1 year. By 30 days, 393 of 1188 (33.1%) patients assigned to receive early nutritional support via the parenteral route and 409 of 1195 (34.2%) assigned to the enteral route had died [p = 0.57; absolute risk reduction 1.15%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.65 to 4.94; relative risk 0.97 (0.86 to 1.08)]. At 1 year, INB for the parenteral route compared with the enteral route was negative at -£1320 (95% CI -£3709 to £1069). The probability that early nutritional support via the parenteral route is more cost-effective - given the data - is < 20

  1. A multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early nutritional support via the parenteral versus the enteral route in critically ill patients (CALORIES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sheila E; Parrott, Francesca; Harrison, David A; Sadique, M Zia; Grieve, Richard D; Canter, Ruth R; McLennan, Blair Kp; Tan, Jermaine Ck; Bear, Danielle E; Segaran, Ella; Beale, Richard; Bellingan, Geoff; Leonard, Richard; Mythen, Michael G; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Malnutrition is a common problem in critically ill patients in UK NHS critical care units. Early nutritional support is therefore recommended to address deficiencies in nutritional state and related disorders in metabolism. However, evidence is conflicting regarding the optimum route (parenteral or enteral) of delivery. OBJECTIVES To estimate the effect of early nutritional support via the parenteral route compared with the enteral route on mortality at 30 days and on incremental cost-effectiveness at 1 year. Secondary objectives were to compare the route of early nutritional support on duration of organ support; infectious and non-infectious complications; critical care unit and acute hospital length of stay; all-cause mortality at critical care unit and acute hospital discharge, at 90 days and 1 year; survival to 90 days and 1 year; nutritional and health-related quality of life, resource use and costs at 90 days and 1 year; and estimated lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness. DESIGN A pragmatic, open, multicentre, parallel-group randomised controlled trial with an integrated economic evaluation. SETTING Adult general critical care units in 33 NHS hospitals in England. PARTICIPANTS 2400 eligible patients. INTERVENTIONS Five days of early nutritional support delivered via the parenteral (n = 1200) and enteral (n = 1200) route. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES All-cause mortality at 30 days after randomisation and incremental net benefit (INB) (at £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year) at 1 year. RESULTS By 30 days, 393 of 1188 (33.1%) patients assigned to receive early nutritional support via the parenteral route and 409 of 1195 (34.2%) assigned to the enteral route had died [p = 0.57; absolute risk reduction 1.15%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.65 to 4.94; relative risk 0.97 (0.86 to 1.08)]. At 1 year, INB for the parenteral route compared with the enteral route was negative at -£1320 (95% CI -£3709 to £1069). The probability that early

  2. Nutritional and behavioral modification therapies of obesity: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranešić Bender, Darija; Krznarić, Zeljko

    2012-01-01

    Current practice guidelines for management of overweight and obesity recommend a tripartite treatment - lifestyle modification program of diet, exercise, and behavior therapy for all persons with a body mass index of at least 30 (and those with body mass index 25 plus two weight-related comorbidities). Behavior therapy provides the structure that facilitates meeting goals for energy intake and expenditure. Lately, there has been a shift in focus from behavior change to cognitive change because it improves long-term results of lifestyle modification programs. Weight loss diets based on the amounts of individual macronutrients (high-protein diets, low-fat diets and low-carbohydrate diets, etc.) in the diet are not more effective than 'classical' low-calorie and balanced diets. An exception has been detected only in short-term diets with a low glycemic load. Also, epidemiological studies show that there is an inversely proportional relationship between body weight and Mediterranean diet. Cognitive behavioral therapy based on the Mediterranean diet has proven to be effective in clinical practice with regard to weight loss, body fat distribution, biochemical parameters, blood pressure and simplicity of following the diet. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Indirect calorimetry in nutritional therapy. A position paper by the ICALIC study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Berger, Mette M; De Waele, Elisabeth; Guttormsen, Anne Berit; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Hiesmayr, Michael; Singer, Pierre; Wernerman, Jan; Pichard, Claude

    2017-06-01

    This review aims to clarify the use of indirect calorimetry (IC) in nutritional therapy for critically ill and other patient populations. It features a comprehensive overview of the technical concepts, the practical application and current developments of IC. Pubmed-referenced publications were analyzed to generate an overview about the basic knowledge of IC, to describe advantages and disadvantages of the current technology, to clarify technical issues and provide pragmatic solutions for clinical practice and metabolic research. The International Multicentric Study Group for Indirect Calorimetry (ICALIC) has generated this position paper. IC can be performed in in- and out-patients, including those in the intensive care unit, to measure energy expenditure (EE). Optimal nutritional therapy, defined as energy prescription based on measured EE by IC has been associated with better clinical outcome. Equations based on simple anthropometric measurements to predict EE are inaccurate when applied to individual patients. An ongoing international academic initiative to develop a new indirect calorimeter aims at providing innovative and affordable technical solutions for many of the current limitations of IC. Indirect calorimetry is a tool of paramount importance, necessary to optimize the nutrition therapy of patients with various pathologies and conditions. Recent technical developments allow broader use of IC for in- and out-patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutritional support in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2010-05-01

    Obesity and overweight are risk factors for developing an oesophageal cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma in the distal oesophagus or at the gastroesophageal junction, and many patients still are overweight at the clinical presentation even if they are losing weight. Main mechanisms involved in weight loss are a decreased nutrients' intake and an alteration in metabolism due to a cytokine-driven inflammatory status. Malnutrition is a risk factor for a poor compliance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and finally for the oncologic outcome. There is scientific evidence that frequently both conditions exist but in the advanced stages of disease metabolic alterations play a major role and are responsible for the poor response to nutritional support. The literature about the nutritional support in patients with cancer of the oesophagus has been reviewed with special emphasis on randomised clinical trials whenever available. In surgical patients, both overweight and weight loss increase the risk of postoperative complications. In non-dysphagic patients receiving a neo-adjuvant oncologic treatment, the simple use of oral nutritional supplements is little effective in ameliorating the nutritional status, in contrast, an intensive dietetic surveillance associated with oral supplements can lead to better nutritional status, improved quality of life and better compliance with therapy. In dysphagic patients, many comparative non-randomised clinical studies have shown clinical benefits from tube feeding on the nutritional status and compliance with therapy. There is no apparent difference on the metabolic efficacy of the enteral versus parenteral nutrition. Studies on peri-operative nutrition in oesophagectomy patients were often underpowered and, hence, inconclusive, but the large experience on the nutritional support in patients with gastrointestinal cancer undergoing major abdominal surgery has clearly shown the benefits of the enteral nutrition. Both the American and

  5. Soluble And Insoluble Fibres Of Vegetables, Tubers And Cinnamon For Use In Enteral Nutrition [fibras Solúveis E Insolúveis De Verduras, Tubérculos E Canela Para Uso Em Nutrição Clínica

    OpenAIRE

    de Araujo E.M.; de Menezes H.C.; Tomazini J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Enteral diets containing conventional foods are used to reduce costs and obtain individualization. However, more studies are required to improve their dietary fibre content, the nutritive value, and reliability. This study proposed to study the dietary fibres of different vegetables and spices such as pumpkin, watercress, powdered cinnamon, cauliflower, yam, and tomato for use in enteral nutrition or in oral nutritional supplements. These foods were chosen since they contain dietary fibres an...

  6. Difference in Composite End Point of Readmission and Death Between Malnourished and Nonmalnourished Veterans Assessed Using Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Lynn D; Shaw, Robert F; Fabri, Peter J

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between malnutrition and poor outcomes. The primary objective of this study was to explore the difference in the composite end point of readmission rate or mortality rate between hospitalized veterans with and without malnutrition. This was a retrospective chart review comparing veterans with malnutrition based on a modified version of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition consensus characteristics that used 5 of the 6 clinical characteristics to a matched control group of nonmalnourished veterans based on age, admitting service, and date of admission who were admitted between August 1, 2012, and December 1, 2014. Data were extracted from the medical record. Multivariate analysis was used to identify predictors of outcomes. In total, 404 patients were included in the final analysis. All end points were found to be statistically significant. The malnourished group was more likely to meet the composite end point (odds ratio [OR], 5.3), more likely to be readmitted within 30 days (OR, 3.4), more likely to die within 90 days of discharge (OR, 5.5), and more likely to have a length of stay >7 days (OR, 4.3) compared with the nonmalnourished group. Length of stay was significantly longer in the malnourished group, 9.80 (11.5) vs 4.38 (4.5) days. Malnutrition was an independent risk factor for readmission within 30 days or death within 90 days of discharge. Malnourished patients had higher rates of readmission, higher mortality rates, and longer lengths of stay and were more likely to be discharged to nursing homes.

  7. Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, J V

    1976-07-01

    Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K.

  8. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy Doenças inflamatórias intestinais: princípios da terapia nutricional

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    Fábio Guilherme Campos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.As doenças inflamatórias intestinais - retocolite ulcerativa inespec

  9. Nutritional status in the era of target therapy: poor nutrition is a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehhoon; Park, Seongyeol; Lee, Se-Hoon; Suh, Beomseok; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young Whan; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-11-01

    Pretreatment nutritional status is an important prognostic factor in patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the era of target therapies, its value is overlooked and has not been investigated. The aim of our study is to evaluate the value of nutritional status in targeted therapy. A total of 2012 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were reviewed and 630 patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) were enrolled for the final analysis. Anemia, body mass index (BMI), and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) were considered as nutritional factors. Hazard ratio (HR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for each group were calculated by Cox proportional analysis. In addition, scores were applied for each category and the sum of scores was used for survival analysis. In univariable analysis, anemia (HR, 1.29; p = 0.015), BMI lower than 18.5 (HR, 1.98; p = 0.002), and PNI lower than 45 (HR, 1.57; p nutritional status is a prognostic marker in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR TKI. Hence, baseline nutritional status should be more carefully evaluated and adequate nutrition should be supplied to these patients.

  10. Tratamento de compactação do cólon maior em eqüídeos com fluidoterapia enteral Treatment of large colon impaction in equids with enteral fluid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Ferreira Lopes

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A eficiência da fluidoterapia por via enteral foi avaliada em 14 eqüídeos (12 eqüinos e dois muares que apresentavam compactação do cólon maior. Os animais tinham entre um ano e meio e 20 anos de idade e todos eram alimentados com capim elefante (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach triturado. O início dos sinais de cólica foi observado no dia do internamento em seis casos, um dia antes em cinco casos, três dias antes em um caso, quatro dias antes em um caso e seis dias antes em um caso. Um cavalo havia sido banhado com amitraz dois dias antes dos primeiros sinais de cólica. Quando foram internados, todos os animais apresentavam desidratação, dor leve a moderada e intermitente, fezes ressecadas e digesta compactada no cólon maior. Onze animais foram medicados com analgésico. Através de sonda nasogástrica foi administrada água a todos os animais. O volume administrado, de cada vez, foi de no máximo 10 litros e o intervalo entre as administrações foi de no mínimo 30 minutos. O volume total administrado a cada animal variou de 60 a 223 litros (média 119,14 litros. Durante o tratamento, o único ali mento fornecido foi ração à base de grãos e suplemento mineral. Diariamente eram feitos dois exames clínicos e todos os animais apresentaram poliúria, redução gradativa do volume abdominal, amolecimento das fezes e remissão dos sinais de desidratação. O tratamento teve a duração de um a cinco dias (média 2,57 dias. Quando a fluidoterapia foi interrompida, nenhum animal apresentava dor abdominal ou compactação do intestino grosso. Concluiu-se que a fluidoterapia enteral foi eficiente no tratamento de compactação do cólon maior em eqüídeos.The efficiency of enteral fluid therapy was checked in 14 equids (12 horses and two mules presenting large colon impaction. The age of the animals ranged from 1.5 to 20 years old. All equids were fed chopped "capim elefante" (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach. The first colic signs were

  11. Nutrition support in Brazil: past, present, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzberg, Dan L; Campos, Antonio Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The history of nutrition support in Brazil is parallel to its development in the world. Inspired by the publications of the surgical group headed by Professor Rhoads at the University of Pennsylvania, a group of Brazilian physicians pioneered the beginning of parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy. The Brazilian Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SBNPE) was officially founded in 1975. Soon, scientific contributions started to appear, reflected by articles in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and other journals and by books. In many states of Brazil, nutrition support services were created to carry out scientific and educational activities. The relationship with the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition was fundamental in the development of clinical nutrition in Brazil because of the strong scientific exchange between the United States and Brazil. However, after the stimulating initial launching, momentum slowed because of the lack of medical awareness and inadequate reimbursement. In Brazil, the federal government is responsible for the majority of health care, but enteral nutrition was not reimbursed. In response to this situation, a study in 4000 hospitalized patients was undertaken in Brazil. It was reported that nearly half of them presented with malnutrition, and > 12% had severe malnutrition. These alarming results were decisive in persuading the Brazilian government to begin reimbursement for enteral nutrition. Today, Brazilian hospitals that assist public health system patients receive reimbursement for enteral nutrition. However, it is required to have an officially registered nutrition support team and a certified and approved facility for enteral feeding preparation. Considering that low nutrition prescription in Brazil could be the result of lack of nutrition education (not required in most medical schools), the SBNPE participated in the creation of 2 very effective, practical, and dynamic courses for the basic teaching

  12. STOSS THERAPY AND WEEKLY VITAMIN D THERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NUTRITIONAL RICKETS IN CHILDREN- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

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    Madhava Vijayakumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The Aim of the study is to study the risk factors of nutritional rickets in children of age 1-5 years and to compare the effectiveness of classical single mega dose vitamin D administration (stoss therapy and weekly cholecalciferol administration. METHODS 50 children of age group 1-5 year with clinical, biochemical and radiological features of nutritional rickets and an equal number of age and gender matched control were included in the study. Their risk factors were compared. Those children with rickets were divided randomly into two groups of equal numbers. For one group, single oral dose of 6,00,000 IU of vitamin D and for the other group, weekly oral dose of 60,000 IU of vitamin D was administered for 8 weeks. All children were given calcium supplementation. Regular follow up was done at 1, 2, 6, 9 and 12 months and the improvement was assessed clinically, radiologically and as per the laboratory results. RESULTS Major risk factors for the development of nutritional rickets were prematurity, low birth weight, high birth order, consumption of complementary feeds poor in calcium, lack of adequate sunlight exposure and prolonged exclusive breast feeding. Response to treatment was comparable both clinically and as per the investigation results among those who received single massive dose and those on weekly vitamin D therapy. CONCLUSION Increased birth order, prematurity and low birth weight were important risk factors for rickets. Inadequate dietary calcium and inadequate sunlight exposure increased chance of getting rickets. Supplementation of vitamin D and calcium were protective. Inadequate maternal sunlight exposure, lack of antenatal and post-natal calcium and vitamin D supplementation showed a significant association with rickets. The most common clinical feature of rickets was bow legs. Both massive single dose therapy and weekly vitamin D administration were equally effective and revealed no significant difference in clinical

  13. [Hepatic complications in parenteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M J

    1996-01-01

    During parenteral nutrition hepatic complications are seen in about 15% of patients. They are characterized by steatosis, cholestasis and formation of sludge and bile stones. These hepatic complications depend on the duration as well as on the concept and mode of application of parenteral nutrition. They are more frequent after treatment periods of > 1-2 weeks, in response to a carbohydrate rich and low fat parenteral nutrition and in patients with extensive intestinal resection. Clinically, hepatic complications are frequently observed in new-borns and children, patients with inflammatory bowel disease, after ileum resection and in patients with hepatic malignancies. The exact pathophysiology of these phenomena is presently unknown. Enteral instead of parenteral nutrition, meeting the demand of nutrients, increasing fat supply (up to 50% of energy supply), "cyclic" parenteral nutrition and the addition of "semi-essential" nutrients (like L-glutamine, carnitin, cholin) are considered as possible strategies for the prevention and therapy of hepatic complications during parenteral nutrition.

  14. Description of an intensive nutrition therapy in hospitalized adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Cecilia; Tubic, Bojan; Svedlund, Anna; Magnusson, Per; Ellegård, Lars; Swolin-Eide, Diana; Forslund, Heléne Bertéus

    2016-04-01

    To describe an intensive nutrition therapy for hospitalized adolescents and young adults with anorexia nervosa (AN) in terms of body weight, body composition, energy balance and food related anxiety. Twenty-six young females, 16-24years of age, with AN were invited to participate at admission to a specialized eating disorder unit in Göteborg, Sweden. Intensive nutrition therapy comprised 12weeks on a structured meal plan. Six meals were served daily, in combination with high-energy liquid nutritional supplements from start. Energy and nutrient intakes, energy expenditure, body composition and food related anxiety were measured during the study. A 3-month follow-up of body weight and food related anxiety was conducted. Twenty-one patients participated. The total daily energy intake was, during the first week of treatment, (mean±SD) 3264±196kcal (74kcal/kg), and decreased gradually during treatment to 2622±331kcal (49kcal/kg). Total daily energy expenditure was initially 1568±149kcal and increased gradually to 2034±194kcal. Patients gained on average 9.8±2.1kg and body mass index increased from 15.5±0.9 to 19.0±0.9kg/m(2). Body fat increased from 13±6% to 26±6%. Fat free mass remained unchanged, but skeletal muscle mass increased from 16.7±2.0 to 17.6±2.4kg, p=0.009. Patients' food related anxiety decreased significantly during treatment and was still unchanged 3months later. The presented intensive nutrition therapy with initially high energy and nutrient intakes produced substantial weight gain, increased fat and muscle mass and decreased food related anxiety in AN patients, without any clinical side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enteral nutrition and quality of life in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma: a comparison of nasogastric tube, esophageal stent, and ostomy tube feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Jung; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wu, Chien-Yi; Chuang, Yun-Shiuan; Lee, Jui-Ying; Li, Hsien-Pin; Fang, Pen-Tzu; Tsai, Dong-Lin; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Wu, I-Chen

    2017-12-07

    This study prospectively recruited esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients who received esophageal stent, nasogastric tube (NGT), or jejunostomy/gastrostomy feeding to compare the changes in nutritional status and quality of life during chemoradiation therapy (CRT). In total, 81 patients were analyzed (stent, 7; surgical ostomy, 26; NGT, 19; oral intake, 29). An NGT was inserted when, despite medication, dysphagia or pain worsened with oral feeding during CRT. Serial body weight and daily narcotic demand were recorded. Changes in serum albumin level and quality of life were also assessed. In subgroup analysis comparing NGT and prophylactic surgical ostomy feeding, 5 patients with total occlusion in the ostomy group were excluded. Patients in all groups had similar decreases in mean body weight with an overall change of -6.41% ± 5.21% at the end of CRT. The stent group had significantly worse pain, decreased albumin (-1.03 ± .9 mg/dL), and decreased quality of life across CRT compared with the other groups. In subgroup analysis the stent group had significantly higher weight loss, whereas the NGT group had higher narcotic demand and slightly worse quality of life. Two patients (7.7%) had ileus days after jejunostomy creation. Five patients (23.8%) among those received prophylactic ostomy creation and scarcely used it. These preliminary results raise concerns that use of esophageal stents may be less suitable in patients undergoing CRT. Tube feeding by means of transnasal or percutaneous routes appear to be comparably effective during CRT, but both have advantages and disadvantages. We suggest a careful endoscopic evaluation to select the population more appropriate for NGT feeding on an as-needed basis during CRT. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modulation by enteral nutrition of the acute phase response and immune functions Regulación de la respuesta de fase aguda y de las funciones inmunitarias mediante nutrición enteral

    OpenAIRE

    Stig Bengmark

    2003-01-01

    To use nutrition in order to limit the negative consequences of physical and mental stress is not new. Recent advances in immunology and particularly in the understanding of the chemical language used to communicate both by eukarytic and prokarotic cells has made it easier to objectively evaluate effects of various immunomodulating efforts including the use of nutrients, vitamins and antioxidants in preventing or limiting the development of disease and its late consequences.El empleo de la nu...

  17. Antioxidant Intake and Antitumor Therapy: Toward Nutritional Recommendations for Optimal Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mut-Salud, Nuria; Álvarez, Pablo Juan; Garrido, Jose Manuel; Carrasco, Esther; Aránega, Antonia; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The role of the induction of oxidative stress as the mechanism of action of many antitumor drugs is acquiring an increasing interest. In such cases, the antitumor therapy success may be conditioned by the antioxidants present in our own body, which can be synthesized de novo (endogenous) or incorporated through the diet and nutritional supplements (exogenous). In this paper, we have reviewed different aspects of antioxidants, including their classification, natural sources, importance in diet, consumption of nutritional supplements, and the impact of antioxidants on health. Moreover, we have focused especially on the study of the interaction between antioxidants and antitumor therapy, considering both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In this regard, we found that the convenience of administration of antioxidants during cancer treatment still remains a very controversial issue. In general terms, antioxidants could promote or suppress the effectiveness of antitumor treatment and even protect healthy tissues against damage induced by oxidative stress. The effects may depend on many factors discussed in the paper. These factors should be taken into consideration in order to achieve precise nutritional recommendations for patients. The evidence at the moment suggests that the supplementation or restriction of exogenous antioxidants during cancer treatment, as appropriate, could contribute to improving its efficiency. PMID:26682013

  18. The application of an occupational therapy nutrition education programme for children who are obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguba, Marilene Calderaro; Valdés, Maria Teresa Moreno; da Silva, Carlos Antonio Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an occupational therapy nutrition education programme for children who are obese with the use of two interactive games. A quasi-experimental study was carried out at a municipal school in Fortaleza, Brazil. A convenient sample of 200 children ages 8-10 years old participated in the study. Data collection comprised a semi-structured interview, direct and structured observation, and focus group, comparing two interactive games based on the food pyramid (video game and board game) used individually and then combined. Both play activities were efficient in the mediation of nutritional concepts, with a preference for the board game. In the learning strategies, intrinsic motivation and metacognition were analysed. The attention strategy was most applied at the video game. We concluded that both games promoted the learning of nutritional concepts. We confirmed the effectiveness of the simultaneous application of interactive games in an interdisciplinary health environment. It is recommended that a larger sample should be used in evaluating the effectiveness of play and video games in teaching healthy nutrition to children in a school setting. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Different nutritional-state indicators of HIV-positive individuals undergoing antiretroviral therapy

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    J. Geraix

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at learning about the nutritional profile of HIV-positive individuals undergoing antiretroviral therapy and at comparing the performance of nutritional-state indicators. A transversal study was performed on 94 patients attending the Tropical Diseases Outpatient Hospital of Botucatu Medical School (FMB - UNESP. The body mass index (BMI and the classification by Papini-Berto (PB were used to evaluate nutritional state, aiming at detecting malnutrition and obesity. The waist-to-hips ratio (W/HR and waist circumference (WC were adopted for identification of abdominal obesity and lipodystrophy. According to BMI, most of the individuals were eutrophic, followed by 30.9% overweight and 6.4% malnourished. By using the PB classification, the frequency of malnourished increased (22.3%. The analysis of the PB classification in relation to BMI indicated that the former presented high sensitivity and good specificity for malnutrition diagnosis, namely 100% and 83%, respectively. The prevalence of abdominal obesity was 7.44% according to WC, and a higher prevalence (38.3% was observed when taking W/HR into account. There was significant positive association between nutritional diagnosis according to PB and T CD4+ lymphocyte. The results support the use of PB classification for malnutrition detection as well as that of BMI and W/HR for overweight and fat redistribution.

  20. Unique Patterns of Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements During Maturation in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Neonates: Opportunities for Modifying Nutritional Therapy and Influencing Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algotar, Anushree; Shaikhkhalil, Ala K; Siler-Wurst, Kim; Sitaram, Swetha; Gulati, Ish; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2018-01-01

    Body composition is an important predictor of long-term outcomes in neonates and may be altered by several factors. Innovative methods like air displacement plethysmography (ADP) can safely and reliably measure body composition, potentially assisting in individualization of nutrition therapy. 1) To characterize patterns of body composition change in convalescing neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and examine factors leading to variation. 2) To evaluate if the time interval between 2 measurements via ADP can detect significant changes. NICU infants underwent anthropometry and body composition measurements by ADP at 37.5±0.7 weeks (Time 1) and 41.0±0.7 weeks (Time 2) postmenstrual age. Nutrition data were recorded. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests and linear regression models, presented as mean±SE, median (IQR), or %. Twenty-two neonates (54% males, 32.2±0.9 weeks gestation) were evaluated with a median interval of 3.6 (2.9-4.0) weeks between studies. Mean weight and % body fat increased significantly. There was no significant difference between mean weight and mean % body fat compared with normal references. Abdominal girth increased and mid-arm circumference decreased (pcomposition can effectively assess nutrition status of fragile NICU infants. Although, an interval of 2.9-4.0 weeks between consecutive measurements detected significant changes in body composition, more frequent measurements are needed to determine nutrition factors responsible for body composition changes. © 2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Prospective, randomized trial on the effect of cyclic versus continuous enteral nutrition on postoperative gastric function after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Akkermans, L. M.; van Gulik, T. M.; Masclee, A. A.; Moojen, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of a cyclic versus a continuous enteral feeding protocol on postoperative delayed gastric emptying, start of normal diet, and hospital stay was assessed in patients undergoing pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Delayed gastric emptying

  2. Perspectivas en el diseño y desarrollo de productos para nutrición enteral Perspectives in the design and development of new products for enteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    A. J. Pérez de la Cruz; J. Abilés; R. Pérez Abud

    2006-01-01

    La Nutrición Enteral es una técnica que aunque utilizada desde tiempos inmemoriales, ha sido en los últimos 25 años cuando ha experimentado un desarrollo considerable, pasando de ser un elemento terapéutico secundario, destinado exclusivamente a alimentar al paciente, a ocupar en la actualidad un papel importante que va mucho más allá del simple acto de nutrir. La composición cuantitativa pero sobre todo la cualitativa, es objeto de un interesante debate en el que se busca un perfil que permi...

  3. Nutrition for the pediatric surgical patient: approach in the peri-operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcão Mário Cícero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is essential for maintenance of physiologic homeostasis and growth. Hypermetabolic states lead to a depletion of body stores, with decreased immunocompetence and increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update regarding the provision of appropriate nutrition for the pediatric surgical patient, emphasizing the preoperative and postoperative periods. Modern nutritional support for the surgical patient comprises numerous stages, including assessment of nutritional status, nutritional requirements, and nutritional therapy. Nutritional assessment is performed utilizing the clinical history, clinical examination, anthropometry, and biochemical evaluation. Anthropometric parameters include body weight, height, arm and head circumference, and skinfold thickness measurements. The biochemical evaluation is conducted using determinations of plasma levels of proteins, including album, pre-albumin, transferrin, and retinol-binding protein. These parameters are subject to error and are influenced by the rapid changes in body composition in the peri-operative period. Nutritional therapy includes enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. Enteral feeding is the first choice for nutritional therapy. If enteral feeding is not indicated, parenteral nutrition must be utilized. In all cases, an individualized, adequate diet (enteral formula or parenteral solution is obligatory to decrease the occurrence of overfeeding and its undesirable consequences.

  4. Nutritional intra-amniotic therapy increases survival in a rabbit model of fetal growth restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Miriam; Pla, Laura; Zamora, Monica; Crispi, Fatima; Gratacos, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the perinatal effects of a prenatal therapy based on intra-amniotic nutritional supplementation in a rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Methods IUGR was surgically induced in pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25 by ligating 40–50% of uteroplacental vessels of each gestational sac. At the same time, modified-parenteral nutrition solution (containing glucose, amino acids and electrolytes) was injected into the amniotic sac of nearly half of the IUGR fetuses (IUGR-T group n = 106), whereas sham injections were performed in the rest of fetuses (IUGR group n = 118). A control group without IUGR induction but sham injection was also included (n = 115). Five days after the ligation procedure, a cesarean section was performed to evaluate fetal cardiac function, survival and birth weight. Results Survival was significantly improved in the IUGR fetuses that were treated with intra-amniotic nutritional supplementation as compared to non-treated IUGR animals (survival rate: controls 71% vs. IUGR 44% p = 0.003 and IUGR-T 63% vs. IUGR 44% p = 0.02), whereas, birth weight (controls mean 43g ± SD 9 vs. IUGR 36g ± SD 9 vs. IUGR-T 35g ± SD 8, p = 0.001) and fetal cardiac function were similar among the IUGR groups. Conclusion Intra-amniotic injection of a modified-parenteral nutrient solution appears to be a promising therapy for reducing mortality among IUGR. These results provide an opportunity to develop new intra-amniotic nutritional strategies to reach the fetus by bypassing the placental insufficiency. PMID:29466434

  5. Nutritional status and CD4 cell counts in patients with HIV/AIDS receiving antiretroviral therapy

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    Ana Celia Oliveira dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Even with current highly active antiretroviral therapy, individuals with AIDS continue to exhibit important nutritional deficits and reduced levels of albumin and hemoglobin, which may be directly related to their cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 cell counts. The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS and relate the findings to the albumin level, hemoglobin level and CD4 cell count. Methods Patients over 20 years of age with AIDS who were hospitalized in a university hospital and were receiving antiretroviral therapy were studied with regard to clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and sociodemographic characteristics. Body mass index, percentage of weight loss, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and arm muscle circumference were analyzed. Data on albumin, hemoglobin, hematocrit and CD4 cell count were obtained from patient charts. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test for independent variables and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The level of significance was set to 0.05 (α = 5%. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. Results Of the 50 patients evaluated, 70% were male. The prevalence of malnutrition was higher when the definition was based on arm circumference and triceps skinfold measurement. The concentrations of all biochemical variables were significantly lower among patients with a body mass index of less than 18.5kg/m2. The CD4 cell count, albumin, hemoglobin and hematocrit anthropometric measures were directly related to each other. Conclusions These findings underscore the importance of nutritional follow-up for underweight patients with AIDS, as nutritional status proved to be related to important biochemical alterations.

  6. Effect of minimal enteral feeding on recovery in a methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S. S.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Havinga, Rick; Groen, Albert K.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from gastrointestinal mucositis often receive parenteral nutrition as nutritional support. However, the absence of enteral nutrition might not be beneficial for the intestine. We aimed to determine the feasibility of minimal enteral feeding (MEF) administration in a methotrexate

  7. Effect of minimal enteral feeding on recovery in a methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S. S.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Havinga, Rick; Groen, Albert K.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    Patients suffering from gastrointestinal mucositis often receive parenteral nutrition as nutritional support. However, the absence of enteral nutrition might not be beneficial for the intestine. We aimed to determine the feasibility of minimal enteral feeding (MEF) administration in a methotrexate

  8. [Contemporary criteria of the diagnosis and current recommendations for nutritional therapy in anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Musialik, Katarzyna; Skrypnik, Katarzyna

    2014-05-01

    The basic criterion for the diagnosis of anorexia (AN - anorexia nervosa) by ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, version 10) is the body weight less than 15% of the expected normal body weight. According to DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, version IV) the basic feature of AN is a refusal to maintain body weight equal or greater than the minimal normal weight. The prevalence of anorexia nervosa is 0.3-0.5% or even 1.3-3.7% if include pre-anorexic states (eg. the phenomenon of pro-ana). The main feature of anorexia is a reduction of caloric intake. According to the recommendations of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for nutritional treatment of patients with AN the main goals in therapy of AN are: restoration of body weight, normalization of eating patterns, achievement a normal feeling of hunger and satiety and correction of the consequences of improper nutrition. APA suggests that achievable weight gain is about 0.9-1.4 kg per week in the case of hospitalized patients and approximately 0.23-0.45 kg per week in the case of outpatients. During the nutritional treatment of AN numerous side effects including anxiety, phobia, occurrence of obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior, suicidal thoughts and intentions may occur. According to National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) the most important goal of AN therapy is weight gain in the range of 0.5-1 kg per week in hospitalized patients and 0.5 kg per week for outpatients. A person suffering from anorexia in the initial period of nutritional treatment spends twice more energy to maintain elevated body temperature, which significantly increases during the night rest. This phenomenon is called nocturnal hyperthermia and has a negative effect on the healing process. "Refeeding syndrome" is an adverse effect of nutritional treatment in anorexia. It is caused by too rapid nutrition in a patient suffering from chronic starvation. It can endanger the patient

  9. ASPEN-AND-ESPEN: A postacute-care comparison of the basic definition of malnutrition from the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics with the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Dolores; Marco, Ester; Ronquillo-Moreno, Natalia; Maciel-Bravo, Liev; Gonzales-Carhuancho, Abel; Duran, Xavier; Guillén-Solà, Anna; Vázquez-Ibar, Olga; Escalada, Ferran; Muniesa, Josep M

    2018-01-25

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition by applying the ASPEN/AND definition and the ESPEN consensus definition in a postacute-care population, and secondly, to determine the metrological properties of the set of six clinical characteristics that constitute the ASPEN/AND basic diagnosis, compared to the ESPEN consensus, based mostly on objective anthropometric measurements. Prospective study of 84 consecutive deconditioned older inpatients (85.4 ± 6.2; 59.5% women) admitted for rehabilitation in postacute care. ASPEN/AND diagnosis of malnutrition was considered in presence of at least two of the following: low energy intake, fluid accumulation, diminished handgrip strength, and loss of weight, muscle mass, or subcutaneous fat. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, accuracy, likelihood ratios, and kappa statistics were calculated for ASPEN/AND criteria and compared with ESPEN consensus. The prevalence of malnutrition by ASPEN/AND criteria was 63.1% and by ESPEN consensus, 20.2%; both diagnoses were associated with significantly longer length of stay, but the ESPEN definition was significantly associated with poorer functional outcomes after the rehabilitation program. Compared to ESPEN consensus, ASPEN/AND diagnosis showed fair validity (sensitivity = 94.1%; specificity = 44.8%); kappa statistic was 2.217. Applying the ASPEN/AND definition obtained a higher prevalence of malnutrition in a postacute-care population than was identified by the ESPEN definition. ASPEN/AND criteria had fair validity and agreement compared with the ESPEN definition. A simple, evidence-based, unified malnutrition definition might improve geriatric care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutrition therapy with high intensity interval training to improve prostate cancer-related fatigue in men on androgen deprivation therapy: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Baguley, Brenton J.; Skinner, Tina L.; Leveritt, Michael D.; Wright, Olivia R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent, prolonged and distressing side effects of prostate cancer treatment with androgen deprivation therapy. Preliminary evidence suggests natural therapies such as nutrition therapy and structured exercise prescription can reduce symptoms of cancer-related fatigue. Men appear to change their habitual dietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis, yet prostate-specific dietary guidelines provide limited support for managing adverse ...

  11. Soporte nutricional enteral en pacientes pediátricos con insuficiencia renal crónica en hemodiálisis Enteral nutritional support in pediatric patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Pineda Pérez; Mercedes Morell Contreras; Santiago Valdés Martín; José Florin Yrabier; Xiomara Herrera Argüelles; Margarita Hernández

    2006-01-01

    Se realizó un estudio clínico con el objetivo de evaluar la aceptabilidad, tolerancia y efecto en el estado nutricional de la nutrición enteral con Nutricomp® ADN renal de B-BRAUN. Se estudiaron 12 pacientes en edades entre los 10 y 19 años, que presentaban insuficiencia renal crónica y recibían tratamiento de hemodiálisis. Además de su alimentación habitual se indicó ADN renal (90 g), por vía oral, en la sesión de diálisis. Se evaluó cada paciente al inicio y se comparó consigo mismo a los 3...

  12. Functional assessment of nutrition status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mary Krystofiak

    2015-04-01

    Functional status assessment has been recommended as a part of a complete nutrition assessment for decades, but the specific components of this assessment have eluded a consensus definition. The recent Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition consensus criteria for identification of malnutrition include functional assessment determined by handgrip dynamometry, with the understanding that this technique is not practical for use in some patient populations. Other techniques for functional assessment include physical performance measures such as timed gait and chair stands, as well as activities of daily living tools such as the Katz Index, Lawton Scale, and Karnofsky Scale Index. Manual muscle testing and computed tomography scan assessment of lean tissue are other tools that show promise in correlating functional and nutrition assessments. Functional assessment parameters may be least well correlated with nutrition status in older individuals. Despite a number of scientific studies of a variety of tools for functional assessment, there is to date no definitive tool for use in all individuals in all settings. Nutrition scientists and clinicians must continue to collaborate with colleagues in physical and occupational therapy, geriatrics, and nursing to refine current functional assessment tools to more effectively correlate with nutrition and malnutrition assessment parameters. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Individual nutrition therapy and exercise regime: a controlled trial of injured, vulnerable elderly (INTERACTIVE trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susie K; Humphreys, Karen J; Miller, Michelle D; Cameron, Ian D; Whitehead, Craig; Kurrle, Susan; Mackintosh, Shylie; Crotty, Maria

    2008-02-26

    Proximal femoral fractures are amongst the most devastating consequences of osteoporosis and injurious accidental falls with 25-35% of patients dying in the first year post-fracture. Effective rehabilitation strategies are evolving however, despite established associations between nutrition, mobility, strength and strength-related functional outcomes; there has been only one small study with older adults immediately following fragility fracture where a combination of both exercise and nutrition have been provided. The aim of the INTERACTIVE trial is to establish whether a six month, individualised exercise and nutrition program commencing within fourteen days of surgery for proximal femur fracture, results in clinically and statistically significant improvements in physical function, body composition and quality of life at an acceptable level of cost and resource use and without increasing the burden of caregivers. This randomised controlled trial will be performed across two sites, a 500 bed acute hospital in Adelaide, South Australia and a 250 bed acute hospital in Sydney, New South Wales. Four hundred and sixty community-dwelling older adults aged > 70 will be recruited after suffering a proximal femoral fracture and followed into the community over a 12-month period. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a six month individualised care plan combining resistance training and nutrition therapy commencing within 14 days post-surgery. Outcomes will be assessed by an individual masked to treatment allocation at six and 12 months. To determine differences between the groups at the primary end-point (six months), ANCOVA or logistic regression will be used with models adjusted according to potential confounders. The INTERACTIVE trial is among the first to combine nutrition and exercise therapy as an early intervention to address the serious consequence of rapid deconditioning and weight loss and subsequent ability to regain pre-morbid function

  14. Individual nutrition therapy and exercise regime: A controlled trial of injured, vulnerable elderly (INTERACTIVE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead Craig

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal femoral fractures are amongst the most devastating consequences of osteoporosis and injurious accidental falls with 25–35% of patients dying in the first year post-fracture. Effective rehabilitation strategies are evolving however, despite established associations between nutrition, mobility, strength and strength-related functional outcomes; there has been only one small study with older adults immediately following fragility fracture where a combination of both exercise and nutrition have been provided. The aim of the INTERACTIVE trial is to establish whether a six month, individualised exercise and nutrition program commencing within fourteen days of surgery for proximal femur fracture, results in clinically and statistically significant improvements in physical function, body composition and quality of life at an acceptable level of cost and resource use and without increasing the burden of caregivers. Methods and Design This randomised controlled trial will be performed across two sites, a 500 bed acute hospital in Adelaide, South Australia and a 250 bed acute hospital in Sydney, New South Wales. Four hundred and sixty community-dwelling older adults aged > 70 will be recruited after suffering a proximal femoral fracture and followed into the community over a 12-month period. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a six month individualised care plan combining resistance training and nutrition therapy commencing within 14 days post-surgery. Outcomes will be assessed by an individual masked to treatment allocation at six and 12 months. To determine differences between the groups at the primary end-point (six months, ANCOVA or logistic regression will be used with models adjusted according to potential confounders. Discussion The INTERACTIVE trial is among the first to combine nutrition and exercise therapy as an early intervention to address the serious consequence of rapid deconditioning

  15. American Society for Enhanced Recovery and Perioperative Quality Initiative Joint Consensus Statement on Nutrition Screening and Therapy Within a Surgical Enhanced Recovery Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmeyer, Paul E; Carli, Franco; Evans, David C; Guilbert, Sarah; Kozar, Rosemary; Pryor, Aurora; Thiele, Robert H; Everett, Sotiria; Grocott, Mike; Gan, Tong J; Shaw, Andrew D; Thacker, Julie K M; Miller, Timothy E; Hedrick, Traci L; McEvoy, Matthew D; Mythen, Michael G; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Gupta, Ruchir; Holubar, Stefan D; Senagore, Anthony J; Abola, Ramon E; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott; Kent, Michael L; Feldman, Liane S; Fiore, Julio F

    2018-01-23

    Perioperative malnutrition has proven to be challenging to define, diagnose, and treat. Despite these challenges, it is well known that suboptimal nutritional status is a strong independent predictor of poor postoperative outcomes. Although perioperative caregivers consistently express recognition of the importance of nutrition screening and optimization in the perioperative period, implementation of evidence-based perioperative nutrition guidelines and pathways in the United States has been quite limited and needs to be addressed in surgery-focused recommendations. The second Perioperative Quality Initiative brought together a group of international experts with the objective of providing consensus recommendations on this important topic with the goal of (1) developing guidelines for screening of nutritional status to identify patients at risk for adverse outcomes due to malnutrition; (2) address optimal methods of providing nutritional support and optimizing nutrition status preoperatively; and (3) identifying when and how to optimize nutrition delivery in the postoperative period. Discussion led to strong recommendations for implementation of routine preoperative nutrition screening to identify patients in need of preoperative nutrition optimization. Postoperatively, nutrition delivery should be restarted immediately after surgery. The key role of oral nutrition supplements, enteral nutrition, and parenteral nutrition (implemented in that order) in most perioperative patients was advocated for with protein delivery being more important than total calorie delivery. Finally, the role of often-inadequate nutrition intake in the posthospital setting was discussed, and the role of postdischarge oral nutrition supplements was emphasized.

  16. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druml, W.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Partial EN (enteral nutrition should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD, peritoneal dialysis (PD or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT, or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully. In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out.

  17. Nutrition therapy with high intensity interval training to improve prostate cancer-related fatigue in men on androgen deprivation therapy: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Brenton J; Skinner, Tina L; Leveritt, Michael D; Wright, Olivia R L

    2017-01-03

    Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent, prolonged and distressing side effects of prostate cancer treatment with androgen deprivation therapy. Preliminary evidence suggests natural therapies such as nutrition therapy and structured exercise prescription can reduce symptoms of cancer-related fatigue. Men appear to change their habitual dietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis, yet prostate-specific dietary guidelines provide limited support for managing adverse side effects of treatment. The exercise literature has shown high intensity interval training can improve various aspects of health that are typically impaired with androgen deprivation therapy; however exercise at this intensity is yet to be conducted in men with prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of nutrition therapy beyond the current healthy eating guidelines with high intensity interval training for managing cancer-related fatigue in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy. This is a two-arm randomized control trial of 116 men with prostate cancer and survivors treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group i.e. nutrition therapy and high intensity interval training, or usual care. The intervention group will receive 20 weeks of individualized nutrition therapy from an Accredited Practising Dietitian, and high intensity interval training (from weeks 12-20 of the intervention) from an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. The usual care group will maintain their standard treatment regimen over the 20 weeks. Both groups will undertake primary and secondary outcome testing at baseline, week 8, 12, and 20; testing includes questionnaires of fatigue and quality of life, objective measures of body composition, muscular strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, biomarkers for disease progression, as well as dietary analysis. The primary outcomes for this trial are measures of

  18. Successful in vitro expansion and Characterization of Human Enteric Neuronal cells- A step towards Cell based therapies for Hirschsprung’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Enteric Nervous system (ENS is a part of the Peripheral nervous system (PNS that controls the peristaltic activity of the gut wall which is essential for propulsion of food in the digestive tract. It is composed of a large number of neurons and glial cells, distributed throughout the length of the gut. These ganglion cells develop from the neural crest in the embryo. Failure of complete colonization of the gut by these enteric neural crest cells during early development of life results in absence of ganglia or neurons in a portion of the gut, usually the colon which leads to aperistaltis and severe intestinal obstruction. This is known as Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR also known as congenital megacolon. HSCR affects 1 in 4500 newborns (1, 2. It appears either sporadically or has a familial basis and is often associated with other developmental defects. The main forms of treatment of HSCR are surgical resection of the aganglionic segment and pull through of the normal bowel. At present research is aimed at developing Cell based therapies for replacement of ganglion cells or enteric neuronal cells in the aganglionic portion of the gut thus aiming at restoring the function of the gut (1, 3, 5. In this study we have isolated, in vitro expanded and characterized the Enteric Neuronal cells derived from human gut full thickness biopsy samplesMATERIALS AND METHODS: The postnatal gut full thickness biopsy samples of size 2-4 mm were obtained using from 13 patients undergoing gut resection surgery after informed consent. The samples were washed in Phosphate Buffer saline and using forceps, the outer smooth muscle layers along with the myenteric plexus were peeled off from the underlying tissue as strips. The strips were washed in Phosphate Buffer saline (PBS and treated with 1mg/ml Collagenase/Dispase mixture in PBS for 30-45 min at 37°C. The digested cells were filtered with 70µm filter and the cell suspensions were centrifuged at 1800

  19. Nutraceuticals, nutritional therapy, phytonutrients, and phytotherapy for improvement of human health: a perspective on plant biotechnology application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Plants are one of the most important resources of human foods and medicines. Rapidly increasing knowledge on nutrition, medicine, and plant biotechnology has dramatically changed the concepts about food, health and agriculture, and brought in a revolution on them. Nutritional therapy and phytotherapy have emerged as new concepts and healing systems have quickly and widely spread in recent years. Strong recommendations for consumption of nutraceuticals, natural plant foods, and the use of nutritional therapy and phytotherapy have become progressively popular to improve health, and to prevent and treat diseases. With these trends, improving the dietary nutritional values of fruits, vegetables and other crops or even bioactive components in folk herbals has become targets of the blooming plant biotechnology industry. This review attempts to display and remark on these aspects. It summarizes the progress made on nutraceuticals, nutritional therapy, phytonutrients, phytotherapy, and their related epidemiological investigations and clinical studies. It also covers markets of these health-promoting products and disease-preventing or healing systems, as well as regulations behind them that direct the development of biotechnology study and application. Finally, related patents are listed and briefly analyzed, regarding of plant biotechnological research and progress on transgenic crops to improve nutritional value, phytotherapy efficiency, or to produce pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites or high-valued protein medicines such as vaccines and antibodies.

  20. Analysis of the declared nutritional behaviours in a group of diabetology nurses educating patients about diabetes diet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głąbska, Dominika; Włodarek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The proper nutrition in diabetes is one of the crucial elements of therapy, but in practice, diet of diabetic individuals is commonly improperly balanced, that is associated with lack of nutritional knowledge. The nurses are also often characterized by insufficient knowledge about diabetes diet therapy and poor nutritional behaviors. The aim of the study was to analyze of the declared nutritional behaviors in a group of diabetology nurses and to compare it with declared nutritional behaviors of the control group. The group of 52 nurses recruited from all the regions of Poland working with diabetic patients was analysed and compared with control group of 63 individuals - random non-diabetic patients from all the regions of Poland. They were asked about accomplishing practical recommended nutritional goals for adults in Poland and were able to indicate if they follow detailed recommended nutritional goals "always" (3 points), "sometimes" (1 point) or "never" (0 points). The diabetology nurses rarely declared fish and legumes intake (never or sometimes accomplishing goal: 87%), milk and dairy products intake (75%), as well as moderate sugar and sweets intake (69%). Nurses significantly rarer than control group declared regularity of meals (p=0.0000) and diversion of meals (p=0.0000). The lack of correlation between number of years of working with diabetic individuals and number of obtained points during assessment of nutritional behaviors was observed. The nutritional behaviors of diabetology nurses are not good, even if they educate diabetic patients on daily basis. Nutritional education should be conducted not only in groups of diabetic patients, but also, in groups of diabetology nurses.

  1. Glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very-low-birth-weight infants and effects on feeding tolerance and infectious morbidity: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Fetter, Willem P. F.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Glutamine depletion has negative effects on the functional integrity of the gut and leads to immunosuppression. Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion because nutrition is limited in the first weeks of life. Objective: The objective was to determine

  2. Intestinal adaptation is stimulated by partial enteral nutrition supplemented with the prebiotic short-chain fructooligosaccharide in a neonatal intestinal failure piglet model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Jennifer L; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    Butyrate has been shown to stimulate intestinal adaptation when added to parenteral nutrition (PN) following small bowel resection but is not available in current PN formulations. The authors hypothesized that pre- and probiotic administration may be a clinically feasible method to administer...

  3. Attitudes Toward Combining Psychological, Mind-Body Therapies and Nutritional Approaches for the Enhancement of Mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, Taryn Jade; Henke, Miriam; Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Context • Interest has been rising in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the promotion of health and treatment of disease. To date, the majority of CAM research has focused on exploring the demographic characteristics, attitudes, and motivations of CAM users and on the efficacy of different therapies and products. Less is known with respect to the psychological characteristics of people who use CAM. Previous research has not investigated the usefulness of integrating mind-body therapies with natural products in a combined mood intervention. Objective • The study intended to investigate attitudes toward a proposed new approach to the treatment of mood, one that integrates psychological mind-body therapies and natural nutritional products. Design • Participants completed an online survey covering demographics, personality traits, locus of control, use of CAM, attitudes toward the proposed psychonutritional approach, and mood. Setting • This study was conducted at the University of Adelaide School of Psychology (Adelaide, SA, Australia). Participants • Participants were 333 members of the Australian general public, who were recruited online via the social-media platform Facebook. The majority were women (83.2%), aged between 18 and 81 y. Outcome Measures • Measures included the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale Form B, the Ten-Item Personality Inventory, and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. Results • Participants were positive about the proposed approach and were likely to try it to enhance their moods. The likeliness of use of the combined approach was significantly higher in the female participants and was associated with higher levels of the personality trait openness and an internal health locus of control, after controlling for all other variables. Conclusions • Interest exists for an intervention for mood that incorporates both psychological and nutritional approaches. Further research into the

  4. Combining pain therapy with lifestyle: the role of personalized nutrition and nutritional supplements according to the SIMPAR Feed Your Destiny approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Manuela; Muscoli, Carolina; Schatman, Michael E; Stallone, Tiziana; Intelligente, Fabio; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Franceschi, Francesco; Arranz, Laura Isabel; Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Salamone, Maurizio; Ilari, Sara; Belfer, Inna; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, attention to the lifestyle of patients has been rapidly increasing in the field of pain therapy, particularly with regard to the role of nutrition in pain development and its management. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the role of nutrition and nutraceuticals, microbiome, obesity, soy, omega-3 fatty acids, and curcumin supplementation as key elements in modulating the efficacy of analgesic treatments, including opioids. These main topics were addressed during the first edition of the Study In Multidisciplinary Pain Research workshop: "FYD (Feed Your Destiny): Fighting Pain", held on April 7, 2016, in Rome, Italy, which was sponsored by a grant from the Italian Ministry of Instruction on "Nutraceuticals and Innovative Pharmacology". The take-home message of this workshop was the recognition that patients with chronic pain should undergo nutritional assessment and counseling, which should be initiated at the onset of treatment. Some foods and supplements used in personalized treatment will likely improve clinical outcomes of analgesic therapy and result in considerable improvement of patient compliance and quality of life. From our current perspective, the potential benefit of including nutrition in personalizing pain medicine is formidable and highly promising.

  5. Combining pain therapy with lifestyle: the role of personalized nutrition and nutritional supplements according to the SIMPAR Feed Your Destiny approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Manuela; Muscoli, Carolina; Schatman, Michael E; Stallone, Tiziana; Intelligente, Fabio; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Franceschi, Francesco; Arranz, Laura Isabel; Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Salamone, Maurizio; Ilari, Sara; Belfer, Inna; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, attention to the lifestyle of patients has been rapidly increasing in the field of pain therapy, particularly with regard to the role of nutrition in pain development and its management. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the role of nutrition and nutraceuticals, microbiome, obesity, soy, omega-3 fatty acids, and curcumin supplementation as key elements in modulating the efficacy of analgesic treatments, including opioids. These main topics were addressed during the first edition of the Study In Multidisciplinary Pain Research workshop: “FYD (Feed Your Destiny): Fighting Pain”, held on April 7, 2016, in Rome, Italy, which was sponsored by a grant from the Italian Ministry of Instruction on “Nutraceuticals and Innovative Pharmacology”. The take-home message of this workshop was the recognition that patients with chronic pain should undergo nutritional assessment and counseling, which should be initiated at the onset of treatment. Some foods and supplements used in personalized treatment will likely improve clinical outcomes of analgesic therapy and result in considerable improvement of patient compliance and quality of life. From our current perspective, the potential benefit of including nutrition in personalizing pain medicine is formidable and highly promising. PMID:27994480

  6. Terapia nutricional em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Nutritional therapy in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iára Kallyanna Cavalcante Ferreira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Esta revisão tem como objetivo levantar os principais aspectos necessários para a realização de terapia nutricional segura e eficaz ao paciente crítico. CONTEÚDO: Foi feito um levantamento bibliográfico com livros didáticos e artigos científicos em Português, Inglês e Espanhol com resultados dos últimos 20 anos.A terapia nutricional é parte integrante dos cuidados do paciente em unidades de terapia intensiva. O seu sucesso envolve as etapas de avaliação nutricional, determinação das necessidades de calorias e nutrientes, decisão da via de infusão e o tipo de dieta empregada. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de nutrientes com a finalidade de melhorar a função imunológica (imunonutrientes, é cada vez mais freqüente, porém seu uso não está bem estabelecido para pacientes críticos. Mais estudos clínicos são necessários para estabelecer a melhor forma de nutrir o paciente crítico.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review is to approach the main necessary aspects for the accomplishment of safety and efficient nutritional therapy to the critically ill patient. CONTENTS: Bibliographical survey with didactic books and scientific articles was made in Portuguese, English and Spanish with results of the last 20 years. Nutritional support is an integrant part in the care of patients in intensive care units. The success of the nutritional therapy involves the stages of nutritional assessment, determines the route of diet infusion and the calories and nutrients needs. CONCLUSIONS: The use of nutrients with immune function (immunonutrients is each more frequents, however, its use is not well established for critical illness. More clinical studies are necessary to establish the best form to nourish the critical ill patient.

  7. Terapia nutricional no transplante hepático Nutritional therapy in liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Beatriz PAROLIN

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Racional - Deficiências nutricionais, por vezes graves, são comuns em pacientes com insuficiência hepática, candidatos a transplante de fígado. A terapia nutricional pode corrigir total ou parcialmente tais deficiências, melhorando as condições clínicas e o prognóstico desses indivíduos, frente ao grande desafio do transplante hepático. Objetivos - Breve revisão do papel do fígado no metabolismo dos diversos nutrientes. Descrição dos métodos de avaliação do estado nutricional, traçando-se as bases da terapia nutricional segundo condições hepáticas diversas, no pré e pós-transplante, em relação às necessidades calóricas e dos diversos nutrientes. Apresentação de intervenções nutricionais, no controle das complicações metabólicas resultantes do uso de drogas imunossupressoras. Conclusão - A terapia nutricional é valiosa aliada no tratamento clínico de pacientes candidatos ou já submetidos ao transplante hepático, contribuindo para um prognóstico favorável e para a melhora da qualidade de vida desses indivíduos.Background - Malnutrition, sometimes severe is common in patients with chronic hepatic diseases who are candidates for liver transplantation. Nutritional therapy can induce partial or total correction of such deficiencies, improving clinical conditions and prognosis of patients who face the great defiance of liver transplantation. Aims - Brief revision of hepatic role in the metabolism of several nutrients. Description of available methods of dietary therapy and its application both under different abnormal hepatic conditions and pre and post-transplant periods. The role of nutritional intervention in metabolic side effects due to immunosuppressive drugs. Conclusion - Nutritional therapy is a valuable adjuvant resource to the clinical treatment of candidates and submitted patients to hepatic transplantation providing better prognosis and improved life quality.

  8. Effect of intensive vs conventional insulin therapy on perioperative nutritional substrates metabolism in patients undergoing gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Cheng; Zhou, Yan-Bing; Chen, Dong; Niu, Zhao-Jian; Yu, Yang

    2012-06-07

    To investigate the effect of intensive vs conventional insulin therapy on perioperative nutritional substrates metabolism in patients undergoing radical distal gastrectomy. Within 24 h of intensive care unit management, patients with gastric cancer were enrolled after written informed consent and randomized to the intensive insulin therapy (IIT) group to keep glucose levels from 4.4 to 6.1 mmol/L or the conventional insulin therapy (CIT) group to keep levels less than 10 mmol/L. Resting energy expenditure (REE), respiratory quotient (RQ), resting energy expenditure per kilogram (REE/kg), and the lipid oxidation rate were monitored by the indirect calorimeter of calcium citrate malate nutrition metabolism investigation system. The changes in body composition were analyzed by multi-frequency bioimpedance analysis. Blood fasting glucose and insulin concentration were measured for assessment of Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Sixty patients were enrolled. Compared with preoperative baseline, postoperative REE increased by over 22.15% and 11.07%; REE/kg rose up to 27.22 ± 1.33 kcal/kg and 24.72 ± 1.43 kcal/kg; RQ decreased to 0.759 ± 0.034 and 0.791 ± 0.037; the lipid oxidation ratio was up to 78.25% ± 17.74% and 67.13% ± 12.76% supported by parenteral nutrition solutions from 37.56% ± 11.64% at the baseline; the level of Ln-HOMA-IR went up dramatically (P total protein, albumin and triglyceride declined significantly on postoperative days 1 and 3 compared with pre-operative levels (P total protein and albumin concentrations in the IIT group were greater than those in the CIT group (P = 0.023, 0.009). Postoperative values of internal cell fluid (ICF), fat mass, protein mass (PM), muscle mass, free fat mass and body weight decreased obviously on postoperative 7th day compared with the preoperative baseline in the CIT group (P consumption of fat mass, PM and ICF compared with CIT (P = 0.009 to 0.026). There were some benefits of IIT in

  9. Nutritional status and clinical outcome of children on continuous renal replacement therapy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ana; Santiago, Maria J; López-Herce, Jesús; Montoro, Sandra; López, Jorge; Bustinza, Amaya; Moral, Ramón; Bellón, Jose M

    2012-09-27

    No studies on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) have analyzed nutritional status in children. The objective of this study was to assess the association between mortality and nutritional status of children receiving CRRT. Prospective observational study to analyze the nutritional status of children receiving CRRT and its association with mortality. The variables recorded were age, weight, sex, diagnosis, albumin, creatinine, urea, uric acid, severity of illness scores, CRRT-related complications, duration of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, and mortality. The sample comprised 174 critically ill children on CRRT. The median weight of the patients was 10 kg, 35% were under percentile (P) 3, and 56% had a weight/P50 ratio of less than 0.85. Only two patients were above P95. The mean age for patients under P3 was significantly lower than that of the other patients (p = 0.03). The incidence of weight under P3 was greater in younger children (p = 0.007) and in cardiac patients and in those who had previous chronic renal insufficiency (p = 0.047). The mortality analysis did not include patients with pre-existing renal disease. Mortality was 38.9%. Mortality for patients with weight P3 (51% vs 33%; p = 0.037). In the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, the only factor associated with mortality was protein-energy wasting (malnutrition) (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.067-4.173; p = 0.032). The frequency of protein-energy wasting in children who require CRRT is high, and the frequency of obesity is low. Protein-energy wasting is more frequent in children with previous end-stage renal disease and heart disease. Underweight children present a higher mortality rate than patients with normal body weight.

  10. Combining pain therapy with lifestyle: the role of personalized nutrition and nutritional supplements according to the SIMPAR Feed Your Destiny approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gregori M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Manuela De Gregori,1–3 Carolina Muscoli,2,4,5 Michael E Schatman,2,6 Tiziana Stallone,2,7 Fabio Intelligente,2,8 Mariangela Rondanelli,2,9 Francesco Franceschi,2,10 Laura Isabel Arranz,2,11 Silvia Lorente-Cebrián,2,12 Maurizio Salamone,2,13,14 Sara Ilari,2,5 Inna Belfer,2,15 Massimo Allegri2,16,17 1Pain Therapy Service, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 2Study in Multidisciplinary Pain Research Group, 3Young Against Pain Group, Parma, Italy; 4Department of Health Sciences, Institute of Research for Food Safety and Health, University “Magna Graecia” of Catanzaro, Parma, Italy; 5IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Roccelletta di Borgia, Catanzaro, Italy; 6US Pain Foundation, Bellevue, WA, USA; 7ENPAB, Rome, 8Chronic Pain Service Anestesia Day-Surgery, IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, 9Department of Public Health, Section of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, University of Pavia, Pavia, 10Institute of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 11Department of Nutrition, Food Sciences and Gastronomy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, 12Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Center for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; 13Metagenics Italia srl, Milano, 14Italian Lifestyle Medicine Association, Bari, Italy; 15Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 16Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, 17Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Therapy Service, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria of Parma, Parma, Italy Abstract: Recently, attention to the lifestyle of patients has been rapidly increasing in the field of pain therapy, particularly with regard to the role of nutrition in pain development and its management. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the role of nutrition and nutraceuticals, microbiome, obesity, soy, omega-3 fatty acids, and curcumin supplementation as key elements in

  11. A Delphi consensus panel on nutritional therapy in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Stefano; Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Brunori, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Polito, Pasquale; Santoro, Domenico; Santoro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The conservative management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) includes nutritional therapy (NT) with the aim to reduce the intake of proteins, phosphorus, organic acids, sodium, and potassium, while ensuring adequate caloric intake. While there is evidence that NT may help to prevent and control metabolic alterations in CKD, the criteria for implementing a low-protein regimen in CKD are still debated. There is no final consensus on the composition of the diet, nor indications for specific patient settings or different stages of CKD. Also when and how to start dietary manipulation of different nutrients in CKD is not well defined. A group of Italian nephrologists participated, under the auspices of the Italian Society of Nephrology, in a Delphi exercise to explore the consensus on some open questions regarding the nutritional treatment in CKD in Italy, generating a consensus opinion for 23 statements on: (1) general principles of NT; (2) indications for and initiation of NT; (3) role of protein-free products; (4) NT safety; (5) integrated management of NT. This Delphi exercise shows that there is broad consensus regarding NT in CKD across a wide range of management areas. These clinician-led consensus statements provide a framework for appropriate guidance on NT in patients with CKD, and are intended as a guide in decision-making whenever possible.

  12. Tailored nutrition education and food assistance improve adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy: evidence from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Homero; Palar, Kartika; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Ramírez, Blanca; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn

    2014-10-01

    Food insecurity and malnutrition negatively affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are associated with poor HIV clinical outcomes. We examined the effect of providing household food assistance and nutrition education on ART adherence. A 12-month prospective clinical trial compared the effect of a monthly household food basket (FB) plus nutrition education (NE) versus NE alone on ART adherence on 400 HIV patients at four clinics in Honduras. Participants had been receiving ART for an average of 3.7 years and were selected because they had suboptimal adherence. Primary outcome measures were missed clinic appointments, delayed prescription refills, and self-reported missed doses of ART. These three adherence measures improved for both groups over 12 months (p < 0.01), mostly within 6 months. On-time prescription refills improved for the FB plus NE group by 19.6 % more than the group receiving NE alone after 6 months (p < 0.01), with no further change at 12 months. Change in missed appointments and self-reported missed ART doses did not significantly differ by intervention group.

  13. Gut-central nervous system axis is a target for nutritional therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimentel Gustavo D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically, in the 1950s, the chemist Linus Pauling established a relationship between decreased longevity and obesity. At this time, with the advent of studies involving the mechanisms that modulate appetite control, some researchers observed that the hypothalamus is the "appetite centre" and that peripheral tissues have important roles in the modulation of gut inflammatory processes and levels of hormones that control food intake. Likewise, the advances of physiological and molecular mechanisms for patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, inflammatory bowel diseases, bariatric surgery and anorexia-associated diseases has been greatly appreciated by nutritionists. Therefore, this review highlights the relationship between the gut-central nervous system axis and targets for nutritional therapies.

  14. EARLY ENTERAL FEEDING AND DELAYED ENTERAL FEEDING- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Muthiah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nutrients form the fuel for the body, which comes in the form of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The body is intended to burn fuels in order to perform work. Starvation with malnutrition affects the postoperative patients and patients with acute pancreatitis. There is an increased risk of nosocomial infections and a delay in the wound healing may be noted. They are more prone for respiratory tract infections. Enteral Nutrition (EN delivers nutrition to the body through gastrointestinal tract. This also includes the oral feeding. This study will review the administration, rationale and assess the pros and cons associated with the early initiation of enteral feeding. The aim of this study is to evaluate if early commencement of enteral nutrition compared to traditional management (delayed enteral feeding is associated with fewer complications and improved outcome-  In patients undergoing elective/emergency gastrointestinal surgery.  In patients with acute pancreatitis. It is also used to determine whether a period of starvation (nil by mouth after gastrointestinal surgery or in the early days of acute pancreatitis is beneficial in terms of specific outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective cohort interventional study was conducted using 100 patients from July 2012 to November 2012. Patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. Patients admitted in my unit for GIT surgeries or acute pancreatitis constituted the test group, while patients admitted in other units for similar disease processes constituted the control group. RESULTS Our study concluded that early enteral feeding resulted in reduced incidence of surgical site infections. When the decreased length of stay, shorter convalescent period and the lesser post-interventional fatigue were taken into account, early enteral feeding has a definite cost benefit.CONCLUSION Early enteral feeding was beneficial associated with fewer

  15. Nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and pharmacologic therapies to facilitate weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Marion L; Amaro, Anastassia; Volger, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    Diet plays an integral role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Unfortunately, many patients with T2DM do not have access to a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator, and rates of physician counseling about diet remain low. This article provides an overview of the current recommendations for the nutritional management of T2DM, which are endorsed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Medical nutrition therapy, which provides a flexible and individualized approach to diet, emphasizes the total number (rather than the type) of carbohydrate consumed. Because fat intake also affects glycemia and cardiovascular risk, a reduction in daily mono- and polyunsaturated fat intake is recommended for most patients with T2DM. Weight loss plays an important adjunct role in treating patients with T2DM, because the majority of individuals with T2DM are overweight or obese. Patient lifestyle modification, which encompasses diet, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, can be used to facilitate weight loss in conjunction with several different dietary approaches. These include low-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-glycemic index, and Mediterranean diets. Studies have demonstrated that modest weight loss (5%-10% of body weight) is associated with significant improvements in patient measures of glycemic control, lipids, blood pressure, and other cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, a modest weight loss of as little as 4.5 kg can result in reducing the glycated hemoglobin level by approximately 0.5%. Pharmacologic agents, when combined with these approaches, may further augment weight loss. Familiarity with these principles can help physicians provide dietary counseling to their patients with T2DM and obesity.

  16. Implementation of indicators through balanced scorecards in a nutritional therapy company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos Nasser, Emanuele; Reis da Costa, Stella Regina

    2013-01-01

    The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a tool that helps in strategic management under the four following perspectives: the financial one, the client s, the internal processes of the company's, the growth and learning processes. In order to measure the performance of the entities, the BSC uses as a basis financial and non-financial indicators. To implement the BSC in a nutrional therapy company. This research deals with a case study that took place in a nutrional therapy company from January to November 2010. For analysis of the learning and growth perspective all 45 of the company's collaborators were considered and for client analysis 124 home-care clients were considered. The study sample consisted of 39 collaborators and 44 clients participating in the research. Material was elaborated for collection of data and verification of perspective tendencies through analysis of the main processes of the company, questionnaires of client's satisfaction, questionnaires of collaborator s satisfaction and spread sheets for the verification of net renvenue and percentage of disallowances. The data was launched in the spread sheet of the Excel Application Program. The indicators were chosen conforming to the strategic objectives and organizational profiles. Learning perspectives and personal growth: efficacy in capacitaion 94%, participation 77%, fidelity/retention 93%, satisfaction 75%, organizational environment 88%, well being 100%, process perspective: microbiological analysis 100%, internal auditing 100%, productivity 100%, nutritional evaluation 81%, nutritional support 100%, indication for domicile hospital care 94%, home-care visits 98%, client perspective: company perception 97%, prioritizating 94%, retention 59%, insatisfaction 24%, logistics 94%, customers ervice (SAC) 88%, motivation: trust, financial perspectives, disallowances 5% and positive company net revenue. The implementation of indicators under the four perspectives of the Balanced Scorecard were favourable in

  17. Metabolic and nutritional aspects of acute renal failure in critically ill patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooley, Jennifer A; Btaiche, Imad F; Good, Kelley L

    2005-04-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is rarely an isolated process but is often a complication of underlying conditions such as sepsis, trauma, and multiple-organ failure in critically ill patients. As such, concomitant clinical conditions significantly affect patient outcome. Poor nutritional status is a major factor in increasing patients' morbidity and mortality. Malnutrition in ARF patients is caused by hypercatabolism and hypermetabolism that parallel the severity of illness. When dialytic intervention is indicated, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a commonly used alternative to intermittent hemodialysis because it is well tolerated by hemodynamically unstable patients. This paper reviews the metabolic and nutritional alterations associated with ARF and provides recommendations regarding the nutritional, fluid, electrolyte, micronutrient, and acid-base management of these patients. The basic principles of CRRT are addressed, along with their nutritional implications in critically ill patients. A patient case is presented to illustrate the clinical application of topics covered within the paper.

  18. Serum albumin levels in burn people are associated to the total body surface burned and the length of hospital stay but not to the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M; Rioja, Luis F; DeRosier, Leo C; de la Torre, Jorge I

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Serum albumin levels have been used to evaluate the severity of the burns and the nutrition protein status in burn people, specifically in the response of the burn patient to the nutrition. Although it hasn’t been proven if all these associations are fully funded. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the relationship of serum albumin levels at 3-7 days after the burn injury, with the total body surface area burned (TBSA), the length of hospital stay (LHS) and the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition (IOEN). Subject and methods: It was carried out with the health records of patients that accomplished the inclusion criteria and were admitted to the burn units at the University Hospital of Reina Sofia (Córdoba, Spain) and UAB Hospital at Birmingham (Alabama, USA) over a 10 years period, between January 2000 and December 2009. We studied the statistical association of serum albumin levels with the TBSA, LHS and IOEN by ANOVA one way test. The confidence interval chosen for statistical differences was 95%. Duncan’s test was used to determine the number of statistically significantly groups. Results: Were expressed as mean±standard deviation. We found serum albumin levels association with TBSA and LHS, with greater to lesser serum albumin levels found associated to lesser to greater TBSA and LHS. We didn’t find statistical association with IOEN. Conclusion: We conclude that serum albumin levels aren’t a nutritional marker in burn people although they could be used as a simple clinical tool to identify the severity of the burn wounds represented by the total body surface area burned and the lenght of hospital stay. PMID:23875122

  19. Enteral stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajulu, Shyam; Banerjee, Subhas; Barth, Bradley; Desilets, David; Kaul, Vivek; Kethu, Sripathi; Pedrosa, Marcos; Pfau, Patrick; Tokar, Jeffrey; Wang, Amy; Song, Louis-Michel Wong Kee; Rodriguez, Sarah

    2011-09-01

    The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but in many cases, data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through August 2010 for articles related to enteral, esophageal, duodenal, and colonic stents. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diets and enteral supplements for improving outcomes in chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Cano, Noël J.; Budde, Klemens; Chazot, Charles; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Mak, Robert H.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Raj, Dominic S.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2013-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), which is manifested by low serum levels of albumin or prealbumin, sarcopenia and weight loss, is one of the strongest predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although PEW might be engendered by non-nutritional conditions, such as inflammation or other comorbidities, the question of causality does not refute the effectiveness of dietary interventions and nutritional support in improving outcomes in patients with CKD. The literature indicates that PEW can be mitigated or corrected with an appropriate diet and enteral nutritional support that targets dietary protein intake. In-center meals or oral supplements provided during dialysis therapy are feasible and inexpensive interventions that might improve survival and quality of life in patients with CKD. Dietary requirements and enteral nutritional support must also be considered in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus, in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, renal transplant recipients, and in children with CKD. Adjunctive pharmacological therapies, such as appetite stimulants, anabolic hormones, and antioxidative or anti-inflammatory agents, might augment dietary interventions. Intraperitoneal or intradialytic parenteral nutrition should be considered for patients with PEW whenever enteral interventions are not possible or are ineffective. Controlled trials are needed to better assess the effectiveness of in-center meals and oral supplements. PMID:21629229

  1. Nutritional management of acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with fundamental alterations of metabolism and immunocompetence with the induction of a pro-oxidative and proinflammatory state. Thus, the objectives of nutritional therapy include not only conventional goals such as maintaining lean body mass and stimulating immunocompetence and repair functions, but also mitigating the inflammatory state and improving the oxygen radical scavenging system and endothelial functions. Moreover, pre-existing and/or hospital-acquired malnutrition has been identified as an important factor contributing to the persistent high mortality in acutely ill patients with ARF. A nutritional program for a patient with ARF must consider not only the specific metabolic consequences associated with renal failure and with the underlying disease process, but also the profound alterations in nutrient balances induced by replacement therapy. Nutrient requirements thus may differ widely between individual patients and during the course of disease, and nutrition therapy must be coordinated with renal replacement therapy. Whenever possible, enteral nutrition should be provided in patients with ARF because even small amounts of luminal nutrients will help to maintain intestinal function. Nevertheless, in many patients parenteral nutrition, at least supplementary and/or temporarily, will become necessary. Because of the complex alterations in the use of various nutrients and the impaired tolerance to electrolytes and volume load, metabolic complications of nutritional support frequently occur in patients with ARF. Therefore, nutrition therapy must be more closely monitored in patients with ARF than with other diseases.

  2. Nutritional and metabolic assessment of HIV patients in use of antiretroviral therapy at Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Aguiar Braga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate nutritional and metabolic changes in HIV infected (HIV+ patients on use of antiretroviral therapy. Methods:  A cross-sectional descriptive study involving HIV+ patients on use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. The demographic data studied were gender, birth date and time of use of antiretroviral medication. Anthropometric variables were weight and height with calculation of body mass index (BMI. Biochemical data were lipid profile, blood glucose, renal function, albumin, uric acid, oxalacetic and pyruvic transaminases and red blood cells count. Results: The study population comprised 70 patients, 36 (51.4% men and 34 (48.6% women with an average time of HAART-use of 34.5 + 16.5 months. We observed a prevalence of 42 (60% healthy weight for BMI, changes in lipid profile and reduction of lean mass in 18 (50% men and increased abdominal obesity in 23 (67.7% women. Conclusion: The studied subjects in use of HAART showed to have loss of subcutaneous fat, lipid changes and higher prevalence of abdominal obesity in women.

  3. A review of the relative efficacy of dietary, nutritional supplements, lifestyle, and drug therapies in the management of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Pierce, Grant N

    2017-11-02

    Despite advancements in hypertensive therapies, the prevalence of hypertension and associated morbidities are still immense. Physicians are in great need for updated information on novel and effective antihypertensive therapies. Therefore, the study objective was to provide comprehensive information on the efficacy of available antihypertensive therapies. Antihypertensive therapies were divided into four general approaches: diet, nutritional supplements, lifestyle modification, and conventional antihypertensive medications. A search of PubMed and Google Scholar resulted in an analysis of 30 antihypertensive therapies from meta-analyses and randomized-controlled trials (RCTs). The studies were analyzed using the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology classification system. Calculated average blood pressure reductions were: (systolic/diastolic) 6/4 mmHg, 4/2 mmHg, 5/3 mmHg, and 9/5 mmHg for dietary, nutritional supplements, lifestyle, and medications, respectively. The results demonstrate that dietary, nutritional supplement and lifestyle strategies have a solid level of evidence to support their efficacy as antihypertensive strategies. These strategies can be as effective as medications and, in some cases, even more effective. Dissemination of this information to physicians/dietitians can help facilitate an important shift in hypertension management.

  4. Targeted Physician Education Positively Affects Delivery of Nutrition Therapy and Patient Outcomes: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Ryan T; McClave, Stephen A; Evans, David C; Jones, Chris; Miller, Keith R; Frazier, Thomas H; Minhas, Mahad A; Lowen, Cynthia C; Stout, Allyson; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Matheson, Paul J; Franklin, Glen A

    2015-11-01

    Malnutrition is a continuing epidemic among hospitalized patients. We hypothesize that targeted physician education should help reduce caloric deficits and improve patient outcomes. We performed a prospective trial of patients (n = 121) assigned to 1 of 2 trauma groups. The experimental group (EG) received targeted education consisting of strategies to increase delivery of early enteral nutrition. Strategies included early enteral access, avoidance of nil per os (NPO) and clear liquid diets (CLD), volume-based feeding, early resumption of feeds postprocedure, and charting caloric deficits. The control group (CG) did not receive targeted education but was allowed to practice in a standard ad hoc fashion. Both groups were provided with dietitian recommendations on a multidisciplinary nutrition team per standard practice. The EG received a higher percentage of measured goal calories (30.1 ± 18.5%, 22.1 ± 23.7%, P = .024) compared with the CG. Mean caloric deficit was not significantly different between groups (-6796 ± 4164 kcal vs -8817 ± 7087 kcal, P = .305). CLD days per patient (0.1 ± 0.5 vs 0.6 ± 0.9), length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.5 ± 5.5 vs 5.2 ± 6.8 days), and duration of mechanical ventilation (1.6 ± 3.7 vs 2.8 ± 5.0 days) were all reduced in the EG compared with the CG (P affected patient care and outcomes. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Evolving trends in enteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsky, J L

    1986-01-01

    Nutrition has become a cornerstone of surgical patient care. With better understanding of metabolic and compositional requirements, great advances have been made in the area of total parenteral nutrition. Recent attention to full utilization of alimentary tract function has prompted a resurgence of interest in dietary formulas and methods of delivery. Three new approaches to the alimentary tract provide better access for feeding. Needle catheter jejunostomy allows early alimentary tract utilization following operations, while percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and jejunostomy provide long-term solutions to the provision of enteral alimentation. Future utilization of these techniques will certainly lead to better patient care.

  6. Productivity and Time Use during Occupational Therapy and Nutrition/Dietetics Clinical Education: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Stephens, Elizabeth; Clark, Michele; Ash, Susan; Hurst, Cameron; Graves, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently in the Australian higher education sector higher productivity from allied health clinical education placements is a contested issue. This paper will report results of a study that investigated output changes associated with occupational therapy and nutrition/dietetics clinical education placements in Queensland, Australia. Supervisors’ and students’ time use during placements and how this changes for supervisors compared to when students are not present in the workplace is also presented. Methodology/Principal Findings A cohort design was used with students from four Queensland universities, and their supervisors employed by Queensland Health. There was an increasing trend in the number of occasions of service delivered when the students were present, and a statistically significant increase in the daily mean length of occasions of service delivered during the placement compared to pre-placement levels. Conclusions/Significance A novel method for estimating productivity and time use changes during clinical education programs for allied health disciplines has been applied. During clinical education placements there was a net increase in outputs, suggesting supervisors engage in longer consultations with patients for the purpose of training students, while maintaining patient numbers. Other activities were reduced. This paper is the first time these data have been shown in Australia and form a sound basis for future assessments of the economic impact of student placements for allied health disciplines. PMID:22952964

  7. In ovo method for evaluating the effect of nutritional therapies on tumor development, growth and vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves M. Dupertuis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the state of the art evaluation of nutritional therapy on tumor development, growth and vascularization requires tedious and expensive in vivo assays in which a significant number of animals undergo invasive treatments. Therefore, new alternative methods to avoid animal suffering and sacrifice are welcome. This review presents a rapid and low-cost method of experimental radio/chemotherapy in tumor xenografted chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM, which may contribute to implement the 3R principle (Reduce, Refine, Replace. Advantages and limitations of the CAM as an experimental model in cancer research are discussed. Improving the CAM model by using tumor spheroid grafting and positron emission and computed tomography imaging would help to overcome the drawbacks of poor tumor grafting efficiency and restrained 2-D tumor growth measurement to the CAM surface. Such a simple, reliable, reproducible and quantitative method for obtaining dose–response analysis and estimating treatment schedule (i.e. type, route, dose and timing would provide an alternative to the time-consuming and expensive evaluation step in animals before initiating clinical trials.

  8. Practical guidelines for nutritional management of burn injury and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelack, Kathy; Dylewski, Maggie; Sheridan, Robert L

    2007-02-01

    Nutrition practice in burn injury requires a multifaceted approach aimed at providing metabolic support during a heightened inflammatory state, while accommodating surgical and medical needs of the patient. Nutritional assessment and determination of nutrient requirements is challenging, particularly given the metabolic disarray that frequently accompanies inflammation. Nutritional therapy requires careful decision making, regarding the safe use of enteral or parenteral nutrition and the aggressiveness of nutrient delivery given the severity of the patient's illness and response to treatment. With the discovery that specific nutrients can actually alter the course of disease, the role of nutrition support in critical illness has shifted from one of preventing malnutrition to one of disease modulation. Today the use of glutamine, arginine, essential fatty acids, and other nutritional factors for their effects on immunity and cell regulation is becoming more common, although the evidence is often lagging. An exciting dichotomy exits, forcing nutrition support specialists to make responsible choices while remaining open to new potential helpful therapeutic options.

  9. A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Andersen, Henning Keinke; Snorgaard, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian. Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided by a regis......Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian. Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided......) that assessed the outcomes glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2), and LDL cholesterol. Risk of bias and the quality of evidence were assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines. Results: We identified 5 RCTs comprising 912...... participants in total. In the first year of intervention (at 6 or 12 mo), nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice was followed by a 0.45% (95% CI: 0.36%, 0.53%) lower mean difference in HbA1c, a 0.55 (95% CI: 0.02, 1.1) lower BMI, a 2.1-kg (95% CI: 1.2-, 2.9-kg) lower weight, and a 0.17-mmol/L (95% CI...

  10. [Nutritional management of kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovik, T E; Kutafina, E K; Tsygin, A N; Sergeeva, T V; Baranov, A A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Voznesenskaya, T S; Zakharova, I N; Semenova, N N; Zvonkova, N G; Yatsyk, S P

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of various kidney diseases in children remains high in recent decades. Adequate nutrition management can enhance the effectiveness of drug treatment, slow the frequency of relapses andprevent the progression of the disease. The article is devoted to modern approaches to diet therapy in various kidney diseases in children with the defeat of tubular and glomerular appa ratus. For the first time the therapeutic diets for children with various kidney diseases are presented. Particular attention is paid to diet therapy in nephrotic syndrome (steroid-responsive and steroid-refractory). Dietary approaches with modern formulas for enteral nutrition in cases of steroid therapy complications in children with renal insufficiency (in predialysis stage and on dialysis) are described. Differentiated nutritional approaches for patients with different types of crystalluria are separately presented.

  11. Continuous elemental enteral alimentation in children with Crohn's disease and growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C L; Roulet, M; Roy, C C; Weber, A

    1980-12-01

    Four children aged (11.7-13.5 yr) with protracted growth retardation related to Crohn's disease, received a 6-wk period of continuous elemental enteral alimentation with no other form of treatment. Despite drug therapy the yearly height and weight gain velocities of these children (1.7 +/- 0.3 cm and -0.8 +/- 1.4 kg, respectively) had been abnormal during the previous 2 yr. All patients experienced a complete remission of symptoms, improved nutritional status, and significant height (1.8 +/- 0.3 cm) and weight (3.8 +/- 0.5 kg) gains during the 67 wk of treatment. After cessation of elemental enteral alimentation, 3 of the 4 patients continued to grow, and over a period of 4.5 mo from the beginning of this form of nutritional therapy, they gained an average of 5.0 +/- 1.6 kg and 3.5 +/- 0.3 cm. The disease became active thereafter, and the 3 children resumed their previously abnormal growth patterns during the ensuing year. The 4th patient had surgery 2 mo after elemental enteral alimentation and experienced a subsequent second spurt of growth and pubertal changes. This study suggests that a relatively short course of elemental enteral alimentation leads to a temporary resumption of growth in children with severe growth failure and Crohn's disease. The possibility that repeated courses of elemental enteral alimentation might be beneficial needs to be explored.

  12. Analysis of the Level of Dysphagia, Anxiety, and Nutritional Status Before and After Speech Therapy in Patients with Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdz, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The rehabilitation in oropharyngeal dysphagia evidence-based implies the relationship between the interventions and their results. Objective: Analyze level of dysphagia, oral ingestion, anxiety levels and nutritional status of patients with stroke diagnosis, before and after speech therapy. Method: Clinical assessment of dysphagia partially using the Protocol of Risk Assessment for Dysphagia (PARD, applying the scale Functional Oral Intake Scale for Dysphagia in Stroke Patients (FOIS, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI and the Mini Nutritional Assessment MNA®. The sample consisted of 12 patients, mean age of 64.6 years, with a medical diagnosis of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke and without cognitive disorders. All tests were applied before and after speech therapy (15 sessions. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test, McNemar's test, Bowker's symmetry test and Wilcoxon's test. Results: During the pre-speech therapy assessments, 33.3% of patients had mild to moderate dysphagia, 88.2% did not receive food orally, 47.1% of the patients showed malnutrition and 35.3% of patients had mild anxiety level. After the therapy sessions, it was found that 33.3% of patients had mild dysphagia, 16.7% were malnourished and 50% of patients had minimal level of anxiety. Conclusion:  There were statistically significant evolution of the level of dysphagia (p = 0.017 and oral intake (p = 0.003 post-speech therapy. Although not statistically significant, there was considerable progress in relation to the level of anxiety and nutritional status.

  13. Food and dietary pattern-based recommendations: an emerging approach to clinical practice guidelines for nutrition therapy in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievenpiper, John L; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2013-02-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for the nutritional management of diabetes mellitus have evolved considerably over the last 25 years. As major diabetes associations have focussed on the individualization of nutrition therapy, there has been a move toward a broader more flexible macronutrient distribution that emphasizes macronutrient quality over quantity. There is now a call for the integration of food- and dietary pattern-based approaches into diabetes association CPGs. The main argument has been that an approach that focuses on nutrients alone misses important nutrient interactions oversimplifying the complexity of foods and dietary patterns, both of which have been shown to have a stronger influence on disease risk than nutrients alone. Although cancer and heart associations have begun to integrate this approach into their dietary guidelines, diabetes associations have not yet adopted this approach. We provide a rationale for the adoption of this approach for The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) 2013 CPGs for nutrition therapy. The systematic review for the development of these guidelines revealed emerging evidence to support the use of vegetarian, Mediterranean, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary patterns as well as specific foods such as dietary pulses and nuts in people with diabetes. Popular and conventional weight loss diets were also found to have similar advantages in people with diabetes, although poor dietary adherence remains an issue with these diets. The CDA 2013 CPGs will support an even greater individualization of nutrition therapy for people with diabetes and appeal to a broader range of practice styles of health professionals. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Detoxical aspects of nutritional therapy using natural enterosorbents on the basis of pectins

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    Elena E. Tekutskaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rate of anthropogenic pollution and reduction of the environmental quality progress quicker than adaptive possibilities of an organism. This causes pre-pathological and pathological changes. So there is a necessity of preventive measures organization to eliminate toxic load and accelerated eliminating of xenobiotics from an organism. The discoveries of the recent 15 years had been revealed the possibility to change complexons (which are used for detoxication to dietary fibers, pectin as well. Meanwhile pectin substances are not widely used in clinical practice, and their efficiency comparing with small concentrations of cumulating poisons had not been studied yet. During the development of the detoxification nutritional therapy at patients with different pathology of the digestive system organs (with the revealed heavy metals and organochlorine pesticides there had been organized tests of pectin efficiency (citrus and apple for reducing the contamination with these xenobiotics. After the course of pectin treatment there had been fixed not only the reduce of toxic heavy metals, but essential microelements as well, which is connected with nonselective complexing capability of pectin substances. The probe tests also showed that course of citrus pectin treatment favored total excretion of organochlorine pesticides at 11.0% of patients, at other patients pesticide level reduced up to minimal rate (revealed by gas chromatographic method 0.0001 mg/dm³. There is a significant difference of values before and after pectin treatment. At the same time at patients who had not taken enterosorbent (compare group the level of organochlorine pesticides after repeated tests stayed on the level close to the basic. There had been discussed mechanism of excretion of organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals with the help of pectins.

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Risk and Progression: The Role of Nutritional Supplements and their Effect on Drug Therapy Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, A; Vignini, A; Nanetti, L; Mazzanti, L; Di Primio, R; Salvolini, E

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly population. Despite significant advancements in understanding the genetic and molecular basis of AD, the pathology still lacks treatments that can slow down or reverse the progression of cognitive deterioration. Recently, the relationship between nutrient deficiency and dementia onset has been highlighted. AD is in fact a multifactorial pathology, so that a multi-target approach using combinations of micronutrients and drugs could have beneficial effects on cognitive function in neurodegenerative brain disorders leading to synaptic degeneration. Primarily, this review examines the most recent literature regarding the effects of nutrition on the risk/progression of the disease, focusing attention mostly on antioxidants agents, polyunsaturated fatty acids and metals. Secondly, it aims to figure out if nutritional supplements might have beneficial effects on drug therapy outcome. Even if nutritional supplements showed contrasting evidence of a likely effect of decreasing the risk of AD onset that could be studied more deeply in other clinical trials, no convincing data are present about their usefulness in combination with drug therapies and their effectiveness in slowing down the disease progression.

  16. Effects on anthropometry and appetite of vitamins and minerals given in lipid nutritional supplements for malnourished HIV-infected adults referred for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Andrea M; Woodd, Susannah; PrayGod, George

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE:: We hypothesised that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnouris......BACKGROUND:: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE:: We hypothesised that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain...... in malnourished patients starting ART and that vitamin and mineral supplementation would improve appetite and permit nutritional recovery. DESIGN:: The randomised controlled Nutritional Support for Africans Starting Antiretroviral Therapy (NUSTART) trial was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania and Lusaka, Zambia. ART......-naïve adults referred for ART and with body mass index (BMI)vitamins and minerals (LNS-VM), beginning prior to ART initiation. Participants were given 30 g/day LNS from recruitment until 2 weeks after starting ART...

  17. Rapid enteric testing to permit targeted antimicrobial therapy, with and without Lactobacillus reuteri probiotics, for paediatric acute diarrhoeal disease in Botswana: A pilot, randomized, factorial, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Pernica

    Full Text Available Diarrhoeal disease is the second-leading cause of death in young children. Current guidelines recommend treating children with acute non-bloody diarrhea with oral rehydration solutions and zinc, but not antimicrobials. However, in many resource-limited settings, infections with treatable enteric bacterial and protozoan pathogens are common. Probiotics have shown promise as an adjunct treatment for diarrhoea but have not been studied in sub-Saharan Africa.We conducted a pilot, factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of children aged 2-60 months hospitalized in Botswana for acute non-bloody diarrhoea. A rapid test-and-treat intervention, consisting of multiplex PCR testing of rectal swabs taken at enrolment, accompanied by targeted antimicrobial therapy if treatable pathogens were detected, was compared to the reference standard of no stool testing. Additionally, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 x 60 days was compared to placebo treatment. The main objective of this pilot study was to assess feasibility. The primary clinical outcome was the increase in age-standardized height (HAZ at 60 days adjusted for baseline HAZ.Seventy-six patients were enrolled over a seven-month study period. We judged that the recruitment rate, lab processing times, communication protocols, provision of specific antimicrobials, and follow-up rates were acceptable. Compared to the reference arm (no stool testing and placebo treatment, the combination of the rapid test-and-treat strategy plus L. reuteri DSM 17938 was associated with an increase of 0.61 HAZ (95% CI 0.09-1.13 and 93% lower odds of recurrent diarrhoea (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.01-0.61 at 60 days.We demonstrated that it was feasible to evaluate the study interventions in Botswana. Despite the small sample size, we observed a statistically significant increase in HAZ at 60 days and significantly lower odds of recurrent diarrhoea in children receiving both rapid test-and-treat and L. reuteri. There is sufficient

  18. Pretreatment nutritional status and locoregional failure of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Popat, Saurin R; Warren, Graham W; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L; Khan, Mohamed K; Loree, Thom R; Singh, Anurag K

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pretreatment %IBW should be examined further. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Enteral feeding pumps: efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White H

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Helen White, Linsey King Nutrition and Dietetic Group, School of Health and Wellbeing, Faculty Health and Social Science, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, United Kingdom Abstract: Enteral feeding is a long established practice across pediatric and adult populations, to enhance nutritional intake and prevent malnutrition. Despite recognition of the importance of nutrition within the modern health agenda, evaluation of the efficacy of how such feeds are delivered is more limited. The accuracy, safety, and consistency with which enteral feed pump systems dispense nutritional formulae are important determinants of their use and acceptability. Enteral feed pump safety has received increased interest in recent years as enteral pumps are used across hospital and home settings. Four areas of enteral feed pump safety have emerged: the consistent and accurate delivery of formula; the minimization of errors associated with tube misconnection; the impact of continuous feed delivery itself (via an enteral feed pump; and the chemical composition of the casing used in enteral feed pump manufacture. The daily use of pumps in delivery of enteral feeds in a home setting predominantly falls to the hands of parents and caregivers. Their understanding of the use and function of their pump is necessary to ensure appropriate, safe, and accurate delivery of enteral nutrition; their experience with this is important in informing clinicians and manufacturers of the emerging needs and requirements of this diverse patient population. The review highlights current practice and areas of concern and establishes our current knowledge in this field. Keywords: nutrition, perceptions, experience

  20. Nutritional management of acute pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kristine B; Chan, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    To review current and emerging nutritional approaches in the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) in people, dogs, and cats, and to provide a framework for further investigation in this field. Veterinary retrospective studies and reviews, human prospective clinical trials and reviews, and experimental animal studies focusing on nutritional management during AP. Nutritional management is an important part of the treatment plan for patients with AP. In human medicine, the general approach for providing nutrition in patients with AP has changed in recent years and favors enteral over parenteral nutrition with an emphasis on early enteral nutrition (EN). Although there are limited data available, there is increasing evidence in the veterinary literature that supports the beneficial role of EN in AP and contradicts previous assumptions about poor tolerance to enteral feeding in this patient population. Parenteral nutrition may be appropriate alone or in combination with EN as a temporary measure in malnourished patients that do not tolerate adequate EN; however, enteral feeding should be attempted first in most cases. Immunonutrition is being investigated for its positive role in modulating pancreatic inflammation and improving gut barrier function in cases of human AP. The nutritional management of veterinary patients with AP remains challenging. Based on clinical evidence in people, experimental animal studies, and preliminary studies in dogs and cats, the choice of EN over parenteral nutritional support during AP in dogs and cats appears to be beneficial and well tolerated. Optimization of nutritional therapies in dogs and cats including the use of immunonutrition during AP warrants further investigation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  1. Attitudes toward the American nutrition guidelines for the critically ill patients of Chinese intensive care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-ling; Zhou, Jian-cang; Pan, Kong-han; Zhao, Hong-chen; Ying, Ke-jing

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition therapy is essential for the management of critically ill patients. Some guidelines have been published to standardize and optimize the nutrition therapy. However, there are still many controversies in nutrition practice and there is a gap between guidelines and clinical nutrition therapy for patients in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to assess attitudes and beliefs toward nutrition therapy of Chinese intensive care physicians by using the American guidelines as a surrogate. A questionnaire was sent to 45 adult ICUs in China, in which surveyed physicians were asked to rate their attitudes toward the American guidelines. A total of 162 physicians from 45 ICUs returned the questionnaires. Physicians were categorized into groups according to their professional seniority, hospital levels and whether they were members of Chinese Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (CSPEN). Overall, 94% of the respondents thought that nutrition therapy for critically ill patients was very important, and 80% mentioned that they used the American guidelines. There was diversity of opinion on the recommendations pertaining to nutrition assessment, supplemental parenteral nutrition and cutoff values for gastric residual volume, negative or neutral attitudes about these recommendations were 43%, 59% and 41%, respectively. Members of CSPEN were more likely to select a greater strength of recommendation than non-members. In conclusion, the overall attitudes of Chinese intensive care physicians toward the American guidelines were positive. Nevertheless, given the great guideline-practice gap, nutrition-focused education is warranted for many intensive care physicians in China.

  2. An American Clinical Training Program for Spanish Nutrition Support Pharmacists: A Three-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N. Dickerson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A clinical nutrition support pharmacist training program, in collaboration with the Spanish Foundation of Hospital Pharmacy, Spanish Society of Clinical Nutrition, Abbott Nutrition International, University of Tennessee, College of Pharmacy and Regional One Health, is described. Nutrition support pharmacists from Spain were selected to participate in a one-month training program with an experienced board-certified nutrition support pharmacist faculty member within an interdisciplinary nutrition support team environment in the U.S. Participants were expected to actively engage in an advanced clinical practice role with supervision. Clinical activities included daily intensive patient monitoring, physical assessment, critical evaluation of the patient and development of an appropriate treatment plan for patients receiving either enteral or parenteral nutrition therapy. Upon successful completion of the training program, participants were anticipated to incorporate these techniques into their current practice in Spain and to train other pharmacists to function in an advanced clinical role independently or within an interdisciplinary nutrition support team environment.

  3. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of genetically modified soy in enteral nutrition formulas by polymerase chain reaction based methods Avaliação qualitativa e quantitativa de soja geneticamente modificada em fórmulas de nutrição enteral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Eudes Fagundes de Barros

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to investigate the occurrence of Roundup Ready soybean in enteral nutrition formulas sold in Brazil. METHODS: A duplex Polymerase Chain Reaction based on the amplification of the lectin gene and the construction of the recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant soybean (35S promoter and chloroplast transit peptide gene was performed in order to analyze the deoxyribonucleic acid obtained from nine soy protein isolate-containing formulas. RESULTS: Despite the highly processed nature of the food matrices, amplifiable deoxyribonucleic acid templates were obtained from all tested samples, as judged by the amplification of the lectin gene sequence. However, amplicons relative to the presence of Roundup Ready soybean were restricted to one of the nine enteral nutrition formulas analyzed as well as to the soybean reference powder, as expected. Quantitative analysis of the genetically modified formula by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction showed a content of approximately 0.3% (w/w of recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid from the Roundup Ready soybean. CONCLUSION: The results show that one of the formulas contained genetically modified soy, pointing to the need of regulating the use of transgenic substances and of specific labeling in this product category.OBJETIVO: Investigar a ocorrência de soja transgênica em fórmulas de suporte nutricional comercializadas no Brasil. MÉTODOS: Foi desenvolvido o método da reação em cadeia da polimerase duplex, com base na amplificação do gene na lectina, e na construção do ácido desoxirribonucléico recombinante da soja transgênica tolerante a glifosato (promotor 35S e gene de peptídeo de trânsito de cloroplasto, a fim de avaliar o ácido desoxirribonucléico extraído a partir das nove fórmulas contendo isolado protéico de soja. RESULTADOS: Apesar do alto grau de processamento aos quais os produtos avaliados foram submetidos, foi poss

  4. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): critically-burned patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Lorenzo y Mateos, A; Ortiz Leyba, C; Sánchez Sánchez, S M

    2011-11-01

    The response to severe burns is characterized by hypermetabolism (the most hypermetabolic existing model of aggression) and hypercatabolism, with a high degree of destruction of the skeletal musculature. Metabolic disorders are most evident in the first two weeks after the burn, although they can be prolonged in direct relation to the complications that these patients develop. Nutritional-metabolic support is an essential part of the treatment of these patients and should be started early, preferentially through the enteral route, with parenteral nutrition as complementary support. Exact calculation of calorie-protein requirements in these patients is difficult, even when indirect calorimetry is used, due to the high loss of proteins and CO(2) through the skin. Specific pharmaconutrients are indicated, with a high dose of micronutrients. The use of drugs or medications with anabolic effects is also sometimes indicated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Composição centesimal, lisina disponível e digestibilidade in vitro de proteínas de fórmulas para nutrição oral ou enteral Proximate composition, available lysine and in vitro digestibility of proteins in formulae for oral or enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edma M. Araújo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultimamente tem-se verificado aumento do uso de nutrição enteral (NE em domicílio, objetivando reduzir custos e melhorar a qualidade de vida. Contudo, é importante monitorar o valor nutricional das dietas. Nesse estudo foram avaliadas as formulações F1 e F2 (ARAÚJO; GALEAZZI, 1999 contendo carne bovina, ovo (F1, chicória, cenoura, fubá de milho, extrato hidrossolúvel de soja, óleo de soja, Nidex® e sal, para uso em NE ou oral domiciliar, objetivando obter dados mais confiáveis e seguros. Foram determinadas: composição centesimal, digestibilidade in vitro e lisina disponível. As composições centesimais (base seca foram as seguintes: F1: calorias 454,69, umidade 79,29±0,07, proteína 17,04±0,06, lipídios 14,85±0,11, carboidratos 63,22, fibra alimentar solúvel 0,67±0,66 e insolúvel 1,65±0,73, cinzas 2,57±0,01; F2: calorias 463,92, umidade 78,96±0,09, proteína 16,56±0,09, lipídios 15,12±0,20, fibra alimentar solúvel 1,09±0,11 e insolúvel 1,84±0,09, carboidratos 65,40 e cinzas 2,63±0,08. A distribuição calórica mostrou-se adequada. Os teores de lisina eram 80 mg/g de proteína para F1 e 139 para F2. A digestibilidade (% das proteínas foi 95 para F1 e 93 para F2. As formulações são factíveis de preparo em domicílio, possuem fontes de proteína de boa qualidade, baixo custo, podendo atender às necessidades nutricionais de indivíduos em terapia nutricional domiciliar e promover a recuperação nutricional.Recently the use of home enteral nutrition (EN has increased, aimed at reducing costs and improving the quality of life. Monitoring the nutritional value of these diets is therefore important. In this study the formulations F1 and F2 (ARAÚJO; GALEAZZI, 1999 containing beef, egg (F1, chicory, carrot, corn grits, ater-soluble soybean extract, soybean oil, Nidex ater-soluble soybean extract, soybean oil, Nidex® and salt, ere evaluated for use in home EN, aiming at obtaining more reliable, safer data. The

  6. [Enteral resorption and tumor cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, R; Matkowitz, R; Hartig, W; Conradi, G; Laue, R

    1979-01-15

    The rapid loss of the body weight of oncological patients in the advanced stage of the carcinomatous disease is caused by numerous pathophysiological mechanisms. With the help of the modified D-xylose absorption test was investigated which value have disturbances of the enteral absorption in the complex of causes for the development of a tumour cachexia. For the patients in the stage of generalisation of the carcinomatous disease clear disturbances in the enteral food intake could be proved in contrast to patients with carcinoma without general tumour symptomatology and healthy persons. The influence of chemo- and radio-therapy on the enteral absorption of patients with carcinoma was discussed. The forced alimentation of oncological patients with unspezific tumour symptoms must be regarded as a firm constituent in the treatment of patients with carcinoma.

  7. Nutritional Interventions in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Bossola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed to define the role of nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in HNC patients undergoing CRT as well as their impact on CRT-related toxicity and survival. Head and neck cancer patients are frequently malnourished at the time of diagnosis and prior to the beginning of treatment. In addition, chemo-radiotherapy (CRT causes or exacerbates symptoms, such as alteration or loss of taste, mucositis, xerostomia, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, with consequent worsening of malnutrition. Nutritional counseling (NC and oral nutritional supplements (ONS should be used to increase dietary intake and to prevent therapy-associated weight loss and interruption of radiation therapy. If obstructing cancer and/or mucositis interfere with swallowing, enteral nutrition should be delivered by tube. However, it seems that there is not sufficient evidence to determine the optimal method of enteral feeding. Prophylactic feeding through nasogastric tube or percutaneous gastrostomy to prevent weight loss, reduce dehydration and hospitalizations, and avoid treatment breaks has become relatively common. Compared to reactive feeding (patients are supported with oral nutritional supplements and when it is impossible to maintain nutritional requirements enteral feeding via a NGT or PEG is started, prophylactic feeding does not offer advantages in terms of nutritional outcomes, interruptions of radiotherapy and survival. Overall, it seems that further adequate prospective, randomized studies are needed to define the better nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

  8. Nutritional Interventions in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossola, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The present review aimed to define the role of nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in HNC patients undergoing CRT as well as their impact on CRT-related toxicity and survival. Head and neck cancer patients are frequently malnourished at the time of diagnosis and prior to the beginning of treatment. In addition, chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) causes or exacerbates symptoms, such as alteration or loss of taste, mucositis, xerostomia, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, with consequent worsening of malnutrition. Nutritional counseling (NC) and oral nutritional supplements (ONS) should be used to increase dietary intake and to prevent therapy-associated weight loss and interruption of radiation therapy. If obstructing cancer and/or mucositis interfere with swallowing, enteral nutrition should be delivered by tube. However, it seems that there is not sufficient evidence to determine the optimal method of enteral feeding. Prophylactic feeding through nasogastric tube or percutaneous gastrostomy to prevent weight loss, reduce dehydration and hospitalizations, and avoid treatment breaks has become relatively common. Compared to reactive feeding (patients are supported with oral nutritional supplements and when it is impossible to maintain nutritional requirements enteral feeding via a NGT or PEG is started), prophylactic feeding does not offer advantages in terms of nutritional outcomes, interruptions of radiotherapy and survival. Overall, it seems that further adequate prospective, randomized studies are needed to define the better nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. PMID:25569622

  9. Household food insecurity, maternal nutritional status, and infant feeding practices among HIV-infected Ugandan women receiving combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sera L; Plenty, Albert H J; Luwedde, Flavia A; Natamba, Barnabas K; Natureeba, Paul; Achan, Jane; Mwesigwa, Julia; Ruel, Theodore D; Ades, Veronica; Osterbauer, Beth; Clark, Tamara D; Dorsey, Grant; Charlebois, Edwin D; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane V; Cohan, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    Household food insecurity (HHFI) may be a barrier to both optimal maternal nutritional status and infant feeding practices, but few studies have tested this relationship quantitatively, and never among HIV-infected individuals. We therefore described the prevalence of HHFI and explored if it was associated with poorer maternal nutritional status, shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and fewer animal-source complementary foods. We assessed these outcomes using bivariate and multivariate analyses among 178 HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding (BF) women receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in the PROMOTE trial (NCT00993031), a prospective, longitudinal cohort study in Tororo, Uganda. HHFI was common; the prevalence of severe, moderate, and little to no household hunger was 7.3, 39.9, and 52.8 %, respectively. Poor maternal nutritional status was common and women in households experiencing moderate to severe household hunger (MSHH) had statistically significantly lower body mass index (BMIs) at enrollment (21.3 vs. 22.5, p maternal malnutrition, and suboptimal infant feeding practices are high and the causal relationships among these phenomena must be further explored.

  10. [Ultrasonic study of gallbladder motility during exclusive continuous enteral feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douard, H; Cosnes, J; Sebag, A; Evard, D; Le Quintrec, Y

    1987-10-01

    Total parenteral nutrition may be responsible for gallbladder sludge and lithiasis which might possibly be related to gallbladder bile stasis. Gallbladder motility has not yet been studied during constant-rate enteral nutrition. We performed serial ultrasonographic studies of gallbladder volume and contents in ten patients receiving constant-rate enteral nutrition during 35 +/- 17 days. Each patient had two weekly examinations at 9 AM and 2 PM on the same day. None of the patients developed gallbladder sludge or lithiasis. The gallbladder was frequently seen to be contracted. Mean gallbladder volume during constant-rate enteral nutrition was not significantly different from mean gallbladder volume after Bladex. Individual gallbladder volume changed significantly from one measurement to another. This study showed that gallbladder motility is preserved during constant-rate enteral nutrition. The persistence of gallbladder contractions may prevent the development of biliary sludge ad lithiasis.

  11. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2015-04-09

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 February 2015.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 13 February 2015. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. The searches identified 38 trials; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status necessitates it.

  12. Nutritional assessment and lipid profile in HIV-infected children and adolescents treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    Marina Hjertquist Tremeschin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV-infected children and adolescents treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART regimens that include a protease inhibitor (PI can show significant improvements in clinical outcomes, nutritional status and quality of life. The study aimed to report nutritional and metabolic alterations for pediatric patients continuously exposed to HAART and for healthy controls for up to 1 year. METHODS: Clinical, anthropometric, lipid profile and food intake data were collected prospectively over approximately 12-months for each patient. RESULTS: Fifty-one individuals were studied, of these, 16 were healthy. After 12 months follow-up, HIV-positive individuals remained below the healthy control group parameters. No change was observed concerning food intake. Triglyceride serum levels were higher in patients using protease inhibitor at the onset of the study [PI groups: 114 (43 - 336, and 136 (63 - 271 versus control group: 54.5 (20 - 162; p = 0.003], but after twelve months follow-up, only the group using protease inhibitor for up to two months presented higher values [140 (73 - 273 versus 67.5 (33 - 117; p = 0.004]. HDL-cholesterol was lower in HIV-positive individuals [HIV-positive groups: 36 (27 - 58 and 36 (23 - 43; control 49.5 (34 - 69; p = 0.004]. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected children and adolescents treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy showed compromised nutritional parameters compared to a paired healthy control group. Individuals using protease inhibitor presented worse triglyceride serum levels compared to their healthy counterparts.

  13. Hemogasometria em eqüinos com compactação experimental do cólon maior tratados com sene, fluidoterapia enteral e parenteral Blood gas analysis in equine with experimental large colon impaction treated with sene, enteral and parenteral fluid therapy

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    José Dantas Ribeiro Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O equilíbrio ácido-base foi estudado em eqüinos com compactação experimental do cólon maior após o uso de solução isotônica poliônica enteral, sene mais hidratação intravenosa e hidratação intravenosa. As amostras sangüíneas foram colhidas de 20 animais, quatro grupos (E8, RL, SE e C de cinco animais cada. Os animais dos grupos tratados eram portadores de compactação no cólon maior induzida experimentalmente. Eqüinos no grupo E8 receberam solução isotônica poliônica enteral (8mL kg-1 h-1 48h-1; no grupo SE, sene foram administrados na dose de 20mg kg-1, duas doses de 24/24h, mais Ringer lactato intravenoso, 10mL kg-1h(-112h-1, durante dois dias; sendo que o grupo RL recebeu Ringer lactato intravenoso (16mL kg-1h(-112h-1 durante dois dias. O grupo C, controle, não foi tratado. Entre os tratamentos testados, a fluidoterapia intravenosa com solução de Ringer lactato (RL foi o tratamento mais eficiente para a correção das variáveis hemogasométricas em eqüinos com compactação do cólon maior. A solução isotônica poliônica enteral (E8 e sene associada com fluidoterapia intravenosa (SE foram eficientes, porém em menor grau.The blood acid-base status was studied in equines when induced large colon impaction was followed by applying an isotonic polionic enteral solution, or sene associated with intravenous fluid therapy, or fluid therapy alone. The blood samples were collected in twenty animals, four groups (E8, RL, SE, and C of five animals each. Animals of the treated groups had experimentally induced colon impactions. Equines in group E8 received isotonic polionic enteral solution (8 mL kg-1 h-1 48 h-1; in group SE, sene was applied at 20mg kg-1, two doses per animal, at 24-hour intervals, along with the Ringer lactate IV, 10mL kg-1 h-1, 12 h-1, both during two days; and in the RL animals received Ringer lactate IV only (16mL kg-1 h-1 12h-1, applied during two days. Group C was the non-treated control. Among the

  14. Pediatric Enteric Feeding Techniques: Insertion, Maintenance, and Management of Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijs, Els L. F.; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    Enteral feeding is considered a widespread, well-accepted means of delivering nutrition to adults and children who are unable to consume food by mouth or who need support in maintaining adequate nutrition for a variety of reasons, including acute and chronic disease states. Delivery of enteral feeding to nutritionally deprived patients may be achieved by several means. In this article, the indications and insertion of enteral access in children will be reviewed. In addition, common complications and management of problems will be discussed.

  15. The common enteric bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among HIV-infected individuals attending the antiretroviral therapy clinic of Hawassa university hospital, southern Ethiopia

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    Ayele Kebede

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequent occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis among HIV-infected individuals together with increased antimicrobial drug resistance pose a significant public health challenge in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of enteric bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital in southern Ethiopia. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at Hawassa University Comprehensive Specialized Hospital from February to May, 2016. A consecutive 215 HIV-infected patients, with complaints of gastrointestinal tract disease, were enrolled. Data on socio-demography and related factors was collected using a structured questionnaire. A stool sample was collected from each study participant and cultured to isolate enteric bacterial pathogens; isolates were characterized using biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the Kirby- Bauer disk diffusion technique. Results Out of 215 patients, 27(12.6% were culture positive for various bacterial pathogens. Campylobacter species was the most common bacterial isolate (6.04%, followed by Salmonella species (5.1%. The majority of isolates was sensitive to norfloxacin, nalidixic acid, gentamicin, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin and showed resistance to trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (SXT and chloramphenicol. Consumption of raw food was the only risk factor found to be significantly associated with enteric bacterial infection (crude odds ratio 3.41 95% CI 1.13–10.3. Conclusions The observed rate of enteric bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance pattern to the commonly prescribed antibiotics highlights the need to strengthen intervention efforts and promote rational use of antimicrobials. In this regard, the need to strengthen antimicrobial stewardship efforts should be emphasized to slow grown antimicrobial resistance among this population

  16. Features of medical nutrition and diet in combined therapy of dermatological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrulaeva Kh.

    2016-01-01

    The most important, and sometimes critical in many skin diseases is the observance of a certain diet. The basis of their pathogenesis are metabolic changes, functional disorders, pathology of the gastrointestinal tract, food intoxication, violation of gut barrier function, etc. In addition, a huge impact on the emergence or worsening of skin diseases, especially allergic nature are chemical substances entering the body with food. It is now known that eating disorders with treatment of skin di...

  17. Effect of visual perception training combined with total nutrition meal sequential therapy on myopic amblyopia in preschool children

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    Hong Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the therapeutic effect of visual perception training combined with total nutrition meal sequential therapy in the treatment of myopic amblyopia. METHODS: Totally 73 children(135 eyeswith myopic amblyopia were divided into control group(36 cases, 67 eyesand treatment group(37 cases, 68 eyesaccording to random number table. The control group were treated with traditional spectaculars and grating covering combined with fine eyesight training; the treatment group were treated with visual perception training combined with total nutrient meal sequential therapy. The visual acuity, diopter and average diopter of two groups were compared before and after treatment at 3, 6mo and 1a. The curative effect of two groups of children was compared after 1a treatment. And the adverse reactions were recorded in two groups during the treatment period. The recurrence rate of amblyopia in 1a follow-up was compared between two groups. RESULTS: The difference of visual acuity between two groups was not significant at 3mo(P>0.05. The visual acuity of the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group at 6mo and 1a(PP>0.05, but the average annual refractive changes in the treatment group were significantly lower than that in the control group(PPPCONCLUSION: Visual perception training combined with total nutrition meal sequential therapy in the treatment of myopic amblyopia in preschool children can significantly improve patients' visual acuity, reduce the average annual diopter changes, improve the therapeutic effect, reduce the recurrence rate of amblyopia.

  18. [The role of enteral oxygen-therapy in the correction of functional disturbances in the autonomic nervous system of the children presenting with chronic diseases of the respiratory organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konova, O M; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Dmitrienko, E G; Davydova, I V

    2014-01-01

    Vegetative dysfunction is observed in 60-90% of the children presenting with chronic respiratory diseases. Its timely identification and correction increases the effectiveness of the combined rehabilitative treatment of such patients. The vegetative regulation was dynamically evaluated by the analysis of the heart rate variability in 95 patients presenting with bronchial asthma and chronic nonspecific lung diseases. The age of the patients varied from 7 to 16 years. Sixty children received the combined treatment including enteral oxygen therapy, the control group was comprised of 35 patients. The enteral oxygen therapy eliminated the vegetative disbalance in 80.0% of the children with bronchial asthma and in 88,0% of those suffering from chronic nonspecific lung diseases. The results of the spectral analysis of heart rate variability indicate that the total spectrum power (TSP) was significantly increased in the patients of the study group. This effect was accompanied by the restructuring of wave frequency ranges pointing out to the enhancement of the activity of the sympathetic-adrenal system. The integral index of adaptive reserves (AR) increased from 2.0±0,6 to 4.7±0,6 points (p0.05). More manifest pronounced positive dynamics was observed in the patients presenting with initial vagotonia and the severe or moderate form of the disease. The present study has demonstrated the favourable influence of enteral oxygen therapy on the vegetative regulation mechanisms and the adaptive potential of the organism. Analysis of the heart rate variability may be a screening method for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the proposed therapeutic modality.

  19. [Nutritional support in polytraumatized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Lorenzo y Mateos, A; Acosta Escribano, J; Bonet Saris, A

    2005-06-01

    Polytraumatism usually presents in previously healthy patients with a good nutritional status. However, metabolic changes derived from the traumatic injury put these patients in a nutritional risk situation. Specialized nutritional support should be started if it is foreseeable that nutritional requirements will not be met p.o. within the 5-10 days period from admission. Enteral nutrition should be the first route to consider for nutrients intake. However, the presence of head trauma leads to gastrointestinal motility impairments that hinder tolerance to enteral nutrition. Patients with abdominal trauma also present difficulties for the onset and tolerance of enteral diet. The insertion of transpyloric tubes or jejunostomy catheters allows early use of enteral nutrition in these patients.

  20. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait

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    Katoue MG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs. Objective: This study was designed to explore pharmacists’ role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Methods: Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists’ demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists’ education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists

  1. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Al-Taweel, Dalal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN) therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs). This study was designed to explore pharmacists' role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital) in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists' demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists' education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists' communication and conducting TPN-research research. TPN

  2. A televideo exercise and nutrition program for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in maintenance therapy: design and methods

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    Gibson CA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cheryl A Gibson,1 Keith J August,2 Jerry L Greene,3 Stephen D Herrmann,4 Jaehoon Lee,5 Susan P Harvey,6 Kate Lambourne,3 Debra K Sullivan7 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General and Geriatric Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, KS, USA; 2Children's Mercy Hospital, MO, USA; 3Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences, University of Kansas, KS, USA; 4Children's Health Research Center, Sanford Research, SD, USA; 5Institute for Measurement, Methodology, Analysis and Policy, Texas Tech University, TX, USA; 6Center for Research on Learning, University of Kansas, KS, USA; 7Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Kansas Medical Center, KS, USA Abstract: Changes in nutrient intake and decreased exercise resulting from cancer therapies as well as their side effects may be contributing factors in the increased body weight and differences in physical fitness observed in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. This article will describe the study protocol for an intervention program designed to improve the physical activity and nutrition behaviors of ALL survivors. Twenty-four children aged between 4 years and 12 years with ALL will be randomized to a 6-month technology-based exercise and nutrition program (TLC4ALLKids or to enhanced usual care (eUC. The participants randomized to the TLC4ALLKids will participate in weekly, 1-hour coaching sessions on nutrition and physical activity and 1-hour physical activity classes delivered by group video conferencing. Participants will be provided with iPad tablets loaded with video conferencing software and the Healthy Lifestyle Tracking calendar to track daily nutrition and physical activity goals and weight. Both groups will be provided with Fitbit™ Zip to monitor physical activity. To assess feasibility, participant recruitment (achievement of proposed sample size, attendance (per weekly online sessions/assessment sessions, and adherence (number of

  3. Terapia nutricional na anorexia e bulimia nervosas Nutritional therapy in anorexia and bulimia nervosa

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    Marle Alvarenga

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A alimentação e a dieta têm um importante papel no desenvolvimento e manutenção dos transtornos alimentares. Portanto, devem ser levados em consideração nos programas de tratamento dessas condições clínicas. Pacientes com transtornos alimentares apresentam importantes restrições dietéticas, padrões alimentares inadequados e hábitos errôneos devido a uma série de falsos mitos e crenças e a uma sensação de incompetência para lidar com o alimento. Tais alterações podem levar a mudanças em seu estado nutricional, que necessita de cuidados dietéticos específicos, como reabilitação nutricional e orientação sobre dieta adequada. Além disto, o aconselhamento nutricional é necessário para esclarecer e desmistificar crenças inadequadas e para estabelecer uma adequada relação com o alimento.Food and diet have an important role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Thus, they should be properly addressed in the treatment program for such disorders. Patients with eating disorders present dietary restrictions, unhealthy eating patterns, modified nutritional patterns, and unhealthy eating behaviors due to false myths and beliefs, and to a feeling of incompetence in dealing with food. Dietary restrictions, as well as the unhealthy eating patterns carried out by these patient