WorldWideScience

Sample records for entangled-photon coincidence fluorescence

  1. Entangled photons from single atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordén, Bengt

    2018-05-01

    The first two-photon entanglement experiment performed 50 years ago by Kocher and Commins (KC) provided isolated pairs of entangled photons from an atomic three-state fluorescence cascade. In view of questioning of Bell's theorem, data from these experiments are re-analyzed and shown sufficiently precise to confirm quantum mechanical and dismiss semi-classical theory without need for Bell's inequalities. Polarization photon correlation anisotropy (A) is useful: A is near unity as predicted quantum mechanically and well above the semi-classic range, 0 ⩽ A ⩽ 1 / 2 . Although yet to be found, one may envisage a three-state molecule emitting entangled photon pairs, in analogy with the KC atomic system. Antibunching in fluorescence from single molecules in matrix and entangled photons from quantum dots promise it be possible. Molecules can have advantages to parametric down-conversion as the latter photon distribution is Poissonian and unsuitable for producing isolated pairs of entangled photons. Analytical molecular applications of entangled light are also envisaged.

  2. Slow Images and Entangled Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swordy, Simon

    2007-01-01

    I will discuss some recent experiments using slow light and entangled photons. We recently showed that it was possible to map a two dimensional image onto very low light level signals, slow them down in a hot atomic vapor while preserving the amplitude and phase of the images. If time remains, I will discuss some of our recent work with time-energy entangled photons for quantum cryptography. We were able to show that we could have a measurable state space of over 1000 states for a single pair of entangled photons in fiber.

  3. Entangled photons and quantum communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Zhensheng, E-mail: yuanzs@ustc.edu.c [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bao Xiaohui [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lu Chaoyang; Zhang Jun; Peng Chengzhi [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Pan Jianwei, E-mail: pan@ustc.edu.c [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    This article reviews the progress of quantum communication that utilizes photonic entanglement. We start with a survey of various methods for generating entangled photons, followed by an introduction of the theoretical principles and the experimental implementations of quantum key distribution. We then move on to a discussion of more involved quantum communication protocols including quantum dense coding, teleportation and quantum communication complexity. After that, we review the progress in free-space quantum communication, decoherence-free subspace, and quantum repeater protocols which are essential ingredients for long-distance quantum communication. Practical realizations of quantum repeaters, which require an interface between photons and quantum memories, are discussed briefly. Finally, we draw concluding remarks considering the technical challenges, and put forward an outlook on further developments of this field.

  4. Entangled photons and quantum communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhensheng; Bao Xiaohui; Lu Chaoyang; Zhang Jun; Peng Chengzhi; Pan Jianwei

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the progress of quantum communication that utilizes photonic entanglement. We start with a survey of various methods for generating entangled photons, followed by an introduction of the theoretical principles and the experimental implementations of quantum key distribution. We then move on to a discussion of more involved quantum communication protocols including quantum dense coding, teleportation and quantum communication complexity. After that, we review the progress in free-space quantum communication, decoherence-free subspace, and quantum repeater protocols which are essential ingredients for long-distance quantum communication. Practical realizations of quantum repeaters, which require an interface between photons and quantum memories, are discussed briefly. Finally, we draw concluding remarks considering the technical challenges, and put forward an outlook on further developments of this field.

  5. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, W.; Eliel, E. R.; Woerdman, J. P.; Euser, T. G.; Scharrer, M.; Russell, P.

    2012-03-01

    High-dimensional entangled photons pairs are interesting for quantum information and cryptography: Compared to the well-known 2D polarization case, the stronger non-local quantum correlations could improve noise resistance or security, and the larger amount of information per photon increases the available bandwidth. One implementation is to use entanglement in the spatial degree of freedom of twin photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, which is equivalent to orbital angular momentum entanglement, this has been proven to be an excellent model system. The use of optical fiber technology for distribution of such photons has only very recently been practically demonstrated and is of fundamental and applied interest. It poses a big challenge compared to the established time and frequency domain methods: For spatially entangled photons, fiber transport requires the use of multimode fibers, and mode coupling and intermodal dispersion therein must be minimized not to destroy the spatial quantum correlations. We demonstrate that these shortcomings of conventional multimode fibers can be overcome by using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, which follows the paradigm to mimic free-space transport as good as possible, and are able to confirm entanglement of the fiber-transported photons. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons is largely unexplored yet, therefore we discuss the main complications, the interplay of intermodal dispersion and mode mixing, the influence of external stress and core deformations, and consider the pros and cons of various fiber types.

  6. Characterization of our source of polarization-entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenier, Guillaume

    2012-12-01

    We present our source of polarization entangled photons, which consist of orthogonally polarized and collinear parametric down converted photons sent to the same input of a nonpolarizing beam splitter. We show that a too straightforward characterization of the quantum state cannot account for all the experimental observations, in particular for the behavior of the doublecounts, which are the coincidences produced whenever both photons are dispatched by the beam splitter to the same measuring station (either Alice or Bob). We argue that in order to account for all observations, the state has to be entangled in polarization before the non-polarizing beam splitter, and we discuss the intriguing and nevertheless essential role of the time-compensation required to obtain such a polarization entanglement.

  7. Quantum secret sharing protocol using modulated doubly entangled photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuan, Wang; Yong, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a quantum secret sharing protocol utilizing polarization modulated doubly entangled photon pairs. The measurement devices are constructed. By modulating the polarizations of entangled photons, the boss could encode secret information on the initial state and share the photons with different members to realize the secret sharing process. This protocol shows the security against intercept-resend attack and dishonest member cheating. The generalized quantum secret sharing protocol is also discussed. (general)

  8. Quantum key distribution with entangled photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiongfeng; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Lo, H.-K.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric down-conversion (PDC) source can be used as either a triggered single-photon source or an entangled-photon source in quantum key distribution (QKD). The triggering PDC QKD has already been studied in the literature. On the other hand, a model and a post-processing protocol for the entanglement PDC QKD are still missing. We fill in this important gap by proposing such a model and a post-processing protocol for the entanglement PDC QKD. Although the PDC model is proposed to study the entanglement-based QKD, we emphasize that our generic model may also be useful for other non-QKD experiments involving a PDC source. Since an entangled PDC source is a basis-independent source, we apply Koashi and Preskill's security analysis to the entanglement PDC QKD. We also investigate the entanglement PDC QKD with two-way classical communications. We find that the recurrence scheme increases the key rate and the Gottesman-Lo protocol helps tolerate higher channel losses. By simulating a recent 144-km open-air PDC experiment, we compare three implementations: entanglement PDC QKD, triggering PDC QKD, and coherent-state QKD. The simulation result suggests that the entanglement PDC QKD can tolerate higher channel losses than the coherent-state QKD. The coherent-state QKD with decoy states is able to achieve highest key rate in the low- and medium-loss regions. By applying the Gottesman-Lo two-way post-processing protocol, the entanglement PDC QKD can tolerate up to 70 dB combined channel losses (35 dB for each channel) provided that the PDC source is placed in between Alice and Bob. After considering statistical fluctuations, the PDC setup can tolerate up to 53 dB channel losses

  9. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  10. Sensitivity of entangled photon holes to loss and amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franson, J. D. [Physics Department, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Energy-time entangled photon holes are shown to be relatively insensitive to photon loss due to absorption by atoms whose coherence times are longer than the time delays typically employed in nonlocal interferometry (a fraction of a nanosecond). Roughly speaking, the excited atoms do not retain any significant ''which-path'' information regarding the time at which a photon was absorbed. High-intensity entangled photon holes can also be amplified under similar conditions. Decoherence does occur from losses at beam splitters, and these results show that photon loss cannot always be adequately modeled using a sequence of beam splitters. These properties of entangled photon holes may be useful in quantum communications systems where the range of the system is limited by photon loss.

  11. Setting Single Photon Detectors for Use with an Entangled Photon Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    EPA software). 5) If a TPI measurement is to be performed, the polarization of the PAs must first be adjusted to account for the birefringence of the... measurement of the entangled photon pairs generated by an entangled photon pair source require at least 2 SPDs operating at their highest possible...v 1. Introduction 1 2. Generation, Detection, and Measurement of Entangled Photon Pairs 1 2.1 Generation of Entangled Photon Pairs 2 2.2

  12. Measurement problem and local hidden variables with entangled photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchowski Eugen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that there is no remote action with polarization measurements of photons in singlet state. A model is presented introducing a hidden parameter which determines the polarizer output. This model is able to explain the polarization measurement results with entangled photons. It is not ruled out by Bell’s Theorem.

  13. State preparation and detector effects in quantum measurements of rotation with circular polarization-entangled photons and photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Zijing; Zhang, Jiandong; Li, Shuo; Sun, Yifei; Yan, Linyu; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Feng

    2017-11-01

    Circular polarization-entangled photons can be used to obtain an enhancement of the precision in a rotation measurement. In this paper, the method of entanglement transformation is used to produce NOON states in circular polarization from a readily generated linear polarization-entangled photon source. Detection of N -fold coincidences serves as the postselection and N -fold superoscillating fringes are obtained simultaneously. A parity strategy and conditional probabilistic statistics contribute to a better fringe, saturating the angle sensitivity to the Heisenberg limit. The impact of imperfect state preparation and detection is discussed both separately and jointly. For the separated case, the influence of each system imperfection is pronounced. For the joint case, the feasibility region for surpassing the standard quantum limit is given. Our work pushes the state preparation of circular polarization-entangled photons to the same level as that in the case of linear polarization. It is also confirmed that entanglement can be transformed into different frames for specific applications, serving as a useful scheme for using entangled sources.

  14. Practical quantum key distribution with polarization-entangled photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppe, A.; Fedrizzi, A.; Boehm, H.; Ursin, R.; Loruenser, T.; Peev, M.; Maurhardt, O.; Suda, M.; Kurtsiefer, C.; Weinfurter, H.; Jennewein, T.; Zeilinger, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present an entangled-state quantum cryptography system that operated for the first time in a real-world application scenario. The full key generation protocol was performed in real-time between two distributed embedded hardware devices, which were connected by 1.45 km of optical fiber, installed for this experiment in the Vienna sewage system. A source for polarization-entangled photons delivered about 8200 entangled photon pairs per second. After transmission to the distant receivers, a mean value of 468 pairs per second remained for the generation of a raw key, which showed an average qubit error rate of 6.4 %. The raw key was sifted and subsequently processed by a classical protocol which included error correction and privacy amplification. The final secure key bit rate was about 76 bits per second. The generated quantum key was then handed over and used by a secure communication application. (author)

  15. Direct Characterization of Ultrafast Energy-Time Entangled Photon Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Donohue, John M; Resch, Kevin J

    2018-02-02

    Energy-time entangled photons are critical in many quantum optical phenomena and have emerged as important elements in quantum information protocols. Entanglement in this degree of freedom often manifests itself on ultrafast time scales, making it very difficult to detect, whether one employs direct or interferometric techniques, as photon-counting detectors have insufficient time resolution. Here, we implement ultrafast photon counters based on nonlinear interactions and strong femtosecond laser pulses to probe energy-time entanglement in this important regime. Using this technique and single-photon spectrometers, we characterize all the spectral and temporal correlations of two entangled photons with femtosecond resolution. This enables the witnessing of energy-time entanglement using uncertainty relations and the direct observation of nonlocal dispersion cancellation on ultrafast time scales. These techniques are essential to understand and control the energy-time degree of freedom of light for ultrafast quantum optics.

  16. Two-photon interference of polarization-entangled photons in a Franson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Kwon, Osung; Moon, Han Seb

    2017-07-18

    We present two-photon interference experiments with polarization-entangled photon pairs in a polarization-based Franson-type interferometer. Although the two photons do not meet at a common beamsplitter, a phase-insensitive Hong-Ou-Mandel type two-photon interference peak and dip fringes are observed, resulting from the two-photon interference effect between two indistinguishable two-photon probability amplitudes leading to a coincidence detection. A spatial quantum beating fringe is also measured for nondegenerate photon pairs in the same interferometer, although the two-photon states have no frequency entanglement. When unentangled polarization-correlated photons are used as an input state, the polarization entanglement is successfully recovered through the interferometer via delayed compensation.

  17. Generation and manipulation of entangled photons on silicon chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda Nobuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated quantum photonics is now seen as one of the promising approaches to realize scalable quantum information systems. With optical waveguides based on silicon photonics technologies, we can realize quantum optical circuits with a higher degree of integration than with silica waveguides. In addition, thanks to the large nonlinearity observed in silicon nanophotonic waveguides, we can implement active components such as entangled photon sources on a chip. In this paper, we report recent progress in integrated quantum photonic circuits based on silicon photonics. We review our work on correlated and entangled photon-pair sources on silicon chips, using nanoscale silicon waveguides and silicon photonic crystal waveguides. We also describe an on-chip quantum buffer realized using the slow-light effect in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide. As an approach to combine the merits of different waveguide platforms, a hybrid quantum circuit that integrates a silicon-based photon-pair source and a silica-based arrayed waveguide grating is also presented.

  18. Equivalence principle and quantum mechanics: quantum simulation with entangled photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S

    2018-01-15

    Einstein's equivalence principle (EP) states the complete physical equivalence of a gravitational field and corresponding inertial field in an accelerated reference frame. However, to what extent the EP remains valid in non-relativistic quantum mechanics is a controversial issue. To avoid violation of the EP, Bargmann's superselection rule forbids a coherent superposition of states with different masses. Here we suggest a quantum simulation of non-relativistic Schrödinger particle dynamics in non-inertial reference frames, which is based on the propagation of polarization-entangled photon pairs in curved and birefringent optical waveguides and Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference measurement. The photonic simulator can emulate superposition of mass states, which would lead to violation of the EP.

  19. Exciton absorption of entangled photons in semiconductor quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ferney; Guzman, David; Salazar, Luis; Quiroga, Luis; Condensed Matter Physics Group Team

    2013-03-01

    The dependence of the excitonic two-photon absorption on the quantum correlations (entanglement) of exciting biphotons by a semiconductor quantum well is studied. We show that entangled photon absorption can display very unusual features depending on space-time-polarization biphoton parameters and absorber density of states for both bound exciton states as well as for unbound electron-hole pairs. We report on the connection between biphoton entanglement, as quantified by the Schmidt number, and absorption by a semiconductor quantum well. Comparison between frequency-anti-correlated, unentangled and frequency-correlated biphoton absorption is addressed. We found that exciton oscillator strengths are highly increased when photons arrive almost simultaneously in an entangled state. Two-photon-absorption becomes a highly sensitive probe of photon quantum correlations when narrow semiconductor quantum wells are used as two-photon absorbers. Research funds from Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes

  20. Quantum interferometry with multiports: entangled photons in optical fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reck, M. H. A.

    1996-07-01

    This thesis is the result of theoretical and experimental work on the physics of optical multiports, which are the logical generalization of the beam splitter in classical and quantum optics. The experimental results are discussed in the context of Bell's inequalities and the physics of entanglement. The theoretical results show that multiport interferometers can be used to realize any discrete unitary transformation operating on modes of a classical or a quantum radiation field. Tests of a Bell-type inequality for higher-dimensional entangled states are thus possible using entangled photon pairs from a parametric downconversion source. The experimental work measured the nonclassical interferences at the fiber-optical three-way beam splitters (tritters) and three-path fiber interferometers. An experiment with a three-path all-fiber interferometer with HeNe laser light revealed the typical features of multipath interferometry. In another experiment, entangled photon pairs from the spontaneous parametric downconversion process were used to demonstrate a purely quantum effect, the antibunching of photon pairs at the output of an integrated fiber multiport. In the main experiment, time-energy entanglement of photon pairs from a parametric downconversion source in two threepath interferometers was used to built the first realization of an entangled three-state system. The interferences measured in this experiment are the first demonstration of two-photon three-path interferences. The quantum and classical pictures of the experiment are discussed giving an outlook to new experiments. Technical details about the experiments, a MATHEMATICA program for the design of unitary interferometers, some calculations, and photographs of type-II downconversion light are included in the appendices. (author)

  1. Entangled-photon generation from a quantum dot in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajiki, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study polarization-entangled photon generation from a single quantum dot in a microcavity. Entangled-photon pairs with singlet or triplet Bell states are generated in the resonant-hyperparametric scattering via dressed states in the cavity QED. Although co-polarized non-entangled photons are also generated, the generation is dramatically suppressed in the strong-coupling limit owing to the photon blockade effect. Finite binding energy of biexciton is also important for the generation of photon pairs with high degree of entanglement. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Coincidence Imaging and interference with coherent Gaussian beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yang-jian; ZHU Shi-yao

    2006-01-01

    we present a theoretical study of coincidence imaging and interference with coherent Gaussian beams The equations for the coincidence image formation and interference fringes are derived,from which it is clear that the imaging is due to the corresponding focusing in the two paths .The quality and visibility of the images and fringes can be high simultaneously.The nature of the coincidence imaging and interference between quantum entangled photon pairs and coherent Gaussian beams are different .The coincidence image with coherent Gaussian beams is due to intensity-intensity correspondence,a classical nature,while that with entangled photon pairs is due to the amplitude correlation a quantum nature.

  3. Polarization entangled photon pair source for space-based quantum communication, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this NASA effort is to develop and deliver efficient, single-pass quantum optical waveguide sources generating high purity hyper-entangled photon...

  4. Generation of narrow-band polarization-entangled photon pairs at a rubidium D1 line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Long; Li Shujing; Yuan Haoxiang; Wang Hai

    2016-01-01

    Using the process of cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC), we generate a narrow-band polarization-entangled photon pair resonant on the rubidium (Rb) D1 line (795 nm). The degenerate single-mode photon pair is selected by multiple temperature controlled etalons. The linewidth of generated polarization-entangled photon pairs is 15 MHz which matches the typical atomic memory bandwidth. The measured Bell parameter for the polarization-entangled photons S = 2.73 ± 0.04 which violates the Bell-CHSH inequality by ∼18 standard deviations. The presented entangled photon pair source could be utilized in quantum communication and quantum computing based on quantum memories in atomic ensemble. (author)

  5. System and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yanhua (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs is provided. The present invention relies on the measurement of the second order correlation function of entangled states. Photons from an entangled photon source travel one-way to the clocks to be synchronized. By analyzing photon registration time histories generated at each clock location, the entangled states allow for high accuracy clock synchronization as well as high accuracy position determination.

  6. Multi-user distribution of polarization entangled photon pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapateau, J.; Orieux, A.; Diamanti, E.; Zaquine, I., E-mail: isabelle.zaquine@telecom-paristech.fr [LTCI, CNRS, Télécom ParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, 75013 Paris (France); Ghalbouni, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences 2, Lebanese University, Campus Fanar, BP 90656 Jdeidet (Lebanon)

    2015-10-14

    We experimentally demonstrate multi-user distribution of polarization entanglement using commercial telecom wavelength division demultiplexers. The entangled photon pairs are generated from a broadband source based on spontaneous parametric down conversion in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal using a double path setup employing a Michelson interferometer and active phase stabilisation. We test and compare demultiplexers based on various technologies and analyze the effect of their characteristics, such as losses and polarization dependence, on the quality of the distributed entanglement for three channel pairs of each demultiplexer. In all cases, we obtain a Bell inequality violation, whose value depends on the demultiplexer features. This demonstrates that entanglement can be distributed to at least three user pairs of a network from a single source. Additionally, we verify for the best demultiplexer that the violation is maintained when the pairs are distributed over a total channel attenuation corresponding to 20 km of optical fiber. These techniques are therefore suitable for resource-efficient practical implementations of entanglement-based quantum key distribution and other quantum communication network applications.

  7. Semiconductor devices for entangled photon pair generation: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orieux, Adeline; Versteegh, Marijn A. M.; Jöns, Klaus D.; Ducci, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Entanglement is one of the most fascinating properties of quantum mechanical systems; when two particles are entangled the measurement of the properties of one of the two allows the properties of the other to be instantaneously known, whatever the distance separating them. In parallel with fundamental research on the foundations of quantum mechanics performed on complex experimental set-ups, we assist today with bourgeoning of quantum information technologies bound to exploit entanglement for a large variety of applications such as secure communications, metrology and computation. Among the different physical systems under investigation, those involving photonic components are likely to play a central role and in this context semiconductor materials exhibit a huge potential in terms of integration of several quantum components in miniature chips. In this article we review the recent progress in the development of semiconductor devices emitting entangled photons. We will present the physical processes allowing the generation of entanglement and the tools to characterize it; we will give an overview of major recent results of the last few years and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  8. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    1996-01-01

    Argon L 2.3 -M 2.3 M 2.3 Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with Kα fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons

  9. On-chip steering of entangled photons in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, H Y; Yu, X Q; Gong, Y X; Xu, P; Xie, Z D; Jin, H; Zhang, C; Zhu, S N

    2011-08-16

    One promising technique for working toward practical photonic quantum technologies is to implement multiple operations on a monolithic chip, thereby improving stability, scalability and miniaturization. The on-chip spatial control of entangled photons will certainly benefit numerous applications, including quantum imaging, quantum lithography, quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, external optical elements are usually required to spatially control the entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of on-chip spatial control of entangled photons, based on a domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystal. We manipulate the entangled photons using the inherent properties of the crystal during the parametric downconversion, demonstrating two-photon focusing and beam-splitting from a periodically poled lithium tantalate crystal with a parabolic phase profile. These experimental results indicate that versatile and precise spatial control of entangled photons is achievable. Because they may be operated independent of any bulk optical elements, domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystals may prove to be a valuable ingredient in on-chip integrated quantum optics.

  10. Femtosecond Laser--Pumped Source of Entangled Photons for Quantum Cryptography Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, D.; Donaldson, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental setup for generation of entangled-photon pairs via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, based on the femtosecond-pulsed laser. Our entangled-photon source utilizes a 76-MHz-repetition-rate, 100-fs-pulse-width, mode-locked, ultrafast femtosecond laser, which can produce, on average, more photon pairs than a cw laser of an equal pump power. The resulting entangled pairs are counted by a pair of high-quantum-efficiency, single-photon, silicon avalanche photodiodes. Our apparatus s intended as an efficient source/receiver system for the quantum communications and quantum cryptography applications

  11. Towards Scalable Entangled Photon Sources with Self-Assembled InAs /GaAs Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Gong, Ming; Guo, G.-C.; He, Lixin

    2015-08-01

    The biexciton cascade process in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) provides an ideal system for realizing deterministic entangled photon-pair sources, which are essential to quantum information science. The entangled photon pairs have recently been generated in experiments after eliminating the fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons using a number of different methods. Thus far, however, QD-based sources of entangled photons have not been scalable because the wavelengths of QDs differ from dot to dot. Here, we propose a wavelength-tunable entangled photon emitter mounted on a three-dimensional stressor, in which the FSS and exciton energy can be tuned independently, thereby enabling photon entanglement between dissimilar QDs. We confirm these results via atomistic pseudopotential calculations. This provides a first step towards future realization of scalable entangled photon generators for quantum information applications.

  12. Bright nanoscale source of deterministic entangled photon pairs violating Bell's inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jöns, K.D.; Schweickert, L.S.; Versteegh, M.A.M.; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Gulinatti, Angelo; Giudice, Andrea; Zwiller, V.G.; Reimer, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Global, secure quantum channels will require efficient distribution of entangled photons. Long distance, low-loss interconnects can only be realized using photons as quantum information carriers. However, a quantum light source combining both high qubit fidelity and on-demand bright emission has

  13. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, S.A.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Eastham, D.A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J.R.H.; Tolfree, D.W.L.; Warner, D.D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I.S.; Walker, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124 Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g 7/2 5/2[413] neutron and g 9/2 9/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction. (orig.)

  14. Probabilistic teleportation scheme of two-mode entangled photon states by using linear optic element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Shao-hua

    2003-01-01

    A scheme for teleporting two-mode entangled photon states with the successful probability 33.3% is proposed. In the scheme, the teleporte d qubit is two-mode photon entangled states, and two pairs of EPR pair are used as quantum channel between a sender and a receiver. This procedure is achieved by using two 50/50 symmetric beam splitters and four photon number detectors wit h the help of classical information.

  15. Spatiotemporal correlations in entangled photons generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Clara I; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P

    2008-01-01

    In most configurations aimed at generating entangled photons based on spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC), the generated pairs of photons are required to be entangled in only one degree of freedom. Any distinguishing information coming from the other degrees of freedom that characterize the photon should be suppressed to avoid correlations with the degree of freedom of interest. However, this suppression is not always possible. Here, we show how the frequency information available affects the purity of the two-photon state in space, revealing a correlation between the frequency and the space degrees of freedom. This correlation should be taken into account to calculate the total amount of entanglement between the photons.

  16. Parametric conversion and maximally entangled photon pair via collective excitations in a cycle atomic ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yu, R.; Yang, X.

    2008-01-01

    We study the propagation of two quantized optical fields via considering the collective effects of photonic emissions and excitations of a three-level cyclic-type system (such as atomic ensemble with symmetry broken, or the chiral molecular gases, or manual 'atomic' array with symmetry broken), where the quantum transitions is driven by two quantized fields and a classical one. The results show that the parametric conversion and maximally entangled photon pair generation can be achieved by means of the collective excitation of the two upper energy levels induced by the classic optical field. This investigation may be used for the generated coherent short-wavelength quantum radiation and quantum information processing

  17. Propagation and survival of frequency-bin entangled photons in metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olislager Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design of two plasmonic nanostructures and the propagation of frequency-bin entangled photons through them. The experimental findings clearly show the robustness of frequency-bin entanglement, which survives after interactions with both a hybrid plasmo-photonic structure, and a nano-pillar array. These results confirm that quantum states can be encoded into the collective motion of a many-body electronic system without demolishing their quantum nature, and pave the way towards applications of plasmonic structures in quantum information.

  18. Electric-Field-Induced Energy Tuning of On-Demand Entangled-Photon Emission from Self-Assembled Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Zallo, Eugenio; Höfer, Bianca; Chen, Yan; Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Böttner, Stefan; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2017-01-11

    We explore a method to achieve electrical control over the energy of on-demand entangled-photon emission from self-assembled quantum dots (QDs). The device used in our work consists of an electrically tunable diode-like membrane integrated onto a piezoactuator, which is capable of exerting a uniaxial stress on QDs. We theoretically reveal that, through application of the quantum-confined Stark effect to QDs by a vertical electric field, the critical uniaxial stress used to eliminate the fine structure splitting of QDs can be linearly tuned. This feature allows experimental realization of a triggered source of energy-tunable entangled-photon emission. Our demonstration represents an important step toward realization of a solid-state quantum repeater using indistinguishable entangled photons in Bell state measurements.

  19. Single track coincidence measurements of fluorescent and plastic nuclear track detectors in therapeutic carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osinga, J-M; Jäkel, O; Ambrožová, I; Brabcová, K Pachnerová; Davídková, M; Akselrod, M S; Greilich, S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for single track coincidence measurements using two different track detector materials. We employed plastic and fluorescent nuclear track detectors (PNTDs and FNTDs) in the entrance channel of a monoenergetic carbon ion beam covering the therapeutic energy range from 80 to 425 MeV/u. About 99% of all primary particle tracks detected by both detectors were successfully matched, while 1% of the particles were only detected by the FNTDs because of their superior spatial resolution. We conclude that both PNTDs and FNTDs are suitable for clinical carbon beam dosimetry with a detection efficiency of at least 98.82% and 99.83% respectively, if irradiations are performed with low fluence in the entrance channel of the ion beam. The investigated method can be adapted to other nuclear track detectors and offers the possibility to characterize new track detector materials against well-known detectors. Further, by combining two detectors with a restricted working range in the presented way a hybrid-detector system can be created with an extended and optimized working range

  20. A significant-loophole-free test of Bell's theorem with entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, Marissa; Versteegh, Marijn A. M.; Wengerowsky, Sören; Handsteiner, Johannes; Hochrainer, Armin; Phelan, Kevin; Steinlechner, Fabian; Kofler, Johannes; Larsson, Jan-Åke; Abellán, Carlos; Amaya, Waldimar; Mitchell, Morgan W.; Beyer, Jörn; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E.; Shalm, Lynden K.; Nam, Sae Woo; Scheidl, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Wittmann, Bernhard; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-10-01

    John Bell's theorem of 1964 states that local elements of physical reality, existing independent of measurement, are inconsistent with the predictions of quantum mechanics (Bell, J. S. (1964), Physics (College. Park. Md). Specifically, correlations between measurement results from distant entangled systems would be smaller than predicted by quantum physics. This is expressed in Bell's inequalities. Employing modifications of Bell's inequalities, many experiments have been performed that convincingly support the quantum predictions. Yet, all experiments rely on assumptions, which provide loopholes for a local realist explanation of the measurement. Here we report an experiment with polarization-entangled photons that simultaneously closes the most significant of these loopholes. We use a highly efficient source of entangled photons, distributed these over a distance of 58.5 meters, and implemented rapid random setting generation and high-efficiency detection to observe a violation of a Bell inequality with high statistical significance. The merely statistical probability of our results to occur under local realism is less than 3.74×10-31, corresponding to an 11.5 standard deviation effect.

  1. Progress towards the development of a source of entangled photons for Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Jennewein, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-03-01

    Quantum entanglement offers exciting applications like quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography. Ground based quantum communication schemes in optical fibres however are limited to a distance of the order of ˜100 km. In order to extend this limit to a global scale we are working on the realization of an entanglement-based quantum communication transceiver for space deployment. Here we report on a compact, extremely bright source for polarization entangled photons meeting the scientific requirements for a potential space to ground optical link. The pair production rate exceeds 4*10̂6 pairs/s at just 20mW of laser diode pump power. Furthermore, we will present the results of various experiments proving the feasibility of quantum information in space, including a weak coherent pulse single-photon downlink from a LEO satellite and the distribution of entanglement over a 144km free space link, using ESAs optical ground station.

  2. Significant-Loophole-Free Test of Bell's Theorem with Entangled Photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, Marissa; Versteegh, Marijn A M; Wengerowsky, Sören; Handsteiner, Johannes; Hochrainer, Armin; Phelan, Kevin; Steinlechner, Fabian; Kofler, Johannes; Larsson, Jan-Åke; Abellán, Carlos; Amaya, Waldimar; Pruneri, Valerio; Mitchell, Morgan W; Beyer, Jörn; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E; Shalm, Lynden K; Nam, Sae Woo; Scheidl, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Wittmann, Bernhard; Zeilinger, Anton

    2015-12-18

    Local realism is the worldview in which physical properties of objects exist independently of measurement and where physical influences cannot travel faster than the speed of light. Bell's theorem states that this worldview is incompatible with the predictions of quantum mechanics, as is expressed in Bell's inequalities. Previous experiments convincingly supported the quantum predictions. Yet, every experiment requires assumptions that provide loopholes for a local realist explanation. Here, we report a Bell test that closes the most significant of these loopholes simultaneously. Using a well-optimized source of entangled photons, rapid setting generation, and highly efficient superconducting detectors, we observe a violation of a Bell inequality with high statistical significance. The purely statistical probability of our results to occur under local realism does not exceed 3.74×10^{-31}, corresponding to an 11.5 standard deviation effect.

  3. Generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs in a cascade of two type-I crystals pumped by femtosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Yoshihiro; Usami, Koji; Tsuda, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    We report the generation of polarization-entangled photons by femtosecond-pulse-pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a cascade of two type-I crystals. Highly entangled pulsed states were obtained by introducing a temporal delay between the two orthogonal polarization components of the pump field. They exhibited high-visibility quantum interference and a large concurrence value, without the need of postselection using narrow-bandwidth spectral filters. The results are well explained by the theory which incorporates the space-time dependence of interfering two-photon amplitudes if dispersion and birefringence in the crystals are appropriately taken into account. Such a pulsed entangled photon well localized in time domain is useful for various quantum communication experiments, such as quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation

  4. Classical reconstruction of interference patterns of position-wave-vector-entangled photon pairs by the time-reversal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Tomita, Akihisa

    2018-02-01

    The quantum interference of entangled photons forms a key phenomenon underlying various quantum-optical technologies. It is known that the quantum interference patterns of entangled photon pairs can be reconstructed classically by the time-reversal method; however, the time-reversal method has been applied only to time-frequency-entangled two-photon systems in previous experiments. Here, we apply the time-reversal method to the position-wave-vector-entangled two-photon systems: the two-photon Young interferometer and the two-photon beam focusing system. We experimentally demonstrate that the time-reversed systems classically reconstruct the same interference patterns as the position-wave-vector-entangled two-photon systems.

  5. Energy-Tunable Sources of Entangled Photons: A Viable Concept for Solid-State-Based Quantum Relays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Daruka, Istvan; Ortix, Carmine; Rastelli, Armando

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method of generating triggered entangled photon pairs with wavelength on demand. The method uses a microstructured semiconductor-piezoelectric device capable of dynamically reshaping the electronic properties of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) via anisotropic strain engineering. Theoretical models based on k .p theory in combination with finite-element calculations show that the energy of the polarization-entangled photons emitted by QDs can be tuned in a range larger than 100 meV without affecting the degree of entanglement of the quantum source. These results pave the way towards the deterministic implementation of QD entanglement resources in all-electrically-controlled solid-state-based quantum relays.

  6. Compact source of narrow-band counterpropagating polarization-entangled photon pairs using a single dual-periodically-poled crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Yan-Xiao; Xie, Zhen-Da; Xu, Ping; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Xue, Peng

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the generation of counterpropagating polarization-entangled photon pairs from a dual-periodically-poled crystal. Compared with the usual forward-wave-type source, this source, in the backward-wave way, has a much narrower bandwidth. With a 2-cm-long bulk crystal, the bandwidths of the example sources are estimated to be 3.6 GHz, and the spectral brightnesses are more than 100 pairs/(s GHz mW). Two concurrent quasi-phase-matched spontaneous parametric down-conversion processes in a single crystal enable our source to be compact and stable. This scheme does not rely on any state projection and applies to both degenerate and nondegenerate cases, facilitating applications of the entangled photons.

  7. High-fidelity frequency down-conversion of visible entangled photon pairs with superconducting single-photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Kato, Hiroshi; Kusaka, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Koashi, Masato

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-fidelity visible-to-telecommunicationwavelength conversion of a photon by using a solid-state-based difference frequency generation. In the experiment, one half of a pico-second visible entangled photon pair at 780 nm is converted to a 1522-nm photon. Using superconducting single-photon detectors with low dark count rates and small timing jitters, we observed a fidelity of 0.93±0.04 after the wavelength conversion

  8. Generation and control of polarization-entangled photons from GaAs island quantum dots by an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Mohsen; Ohtani, Keita; Ohno, Yuzo; Ohno, Hideo

    2012-02-07

    Semiconductor quantum dots are potential sources for generating polarization-entangled photons efficiently. The main prerequisite for such generation based on biexciton-exciton cascaded emission is to control the exciton fine-structure splitting. Among various techniques investigated for this purpose, an electric field is a promising means to facilitate the integration into optoelectronic devices. Here we demonstrate the generation of polarization-entangled photons from single GaAs quantum dots by an electric field. In contrast to previous studies, which were limited to In(Ga)As quantum dots, GaAs island quantum dots formed by a thickness fluctuation were used because they exhibit a larger oscillator strength and emit light with a shorter wavelength. A forward voltage was applied to a Schottky diode to control the fine-structure splitting. We observed a decrease and suppression in the fine-structure splitting of the studied single quantum dot with the field, which enabled us to generate polarization-entangled photons with a high fidelity of 0.72 ± 0.05.

  9. Strong violations of locality by testing Bell’s inequality with improved entangled-photon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yao; Fan Dai-He; Guo Wei-Jie; Wei Lian-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Bell’s theorem states that quantum mechanics cannot be accounted for by any local theory. One of the examples is the existence of quantum non-locality is essentially violated by the local Bell’s inequality. Therefore, the violation of Bell’s inequality (BI) has been regarded as one of the robust evidences of quantum mechanics. Until now, BI has been tested by many experiments, but the maximal violation (i.e., Cirel’son limit) has never been achieved. By improving the design of entangled sources and optimizing the measurement settings, in this work we report the stronger violations of the Clauser–Horne–Shimony–Holt (CHSH)-type Bell’s inequality. The biggest value of Bell’s function in our experiment reaches to a significant one: S = 2.772± 0.063, approaching to the so-called Cirel’son limit in which the Bell function value is . Further improvement is possible by optimizing the entangled-photon sources. (paper)

  10. Theory of two-photon interactions with broadband down-converted light and entangled photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayan, Barak

    2007-01-01

    When two-photon interactions are induced by down-converted light with a bandwidth that exceeds the pump bandwidth, they can obtain a behavior that is pulselike temporally, yet spectrally narrow. At low photon fluxes this behavior reflects the time and energy entanglement between the down-converted photons. However, two-photon interactions such as two-photon absorption (TPA) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) can exhibit such a behavior even at high power levels, as long as the final state (i.e., the atomic level in TPA, or the generated light in SFG) is narrow-band enough. This behavior does not depend on the squeezing properties of the light, is insensitive to linear losses, and has potential applications. In this paper we describe analytically this behavior for traveling-wave down conversion with continuous or pulsed pumping, both for high- and low-power regimes. For this we derive a quantum-mechanical expression for the down-converted amplitude generated by an arbitrary pump, and formulate operators that represent various two-photon interactions induced by broadband light. This model is in excellent agreement with experimental results of TPA and SFG with high-power down-converted light and with entangled photons [Dayan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 023005 (2004); 94, 043602 (2005); Pe'er et al., ibid. 94, 073601 (2005)

  11. Bell violation using entangled photons without the fair-sampling assumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, Marissa; Mech, Alexandra; Ramelow, Sven; Wittmann, Bernhard; Kofler, Johannes; Beyer, Jörn; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2013-05-09

    The violation of a Bell inequality is an experimental observation that forces the abandonment of a local realistic viewpoint--namely, one in which physical properties are (probabilistically) defined before and independently of measurement, and in which no physical influence can propagate faster than the speed of light. All such experimental violations require additional assumptions depending on their specific construction, making them vulnerable to so-called loopholes. Here we use entangled photons to violate a Bell inequality while closing the fair-sampling loophole, that is, without assuming that the sample of measured photons accurately represents the entire ensemble. To do this, we use the Eberhard form of Bell's inequality, which is not vulnerable to the fair-sampling assumption and which allows a lower collection efficiency than other forms. Technical improvements of the photon source and high-efficiency transition-edge sensors were crucial for achieving a sufficiently high collection efficiency. Our experiment makes the photon the first physical system for which each of the main loopholes has been closed, albeit in different experiments.

  12. Entangled photon pair generation by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in finite-length one-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centini, M.; Sciscione, L.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Perina, J. Jr.; Scalora, M.; Bloemer, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    A description of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in finite-length one-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals is developed using semiclassical and quantum approaches. It is shown that if a suitable averaging is added to the semiclassical model, its results are in very good agreement with the quantum approach. We propose two structures made with GaN/AlN that generate both degenerate and nondegenerate entangled photon pairs. Both structures are designed so as to achieve a high efficiency of the nonlinear process

  13. Bell Test over Extremely High-Loss Channels: Towards Distributing Entangled Photon Pairs between Earth and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Zou, Wen-Jie; Li, Zheng-Ping; Shen, Qi; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Ren, Ji-Gang; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-04-01

    Quantum entanglement was termed "spooky action at a distance" in the well-known paper by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. Entanglement is expected to be distributed over longer and longer distances in both practical applications and fundamental research into the principles of nature. Here, we present a proposal for distributing entangled photon pairs between Earth and the Moon using a Lagrangian point at a distance of 1.28 light seconds. One of the most fascinating features in this long-distance distribution of entanglement is as follows. One can perform the Bell test with human supplying the random measurement settings and recording the results while still maintaining spacelike intervals. To realize a proof-of-principle experiment, we develop an entangled photon source with 1 GHz generation rate, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than previous results. Violation of Bell's inequality was observed under a total simulated loss of 103 dB with measurement settings chosen by two experimenters. This demonstrates the feasibility of such long-distance Bell test over extremely high-loss channels, paving the way for one of the ultimate tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics.

  14. Light for the quantum. Entangled photons and their applications: a very personal perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-07-01

    local realistic explanations of the quantum phenomenon of entanglement in a significant way. These experiments may go down in the history books of science. Future experiments will address particularly the freedom-of-choice loophole using cosmic sources of randomness. Such experiments confirm that unconditionally secure quantum cryptography is possible, since quantum cryptography based on Bell’s theorem can provide unconditional security. The fact that the experiments were loophole-free proves that an eavesdropper cannot avoid detection in an experiment that correctly follows the protocol. I finally discuss some recent experiments with single- and entangled-photon states in higher dimensions. Such experiments realized quantum entanglement between two photons, each with quantum numbers beyond 10 000 and also simultaneous entanglement of two photons where each carries more than 100 dimensions. Thus they offer the possibility of quantum communication with more than one bit or qubit per photon. The paper concludes discussing Einstein’s contributions and viewpoints of quantum mechanics. Even if some of his positions are not supported by recent experiments, he has to be given credit for the fact that his analysis of fundamental issues gave rise to developments which led to a new information technology. Finally, I reflect on some of the lessons learned by the fact that nature cannot be local, that objective randomness exists and about the emergence of a classical world. It is suggestive that information plays a fundamental role also in the foundations of quantum physics.

  15. The mechanism of producing energy-polarization entangled photon pairs in the cavity-quantum electrodynamics scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Chang-Gan; Xin Xia; Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan; Yao Wen-Jie; Wang Dong-Lin; Cao Gui

    2012-01-01

    We investigate theoretically two photon entanglement processes in a photonic-crystal cavity embedding a quantum dot in the strong-coupling regime. The model proposed by Johne et al. (Johne R, Gippius N A, Pavlovic G, Solnyshkov D D, Shelykh I A and Malpuech G 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 240404), and by Robert et al. (Robert J, Gippius N A and Malpuech G 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155317) is modified by considering irreversible dissipation and incoherent continuous pumping for the quantum dot, which is necessary to connect the realistic experiment. The dynamics of the system is analysed by employing the Born—Markov master equation, through which the spectra for the system are computed as a function of various parameters. By means of this analysis the photon-reabsorption process in the strong-coupling regime is first observed and analysed from the perspective of radiation spectrum and the optimal parameters for observing energy-entangled photon pairs are identified. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Properties of entangled photon pairs generated in one-dimensional nonlinear photonic-band-gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perina, Jan Jr.; Centini, Marco; Sibilia, Concita; Bertolotti, Mario; Scalora, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a rigorous quantum model of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a nonlinear 1D photonic-band-gap structure based upon expansion of the field into monochromatic plane waves. The model provides a two-photon amplitude of a created photon pair. The spectra of the signal and idler fields, their intensity profiles in the time domain, as well as the coincidence-count interference pattern in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are determined both for cw and pulsed pumping regimes in terms of the two-photon amplitude. A broad range of parameters characterizing the emitted down-converted fields can be used. As an example, a structure composed of 49 layers of GaN/AlN is analyzed as a suitable source of photon pairs having high efficiency

  17. Integrated Sources of Polarization Entangled Photon Pair States via Spontaneous Four-Wave Mixing in AlGaAs Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultavewuti, Pisek

    Polarization-entangled photon pair states (PESs) are indispensable in several quantum protocols that should be implemented in an integrated photonic circuit for realizing a practical quantum technology. Preparing such states in integrated waveguides is in fact a challenge due to polarization mode dispersion. Unlike other conventional ways that are plagued with complications in fabrication or in state generation, in this thesis, the scheme based on parallel spontaneous four-wave mixing processes of two polarization waveguide modes is thoroughly studied in theory and experimentation for the polarization entanglement generation. The scheme in fact needs the modal dispersion, contradictory to the general perception, as revealed by a full quantum mechanical framework. The proper modal dispersion balances the effects of temporal walk-off and state factorizability. The study also shows that the popular standard platform such as a silicon-on-insulator wafer is far from suitable to implement the proposed simple generation technique. Proven by the quantum state tomography, the technique produces a highly-entangled state with a maximum concurrence of 0.97 +/- 0:01 from AlGaAs waveguides. In addition, the devices directly generated Bell states with an observed fidelity of 0.92 +/- 0:01 without any post-generation compensating steps. Novel suspended device structures, including their components, are then investigated numerically and experimentally characterized in pursuit of finding the geometry with the optimal dispersion property. The 700 nm x 1100 nm suspended rectangular waveguide is identified as the best geometry with a predicted maximum concurrence of 0.976 and a generation bandwidth of 3.3 THz. The suspended waveguide fabrication procedure adds about 15 dB/cm and 10 dB/cm of propagation loss to the TE and TM mode respectively, on top of the loss in corresponding full-cladding waveguides. Bridges, which structurally support the suspended waveguides, are optimized using

  18. Time-bin entangled photon pairs from spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by a cw multi-mode diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Osung; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Ra, Young-Sik; Kim, Yong-Su; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2013-10-21

    Generation of time-bin entangled photon pairs requires the use of the Franson interferometer which consists of two spatially separated unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers through which the signal and idler photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) are made to transmit individually. There have been two SPDC pumping regimes where the scheme works: the narrowband regime and the double-pulse regime. In the narrowband regime, the SPDC process is pumped by a narrowband cw laser with the coherence length much longer than the path length difference of the Franson interferometer. In the double-pulse regime, the longitudinal separation between the pulse pair is made equal to the path length difference of the Franson interferometer. In this paper, we propose another regime by which the generation of time-bin entanglement is possible and demonstrate the scheme experimentally. In our scheme, differently from the previous approaches, the SPDC process is pumped by a cw multi-mode (i.e., short coherence length) laser and makes use of the coherence revival property of such a laser. The high-visibility two-photon Franson interference demonstrates clearly that high-quality time-bin entanglement source can be developed using inexpensive cw multi-mode diode lasers for various quantum communication applications.

  19. Integrated coincidence circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borejko, V.F.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of two coincidence units employing integral circuits in the VISHNYA standard. The units are distinguished for the coincidence selection element which is essentially a combination of a tunnel diode and microcircuits. The output fast response of the units is at least 90 MHz in the mode of the output signal unshaped in duration and 50 MHz minimum in the mode of the output signal shaping. The resolution time of the units is dependent upon the duration of input signals

  20. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  1. Experiments using coincidence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Dhani.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on γ spectroscopy using the simple coincidence techniques, including investigation of angular distribution of γ radiation from annihilation process in decay of Na 22 , γ - γ angular correlation technique in decay of Co 60 , decay scheme study of Bi 207 and life time measurement of nuclear Pb 207 excited state have been carried out. (author)

  2. A β - γ coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agullo, F.

    1960-01-01

    A β - γ coincidence method for absolute counting is given. The fundamental principles are revised and the experimental part is detailed. The results from 1 98 Au irradiated in the JEN 1 Swimming pool reactor are given. The maximal accuracy is 1 per cent. (Author) 11 refs

  3. Digital coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.M.; Ius, D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a digital coincidence-counting system which comprises a custom-built data acquisition card and associated PC software. The system has been designed to digitise the pulse-trains from two radiation detectors at a rate of 20 MSamples/s with 12-bit resolution. Through hardware compression of the data, the system can continuously record both individual pulse-shapes and the time intervals between pulses. Software-based circuits are used to process the stored pulse trains. These circuits are constructed simply by linking together icons representing various components such as coincidence mixers, time delays, single-channel analysers, deadtimes and scalers. This system enables a pair of pulse trains to be processed repeatedly using any number of different methods. Some preliminary results are presented in order to demonstrate the versatility and efficiency of this new method. (orig.)

  4. Digital coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, S. M.; Ius, D.

    1996-02-01

    This paper reports on the development of a digital coincidence-counting system which comprises a custom-built data acquisition card and associated PC software. The system has been designed to digitise the pulse-trains from two radiation detectors at a rate of 20 MSamples/s with 12-bit resolution. Through hardware compression of the data, the system can continuously record both individual pulse-shapes and the time intervals between pulses. Software-based circuits are used to process the stored pulse trains. These circuits are constructed simply by linking together icons representing various components such as coincidence mixers, time delays, single-channel analysers, deadtimes and scalers. This system enables a pair of pulse trains to be processed repeatedly using any number of different methods. Some preliminary results are presented in order to demonstrate the versatility and efficiency of this new method.

  5. Prospects in coincidence experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of virtual photons to the local variations of the charge and magnetization densities is exploited to study the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. The possibility of varying energy, squared mass and longitudinal polarization of the photons independently enables us to disentangle the mechanisms related to the internal structure of the nucleon (e.g. quark interchange) and the contribution due to meson exchange. Coincidence experiments of the type (e,e'N) and (e,e'NN) are performed to suppress the meson contribution to the longitudinal part of the quasi-elastic peak. Four typical examples of coincidence experiments induced by virtual photons are discussed: experiments (1) on the spectroscopic structure of the quasi-elastic peak and the problem of deep lying hole states; (2) on the structure of the continuum; (3) on the low energy side of the quasi-elastic peak; and finally a three-arm coincidence experiment. (Auth.)

  6. Secured Optical Communications Using Quantum Entangled Two-Photon Transparency Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun (Inventor); Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Lekki, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and method is disclosed wherein optical signals are coded in a transmitter by tuning or modulating the interbeam delay time (which modulates the fourth-order coherence) between pairs of entangled photons. The photon pairs are either absorbed or not absorbed (transparent) by an atomic or molecular fluorescer in a receiver, depending on the inter-beam delay that is introduced in the entangled photon pairs. Upon the absorption, corresponding fluorescent optical emissions follow at a certain wavelength, which are then detected by a photon detector. The advantage of the disclosed system is that it eliminates a need of a coincidence counter to realize the entanglement-based secure optical communications because the absorber acts as a coincidence counter for entangled photon pairs.

  7. Triple-coincidence with automatic chance coincidence correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, R.L.

    1975-05-01

    The chance coincidences in a triple-coincidence circuit are of two types--partially correlated and entirely uncorrelated. Their relative importance depends on source strength and source and detector geometry so that the total chance correction cannot, in general, be calculated. The system described makes use of several delays and straightforward integrated circuit logic to provide independent evaluation of the two components of the chance coincidence rate. (auth)

  8. Coincidence counting corrections for dead time losses and accidental coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, H.A.

    1987-04-01

    An equation is derived for the calculation of the radioactivity of a source from the results of coincidence counting taking into account the dead-time losses and accidental coincidences. The derivation is an extension of the method of J. Bryant [Int. J. Appl. Radiat. Isot., 14:143, 1963]. The improvement on Bryant's formula has been verified by experiment

  9. Entangled photons from small quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.M.; Allaart, K.; Lenstra, D.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss level schemes of small quantum-dot turnstiles and their applicability in the production of entanglement in two-photon emission. Due to the large energy splitting of the single-electron levels, only one single-electron level and one single-hole level can be made resonant with the levels in

  10. Channel coincidence counter: version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.

    1980-06-01

    A thermal neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the assay of fast critical assembly fuel drawers and plutonium-bearing fuel rods. The principal feature of the detector is a 7-cm by 7-cm by 97-cm detector channel, which provides a uniform neutron detection efficiency of 16% along the central 40 cm of the channel. The electronics system is identical to that used for the High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter

  11. Resonance Fluorescence of a Trapped Four-Level Atom with Bichromatic Driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergou, J.; Jakob, M.; Abranyos, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The resonance fluorescence spectrum of a bichromatically driven four-level atom is polarization dependent. Very narrow lines occur in the incoherent parts of the spectrum for polarization directions which are different from that of the driving fields. The degree of squeezing has a maximum of 56% which should make it easily observable. The second-order correlation function exhibits anti bunching for zero time delay and strong super bunching for certain values of the interaction parameter and time delay. For these parameters resonant two-photon emission takes place in the form of polarization entangled photon pairs. The system can be a novel source of photons in the EPR and/or Bell states. Some experiments will be proposed which make use of this unique source. (Authors)

  12. Video Histories, Memories, and Coincidences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    2012-01-01

    Looping images allows us to notice things that we have never noticed before. Looping a small but exquisite selection of the video tapes of Marcel Odenbach, Dieter Kiessling and Matthias Neuenhofer may allow the discovering of Histories, Coincidences, and Infinitesimal Aesthetics inscribed...

  13. Multiple channel programmable coincidence counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Gaetano J.

    1990-01-01

    A programmable digital coincidence counter having multiple channels and featuring minimal dead time. Neutron detectors supply electrical pulses to a synchronizing circuit which in turn inputs derandomized pulses to an adding circuit. A random access memory circuit connected as a programmable length shift register receives and shifts the sum of the pulses, and outputs to a serializer. A counter is input by the adding circuit and downcounted by the seralizer, one pulse at a time. The decoded contents of the counter after each decrement is output to scalers.

  14. Numerical coincidences and 'tuning' in cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    Fred Hoyle famously drew attention to the significance of apparent coincidences in the energy levels of the carbon and oxygen nucleus. This paper addresses the possible implications of other coincidences in cosmology.

  15. Coincident photoelectron spectroscopy on superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the performed experiments of this thesis was to attempt to detect Cooper pairs as carriers of the superconducting current directly by means of the photoelectric effect. The method of the coincident photoelectron spectroscopy aims thereby at the detection of two coherently emitted electrons by the interaction with a photon. Because electrostatic analyzers typically cover only a very small spatial angle, which goes along with very low coincidence rates, in connection with this thesis a time-of-flight projection system has been developed, which maps nearly the whole spatial angle on a position-resolving detector. The pulsed light source in form of special synchrotron radiation necessary for the measurement has been adjusted so weak, that only single photons could arrive at the sample. Spectroscoped were beside test measurements on silver layers both a lead monocrystal as representative of the classical BCS superconductors and monocrystalline Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 from the family of the high-temperature superconductors. With excitation energies up to 40 eV could be shown that sufficiently smooth and clean surfaces in the superconducting phase exhibit within the resolving power of about 0.5 eV no recognizable differences in comparison to the normally conducting phase. Beside these studies furthermore the simple photoemission at the different samples and especially in the case of the lead crystal is treated, because here no comparable results are known. Thereby the whole momentum space is discussed and the Fermi surface established as three-dimensional model, by means of which the measurement results are discussed. in the theoretical descriptions different models for the Cooper-pair production are presented, whereby to the momentum exchange with the crystal a special role is attributed, because this can only occur in direct excitations via discrete lattice vectors.

  16. A portable neutron coincidence counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Bowyer, S.M.; Craig, R.A.; Dudder, G.B.; Knopf, M.A.; Panisko, M.E.; Reeder, P.L.; Stromswold, D.C.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1996-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has designed and constructed a prototype portable neutron coincidence counter intended for use in a variety of applications, such as the verification and inspection of weapons components, safety measurements for novel and challenging situations, portable portal deployment to prevent the transportation of fissile materials, uranium enrichment measurements in hard-to-reach locations, waste assays for objects that cannot be measured by existing measurement systems, and decontamination and decommissioning. The counting system weighs less than 40 kg and is composed of parts each weighing no more than 5 kg. In addition, the counter`s design is sufficiently flexible to allow rapid, reliable assembly around containers of nearly arbitrary size and shape. The counter is able to discern the presence of 1 kg of weapons-grade plutonium within an ALR-8 (30-gal drum) in roughly 100 seconds and 10 g in roughly 1000 seconds. The counter`s electronics are also designed for maximum adaptability, allowing operation under a wide variety of circumstances, including exposure to gamma-ray fields of 1 R/h. This report provides a detailed review of the design and construction process. Finally, preliminary experimental measurements that confirm the performance capabilities of this counter are discussed. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Multiverse understanding of cosmological coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the time scales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  18. Photoion spectroscopy of atoms using coincidence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayaishi, Tatsuji

    1990-01-01

    Interaction of atoms or molecules with photons causes many effects which are often obscured because of many decay paths from the event. To pick up an effect in the mixed-up ones, it is necessary to observe the decay path arising the effect alone. There is a coincidence technique in one of experimental means for the purpose of observing the decay path. In this article, two coincidence measurements are presented; a photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique and a threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique. Furthermore, experimental facts of rare gases atoms obtained by the techniques are reviewed. (author)

  19. Sensitivity to coincidences and paranormal belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlaczky, Gergö; Westerlund, Joakim

    2011-12-01

    Often it is difficult to find a natural explanation as to why a surprising coincidence occurs. In attempting to find one, people may be inclined to accept paranormal explanations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether people with a lower threshold for being surprised by coincidences have a greater propensity to become believers compared to those with a higher threshold. Participants were exposed to artificial coincidences, which were formally defined as less or more probable, and were asked to provide remarkability ratings. Paranormal belief was measured by the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale. An analysis of the remarkability ratings revealed a significant interaction effect between Sheep-Goat score and type of coincidence, suggesting that people with lower thresholds of surprise, when experiencing coincidences, harbor higher paranormal belief than those with a higher threshold. The theoretical aspects of these findings were discussed.

  20. X-ray line coincidence photopumping in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F. P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Mathioudakis, M.; Rose, S. J.; Flowerdew, J.; Hynes, D.; Christian, D. J.; Nilsen, J.; Johnson, W. R.

    2018-03-01

    Line coincidence photopumping is a process where the electrons of an atomic or molecular species are radiatively excited through the absorption of line emission from another species at a coincident wavelength. There are many instances of line coincidence photopumping in astrophysical sources at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, with the most famous example being Bowen fluorescence (pumping of O III 303.80 Å by He II), but none to our knowledge in X-rays. However, here we report on a scheme where a He-like line of Ne IX at 11.000 Å is photopumped by He-like Na X at 11.003 Å, which predicts significant intensity enhancement in the Ne IX 82.76 Å transition under physical conditions found in solar flare plasmas. A comparison of our theoretical models with published X-ray observations of a solar flare obtained during a rocket flight provides evidence for line enhancement, with the measured degree of enhancement being consistent with that expected from theory, a truly surprising result. Observations of this enhancement during flares on stars other than the Sun would provide a powerful new diagnostic tool for determining the sizes of flare loops in these distant, spatially unresolved, astronomical sources.

  1. Statistical data filtration in neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddingfield, D.H.; Menlove, H.O.

    1992-11-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of statistical data filtration to minimize the contribution of matrix materials in 200-ell drums to the nondestructive assay of plutonium. Those matrices were examined: polyethylene, concrete, aluminum, iron, cadmium, and lead. Statistical filtration of neutron coincidence data improved the low-end sensitivity of coincidence counters. Spurious data arising from electrical noise, matrix spallation, and geometric effects were smoothed in a predictable fashion by the statistical filter. The filter effectively lowers the minimum detectable mass limit that can be achieved for plutonium assay using passive neutron coincidence counting

  2. Coincident effect characteristic in a thermoacoustic regenerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yicai; Xin Tianlong; Huang Qian; Shi Xiangnan; Chen Siming; Chen Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Many previous studies on characteristics of thermoacoustic regenerator are based on fluid micro-groups and their compression-expansion cycle. In this paper, coincident frequency is introduced to evaluate its acoustic characteristics by combining structural acoustic with structural vibration theories. The relationship among structure wave radiation and regenerator position, slab thickness, and properties of material are analyzed by numerical calculation. The results show that in the low-frequency thermoacoustic system, the coincident effect generated by higher frequency wave weakens the fundamental sound wave. While in the high-frequency thermoacoustic system, where the oscillating fundamental frequency is higher than the coincident frequency, the sound field strength is enhanced by stronger structure wave radiation because of the coincident effect.

  3. A versatile fast coincidence system with memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouthas, J.

    1976-01-01

    A versatile fast coincidence system has been studied for experiments using several detectors. In this system, all the coincidence events are produced with an associated code, and thus, different kinds of events can be processed with the same experimental set-up. Also, the classification of the logical pulses gives the possibility of using a large number of ways (30 in this system). The setting of the system is very simple: there are only two time windows to adjust. (Auth.)

  4. Simulation of triple coincidences in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cal-González, J; Herranz, E; Vicente, E; Udias, J M; Lage, E; Dave, S R; Parot, V; Herraiz, J L; Moore, S C; Park, M-A

    2015-01-01

    Although current PET scanners are designed and optimized to detect double coincidence events, there is a significant amount of triple coincidences in any PET acquisition. Triple coincidences may arise from causes such as: inter-detector scatter (IDS), random triple interactions (R T ), or the detection of prompt gamma rays in coincidence with annihilation photons when non-pure positron-emitting radionuclides are used (β + γ events). Depending on the data acquisition settings of the PET scanner, these triple events are discarded or processed as a set of double coincidences if the energy of the three detected events is within the scanner’s energy window. This latter option introduces noise in the data, as at most, only one of the possible lines-of-response defined by triple interactions corresponds to the line along which the decay occurred. Several novel works have pointed out the possibility of using triple events to increase the sensitivity of PET scanners or to expand PET imaging capabilities by allowing differentiation between radiotracers labeled with non-pure and pure positron-emitting radionuclides. In this work, we extended the Monte Carlo simulator PeneloPET to assess the proportion of triple coincidences in PET acquisitions and to evaluate their possible applications. We validated the results of the simulator against experimental data acquired with a modified version of a commercial preclinical PET/CT scanner, which was enabled to acquire and process triple-coincidence events. We used as figures of merit the energy spectra for double and triple coincidences and the triples-to-doubles ratio for different energy windows and radionuclides. After validation, the simulator was used to predict the relative quantity of triple-coincidence events in two clinical scanners assuming different acquisition settings. Good agreement between simulations and preclinical experiments was found, with differences below 10% for most of the observables considered. For

  5. Coincidence method for determination of radionuclides activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrukhovich, S.K.; Berestov, A.V.; Rudak, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    The radon and radium activity measurements using six-crystal gamma-gamma coincidence, 4 -spectrometer PRIPJAT and radioactivity measurements in different samples of meat and vegetation by 32-crystal spectrometer ARGUS, are described. Radiation detector with 4 -geometry provides higher efficiency, and therefore shorter counting time than a detector without such geometry. However, its application is limited by the fact that obtained spectrum contains summing peaks of all γ-quanta registered in coincidence. Multiparameter information on coincident photon emission can be obtained only by a detection system where the 4 -geometry is made by many detectors, such are both the PRIPJAT and the ARGUS - γ-coincidence spectrometer of the Crystal Ball type in the Institute of Physics, Minsk [1,2]. There are other characteristics, as background conditions, energy and time resolution, makes it ve suitable for investigation of rare decays and interactions, cascade transitions, k intensity radiations etc. We are developing a method of 2 26R a and 2 26 Rn measurement by a multidetector 4 -spectrometer. The method is based on coincidence counting of γ-rays from two step cascade transitions that follow - decay of 2 14 Bi. Its application to the PRIPL spectrometer, which has 6 Nal(Tl) detectors, is presented here, as well as the method of the determination of radionuclide activities based on the registration of the cascades intensity of γ-rays of different multiplicity using ARGUS

  6. Quintessence, Cosmic Coincidence, and the Cosmological Constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatev, I.; Wang, L.; Steinhardt, P.J.; Steinhardt, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that a large fraction of the energy density of the Universe has negative pressure. One explanation is vacuum energy density; another is quintessence in the form of a scalar field slowly evolving down a potential. In either case, a key problem is to explain why the energy density nearly coincides with the matter density today. The densities decrease at different rates as the Universe expands, so coincidence today appears to require that their ratio be set to a specific, infinitesimal value in the early Universe. In this paper, we introduce the notion of a open-quotes tracker field,close quotes a form of quintessence, and show how it may explain the coincidence, adding new motivation for the quintessence scenario. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  7. Slow coincidences for CAMAC multiparameter analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, Yu.K.; Kalinin, A.I.; Tissol'd, E.; Fromm, V.D.; Ekstein, P.

    1978-01-01

    A coincidence circuit with controlled parameters is described. The circuit has six coincidence inputs and one input for anticoincidences. A pulse duration in channels is changed from 0.25 to 5 μs and delay time, within 8 μs. The circuit is developed for multiparameter spectrometric analysis with the use of amplitude-digital and time-digital convertors. Its introduction permits one to diminish considerably the ''dead'' time of apparatus and to select rapidly and reliably strictly correlated digital information from convertors

  8. Coincidence-counting corrections for accidental coincidences, set dead time and intrinsic dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the radioactivity of a source from the results of coincidence counting, taking into account dead-time losses and accidental coincidences. The corrections allow for the extension of the set dead time in the p channel by the intrinsic dead time. Experimental verification shows improvement over a previous equation. (author)

  9. Determining chance coincidence, survival factor and decay factor in 220Rn delayed coincidence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Derong; Yan Yongjun; Zhou Jianliang; Qiu Shoukang

    2013-01-01

    The method and calculation formulas to determine the chance coincidence in the 220 Rn coincidence measurement are introduced in this paper. The poisson distribution is introduced to correct the chance coincidence. The relative deviation of the true coincidence between the method and the Giffin's is within 5% after the correction of the cohance coincidence. The measurement of 220 Rn is done by comparative measurement with RAD7. The results shows that 220 Rn can be measured by the method with a relative deviation of 14%. Mean while, for the 220 Rn flow regime is difficult to meet the condition of calculation formulas, a solution to solve the survival factor and decay factor is proposed and the error come from the useage of theoretical calculation formula is avoided. (authors)

  10. Tachyon driven solution to Cosmic Coincidence Problrm

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastaca, S. K.

    2004-01-01

    Here, non-minimally coupled tachyon to gravity is considered as a source of "dark energy". It is demonstrated that with expansion of the universe, tachyon dark energy decays to "dark matter" providing a solution to "cosmic coincidence problem".Moreover, it is found that universe undergoes accelerated expansion simultaneously.

  11. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Zhang, Ru [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); School of Ethnic Minority Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Chuan, E-mail: wangchuan@bupt.edu.cn [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  12. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  13. One-way entangled-photon autocompensating quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Zachary D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2003-06-01

    A quantum cryptography implementation is presented that uses entanglement to combine one-way operation with an autocompensating feature that has hitherto only been available in implementations that require the signal to make a round trip between the users. Using the concept of advanced waves, it is shown that this proposed implementation is related to the round-trip implementation in the same way that Ekert’s two-particle scheme is related to the original one-particle scheme of Bennett and Brassard. The practical advantages and disadvantages of the proposed implementation are discussed in the context of existing schemes.

  14. One-way entangled-photon autocompensating quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, Zachary D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2003-01-01

    A quantum cryptography implementation is presented that uses entanglement to combine one-way operation with an autocompensating feature that has hitherto only been available in implementations that require the signal to make a round trip between the users. Using the concept of advanced waves, it is shown that this proposed implementation is related to the round-trip implementation in the same way that Ekert's two-particle scheme is related to the original one-particle scheme of Bennett and Brassard. The practical advantages and disadvantages of the proposed implementation are discussed in the context of existing schemes

  15. Quantum Communication with a High-Rate Entangled Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathaniel C.; Chaffee, Dalton W.; Lekki, John D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    A high generation rate photon-pair source using a dual element periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PP KTP) waveguide is described. The photon-pair source features a high pair generation rate, a compact power-efficient package, and continuous wave (CW) or pulsed operation. Characterization and test results are presented. Details and preliminary results of a laboratory free-space QKD experiment with the B92 protocol are also presented.

  16. Using Compton scattering for random coincidence rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) project presents a new approach for the design of nuclear medicine imaging devices by using highly segmented pixel CdTe sensors. CdTe detectors can achieve an energy resolution of ≈ 1% FWHM at 511 keV and can be easily segmented into submillimeter sized voxels for optimal spatial resolution. These features help in rejecting a large part of the scattered events from the PET coincidence sample in order to obtain high quality images. Another contribution to the background are random events, i.e., hits caused by two independent gammas without a common origin. Given that 60% of 511 keV photons undergo Compton scattering in CdTe (i.e. 84% of all coincidence events have at least one Compton scattering gamma), we present a simulation study on the possibility to use the Compton scattering information of at least one of the coincident gammas within the detector to reject random coincidences. The idea uses the fact that if a gamma undergoes Compton scattering in the detector, it will cause two hits in the pixel detectors. The first hit corresponds to the Compton scattering process. The second hit shall correspond to the photoelectric absorption of the remaining energy of the gamma. With the energy deposition of the first hit, one can calculate the Compton scattering angle. By measuring the hit location of the coincident gamma, we can construct the geometric angle, under the assumption that both gammas come from the same origin. Using the difference between the Compton scattering angle and the geometric angle, random events can be rejected.

  17. Method and apparstus for determining random coincidence count rate in a scintillation counter utilizing the coincidence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrocks, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the reliable determination of a random coincidence count attributable to chance coincidences of single-photon events which are each detected in only a single detector of a scintillation counter utilizing two detectors in a coincidence counting technique are described. A firstdelay device is employed to delay output pulses from one detector, and then the delayed signal is compared with the undelayed signal from the other detector in a coincidence circuit, to obtain an approximate random coincidence count. The output of the coincidence circuit is applied to an anti-coincidence circuit, where it is corrected by elimination of pulses coincident with, and attributable to, conventionally detected real coincidences, and by elimination of pulses coincident with, and attributable to, real coincidences that have been delayed by a second delay device having the same time parameter as the first. 8 claims

  18. Development of coincidence processing module for PEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Baotong; Shuai Lei; Li Ke

    2011-01-01

    For the breast cancer diagnosis and therapy, a prototype of positron emission mammography (PEM) was developed in Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the design of coincidence processing module (CPM) for this PEM was presented. Both the hardware architecture and the software logic were introduced. In this design, the CPM used the Rocket IO fast interface in FPGA and fiber technology to acquire the preprocessed data from the continuous sampling module (CSM) and then selected the valid event with the coincidence timing window method, which was performed in the FPGA on the daughter board. The CPM transmits the processed data to host computer via gigabit Ethernet. The whole system was controlled by CAN bus. The primary tests indicate that the performance of this design is good. (authors)

  19. Recent progress with digital coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, K.S.A.; Watt, G.C.; Alexiev, D.

    1999-01-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by ANSTO as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue to digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4Π beta detector and a NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software based algorithms. The system is operational and results are now being routinely collected and analysed. Some of the early work is presented for Co-60, Na-22 and Sm-153

  20. New way on designing majorant coincidence circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdamaka, R.I.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Nikityuk, N.M.; Shirikov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A new way of designing fast devices of combinatorial selection by the number of particles passing through a multichannel charged particle detector is decribed. The algorithm of their operation is based on modern algebraic coding theory. By application of analytical computational methods Boolean expressions can be obtianed for designing basic circuits for a large number of inputs. An example of computation of 15 inputs majorant coincidence circuit is considered

  1. Kinematical coincidence method in transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, L.; Amorini, F. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Berceanu, I. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cardella, G., E-mail: cardella@ct.infn.it [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chatterjiee, M.B. [Saha Institute for Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); De Filippo, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L.; Gianì, R. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Grzeszczuk, A. [Institut of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); La Guidara, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Facoltà di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lombardo, I. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Loria, D.; Minniti, T. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-07-01

    A new method to extract high resolution angular distributions from kinematical coincidence measurements in binary reactions is presented. Kinematics is used to extract the center of mass angular distribution from the measured energy spectrum of light particles. Results obtained in the case of {sup 10}Be+p→{sup 9}Be+d reaction measured with the CHIMERA detector are shown. An angular resolution of few degrees in the center of mass is obtained. The range of applicability of the method is discussed.

  2. Coincident-inclusive electrofission angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda Neto, J.D.T.

    1983-08-01

    A method for the joint analysis of coincident and inclusive electrofission data, in order to minimize effects of the model dependence of data interpretation, is developed. Explicit calculations of the (e,e'f) angular correlations are presented. The potentialities of the method to the study of sub- and near-barrier properties of the fission process, and to the study of the giant resonances fission mode, are discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Timing coincidence studies with fast photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoof, M.A.; Raoof, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The time response of RCA C70045D photomultipliers was studied using a subnanosecond light flasher. The tubes, which have an output rise time of approximately 0.5 ns, were used in coincidence to study the variations in the fwhm of the time spectrum over a certain dynamic range of pulse amplitudes for both leading edge and constant fraction discrimination. A comparison has also been made for the measured time resolutions with some of the other fast photomultipliers. (orig.)

  4. Fast coincidence counting with active inspection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Hausladen, P. A.; Pozzi, S. A.; Mihalczo, J. T.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes 2nd and 3rd order time coincidence distributions measurements with a GHz processor that synchronously samples 5 or 10 channels of data from radiation detectors near fissile material. On-line, time coincidence distributions are measured between detectors or between detectors and an external stimulating source. Detector-to-detector correlations are useful for passive measurements also. The processor also measures the number of times n pulses occur in a selectable time window and compares this multiplet distribution to a Poisson distribution as a method of determining the occurrence of fission. The detectors respond to radiation emitted in the fission process induced internally by inherent sources or by external sources such as LINACS, DT generators either pulsed or steady state with alpha detectors, etc. Data can be acquired from prompt emission during the source pulse, prompt emissions immediately after the source pulse, or delayed emissions between source pulses. These types of time coincidence measurements (occurring on the time scale of the fission chain multiplication processes for nuclear weapons grade U and Pu) are useful for determining the presence of these fissile materials and quantifying the amount, and are useful for counter terrorism and nuclear material control and accountability. This paper presents the results for a variety of measurements.

  5. Coincidence measurements of FFTF breeder fuel subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Foley, J.E.; Krick, M.; Menlove, H.O.; Goris, P.; Ramalho, A.

    1984-04-01

    A prototype coincidence counter developed to assay fast breeder reactor fuel was used to measure four fast-flux test facility subassemblies at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington. Plutonium contents in the four subassemblies ranged between 7.4 and 9.7 kg with corresponding 240 Pu-effective contents between 0.9 and 1.2 kg. Large count rates were observed from the measurements, and plots of the data showed significant multiplication in the fuel. The measured data were corrected for deadtime and multiplication effects using established formulas. These corrections require accurate knowledge of the plutonium isotopics and 241 Am content in the fuel. Multiplication-corrected coincidence count rates agreed with the expected count rates based on spontaneous fission-neutron emission rates. These measurements indicate that breeder fuel subassemblies with 240 Pu-effective contents up to 1.2 kg can be nondestructively assayed using the shift-register electronics with the prototype counters. Measurements using the standard Los Alamos National Laboratory shift-register coincidence electronics unit can produce an assay value accurate to +-1% in 1000 s. The uncertainty results from counting statistics and deadtime-correction errors. 3 references, 8 figures, 8 tables

  6. Fast coincidence counting with active inspection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullens, J.A.; Neal, J.S.; Hausladen, P.A.; Pozzi, S.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes 2nd and 3rd order time coincidence distributions measurements with a GHz processor that synchronously samples 5 or 10 channels of data from radiation detectors near fissile material. On-line, time coincidence distributions are measured between detectors or between detectors and an external stimulating source. Detector-to-detector correlations are useful for passive measurements also. The processor also measures the number of times n pulses occur in a selectable time window and compares this multiplet distribution to a Poisson distribution as a method of determining the occurrence of fission. The detectors respond to radiation emitted in the fission process induced internally by inherent sources or by external sources such as LINACS, DT generators either pulsed or steady state with alpha detectors, etc. Data can be acquired from prompt emission during the source pulse, prompt emissions immediately after the source pulse, or delayed emissions between source pulses. These types of time coincidence measurements (occurring on the time scale of the fission chain multiplication processes for nuclear weapons grade U and Pu) are useful for determining the presence of these fissile materials and quantifying the amount, and are useful for counter terrorism and nuclear material control and accountability. This paper presents the results for a variety of measurements

  7. Coincidence corrections for a multi-detector gamma spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, R., E-mail: r.britton@surrey.ac.uk [University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Burnett, J.L.; Davies, A.V. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Regan, P.H. [University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    List-mode data acquisition has been utilised in conjunction with a high-efficiency γ–γ coincidence system, allowing both the energetic and temporal information to be retained for each recorded event. Collected data is re-processed multiple times to extract any coincidence information from the γ-spectroscopy system, correct for the time-walk of low-energy events, and remove accidental coincidences from the projected coincidence spectra. The time-walk correction has resulted in a reduction in the width of the coincidence delay gate of 18.4±0.4%, and thus an equivalent removal of ‘background’ coincidences. The correction factors applied to ∼5.6% of events up to ∼500 keV for a combined {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co source, and are crucial for accurate coincidence measurements of low-energy events that may otherwise be missed by a standard delay gate. By extracting both the delay gate and a representative ‘background’ region for the coincidences, a coincidence background subtracted spectrum is projected from the coincidence matrix, which effectively removes ∼100% of the accidental coincidences (up to 16.6±0.7% of the total coincidence events seen during this work). This accidental-coincidence removal is crucial for accurate characterisation of the events seen in coincidence systems, as without this correction false coincidence signatures may be incorrectly interpreted.

  8. Coincidence logic modules for criticality alarming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaief, C.C. III.

    1977-04-01

    A coincidence Logic Module and a companion contact closure Relay Module utilizing the NIM Standard have been developed for criticality alarming. The units provide an ALARM whenever two or more out of N detectors become activated. In addition, an ALERT is generated whenever one or more detectors is activated or when certain electronic component failures occur. The number of detector inputs (N) can be expanded in groups of six by adding modules. Serial and parallel redundancy were used to reduce the probability of system failure

  9. Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron coincidence gate utilisation factor for passive neutron coincidence counting

    CERN Document Server

    Bourva, L C A

    1999-01-01

    The general purpose neutron-photon-electron Monte Carlo N-Particle code, MCNP sup T sup M , has been used to simulate the neutronic characteristics of the on-site laboratory passive neutron coincidence counter to be installed, under Euratom Safeguards Directorate supervision, at the Sellafield reprocessing plant in Cumbria, UK. This detector is part of a series of nondestructive assay instruments to be installed for the accurate determination of the plutonium content of nuclear materials. The present work focuses on one aspect of this task, namely, the accurate calculation of the coincidence gate utilisation factor. This parameter is an important term in the interpretative model used to analyse the passive neutron coincidence count data acquired using pulse train deconvolution electronics based on the shift register technique. It accounts for the limited proportion of neutrons detected within the time interval for which the electronics gate is open. The Monte Carlo code MCF, presented in this work, represents...

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  11. Coincident Detection Significance in Multimessenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, G.; Burns, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dent, T.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Nielsen, A. B.; Prix, R.; Was, M.; Zhu, S. J.

    2018-06-01

    We derive a Bayesian criterion for assessing whether signals observed in two separate data sets originate from a common source. The Bayes factor for a common versus unrelated origin of signals includes an overlap integral of the posterior distributions over the common-source parameters. Focusing on multimessenger gravitational-wave astronomy, we apply the method to the spatial and temporal association of independent gravitational-wave and electromagnetic (or neutrino) observations. As an example, we consider the coincidence between the recently discovered gravitational-wave signal GW170817 from a binary neutron star merger and the gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A: we find that the common-source model is enormously favored over a model describing them as unrelated signals.

  12. A generalized model for coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a description of the multiplicative processes associated with coincidence counting techniques, for example in the NDA of plutonium bearing materials. The model elucidates both the physical processes and the underlying mathematical formalism in a relatively simple but comprehensive way. In particular, it includes the effect of absorption by impurities or poisons, as well as that of neutron leakage on a parallel basis to the treatment of induced fission itself. The work thus parallels and generalizes the methods of Boehnel of Hage and Cifarelli, and more recently of Yanjushkin. This paper introduces the concept of a dual probability generating function to account for both the basic physical multiplication phenomena, as well as the detection phenomena. The underlying approach extends the idea of a simple probability generating function, due to De Moivre. The basic mathematical background may be found, for example, in Feller 1966

  13. Electron-electron coincidence spectroscopies at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, G.; Iacobucci, S.; Ruocco, A.; Gotter, R.

    2002-01-01

    In the past 20 years, a steadily increasing number of electron-electron coincidence experiments on atoms and molecules have contributed to a deeper understanding of electron-electron correlation effects. In more recent years this technique has been extended to the study of solid surfaces. This class of one photon IN two electrons OUT experiments will be discussed with an emphasis on grazing incidence geometry, that is expected to be particularly suited for studying surfaces. The crucial question of which is the dominant mechanism that leads to ejection of pairs of electron from the surface will be addressed. It will be shown that, depending on the kinematics chosen, the correlated behaviour of the pairs of electrons detected might be singled out from independent particle one

  14. More accurate thermal neutron coincidence counting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.

    1978-01-01

    Using passive thermal neutron coincidence counting techniques, the accuracy of nondestructive assays of fertile material can be improved significantly using a two-ring detector. It was shown how the use of a function of the coincidence count rate ring-ratio can provide a detector response rate that is independent of variations in neutron detection efficiency caused by varying sample moderation. Furthermore, the correction for multiplication caused by SF- and (α,n)-neutrons is shown to be separable into the product of a function of the effective mass of 240 Pu (plutonium correction) and a function of the (α,n) reaction probability (matrix correction). The matrix correction is described by a function of the singles count rate ring-ratio. This correction factor is empirically observed to be identical for any combination of PuO 2 powder and matrix materials SiO 2 and MgO because of the similar relation of the (α,n)-Q value and (α,n)-reaction cross section among these matrix nuclei. However the matrix correction expression is expected to be different for matrix materials such as Na, Al, and/or Li. Nevertheless, it should be recognized that for comparison measurements among samples of similar matrix content, it is expected that some function of the singles count rate ring-ratio can be defined to account for variations in the matrix correction due to differences in the intimacy of mixture among the samples. Furthermore the magnitude of this singles count rate ring-ratio serves to identify the contaminant generating the (α,n)-neutrons. Such information is useful in process control

  15. Minicomputer system for radiochemical analysis by coincidence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, F.P.; Fager, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Minicomputer-based coincidence analysis methods have been developed for use in performing radiochemical analysis by high-resolution x- and gamma-ray coincidence spectrometry. This paper describes the data-acquisition and analysis methods develolped for qualitative and quantitative analyses of coincidence spectrometric data. Data-acquisition capabilities include both direct multiparameter pulse-height analysis and buffered list-mode acquisition

  16. Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron coincidence gate utilisation factor for passive neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourva, L.C.A.; Croft, S.

    1999-01-01

    The general purpose neutron-photon-electron Monte Carlo N-Particle code, MCNP TM , has been used to simulate the neutronic characteristics of the on-site laboratory passive neutron coincidence counter to be installed, under Euratom Safeguards Directorate supervision, at the Sellafield reprocessing plant in Cumbria, UK. This detector is part of a series of nondestructive assay instruments to be installed for the accurate determination of the plutonium content of nuclear materials. The present work focuses on one aspect of this task, namely, the accurate calculation of the coincidence gate utilisation factor. This parameter is an important term in the interpretative model used to analyse the passive neutron coincidence count data acquired using pulse train deconvolution electronics based on the shift register technique. It accounts for the limited proportion of neutrons detected within the time interval for which the electronics gate is open. The Monte Carlo code MCF, presented in this work, represents a new evaluation technique for the estimation of gate utilisation factors. It uses the die-away profile of a neutron coincidence chamber generated either by MCNP TM , or by other means, to simulate the neutron detection arrival time pattern originating from independent spontaneous fission events. A shift register simulation algorithm, embedded in the MCF code, then calculates the coincidence counts scored within the electronics gate. The gate utilisation factor is then deduced by dividing the coincidence counts obtained with that obtained in the same Monte Carlo run, but for an ideal detection system with a coincidence gate utilisation factor equal to unity. The MCF code has been benchmarked against analytical results calculated for both single and double exponential die-away profiles. These results are presented along with the development of the closed form algebraic expressions for the two cases. Results of this validity check showed very good agreement. On this

  17. Soudan 2 muons in coincidence with BATSE bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, D.M.; Marshak, M.L.; Wagner, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of statistically significant temporal and spatial coincidences between underground muons at Soudan 2 and Gamma Ray Bursts at the GRO-BATSE detector. Our search uses data from the April 91 to March 92 BATSE burst catalog to seek correlations within a 100 second window of coincidence. Sixteen of 180 BATSE triggers have temporally and spatially coincident muons in the Soudan 2 detector. We estimate the chance probability of each coincidence assuming the null hypothesis on the basis of a study of the multiplicities of spatially coincident muons observed over a two day period centered on the time of burst

  18. K-chameleon and the coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Hao; Cai Ronggen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid model of k-essence and chameleon, named as k-chameleon. In this model, due to the chameleon mechanism, the directly strong coupling between the k-chameleon field and matters (cold dark matters and baryons) is allowed. In the radiation-dominated epoch, the interaction between the k-chameleon field and background matters can be neglected; the behavior of the k-chameleon therefore is the same as that of the ordinary k-essence. After the onset of matter domination, the strong coupling between the k-chameleon and matters dramatically changes the result of the ordinary k-essence. We find that during the matter-dominated epoch, only two kinds of attractors may exist: one is the familiar K attractor and the other is a completely new, dubbed C attractor. Once the Universe is attracted into the C attractor, the fraction energy densities of the k-chameleon Ω φ and dust matter Ω m are fixed and comparable, and the Universe will undergo a power-law accelerated expansion. One can adjust the model so that the K attractor does not appear. Thus, the k-chameleon model provides a natural solution to the cosmological coincidence problem

  19. Coincidence orientations of grains in hexagonal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmer, H.; Warrington, D.H.

    1986-06-01

    The connection between the rotation matrix in hexagonal lattice coordinates and an angle-axis quadruple is given. The multiplication law of quadruples is derived. It corresponds to multiplying two matrices and gives the effect of two successive rotations. The relation is given between two quadruples that describe the same relative orientation of two lattices due to their hexagonal symmetry; a unique standard description of the relative orientation is proposed. The restrictions satisfied by rotations generating coincidence site lattices (CSLs) are derived for any value of the axial ratio rho = c/a. It is shown that the law for cubic lattices, where the multiplicity SIGMA of the CSL was equal to the least common denominator of the elements of the rotation matrix, does not always hold for hexagonal lattices. A generalisation of this law to lattices of arbitrary symmetry is given and another, quicker method to determine SIGMA for hexagonal lattices is derived. Finally, convenient algorithms are described for determining bases of the CSL and the DSC lattice. (author)

  20. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a high speed circuit for accurate neutron coincidence counting comprising: neutron detecting means for providing an above-threshold signal upon neutron detection; amplifying means inputted by the neutron detecting means for providing a pulse output having a pulse width of about 0.5 microseconds upon the input of each above threshold signal; digital processing means inputted by the pulse output of the amplifying means for generating a pulse responsive to each input pulse from the amplifying means and having a pulse width of about 50 nanoseconds effective for processing an expected neutron event rate of about 1 Mpps: pulse stretching means inputted by the digital processing means for producing a pulse having a pulse width of several milliseconds for each pulse received form the digital processing means; visual indicating means inputted by the pulse stretching means for producing a visual output for each pulse received from the digital processing means; and derandomizing means effective to receive the 50 ns neutron event pulses from the digital processing means for storage at a rate up to the neutron event rate of 1 Mpps and having first counter means for storing the input neutron event pulses

  1. Complex action support from coincidences of couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Our model (Refs. 1–7) with a complex action in a functional integral formulation with path integrals extending over all times, both past and future, is reviewed. Several numerical relations between coupling constants are presented as supporting evidence. The new evidence is that several more hitherto unexplained coincidences are explained by our model: (1) The "scale problem" is solved because the Higgs field expectation value is predicted to be very small compared to say some fundamental scale, that might be the Planck scale. (2) The Higgs VEV need not be just zero, but rather is predicted to be so that the running top-quark Yukawa coupling just is about to be unity at this scale; in this way the (weak) scale easily becomes "exponentially small." Instead of the top-Yukawa we should rather say the highest flavor Yukawa coupling here. These predictions are only achieved by allowing the principle of minimization of the imaginary part of the action SI(history) to a certain extent adjust some coupling constants in addition to the initial conditions. If supersymmetric partners are not found at LHC it would strengthen the need for a "solution" to the hierarchy problem in our direction of an explanation via a fine-tuning scheme inside the Standard Model, from say minimizing "the imaginary part of the action" in our complex action model. (author)

  2. Confocal fluorescence techniques in industrial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian; Gall, Karsten; Palo, Kaupo; Kask, Peet; Brand, Leif

    2003-06-01

    The FCS+plus family of evaluation tools for confocal fluorescence spectroscopy, which was developed during recent years, offers a comprehensive view to a series of fluorescence properties. Originating in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and using similar experimental equipment, a system of signal processing methods such as fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) was created to analyze in detail the fluctuation behavior of fluorescent particles within a small area of detection. Giving simultaneous access to molecular parameters like concentration, translational and rotational diffusion, molecular brightness, and multicolor coincidence, this portfolio was enhanced by more traditional techniques of fluorescence lifetime as well as time-resolved anisotropy determination. The cornerstones of the FCS+plus methodology will be shortly described. The inhibition of a phosphatase enzyme activity gives a comprehensive industrial application that demonstrates FCS+plus' versatility and its potential for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  3. Coincidence measurements in α/β/γ spectrometry with phoswich detectors using digital pulse shape discrimination analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celis, B. de; Fuente, R. de la; Williart, A.; Celis Alonso, B. de

    2007-01-01

    A novel system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for α/β/γ ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The detector is able to discriminate different types of radiation in a mixed α/β/γ field and can be used in a coincidence mode by identifying the composite signal produced by the simultaneous detection of β particles in a plastic scintillator and γ rays in an NaI(Tl) scintillator. Use of a coincidence technique with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, which made it necessary to monitor the low levels of xenon radioisotopes produced by underground nuclear explosions. Previous studies have shown that combining CaF 2 (Eu) for β ray detection and NaI(Tl) for γ ray detection makes it difficult to identify the coincidence signals because of the similar fluorescence decay times of the two scintillators. With the device proposed here, it is possible to identify the coincidence events owing to the short fluorescence decay time of the plastic scintillator. The sensitivity of the detector may be improved by employing liquid scintillators, which allow low radioactivity levels from actinides to be measured when present in environmental samples. The device developed is simpler to use than conventional coincidence equipment because it uses a single detector and electronic circuit, and it offers fast and precise analysis of the coincidence signals by employing digital pulse shape analysis

  4. Principle of coincidence method and application in activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mou; Dai Yihua; Ni Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    The basic principle of coincidence method was discussed. The basic principle was generalized by analysing the actual example, and the condition in theory of coincidence method was brought forward. The cause of variation of efficiency curve and the effect of dead-time in activity measurement were explained using the above principle and condition. This principle of coincidence method provides the foundation in theory for activity measurement. (authors)

  5. Operations manual for the megachannel gamma-ray coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.

    1977-01-01

    To aid in the study of nuclear structures, a megachannel pulse-height coincidence analysis system on a PDP-8 computer was constructed. The system digitizes the energies of coincident gamma-rays and stores the resultant information on a moving-head disk. The system uses a minicomputer to sort and store gamma-gamma coincident information on line. The megachannel system and how to use it are described

  6. Neutron coincidence counting with digital signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagi, Janos; Dechamp, Luc; Dransart, Pascal; Dzbikowicz, Zdzislaw; Dufour, Jean-Luc; Holzleitner, Ludwig; Huszti, Joseph; Looman, Marc; Marin Ferrer, Montserrat; Lambert, Thierry; Peerani, Paolo; Rackham, Jamie; Swinhoe, Martyn; Tobin, Steve; Weber, Anne-Laure; Wilson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is a widely adopted nondestructive assay (NDA) technique used in nuclear safeguards to measure the mass of nuclear material in samples. Nowadays, most neutron-counting systems are based on the original-shift-register technology, like the (ordinary or multiplicity) Shift-Register Analyser. The analogue signal from the He-3 tubes is processed by an amplifier/single channel analyser (SCA) producing a train of TTL pulses that are fed into an electronic unit that performs the time- correlation analysis. Following the suggestion of the main inspection authorities (IAEA, Euratom and the French Ministry of Industry), several research laboratories have started to study and develop prototypes of neutron-counting systems with PC-based processing. Collaboration in this field among JRC, IRSN and LANL has been established within the framework of the ESARDA-NDA working group. Joint testing campaigns have been performed in the JRC PERLA laboratory, using different equipment provided by the three partners. One area of development is the use of high-speed PCs and pulse acquisition electronics that provide a time stamp (LIST-Mode Acquisition) for every digital pulse. The time stamp data can be processed directly during acquisition or saved on a hard disk. The latter method has the advantage that measurement data can be analysed with different values for parameters like predelay and gate width, without repeating the acquisition. Other useful diagnostic information, such as die-away time and dead time, can also be extracted from this stored data. A second area is the development of 'virtual instruments.' These devices, in which the pulse-processing system can be embedded in the neutron counter itself and sends counting data to a PC, can give increased data-acquisition speeds. Either or both of these developments could give rise to the next generation of instrumentation for improved practical neutron-correlation measurements. The paper will describe the

  7. A magnetic-lens - mini-orange coincidence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargholtz, C.; Holmberg, L.; Ruus, N.; Tegner, P.E.; Weiss, G.

    1997-04-01

    A coincidence spectrometer consisting of a Gerholm type magnetic lens and a permanent magnet mini-orange spectrometer is described. Electron-electron or electron-positron coincidences may be registered in various angular settings. The spectrometer has been developed mainly to search for anomalous contributions to Bhabha scattering or positrons and is at present used for such studies. 6 refs

  8. An Inexpensive Coincidence Circuit for the Pasco Geiger Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Fichera, F; Librizzi, F; Riggi, F

    2005-01-01

    A simple coincidence circuit was devised to carry out educational coincidence experiments involving the use of Geiger counters. The system was tested by commercially available Geiger sensors from PASCO, and is intended to be used in collaboration with high school students and teachers

  9. Identification of peaks in multidimensional coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhac, Miroslav E-mail: fyzimiro@savba.sk; Kliman, Jan; Matousek, Vladislav; Veselsky, Martin; Turzo, Ivan

    2000-03-21

    In the paper a new algorithm to find peaks in two, three and multidimensional spectra, measured in large multidetector {gamma}-ray arrays, is derived. Given the dimension m, the algorithm is selective to m-fold coincidence peaks. It is insensitive to intersections of lower-fold coincidences, hereinafter called ridges.

  10. Identification of peaks in multidimensional coincidence γ-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morhac, Miroslav; Kliman, Jan; Matousek, Vladislav; Veselsky, Martin; Turzo, Ivan

    2000-01-01

    In the paper a new algorithm to find peaks in two, three and multidimensional spectra, measured in large multidetector γ-ray arrays, is derived. Given the dimension m, the algorithm is selective to m-fold coincidence peaks. It is insensitive to intersections of lower-fold coincidences, hereinafter called ridges

  11. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Eduardo, E-mail: elage@mit.edu; Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L. [Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Udías, Jose M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vaquero, Juan J. [Departamento de Ingeniería Biomédica e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés 28911 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  12. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Eduardo; Parot, Vicente; Moore, Stephen C; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Udías, Jose M; Dave, Shivang R; Park, Mi-Ae; Vaquero, Juan J; Herraiz, Joaquin L

    2015-03-01

    Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. To recover triple coincidences, the authors' method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. The addition of triple-coincidence events with the authors' method increased peak

  13. High rate 4π β-γ coincidence counting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.O.; Gehrke, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A high count rate 4π β-γ coincidence counting system for the determination of absolute disintegration rates of short half-life radionuclides is described. With this system the dead time per pulse is minimized by not stretching any pulses beyond the width necessary to satisfy overlap coincidence requirements. The equations used to correct for the β, γ, and coincidence channel dead times and for accidental coincidences are presented but not rigorously developed. Experimental results are presented for a decaying source of 56 Mn initially at 2 x 10 6 d/s and a set of 60 Co sources of accurately known source strengths varying from 10 3 to 2 x 10 6 d/s. A check of the accidental coincidence equation for the case of two independent sources with varying source strengths is presented

  14. Standardisation of 64Cu using a software coincidence counting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havelka, Miroslav; Sochorová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The activity of the radionuclide 64 Cu was determined by the efficiency extrapolation method applied to 4π(PC)−γ coincidence counting. The standardisation was performed by software coincidence counting—a digital method for primary activity measurement that simplifies the setting of optimal coincidence parameters. The γ-ray-energy window, characterised by identical gamma detection efficiency related to the sum of EC and to the sum of beta decay branches, was found. This setting ensured a linear and zero slope extrapolation curve. - Highlights: • Standardisation realised by extrapolation method applied to 4π(PC)−γ coincidence. • Digital method for optimal setting of coincidence parameters was used. • Result with total standard uncertainty of 0.74% was obtained

  15. Software correction of scatter coincidence in positron CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Iinuma, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a software correction of scatter coincidence in positron CT which is based on an estimation of scatter projections from true projections by an integral transform. Kernels for the integral transform are projected distributions of scatter coincidences for a line source at different positions in a water phantom and are calculated by Klein-Nishina's formula. True projections of any composite object can be determined from measured projections by iterative applications of the integral transform. The correction method was tested in computer simulations and phantom experiments with Positologica. The results showed that effects of scatter coincidence are not negligible in the quantitation of images, but the correction reduces them significantly. (orig.)

  16. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  17. Some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensslin, N.; Langner, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.; Miller, M.C.; Russo, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting of plutonium metal, oxide, mixed oxide, and scrap and waste. The target values are based in part on past user experience and in part on the estimated results from new coincidence counting techniques that are under development. The paper summarizes assay error sources and the new coincidence techniques, and recommends the technique that is likely to yield the lowest assay uncertainty for a given material type. These target assay uncertainties are intended to be useful for NDA instrument selection and assay variance propagation studies for both new and existing facilities. 14 refs., 3 tabs

  18. Low-resource synchronous coincidence processor for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new FPGA-based method for coincidence detection in positron emission tomography. The method requires low device resources and no specific peripherals in order to resolve coincident digital pulses within a time window of a few nanoseconds. This method has been validated with a low-end Xilinx Spartan-3E and provided coincidence resolutions lower than 6 ns. This resolution depends directly on the signal propagation properties of the target device and the maximum available clock frequency, therefore it is expected to improve considerably on higher-end FPGAs.

  19. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Computed neutron coincidence counting applied to passive waste assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R. [Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium)

    1997-11-01

    Neutron coincidence counting applied for the passive assay of fissile material is generally realised with dedicated electronic circuits. This paper presents a software based neutron coincidence counting method with data acquisition via a commercial PC-based Time Interval Analyser (TIA). The TIA is used to measure and record all time intervals between successive pulses in the pulse train up to count-rates of 2 Mpulses/s. Software modules are then used to compute the coincidence count-rates and multiplicity related data. This computed neutron coincidence counting (CNCC) offers full access to all the time information contained in the pulse train. This paper will mainly concentrate on the application and advantages of CNCC for the non-destructive assay of waste. An advanced multiplicity selective Rossi-alpha method is presented and its implementation via CNCC demonstrated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Permutational symmetries for coincidence rates in multimode multiphotonic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Abdullah; Spivak, Dylan; Sanders, Barry C.; de Guise, Hubert

    2018-06-01

    We obtain coincidence rates for passive optical interferometry by exploiting the permutational symmetries of partially distinguishable input photons, and our approach elucidates qualitative features of multiphoton coincidence landscapes. We treat the interferometer input as a product state of any number of photons in each input mode with photons distinguished by their arrival time. Detectors at the output of the interferometer count photons from each output mode over a long integration time. We generalize and prove the claim of Tillmann et al. [Phys. Rev. X 5, 041015 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.041015] that coincidence rates can be elegantly expressed in terms of immanants. Immanants are functions of matrices that exhibit permutational symmetries and the immanants appearing in our coincidence-rate expressions share permutational symmetries with the input state. Our results are obtained by employing representation theory of the symmetric group to analyze systems of an arbitrary number of photons in arbitrarily sized interferometers.

  2. Computed neutron coincidence counting applied to passive waste assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron coincidence counting applied for the passive assay of fissile material is generally realised with dedicated electronic circuits. This paper presents a software based neutron coincidence counting method with data acquisition via a commercial PC-based Time Interval Analyser (TIA). The TIA is used to measure and record all time intervals between successive pulses in the pulse train up to count-rates of 2 Mpulses/s. Software modules are then used to compute the coincidence count-rates and multiplicity related data. This computed neutron coincidence counting (CNCC) offers full access to all the time information contained in the pulse train. This paper will mainly concentrate on the application and advantages of CNCC for the non-destructive assay of waste. An advanced multiplicity selective Rossi-alpha method is presented and its implementation via CNCC demonstrated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Measurement of plutonium oxalate in thermal neutron coincidence counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.S.; Erkkila, B.H.

    1979-01-01

    A coincidence neutron counting method has been developed for assaying batches of plutonium oxalate. Using counting data from two concentric rings of 3 He detectors, corrections are made for the effects that water has on the coincidence neutron count rate. Batches of plutonium oxalate varying from 750 to 1000 g of plutonium and from 34 to 54% water are assayed with an average accuracy of +-3%

  4. Calculation of the n-th coincidences frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, C.

    1959-01-01

    Events can occur randomly with a given frequency. Each event lasts a Θ-time. During this Θ-time other events can occur. A coincidence beginning of order n at a t-time is when an event occurs while n other events already occurred between t-Θ and t. In this work the frequency of coincidence beginnings with an order greater than or equal to n is established

  5. CDL, a Precise, Low-Cost Coincidence Detector Latch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Joost

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The electronic detection of the coincidence of two events is still a key ingredient for high-performance applications, such as Positron Emission Tomography and Quantum Optics. Such applications are demanding, since the precision of their calculations and thus their conclusions directly depend on the duration of the interval in which two events are considered coincidental. This paper proposes a new circuitry, called coincidence detector latch (CDL, which is derived from standard RS latches. The CDL has the following advantages: low complexity, fully synthesizable, and high scalability. Even in its simple implementation, it achieves a coincidence window width as short as 115 ps, which is more than 10 times better than that reported by recent research.

  6. Photoion Auger-electron coincidence measurements near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.C.; Biedermann, C.; Keller, N.; Liljeby, L.; Short, R.T.; Sellin, I.A.; Lindle, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The vacancy cascade which fills an atomic inner-shell hole is a complex process which can proceed by a variety of paths, often resulting in a broad distribution of photoion charge states. We have measured simplified argon photoion charge distributions by requiring a coincidence with a K-LL or K-LM Auger electron, following K excitation with synchrotron radiation, as a function of photon energy, and report here in detail the argon charge distributions coincident with K-L 1 L 23 Auger electrons. The distributions exhibit a much more pronounced photon-energy dependence than do the more complicated non-coincident spectra. Resonant excitation of the K electron to np levels, shakeoff of these np electrons by subsequent decay processes, double-Auger decay, and recapture of the K photoelectron through postcollision interaction occur with significant probability. 17 refs

  7. Importance of interpolation and coincidence errors in data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Tirelli, Cecilia; Zoppetti, Nicola; Del Bianco, Samuele; Cortesi, Ugo; Kujanpää, Jukka; Dragani, Rossana

    2018-02-01

    The complete data fusion (CDF) method is applied to ozone profiles obtained from simulated measurements in the ultraviolet and in the thermal infrared in the framework of the Sentinel 4 mission of the Copernicus programme. We observe that the quality of the fused products is degraded when the fusing profiles are either retrieved on different vertical grids or referred to different true profiles. To address this shortcoming, a generalization of the complete data fusion method, which takes into account interpolation and coincidence errors, is presented. This upgrade overcomes the encountered problems and provides products of good quality when the fusing profiles are both retrieved on different vertical grids and referred to different true profiles. The impact of the interpolation and coincidence errors on number of degrees of freedom and errors of the fused profile is also analysed. The approach developed here to account for the interpolation and coincidence errors can also be followed to include other error components, such as forward model errors.

  8. A training and educational tool for neutron coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huszti, J.; Bagi, J.; Langner, D.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron coincidence counting techniques are widely used for nuclear safeguards inspection. They are based on the detection of time correlated neutrons created from spontaneous or induced fission of plutonium and some other actinides. IAEA inspectors are trained to know and to use this technique, but it is not easy to illustrate and explain the basics of the neutron coincidence counting. The traditional shift registers or multiplicity counters give only multiplicity distributions and the singles, doubles and triples count rates. Using the list mode method for the recording and evaluation of neutron coincidence data makes it easier to teach this technique. List mode acquisition is a relatively new way to collect data in neutron coincidence counting. It is based on the recording of the follow-up times of neutron pulses originating from a neutron detector into a file. The recorded pulse train can be evaluated with special software after the measurement. Hardware and software for list mode neutron coincidence acquisition have been developed in the Institute of Isotopes and is called a Pulse Train Reader. A system called Virtual Source for replaying pulse trains registered with the list mode device has also been developed. The list mode device and the pulse train 're-player' together build a good educational tool for teaching the basics of neutron coincidence counting. Some features of the follow-up time, multiplicity and Rossi-alpha distributions can be well demonstrated by replaying artificially generated or pre-recorded pulse trains. The choice of real sources is stored on DVD. There is no need to transport and maintain real sources for the training. Virtual sources also give the possibility of investigating rare sources that trainees would not have access to otherwise. (authors)

  9. Data acquisition and processing system for coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xu

    1990-07-01

    An instrument has been designed for the absolute measurement of radioactivity with 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence. The instrument can be used as a standard device for the radioactivity measurement in metrology laboratories. Also it can be used in the nuclear science and engineering research for absolute measurement of nuclear decay rate. The control of the system dead time and coincidence resolving time is digitized. The precision can reach ±2 ns. For data acquisition and communication the normalizing GPIB interface system technique is adopted. The measuring error caused by this instrument itself can be better than ±0.02%

  10. On the structure of the set of coincidence points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, A V [Peoples Friendship University of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gel' man, B D [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-31

    We consider the set of coincidence points for two maps between metric spaces. Cardinality, metric and topological properties of the coincidence set are studied. We obtain conditions which guarantee that this set (a) consists of at least two points; (b) consists of at least n points; (c) contains a countable subset; (d) is uncountable. The results are applied to study the structure of the double point set and the fixed point set for multivalued contractions. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  11. On neutron activation analysis with γγ coincidence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, Rolf; Danyal Turkoglu; Ibere Souza Ribeiro Junior; Shetty, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    A new γγ coincidence system has been set up at NIST. It is operated with a digital data finder supported by new software developed at NIST. The system is used to explore possible enhancements in instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and study applicability to neutron capture prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The performance of the system is tested with certified reference materials for efficiency calibration and quantitative performance. Comparisons of INAA results based on conventional gamma-ray spectrometry data with INAA results based on coincidence data obtained from the same samples show improvements in the counting uncertainties and demonstrates the quantitative accuracy of the new system. (author)

  12. Standardization of portable assay instrumentation: the neutron-coincidence tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1983-01-01

    Standardization of portable neutron assay instrumentation has been achieved by using the neutron coincidence technique as a common basis for a wide range of instruments and applications. The electronics originally developed for the High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter has been adapted to both passive- and active-assay instrumentation for field verification of bulk plutonium, inventory samples, pellets, powders, nitrates, high-enriched uranium, and materials-testing-reactor, light-water-reactor, and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies. The family of detectors developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their performance under in-field conditions are described. 16 figures, 3 tables

  13. Automatic classification of gammas-gamma coincidence matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Gonzalez, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The information obtained during a coincidence experiment, recorded on magnetic tape by a MULTI-8 minicomputer, is transferred to a new tape in 36 bit words, using the program LEC0M8. The classification in two dimensional matrix form is carried out off-line, on a magnetic disk file, by the program CLAFI. On finishing classification one obtains a copy of the coincidence matrix on the second magnetic tape. Both programs are written to be processed in that order with the UNIVAC 1106 computer of J.E.N. (Author) 4 refs

  14. Automatic classification of gamma-gamma coincidence matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Arcos Merino, J.M.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The information obtained during a coincidence experiment, recorded on magnetic tape by a Multi-8 minicomputer, is transferred to a new tape in 36 bit words, using the program Lecom8. The classification in two dimensional matrix form is carried out off-line, on a magnetic disk file, by the program Clafi. On finishing classification one obtains a copy of the coincidence matrix on the second magnetic tape. Both programs are written to be processed in that order with the Univac 1106 computer of J.E.N. (author)

  15. Comparative study of chance coincidence correction in measuring 223Ra and 224Ra by delay coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongjun; Huang Derong; Zhou Jianliang; Qiu Shoukang

    2013-01-01

    The delay coincidence measurement of 220 Rn and 219 Rn has been proved to be a valid indirect method for measuring 224 Ra and 223 Ra extracted from natural water, which can provide valuable information on estuarine/ocean mixing, submarine groundwater discharge, and water/soil interactions. In practical operation chance coincidence correction must be considered, mostly Moore's correction method, but Moore's and Giffin's methods were incomplete in some ways. In this paper the modification (method 1) and a new chance coincidence correction formula (method 2) were provided. Experiments results are presented to demonstrate the conclusions. The results show that precision is improved while counting rate is less than 70 min- 1 . (authors)

  16. Coincidence measurements in α/β/γ spectrometry with phoswich detectors using digital pulse shape discrimination analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Celis, B.; de la Fuente, R.; Williart, A.; de Celis Alonso, B.

    2007-09-01

    A novel system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for α/β/γ ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The detector is able to discriminate different types of radiation in a mixed α/β/γ field and can be used in a coincidence mode by identifying the composite signal produced by the simultaneous detection of β particles in a plastic scintillator and γ rays in an NaI(Tl) scintillator. Use of a coincidence technique with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, which made it necessary to monitor the low levels of xenon radioisotopes produced by underground nuclear explosions. Previous studies have shown that combining CaF 2(Eu) for β ray detection and NaI(Tl) for γ ray detection makes it difficult to identify the coincidence signals because of the similar fluorescence decay times of the two scintillators. With the device proposed here, it is possible to identify the coincidence events owing to the short fluorescence decay time of the plastic scintillator. The sensitivity of the detector may be improved by employing liquid scintillators, which allow low radioactivity levels from actinides to be measured when present in environmental samples. The device developed is simpler to use than conventional coincidence equipment because it uses a single detector and electronic circuit, and it offers fast and precise analysis of the coincidence signals by employing digital pulse shape analysis.

  17. IMPECC, new 4 π β γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Chauvenet, B.; Vatin, R.

    1988-05-01

    The new 4 π β γ coincidence system IMPECC which uses an extensible dead time circuit common to both channels is described. Correction formulae which take into account the particularities of the electronics are also presented. The use of two ADC's and the symmetry in the two channels gives us a very powerful instrument when measuring complex decay scheme radionuclides [fr

  18. Optical Co-Incidence Gate | Srinivasulu | African Journal of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper explains Optical co-incidence gate, realized using Unijunction transistors (UJT), Light emitting diodes (LED) and Photo-resistors (LDR), which works on 1.8Vdc instead of 3Vdc. The power dissipation of the designed gate is only 3 mW. This optical gate finds application in the field of Mechatronics, Instrumentation ...

  19. Positron two-photon annihilation coincidence technique: difference mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karol, P J; Klobuchar, R L [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1978-05-01

    A difference (or comparative) mode in the measurement of two-photon coincidences from positron or positronium annihilation has been developed. The method can be used to advantage, particularly in gases, in determining annihilation parameters such as quenching cross sections for low concentration strongly quenching chemical species in a reference medium which is relatively non-quenching.

  20. Analysis of (HI, xnγ) coincidence spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Ghugre, S.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    The increase in the sensitivity and the detection limits of the modern third generation gamma detector arrays, has made it necessary to properly understand and estimate the observed background in such experiments. The present paper extends the two algorithms to improve the genuine photo-peak-photo-peak coincident events of interest

  1. A {beta} - {gamma} coincidence; Metodo de coincidencias {beta} - {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo, F

    1960-07-01

    A {beta} - {gamma} coincidence method for absolute counting is given. The fundamental principles are revised and the experimental part is detailed. The results from {sup 1}98 Au irradiated in the JEN 1 Swimming pool reactor are given. The maximal accuracy is 1 per cent. (Author) 11 refs.

  2. Chemical application of positron annihilation through triple coincidence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegnasubramanian, S.; Gangadharan, S.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarises the work on the application of triple coincidence measurement of annihilation radiation for providing chemical state information; the observations have been corroborated by angular correlation and Doppler broadening measurements and supplemented by the magnetic quenching in the angular correlation and peak-to-valley ratio in the Ge(Li) singles spectrum for the 511 keV line. (author)

  3. Measurement of L sub(III) subshell fluorescence yields in Pb, Th and U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S K; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1981-01-01

    L sub(III) subshell fluorescence yields in Pb, Th and U have been measured using photoionization for creating vacancies. The results have been compared with the available data and are found to agree with the recent measurements of Price made using K-L coincidence technique but higher than those of Stephenson made using fluorescent excitation of L sub(III) subshell.

  4. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  5. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2008-01-01

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples

  6. Device for multi-dimensional γ-γ-coincidence study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzinova, T.M.; Erokhina, K.I.; Kutuzov, V.I.; Lemberg, I.Kh.; Petrov, S.A.; Revenko, V.S.; Senin, A.T.; Chugunov, I.N.; Shishlinov, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    A device for studying multi-dimensional γ-γ coincidences is described which operates on-line with the BESM-4 computer. The device comprises Ge(Li) detectors, analog-to-digital converters, shaper discriminators and fast amplifiers. To control the device operation as a whole and to elaborate necessary commands, an information distributor has been developed. The following specific features of the device operation are noted: the device may operate both in the regime of recording spectra of direct γ radiation in the block memory of multi-channel analyzer, and in the regime of data transfer to the computer memory; the device performs registration of coincidences; it transfers information to the computer which has a channel of direct access to the memory. The procedure of data processing is considered, the data being recorded on a magnetic tape. Partial spectra obtained are in a good agreement with data obtained elsewhere

  7. Performance of an active well coincidence counter for HEU samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Francesca; Peerani, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is the reference NDA technique used in nuclear safeguards to measure the mass of nuclear material in samples. For high-enriched uranium (HEU) samples active neutron interrogation is generally performed and the most common device used by nuclear inspectors is the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC). Within her master thesis at the Polytechnic of Milan, the first author performed an intensive study on the characteristics and performances of the AWCC in order to assess the 235 U mass in HEU oxide samples at the PERLA laboratory of JRC. The work has been summarised in this paper that starts with the optimisation of the use of AWCC for nuclear safeguards, describing the calibration procedure, reporting results of a series of verification measurements, summarising the performances that can be obtained with this instruments during inspections at fuel production plants and concluding with the discussion of uncertainties related to these measurements.

  8. Using CHIMERA detector at LNS for gamma-particle coincidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardella G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently evaluated the quality of γ-ray angular distributions that can be extracted in particle-gamma coincidence measurements using the CHIMERA detector at LNS. γ-rays have been detected using the CsI(Tl detectors of the spherical part of the CHIMERA array. Very clean γ-rays angular distributions were extracted in reactions induced by different stable beams impinging on 12C thin targets. The results evidenced an effect of projectile spin flip on the γ-rays angular distributions. γ-particle coincidence measurements were also performed in reactions induced by neutron rich exotic beams produced through in-flight fragmentation at LNS. In recent experiments also the Farcos array was used to improve energy and angular resolution measurements of the detected charged particles. Results obtained with both stable and radioactive beams are reported.

  9. Alpha-Photon Coincidence Spectroscopy Along Element 115 Decay Chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, D. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Forsberg, U. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Golubev, P. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Yakushev, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Andersson, L. -L. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dullmann, Ch. E. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gross, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herzberg, R. -D. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hessberger, F. P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Khuyagbaatar, J. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Rykaczewski, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schadel, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai (Japan); Aberg, S. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Ackermann, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Brand, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Carlsson, B. G. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Cox, D. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Derkx, X. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Eberhardt, K. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Even, J. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Fahlander, C. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Gerl, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Jager, E. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Kindler, B. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Krier, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Kojouharov, I. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Kurz, N. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Lommel, B. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Mistry, A. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mokry, C. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Omtvedt, J. P. [Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Papadakis, P. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ragnarsson, I. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Runke, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Schaffner, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Schausten, B. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Thorle-Pospiech, P. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Torres, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Turler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institute and Univ. of Bern, Villigen (Switzerland); Ward, A. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ward, D. E. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Wiehl, N. [Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Produced in the reaction 48Ca+ 243Am, thirty correlated α-decay chains were observed in an experiment conducted at the GSI Helmholzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. The decay chains are basically consistent with previous findings and are considered to originate from isotopes of element 115 with mass numbers 287, 288, and 289. A set-up aiming specifically for high-resolution charged particle and photon coincidence spectroscopy was placed behind the gas-filled separator TASCA. For the first time, γ rays as well as X-ray candidates were observed in prompt coincidence with the α-decay chains of element 115.

  10. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Tao

    2005-01-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown

  11. High-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNCC): users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.

    1979-06-01

    This manual describes the portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter (HLNCC) developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for the assay of plutonium, particularly by inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The counter is designed for the measurement of the effective 240 Pu mass in plutonium samples which may have a high plutonium content. The following topics are discussed: principle of operation, description of the system, operating procedures, and applications

  12. Coincidence of asthma and bronchospasm during anesthesia in tympanomastoidectomy.

    OpenAIRE

    Nima Hosseinzadeh; Shahram Samadi; Amin Amali; Mihan Jafari Javid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of asthma and bronchospasm was observed during induction of anesthesia in patients with chronic suppurative otitis mMedia (CSOM) who underwent tympanomastoidectomy. Although several studies have proposed association of allergic diseases with CSOM but no consensus about it has been established. Current study was designed to determine the coincidence of asthma in CSOM patients. In a cross-sectional study, authors investigated medical records of 106 CSOM patients underwent tympan...

  13. Energy and depth resolution in elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, E., E-mail: szilagyi@rmki.kfki.h [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-06-15

    Elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry was implemented into the analytical ion beam simulation program DEPTH. In the calculations, effective detector geometry and multiple scattering effects are considered. Mott's cross section for the identical, spin zero particles is included. Spectra based on the individual detector signal and summing the energy of the recoiled and scattered particles originating from the same scattering events can also be calculated. To calculate this latter case, the dependency of the energy spread contributions had to be reconsidered.

  14. Energy and depth resolution in elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry was implemented into the analytical ion beam simulation program DEPTH. In the calculations, effective detector geometry and multiple scattering effects are considered. Mott's cross section for the identical, spin zero particles is included. Spectra based on the individual detector signal and summing the energy of the recoiled and scattered particles originating from the same scattering events can also be calculated. To calculate this latter case, the dependency of the energy spread contributions had to be reconsidered.

  15. Coincidence summing corrections for positron emitters in germanium gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, A.E.; Sallee, W.W.; New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces

    1990-01-01

    For positron emitters, 511 keV annihilation quanta are in coincidence with other gamma rays in the decay scheme. If the positrons are not localized at the point of decay, annihilation quanta will be produced at a site some distance from the point of emission. The magnitude of the summing coincidence effect will depend upon the position of annihilation. A method for determining the magnitude of the summing effect for a single gamma of energy E in coincidence with the annihilation gammas from non-localized positrons has been developed which makes use of the counting data for the full energy peaks for both the gamma ray (E) and the 511 keV annihilation gammas. With this data and efficiency calibration data one can determine the average total efficiency for the annihilation positions from which 511 keV gammas originate, and thereby obtain the summing correction factor, SCF, for gamma ray (E). Application of the method to a 22 Na NIST standard gave excellent agreement of observed emission rates for the 1275 keV gamma with the NIST value for wide ranging degrees of positron localization having summing correction factors ranging from 1.021 to 1.505. The method was also applied successfully to 58 Co in neutron-irradiated nickel foils. The method shows promise as a check on the accuracy of the efficiency calibration for a particular detector geometry at the 511 keV energy and energies for other gammas associated with positron emission. (orig.)

  16. Importance of interpolation and coincidence errors in data fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ceccherini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The complete data fusion (CDF method is applied to ozone profiles obtained from simulated measurements in the ultraviolet and in the thermal infrared in the framework of the Sentinel 4 mission of the Copernicus programme. We observe that the quality of the fused products is degraded when the fusing profiles are either retrieved on different vertical grids or referred to different true profiles. To address this shortcoming, a generalization of the complete data fusion method, which takes into account interpolation and coincidence errors, is presented. This upgrade overcomes the encountered problems and provides products of good quality when the fusing profiles are both retrieved on different vertical grids and referred to different true profiles. The impact of the interpolation and coincidence errors on number of degrees of freedom and errors of the fused profile is also analysed. The approach developed here to account for the interpolation and coincidence errors can also be followed to include other error components, such as forward model errors.

  17. High sensitivity neutron activation analysis using coincidence counting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    1999-01-01

    Four kinds of standard samples such as river sediment (NIES CRM No.16), Typical Japanese Diet, otoliths and river water were irradiated by TRIGA-II (100 kW, 3.7x10 12 n cm -2 s -1 ) for 6 h. After irradiation and cooling, they were analyzed by the coincidence counting method and a conventional γ-ray spectrometry. Se, Ba and Hf were determined by 75 Se 265 keV, 131 Ba 496 keV and 181 Hf 482 keV. On the river sediment sample, Ba and Hf showed the same values by two methods, but Se value contained Ta by the conventional method, although the coincidence counting method could analyze Se. On Typical Japanese Diet and otoliths, Se could be determined by two methods and Ba and Hf determined by the coincidence counting method but not determined by the conventional method. Se value in the river water agreed with the authorization value. (S.Y.)

  18. Recent Advances in Digital Coincidence Counting for Radionuclide Metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keightley, John; Bobin, Christophe; Bouchard, Jacques; Capogni, Marco; Loreti, Stefano; Roteta, Miguel

    2013-06-01

    The radioactivity measurement techniques developed within the EURAMET EMRP 'MetroFission' Joint Research Project, were aimed at performing on-site activity measurements at the primary standard level (4πβ-γ coincidence counting) for a wide range of radionuclides utilizing recent advances in high-speed digital sampling and digital signal processing. The state-of-the-art technology employed within this project provides up to 14-bit digitizer systems operating with sampling rates in the order of 10 8 to 10 9 samples-per-second, incorporating on-board FPGA devices, which greatly enhances the application of digital signal processing for the implementation of digital coincidence counting. These devices when coupled to suitable analysis software, demonstrate a significant improvement in the provision of primary standards of radioactivity. This manuscript provides a description of the systems employed, along with recommendations regarding optimization of the digital sampling of signals from photo-multiplier tubes and pre-amplifiers and compare the benefits of 'off-line' versus 'on-line' 4πβ-γ digital coincidence counting systems. (authors)

  19. Post training REMs coincident auditory stimulation enhances memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C; Weeden, K

    1990-06-01

    Sleep activity was monitored in 20 freshman college students for two consecutive nights. Subjects were assigned to 4 equal groups and all were asked to learn a complex logic task before bed on the second night. Two groups of subjects learned the task with a constant clicking noise in the background (cued groups), while two groups simply learned the task (non cued). During the night, one cued and one non cued group were presented with auditory clicks during REM sleep such as to coincide with all REMs of at least 100 microvolts. The second cued group was given auditory clicks during REM sleep, but only during the REMs "quiet" times. The second non-cued control group was never given any nighttime auditory stimulations. The cued REMs coincident group showed a significant 23% improvement in task performance when tested one week later. The non cued REMs coincident group showed only an 8.8% improvement which was not significant. The cued REMs quiet and non-stimulated control groups showed no change in task performance when retested. The results were interpreted as support for the idea that the cued auditory stimulation induced a "recall" of the learned material during the REM sleep state in order for further memory processing to take place.

  20. Simulation approach to coincidence summing in {gamma}-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziri, S., E-mail: samir.dziri@iphc.cnrs.fr [Groupe RaMsEs, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), University of Strasbourg, CNRS, IN2P3, UMR 7178, 23 rue de Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Nourreddine, A.; Sellam, A.; Pape, A.; Baussan, E. [Groupe RaMsEs, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), University of Strasbourg, CNRS, IN2P3, UMR 7178, 23 rue de Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-07-15

    Some of the radionuclides used for efficiency calibration of a HPGe spectrometer are subject to coincidence-summing (CS) and account must be taken of the phenomenon to obtain quantitative results when counting samples to determine their activity. We have used MCNPX simulations, which do not take CS into account, to obtain {gamma}-ray peak intensities that were compared to those observed experimentally. The loss or gain of a measured peak intensity relative to the simulated peak is attributed to CS. CS correction factors are compared with those of ETNA and GESPECOR. Application to a test sample prepared with known radionuclides gave values close to the published activities. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coincidence summing occurs when the solid angle is increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of counts gives rise to an approximative efficiency curves, this means a wrong quantitative data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To overcome this problem we need mono-energetic source, otherwise, the MCNPX simulation allows by comparison with the experiment data to get the coincidence summing correction factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By multiplying these factors by the approximative efficiency, we obtain the accurate efficiency.

  1. A coincidence study between photo- and Auger electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricz, S.; Koever, A.; Varga, D.; Molnar, J.; Aksela, S.; Jurvansuu, M.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The investigation of double differential cross sections of photon induced Auger electrons provides very sensitive method for studying the rearrangement process, especially when the angular correlation between photo- and Auger electrons is also studied. Such type of measurements could reveal a new aspect in studying the electron-electron, hole-electron and photoelectron - Auger electron interactions. It enables one to separate the overlapping Auger lines belonging to different initial holes. The traditional coincidence measurement is very time consuming and causes serious calibration problems. In order to overcome these experimental difficulties a new electron-spectrometer (ESA-22) was developed in ATOMKI, Debrecen in cooperation with the Electron spectroscopy group of University of Oulu, Finland. The analyzer consists of a spherical and a cylindrical part. It is very similar to the ESA-21 analyzer. The main differences is that the focal ring can be set different diameters thus either a series of channel detectors can be used to detect the electrons at different angles or a position sensitive channel plate can be applied for simultaneous angular recording of electrons. Furthermore the outer sphere and cylinder are cut into two parts so the spectrometer is capable to analyze two independent angularly resolved electron spectra (in the 0 deg - 180 deg region) at different energy regions, simultaneously. A special electronic control and data handling electronics and software was worked out to control the analyzer. The first results were presented in. In the last year the ESA-22 electron-spectrometer was transported to the I411 beam line of MAX-II synchrotron in Lund, Sweden. The advanced properties of the spectrometer was investigated by measuring coincidences between the photoelectrons originated from the Ar L 3 subshell and the Ar Auger electrons in the 203-207 eV energy region. Fig. 1 shows the single and the coincidence spectra

  2. Experimental violation of entropic inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovino, F.A.; Castagnoli, G.; Ekert, A.; Horodecki, P.; Alves, C.M.; Sergienko, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We report the experimental evidence that polarization entangled photons violate the inequality based on Renyi entropy. Our experimental method is based on four-photon coincidences in photon bunching and antibunching effects. We introduce an additional 'phase marking' technique, which allow observing the violation of the inequalities even with non-deterministic sources of entangled photons. Our method can be applied to measure selected non-linear properties of bipartite quantum states, such as purity or entanglement. (author)

  3. Coincident brane nucleation and the neutralization of Λ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Megevand, Ariel

    2004-01-01

    Nucleation of branes by a four-form field has recently been considered in string motivated scenarios for the neutralization of the cosmological constant. An interesting question in this context is whether the nucleation of stacks of coincident branes is possible, and if so, at what rate does it proceed. Feng et al. have suggested that, at high ambient de Sitter temperature, the rate may be strongly enhanced, due to large degeneracy factors associated with the number of light species living on the worldsheet. This might facilitate the quick relaxation from a large effective cosmological constant down to the observed value. Here, we analyze this possibility in some detail. In four dimensions, and after the moduli are stabilized, branes interact via repulsive long range forces. Because of that, the Coleman-de Luccia (CdL) instanton for coincident brane nucleation may not exist, unless there is some short range interaction that keeps the branes together. If the CdL instanton exists, we find that the degeneracy factor depends only mildly on the ambient de Sitter temperature, and does not switch off even in the case of tunneling from flat space. This would result in catastrophic decay of the present vacuum. If, on the contrary, the CdL instanton does not exist, coincident brane nucleation may still proceed through a 'static' instanton, representing pair creation of critical bubbles--a process somewhat analogous to thermal activation in flat space. In that case, the branes may stick together due to thermal symmetry restoration, and the pair creation rate depends exponentially on the ambient de Sitter temperature, switching off sharply as the temperature approaches zero. Such a static instanton may be well suited for the 'saltatory' relaxation scenario proposed by Feng et al

  4. Bell's inequalities and the four-coincidence experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garuccio, A.; Rapisarda, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The four-coincidence experiment, in which two correlated particles interact, each, with a dichotomic-detection apparatus, is formally described. Some care is devoted to analyze what is due to the structure of the experiment, and what can really be measured. Some of the questions which the experiment can answer are posed in a general probabilistic hidden-variable frame and, for the QM point of view, in the specific case of the 0-1-0 calcium atomic cascade. Besides, a new method to treat discriminating inequalities is shown which allows, in our opinion, a deeper insight into the theoretical assumptions together with a better experimental reliability. (author)

  5. Reconstructed Image Spatial Resolution of Multiple Coincidences Compton Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2010-02-01

    We study the multiple coincidences Compton imager (MCCI) which is based on a simultaneous acquisition of several photons emitted in cascade from a single nuclear decay. Theoretically, this technique should provide a major improvement in localization of a single radioactive source as compared to a standard Compton camera. In this work, we investigated the performance and limitations of MCCI using Monte Carlo computer simulations. Spatial resolutions of the reconstructed point source have been studied as a function of the MCCI parameters, including geometrical dimensions and detector characteristics such as materials, energy and spatial resolutions.

  6. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included

  7. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  8. Standardization of 18F by coincidence and LSC methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roteta, Miguel; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo; Rodriguez Barquero, Leonor

    2006-01-01

    The nuclide 18 F disintegrates to 18 O by β + emission (96.86%) and electron capture (3.14%) with a half-life of 1.8288 h. It is widely used in nuclear medicine for positron emission tomography (PET). A radioactive solution of this nuclide has been standardized by two techniques: coincidence measurements with a pressurized proportional counter and liquid scintillation counting using the CIEMAT/NIST method. One ampoule containing a solution calibrated in activity was sent for measurement at the International Reference System maintained by the BIPM. Results are in excellent agreement with SIR values

  9. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucott, Timothy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, Alexander [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  10. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  11. Preliminary results of a neutron-gamma coincidence experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercey, R.B.; Dunnam, F.E.; Muga, M.L.; Rester, A.C.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Eberth, J.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    The recently completed neutron multiplicity detector dubbed PANDA (Pentagonal Annular Neutron Detector Array) is fully described later in this report. The new detector was recently used for the first time on-line at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility to measure neutron-gamma coincidence in the 24 Mg( 58 Ni,xαypzn) reaction. The detector configuration for the experiment is shown. The PANDA was situated in the forward direction, coaxial to the beam line with five gamma-ray detectors placed at +/- 90 0 , +/- 135 0 , and 0 0 . 2 figures

  12. Coincidence of lung cancer and silicosis in Czechoslovak uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, S.; Urbanova, S.

    1988-01-01

    27 patients with established coincidence of lung cancer and silicosis from a group of 1607 cases of lung cancer from radioactive compounds, and 166 cases of pneumoconiosis were reported by the Occupational Diseases Ward of the works Institute of National Health in Uranium Industry in the 1962 to 1986 years. Lung cancer was found in 16% of reported silicosis patients, in 81% it was simple silicosis, in 50% of cases in was an epidermoid type of cancer. In two cases the malignant process originated in the silicotic node, in one case from a tuberculoma. Lung cancer occurred most frequently in the right lower lung region. The mean age of the silicosis group was 48.6 years and 56.0 years for the lung cancer group. No difference was thus seen from the mean age of patients with lung cancer from radioactive compounds diagnosed in the years 1976 to 1980 but it was significantly lower that the reported average age of patients with coincidence of lung cancer and pneumoconiosis in the population not exposed to ionizing radiation. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  13. Coincidence Detection Using Spiking Neurons with Application to Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhlan Kamaruzaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We elucidate the practical implementation of Spiking Neural Network (SNN as local ensembles of classifiers. Synaptic time constant τs is used as learning parameter in representing the variations learned from a set of training data at classifier level. This classifier uses coincidence detection (CD strategy trained in supervised manner using a novel supervised learning method called τs Prediction which adjusts the precise timing of output spikes towards the desired spike timing through iterative adaptation of τs. This paper also discusses the approximation of spike timing in Spike Response Model (SRM for the purpose of coincidence detection. This process significantly speeds up the whole process of learning and classification. Performance evaluations with face datasets such as AR, FERET, JAFFE, and CK+ datasets show that the proposed method delivers better face classification performance than the network trained with Supervised Synaptic-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP. We also found that the proposed method delivers better classification accuracy than k nearest neighbor, ensembles of kNN, and Support Vector Machines. Evaluation on several types of spike codings also reveals that latency coding delivers the best result for face classification as well as for classification of other multivariate datasets.

  14. Cochlear spike synchronization and neuron coincidence detection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Rolf

    2018-02-01

    Coincidence detection of a spike pattern fed from the cochlea into a single neuron is investigated using a physical Finite-Difference model of the cochlea and a physiologically motivated neuron model. Previous studies have shown experimental evidence of increased spike synchronization in the nucleus cochlearis and the trapezoid body [Joris et al., J. Neurophysiol. 71(3), 1022-1036 and 1037-1051 (1994)] and models show tone partial phase synchronization at the transition from mechanical waves on the basilar membrane into spike patterns [Ch. F. Babbs, J. Biophys. 2011, 435135]. Still the traveling speed of waves on the basilar membrane cause a frequency-dependent time delay of simultaneously incoming sound wavefronts up to 10 ms. The present model shows nearly perfect synchronization of multiple spike inputs as neuron outputs with interspike intervals (ISI) at the periodicity of the incoming sound for frequencies from about 30 to 300 Hz for two different amounts of afferent nerve fiber neuron inputs. Coincidence detection serves here as a fusion of multiple inputs into one single event enhancing pitch periodicity detection for low frequencies, impulse detection, or increased sound or speech intelligibility due to dereverberation.

  15. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per μCi/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 μs, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for 18 F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs

  16. Coincidence-anticipation timing requirements are different in racket sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Selçuk; Devrilmez, Erhan; Kirazci, Sadettin

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy of athletes of different racket sports with various stimulus velocity requirements. Ninety players (15 girls, 15 boys for each sport) from tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.4), badminton (M age = 12.5 yr., SD = 1.4), and table tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.2) participated in this study. Three different stimulus velocities, low, moderate, and high, were used to simulate the velocity requirements of these racket sports. Tennis players had higher accuracy when they performed under the low stimulus velocity compared to badminton and table tennis players. Badminton players performed better under the moderate speed comparing to tennis and table tennis players. Table tennis players had better performance than tennis and badminton players under the high stimulus velocity. Therefore, visual and motor systems of players from different racket sports may adapt to a stimulus velocity in coincidence-anticipation timing, which is specific to each type of racket sports.

  17. Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with velocity focusing electron optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodi, Andras; Johnson, Melanie; Gerber, Thomas; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Sztaray, Balint; Baer, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    An imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer at the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is presented and a few initial measurements are reported. Monochromatic synchrotron VUV radiation ionizes the cooled or thermal gas-phase sample. Photoelectrons are velocity focused, with better than 1 meV resolution for threshold electrons, and also act as start signal for the ion time-of-flight analysis. The ions are accelerated in a relatively low, 40-80 V cm -1 field, which enables the direct measurement of rate constants in the 10 3 -10 7 s -1 range. All electron and ion events are recorded in a triggerless multiple-start/multiple-stop setup, which makes it possible to carry out coincidence experiments at >100 kHz event frequencies. As examples, the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the argon dimer and the breakdown diagrams for hydrogen atom loss in room temperature methane and the chlorine atom loss in cold chlorobenzene are shown and discussed.

  18. True coincidence-summing corrections for the coincident γ-rays measured with coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuecel, H.; Solmaz, A.N.; Koese, E.; Bor, D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, true coincidence-summing (TCS) correction factors have been measured for the sources 22 Na, 60 Co, 133 Ba and 152 Eu by use of three large volume coplanar grid CdZnTe (acronym: CZT) detectors. In case of a close-in detection geometry, two different TCS calculation algorithms were used to compute the required TCS correction factors. Both of the algorithms are based on the measured total-to-peak (TTP) ratio and full-energy peak (FEP) efficiency values that were obtained using almost 'single' energy and coincidence-free nuclides. The results for TCS correction factors obtained by two different algorithms were agreeable to each other. The obtained TCS factors were ranged from about 7% to 30.5% in a 2250 mm 3 CZT detector when a close counting geometry was used. For other two detectors with a volume of 1000 and 1687.5 mm 3 , the resulted TCS correction factors were relatively smaller and varied between about 0.1% and 20% at the close counting geometry condition. Therefore, the results indicate that there is a need for the estimation of TCS corrections in CZT detectors, especially when their crystal volumes are greater than 1 cm 3 and these detectors are used in the case of a close-in detection geometry.

  19. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  20. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  1. Analysis of 125Xe electron-photon coincidence decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingberg, F.J.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), environmental gas samples originating from nuclear fission are analyzed for the presence of 131m Xe, 133m Xe, 133 Xe, and 135 Xe. In this work, the non-traditional radioxenon isotope 125 Xe was investigated. The isotope was produced as an isotopically pure sample via neutron activation of 124 Xe at the University of Texas at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab's TRIGA MARK II Reactor. The sample was then measured using a HPGe detector as well as an ARSA-style b-c coincidence detector. Potential sources and sensitivities for production of 125 Xe are also considered for relevance to the CTBT verification mission. (author)

  2. A high-efficiency neutron coincidence counter for small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O.; Russo, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The inventory sample coincidence counter (INVS) has been modified to enhance its performance. The new design is suitable for use with a glove box sample-well (in-line application) as well as for use in the standard at-line mode. The counter has been redesigned to count more efficiently and be less sensitive to variations in sample position. These factors lead to a higher degree of precision and accuracy in a given counting period and allow for the practical use of the INVS counter with gamma-ray isotopics to obtain a plutonium assay independent of operator declarations and time-consuming chemicals analysis. A calculation study was performed using the Los Alamos transport code MCNP to optimize the design parameters. 5 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  3. Positron emission tomography with gamma camera in coincidence mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertel, A.; Hoer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-18 FDG has been estbalished in clinical diagnostics with first indications especially in oncology. To install a conventional PET tomography (dedicated PET) is financially costly and restricted to PET examinations only. Increasing demand for PET diagnostics on one hand and restricted financial resources in the health system on the other hand led industry to develop SPECT cameras to be operated in coincidence mode (camera PET) in order to offer nuclear medicine physicians cost-effective devices for PET diagnostic. At the same time camera PET is inferior to conventional PET regarding sensitivity and detection-efficiency for 511 keV photons. Does camera-PET offer a reliable alternative to conventional PET? The first larger comparative studies are now available, so a first apraisal about the technical clinical performance of camera-PET can be done. (orig.) [de

  4. Airborne LIDAR borsight error calibration based on surface coincide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Fangyan; Li, Guoqing; Zuo, Zhengli; Li, Dong; Qi, Zengying; Qiu, Wen; Tan, Junxiang

    2014-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is a system which can directly collect three-dimensional coordinate information of ground point and laser reflection strength information. With the wide application of LIDAR system, users hope to get more accurate results. Boresight error has an important effect on data accuracy and thus, it is thought that eliminating the error is very important. In recent years, many methods have been proposed to eliminate the error. Generally, they can be categorized into tie point method and surface matching method. In this paper, we propose another method called try value method based on surface coincide that is used in actual production by many companies. The method is simple and operable. Further, the efficacy of the method was demonstrated by analyzing the data from Zhangye city

  5. On the spatial coincidence of hydroxyl and methanol masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Menten, K. M.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1995-01-01

    We argue that purely gas-phase chemical models for the production of OH in hydroxyl masers around ultracompact H II regions such as W3(OH) cannot account for the CH_3OH in the methanol masers that are found to coincide with the hydroxyl masers in these sources. We suggest that the CH_3OH in the masers is injected into the gas phase by evaporation of the grain mantles, the grains being heated by the passage of weak shocks. Gas evaporation also injects H_2O into the gas. Photodissociation of H_2O, CH_3OH and OH occur at similar rates, and substantial abundances of CH_3OH and OH coexist.

  6. The spallation in reverse kinematics: what for a coincidence measurement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducret, J.E.

    2006-07-01

    The Spaladin installation has been designed to study spallation reactions in reverse kinematics. Furthermore, the heavy and light fragments are detected by coincidence which allows us to get an instantaneous picture of the reaction at a level of accuracy better than that obtained through inclusive measurement. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical description of the different mechanisms involved in the spallation reactions. In the second part we describe the Spaladin installation and report some results on the reaction: Fe 56 + p at an energy of 1 GeV/nucleon. In the third part we expose the performance of the installation through its simulation with the Geant-IV model. We present a study about the sensitivity of the Spaladin installation to theoretical predictions. The fourth part is dedicated to the future experiments that will be performed with the Spaladin installation. (A.C.)

  7. Optimized coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy using deconvolution algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.F.; Ching, H.M.; Cheng, K.W.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.; Ng, K.P.

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years a number of excellent deconvolution algorithms have been developed for use in ''de-blurring'' 2D images. Here we report briefly on one such algorithm we have studied which uses the non-negativity constraint to optimize the regularization and which is applied to the 2D image like data produced in Coincidence Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (CDBS). The system instrumental resolution functions are obtained using the 514 keV line from 85 Sr. The technique when applied to a series of well annealed polycrystalline metals gives two photon momentum data on a quality comparable to that obtainable using 1D Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation (ACAR). (orig.)

  8. Passive Time Coincidence Measurements with HEU and DU Metal Castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConchie, Seth M.; Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John T.; Wright, Michael C.; Archer, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A Department of Energy sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Y-12 National Security Complex program of passive time coincidence measurements has been initiated at Y-12 to evaluate the ability to determine the presence of high enriched uranium (HEU) and distinguish it from depleted uranium (DU). This program uses the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) without an active interrogation source. Previous passive NMIS measurements with Pu metal and Pu oxide have been successful in determining the Pu mass, assuming a known 240Pu content. The spontaneous fission of uranium metal is considerably lower than Pu and measurements of this type have been performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work presents results of measurements of HEU and DU metal castings using moderated 3He detectors.

  9. Testable solution of the cosmological constant and coincidence problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Douglas J.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new solution to the cosmological constant (CC) and coincidence problems in which the observed value of the CC, Λ, is linked to other observable properties of the Universe. This is achieved by promoting the CC from a parameter that must be specified, to a field that can take many possible values. The observed value of Λ≅(9.3 Gyrs) -2 [≅10 -120 in Planck units] is determined by a new constraint equation which follows from the application of a causally restricted variation principle. When applied to our visible Universe, the model makes a testable prediction for the dimensionless spatial curvature of Ω k0 =-0.0056(ζ b /0.5), where ζ b ∼1/2 is a QCD parameter. Requiring that a classical history exist, our model determines the probability of observing a given Λ. The observed CC value, which we successfully predict, is typical within our model even before the effects of anthropic selection are included. When anthropic selection effects are accounted for, we find that the observed coincidence between t Λ =Λ -1/2 and the age of the Universe, t U , is a typical occurrence in our model. In contrast to multiverse explanations of the CC problems, our solution is independent of the choice of a prior weighting of different Λ values and does not rely on anthropic selection effects. Our model includes no unnatural small parameters and does not require the introduction of new dynamical scalar fields or modifications to general relativity, and it can be tested by astronomical observations in the near future.

  10. Coincident photoelectron spectroscopy on superconductors; Koinzidente Photoelektronenspektroskopie an Supraleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Aim of the performed experiments of this thesis was to attempt to detect Cooper pairs as carriers of the superconducting current directly by means of the photoelectric effect. The method of the coincident photoelectron spectroscopy aims thereby at the detection of two coherently emitted electrons by the interaction with a photon. Because electrostatic analyzers typically cover only a very small spatial angle, which goes along with very low coincidence rates, in connection with this thesis a time-of-flight projection system has been developed, which maps nearly the whole spatial angle on a position-resolving detector. The pulsed light source in form of special synchrotron radiation necessary for the measurement has been adjusted so weak, that only single photons could arrive at the sample. Spectroscoped were beside test measurements on silver layers both a lead monocrystal as representative of the classical BCS superconductors and monocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} from the family of the high-temperature superconductors. With excitation energies up to 40 eV could be shown that sufficiently smooth and clean surfaces in the superconducting phase exhibit within the resolving power of about 0.5 eV no recognizable differences in comparison to the normally conducting phase. Beside these studies furthermore the simple photoemission at the different samples and especially in the case of the lead crystal is treated, because here no comparable results are known. Thereby the whole momentum space is discussed and the Fermi surface established as three-dimensional model, by means of which the measurement results are discussed. in the theoretical descriptions different models for the Cooper-pair production are presented, whereby to the momentum exchange with the crystal a special role is attributed, because this can only occur in direct excitations via discrete lattice vectors.

  11. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Braden, E-mail: goddard.braden@gmail.com [Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Charlton, William [Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Peerani, Paolo [European Commission, EC-JRC-ITU, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (∼0.2 wt% {sup 235}U) to high enriched (>20 wt% {sup 235}U); compositions consisting of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, UO{sub 2}, UF{sub 6}, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since {sup 235}U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the {sup 235}U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the “known standard” method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact {sup 235}U sample masses.

  12. Quenched carbonaceous composite - Fluorescence spectrum compared to the extended red emission observed in reflection nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Akira; Wada, Setsuko; Narisawa, Takatoshi; Asano, Yoichi; Iijima, Yutaka; Onaka, Takashi; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    1992-01-01

    The photoluminescence (fluorescence) of a film of the laboratory-synthesized quenched carbonaceous composite (filmy QCC) is shown to have a single broad emission feature with a peak wavelength that varies from 670 to 725 nm, and coincides with that of the extended red emission observed in reflection nebulae. The rapid decay of the filmy QCC red fluorescence in air and of the stable blue fluorescence of the filmy QCC dissolved in liquid Freon suggests that the red fluorescence originates from the interaction of active chemical species and aromatic components in the filmy QCC. A material similar in nature to that of the filmy QCC may be a major component of interstellar dust.

  13. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  14. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  15. Experimental implementation of the Bacon-Shor code with 10 entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-Segovia, Mercedes; Sanders, Barry C.

    The number of qubits that can be effectively controlled in quantum experiments is growing, reaching a regime where small quantum error-correcting codes can be tested. The Bacon-Shor code is a simple quantum code that protects against the effect of an arbitrary single-qubit error. In this work, we propose an experimental implementation of said code in a post-selected linear optical setup, similar to the recently reported 10-photon GHZ generation experiment. In the procedure we propose, an arbitrary state is encoded into the protected Shor code subspace, and after undergoing a controlled single-qubit error, is successfully decoded. BCS appreciates financial support from Alberta Innovates, NSERC, China's 1000 Talent Plan and the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, which is an NSF Physics Frontiers Center(NSF Grant PHY-1125565) with support of the Moore Foundation(GBMF-2644).

  16. Cryptanalysis and improvement of quantum secure communication network protocol with entangled photons for mobile communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Gan

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a communication protocol called controlled bidirectional quantum secret direct communication for mobile networks was proposed by Chou et al (2014 Mobile Netw. Appl. 19 121). We study the security of the proposed communication protocol and find that it is not secure. The controller, Telecom Company, may eavesdrop secret messages from mobile devices without being detected. Finally, we give a possible improvement of the communication protocol. (paper)

  17. On the implementation of a deterministic secure coding protocol using polarization entangled photons

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermeyer, Martin; Walenta, Nino

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a prototype-implementation of deterministic information encoding for quantum key distribution (QKD) following the ping-pong coding protocol [K. Bostroem, T. Felbinger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 187902-1]. Due to the deterministic nature of this protocol the need for post-processing the key is distinctly reduced compared to non-deterministic protocols. In the course of our implementation we analyze the practicability of the protocol and discuss some security aspects of informat...

  18. Earth-to-Satellite Quantum Key Distribution with Noise Reduction via Entangled Photon Time Correlation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to establish a provably secure communication link between ground and low-earth-orbit (LEO). Current communication technologies rely...

  19. Experimental noise-resistant Bell-inequality violations for polarization-entangled photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovino, Fabio A.; Castagnoli, Giuseppe; Cabello, Adan; Lamas-Linares, Antia

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that violations of Bell's inequalities for two-photon polarization-entangled states with colored noise are extremely robust, whereas this is not the case for states with white noise. Controlling the amount of noise by using the timing compensation scheme introduced by Kim et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 010301(R) (2003)], we have observed violations even for states with very high noise, in excellent agrement with the predictions of Cabello et al. [Phys. Rev. A 72, 052112 (2005)

  20. Quantum optical measurement with tripartite entangled photons generated by triple parametric down-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-05-01

    Parametric down-conversion is a second-order nonlinear optical process annihilating a pump photon and creating a pair of photons in the signal and idler modes. Then, by using two parametric down-converters and introducing a path indistinguishability for the two generated idler modes, a quantum coherence between two conjugate signal beams can be induced. Such a double spontaneous or stimulated parametric down-conversion scheme has been used to demonstrate quantum spectroscopy and imaging with undetected idler photons via measuring one-photon interference between their correlated signal beams. Recently, we considered another quantum optical measurement scheme utilizing W-type tripartite entangled signal photons that can be generated by employing three spontaneous parametric down-conversion crystals and by inducing coherences or path-indistinguishabilities between their correlated idler beams and between quantum vacuum fields. Here, we consider an extended triple stimulated parametric down-conversion scheme for quantum optical measurement of sample properties with undetected idler and photons. Noting the real effect of vacuum field indistinguishability on the fringe visibility as well as the role of zero-point field energy in the interferometry, we show that this scheme is an ideal and efficient way to create a coherent state of W-type entangled signal photons. We anticipate that this scheme would be of critical use in further developing quantum optical measurements in spectroscopy and microscopy with undetected photons.

  1. Parameter dependence in the atmospheric decoherence of modal entangled photon pairs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ibrahim, AH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available of the concurrence as a function of t for K = 0.067 and ℓ = 1. The five curves are obtained with five different sets of dimension param- eters, shown in Table II, all of which produce the same value of K. We select K = 0.067, because it represents a TABLE II... parameters given in Table II agreement with the SPS results. Moreover, the evolution of the concurrence is fully described by the single param- eter W = w0/r0 and modes with larger OAM values are more robust in turbulence. On the other hand, for weak...

  2. Parameter Estimation with Entangled Photons Produced by Parametric Down-Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Hugo; Durkin, Gabriel A.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the advantages offered by twin light beams produced in parametric down-conversion for precision measurement. The symmetry of these bipartite quantum states, even under losses, suggests that monitoring correlations between the divergent beams permits a high-precision inference of any symmetry-breaking effect, e.g., fiber birefringence. We show that the quantity of entanglement is not the key feature for such an instrument. In a lossless setting, scaling of precision at the ultimate "Heisenberg" limit is possible with photon counting alone. Even as photon losses approach 100% the precision is shot-noise limited, and we identify the crossover point between quantum and classical precision as a function of detected flux. The predicted hypersensitivity is demonstrated with a Bayesian simulation.

  3. Quantum optical measurement with tripartite entangled photons generated by triple parametric down-conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-05-14

    Parametric down-conversion is a second-order nonlinear optical process annihilating a pump photon and creating a pair of photons in the signal and idler modes. Then, by using two parametric down-converters and introducing a path indistinguishability for the two generated idler modes, a quantum coherence between two conjugate signal beams can be induced. Such a double spontaneous or stimulated parametric down-conversion scheme has been used to demonstrate quantum spectroscopy and imaging with undetected idler photons via measuring one-photon interference between their correlated signal beams. Recently, we considered another quantum optical measurement scheme utilizing W-type tripartite entangled signal photons that can be generated by employing three spontaneous parametric down-conversion crystals and by inducing coherences or path-indistinguishabilities between their correlated idler beams and between quantum vacuum fields. Here, we consider an extended triple stimulated parametric down-conversion scheme for quantum optical measurement of sample properties with undetected idler and photons. Noting the real effect of vacuum field indistinguishability on the fringe visibility as well as the role of zero-point field energy in the interferometry, we show that this scheme is an ideal and efficient way to create a coherent state of W-type entangled signal photons. We anticipate that this scheme would be of critical use in further developing quantum optical measurements in spectroscopy and microscopy with undetected photons.

  4. Efficient generation of single and entangled photons on a silicon photonic integrated chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mower, Jacob; Englund, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    We present a protocol for generating on-demand, indistinguishable single photons on a silicon photonic integrated chip. The source is a time-multiplexed spontaneous parametric down-conversion element that allows optimization of single-photon versus multiphoton emission while realizing high output rate and indistinguishability. We minimize both the scaling of active elements and the scaling of active element loss with multiplexing. We then discuss detection strategies and data processing to further optimize the procedure. We simulate an improvement in single-photon-generation efficiency over previous time-multiplexing protocols, assuming existing fabrication capabilities. We then apply this system to generate heralded Bell states. The generation efficiency of both nonclassical states could be increased substantially with improved fabrication procedures.

  5. A versatile source of polarization entangled photons for quantum network applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Florian; Issautier, Amandine; Ngah, Lutfi A; Alibart, Olivier; Martin, Anthony; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    We report a versatile and practical approach for the generation of high-quality polarization entanglement in a fully guided-wave fashion. Our setup relies on a high-brilliance type-0 waveguide generator producing paired photons at a telecom wavelength associated with an advanced energy-time to polarization transcriber. The latter is capable of creating any pure polarization entangled state, and allows manipulation of single-photon bandwidths that can be chosen at will over five orders of magnitude, ranging from tens of MHz to several THz. We achieve excellent entanglement fidelities for particular spectral bandwidths, i.e. 25 MHz, 540 MHz and 80 GHz, proving the relevance of our approach. Our scheme stands as an ideal candidate for a wide range of network applications, ranging from dense division multiplexing quantum key distribution to heralded optical quantum memories and repeaters. (letter)

  6. Experimental amplification of an entangled photon: what if the detection loophole is ignored?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarico, Enrico; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Sekatski, Pavel; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The experimental verification of quantum features, such as entanglement, at large scales is extremely challenging because of environment-induced decoherence. Indeed, measurement techniques for demonstrating the quantumness of multiparticle systems in the presence of losses are difficult to define, and if they are not sufficiently accurate they can provide wrong conclusions. We present a Bell test where one photon of an entangled pair is amplified and then detected by threshold detectors, whose signals undergo postselection. The amplification is performed by a classical machine, which produces a fully separable micro-macro state. However, by adopting such a technique one can surprisingly observe a violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality. This is due to the fact that ignoring the detection loophole opened by the postselection and the system losses can lead to misinterpretations, such as claiming micro-macro entanglement in a setup where evidently it is not present. By using threshold detectors and postselection, one can only infer the entanglement of the initial pair of photons, and so micro-micro entanglement, as is further confirmed by the violation of a nonseparability criterion for bipartite systems. How to detect photonic micro-macro entanglement in the presence of losses with the currently available technology remains an open question.

  7. Three-color Sagnac source of polarization-entangled photon pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Michael; Hübel, Hannes; Poppe, Andreas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2009-12-07

    We demonstrate a compact and stable source of polarization-entangled pairs of photons, one at 810 nm wavelength for high detection efficiency and the other at 1550 nm for long-distance fiber communication networks. Due to a novel Sagnac-based design of the interferometer no active stabilization is needed. Using only one 30 mm ppKTP bulk crystal the source produces photons with a spectral brightness of 1.13 x 10(6) pairs/s/mW/THz with an entanglement fidelity of 98.2%. Both photons are single-mode fiber coupled and ready to be used in quantum key distribution (QKD) or transmission of photonic quantum states over large distances.

  8. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I [Berkeley, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Srivastava, Abneesh [Santa Clara, CA; Bogan, Michael J [Dublin, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Oakland, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  9. Analysis method for beta-gamma coincidence spectra from radio-xenon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wenjing; Yin Jingpeng; Huang Xiongliang; Cheng Zhiwei; Shen Maoquan; Zhang Yang

    2012-01-01

    Radio-xenon isotopes monitoring is one important method for the verification of CTBT, what includes the measurement methods of HPGe γ spectrometer and β-γ coincidence. The article describes the analytic flowchart and method of three-dimensional beta-gamma coincidence spectra from β-γ systems, and analyses in detail the principles and methods of the regions of interest of coincidence spectra and subtracting the interference, finally gives the formula of radioactivity of Xenon isotopes and minimum detectable concentrations. Studying on the principles of three-dimensional beta-gamma coincidence spectra, which can supply the foundation for designing the software of β-γ coincidence systems. (authors)

  10. Design and development of VHDL based IP core for coincidence analyzer for FPGA based TDCR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Shivam; Gupta, Ashutosh; Chaudhury, Probal; Sharma, M.K.; Kulkarni, M.S.

    2018-01-01

    The coincidence counting technique is used in activity measurement methods to determine the activity of radionuclide e.g. 4πβ-γ method and Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method etc. The 4πβ-γ method requires two inputs Coincidence Analyzer (CA) whereas; TDCR method requires three inputs CA. A VHDL (Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware Description Language) based IP (Intellectual Property) core for coincidence analyzer has been designed and implemented in FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) for TDCR system. The developed IP not only facilitates the coincidence counting of three channels simultaneously but also provides an extendable dead time feature

  11. Optimization of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; van Weeren, L.; Joosen, L.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Engelborghs, Y.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fluorescent protein (FP) variants have been engineered to fluoresce in all different colors; to display photoswitchable, or photochromic, behavior; or to show yet other beneficial properties that enable or enhance a still growing set of new fluorescence spectroscopy and microcopy

  12. Active method of neutron time correlation coincidence measurement to authenticate mass and enrichment of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Songbai; Wu Jun; Zhu Jianyu; Tian Dongfeng; Xie Dong

    2011-01-01

    The active methodology of time correlation coincidence measurement of neutron is an effective verification means to authenticate uranium metal. A collimated 252 Cf neutron source was used to investigate mass and enrichment of uranium metal through the neutron transport simulation for different enrichments and different masses of uranium metal, then time correlation coincidence counts of them were obtained. By analyzing the characteristic of time correlation coincidence counts, the monotone relationships were founded between FWTH of time correlation coincidence and multiplication factor, between the total coincidence counts in FWTH for time correlation coincidence and mass of 235 U multiplied by multiplication factor, and between the ratio of neutron source penetration and mass of uranium metal. Thus the methodology to authenticate mass and enrichment of uranium metal was established with time correlation coincidence by active neutron investigation. (authors)

  13. Sustaining IAEA Neutron Coincidence Counting: Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, J.; Schaffer, K.M.; Nordquist, H.

    2015-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's IAEA Neutron Coincidence Counting (INCC) code is the standard tool for neutron coincidence counting measurements. INCC software and its' predecessors were originally implemented in the 1970s. The measurement and analysis techniques perfected in the code arise from many years of laboratory and field experience by nuclear engineers and physicists. Covering the full arc of INCC's lifecycle, we discuss the engineering approaches used for conception, original development, worldwide deployment of the stand-alone Windows application, more than a decade of sustained maintenance support, and our recent work to carry INCC successfully into future applications. We delve into the recent re-architecture of the INCC code base, an effort to create a maintainable and extensible architecture designed to preserve the existing INCC code base while adding support for new analyzes and instruments (e.g., List Mode PTR-32 and the List Mode Multiplicity Module). INCC now consists of separate modules implementing attended instrumentation control, data file processing, statistical and Pu mass calculation and analyzes, list mode counting and analyzes, reporting functions, and a database support library. Separating functional capabilities in this architecture enables better testing, isolates development risk and enables the use of INCC features in other software systems. We discuss our approach to handling divergent data and protocol support as a result of this re-architecture. INCC has complex testing requirements; we show how the testing effort was reduced by breaking the software into separate modules. This new architecture enables integration of INCC analysis into the IAEA's new Integrated Review and Analysis Programme (iRAP) data review system. iRAP is based on the respected Euratom Comprehensive Review Inspector Software Package (CRISP) software framework, and is expected to be the future data review system for IAEA and Euratom

  14. Low level GAMMA0 spectrometry by beta-gamma coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorescu, E.L.; Luca, A.; Razdolescu, A.C.; Ivan, C.

    1999-01-01

    Low level gamma spectrometry has a wide application, especially in environmental monitoring. Two variants, based on a beta-gamma coincidence technique, were studied. The equipment was composed of a beta detector and a Ge(Li) gamma detector (6% - relative efficiency), with the associated electronics. The gamma rays are recorded by the multichannel analyzer (4096 channels) only if the associated beta particles, which precede the gamma transitions, are registered in coincidence. Two types of beta detectors were used: plastic and liquid scintillators. In both cases, an external lead shield of 5 cm thick was used. The integral gamma background (50-1700 KeV) was reduced about 85 and 50 times, respectively. The corresponding MDA (Minimum Detectable Activity) values decreased about 1.5 and (3-7) times, respectively. The 2π sr plastic beta detector was placed on top the Ge(Li). The sample was inserted between the two detectors. The measurement time was 10 4 s. A 4π sr detector, built of the same material, was also studied, but it proved to be less advantageous because the background was reduced only 16 times; for a MDA reduction similar with that of the 2π sr variant, a longer measurement was needed (3.10 4 s). The other type of beta detector used, was a liquid scintillator. The dissolving of the samples in scintillator ensures a 4π sr measurement geometry. The vials with scintillator (10 ml volume) were placed on top the Ge(Li) and visualised by the photocathode of a phototube. This setup was surrounded by an enclosure which prevent the light penetration. The measurement time was 10 4 s. The only difficulty encountered in this low level measurement method is the accurate determination of the beta efficiency. A limitation is the possibility to measure only small mass samples. These variants are more simple and cheaper than others, previously studied. The advantage of the method is obvious when, instead of low MDA values, shorter measurement times are preferred. The

  15. Coincidence of asthma and bronchospasm during anesthesia in tympanomastoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Nima; Samadi, Shahram; Amali, Amin; Jafari Javid, Mihan

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of asthma and bronchospasm was observed during induction of anesthesia in patients with chronic suppurative otitis mMedia (CSOM) who underwent tympanomastoidectomy. Although several studies have proposed association of allergic diseases with CSOM but no consensus about it has been established. Current study was designed to determine the coincidence of asthma in CSOM patients. In a cross-sectional study, authors investigated medical records of 106 CSOM patients underwent tympanomastoidectomy, aged 15 to 65 years, and 95 controls, which were matched by age and sex. Participants were admitted to Valiasr Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April of 2011 to March of 2013. Required information, such as demographic characteristics and history of allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma were obtained from patients' medical records. The prevalence of AR in the CSOM group was higher than controls' group (19.8% and 15.8%, respectively) (P>0.05). Asthma prevalence was significantly higher in patients with CSOM (P=0.03) (OR=7.67, 95% CI:  0.9-62.5). No significant association was found between history of AR and chronic ear infections. However, asthma was significantly more common in CSOM patients. Current study indicates that asthma and risk of bronchospasm need particular attention in patients with CSOM underwent tympanomastoidectomy before and during anesthesia.

  16. Coincidence of asthma and bronchospasm during anesthesia in tympanomastoidectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Hosseinzadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of asthma and bronchospasm was observed during induction of anesthesia in patients with chronic suppurative otitis mMedia (CSOM who underwent tympanomastoidectomy. Although several studies have proposed association of allergic diseases with CSOM but no consensus about it has been established. Current study was designed to determine the coincidence of asthma in CSOM patients. In a cross-sectional study, authors investigated medical records of 106 CSOM patients underwent tympanomastoidectomy, aged 15 to 65 years, and 95 controls, which were matched by age and sex. Participants were admitted to Valiasr Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April of 2011 to March of 2013. Required information, such as demographic characteristics and history of allergic rhinitis (AR and asthma were obtained from patients' medical records. The prevalence of AR in the CSOM group was higher than controls' group (19.8% and 15.8%, respectively (P>0.05. Asthma prevalence was significantly higher in patients with CSOM (P=0.03 (OR=7.67, 95% CI:  0.9-62.5. No significant association was found between history of AR and chronic ear infections. However, asthma was significantly more common in CSOM patients. Current study indicates that asthma and risk of bronchospasm need particular attention in patients with CSOM underwent tympanomastoidectomy before and during anesthesia.

  17. Line identification studies using traditional techniques and wavelength coincidence statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, C.R.; Adelman, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Traditional line identification techniques result in the assignment of individual lines to an atomic or ionic species. These methods may be supplemented by wavelength coincidence statistics (WCS). The strength and weakness of these methods are discussed using spectra of a number of normal and peculiar B and A stars that have been studied independently by both methods. The present results support the overall findings of some earlier studies. WCS would be most useful in a first survey, before traditional methods have been applied. WCS can quickly make a global search for all species and in this way may enable identifications of an unexpected spectrum that could easily be omitted entirely from a traditional study. This is illustrated by O I. WCS is a subject to well known weakness of any statistical technique, for example, a predictable number of spurious results are to be expected. The danger of small number statistics are illustrated. WCS is at its best relative to traditional methods in finding a line-rich atomic species that is only weakly present in a complicated stellar spectrum

  18. Intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruonan; Sen, Pratik; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2017-02-20

    An intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter is demonstrated by using strain-aligned polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb certain polarized states of incident light. The photovoltaic-based polarimeter is capable of measuring four Stokes parameters by cascading four semitransparent OPVs in series along the same optical axis. This in-line polarimeter concept potentially ensures high temporal and spatial resolution with higher radiometric efficiency as compared to the existing polarimeter architecture. Two wave plates were incorporated into the system to modulate the S3 Stokes parameter so as to reduce the condition number of the measurement matrix and maximize the measured signal-to-noise ratio. Radiometric calibration was carried out to determine the measurement matrix. The polarimeter presented in this paper demonstrated an average RMS error of 0.84% for reconstructed Stokes vectors after normalized to S0. A theoretical analysis of the minimum condition number of the four-cell OPV design showed that for individually optimized OPV cells, a condition number of 2.4 is possible.

  19. Fluorescence study of some xanthine dyes under stepped laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkova, L.V.; Ketsle, G.A.; Ermagambetov, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Paper is devoted to definition of triplet state in molecules of xanthine dyes and study of intramolecular energy circulation. Stepped two-quanta excitation of dyes has been carried out with help of experimental unit. Intensive luminescence activated by excitation of triplet molecules of dyes within triplet-triplet band with wave length of 1060 nm was registered for eosin. Given luminescence spectrally coincides with fast fluorescence. 5 refs., 6 figs

  20. Method and device for X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagoutz, E.; Palme, C.

    1978-01-01

    In the x-ray fluorescence analyzer the useful signal can be completely separated from the spurious signals, and especially the pulse can be determined. For this purpose the output of the radiation detector is connected with a multichannel pulse height discriminator. The measured signal determined in the pulse heigth discriminator may be indicated by a visual display or processed by a computer (coincidence circuits). (DG) [de

  1. The optimum choice of gate width for neutron coincidence counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S., E-mail: crofts@ornl.gov [Safeguards and Security Technology (SST), Global Nuclear Security Technology Divisions, PO Box 2008, Building 5700, MS-6166, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 (United States); Henzlova, D.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D.K.; Santi, P.A. [Safeguards Science and Technology Group (NEN-1), Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, MS-E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-11-11

    In the measurement field of international nuclear safeguards, passive neutron coincidence counting is used to quantify the spontaneous fission rate of certain special nuclear materials. The shift register autocorrelation analysis method is the most commonly used approach. However, the Feynman-Y technique, which is more commonly applied in reactor noise analysis, provides an alternative means to extract the correlation information from a pulse train. In this work we consider how to select the optimum gate width for each of these two time-correlation analysis techniques. The optimum is considered to be that which gives the lowest fractional precision on the net doublets rate. Our theoretical approach is approximate but is instructional in terms of revealing the key functional dependence. We show that in both cases the same performance figure of merit applies so that common design criteria apply to the neutron detector head. Our prediction is that near optimal results, suitable for most practical applications, can be obtained from both techniques using a common gate width setting. The estimated precision is also comparable in the two cases. The theoretical expressions are tested experimentally using {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission sources measured in two thermal well counters representative of the type in common use by international inspectorates. Fast accidental sampling was the favored method of acquiring the Feynman-Y data. Our experimental study confirmed the basic functional dependences predicted although experimental results when available are preferred. With an appropriate gate setting Feynman-Y analysis provides an alternative to shift register analysis for safeguards applications which is opening up new avenues of data collection and data reduction to explore.

  2. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  3. Coincidence and covariance data acquisition in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. II. Analysis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikosch, Jochen; Patchkovskii, Serguei

    2013-10-01

    We use an analytical theory of noisy Poisson processes, developed in the preceding companion publication, to compare coincidence and covariance measurement approaches in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. For non-unit detection efficiencies, coincidence data acquisition (DAQ) suffers from false coincidences. The rate of false coincidences grows quadratically with the rate of elementary ionization events. To minimize false coincidences for rare event outcomes, very low event rates may hence be required. Coincidence measurements exhibit high tolerance to noise introduced by unstable experimental conditions. Covariance DAQ on the other hand is free of systematic errors as long as stable experimental conditions are maintained. In the presence of noise, all channels in a covariance measurement become correlated. Under favourable conditions, covariance DAQ may allow orders of magnitude reduction in measurement times. Finally, we use experimental data for strong-field ionization of 1,3-butadiene to illustrate how fluctuations in experimental conditions can contaminate a covariance measurement, and how such contamination can be detected.

  4. Description and performance characteristics for the neutron Coincidence Collar for the verification of reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1981-08-01

    An active neutron interrogation method has been developed for the measurement of 235 U content in fresh fuel assemblies. The neutron Coincidence Collar uses neutron interrogation with an AmLi neutron source and coincidence counting the induced fission reaction neutrons from the 235 U. This manual describes the system components, operation, and performance characteristics. Applications of the Coincidence Collar to PWR and BWR types of reactor fuel assemblies are described

  5. It takes two—coincidence coding within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee

    OpenAIRE

    Brill, Martin F.; Meyer, Anneke; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To rapidly process biologically relevant stimuli, sensory systems have developed a broad variety of coding mechanisms like parallel processing and coincidence detection. Parallel processing (e.g., in the visual system), increases both computational capacity and processing speed by simultaneously coding different aspects of the same stimulus. Coincidence detection is an efficient way to integrate information from different sources. Coincidence has been shown to promote associative learning and...

  6. Quantifying radionuclide signatures from a γ–γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Richard; Jackson, Mark J.; Davies, Ashley V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for quantifying gamma coincidence signatures has been developed, and tested in conjunction with a high-efficiency multi-detector system to quickly identify trace amounts of radioactive material. The γ–γ system utilises fully digital electronics and list-mode acquisition to time–stamp each event, allowing coincidence matrices to be easily produced alongside typical ‘singles’ spectra. To quantify the coincidence signatures a software package has been developed to calculate efficiency and cascade summing corrected branching ratios. This utilises ENSDF records as an input, and can be fully automated, allowing the user to quickly and easily create/update a coincidence library that contains all possible γ and conversion electron cascades, associated cascade emission probabilities, and true-coincidence summing corrected γ cascade detection probabilities. It is also fully searchable by energy, nuclide, coincidence pair, γ multiplicity, cascade probability and half-life of the cascade. The probabilities calculated were tested using measurements performed on the γ–γ system, and found to provide accurate results for the nuclides investigated. Given the flexibility of the method, (it only relies on evaluated nuclear data, and accurate efficiency characterisations), the software can now be utilised for a variety of systems, quickly and easily calculating coincidence signature probabilities. - Highlights: • Monte-Carlo based software developed to easily create/update a coincidence signal library for environmental radionuclides. • Coincidence library utilised to accurately quantify gamma coincidence signatures. • All coincidence signature probabilities are corrected for cascade summing, conversion electron emission and pair production. • Key CTBTO relevant radionuclides have been tested to verify the calculated correction factors. • Accurately quantifying coincidence signals during routine analysis will allow dramatically improved detection

  7. Differential coincidence circuit in the 10-10 second region (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zurk, R.; Grenoble-1 Univ., 38; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    A coincidence circuit of low resolution time using the differential coincidence Bay principle is described. It uses three 6BN6 tubes ordered to chronotron structure. Results with Radiotechnique 56 AVP photomultipliers and for 60 Co γ-γ coincidences are 4,6.10 -10 s (full width at half maximum) if the efficiency is ε = 40 per cent and also 7,2.10 -10 s if ε = 85 per cent. (author) [fr

  8. Obesidade e asma: associação ou coincidência? Obesity and asthma: association or coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Fernandes Camilo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A asma e a obesidade estão entre as maiores causas de morbidade na infância e adolescência. A obesidade precoce aumenta as chances de doenças crônicas degenerativas no adulto. Embora a concomitância de ambas as situações clínicas vem sendo demonstrada em vários estudos, os mecanismos intrínsecos dessa associação ainda são pouco conhecidos. Portanto, o objetivo deste artigo foi revisar os principais trabalhos sobre a associação de obesidade e asma e verificar se existe relação de causa e efeito entre ambas. FONTES DOS DADOS: Revisão sistemática baseada em bases de dados indexadas MEDLINE (PubMed e SciELO. Foram revisados artigos originais (transversal, caso-controle e prospectivo e meta-análises publicados no período de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2008. Foram pesquisados estudos divulgados em língua inglesa, espanhola e portuguesa. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Embora existam muitos estudos sobre as crescentes prevalências da asma e da obesidade, poucos estabelecem relações de causa e efeito entre ambas. Os mecanismos fisiopatológicos e os fatores envolvidos nesse processo ainda são pouco conhecidos. CONCLUSÃO: O rigor metodológico em estudos futuros deverá buscar respostas para melhor entender se existe associação entre asma e obesidade, ou se a relação entre ambas as doenças é coincidência.OBJECTIVE: Asthma and obesity are among the major causes of morbidity in childhood and adolescence. Early obesity increases the chances of chronic degenerative diseases in adults. Although the concomitance or both clinical situations are being demonstrated in various studies, the intrinsic mechanisms of this association are still very little known. Therefore, the objective of this article was to review the main studies on the association of obesity and asthma and check if there is a cause-effect relation between them. SOURCES: Systematic review based on indexed data bases MEDLINE (PubMed and SciELO. Original articles

  9. Design and test of 4πβ-γ coincidence measurement device based on DSP technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Herong; Feng Qijie; Leng Jun; Qian Dazhi; Bai Lixin; Zhang Yiyun

    2012-01-01

    The paper illustrates the hardware and software of the 4πβ-γ coincidence measurement device based on DSP technology in detail. In such device, the single-channel analyzer, gate generator, coincidence circuit and scalar in the traditional coincidence measurement device are replaced by the digital coincidence acquirer which is researched and manufactured by ourselves. Doing so, the measurement efficiency will be respectively improved, and the hardware cost will be lowered. The comparison experiment shows that the design of such device is a success. (authors)

  10. Studies on the true coincidence correction in measuring filter samples by gamma spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lian Qi; Chang Yong Fu; Xia Bing

    2002-01-01

    The true coincidence correction in measuring filter samples has been studied by high efficiency HPGe gamma detectors. The true coincidence correction for a specific three excited levels de-excitation case has been analyzed, and the typical analytical expressions of true coincidence correction factors have been given. According to the measured relative efficiency on the detector surface with 8 'single' energy gamma emitters and efficiency of filter samples, the peak and total efficiency surfaces are fitted. The true coincidence correction factors of sup 6 sup 0 Co and sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 Eu calculated by the efficiency surfaces agree well with experimental results

  11. The development and application of a coincidence measurement apparatus with micro-computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Hongshan; Zhou Youpu; Gao Junlin; Qin Deming; Cao Yunzheng; Zhao Shiping

    1987-01-01

    A coincidence measurement apparatus with micro-computer system is developed. Automatic data acquisition and processing are achieved. Results of its application for radioactive measurement are satisfactory

  12. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  13. Fluorescence of irradiated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulis, I.G.; Evdokimenko, V.M.; Lapkovskij, M.P.; Petrov, P.T.; Gulis, I.M.; Markevich, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    A visible fluorescence has been found out in γ-irradiated aqueous of carbohydrates. Two bands have been distinguished in fluorescence spectra of the irradiated solution of dextran: a short-wave band lambdasub(max)=140 nm (where lambda is a wave length) at lambdasub(β)=380 nm and a long-wave band with lambdasub(max)=540 nm at lambdasub(β)=430 nm. A similar form of the spectrum has been obtained for irradiated solutions of starch, amylopectin, lowmolecular glucose. It has been concluded that a macromolecule of polysaccharides includes fluorescent centres. A relation between fluorescence and α-oxiketon groups formed under irradiation has been pointed out

  14. Copper spherical cavity arrays: Fluorescence enhancement in PFO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spada, Edna R., E-mail: edspada@gmail.com [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Valente, Gustavo T.; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Sartorelli, Maria L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, 88040-900, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Guimarães, Francisco E.G.; Faria, Roberto M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    This manuscript addresses the use of a well-ordered antidot copper nanostructure as a active substrate for surface enhancement fluorescence (SEF). The antidot array was produced by electrodeposition and nanosphere lithography and characterized by microscopy technique, its successful application as SEF-active substrates was verified using polyfluorene (PFO) as a probe layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the regularity of the metal surface as well PFO coated process and confocal laser fluorescence microscopy (CLSM) to determine the behavior exhibited by the fluorescent layer due to the existence of the nanostructured surface. No accumulation PFO in the cavities was detected and the more intense emission regions coincides with the position of the cavities and is at about one order of magnitude higher.

  15. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  16. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  17. New technique for determination of long-lived radioisotopes, Iodine-129, using multiparameter coincidence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Oshima, Masumi; Toh, Yosuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kushita, Kosuke; Ueno, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Multiparameter coincidence γ-ray spectrometry based on g-g coincidence is widely used in the field of nuclear structure studies, and has produced many successful results. In this study, feasibility of the method for neutron activation analysis of long lived iodine isotope, 129 I, was investigated. (author)

  18. It Takes Two – Coincidence coding within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Brill

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To rapidly process biologically relevant stimuli, sensory systems have developed a broad variety of coding mechanisms like parallel processing and coincidence detection. Parallel processing (e.g. in the visual system, increases both computational capacity and processing speed by simultaneously coding different aspects of the same stimulus. Coincidence detection is an efficient way to integrateinformation from different sources. Coincidence has been shown to promote associative learning and memory or stimulus feature detection (e.g. in auditory delay lines. Within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee both of these mechanisms might be implemented by uniglomerular projection neurons (PNs that transfer information from the primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobe (AL, to a multimodal integration center, the mushroom body (MB. PNs from anatomically distinct tracts respond to the same stimulus space, but have different physiological properties, characteristics that are prerequisites for parallel processing of different stimulus aspects. However, the PN pathways also display mirror-imaged like anatomical trajectories that resemble neuronal coincidence detectors as known from auditory delay lines. To investigate temporal processing of olfactory information, we recorded PN odor responses simultaneously from both tracts and measured coincident activity of PNs within and between tracts. Our results show that coincidence levels are different within each of the two tracts. Coincidence also occurs between tracts, but to a minor extent compared to coincidence within tracts. Taken together our findings support the relevance of spike timing in coding of olfactory information (temporal code.

  19. It takes two-coincidence coding within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Martin F; Meyer, Anneke; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To rapidly process biologically relevant stimuli, sensory systems have developed a broad variety of coding mechanisms like parallel processing and coincidence detection. Parallel processing (e.g., in the visual system), increases both computational capacity and processing speed by simultaneously coding different aspects of the same stimulus. Coincidence detection is an efficient way to integrate information from different sources. Coincidence has been shown to promote associative learning and memory or stimulus feature detection (e.g., in auditory delay lines). Within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee both of these mechanisms might be implemented by uniglomerular projection neurons (PNs) that transfer information from the primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobe (AL), to a multimodal integration center, the mushroom body (MB). PNs from anatomically distinct tracts respond to the same stimulus space, but have different physiological properties, characteristics that are prerequisites for parallel processing of different stimulus aspects. However, the PN pathways also display mirror-imaged like anatomical trajectories that resemble neuronal coincidence detectors as known from auditory delay lines. To investigate temporal processing of olfactory information, we recorded PN odor responses simultaneously from both tracts and measured coincident activity of PNs within and between tracts. Our results show that coincidence levels are different within each of the two tracts. Coincidence also occurs between tracts, but to a minor extent compared to coincidence within tracts. Taken together our findings support the relevance of spike timing in coding of olfactory information (temporal code).

  20. Coincidence imaging of polyatomic molecules via laser-induced Coulomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, J; Corkum, P B; Bhardwaj, V R; Lee, Kevin F; Rayner, D M

    2008-01-01

    We extend laser-induced Coulomb explosion imaging to retrieve the structure of the five-atom dichloromethane (CH 2 Cl 2 ) molecule by developing coincidence imaging and geometry optimization techniques. By detecting all five atoms in coincidence, we show that, from the measured velocity vectors, the geometry of the molecules can be reconstructed.

  1. Coincidence and noncoincidence counting (81Rb and 43K): a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Duken, H.; Tillmanns, H.; Bing, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The accuracy of imaging and resolution obtained with 81 Rb and 43 K using coincidence and noncoincidence counting was compared. Phantoms and isolated infarcted dog hearts were used. The results clearly show the superiority of coincidence counting with a resolution of 0.5 cm. Noncoincidence counting failed to reveal even sizable defects in the radioactive source. (U.S.)

  2. A new apparatus for electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Pruemper, G.; Liu, X.-J.; Lischke, T.; Ueda, K.; Tamenori, Y.; Oura, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Suzuki, I.H.; Saito, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new experimental apparatus for the electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy in order to obtain the angular distributions of vibration-resolved photoelectrons from molecules fixed in space. The apparatus consists of a four-stage molecular supersonic jet and a spectrometer analyzing three-dimensional momenta of fragment ions and electrons in coincidence

  3. Dissociative photoionization of the NO molecule studied by photoelectron-photon coincidence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivimaeki, A.; Alvarez-Ruiz, J.; Coreno, M.; Simone, M. de; Moise, A.; Partanen, L.; Richter, R.; Stankiewicz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-energy photoelectron-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon coincidences have been measured using synchrotron radiation excitation in the inner-valence region of the nitric oxide molecule. The capabilities of the coincidence set-up were demonstrated by detecting the 2s -1 → 2p -1 radiative transitions in coincidence with the 2s photoelectron emission in Ne. In NO, the observed coincidence events are attributed to dissociative photoionization with excitation, whereby photoelectron emission is followed by fragmentation of excited NO + ions into O + + N* or N + + O* and VUV emission from an excited neutral fragment. The highest coincidence rate occurs with the opening of ionization channels which are due to correlation satellites of the 3σ photoionization. The decay time of VUV photon emission was also measured, implying that specific excited states of N atoms contribute significantly to observed VUV emission.

  4. Differential coincidence circuit in the 10{sup -10} second region (1960); Circuit de coincidence differentiel dans le domaine de 10{sup -10} seconde (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zurk, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. de Physique Nucleaire, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France); [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    A coincidence circuit of low resolution time using the differential coincidence Bay principle is described. It uses three 6BN6 tubes ordered to chronotron structure. Results with Radiotechnique 56 AVP photomultipliers and for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences are 4,6.10{sup -10} s (full width at half maximum) if the efficiency is {epsilon} = 40 per cent and also 7,2.10{sup -10} s if {epsilon} = 85 per cent. (author) [French] Un circuit de coincidence differentiel du type de Bay, utilise en selecteur en temps a canal mobile, a ete construit pour la mesure des periodes {gamma} et des periodes d'annihilation du positon dans differents materiaux. Il comporte trois tubes 6BN6 disposes en structure chronotron. On a utilise les nouveaux photomultiplicateurs 56 AVP avec scintillateur plastique. Avec les coincidences {gamma}-{gamma} du {sup 60}Co, on obtient 2T 4,6.10{sup -10} s avec une efficacite de 40 pour cent et 2T = 7,2.10{sup -10} s avec une efficacite de 85 pour cent. (auteur)

  5. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  6. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Evaluation of accidental coincidences for time-differential Moessbauer-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alflen, M.; Meyer, W.

    1995-01-01

    The accidental coincidences of a measuring system based on time-to-amplitude conversion are considered in some detail for the case of low starting and high stopping rates. Two types of accidental coincidences are distinguished, those carrying time information and those without time information. Neglecting any deadtime effects of the detectors, analytical expressions for the calculation of the time distribution of the random coincidences are evaluated. The analytical expressions have been confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations. The procedure is applied to time-differential Moessbauer spectroscopy in order to extract the time spectra of true coincidences. The measured spectrum in a time channel turns out to be a superposition of the true spectrum (true coincidences), a time integral spectrum (random coincidences), and a weighted superposition of true spectra of other time channels (random but time carrying information). A measurement with a single line 57 Co/Rh-source and single line K[Fe(CN) 6 ].3H 2 O-absorber with stopping rates of 1 MBq shows agreement between the theoretical time-filtered spectra and the corrected measured spectra of true coincidences. ((orig.))

  9. Tight bounds for the Pearle-Braunstein-Caves chained inequality without the fair-coincidence assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogenfors, Jonathan; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2017-08-01

    In any Bell test, loopholes can cause issues in the interpretation of the results, since an apparent violation of the inequality may not correspond to a violation of local realism. An important example is the coincidence-time loophole that arises when detector settings might influence the time when detection will occur. This effect can be observed in many experiments where measurement outcomes are to be compared between remote stations because the interpretation of an ostensible Bell violation strongly depends on the method used to decide coincidence. The coincidence-time loophole has previously been studied for the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt and Clauser-Horne inequalities, but recent experiments have shown the need for a generalization. Here, we study the generalized "chained" inequality by Pearle, Braunstein, and Caves (PBC) with N ≥2 settings per observer. This inequality has applications in, for instance, quantum key distribution where it has been used to reestablish security. In this paper we give the minimum coincidence probability for the PBC inequality for all N ≥2 and show that this bound is tight for a violation free of the fair-coincidence assumption. Thus, if an experiment has a coincidence probability exceeding the critical value derived here, the coincidence-time loophole is eliminated.

  10. Control of photon correlations in type II parametric down-conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R; Joseph, A T; Pike, E R; Sarkar, Sarben

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe theoretically quantum control of temporal correlations of entangled photons produced by collinear type II spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We examine the effect of spectral phase modulation of the signal or idler photons arriving at a 50/50 beam splitter on the temporal shape of the entangled-photon wavepacket. The coincidence count rate is calculated analytically for photon pairs in terms of the modulation depth applied to either the signal or idler beam with a spectral phase filter. It is found that the two-photon coincidence rate can be controlled by varying the modulation depth of the spectral filter

  11. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  12. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  13. Instrument limitation of accuracy of absolute measurement by method of 4π beta-gamma coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plkh, J.

    1979-01-01

    Accuracy is discussed of determination of coincidence channels dead-time in 4π β-γ installation and determination of coincidence resolution time as well as conditions for determination and accuracy of these parameters. Conditions are considered under which these parameters have not been determined and there is wrong performance of the installation. Special attention was paid to the electronic circuit of the γ-channel. It has been shown that as a result of wrong performance of electronic circuit a new type of wrong coincidence appeared [ru

  14. Testing the Cosmic Coincidence Problem and the Nature of Dark Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, Neal; Abazajian, Kevork; Jenkins, Elizabeth; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2001-01-01

    Dark energy models which alter the relative scaling behavior of dark energy and matter could provide a natural solution to the cosmic coincidence problem -- why the densities of dark energy and dark matter are comparable today. A generalized class of dark energy models is introduced which allows noncanonical scaling of the ratio of dark matter and dark energy with the Robertson-Walker scale factor a(t) . We show that determining whether there is a coincidence problem, and the extent of cosmic coincidence, can be addressed by several forthcoming experiments

  15. The IAEA neutron coincidence counting (INCC) and the DEMING least-squares fitting programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.; Rinard, P.M.; Wenz, T.R.; Lewis, W.; Pham, P.; Ridder, P. de

    1998-01-01

    Two computer programs are described: (1) the INCC (IAEA or International Neutron Coincidence Counting) program and (2) the DEMING curve-fitting program. The INCC program is an IAEA version of the Los Alamos NCC (Neutron Coincidence Counting) code. The DEMING program is an upgrade of earlier Windows reg-sign and DOS codes with the same name. The versions described are INCC 3.00 and DEMING 1.11. The INCC and DEMING codes provide inspectors with the software support needed to perform calibration and verification measurements with all of the neutron coincidence counting systems used in IAEA inspections for the nondestructive assay of plutonium and uranium

  16. Angular shaping of fluorescence from synthetic opal-based photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, Vitalii; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Dolgov, Leonid; Kiisk, Valter; Sildos, Ilmo; Loot, Ardi; Gorelik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spectral, angular, and temporal distributions of fluorescence as well as specular reflection were investigated for silica-based artificial opals. Periodic arrangement of nanosized silica globules in the opal causes a specific dip in the defect-related fluorescence spectra and a peak in the reflectance spectrum. The spectral position of the dip coincides with the photonic stop band. The latter is dependent on the size of silica globules and the angle of observation. The spectral shape and intensity of defect-related fluorescence can be controlled by variation of detection angle. Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip. Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed. Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

  17. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescence Image Segmentation by using Digitally Reconstructed Fluorescence Images

    OpenAIRE

    Blumer, Clemens; Vivien, Cyprien; Oertner, Thomas G; Vetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In biological experiments fluorescence imaging is used to image living and stimulated neurons. But the analysis of fluorescence images is a difficult task. It is not possible to conclude the shape of an object from fluorescence images alone. Therefore, it is not feasible to get good manual segmented nor ground truth data from fluorescence images. Supervised learning approaches are not possible without training data. To overcome this issues we propose to synthesize fluorescence images and call...

  19. Comparison of satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a in a temperate reservoir using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense coincident surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    We analyzed 10 established and 4 new satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in a temperate reservoir in southwest Ohio using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense water truth collected within one hour of image acquisition to develop si...

  20. Reproduction of the coincidence effect in gamma ray spectrometry by using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. H.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Scintillation detector such as NaI(TI), or semiconductor detector, such as HPGe, are used for Measurement/Assessment of the radiation type and radiation activity. The measured energy spectrum are used for measuring the radiation type and activity. Corrections for true coincidence due to emit more than 2 photons at the same time and random coincidence due to measuring system when increasing of the radiation intensity. For accurate assessment, measurement with adequate measure system is performed, and corrections for coincidence are performed in the hardware aspect and software aspect. In general, there are limitations or difficulties in measurement of radiation assessment, computational simulation is instead used. In simulation, it has much advantages than measurement in technically, timely, and financially, it is widely used instead of measurement. In this study, the method to reproduce of the coincidence effect was proposed by using monte carlo method

  1. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M.; Maruyama, Pietro K.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographicall...

  2. On the extension of (e,2e) theory to coincidence studies of ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godunov, A.L.; Kampp, Marco; Sulik, B.; Walters, H.R.J.; Whelan, Colm T.

    2007-01-01

    The extension of (e,2e) theory to the coincidence studies of ion-atom collisions is considered. The simultaneous ionization of projectile and target is discussed and results are presented for transfer ionization

  3. Angular correlations of coincident electron-positron pairs in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, O.

    1988-10-01

    In the present thesis angular correlations of coincident electron-positron pairsnin heavy ion collisions are studied. It is meant as a contribution to the answer of fundamental questions in the quantum electrodynamics of strong fields. (orig./HSI) [de

  4. A data acquisition system for coincidence imaging using a conventional dual head gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, T. K.; Miyaoka, R. S.; Jansen, F.; Kaplan, M. S.

    1997-06-01

    A low cost data acquisition system (DAS) was developed to acquire coincidence data from an unmodified General Electric Maxxus dual head scintillation camera. A high impedance pick-off circuit provides position and energy signals to the DAS without interfering with normal camera operation. The signals are pulse-clipped to reduce pileup effects. Coincidence is determined with fast timing signals derived from constant fraction discriminators. A charge-integrating FERA 16 channel ADC feeds position and energy data to two CAMAC FERA memories operated as ping-pong buffers. A Macintosh PowerPC running Labview controls the system and reads the CAMAC memories. A CAMAC 12-channel scaler records singles and coincidence rate data. The system dead-time is approximately 10% at a coincidence rate of 4.0 kHz.

  5. A data acquisition system for coincidence imaging using a conventional dual head gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, T.K.; Miyaoka, R.S.; Kaplan, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    A low cost data acquisition system (DAS) was developed to acquire coincidence data from an unmodified General Electric Maxxus dual head scintillation camera. A high impedance pick-off circuit provides position and energy signals to the DAS without interfering with normal camera operation. The signals are pulse-clipped to reduce pileup effects. Coincidence is determined with fast timing signals derived from constant fraction discriminators. A charge-integrating FERA 16 channel ADC feeds position and energy data to two CAMAC FERA memories operated as ping-pong buffers. A Macintosh PowerPC running Labview controls the system and reads the CAMAC memories. A CAMAC 12-channel scaler records singles and coincidence rate data. The system dead-time is approximately 10% at a coincidence rate of 4.0 kHz

  6. Calibration of nuclides by gamma-gamma sum peak coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of extending sum peak coincidence counting to the direct calibration of gamma-ray emitters having particular decay schemes was investigated, also checkings of the measurement accuracy, by comparing with more precise beta-gamma coincidence counting have been performed. New theoretical studies and experiments were developed, demonstrating the reliability of the procedure. Uncertainties of less than one percent were obtained when certain radioactive sources were measured. The application of the procedure to 60 Co, 22 Na, 47 Ca and 148 Pm was studied. Theoretical bases of sum peak coincidence counting were set in order to extend it as an alternative method for absolute activity determination. In this respect, theoretical studies were performed for positive and negative beta decay, and electron capture, either accompanied or unaccompanied by coincident gamma rays. They include decay schemes containing up to three daughter nuclide excited levels, for different geometrical configurations. Equations are proposed for a possible generalization of the procedure. (M.E.L.) [es

  7. A method for measuring the energy spectrum of coincidence events in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Stout, David B; Thompson, Christopher J

    2010-01-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) system energy response is typically characterized in singles detection mode, yet there are situations in which the energy spectrum of coincidence events might be different than the spectrum measured in singles mode. Examples include imaging with isotopes that emit a prompt gamma in coincidence with a positron emission, imaging with low activity in a LSO/LYSO-based cameras, in which the intrinsic activity is significant, and in high scatter situations where the two 511 keV photons have different scattering probabilities (i.e. off-center line source). The ability to accurately measure the energy spectrum of coincidence events could be used for validating simulation models, optimizing energy discriminator levels and examining scatter models and corrections. For many PET systems operating in coincidence mode, the only method available for estimating the energy spectrum is to step the lower and upper level discriminators (LLD and ULD). Simple measurement techniques such as using a narrow sliding energy window or stepping only the LLD will not yield a spectrum of coincidence events that is accurate for cases where there are different energy components contributing to the spectrum. In this work we propose a new method of measuring the energy spectrum of coincidence events in PET based on a linear combination of two sets of coincident count measurements: one made by stepping the LLD and one made by stepping the ULD. The method was tested using both Monte Carlo simulations of a Siemens microPET R4 camera and measured data acquired on a Siemens Inveon PET camera. The results show that our energy spectrum calculation method accurately measures the coincident energy spectra for cases including the beta/gamma spectrum of the (176)Lu intrinsic activity present in the LSO scintillator crystals, a (68)Ge source and an (124)I source (in which there are prompt gamma-rays emitted together with the positron).

  8. Coincidence and covariance data acquisition in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. I. Formal theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikosch, Jochen; Patchkovskii, Serguei

    2013-10-01

    We derive a formal theory of noisy Poisson processes with multiple outcomes. We obtain simple, compact expressions for the probability distribution function of arbitrarily complex composite events and its moments. We illustrate the utility of the theory by analyzing properties of coincidence and covariance photoelectron-photoion detection involving single-ionization events. The results and techniques introduced in this work are directly applicable to more general coincidence and covariance experiments, including multiple ionization and multiple-ion fragmentation pathways.

  9. Multidimensional coincidence point results for generalized $(\\psi ,\\theta ,\\varphi$-contraction on ordered metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Deshpande

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research article is to establish some coincidence point theorem for $g$-non-decreasing mappings under generalized $(\\psi ,\\theta ,\\varphi $-contraction on a partially ordered metric space. Furthermore, we show how multidimensional results can be seen as a simple consequences of our unidimensional coincidence point theorem. Our results modify, improve, sharpen, enrich and generalize various known results.

  10. Memory Effects Study of Measuring Radioactive Xenon Isotopes With β-γ Coincidence Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Wang Jun; Li Qi; Zhao Yungang; Fan Yuanqing; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of the key important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). This paper describes noble gases memory effects of β-γ coincidence detector. Xenon memory effects were measured and its influence on detector's minimum detectable activity (MDA) was evaluated. The methods of reducing xenon memory effects were studied. In conclusion, aluminium coated plastic scintillator and YAP scintillator can remarkably decrease xenon memory effects. (authors)

  11. Analysis of femtosecond pump-probe photoelectron-photoion coincidence measurements applying Bayesian probability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumetshofer, M.; Heim, P.; Thaler, B.; Ernst, W. E.; Koch, M.; von der Linden, W.

    2018-06-01

    Ultrafast dynamical processes in photoexcited molecules can be observed with pump-probe measurements, in which information about the dynamics is obtained from the transient signal associated with the excited state. Background signals provoked by pump and/or probe pulses alone often obscure these excited-state signals. Simple subtraction of pump-only and/or probe-only measurements from the pump-probe measurement, as commonly applied, results in a degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio and, in the case of coincidence detection, the danger of overrated background subtraction. Coincidence measurements additionally suffer from false coincidences, requiring long data-acquisition times to keep erroneous signals at an acceptable level. Here we present a probabilistic approach based on Bayesian probability theory that overcomes these problems. For a pump-probe experiment with photoelectron-photoion coincidence detection, we reconstruct the interesting excited-state spectrum from pump-probe and pump-only measurements. This approach allows us to treat background and false coincidences consistently and on the same footing. We demonstrate that the Bayesian formalism has the following advantages over simple signal subtraction: (i) the signal-to-noise ratio is significantly increased, (ii) the pump-only contribution is not overestimated, (iii) false coincidences are excluded, (iv) prior knowledge, such as positivity, is consistently incorporated, (v) confidence intervals are provided for the reconstructed spectrum, and (vi) it is applicable to any experimental situation and noise statistics. Most importantly, by accounting for false coincidences, the Bayesian approach allows us to run experiments at higher ionization rates, resulting in a significant reduction of data acquisition times. The probabilistic approach is thoroughly scrutinized by challenging mock data. The application to pump-probe coincidence measurements on acetone molecules enables quantitative interpretations

  12. Neutron coincidence counter for MOX fuel pins in storage trays: users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowder, L.; Menlove, H.

    1982-08-01

    The neutron coincidence counter for measurement of mixed-oxide fuel pins in storage trays is described. The special detector head has been designed so that the detectors, high-voltage junction boxes, and electronics are interchangeable with those of the high-level neutron coincidence counter system. This manual describes the system components and the operation and maintenance of the counter. The counter was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for in-plant inspection applications by the International Atomic Energy Agency

  13. Subtraction of random coincidences in γ-ray spectroscopy: A new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Ghugre, S.S.; Basu, S.K.; Garg, U.; Ray, S.; Sinha, A.K.; Zhu, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new analytical method for estimation and subsequent subtraction of random coincidences has been developed. It utilizes the knowledge of the counts in the main diagonal of a background-subtracted symmetric data set for the estimation of the events originating from random coincidences. This procedure has been successfully applied to several data sets. It could be a valuable tool for low-fold data sets, especially for low-cross-section events

  14. Gamma--gamma directional correlations and coincidence studies in /sup 154/Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, J B; Gupta, S L; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, Tenn. (USA). Dept. of Physics; Delhi Univ. (India). Ramjas Coll.)

    1977-06-01

    The intensities, placements and E2/M1 mixing ratios of transitions in the decay of /sup 154/Eu have been carefully studied to provide accurate data for microscopic calculations. Coincidence relationships in thhe decay of /sup 154/Eu have been studied extensively with a multiparameter ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidence system with two large volume Ge(Li) detectors. Spectra in coincidence with twenty energy gates were analyzed. Twenty-nine new coincidence relationships were established and confirmed most, but not all, of several levels previously assigned by energy fits only. From an analysis of coincidence spectra and singles spectra with a 18% efficiency Ge(Li) detector new information on the gamma-ray intensities were obtained. Precise values of the E2/M1 mixing ratios of transitions from the gamma- and beta-vibrational bands to the g.s. band have been determined from ..gamma..-..gamma.. directional correlation measurements with a NaI(Tl)-Ge(Li) detector coincidence system. Mixing ratios were obtained for a number of other transitions including those from KPI = 0/sup -/ and 2+ bands from direct and skipped cascade correlations.

  15. Low level radioactivity measurements with phoswich detectors using coincident techniques and digital pulse processing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, R; de Celis, B; del Canto, V; Lumbreras, J M; de Celis Alonso, B; Martín-Martín, A; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J L

    2008-10-01

    A new system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels of fission products and actinides using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for alpha/beta/gamma-ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The phoswich can be used in a coincident mode by identifying the composed signal produced by the simultaneous detection of alpha/beta particles and X-rays/gamma particles. The technique of coincidences with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT) which established the necessity of monitoring low levels of gaseous fission products produced by underground nuclear explosions. With the device proposed here it is possible to identify the coincidence events and determine the energy and type of coincident particles. The sensitivity of the system has been improved by employing liquid scintillators and a high resolution low energy germanium detector. In this case it is possible to identify simultaneously by alpha/gamma coincidence transuranic nuclides present in environmental samples without necessity of performing radiochemical separation. The minimum detectable activity was estimated to be 0.01 Bq kg(-1) for 0.1 kg of soil and 1000 min counting.

  16. Low level radioactivity measurements with phoswich detectors using coincident techniques and digital pulse processing analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, R. de la; Celis, B. de; Canto, V. del; Lumbreras, J.M.; Celis, Alonso B. de; Martin-Martin, A.; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    A new system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels of fission products and actinides using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for α/β/γ-ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The phoswich can be used in a coincident mode by identifying the composed signal produced by the simultaneous detection of α/β particles and X-rays/γ particles. The technique of coincidences with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT) which established the necessity of monitoring low levels of gaseous fission products produced by underground nuclear explosions. With the device proposed here it is possible to identify the coincidence events and determine the energy and type of coincident particles. The sensitivity of the system has been improved by employing liquid scintillators and a high resolution low energy germanium detector. In this case it is possible to identify simultaneously by α/γ coincidence transuranic nuclides present in environmental samples without necessity of performing radiochemical separation. The minimum detectable activity was estimated to be 0.01 Bq kg -1 for 0.1 kg of soil and 1000 min counting

  17. Gamma-gamma directional correlations and coincidence studies in 154Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, J.B.; Gupta, S.L.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Delhi Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The intensities, placements and E2/M1 mixing ratios of transitions in the decay of 154 Eu have been carefully studied to provide accurate data for microscopic calculations. Coincidence relationships in thhe decay of 154 Eu have been studied extensively with a multiparameter γ-γ coincidence system with two large volume Ge(Li) detectors. Spectra in coincidence with twenty energy gates were analyzed. Twenty-nine new coincidence relationships were established and confirmed most, but not all, of several levels previously assigned by energy fits only. From an analysis of coincidence spectra and singles spectra with a 18% efficiency Ge(Li) detector new information on the gamma-ray intensities were obtained. Precise values of the E2/M1 mixing ratios of transitions from the gamma- and beta-vibrational bands to the g.s. band have been determined from γ-γ directional correlation measurements with a NaI(Tl)-Ge(Li) detector coincidence system. Mixing ratios were obtained for a number of other transitions including those from KPI = 0 - and 2+ bands from direct and skipped cascade correlations. (orig.) [de

  18. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  19. Development of an analysis methodology applied to 4πβ-γ software coincidence data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancaccio, Franco; Dias, Mauro da Silva; Toledo, Fabio de

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes the new software methodology under development at the IPEN Nuclear Metrology Laboratory for radionuclide standardizations with 4πβ-γ coincidence technique. The software includes the Coincidence Graphic User Interface (GUI) and the Coincidence Analysis Program. The first results for a 60 Co sample measurement are discussed and compared to the results obtained with two different conventional coincidence systems. (author)

  20. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  1. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  2. Determination of trace elements in scallop and fish otolith by instrumental neutron activation analysis using anti-coincidence and coincidence counting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in scallop reference material and fish otolith certified reference materials prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Nine aliquots of scallop sample (ca. 252∼507 mg) and five aliquots of fish otolith sample (ca. 502 ∼ 988 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence γ-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI (Tl) detector to determine as many trace elements as possible with high sensitivity. The concentrations of 34 elements of the NIES No.15 scallop reference material and 16 elements of the NIES No.22 fish otolith CRM were determined. Using the coincidence counting method to determine Se, Ba and Hf, the lower limit of the determination was improved by 2 times compared with the conventional counting method. (author)

  3. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate

  4. Recovering the triple coincidence of non-pure positron emitters in preclinical PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Chen, Szu-Yu; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Non-pure positron emitters, with their long half-lives, allow for the tracing of slow biochemical processes which cannot be adequately examined by the commonly used short-lived positron emitters. Most of these isotopes emit high-energy cascade gamma rays in addition to positron decay that can be detected and create a triple coincidence with annihilation photons. Triple coincidence is discarded in most scanners, however, the majority of the triple coincidence contains true photon pairs that can be recovered. In this study, we propose a strategy for recovering triple coincidence events to raise the sensitivity of PET imaging for non-pure positron emitters. To identify the true line of response (LOR) from a triple coincidence, a framework utilizing geometrical, energy and temporal information is proposed. The geometrical criterion is based on the assumption that the LOR with the largest radial offset among the three sub pairs of triple coincidences is least likely to be a true LOR. Then, a confidence time window is used to test the valid LOR among those within triple coincidence. Finally, a likelihood ratio discriminant rule based on the energy probability density distribution of cascade and annihilation gammas is established to identify the true LOR. An Inveon preclinical PET scanner was modeled with GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo software. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of identification fraction, noise equivalent count rates (NECR), and image quality on various phantoms. With the inclusion of triple coincidence events using the proposed method, the NECR was found to increase from 11% to 26% and 19% to 29% for I-124 and Br-76, respectively, when 7.4-185 MBq of activity was used. Compared to the reconstructed images using double coincidence, this technique increased the SNR by 5.1-7.3% for I-124 and 9.3-10.3% for Br-76 within the activity range of 9.25-74 MBq, without compromising the spatial resolution or

  5. Passive neutron coincidence counting with plastic scintillators for the characterization of radioactive waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyglun, C.; Simony, B.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Saurel, N.; Colas, S. [CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Collot, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Grenoble Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of radioactive material is essential in the fields of safeguards, criticality control of nuclear processes, dismantling of nuclear facilities and components, or radioactive waste characterization. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (LMN) of CEA is involved in the development of time-correlated neutron detection techniques using plastic scintillators. Usually, 3He proportional counters are used for passive neutron coincidence counting owing to their high thermal neutron capture efficiency and gamma insensitivity. However, the global {sup 3}He shortage in the past few years has made these detectors extremely expensive. In addition, contrary to {sup 3}He counters for which a few tens of microseconds are needed to thermalize fast neutrons, in view to maximize the {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H capture cross section, plastic scintillators are based on elastic scattering and therefore the light signal is formed within a few nanoseconds, correlated pulses being detected within a few dozen- or hundred nanoseconds. This time span reflects fission particles time of flight, which allows reducing accordingly the duration of the coincidence gate and thus the rate of random coincidences, which may totally blind fission coincidences when using {sup 3}He counters in case of a high (α,n) reaction rate. However, plastic scintillators are very sensitive to gamma rays, requiring the use of a thick metallic shield to reduce the corresponding background. Cross talk between detectors is also a major issue, which consists on the detection of one particle by several detectors due to elastic or inelastic scattering, leading to true but undesired coincidences. Data analysis algorithms are tested to minimize cross-talk in simultaneously activated detectors. The distinction between useful fission coincidences and the correlated background due to cross-talk, (α,n) and induced (n,2n) or (n,n'γ) reactions, is achieved by measuring 3-fold coincidences. The performances of a

  6. Determination of true coincidence correction factors using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chionis Dionysios A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this work is the numerical calculation of the true coincidence correction factors by means of Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. For this purpose, the Monte Carlo computer code PENELOPE was used and the main program PENMAIN was properly modified in order to include the effect of the true coincidence phenomenon. The modified main program that takes into consideration the true coincidence phenomenon was used for the full energy peak efficiency determination of an XtRa Ge detector with relative efficiency 104% and the results obtained for the 1173 keV and 1332 keV photons of 60Co were found consistent with respective experimental ones. The true coincidence correction factors were calculated as the ratio of the full energy peak efficiencies was determined from the original main program PENMAIN and the modified main program PENMAIN. The developed technique was applied for 57Co, 88Y, and 134Cs and for two source-to-detector geometries. The results obtained were compared with true coincidence correction factors calculated from the "TrueCoinc" program and the relative bias was found to be less than 2%, 4%, and 8% for 57Co, 88Y, and 134Cs, respectively.

  7. Uranium mass and neutron multiplication factor estimates from time-correlation coincidence counts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wenxiong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Center for Strategic Studies, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, Jiansheng [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhu, Jianyu [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Center for Strategic Studies, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-10-11

    Time-correlation coincidence counts of neutrons are an important means to measure attributes of nuclear material. The main deficiency in the analysis is that an attribute of an unknown component can only be assessed by comparing it with similar known components. There is a lack of a universal method of measurement suitable for the different attributes of the components. This paper presents a new method that uses universal relations to estimate the mass and neutron multiplication factor of any uranium component with known enrichment. Based on numerical simulations and analyses of 64 highly enriched uranium components with different thicknesses and average radii, the relations between mass, multiplication and coincidence spectral features have been obtained by linear regression analysis. To examine the validity of the method in estimating the mass of uranium components with different sizes, shapes, enrichment, and shielding, the features of time-correlation coincidence-count spectra for other objects with similar attributes are simulated. Most of the masses and multiplications for these objects could also be derived by the formulation. Experimental measurements of highly enriched uranium castings have also been used to verify the formulation. The results show that for a well-designed time-dependent coincidence-count measuring system of a uranium attribute, there are a set of relations dependent on the uranium enrichment by which the mass and multiplication of the measured uranium components of any shape and size can be estimated from the features of the source-detector coincidence-count spectrum.

  8. Study on the eγ coincidences in the 169Lu decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batsev, S.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, N.A.; Budzyak, A.; Kuznetsov, V.V.; Usmanov, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    The 169 Lu→ 169 Yb decay scheme was analyzed on the basis of measurements of eγ coincidence. The 169 Lu sources were obtained by irradiating a tantalum target by 660 MeV protons. The eγ-coincidence spectra were measured by an ironless β-spectrometer with a toroidal magnetic field and a detector. The γ-ray and eγ-coincidence spectra were processed by a computer. The results of processing the 169 Lu coincidence spectra are tabulated. No excited states of 169 Yb not confirmed by γγ and eγ coincidences (except for the head level of the 3/2 + (651) 720 keV band) remain in the 169 Lu decay scheme proposed. Weak transitions with the total intensity of no more than 3.3% per a 169 Lu decay have remained unarranged, they should discharge weakly excited levels of 169 Yb. Probabilities of the 169 Yb level population per a 169 Lu decay and the corresponding values of probabilities of transitions in them are presented. As a whole, the 169 Lu decay scheme involves 60 levels, 31 states of them are new

  9. Monitoring by fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Gifford, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluorimetric detector is described in which the fluorescence excitation source may be 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 147 Pm or 63 Ni. Such a detector can be adapted for use with flowing liquid systems especially liquid chromatography systems. (U.K.)

  10. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  11. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    not be cited for purposes of advertisement. DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: Destroy this document when no longer needed. Do not return to the... recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  12. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  13. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  14. A theoretical basis for the analysis of multiversion software subject to coincident errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.; Lee, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of redundant software techniques (known as fault-tolerant software) is an understanding of the impact of multiple joint occurrences of errors, referred to here as coincident errors. A theoretical basis for the study of redundant software is developed which: (1) provides a probabilistic framework for empirically evaluating the effectiveness of a general multiversion strategy when component versions are subject to coincident errors, and (2) permits an analytical study of the effects of these errors. An intensity function, called the intensity of coincident errors, has a central role in this analysis. This function describes the propensity of programmers to introduce design faults in such a way that software components fail together when executing in the application environment. A condition under which a multiversion system is a better strategy than relying on a single version is given.

  15. Moisture corrections in neutron coincidence counting of PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.

    1987-01-01

    Passive neutron coincidence counting is capable of 1% assay accuracy for pure, well-characterized PuO 2 samples that contain plutonium masses from a few tens of grams to several kilograms. Moisture in the sample can significantly bias the assay high by changing the (α,n) neutron production, the sample multiplication, and the detection efficiency. Monte Carlo calculations and an analytical model of coincidence counting have been used to quantify the individual and cumulative effects of moisture biases for two PuO 2 sample sizes and a range of moisture levels from 0 to 9 wt %. Results of the calculations suggest a simple correction procedure for moisture bias that is effective from 0 to 3 wt % H 2 O. The procedure requires that the moisture level in the sample be known before the coincidence measurement

  16. Standardization of 241Am by digital coincidence counting, liquid scintillation counting and defined solid angle counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balpardo, C.; Capoulat, M.E.; Rodrigues, D.; Arenillas, P.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclide 241 Am decays by alpha emission to 237 Np. Most of the decays (84.6%) populate the excited level of 237 Np with energy of 59.54 keV. Digital coincidence counting was applied to standardize a solution of 241 Am by alpha-gamma coincidence counting with efficiency extrapolation. Electronic discrimination was implemented with a pressurized proportional counter and the results were compared with two other independent techniques: Liquid scintillation counting using the logical sum of double coincidences in a TDCR array and defined solid angle counting taking into account activity inhomogeneity in the active deposit. The results show consistency between the three methods within a limit of a 0.3%. An ampoule of this solution will be sent to the International Reference System (SIR) during 2009. Uncertainties were analysed and compared in detail for the three applied methods.

  17. Application of GESPECOR software for the calculation of coincidence summing effects in special cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Dirk; Sima, Octavian

    2004-01-01

    In this work, coincidence summing correction factors have been measured for 133 Ba, 152 Eu and 88 Y point sources with a 50% relative efficiency p-type detector and a 25% relative efficiency n-type detector in two close-to-detector measurement geometries. The experimental data for 133 Ba and 152 Eu and the results obtained with the GESPECOR software reveal a complex structure of the conventional dead layer of the p-type detector. The high value of the coincidence summing correction factor for the 511 keV peak of 88 Y, in agreement with the values computed by GESPECOR, in this case cautions against the application of the semiempirical method for evaluating coincidence summing effects

  18. Instrumentation and data handling. I. Positron coincidence imaging with the TOKIM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    In addition to the conventional singles mode of operation, the TOKIM system's two Anger-type gamma cameras may be used in the (stationary, 180 0 opposition) coincidence mode, making it possible to achieve tomographic imaging with three-dimensional spatial resolution and high detection sensitivity, utilizing β + emitting radioisotopes. This method, however, suffers from certain inherent limitations. Our efforts during this past year to improve upon the TOKIM imaging capability in the β + mode have been directed towards the reduction of the limitations by the following means: the removal of out of focal plane image contributions through a computerized iterative correction procedure, coupled with coincidence aperture limitation to achieve uniform sensitivity across a reasonable portion of the detector pair diameter, and the application of Muehllehner's graded filter approach to the TOKIM to increase the ratio of usable coincidence events versus singles count rate

  19. System for ν-ν-coincidence spectra processing with data compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byalko, A.A.; Volkov, N.G.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.M.; Churakov, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Calculational algorithm and program for analyzing gamma-gamma coincidence spectra based on using the method of expansion in singular values for data compression (the SVD method) are described. Results of the testing of the program during the processing of coincidence spectrum for the low-energy region of transitions corresponding to decay 164 Lu → 164 Yb are given. The program is written in the FORTRAN language and is realized by the ES-1040 computer. The counting time constitutes about 20 min. It is concluded that the use of the SVD method permits to correct the data at the expense of distortion filtration caused with statistical deviations and random interferences, at that not distorting the initial data. The data compressed correspond more to theoretical suggestions of forms of semiconductor detector lines and two-dimensional line in the coincidence spectrum

  20. A flexible VME-based multiparametric apparatus for coincidence spectroscopy and investigation of parameters of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, J.

    2000-01-01

    The methodology of Coincidence Instrumental Activation Analysis (CIAA) based on a three-parameter gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometer with two high-purity Ge detectors is presented. A flexible coincidence system was built on standard NIM spectrometric modules connected to a VME or CAMAC data acquisition system. The detailed setup of the system optimized for the maximum energy resolution, maximum data throughput (dead time correction, pile-up rejection) and maximum flexibility is described. The use of different data acquisition platforms is discussed (VME bus with several different controllers, CAMAC bus). The software developed for reading and basic processing of measured data is also described. The possibilities of off-line data evaluation are discussed. The system was tested with respect to its compliance with the criteria of the CIAA method. Some results of measurement by this method are also presented. The flexibility of the system is demonstrated on its ability to measure the time characteristics of different detectors. (author)

  1. Secondary electron/reflected particle coincidence studies during slow highly charged ion-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, C.T.; Szilagyi, Z.; Shah, M.B.; McCullough, R.W. [Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Woolsey, J.M. [Stirling Univ. (United Kingdom). DBMS; Trassl, R.; Salzborn, E. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2001-07-01

    We have measured the secondary electron emission statistics (ES) for 5 keV N{sup q+} (q = 1-4) ions incident at 10 on polycrystalline aluminium, in coincidence with specularly reflected N{sup 0}. In this arrangement the kinetic contribution to secondary electron emission is minimised. The experimental data shows that the coincident electron yield, {gamma}, increases linearly with incident ion charge state. The kinetic emission contribution has also been determined from this data. The ES due to 2 and 4 keV He{sup 2+} impact on polycrystalline aluminium in coincidence with specularly reflected He{sup +} and He{sup 0} have also been determined. The process He{sup 2+} {yields} He{sup 0} yields a larger {gamma} value than the process He{sup 2+} {yields} He{sup +}. (orig.)

  2. Simulations of Lithium-Based Neutron Coincidence Counter for Gd-Loaded Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, Christian C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siciliano, Edward R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Lithium-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology Coincidence Counting for Gd-loaded Fuels at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the development of a lithium-based neutron coincidence counter for nondestructively assaying Gd loaded nuclear fuel. This report provides results from MCNP simulations of a lithium-based coincidence counter for the possible measurement of Gd-loaded nuclear fuel. A comparison of lithium-based simulations and UNCL-II simulations with and without Gd loaded fuel is provided. A lithium-based model, referred to as PLNS3A-R1, showed strong promise for assaying Gd loaded fuel.

  3. Determination of U-235 quantity in fresh fuel elements by neutron coincidence collar technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.C.M. de; Almeida, S.G. de; Marzo, M.A.S.; Moita, L.P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The U-235 quantity per lenght of fresh fuel assemblies of the Angra-I first recharge was determined by Neutron Coincidence Collar technique (N.C.C.). This technique is well-founded in fresh fuel assemblies activation by thermal neutrons from AmLi source to generate U-235 fission neutrons. These neutrons are detected by coincidence method in polyethylene structure where 18 He-3 detectors were placed. The coincidence counting results, in active mode (AmLi), showed 0,7% to standard deviation and equal to 1,49% to mass in 1000s of counting. The accuracies of different calibration methods were evaluated and compared. The results showed that the operator declared values are consistent. This evaluation was part of technical-exchange program between Safeguards Laboratory from C.N.E.N. and Los Alamos National Lab., United States. (author)

  4. Automatic analysis algorithm for radionuclide pulse-height data from beta-gamma coincidence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz Biegalski, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    There are two acceptable noble gas monitoring measurement modes for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) verification purposes defined in CTBT/PC/II/WG.B/1. These include beta-gamma coincidence and high-resolution gamma-spectrometry. There are at present no commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) applications for the analysis of β-γ coincidence data. Development of such software is in progress at the Prototype International Data Centre (PIDC) for eventual deployment at the International Data Centre (IDC). Flowcharts detailing the automatic analysis algorithm for β-γ coincidence data to be coded at the PIDC is included. The program is being written in C with Oracle databasing capabilities. (author)

  5. Convergent input from brainstem coincidence detectors onto delay-sensitive neurons in the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, D; Jiang, D; Shackleton, T M; Palmer, A R

    1998-08-01

    Responses of low-frequency neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized guinea pigs were studied with binaural beats to assess their mean best interaural phase (BP) to a range of stimulating frequencies. Phase plots (stimulating frequency vs BP) were produced, from which measures of characteristic delay (CD) and characteristic phase (CP) for each neuron were obtained. The CD provides an estimate of the difference in travel time from each ear to coincidence-detector neurons in the brainstem. The CP indicates the mechanism underpinning the coincidence detector responses. A linear phase plot indicates a single, constant delay between the coincidence-detector inputs from the two ears. In more than half (54 of 90) of the neurons, the phase plot was not linear. We hypothesized that neurons with nonlinear phase plots received convergent input from brainstem coincidence detectors with different CDs. Presentation of a second tone with a fixed, unfavorable delay suppressed the response of one input, linearizing the phase plot and revealing other inputs to be relatively simple coincidence detectors. For some neurons with highly complex phase plots, the suppressor tone altered BP values, but did not resolve the nature of the inputs. For neurons with linear phase plots, the suppressor tone either completely abolished their responses or reduced their discharge rate with no change in BP. By selectively suppressing inputs with a second tone, we are able to reveal the nature of underlying binaural inputs to IC neurons, confirming the hypothesis that the complex phase plots of many IC neurons are a result of convergence from simple brainstem coincidence detectors.

  6. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  9. Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirato, Richard; Polichar, Raulf

    1992-01-01

    In technique to detect surface contamination, object inspected illuminated by ultraviolet light to make contaminants fluoresce; low-light-level video camera views fluorescence. Image-processing techniques quantify distribution of contaminants. If fluorescence of material expected to contaminate surface is not intense, tagged with low concentration of dye.

  10. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  11. Application of coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy to different carbon phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Djourelov, N.; Suzuki, T.; Kondo, K.; Ito, Y.; Shantarovich, V.; Onoe, J.

    2004-01-01

    Coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy was applied to C60 and C70 fullerenes and other carbon phases, such as nanotubes and graphites. Remarkable differences were observed in the Doppler-broadening of the positron annihilation γ-rays in these materials, which reflect the different densities distribution of the momentum for electrons annihilated with positrons. This would be caused by the different composition of the π and σ electrons in annihilation with positrons. This result shows the sensitivity of the coincidence Doppler-broadening method to determine the density distribution of electrons sampled by positrons. (orig.)

  12. A 15 channel 2- and 3-fold coincidence counting system for radioactivity standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.R.S.; Meyer, B.R.; Raave, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The 4π β-γ liquid scintillation coincidence counting system which is used at the National Accelerator Centre for standardizing radioisotopes, has been extended to allow for up to fifteen data points to be measured simultaneously by introducing a 15-fold coincidence unit and a 32-channel scaler into the system. A new control / data acquisition computer program has been written and its operation explained in detail. The advantages of the new system are discussed, and the activity of a 139 Ce source as measured by the new system and the old 3-fold system is compared

  13. Study and development of a spectrometer with Compton suppression and gamma coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, D.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of a spectrometer consisting of a Ge detector surrounded by a NaI(T1) detector that can operate in Compton-suppression and gamma-gamma coincidence modes. The criteria that led to this measurement configuration are discussed and the spectrometer performances are shown for 60 Co and 137 Cs gamma-ray sources. The results for the measurement of 189 Ir (Compton suppression) and for the measurement of 101 Rh (gamma-gamma coincidence) in the presence of other radioisotopes are given. 83 Rb and 105 Ag isotopes are also measured with this spectrometer [fr

  14. Boron-Coated Straw Collar for Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jianwei; Croft, Stephen; McElroy, Robert Dennis

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design and optimize, in simulation space, an active neutron coincidence counter (or collar) using boron-coated straws (BCSs) as a non- 3 He replacement to the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL). UNCL has been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) since the 1980s to verify the 235 U content in fresh light water reactor fuel assemblies for safeguards purposes. This report documents the design and optimization of the BCS collar.

  15. Boron-Coated Straw Collar for Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design and optimize, in simulation space, an active neutron coincidence counter (or collar) using boron-coated straws (BCSs) as a non-3He replacement to the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL). UNCL has been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) since the 1980s to verify the 235U content in fresh light water reactor fuel assemblies for safeguards purposes. This report documents the design and optimization of the BCS collar.

  16. Determination of plutonium in nuclear fuels using the neutron coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehnel, K.

    1978-03-01

    In assays for plutonium the neutron coincidence technique is often used. This method which is based on measuring spontaneous fission rates is examined both experimentally and theoretically. A novel coincidence unit is described which works in effect without deadtime and which therefore has advantages over the currently used design. For waste samples a principle for measurement is described which avoids space dependence effects by rotating the probe in an asymmetric detector. Formulae are developed for the statistical error and various effects of deadtimes are discussed. Further it is shown that neutron multiplication in the sample is an important source of errors, especially when the (α, n)-background is neglected. (author)

  17. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and includes chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells. Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field Covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy Contains chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells.

  18. Fluorescent quantification of melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bruno; Matamá, Teresa; Guimarães, Diana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy is the best method for melanin quantification as it proved to be highly specific and accurate, detecting even small variations in the synthesis of melanin. This method can also be applied to the quantification of melanin in more complex biological matrices like zebrafish embryos and human hair. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fluorescent nanodiamond for biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milos Nesladek

    2014-01-01

    NV centers in diamond have gained strong interest as a novel tool for quantum information processing, quantum computing and quantum photonics. These applications are based on fluorescent and spin properties of NV-centres. However, in some conditions NV- can lose an electron and turn to NV0. The occupation of NV0 and NV- charge states depend on the position of their ground states with respect to the Fermi level and the mechanism of the charge transfer. Interestingly, that the charge switch has important implications on applications of fluorescent nanodiamond (fND) to nano-biology and nano-medicine. fND can be used for bio-marking and bio-tracking but also for the monitoring of targeted delivery to the cells. In this presentation we review the current state-of-the art for using fND particles for fluorescent bio imaging in cells and discuss the charge transfer and its luminescence stability by using ultra high sensitive spectroscopy methods to study the NV0 and NV- state occupation. (author)

  20. THE LIMITED EFFECT OF COINCIDENT ORIENTATION ON THE CHOICE OF INTRINSIC AXIS (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Su, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The allocentric system computes and represents general object-to-object spatial relationships to provide a spatial frame of reference other than the egocentric system. The intrinsic frame-of-reference system theory, which suggests people learn the locations of objects based upon an intrinsic axis, is important in research about the allocentric system. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the effect of coincident orientation on the choice of intrinsic axis was limited. Two groups of participants (24 men, 24 women; M age = 24 yr., SD = 2) encoded different spatial layouts in which the objects shared the coincident orientation of 315° and 225° separately at learning perspective (0°). The response pattern of partial-scene-recognition task following learning reflected different strategies for choosing the intrinsic axis under different conditions. Under the 315° object-orientation condition, the objects' coincident orientation was as important as the symmetric axis in the choice of the intrinsic axis. However, participants were more likely to choose the symmetric axis as the intrinsic axis under the 225° object-orientation condition. The results suggest the effect of coincident orientation on the choice of intrinsic axis is limited.

  1. Calibration and adjustment of the EGRET coincidence/time-of-flight system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    The coincidence/time-of-flight system of the energetic gamma ray experiment telescope (EGRET) on NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) consists of two layers of sixteen scintillator tiles. These tiles are paired into 96 coincidence telescopes. Valid coincidence and time-of-flight values (indicating downward moving particles) from one of these telescopes are two of the requirements for an EGRET event trigger. To maximize up-down discrimination, variations in the mean timing value of the telescopes must be minimized. The timing values of the 96 telescopes are not independent, hence they cannot be individually adjusted to calibrate the system. An iterative approach was devised to determine adjustments to the length of the photomultiplier signal cables. These adjustments were made directly in units of time using a time domain reflectometry technique, by timing the reflection of a fast pulse from the unterminated end of eable, and observing the charge in signal propagation time as the length of the cable was shortened. Two constant fraction discriminators, a time-to-amplitude converter and a pulse height analyzer were used for these measurements. Using this direct time measuring approach, the timing values for the 96 EGRET coincidence/time-of-flight telescopes were adjusted with an FWHM variation of less than 450 ps (± 1 TOF timing channel). (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of in-plant neutron coincidence counters for the measurement of molten salt extraction residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, D.G.; Russo, P.A.; Wachter, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Americium is extracted from plutonium by a molten salt extraction (MSE) process. The residual americium-laden salts are a significant waste stream in this pyrochemical purification process. Rapid assay of MSE residues is desirable to minimize the exposure of personnel to these often high-level emissions. However, the quantitative assay of plutonium in MSE residues is difficult. Variable, unknown (a,n) rates and variable emitted-neutron energy spectra preclude the use of standard neutron coincidence counting techniques with old-generation neutron coincidence counters. Gamma-ray assay methods have not been successful with some residues because of random lumps of plutonium metal. In this paper, we present measurements of MSE residues with two state-of-the-art neutron coincidence counters at the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility: an in-line counter built for the assay of bulk waste material and the pyrochemical multiplicity counter that underwent test and evaluation at that facility. Both of these counters were designed to minimize the effects on measurements of variations in the sample geometry and variable energy spectra of emitted neutrons. These results are compared to measurements made with an HLNCII and with a 20-yr-old in-line well counter. The latter two counters are not optimized in ft sense. We conclude that the newer counters provide significantly improved assay results. The pyrochemical multiplicity counter operated in the conventional coincidence mode provided the best assays overall

  3. Performance Evaluation of the Neutron Coincidence Counter for the Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Li, T.K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Kim, H.D.; Ko, W.I.; Park, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) is a pyrochemical dry reprocessing technique to convert oxide-type spent nuclear fuel into a metallic form. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing this technology for the purpose of spent fuel management and is planning to perform a lab-scale demonstration in 2006. With this technology, a significant reduction of the volume and heat load of spent fuel is expected, which could decrease the burden of safety and economics. In this study, MCNPX code calculations were carried out to estimate the performance of a neutron coincidence counter designed for measruement of the process materials in the pilot-scale ACP facility. To verify the design requirement, the singles and doubles counting rates of the detectors were simulated with the latest coincidence capability of the MCNPX code. Then, the precision of the coincidence measurements were evaluated on various process materials from the ACP. It was verified that the performance of the neutron coincidence counter could meet the design criteria for all samples in the ACP, and the material accounting system for the pilot-scale ACP facility could meet the IAEA safeguards goals.

  4. Constructing coincident indices of economic activity for the Latin American economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Issler

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has three main contributions. The first is to propose an individual coincident indicator for the following Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico. In order to obtain similar series to those traditionally used in business-cycle research in constructing coincident indices (output, sales, income and employment we were forced to back-cast several individual country series which were not available in a long time-series span. The second contribution is to establish a chronology of recessions for these countries, covering the period from 1980 to 2012 on a monthly basis. Based on this chronology, the countries are compared in several respects. The final contribution is to propose an aggregate coincident indicator for the Latin American economy, which weights individual-country composite indices. Finally, this indicator is compared with the coincident indicator (The Conference Board - TCB of the U.S. economy. We find that the U.S. indicator Granger-causes the Latin American indicator in statistical tests

  5. Increased coincidence detection for quantum versus pseudo-generated random numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshoff, Lieze; Jolij, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    People often see meaning in stimuli that are typically considered meaningless. According to Von Lucadou’s idea of Generalized Quantum Teory (GQT), such perceived coincidences, or examples of synchronicity, may be the result of entanglement between a conscious observer and the physical world. Here we

  6. Use of sum-peak and coincidence counting methods for activity standardization of {sup 22}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, E.M. de, E-mail: estela@ird.gov.br [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Iwahara, A.; Poledna, R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, M.A.L. da [Coordenacao Geral de Instalacoes Nucleares/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, R. Gal. Severiano, 90 - Botafogo, CEP 22290-901 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tauhata, L. [Fundacao Carlos Chagas Filho de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ), Av. Erasmo Braga, 118-6 Degree-Sign andar, CEP 20020-000 Centro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Delgado, J.U. [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear (LIN/PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Caixa Postal 68509, CEP 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    A solution containing the positron emitter {sup 22}Na has been absolutely standardized using the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting method and the sum-peak spectrometry counting method. In the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence method two ways for the activity concentration measurements were used: gating on the 1275 keV photopeak and on the 1786 keV sum-peak where the knowledge of the {beta}{sup +}-branching ratio is required. In the sum-peak method the measurements were carried out using three experimental arrangements: the first composed by a well type 5 in. Multiplication-Sign 5 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal, the second by a 3 in. Multiplication-Sign 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal placed on the top of the first, resulting in a 4{pi} counting geometry and the third arrangement is a high purity coaxial germanium detector. The results that are obtained by these two methods are compatible within the standard uncertainty values with a coverage factor of k=2 ({approx}95% of the confidence level). This means that the sum-peak counting with its more simple experimental setup than the complex coincidence 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} counting system gives consistent results for the activity standardization of {sup 22}Na with smaller uncertainties. Besides, the time period involved to attain the result of the standardization was quite shorter than the coincidence measurements used in this work.

  7. Study of Thermal Equilibrium in Heavy Ion Collisions via the Ma Coincidence Method - Test of Applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirejczyk, M.

    2002-01-01

    The coincidence method of judging whether a system reached thermal equilibrium is shortly presented. It is used on the model data to test, whether it is applicable in the low-relativistic energy range. Also, the cuts corresponding to real detectors are introduced and their influence is briefly discussed. (author)

  8. Pre-coincidence brain activity predicts the perceptual outcome of streaming/bouncing motion display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Wang, Yajie; Jia, Lina; Feng, Chengzhi; Liao, Yu; Feng, Wenfeng

    2017-08-18

    When two identical visual discs move toward each other on a two-dimensional visual display, they can be perceived as either "streaming through" or "bouncing off" each other after their coincidence. Previous studies have observed a strong bias toward the streaming percept. Additionally, the incidence of the bouncing percept in this ambiguous display could be increased by various factors, such as a brief sound at the moment of coincidence and a momentary pause of the two discs. The streaming/bouncing bistable motion phenomenon has been studied intensively since its discovery. However, little is known regarding the neural basis underling the perceptual ambiguity in the classic version of the streaming/bouncing motion display. The present study investigated the neural basis of the perception disambiguating underling the processing of the streaming/bouncing bistable motion display using event-related potential (ERP) recordings. Surprisingly, the amplitude of frontal central P2 (220-260 ms) that was elicited by the moving discs ~200 ms before the coincidence of the two discs was observed to be predictive of subsequent streaming or bouncing percept. A larger P2 amplitude was observed for streaming percept than the bouncing percept. These findings suggest that the streaming/bouncing bistable perception may have been disambiguated unconsciously ~200 ms before the coincidence of the two discs.

  9. Pulse shaping for fast coincidence with NaI(Tl) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, S.; Sinha, B.K.; Bhattacharya, R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of multiple limiting of the anode pulses of the photomultiplier tubes on the resolving time of an NaI(Tl)-NaI(Tl) fast coincidence set up is investigated with the help of a simple transistored limiter circuit. The performance of the set up for different energy ranges selected in the side channels is also investigated. (orig.)

  10. Metformin and lactic acidosis : cause or coincidence? A review of case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stades, AME; Heikens, JT; Erkelens, DW; Holleman, F; Hoekstra, JBL

    Objective. Metformin has been associated with the serious side-effect lactic acidosis. However, it remains unclear whether the use of metformin was a cause or a coincidence in lactic acidosis. Design. A literature search of the Index Medicus (1959-66) and of the databases Embase, Medline, Medline

  11. Metformin and lactic acidosis: cause or coincidence? A review of case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stades, A. M. E.; Heikens, J. T.; Erkelens, D. W.; Holleman, F.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Metformin has been associated with the serious side-effect lactic acidosis. However, it remains unclear whether the use of metformin was a cause or a coincidence in lactic acidosis. Design. A literature search of the Index Medicus (1959-66) and of the databases Embase, Medline, Medline

  12. Field test and calibration of neutron coincidence counters for high-mass plutonium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Dickinson, R.J.; Douglas, I.

    1987-02-01

    Five different neutron coincidence systems were evaluated and calibrated for high-mass PuO 2 samples. The samples were from 2 to 7.2 kg of PuO 2 in mass, with a large range of burnup. This report compares the equipment and the results, with an evaluation of deadtime and multiplication corrections

  13. Interacting dark sector and the coincidence problem within the scope of LRS Bianchi type I model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharlyamov, Ruslan K.; Pankratyeva, Tatiana N.

    2018-05-01

    It is shown that a suitable interaction between dark energy and dark matter in locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi-I space-time can solve the coincidence problem and not contradict the accelerated expansion of present Universe. The interaction parameters are estimated from observational data.

  14. The memory coincidence system (CALI). Principle and use for the multidetector experiments in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouthas, J.

    1984-01-01

    In an experimental set up, the main function of the ''CALI system'' is to achieve ''coincidence'' between logic channels. This system also provides a fast selection of the events and their identification by a digital word, and the connection to the data acquisition system [fr

  15. Calculation of coincidence summing corrections for a specific small soil sample geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, R.G.; Gehrke, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Previously, a system was developed at the INEL for measuring the {gamma}-ray emitting nuclides in small soil samples for the purpose of environmental monitoring. These samples were counted close to a {approx}20% Ge detector and, therefore, it was necessary to take into account the coincidence summing that occurs for some nuclides. In order to improve the technical basis for the coincidence summing corrections, the authors have carried out a study of the variation in the coincidence summing probability with position within the sample volume. A Monte Carlo electron and photon transport code (CYLTRAN) was used to compute peak and total efficiencies for various photon energies from 30 to 2,000 keV at 30 points throughout the sample volume. The geometry for these calculations included the various components of the detector and source along with the shielding. The associated coincidence summing corrections were computed at these 30 positions in the sample volume and then averaged for the whole source. The influence of the soil and the detector shielding on the efficiencies was investigated.

  16. Secondary electron emission studied by secondary electron energy loss coincidence spectroscopy (SE2ELCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emission of secondary electrons is of importance in many branches of fundamental and applied science. It is widely applied in the electron microscope for the investigation of the structure and electronic state of solid surfaces and particle detection in electron multiplier devices, and generally it is related to the energy dissipation of energetic particles moving inside a solid. The process of secondary electron emission is a complex physical phenomenon, difficult to measure experimentally and treat theoretically with satisfactory accuracy. The secondary electron spectrum measured with single electron spectroscopy does not provide detailed information of the energy loss processes responsible for the emission of secondary electrons. This information can be accessed when two correlated electron pairs are measured in coincidence and the pair consists of a backscattered electron after a given energy loss and a resulting emitted secondary electron. To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the emission of secondary electrons, a reflection (e,2e) coincidence spectrometer named Secondary Electron Electron Energy Loss Coincidence Spectrometer (SE2ELCS) has been developed in the framework of this thesis which allows one to uncover the relation between the features in the spectra which are due to energy losses and true secondary electron emission structures. The correlated electron pairs are measured with a hemispherical mirror analyzer (HMA) and a time of flight analyzer (TOF) by employing a continuous electron beam. An effort has been made to increase the coincidence count rate by increasing the effective solid angle of the TOF analyzer and optimizing the experimental parameters to get optimum energy resolution. Double differential coincidence spectra for a number of materials namely, nearly free electron metals (Al, Si), noble metals (Ag, Au, Cu, W) and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been measured using this coincidence spectrometer. The

  17. Photoelectron photoion coincidence imaging of ultrafast control in multichannel molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C Stefan; Ram, N Bhargava; Irimia, Daniel; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2011-01-01

    The control of multichannel ionic fragmentation dynamics in CF3I is studied by femtosecond pulse shaping and velocity map photoelectron photoion coincidence imaging. When CF3I is photoexcited with femtosecond laser pulses around 540 nm there are two major ions observed in the time-of-flight mass spectrum, the parent CF3I+ ion and the CF3+ fragment ion. In this first study we focussed on the influence of LCD-shaped laser pulses on the molecular dynamics. The three-dimensional recoil distribution of electrons and ions were imaged in coincidence using a single time-of-flight delay line detector. By fast switching of the voltages on the various velocity map ion lenses after detection of the electron, both the electron and the coincident ion are measured with the same imaging detector. These results demonstrate that a significant simplification of a photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus is in principle possible using switched lens voltages. It is observed that shaped laser fields like chirped pulses, double pulses, and multiple pulses can enhance the CF3+CF3I+ ratio by up to 100%. The total energetics of the dynamics is revealed by analysis of the coincident photoelectron spectra and the kinetic energy of the CF3+ and I fragments. Both the parent CF3I+ and the CF3+ fragment result from a five-photon excitation process. The fragments are formed with very low kinetic energy. The photoelectron spectra and CF3+/CF3I+ ratio vary with the center wavelength of the shaped laser pulses. An optimal enhancement of the CF3+/CF3I+ ratio by about 60% is observed for the double pulse excitation when the pulses are spaced 60 fs apart. We propose that the control mechanism is determined by dynamics on neutral excited states and we discuss the results in relation to the location of electronically excited (Rydberg) states of CF3I.

  18. Detecting gravitational waves from inspiraling binaries with a network of detectors: Coherent versus coincident strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Himan; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Sago, Norichika; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We compare two strategies of multidetector detection of compact binary inspiral signals, namely, the coincidence and the coherent. For simplicity we consider here two identical detectors having the same power spectral density of noise, that of initial LIGO, located in the same place and having the same orientation. We consider the cases of independent noise as well as that of correlated noise. The coincident strategy involves separately making two candidate event lists, one for each detector, and from these choosing those pairs of events from the two lists which lie within a suitable parameter window, which then are called coincidence detections. The coherent strategy on the other hand involves combining the data phase coherently, so as to obtain a single network statistic which is then compared with a single threshold. Here we attempt to shed light on the question as to which strategy is better. We compare the performances of the two methods by plotting the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for the two strategies. Several of the results are obtained analytically in order to gain insight. Further we perform numerical simulations in order to determine certain parameters in the analytic formulae and thus obtain the final complete results. We consider here several cases from the relatively simple to the astrophysically more relevant in order to establish our results. The bottom line is that the coherent strategy although more computationally expensive in general than the coincidence strategy, is superior to the coincidence strategy--considerably less false dismissal probability for the same false alarm probability in the viable false alarm regime

  19. Electron emission relevant to inner-shell photoionization of condensed water studied by multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikosaka, Y., E-mail: hikosaka@las.u-toyama.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Mashiko, R.; Konosu, Y.; Soejima, K. [Department of Environmental Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Shigemasa, E. [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); SOKENDAI, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy is applied to the study of electron emissions from condensed H2O molecules. • Coincidence Auger spectra are obtained for different photoelectron energies. • The energy distribution of the slow electrons ejected in the Auger decay is deduced from three-fold coincidences. - Abstract: Multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy using a magnetic-bottle electron spectrometer has been applied to the study of the Auger decay following O1s photoionization of condensed H{sub 2}O molecules. Coincidence Auger spectra are obtained for three different photoelectron energy ranges. In addition, the energy distribution of the slow electrons ejected in the Auger decay of the O1s core hole is deduced from three-fold coincidences.

  20. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  1. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  2. Realization of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox using momentum- and position-entangled photons from spontaneous parametric down conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, John C; Bennink, Ryan S; Bentley, Sean J; Boyd, R W

    2004-05-28

    We report on a momentum-position realization of the EPR paradox using direct detection in the near and far fields of the photons emitted by collinear type-II phase-matched parametric down conversion. Using this approach we achieved a measured two-photon momentum-position variance product of 0.01 variant Planck's over 2pi (2), which dramatically violates the bounds for the EPR and separability criteria.

  3. Entangled photon pair generation by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in finite-length one-dimensional photonic crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Centini, M.; Peřina ml., Jan; Sciscione, L.; Sibilia, C.; Scalora, M.; Bloemer, M.J.; Bertolotti, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 72, 03 (2005), 033806/1-033806/11 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC P11.003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : photon pair * photonic crystals * spontaneous parametric down-conversion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.997, year: 2005

  4. Emission of orbital-angular-momentum-entangled photon pairs in a nonlinear ring fiber utilizing spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javůrek, D.; Svozilík, J.; Peřina ml., Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2014), "043844-1"-"043844-12" ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon pairs * orbital-angular-momentum-entangled * nonlinear ring fiber * spontaneous parametric down-conversion Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.808, year: 2014

  5. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  6. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  7. The spallation in reverse kinematics: what for a coincidence measurement?; La spallation en cinematique inverse: pourquoi faire une mesure en coincidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducret, J.E

    2006-07-15

    The Spaladin installation has been designed to study spallation reactions in reverse kinematics. Furthermore, the heavy and light fragments are detected by coincidence which allows us to get an instantaneous picture of the reaction at a level of accuracy better than that obtained through inclusive measurement. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical description of the different mechanisms involved in the spallation reactions. In the second part we describe the Spaladin installation and report some results on the reaction: Fe{sup 56} + p at an energy of 1 GeV/nucleon. In the third part we expose the performance of the installation through its simulation with the Geant-IV model. We present a study about the sensitivity of the Spaladin installation to theoretical predictions. The fourth part is dedicated to the future experiments that will be performed with the Spaladin installation. (A.C.)

  8. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  9. Calculation of “LS-curves” for coincidence summing corrections in gamma ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Tim; Korun, Matjaž

    2006-01-01

    When coincidence summing correction factors for extended samples are calculated in gamma-ray spectrometry from full-energy-peak and total efficiencies, their variation over the sample volume needs to be considered. In other words, the correction factors cannot be computed as if the sample were a point source. A method developed by Blaauw and Gelsema takes the variation of the efficiencies over the sample volume into account. It introduces the so-called LS-curve in the calibration procedure and only requires the preparation of a single standard for each sample geometry. We propose to replace the standard preparation by calculation and we show that the LS-curves resulting from our method yield coincidence summing correction factors that are consistent with the LS values obtained from experimental data.

  10. Complete characterization of breakup of 9Be by α-α coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiei, R.; Luong, D.H.; Hinde, D.J.; Dasgupta, M.; Du Rietz, R.

    2011-01-01

    The breakup mechanisms for 9 Be have been studied through coincident detection of the breakup α particles at sub-barrier energies, where the probability of capture of a charged breakup fragment by the target nucleus is negligible. Combining the reconstructed reaction Q-value and the relative energy of the two coincident breakup α particles a complete picture of breakup dynamics has been obtained. The measurements reveal breakup processes which are fast enough (~ 10 -22 s) to affect fusion, called prompt breakup. It is shown that prompt breakup is triggered predominantly by the transfer of a neutron -a two-step process. The prompt breakup probabilities are shown to have an exponential dependence on the surface-to-surface separation of the interacting nuclei, but are independent of the target nuclei, ranging from 144 Sm to 209 Bi. These results provide significant input towards a complete quantal model aiming to describe the breakup of weakly bound stable and halo nuclei. (author)

  11. Standardization of 56Co had been carried out using 4 pi beta-gamma coincidence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardiyanto, Gatot; Pujadi

    2000-01-01

    Standardization of exp.56 Co had been carried out using 4 pi beta-gamma coincidence methods. The radionuclide use for calibration of nuclear instruments on range of energy over 1500 keV. The exp.56 Co had been produced by irradiation of proton by using a cyclotron with 15 MeV of energy and 300 mb of cross-section to natural iron target (99,5% of purity) at the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Source preparation had been done by gravimetry method after the irradiated source was dissolved in 8N HCI solution. The disintegration rate had been measured using 4 pi beta-gamma coincidence apparatus, where the gamm gets sets on 511 and 847 keV gamma-rays. The result measurement is fairly good with the specific activity is 3078 n 15 Bq/mg

  12. X-ray spectral line coincidences between fluorine VIII (and IX) and transition metal lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.D.; Burkhalter, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy was performed in the 12 to 15 A region, recording L-shell lines from selected laser-irradiated transition metals. Line coincidences and near coincidences were identified between Fe, Cr, Mn, and Ni L-spectra, and F VIII and F IX K-shell lines. Wavelengths were determined to accuracies of 1 to 3 mA and will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future x-ray lasing schemes. High-resolution x-ray spectra were collected under controlled illumination and target conditions using 1.05 μm and 0.527 μm laser excitation with the KMS CHROMA laser

  13. A deadtime reduction circuit for thermal neutron coincidence counters with Amptek preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, S.C.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a deadtime reduction circuit for thermal neutron coincidence counters using Amptek preamplifier/amplifier/discriminator circuits. The principle is to remove the overlap between the output pulses from the Amptek circuits by adding a derandomizer between the Amptek circuits and the shift-register coincidence electronics. We implemented the derandomizer as an Actel programmable logic array; the derandomizer board is small and can be mounted in the high-voltage junction box with the Amptek circuits, if desired. Up to 32 Amptek circuits can be used with one derandomizer. The derandomizer has seven outputs: four groups of eight inputs, two groups of 16 inputs, and one group of 32 inputs. We selected these groupings to facilitate detector ring-ratio measurements. The circuit was tested with the five-ring research multiplicity counter, which has five output signals-one for each ring. The counter's deadtime was reduced from 70 to 30 ns

  14. Multiple capture investigated by coincident electron spectroscopy in X7++Ar, at 70 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.

    1999-01-01

    The multiple electron capture in N 7+ + Ar and F 7+ (1s 2 ) + Ar systems is investigated at 70 keV with a new electron-recoil ion charge coincidence experiment. The whole electron energy range has been studied. Up to six electrons are found to be captured into autoionizing states. The recoil ion charge distribution associated with the emission of electrons is similar for both systems and found to be in good agreement with the prediction of Niehaus's model roughly adapted to take into account autoionizing cascades. New findings for the coincident double and triple captures are briefly discussed. A capture of an inner L-shell electron of Ar into the K-shell of the projectile is also observed in N 7+ + Ar collisions. (orig.)

  15. Use of γ-γ coincidence spectrometry in the geochemical study of diamictites from South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.; Koeberl, Ch.; McDonald, I.; Reimold, W.U.

    2000-01-01

    γ-γ coincidence spectrometry was used to investigate the possible presence of a meteoritical component in 27 samples of South African diamictites. Recently, several studies have suggested that some tillites/diamictites may represent impact breccias, but a petrographical study by our group found no evidence for the presence of impact-characteristic shocked minerals. The siderophile elements, such as Cr, Co, Ni, and, especially, the platinum group elements, have high abundances in meteorites, but low abundances in terrestrial crustal rocks. The Ir content of the diamictites was measured with the new iridium coincidence spectrometer (ICS) at the University of Vienna, with detection limits of around 0.02 ppb. No enrichments in the contents of Ir and other siderophile elements compared to average crustal concentrations were found; thus, no unequivocal evidence for an impact origin of these diamictites of the South African Dwyka Group can be documented. (author)

  16. Coincident site lattice-matched InGaN on (111) spinel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A. G.; Dippo, P. C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Simon, J.; Ptak, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Coincident site lattice-matched wurtzite (0001) In 0.31 Ga 0.69 N, emitting in the important green wavelength region, is demonstrated by molecular beam epitaxy on a cubic (111) MgAl 2 O 4 spinel substrate. The coincident site lattice matching condition involves a 30 deg. rotation between the lattice of the InGaN epitaxial layer and the lattice of the spinel. This work describes an alternative approach towards realizing more compositionally homogenous InGaN films with low dislocation density emitting in the ''green gap'' of low efficiency currently observed for semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach could lead to higher efficiency green LEDs presently of great interest for solid-state lighting applications.

  17. Coincident site lattice-matched InGaN on (111) spinel substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, A. G.; Dippo, P. C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Simon, J.; Ptak, A. J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2012-04-09

    Coincident site lattice-matched wurtzite (0001) In{sub 0.31}Ga{sub 0.69}N, emitting in the important green wavelength region, is demonstrated by molecular beam epitaxy on a cubic (111) MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel substrate. The coincident site lattice matching condition involves a 30 deg. rotation between the lattice of the InGaN epitaxial layer and the lattice of the spinel. This work describes an alternative approach towards realizing more compositionally homogenous InGaN films with low dislocation density emitting in the ''green gap'' of low efficiency currently observed for semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach could lead to higher efficiency green LEDs presently of great interest for solid-state lighting applications.

  18. Ion-ion coincidence imaging at high event rate using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jingming; Furch, Federico J.; Durá, Judith; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John; Schulz, Claus Peter; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2017-07-01

    A new ion-ion coincidence imaging spectrometer based on a pixelated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector has been developed for the investigation of molecular ionization and fragmentation processes in strong laser fields. Used as a part of a velocity map imaging spectrometer, the detection system is comprised of a set of microchannel plates and a Timepix detector. A fast time-to-digital converter (TDC) is used to enhance the ion time-of-flight resolution by correlating timestamps registered separately by the Timepix detector and the TDC. In addition, sub-pixel spatial resolution (principle experiment on strong field dissociative double ionization of carbon dioxide molecules (CO2), using a 400 kHz repetition rate laser system. The experimental results demonstrate that the spectrometer can detect multiple ions in coincidence, making it a valuable tool for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules in strong laser fields.

  19. Standardization of Ga-68 by coincidence measurements, liquid scintillation counting and 4πγ counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roteta, Miguel; Peyres, Virginia; Rodríguez Barquero, Leonor; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Arenillas, Pablo; Balpardo, Christian; Rodrígues, Darío; Llovera, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    The radionuclide (68)Ga is one of the few positron emitters that can be prepared in-house without the use of a cyclotron. It disintegrates to the ground state of (68)Zn partially by positron emission (89.1%) with a maximum energy of 1899.1 keV, and partially by electron capture (10.9%). This nuclide has been standardized in the frame of a cooperation project between the Radionuclide Metrology laboratories from CIEMAT (Spain) and CNEA (Argentina). Measurements involved several techniques: 4πβ-γ coincidences, integral gamma counting and Liquid Scintillation Counting using the triple to double coincidence ratio and the CIEMAT/NIST methods. Given the short half-life of the radionuclide assayed, a direct comparison between results from both laboratories was excluded and a comparison of experimental efficiencies of similar NaI detectors was used instead. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Performance evaluation of BGO block detectors used in positron emission tomography and a coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Choi, Y.; Lim, K. C.; Lee, M. Y.; Woo, S. K.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the basic performances of the BGO block detectors, which is used in the GE Advance positron emission tomography. The block detector is composed of 36 small BGO crystals coupled to two 2-channel photomultiplier tubes. In this study, we measured the crystal map and the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector. The coincidence signals between the detectors were also obtained using F-18. The intrinsic energy resolution of the block detector was 69% FWHM at 140 keV and 33% FWHM at 511 keV. High quality crystal map and the coincidence signals between the detectors were successfully obtained. The timing resolution of the detectors are being measured. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of developing high performance positron emission tomography

  1. Coincidence in the two-photon spectra of Li and Li2 at 735 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGraffenreid, W; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2005-01-01

    A coincidence between the 2 2 S 1/2 -3 2 S 1/2 two-photon transition in the atomic spectrum of 6 Li and the X 1 Σ + g → E 1 Σ + g two-photon ro-vibrational series of 7 Li 2 was observed near 735 nm in a heat pipe oven using a tunable laser and thermionic diode detection scheme. The molecular transition obscures one component of the 6 Li atomic transition. Selective detection of the atomic transition was obtained by adding an intensity-modulated laser that drives atoms from the 3S to 16P state. The coincident molecular transition and four nearby molecular lines were identified using previously determined Dunham coefficients

  2. Gamma-X-ray coincidence Moessbauer spectroscopic study of the aftereffects in sulfate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Makita, T.; Fukumura, K.

    1990-01-01

    The anomalous charge states formed after the electron capture decay of 57 Co in FeSO 4 .H 2 O and FeSO 4 .7H 2 O are investigated using the conventional Moessbauer emission spectroscopy and a gamma-X ray coincidence method. This method is based on the idea that a Moessbauer spectrum observed with the coincidence technique only when K-X rays are emitted is reflected by isolated events with a reduced influence of the Auger-electron self-irradiation. The formation of the anomalous electronic and structural configuration is attributed to the self-radiolysis of the H 2 O and SO 4 2- ligands in the nearest and the second nearest coordination shells around the decaying atom. (orig.)

  3. Studies of weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via coincidence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rowland, C; Champagne, A E; Dummer, A K; Fitzgerald, R; Harley, E C T; Mosher, J; Runkle, R

    2002-01-01

    A method for measuring weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via gamma gamma-coincidence counting techniques is described. The coincidence apparatus consisted of a large-volume germanium detector and an annular NaI(Tl) crystal. The setup was tested by measuring the weak E sub R =227 keV resonance in sup 2 sup 6 Mg(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 7 Al. Absolute germanium and NaI(Tl) counting efficiencies for a range of gamma-ray energies and for different detector-target geometries are presented. Studies of the gamma-ray background in our spectra are described. Compared to previous work, our method improves the detection sensitivity for weak capture-gamma-ray resonances by a factor of approx 100. The usefulness of the present technique for investigations of interest to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  4. Nuclear lifetime measurements with the DSA coincidence method in inverse reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, J.A.J.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis describes lifetime measurements with the DSA coincidence method in inverse reactions. Bombardment of 2 H and 3 H targets with heavy ions of energies up to 50 MeV produces nuclei recoiling at initial velocities of v(0) approximately equal to 0.05 c. Heavy-ion beams of 11 B, 12 C, 14 N, 16 O, 18 O, 19 F, 27 A1, 28 Si, 30 Si, 31 P, 32 S, 35 Cl and 37 Cl are at present available from the Utrecht 6 MV EN tandem accelerator. The recoil nuclei are slowed down in Mg, Al, Cu, Ag or Au and the γ-ray Doppler pattern is observed with a large Ge(Li) detector in coincidence with protons

  5. Research of coincidence method for calculation model of the specific detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangchun, Hu; Suping, Liu; Jian, Gong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry

    2003-07-01

    The physical size of specific detector is known normally, but production business is classified for some sizes that is concerned with the property of detector, such as the well diameter, well depth of detector and dead region. The surface source of even distribution and the sampling method of source particle isotropy sport have been established with the method of Monte Carlo, and gamma ray respond spectral with the {sup 152}Eu surface source been calculated. The experiment have been performed under the same conditions. Calculation and experiment results are compared with relative efficiency coincidence method and spectral similar degree coincidence method. According to comparison as a result, detector model is revised repeatedly to determine the calculation model of detector and to calculate efficiency of detector and spectra. (authors)

  6. Selection and evaluation of gamma decay standards for detector calibration using coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavac, S.

    2000-01-01

    Coincidence method for calibration of gamma detectors using suitable calibration standards with two cascading gamma rays is analyzed. From the list of recommended gamma ray standards currently under reevaluation by the CRP, 14 radionuclides were selected as the potential source candidates for the coincidence method. The following sources were selected 24 Na, 46 Sc, 60 Co, 66 Ga, 75 Se, 88 Y, Nb 94 , 111 In, 123m Te, 133 Ba, 134 Cs, 152 Eu, 154 Eu and 207 Bi. Reaction 11 B (p,γ) 12 C* was also selected as a source of high energy gamma rays. Experimental data on angular correlation coefficients for selected sources were collected from the literature and evaluated according to the recommended procedure. Theoretical angular correlation coefficients were calculated and compared to the evaluated data. (author)

  7. n-Tupled Coincidence Point Theorems in Partially Ordered Metric Spaces for Compatible Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Dalal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intent of this paper is to introduce the notion of compatible mappings for n-tupled coincidence points due to (Imdad et al. (2013. Related examples are also given to support our main results. Our results are the generalizations of the results of (Gnana Bhaskar and Lakshmikantham (2006, Lakshmikantham and Ćirić (2009, Choudhury and Kundu (2010, and Choudhary et al. (2013.

  8. Coincidence study of alpha particle fragmentation at E/sub alpha/ = 140 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the interaction of 140 MeV alpha particles with 90 Zr nuclei resulting in fragmentation of the alpha particle are reported. The experimental observations of the study are analyzed and are found to show that alpha particle breakup reactions leading to at least 4-body final states, composed of two charged alpha particle fragments, contribute significantly to the singles yield of charged fragments observed at a fixed forward angle. The conclusions are based on coincidence measurements where one charged fragment is detected at a small forward angle which remains fixed, while the second charged fragment is detected at a series of coplanar secondary angles. The largest coincidence charged particle yield for the multiparticle final state events results from 90 Zr(α,pp)X reactions, where both of the measured protons have energy distributions similar to the proton singles energy distributions. The second largest observed coincidence yield involving two charged fragments arises from 90 Zr(α,pd)X reactions, where the p and d fragments, as in the 90 Zr(α,pp)X reactions also have energy distribution similar to the singles energy distributions. Analysis of additional measurements, where alpha particle fragments at the fixed angle are detected in coincidence with evaporation and nonequilibrium particles at many coplanar angles, show that the alpha particle fragmentation reactions are also generally associated with large energy transfer to the target nucleus. A multiple scattering model of the fragmentation reaction is employed, in conjunction with the experimental observations, to estimate the cross sections for alpha particle fragmentation into multi-particle final states resulting in n, 2n, p, pp, d, dn, dp, t and 3 He fragments. The estimated total cross section for all fragmentation reactions is 755 mb or approximately 38% of the total reaction cross section for 140 MeV alpha particle interactions with 90 Zr

  9. Field tests and evaluations of the IAEA Active-Well Coincidence Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Rinard, P.M.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates field tests of the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) at Winfrith and Dounreay, United Kingdom. The applicability of the AWCC for assaying the uranium content of a wide variety of materials was demonstrated and calibration curves were generated. The AWCC was used in three modes (fast, thermal, and passive) while assaying powders, pellets, cartridges, plates, assorted residues, and materials-testing-reactor fuel assemblies

  10. USING A PHENOMENOLOGICAL MODEL TO TEST THE COINCIDENCE PROBLEM OF DARK ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yun; Zhu Zonghong; Alcaniz, J. S.; Gong Yungui

    2010-01-01

    By assuming a phenomenological form for the ratio of the dark energy and matter densities ρ X ∝ ρ m a ξ , we discuss the cosmic coincidence problem in light of current observational data. Here, ξ is a key parameter to denote the severity of the coincidence problem. In this scenario, ξ = 3 and ξ = 0 correspond to ΛCDM and the self-similar solution without the coincidence problem, respectively. Hence, any solution with a scaling parameter 0 X = 0, where ω X is the equation of state of the dark energy component, whereas the inequality ξ + 3ω X ≠ 0 represents non-standard cosmology. We place observational constraints on the parameters (Ω X,0 , ω X , ξ) of this model, where Ω X,0 is the present value of density parameter of dark energy Ω X , by using the Constitution Set (397 supernovae of type Ia data, hereafter SNeIa), the cosmic microwave background shift parameter from the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey baryon acoustic peak. Combining the three samples, we get Ω X,0 = 0.72 ± 0.02, ω X = -0.98 ± 0.07, and ξ = 3.06 ± 0.35 at 68.3% confidence level. The result shows that the ΛCDM model still remains a good fit to the recent observational data, and the coincidence problem indeed exists and is quite severe, in the framework of this simple phenomenological model. We further constrain the model with the transition redshift (deceleration/acceleration). It shows that if the transition from deceleration to acceleration happens at the redshift z > 0.73, within the framework of this model, we can conclude that the interaction between dark energy and dark matter is necessary.

  11. 3D Silicon Coincidence Avalanche Detector (3D-SiCAD) for charged particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignetti, M. M.; Calmon, F.; Pittet, P.; Pares, G.; Cellier, R.; Quiquerez, L.; Chaves de Albuquerque, T.; Bechetoille, E.; Testa, E.; Lopez, J.-P.; Dauvergne, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.

    2018-02-01

    Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) are p-n junctions operated in Geiger Mode by applying a reverse bias above the breakdown voltage. SPADs have the advantage of featuring single photon sensitivity with timing resolution in the picoseconds range. Nevertheless, their relatively high Dark Count Rate (DCR) is a major issue for charged particle detection, especially when it is much higher than the incoming particle rate. To tackle this issue, we have developed a 3D Silicon Coincidence Avalanche Detector (3D-SiCAD). This novel device implements two vertically aligned SPADs featuring on-chip electronics for the detection of coincident avalanche events occurring on both SPADs. Such a coincidence detection mode allows an efficient discrimination of events related to an incoming charged particle (producing a quasi-simultaneous activation of both SPADs) from dark counts occurring independently on each SPAD. A 3D-SiCAD detector prototype has been fabricated in CMOS technology adopting a 3D flip-chip integration technique, and the main results of its characterization are reported in this work. The particle detection efficiency and noise rejection capability for this novel device have been evaluated by means of a β- strontium-90 radioactive source. Moreover the impact of the main operating parameters (i.e. the hold-off time, the coincidence window duration, the SPAD excess bias voltage) over the particle detection efficiency has been studied. Measurements have been performed with different β- particles rates and show that a 3D-SiCAD device outperforms single SPAD detectors: the former is indeed capable to detect particle rates much lower than the individual DCR observed in a single SPAD-based detectors (i.e. 2 to 3 orders of magnitudes lower).

  12. Many-body calculation of the coincidence L3 photoelectron spectroscopy main line of Ni metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    The partial singles L 3 photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) main line of Ni metal correlated with Auger electrons emitted by the localized L 3 -VV Auger decay is calculated by a many-body theory. The partial singles L 3 PES main line of Ni metal almost coincides in both line shape and peak kinetic energy (KE) with the singles one. The former main line peak shows a KE shift of only 0.01 eV toward the lower KE and a very small asymmetric line shape change compared to the singles one. The asymmetric line shape change and the peak KE shift of the partial singles L 3 main line are very small. However, they are due to the variation with photoelectron KE in the branching ratio of the partial Auger decay width in the partial singles L 3 PES main line by the photoelectron KE dependent imaginary part of the shakeup self-energy. The L 3 PES main line of Ni metal measured in coincidence with the L 3 -VV ( 1 G) Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) main line peak is the partial singles one modulated by a spectral function R a of a fixed energy Auger electron analyzer so that it should show only a symmetric line narrowing by R a compared to the singles one. The L 3 PES main line peak of Ni metal measured in coincidence with the delocalized band-like L 3 -VV AES peak or not completely split-off (or not completely localized) L 3 -VV ( 3 F) AES peak, will show an asymmetric line narrowing and a KE shift compared to the singles one. Thus, the L 3 PES main line of Ni metal in coincidence with various parts of the L 3 -VV AES spectrum depends on which part of the L 3 -VV AES spectrum a fixed energy Auger electron analyzer is set. The experimental verification is in need

  13. A Monte Carlo Model for Neutron Coincidence Counting with Fast Organic Liquid Scintillation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamage, Kelum A.A.; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Cave, Frank D.

    2013-06-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is an established, nondestructive method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of nuclear materials. Several even-numbered nuclei of the actinide isotopes, and especially even-numbered plutonium isotopes, undergo spontaneous fission, resulting in the emission of neutrons which are correlated in time. The characteristics of this i.e. the multiplicity can be used to identify each isotope in question. Similarly, the corresponding characteristics of isotopes that are susceptible to stimulated fission are somewhat isotope-related, and also dependent on the energy of the incident neutron that stimulates the fission event, and this can hence be used to identify and quantify isotopes also. Most of the neutron coincidence counters currently used are based on 3 He gas tubes. In the 3 He-filled gas proportional-counter, the (n, p) reaction is largely responsible for the detection of slow neutrons and hence neutrons have to be slowed down to thermal energies. As a result, moderator and shielding materials are essential components of many systems designed to assess quantities of fissile materials. The use of a moderator, however, extends the die-away time of the detector necessitating a larger coincidence window and, further, 3 He is now in short supply and expensive. In this paper, a simulation based on the Monte Carlo method is described which has been performed using MCNPX 2.6.0, to model the geometry of a sector-shaped liquid scintillation detector in response to coincident neutron events. The detection of neutrons from a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pellet using an organic liquid scintillator has been simulated for different thicknesses of scintillators. In this new neutron detector, a layer of lead has been used to reduce the gamma-ray fluence reaching the scintillator. The effect of lead for neutron detection has also been estimated by considering different thicknesses of lead layers. (authors)

  14. 'TrueCoinc' software utility for calculation of the true coincidence correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudar, S.

    2002-01-01

    The true coincidence correction plays an important role in the overall accuracy of the γ ray spectrometry especially in the case of present-day high volume detectors. The calculation of true coincidence corrections needs detailed nuclear structure information. Recently these data are available in computerized form from the Nuclear Data Centers through the Internet or on a CD-ROM of the Table of Isotopes. The aim has been to develop software for this calculation, using available databases for the levels data. The user has to supply only the parameters of the detector to be used. The new computer program runs under the Windows 95/98 operating system. In the framework of the project a new formula was prepared for calculating the summing out correction and calculation of the intensity of alias lines (sum peaks). The file converter for reading the ENDSF-2 type files was completed. Reading and converting the original ENDSF was added to the program. A computer accessible database of the X rays energies and intensities was created. The X ray emissions were taken in account in the 'summing out' calculation. Calculation of the true coincidence 'summing in' correction was done. The output was arranged to show independently two types of corrections and to calculate the final correction as multiplication of the two. A minimal intensity threshold can be set to show the final list only for the strongest lines. The calculation takes into account all the transitions, independently of the threshold. The program calculates the intensity of X rays (K, L lines). The true coincidence corrections for X rays were calculated. The intensities of the alias γ lines were calculated. (author)

  15. Coincidence arrangements of local observables and uniqueness of the vacuum in QFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybalski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    A new phase space criterion, encoding the physically motivated behavior of coincidence arrangements of local observables, is proposed in this work. This condition entails, in particular, uniqueness and purity of the energetically accessible vacuum states. It is shown that the qualitative part of this new criterion is equivalent to a compactness condition proposed in the literature. Its novel quantitative part is verified in massive free field theory.

  16. Mass measurement of 80Y by β-γ coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, C.J.; Caprio, M.A.; Beausang, C.W.; Casten, R.F.; Cooper, J.R.; Kruecken, R.; Novak, J.R.; Pietralla, N.; Brenner, D.S.; Zamfir, N.V.; Aprahamian, A.; Wiescher, M.C.; Shawcross, M.; Teymurazyan, A.; Berant, Z.; Wolf, A.; Gill, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Q EC value of 80 Y has been measured by β-γ coincidence spectroscopy to be ≥8929(83) keV. Combining this result with the adopted mass excess of the daughter 80 Sr gives a mass excess for 80 Y of ≥-61 376(83) keV. Results are compared with other measurements, with Audi-Wapstra systematics, and with predictions of mass formulas. Implications of this measurement are considered for the rp process

  17. Sizeable acquired subglottic cyst in a baby with Williams-Beuren syndrome: association or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Athanasios; Tsakalides, Christos; Chatziavramidis, Angelos; Karagianni, Paraskevi; Dimitriadou, Meropi; Konstantinidis, Iordanis

    2013-10-15

    We describe a case of an acquired subglottic cyst presented with persistent stridor and voice hoarsening in a baby diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome that was born premature and required intubation during neonatal period. We also comment on whether this is a coincidence or there can be an association between impaired elastogenesis, a feature of patients with the syndrome and the formation of a subglottic cyst. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of Coincidence Method for Determination Thermal Neutron Flux on RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhri, Syaiful; Hamzah, Amir

    2004-01-01

    The research to develop detection radiation system using coincidence method has been done to determine thermal neutron flux in RS1 and RS2 irradiation facilities RSG-GAS. At this research has arranged beta-gamma coincidence equipment system and parameter of measurement according to Au-198 beta-gamma spectrum. Gold foils that have irradiated for period of time, counted, and the activities of radiation is analyzed to get neutron flux. Result of research indicate that systems measurement of absolute activity with gamma beta coincidence method functioning well and can be applied at activity measurement of gold foil for irradiation facility characterization. The results show that thermal neutron flux in RS1 and RS2, respectively is 2.007E+12 n/cm 2 s and 2.147E+12 n/cm 2 s. To examine the system performance, the result was compared to measure activity using high resolution of Hp Ge detector and achieved discrepancy is about 1.26% and 6.70%. (author)

  19. Pile-up correction for coincidence counting using a CAEN 1724 digitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro Junior, Iberê S.; Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A., E-mail: gzahn@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In conventional gamma-ray spectrometry, the probability of pile-up effects is considered to be proportional to the dead-time, and is usually neglected for low dead-times (below 4-5%). In gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometry, though, while the dead time takes into account only events that are actually digitized, the pile-up effects are proportional to the actual gamma-ray detection rate in each detector, not only to the ones that trigger the coincidence gate. Thus, the pile-up corrections may not be so easy to assess as in single spectrometry systems. In this work, a system composed of two HPGe detectors coupled to a CAEN v1724 digitizer is studied. A 3kBq {sup 60}Co source was analyzed, both alone and in the presence of other radioactive sources ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 152}Eu), and the resulting coincidence peak areas were compared to assess the effectiveness of two distinct corrections: a simple normalization by the live time of acquisition and the normalization by the count rate obtained using a pulse generator. The results obtained stress the need to use the pulse generator in this specific setup in order to get accurate results. (author)

  20. Interaction of multicharged ions with molecules (CO2, C60) by coincident electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.

    2001-01-01

    First results for the investigation of electron capture processes in collisions between multicharged ions and molecule targets using electron spectroscopy in coincidence with charged fragments, are presented. It is shown that a much more detailed investigation of the capture reaction can be achieved using molecular instead of heavy atomic targets provided that an analysis of the target dissociation is made. The collisional systems 18 O 8+ +Ar, CO 2 and C 60 have been studied at 80 keV. Non coincident electron spectra as well as first results of double or triple coincidence experiments are discussed. Kinetic energy distributions of the C n + fragments (n=1 to 8) produced in multiple capture processes from C 60 target are given. A detailed investigation of the double capture process with CO 2 molecule allows the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions (KERD) which characterize the dissociation of CO 2 2+ molecular ions; our results are found to be very similar to those measured in double photoionisation experiments. (orig.)

  1. Modeling of LMM-MVV Auger-Auger Coincidence Spectra From Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, R.; Weiss, A. H.; Hulbert, S. L.; Bartynski, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    Atoms that are highly excited due to the presence of a hole in an inner shell often relax via an Auger transition. This auto-ionizing process results in a final state with two or more holes from an Auger cascade. We present results of the direct measurements of the second and third Auger decays in this sequence. We have measured the Mn MVV Auger spectra from a single-crystal sample of MnO in time coincidence with Auger electrons emitted from prior Mn LMM Auger decays and find these to be much wider than the MVV spectrum measured in time coincidence with M core photoelectron emission. We present a model which attributes the increased energy width of the MVV transitions that follow LMM decays to the rearrangement of ``not so innocent'' bystander hole(s) in the valence band. The energetics of the Auger cascade process are modeled mathematically in terms of correlation integral(s) and convolution integral(s) over the valence band density of states. Comparisons with recent Auger-Auger coincidence studies of Ag and Pd will be made. Acknowledgements: Welch Foundation, NSF DMR98-12628, NSF DMR98-01681, and DOE DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  2. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Kathryn M. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States); Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)]. E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, {beta}-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv{sup +} revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state.

  3. Diversification of C(4) grasses (Poaceae) does not coincide with their ecological dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchenak-Khelladi, Yanis; Slingsby, Jasper A; Verboom, G Anthony; Bond, William J

    2014-02-01

    The radiation of a lineage and its rise to ecological dominance are distinct phenomena and driven by different processes. For example, paleoecological data has been used to show that the Cretaceous angiosperm radiation did not coincide with their rise to dominance. Using a phylogenetic approach, we here explored the evolution of C4 grasses and evaluated whether the diversification of this group and its rise to ecological dominance in the late Miocene were decoupled. We assembled a matrix including 675 grass species of the PACMAD clade and 2784 characters (ITS and ndhF) to run a molecular dating analysis using three fossils as reference calibrations. We coded species as C3 vs. C4 and reconstructed ancestral states under maximum likelihood. We used the program BiSSE to test whether rates of diversification are correlated with photosynthetic pathway and whether the radiation of C4 lineages preceded or coincided with their rise to ecological dominance from ∼10 Ma. C4 grass lineages first originated around 35 Ma at the time of the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Accelerated diversification of C4 lineages did not coincide with their rise to ecological dominance. C4-dominated grasslands have expanded only since the Late Miocene and Pliocene. The initial diversification of their biotic elements can be tracked back as far as the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We suggest that shifts in taxonomic diversification and ecological dominance were stimulated by different factors, as in the case of the early angiosperms in the Cretaceous.

  4. Observation of relaxation on time scale of core hole decay by coincidence photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    It is shown by a many-body theory that when the relaxation time of a metastable core hole state(s) to the most stable one is comparable to or shorter than core hole decay time of the former state(s), a comparison between the singles (noncoincidence) photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) spectrum and the coincidence one provides a direct evidence of the relaxation. In principle the variation with photoelectron kinetic energy of relaxation (or charge transfer (CT)) time can be determined. By singles measurement the correlation of a photoelectron generated by creation of the metastable states not only with an Auger electron generated by annihilation of the same core hole state but also with an Auger electron generated by annihilation of the stable state via relaxation of the metastable state, is completely lost, unless only the metastable state is observed by PES, whereas the correlation often manifests directly in the coincidence spectra. Thus, compared to the coincidence spectroscopy the singles one is often much less capable of elucidating the competition between relaxation and core hole decay of a metastable state. Such examples are discussed

  5. Unattended mode monitoring of passive neutron coincidence detector systems using a commercial data logger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.G.R.; Outram, J.D.; Storey, M.

    1991-01-01

    A commercial Data Logger for unattended passive neutron coincidence data acquisition is described. This consists of an inexpensive commercial Data Logging equipment attached to a neutron coincidence electronics and a software package for data review. The Data Logger permits both the flexible configuration of a passive neutron coincidence measurement system for unattended mode monitoring and the storage of the measured Totals and Reals count rates. An additional feature of the Data Logger is a custom software package providing for the complete analysis of the stored data and yielding an assay of each item passing through the measurement cavity. The analysis includes an input for different isotopic compositions, the calculation of the multiplication corrected Reals rates, the inclusion of a calibration functions, and the determination of 240 Pu masses. The software package for data review displays the Totals and Reals count rates logged by the Data Logger as a function of time. In addition the custom software provides input files to the data review package to display the multiplication corrected Reals count rates and the measured 240 Pu masses as a function of time. Information on the Data Logger is presented along with the monitoring mode specifications. The analysis functions implemented are described as is the data review software. Results are presented for a specific application

  6. Standardization of Ga-68 by coincidence measurements, liquid scintillation counting and 4πγ counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roteta, Miguel; Peyres, Virginia; Rodríguez Barquero, Leonor; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Arenillas, Pablo; Balpardo, Christian; Rodrígues, Darío; Llovera, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The radionuclide 68 Ga is one of the few positron emitters that can be prepared in-house without the use of a cyclotron. It disintegrates to the ground state of 68 Zn partially by positron emission (89.1%) with a maximum energy of 1899.1 keV, and partially by electron capture (10.9%). This nuclide has been standardized in the frame of a cooperation project between the Radionuclide Metrology laboratories from CIEMAT (Spain) and CNEA (Argentina). Measurements involved several techniques: 4πβ−γ coincidences, integral gamma counting and Liquid Scintillation Counting using the triple to double coincidence ratio and the CIEMAT/NIST methods. Given the short half-life of the radionuclide assayed, a direct comparison between results from both laboratories was excluded and a comparison of experimental efficiencies of similar NaI detectors was used instead. - Highlights: ► We standardized the positron emitter Ga-68 in a bilateral cooperation. ► We used several techniques, as coincidence, integral gamma and liquid scintillation. ► An efficiency comparison replaced a direct comparison of reference materials.

  7. New approach to calculate the true-coincidence effect of HpGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnour, I. A., E-mail: aaibrahim3@live.utm.my, E-mail: ibrahim.elnour@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, 12223 Khartoum (Sudan); Wagiran, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai,Johor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, N. [Faculty of Defence Science and Technology, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hamzah, S.; Elias, M. S. [Malaysia Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Siong, W. B. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Resource Science & Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The corrections for true-coincidence effects in HpGe detector are important, especially at low source-to-detector distances. This work established an approach to calculate the true-coincidence effects experimentally for HpGe detectors of type Canberra GC3018 and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C, which are in operation at neutron activation analysis lab in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The correction for true-coincidence effects was performed close to detector at distances 2 and 5 cm using {sup 57}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 137}Cs as standard point sources. The correction factors were ranged between 0.93-1.10 at 2 cm and 0.97-1.00 at 5 cm for Canberra HpGe detector; whereas for Ortec HpGe detector ranged between 0.92-1.13 and 0.95-100 at 2 and 5 cm respectively. The change in efficiency calibration curve of the detector at 2 and 5 cm after correction was found to be less than 1%. Moreover, the polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points.

  8. Digital spectrometer for coincidence measurement of Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizek, J.; Vlcek, M.; Prochazka, I.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution digital coincidence Doppler broadening spectrometer equipped with two high-purity Ge detectors and two-channel 12-bit fast digitizer was developed and tested in this work. Two configurations were compared: (i) semi-digital setup which uses active analogue shaping of detector pulses prior to digitization to improve signal-to-noise ratio, and (ii) pure-digital setup which samples detector pulses directly. Software procedure developed for analysis of sampled waveforms, i.e. precise determination of energy of detected photon and rejection of distorted pulses, is described. Performance of digital coincidence spectrometer was compared with traditional analogue setup connected to the same detectors. It was found that digital spectrometer enables to achieve better energy resolution than in traditional analogue setup. Moreover, in digital configuration one has better control over shape of the signal. This allows efficient elimination of undesired distorted or damaged waveforms and to obtain spectrum of better clarity. The superior parameters of new digital coincidence Doppler broadening spectrometer are demonstrated by benchmark measurements of well defined Fe and Al specimens and also by the detection of rare annihilation in flight events.

  9. Hydrogen scrambling in ethane induced by intense laser fields: statistical analysis of coincidence events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanya, Reika; Kudou, Tatsuya; Schirmel, Nora; Miura, Shun; Weitzel, Karl-Michael; Hoshina, Kennosuke; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2012-05-28

    Two-body Coulomb explosion processes of ethane (CH(3)CH(3)) and its isotopomers (CD(3)CD(3) and CH(3)CD(3)) induced by an intense laser field (800 nm, 1.0 × 10(14) W/cm(2)) with three different pulse durations (40 fs, 80 fs, and 120 fs) are investigated by a coincidence momentum imaging method. On the basis of statistical treatment of the coincidence data, the contributions from false coincidence events are estimated and the relative yields of the decomposition pathways are determined with sufficiently small uncertainties. The branching ratios of the two body decomposition pathways of CH(3)CD(3) from which triatomic hydrogen molecular ions (H(3)(+), H(2)D(+), HD(2)(+), D(3)(+)) are ejected show that protons and deuterons within CH(3)CD(3) are scrambled almost statistically prior to the ejection of a triatomic hydrogen molecular ion. The branching ratios were estimated by statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations by assuming a transition state with a hindered-rotation of a diatomic hydrogen moiety. The hydrogen scrambling dynamics followed by the two body decomposition processes are discussed also by using the anisotropies in the ejection directions of the fragment ions and the kinetic energy distribution of the two body decomposition pathways.

  10. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Kathryn M.; Hoffmann, George R.

    2007-01-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, β-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv + revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state

  11. Standardisation of {sup 18}F by a coincidence method using full solid angle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedjadi, Youcef, E-mail: youcef.nedjadi@chuv.c [Institut de Radiophysique Appliquee, Grand Pre 1, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bailat, Claude; Caffari, Yvan; Bochud, Francois [Institut de Radiophysique Appliquee, Grand Pre 1, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    A solution of {sup 18}F was standardised with a 4{pi}{beta}-4{pi}{gamma} coincidence counting system in which the beta detector is a one-inch diameter cylindrical UPS89 plastic scintillator, positioned at the bottom of a well-type 5''x5'' NaI(Tl) gamma-ray detector. Almost full detection efficiency-which was varied downwards electronically-was achieved in the beta-channel. Aliquots of this {sup 18}F solution were also measured using 4{pi}{gamma} NaI(Tl) integral counting and Monte Carlo calculated efficiencies as well as the CIEMAT-NIST method. Secondary measurements of the same solution were also performed with an IG11 ionisation chamber whose equivalent activity is traceable to the Systeme International de Reference through the contribution IRA-METAS made to it in 2001; IRA's degree of equivalence was found to be close to the key comparison reference value (KCRV). The {sup 18}F activity predicted by this coincidence system agrees closely with the ionisation chamber measurement and is compatible within one standard deviation of the other primary measurements. This work demonstrates that our new coincidence system can standardise short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine.

  12. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stiles, C.D.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Berndsen, A.; Boyles, J.; Cardoso, R. F.; Chawla, P.; Cherry, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day-Lewis, F.D.; Epstein, C. R.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.; Lunsford, G.; Lynch, R. S.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McPhee, C. A.; Penucci, T.; Ransom, S.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D. W.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast

  13. Effect of inter-crystal scatter on estimation methods for random coincidences and subsequent correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Espallardo, I; Spanoudaki, V; Ziegler, S I; Rafecas, M; McElroy, D P

    2008-01-01

    Random coincidences can contribute substantially to the background in positron emission tomography (PET). Several estimation methods are being used for correcting them. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of techniques for random coincidence estimation, with various low-energy thresholds (LETs). Simulated singles list-mode data of the MADPET-II small animal PET scanner were used as input. The simulations have been performed using the GATE simulation toolkit. Several sources with different geometries have been employed. We evaluated the number of random events using three methods: delayed window (DW), singles rate (SR) and time histogram fitting (TH). Since the GATE simulations allow random and true coincidences to be distinguished, a comparison between the number of random coincidences estimated using the standard methods and the number obtained using GATE was performed. An overestimation in the number of random events was observed using the DW and SR methods. This overestimation decreases for LETs higher than 255 keV. It is additionally reduced when the single events which have undergone a Compton interaction in crystals before being detected are removed from the data. These two observations lead us to infer that the overestimation is due to inter-crystal scatter. The effect of this mismatch in the reconstructed images is important for quantification because it leads to an underestimation of activity. This was shown using a hot-cold-background source with 3.7 MBq total activity in the background region and a 1.59 MBq total activity in the hot region. For both 200 keV and 400 keV LET, an overestimation of random coincidences for the DW and SR methods was observed, resulting in approximately 1.5% or more (at 200 keV LET: 1.7% for DW and 7% for SR) and less than 1% (at 400 keV LET: both methods) underestimation of activity within the background region. In almost all cases, images obtained by compensating for random events in the reconstruction

  14. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M., E-mail: m.h.m.janssen@vu.nl [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Powis, Ivan [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations

  15. A KIND OF FLUORESCENCE PROBE TO STUDY THE KINETICS OF POLYMERIZATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guoqiang; WU Shikang

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence properties of 1-phenyl-3-(4'-nitrophenyl) pyrazoline (PNP) were studied in bulk polymerization process of methylmethacrylate (MMA). The fluorescence intensity of PNP was enhanced and the emission maximum was blue shifted with the polymerization progress. In the period of auto-acceleration of the polymerization the enhancement of fluorescence intensity and blue shift of peak wavelength in spectra could be observed evidently. This means that the solvatochromic properties of PNP are influenced not only by the solvent polarity but also by the viscosity of the medium(especially by the phase transition). In solid state PNP emits from the charge transfer excited state without solvent relaxation. The transient emission spectra and the results from Bakhshiev model of solvent relaxation coincide with that from the polymerization experiment.

  16. Fluorescing macerals from wood precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S A; Bensley, D F

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the origin of wood-derived macerals has established the existence of autofluorescent maceral precursors in the secondary xylem of swamp-inhabiting plant species. The optical character and fluorescent properties of microtomed thin-sections of modern woods from the Florida Everglades and Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia are compared to the character and properties of their peatified equivalents from various Everglades and Okefenokee peat horizons and their lignitic equivalents from the Brandon lignite of Vermont and the Trail Ridge lignitic peat from northern Florida. The inherent fluorescence of woody cell walls is believed to be caused by lignin though other cell wall components may contribute. The fluorescence spectra for several wood and cell types had a ..gamma../sub m//sub a//sub x/ of 452 nm and Q value of 0.00. The color as observed in blue light and the spectral geometry as measured in UV light of peatified and lignitic woody cell walls (potential textinites) may change progressively during early coalification. Cell wall-derived maceral material is shown to maintain its fluorescing properties after being converted to a structureless material, perhaps a corpohuminite or humodetrinite precursor. Fluorescing xylem cell contents, such as condensed tannins or essential oils, can maintain the fluorescent character through early coalification. Xylem cell walls and xylem cell contents are shown to provide fluorescing progenitor materials which would not require subsequent infusion with 'lipid' materials to account for their fluorescence as phytoclast material or as macerals in coal. 35 references.

  17. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  19. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  20. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Abuelela, Ayman F.; Mohammad, Amal Jehad

    2017-01-01

    scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least

  1. Clinical value of 18F-FDG coincidence imaging for diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Yanli; Lou Cen; Huang Zhongke; Shi Guohua; Chen Dongfang; Mu Da

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging for diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: A total of 45 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (33 males and 12 females, average age (55.56 ± 13.50) years), who underwent 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging before treatment, were studied retrospectively. The images of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging (GE Millennium VG SPECT) and MRI were analyzed. The radioactivity ratio of the accumulated regions to cerebellum (T/NT)was calculated by ROI technique. The volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was recorded by MRI. The positive rates of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging and EB virus-related antibody measurements were compared by paired χ 2 test. The correlation between T/NT ratios and tumor volumes were tested by Pearson correlation, and then ROC curves were established. The T/NT ratios and tumor volumes of different groups (different first symptoms, clinical stages, T stages, pathological classification and outcomes, with or without lymph node enlargement) were compared by t-test and rank sum test. Results: The positive rate of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging was 97.78% (44/45), and the positive rate of EB virus-related antibody measurement was 95.56% (43/45, χ 2 =1.33, P>0.05). The T/NT ratio (2.439 ±1.119) and tumor volume ((7.311 ± 8.280) cm 3 ) of primary lesions had a positive correlation (r=0.463, P<0.05). The cut-off values of T/NT ratio and the tumor volume were 2.396 and 7.348 cm 3 , respectively, by ROC curves. T/NT ratios in groups with or without first symptom of epistaxis (2.847 ± 1.254 vs 2.082 ± 0.863, t=-2.409) and groups with or without facial numbness (2.855 ± 1.261 vs 2.134 ± 0.913, t=-2.225) were both significantly different (both P<0.05). T/NT ratios of differentiated and undifferentiated cancer were 2.266 ± 0.997 and 2.971 ± 1.351, respectively (t=-2.018, P<0.05). There was a significant difference of tumor volumes between groups with or without facial numbness (t=-2.684, P<0

  2. Estimating accidental coincidences for pixelated PET detectors and singles list-mode acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafecas, M.; Torres, I.; Spanoudaki, V.; McElroy, D.P.; Ziegler, S.I.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the validity of random estimation techniques for various low energy thresholds (LETs) and single list-mode data sets in small animal PET. While a LET below 255 keV helps to increase the sensitivity, it also results in an increase of random coincidences and inter-crystal scatter (ICS). The study is carried out for MADPET-II, a dual-layer positron emission tomography (PET) scanner prototype consisting of LSO crystals read out individually by APDs. The data are acquired in singles list-mode format, and coincidences are computed post-acquisition. To estimate randoms, we have used the delayed coincidence window method (DW), and the singles rate model (SR). Various phantoms were simulated using GATE. For LETs under 255 keV, the number of random events R, estimated using the SR and the DW methods, is larger than the number of randoms which was directly computed from GATE simulations, and R(SR)>R(DW)>R(GATE). The higher the LET, the smaller the overestimation. For LETs >255 keV, R(DW)/R(GATE) ∼1. If scattered singles were excluded from the file, this discrepancy between R(DW or SR) and R(GATE) significantly diminished. This fact points out to ICS as the effect responsible for the mismatch, since for LETs lower than 255 keV, all singles related to an ICS event can be detected independently, thus altering the singles rate. Therefore, if low LETs are used, random estimation techniques should account for ICS

  3. Study on the Spatial Resolution of Single and Multiple Coincidences Compton Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we study the image resolution that can be obtained from the Multiple Coincidences Compton Camera (MCCC). The principle of MCCC is based on a simultaneous acquisition of several gamma-rays emitted in cascade from a single nucleus. Contrary to a standard Compton camera, MCCC can theoretically provide the exact location of a radioactive source (based only on the identification of the intersection point of three cones created by a single decay), without complicated tomographic reconstruction. However, practical implementation of the MCCC approach encounters several problems, such as low detection sensitivities result in very low probability of coincident triple gamma-ray detection, which is necessary for the source localization. It is also important to evaluate how the detection uncertainties (finite energy and spatial resolution) influence identification of the intersection of three cones, thus the resulting image quality. In this study we investigate how the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images using the triple-cone reconstruction (TCR) approach compares to images reconstructed from the same data using standard iterative method based on single-cone. Results show, that FWHM for the point source reconstructed with TCR was 20-30% higher than the one obtained from the standard iterative reconstruction based on expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and conventional single-cone Compton imaging. Finite energy and spatial resolutions of the MCCC detectors lead to errors in conical surfaces definitions (“thick” conical surfaces) which only amplify in image reconstruction when intersection of three cones is being sought. Our investigations show that, in spite of being conceptually appealing, the identification of triple cone intersection constitutes yet another restriction of the multiple coincidence approach which limits the image resolution that can be obtained with MCCC and TCR algorithm.

  4. Chronic auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients: MR analysis of the coincidence between functional and morphologic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Lull, Juan José; García-Martí, Gracián; Aguilar, Eduardo J; Moratal-Pérez, David; Poyatos, Cecilio; Robles, Montserrat; Sanjuán, Julio

    2007-08-01

    To prospectively evaluate if functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging abnormalities associated with auditory emotional stimuli coexist with focal brain reductions in schizophrenic patients with chronic auditory hallucinations. Institutional review board approval was obtained and all participants gave written informed consent. Twenty-one right-handed male patients with schizophrenia and persistent hallucinations (started to hear hallucinations at a mean age of 23 years +/- 10, with 15 years +/- 8 of mean illness duration) and 10 healthy paired participants (same ethnic group [white], age, and education level [secondary school]) were studied. Functional echo-planar T2*-weighted (after both emotional and neutral auditory stimulation) and morphometric three-dimensional gradient-recalled echo T1-weighted MR images were analyzed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2) software. Brain activation images were extracted by subtracting those with emotional from nonemotional words. Anatomic differences were explored by optimized voxel-based morphometry. The functional and morphometric MR images were overlaid to depict voxels statistically reported by both techniques. A coincidence map was generated by multiplying the emotional subtracted functional MR and volume decrement morphometric maps. Statistical analysis used the general linear model, Student t tests, random effects analyses, and analysis of covariance with a correction for multiple comparisons following the false discovery rate method. Large coinciding brain clusters (P < .005) were found in the left and right middle temporal and superior temporal gyri. Smaller coinciding clusters were found in the left posterior and right anterior cingular gyri, left inferior frontal gyrus, and middle occipital gyrus. The middle and superior temporal and the cingular gyri are closely related to the abnormal neural network involved in the auditory emotional dysfunction seen in schizophrenic patients.

  5. Poster – 02: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Reconstruction using higher order Scattered Photon Coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hongwei; Pistorius, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, CancerCare, Manitoba (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    PET images are affected by the presence of scattered photons. Incorrect scatter-correction may cause artifacts, particularly in 3D PET systems. Current scatter reconstruction methods do not distinguish between single and higher order scattered photons. A dual-scattered reconstruction method (GDS-MLEM) that is independent of the number of Compton scattering interactions and less sensitive to the need for high energy resolution detectors, is proposed. To avoid overcorrecting for scattered coincidences, the attenuation coefficient was calculated by integrating the differential Klein-Nishina cross-section over a restricted energy range, accounting only for scattered photons that were not detected. The optimum image can be selected by choosing an energy threshold which is the upper energy limit for the calculation of the cross-section and the lower limit for scattered photons in the reconstruction. Data was simulated using the GATE platform. 500,000 multiple scattered photon coincidences with perfect energy resolution were reconstructed using various methods. The GDS-MLEM algorithm had the highest confidence (98%) in locating the annihilation position and was capable of reconstructing the two largest hot regions. 100,000 photon coincidences, with a scatter fraction of 40%, were used to test the energy resolution dependence of different algorithms. With a 350–650 keV energy window and the restricted attenuation correction model, the GDS-MLEM algorithm was able to improve contrast recovery and reduce the noise by 7.56%–13.24% and 12.4%–24.03%, respectively. This approach is less sensitive to the energy resolution and shows promise if detector energy resolutions of 12% can be achieved.

  6. Utilization of coincidence criteria in absolute length measurements by optical interferometry in vacuum and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schödel, R

    2015-01-01

    Traceability of length measurements to the international system of units (SI) can be realized by using optical interferometry making use of well-known frequencies of monochromatic light sources mentioned in the Mise en Pratique for the realization of the metre. At some national metrology institutes, such as Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany, the absolute length of prismatic bodies (e.g. gauge blocks) is realized by so-called gauge-block interference comparators. At PTB, a number of such imaging phase-stepping interference comparators exist, including specialized vacuum interference comparators, each equipped with three highly stabilized laser light sources. The length of a material measure is expressed as a multiple of each wavelength. The large number of integer interference orders can be extracted by the method of exact fractions in which the coincidence of the lengths resulting from the different wavelengths is utilized as a criterion. The unambiguous extraction of the integer interference orders is an essential prerequisite for correct length measurements. This paper critically discusses coincidence criteria and their validity for three modes of absolute length measurements: 1) measurements under vacuum in which the wavelengths can be identified with the vacuum wavelengths, 2) measurements under air in which the air refractive index is obtained from environmental parameters using an empirical equation, and 3) measurements under air in which the air refractive index is obtained interferometrically by utilizing a vacuum cell placed along the measurement pathway. For case 3), which corresponds to PTB’s Kösters-Comparator for long gauge blocks, the unambiguous determination of integer interference orders related to the air refractive index could be improved by about a factor of ten when an ‘overall dispersion value,’ suggested in this paper, is used as coincidence criterion. (paper)

  7. Disintegration rate of Tc -99m and In -111 radioactive solutions in coincidence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Andreia Barreto de

    2011-01-01

    The 111 In and 99 mTc standardization in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system is described. The 111 In was produced by the reaction of 111 Cd (p, n) 111 In in the cyclotron. The 111 In decays with a half life of 2.8 days by electron capture process, populating the excited levels of 111 Cd, emitting two main gamma rays with energies of 171 keV and 245 keV. The 99m Tc decay with a half life of 6.007 h for isomeric transition, from the radioactive decay of 99 Mo. 111 In standardization was carried out in a 4πβ-γ system, consisted of a gas flow proportional counter with 4π geometry coupled to a pair of NaI(Tl) scintillation counter with conventional electronics. The gamma window was set comprising the (171 keV + 245 keV) total absorption energy peaks. The choice of the window was based on the analysis of the extrapolation curves prediction, obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The 99 mTc standardization has been accomplished by the 4πβ-γ coincidence method using a thin window proportional counter in a 4π geometry coupled to a single NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The beta efficiency was varied by electronic discrimination using a software coincidence counting system (SCS). Two windows were selected for the gamma channel: one at 140 keV gamma ray and the other at 20 keV X ray total absorption peaks. The result of the experimental activity of 111 In two solutions agree with the results obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental activities of 99m Tc for the two gamma windows are in agreement within the experimental uncertainty, indicating that the adopted methodology is adequate. (author)

  8. Coinciding exercise with peak serum caffeine does not improve cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Tina L; Jenkins, David G; Taaffe, Dennis R; Leveritt, Michael D; Coombes, Jeff S

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether coinciding peak serum caffeine concentration with the onset of exercise enhances subsequent endurance performance. Randomised, double-blind, crossover. In this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study, 14 male trained cyclists and triathletes (age 31±5year, body mass 75.4±5.7 kg, VO₂max 69.5±6.1 mL kg⁻¹ min⁻¹ and peak power output 417±35W, mean±SD) consumed 6 mg kg(-1) caffeine or a placebo either 1h (C(1h)) prior to completing a 40 km time trial or when the start of exercise coincided with individual peak serum caffeine concentrations (C(peak)). C(peak) was determined from a separate 'caffeine profiling' session that involved monitoring caffeine concentrations in the blood every 30 min over a 4h period. Following caffeine ingestion, peak serum caffeine occurred 120 min in 12 participants and 150 min in 2 participants. Time to complete the 40 km time trial was significantly faster (2.0%; p=0.002) in C(1h) compared to placebo. No statistically significant improvement in performance was noted in the C(peak) trial versus placebo (1.1%; p=0.240). Whilst no differences in metabolic markers were found between C(peak) and placebo conditions, plasma concentrations of glucose (p=0.005), norepinephrine and epinephrine (p≤0.002) were higher in the C(1h) trial 6 min post-exercise versus placebo. In contrast to coinciding peak serum caffeine concentration with exercise onset, caffeine consumed 60 min prior to exercise resulted in significant improvements in 40 km time trial performance. The ergogenic effect of caffeine was not found to be related to peak caffeine concentration in the blood at the onset of endurance exercise. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  10. Optical isotope shifts of sup(80,82)Sr from coincidence laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Smith, J.R.H.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Wells, S.A.; Fawcett, M.J.; Grant, I.S.

    1986-01-01

    The isotope shifts of radioactive sup(80,82)Sr have been measured by a new, ultrasensitive, laser fluorescence technique. The results have been used to calculate changes in nuclear charge radii. The values, together with those of nearby stable isotopes, are discussed in terms of changes in the static and dynamic nuclear deformations. (author)

  11. An application of the coincidence Doppler spectroscopy for substances of chemical interest: phthalocyanine and acetylacetonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    2000-01-01

    Coincidence Doppler spectroscopy, which is particularly powerful when one is concerned with high momentum components of positron annihilation gamma-rays, has been applied to two different kinds of organo-metallic ligands: metal phthalocyanines and metal acetylacetonates. The energy (momentum) profiles of the annihilation gamma-rays were the same for metal phthalocyanines indicating that positron and/or positronium are not interacting with the metal ions. However, the profiles for the metal acetylacetonates evidently showed a dependence on the kind of metal ions. Discussion is made on the features of positron interaction which are different for phthalocyanines and acetylacetonates.

  12. Manual asymmetry in older adults on a complex coincidence-anticipation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paula Cristina Dos Santos; Silva, João Miguel Carvalho da; Barreiros, João Manuel Pardal; Vasconcelos, Maria Olga Fernandes

    2018-04-20

    Age-related asymmetrical functional decline was tested in a sample of 57 right-handed volunteers between 65 and 85 years of age. Participants performed a complex coincidence-anticipation (CA) task with both preferred and non-preferred hands. Results demonstrated that the proficiency of a complex CA task was similar for the 2 age groups, but different for the 2 hands. The non-preferred hand was more proficient for temporal accuracy but not for response timing, which was similar for both hands. Moreover, the lack of interaction between age and hand both in response timing and response accuracy reveal symmetric performance across ages.

  13. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters

  14. The high-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNCC) family of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, A.; Dahn, E.; Selleck, E.; Kupryashkin, V.; Dubreuil, A.

    1983-01-01

    A description of a group of detectors based on The High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter (HLNCC) concept is presented. Experience in their utilization is summarized and the procedures followed in calibration and data treatment are described. Advantages of the use of this variety of detectors in simplifying the NDA verifications, reducing the interference with facility operators, and increasing the effectiveness of the inspectors' work are stressed. Likewise, remaining problems such as the need for a vigorous programme directed at achieving the best independent calibrations are emphasized. (author)

  15. 65Zn and 133Ba standardizing by photon-photon coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Jamir S.; da Cruz, Paulo A. L.; Iwahara, Akira; Delgado, José U.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2018-03-01

    The LNMRI/Brazil has deployed a system using X-gamma coincidence technique for the standardizing radionuclide, which present simple and complex decay scheme with X-rays of energy below 100 keV. The work was carried on radionuclide metrology laboratory using a sodium iodide detector, for gamma photons, in combination with a high purity germanium detector for X-rays. Samples of 65Zn and 133Ba were standardized and the results for both radionuclides showed good precision and accuracy when compared with reference values. The standardization differences were 0.72 % for 65Zn and 0.48 % for 133Ba samples.

  16. Uranium cross-calibration measurements using an active well coincidence counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.; Prochine, I.; Smirnov, V.; Ensslin, N.; Carillo, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the cross-calibration of an Active Well Coincidence Counter for use in the Materials Protection, Control, and Accountability Graduate Program at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). The cross-calibration procedure and its application to nuclear material types available at MEPhI for instructional purposes is described. Cross-calibration results at Los Alamos and initial applications at MEPhI are summarized. Based on the results so far, the authors conclude that the cross-calibration approach seems useful, with good prospects for potential applications at other Russian and US Dept. of Energy facilities

  17. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency with coincident NEMO and EDA Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Keller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasias (ED are uncommon genetic disorders resulting in abnormalities in ectodermally-derived structures. Though many ED-associated genes have been described, the NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO encoded by the IKBKG gene is unique in that mutations also result in severe humoral and cellular immunologic defects. We describe three unrelated kindreds with defects in both EDA and IKBKG resulting from an X-chromosome crossover. This demonstrates the importance of thorough immunologic consideration of patients with ED even when an EDA etiology is confirmed, and raises the possibility of a specific phenotype arising from coincident mutations in EDA and IKBKB.

  18. Hall effects on unsteady MHD flow between two rotating disks with non-coincident parallel axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, R.N., E-mail: barik.rabinarayan@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Trident Academy of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Dash, G.C., E-mail: gcdash@indiatimes.com [Department of Mathematics, S.O.A. University, Bhubaneswar (India); Rath, P.K., E-mail: pkrath_1967@yahoo.in [Department of Mathematics, B.R.M. International Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2013-01-15

    Hall effects on the unsteady MHD rotating flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two rotating disks with non-coincident parallel axes have been studied. There exists an axisymmetric solution to this problem. The governing equations are solved by applying Laplace transform method. It is found that the torque experienced by the disks decreases with an increase in either the Hall parameter, m or the rotation parameter, S{sup 2}. Further, the axis of rotation has no effect on the fluid flow. (author)

  19. Hall effects on unsteady MHD flow between two rotating disks with non-coincident parallel axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, R.N.; Dash, G.C.; Rath, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hall effects on the unsteady MHD rotating flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two rotating disks with non-coincident parallel axes have been studied. There exists an axisymmetric solution to this problem. The governing equations are solved by applying Laplace transform method. It is found that the torque experienced by the disks decreases with an increase in either the Hall parameter, m or the rotation parameter, S 2 . Further, the axis of rotation has no effect on the fluid flow. (author)

  20. Coincident Auger electron and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for low-energy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, G.; Tarisien, M.; Flechard, X.; Jardin, P.; Guillaume, L.; Sobocinski, P.; Adoui, L.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; Fremont, F.; Hennecart, D.; Lienard, E.; Maunoury, L.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Cassimi, A.

    2003-01-01

    The recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS) method combined with the detection of Auger electrons has been used successfully to analyse double electron capture following O 6+ + He collisions at low impact velocities. Although RIMS and Auger spectroscopies are known to be efficient tools to obtain details on the primary processes occurring during the collision, the conjunction of both techniques provides new insights on the electron capture process. In the present experiment, triple coincidence detection of the scattered projectile, the target recoil ion and the Auger electron allows for a precise identification of the doubly excited states O 4+ (1s 2 nln ' l ' ) populated after double electron-capture events

  1. Constructing coincident indices of economic activity for the Latin American economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Issler

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has three main contributions. The first is to propose an individual coincident indicator for the following Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico. In order to obtain similar series to those traditionally used in business-cycle research in constructing coincident indices (output, sales, income and employment we were forced to back-cast several individual country series which were not available in a long time-series span. The second contribution is to establish a chronology of recessions for these countries, covering the period from 1980 to 2012 on a monthly basis. Based on this chronology, the countries are compared in several respects. The final contribution is to propose an aggregate coincident indicator for the Latin American economy, which weights individual-country composite indices. Finally, this indicator is compared with the coincident indicator (The Conference Board - TCB of the U.S. economy. We find that the U.S. indicator Granger-causes the Latin American indicator in statistical testsEsse artigo tem 3 contribuições à literatura de ciclos de negócios. A primeira é a de construir indicadores coincidentes de atividade econômica para Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colômbia e México, usando pesos idênticos para as séries de Emprego, Produção, Renda, e Vendas. Para tal, tivemos que fazer o back-cast de algumas séries chave para poder construir esses indicadores. A segunda é a de estabelecer uma cronologia de recessões para esses países no período 1980-2012 em bases mensais. Com base na última, fazemos comparações em várias dimensões. Finalmente, nossa última contribuição é propor um índice coincidente agregado para a América Latina, que é comparado ao índice agregado dos EUA. Esta comparação indica que o índice coincidente dos EUA Granger-causa o da América Latina, mas a recíproca não é verdadeira

  2. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renteria, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Munoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost γ-γ TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for 181 Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast-fast and slow-fast PAC spectrometers.

  3. 65Zn and 133Ba standardizing by photon-photon coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Jamir S.; Cruz, Paulo A.L. da; Iwahara, Akira; Delgado, José U.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2017-01-01

    The LNMRI/Brazil has deployed a system using X-gamma coincidence technique for the standardizing radionuclide, which present simple and complex decay scheme with X-rays of energy below 100 keV. The work was carried on radionuclide metrology laboratory using a sodium iodide detector, for gamma photons, in combination with a high purity germanium detector for X-rays. Samples of 65 Zn and 133 Ba were standardized and the results for both radionuclides showed good precision and accuracy when compared with reference values. The standardization differences were 0.72 % for 65 Zn and 0.48 % for 133 Ba samples. (author)

  4. Xe isotope detection and discrimination using beta spectroscopy with coincident gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, P. L.; Bowyer, T. W.

    1998-02-01

    Beta spectroscopic techniques show promise of significant improvements for a beta-gamma coincidence counter that is part of a system for analyzing Xe automatically separated from air. The previously developed counting system for 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, and 135gXe can be enhanced to give additional discrimination between these Xe isotopes by using the plastic scintillation sample cell as a beta spectrometer to resolve the conversion electron peaks. The automated system will be a key factor in monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  5. A note on the local cosmological constant and the dark energy coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajmar, M

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dark energy coincidence problem could be interpreted as a possible link between the cosmological constant and a massive graviton. We show that by using this link and models for the graviton mass, a dark energy density can be obtained that is indeed very close to measurements by WMAP. As a consequence of the models, the cosmological constant was found to depend on the density of matter. A brief outline of the cosmological consequences such as the effect on the black hole solution is given. (comments, replies and notes)

  6. Mid-infrared coincidence measurements on twin photons at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancinelli, M.; Trenti, A.; Piccione, S.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum measurements using single-photon detectors are opening interesting new perspectives in diverse fields such as remote sensing, quantum cryptography and quantum computing. A particularly demanding class of applications relies on the simultaneous detection of correlated single photons...... pave the way to quantum measurements in the MIR by the demonstration of a room temperature coincidence measurement with non-degenerate twin photons at about 3.1 mu m. The experiment is based on the spectral translation of MIR radiation into the visible region, by means of efficient up-converter modules...

  7. Phantom dark energy with varying-mass dark matter particles: Acceleration and cosmic coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate several varying-mass dark matter particle models in the framework of phantom cosmology. We examine whether there exist late-time cosmological solutions, corresponding to an accelerating universe and possessing dark energy and dark matter densities of the same order. Imposing exponential or power-law potentials and exponential or power-law mass dependence, we conclude that the coincidence problem cannot be solved or even alleviated. Thus, if dark energy is attributed to the phantom paradigm, varying-mass dark matter models cannot fulfill the basic requirement that led to their construction.

  8. {sup 65}Zn and {sup 133}Ba standardizing by photon-photon coincidence counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Jamir S.; Cruz, Paulo A.L. da; Iwahara, Akira; Delgado, José U., E-mail: palcruz@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The LNMRI/Brazil has deployed a system using X-gamma coincidence technique for the standardizing radionuclide, which present simple and complex decay scheme with X-rays of energy below 100 keV. The work was carried on radionuclide metrology laboratory using a sodium iodide detector, for gamma photons, in combination with a high purity germanium detector for X-rays. Samples of {sup 65}Zn and {sup 133}Ba were standardized and the results for both radionuclides showed good precision and accuracy when compared with reference values. The standardization differences were 0.72 % for {sup 65}Zn and 0.48 % for {sup 133}Ba samples. (author)

  9. Silicon PIN diode based electron-gamma coincidence detector system for Noble Gases monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, K; Popov, V Yu; Popov, Yu S

    2017-08-01

    We present a new second generation SiPIN based electron-photon coincidence detector system developed by Lares Ltd. for use in the Noble Gas measurement systems of the International Monitoring System and the On-site Inspection verification regimes of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The SiPIN provide superior energy resolution for electrons. Our work describes the improvements made in the second generation detector cells and the potential use of such detector systems for other applications such as In-Situ Kr-85 measurements for non-proliferation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a coincidence circuit with nanosecond resolving time for NaI(Tl) scintillator pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripon, R.; Coussot, G.

    1969-01-01

    The principle and the details of a slow-fast type coincidence circuit for pulses delivered by Nal(Tl) scintillators are presented. Thanks to a voluntary limitation of the analysis band (150 keV to 1 MeV) an excellent stability is obtained with respect to thermal drifts. The resolving time which has been adopted, 4 ns with 100 per cent efficiency, is quite sufficient for the projected experiment but does not represent the optimum performance of which the circuit is capable [fr

  11. Deconvolution of 2D coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.D.; Zhou, T.J.; Cheung, C.K.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.; Ng, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Coincident Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (CDBS) measurements are popular in positron solid-state studies of materials. By utilizing the instrumental resolution function obtained from a gamma line close in energy to the 511 keV annihilation line, it is possible to significantly enhance the quality of the CDBS spectra using deconvolution algorithms. In this paper, we compare two algorithms, namely the Non-Negativity Least Squares (NNLS) regularized method and the Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm. The latter, which is based on the method of maximum likelihood, is found to give superior results to the regularized least-squares algorithm and with significantly less computer processing time

  12. Interesting coincidence of atypical TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanowski, Marek; Zieliński, Grzegorz; Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra; Maksymowicz, Maria; Potoczek, Stanisław; Syrycka, Joanna; Podgórski, Jan K

    2014-01-01

    Thyrotropin-secreting adenomas (TSH-oma) are very rare pituitary tumours. They are macroadenomas usually presenting with signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism, and mass effects. They can co-secrete other hormones such as growth hormone or prolactin. Different malignancies, including haematological ones, are reported in patients with pituitary diseases. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) occurs mostly in older patients, more often in males. CLL is associated with increased risk of second malignancies such as other blood neoplasms, skin and solid tumours. We present a successful neurosurgical outcome in a patient with an interesting coincidence of atypical TSH-oma and asymptomatic CLL.

  13. Study of the continuum in heavy ion inelastic spectra by light particle coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpaci, J.A.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Frascaria, N.; Garron, J.P.; Roynette, J.C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Van der Woude, A.; Alamanos, N.; Fernandez, B.; Gillibert, A.; Van der Woude, A.; Lepine, A.

    1990-01-01

    The continuum in heavy ion inelastic spectra contains, in addition to the excitation of target nucleus states, contributions from pick-up break-up and knock out reactions. In the case of the 40 Ca + 40 Ca collision at 50 MeV/N these contributions are separated and their relative importance assessed by the measurement of light charged particles in coincidence with the inelastically scattered fragments. The pick-up break-up contribution is found to make up less than half of the cross section at high excitation energies, conversely, the knock out process is important

  14. Method for improving the gamma-transition cascade spectra amplitude resolution during coincidence code computerized processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A method of unfolding the differential γ-cascade spectra during radiation capture of slow neutrons based on the computeri-- zed processing of the results of measurements performed, by means of a spectrometer with two Ge(Li) detectors is suggested. The efficiency of the method is illustrated using as an example the spectrum of 35 Cl(n, γ) reaction corresponding to the 8580 keV peak. It is shown that the above approach permits to improve the resolution by 1.2-2.6 times without decrease in registration efficiency within the framework of the method of coincidence pulse amplitude summation

  15. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria, M., E-mail: renteria@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Munoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas (Argentina)

    2008-01-15

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost {gamma}-{gamma} TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for {sup 181}Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast-fast and slow-fast PAC spectrometers.

  16. Studies of the electron-impact double-ionisation process in magnesium using coincidence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    This article will review recent measurements of the electron-impact double-ionisation of atomic magnesium. Results for the resonant Auger double-ionisation process with coincident detection of all three outgoing electrons, the (e, 3e) experiment, and for the direct double-ionisation process where only two outgoing electrons are detected, the (e, (3 -1)e) experiment, will be discussed. The results are analysed with reference to ionisation mechanisms and comparisons are made with calculated double-ionisation cross sections. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  17. Absolute measurements of the alpha-gamma emitters activities by a sum-coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a UO 2 sample, using a sum-coincidence circuit which selected only the alpha particles which were simultaneous with the well known 184 Kev gamma radiation from Th-231. The alpha particles were detected by ZnS(Ag) scintillator specially designed to show its maximun efficiency for U-235 alpha particles, whereas the gamma radiation was detected by NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The values obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with data from various observers using different experimental techniques. (Author) [pt

  18. Fluorescence molecular tomography in the presence of background fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubret, Antoine; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography is an emerging imaging technique that resolves the bio-distribution of engineered fluorescent probes developed for in vivo reporting of specific cellular and sub-cellular targets. The method can detect fluorochromes in picomole amounts or less, imaged through entire animals, but the detection sensitivity and imaging performance drop in the presence of background, non-specific fluorescence. In this study, we carried out a theoretical and an experimental investigation on the effect of background fluorescence on the measured signal and on the tomographic reconstruction. We further examined the performance of three subtraction methods based on physical models of photon propagation, using experimental data on phantoms and small animals. We show that the data pre-processing with subtraction schemes can improve image quality and quantification when non-specific background florescence is present

  19. Minority n out of m coincidence circuits for time-differential experiments with multi-detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunsfurth, J.; Geske, K.

    1976-01-01

    Two n out of m minority coincidence circuits (n<=8, 15<=m<=31), employed for time-differential experiments are presented. Specifications like obtainable prompt coincidence resolution time, expandability to higher detector numbers m, implementation variants and their consequences, and some application modes are discussed. Hardware expenses on electronics for m-detector arrays usually rise nearly proportional to m factorial. In the coincidence system proposed here, the rise in hardware expenses can be reduced to slightly more than proportional to m, without sacrifice in experimental quality and flexibility. (Auth.)

  20. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, Aruna; Ganguly, Rumpa [Dept. of Diagnosis and Health Promotion, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston (United States); Soroushian, Sheila [Dept. of Orthodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC(United States)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, 'With CCAP' and 'Without CCAP', there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health.

  1. PET with a coincidence gamma camera: results in selected oncological questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, I.; Haase, A; Adam, S.; Prueter, I.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Since early 1997, about 1660 investigations with coincidence gamma camera PET (CGC-PET) have been performed in our department, mostly undertaken for oncological questions. Based on these data, several retrospective and prospective studies were performed. In the following, the results in CUP (cancer of unknown primary) syndrome, melanoma and malignant lymphoma are presented. Methods: CGC-PET was performed after application of 250-350 MBq [ 18 F]FDG using a coincidence double head gamma camera with 19 mm Nal cristal. CUP-Syndrome: After completing conventional diagnostic procedures, 32 patients have been examined in a prospective study, including 25 patients with recently detected CUP and 7 patients undergoing restaging after therapy. Localization of the primary tumor was successful in 12 (38%) cases. Melanoma: We evaluated 50 studies in 41 patients suffering from melanoma, retrospectively. CGC-PET showed a sensitivity of 76%, and a specificity of 94%. In comparison to conventional diagnostic methods, CGC-PET delineated important additional information in 16%. CGC-PET was superior to morphological diagnostic tools in the differentiation between residual scar tissue and active tumor following immunochemotherapy. Malignant lymphoma: 29 CGC-PET in 29 patients were performed for staging of malignant lymphoma, sensitivity was 86% versus 88% for CT. Overall CGC-PET showed additional information to conventional diagnostic methods, but revealed problems in detecting small infiltrations of organs. In restaging malignant melanoma (26 patients, 33 studies), specificity of CGC-PET was superior to conventional diagnostics (92% versus 35%). (orig.) [de

  2. F-18 FDG PET with coincidence detection, dual-head gamma camera, initial experience in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.M.G.; Pocock, N.; Quach, T.; Camden, B.M.C. [Liverpool Health Services, Liverpool, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Ultrasound

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The development of Co-incidence Detection (CD) in gamma camera technology has allowed the use of positron radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice without dedicated PET facilities. We report our initial experience of this technology in Oncological applications. All patients were administered 200 MBq of F- 18 FDG intravenously in a fasting state, with serum glucose below 8.9 mmol/L., and hydration well maintained. Tomography was performed using an ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) dual-head gamma camera, 60 minutes after administration and immediately after voiding. Tomography of the torso required up to three collections depending on the length of the patient, with each collection requiring 32 steps of 40 second duration, and a 50% overlap. Tomography of the brain required a single collection with 32 steps of 80 seconds. Patients were scanned in the supine position. An iterative reconstruction algorithm was employed without attenuation correction. All patients had histologically confirmed malignancy. Scan findings were correlated with results of all conventional diagnostic imaging procedures that were pertinent to the evaluation and management of each individual patient`s disease. Correlation with tumour type and treatment status was also undertaken. F-18 FDG uptake as demonstrated by CD-PET was increased in tumour bearing sites. The degree of increased uptake varied with tumour type and with treatment status. Our initial experience with CD-PET has been very encouraging, and has led us to undertake prospective short and long term studies to define its role in oncology

  3. Aspects of the cosmological ''coincidence problem''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velten, H.E.S.; Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Departamento de Fisica, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    The observational fact that the present values of the densities of dark energy and dark matter are of the same order of magnitude, ρ{sub de0}/ρ{sub dm0} ∝ O(1), seems to indicate that we are currently living in a very special period of the cosmic history. Within the standard model, a density ratio of the order of one just at the present epoch can be seen as coincidental since it requires very special initial conditions in the early Universe. The corresponding ''why now'' question constitutes the cosmological ''coincidence problem''. According to the standard model the equality ρ{sub de} = ρ{sub dm} took place ''recently'' at a redshift z ∼ 0.55. The meaning of ''recently'' is, however, parameter dependent. In terms of the cosmic time the situation looks different. We discuss several aspects of the ''coincidence problem'', also in its relation to the cosmological constant problem, to issues of structure formation and to cosmic age considerations. (orig.)

  4. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, Aruna; Ganguly, Rumpa; Soroushian, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, 'With CCAP' and 'Without CCAP', there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health.

  5. Fast procedures for coincidence-summing correction in γ-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Felice, Pierino; Angelini, Paola; Fazio, Aldo; Biagini, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    Simplified and fast procedures for coincidence-summing correction in γ-ray spectrometry were investigated. These procedures are based on the usual theoretical expressions of the correction factors, but differ in the determination of the total efficiency curve based on the following approximations: (a) replacement, below the knee efficiency value, of the total efficiency by the full-energy peak efficiency; and (b) use of linear interpolations (in log-log plot) between only two experimental points above the knee efficiency value; or (c) assumption of a peak-to-total efficiency ratio independent on the counting geometry; or (d) assumption of a constant relation between the peak-to-total efficiency ratios and the photoelectric-to-total cross section ratios. The above approximations were separately assumed for determination of the coincidence-summing correction factors for nuclides with complex decay scheme ( 133 Ba, 134 Cs, 152 Eu) and for 60 Co and 88 Y measured on a 15% relative efficiency p-type coaxial HPGe detector, for three source-detector geometries: point source placed on top of and at 10 cm from the detector window, and 1 l Marinelli beaker filled with aqueous solution. The results were compared with those based on more accurate experimental determinations of the total efficiency curve from measurements of standard sources of eight different single-γ-ray emitters. The usefulness of each simplified procedure is evaluated with respect to its accuracy and to the reduction of the number of standard sources and measurement time

  6. Design of a coincidence processing board for a dual-head PET scanner for breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.D.; Toledo, J.; Esteve, R.; Sebastia, A.; Mora, F.J.; Benlloch, J.M.; Fernandez, M.M.; Gimenez, M.; Gimenez, E.N.; Lerche, Ch.W.; Pavon, N.; Sanchez, F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a coincidence processing board for a dual-head Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner for breast imaging. The proposed block-oriented data acquisition system relies on a high-speed DSP processor for fully digital trigger and on-line event processing that surpasses the performance of traditional analog coincidence detection systems. A mixed-signal board has been designed and manufactured. The analog section comprises 12 coaxial inputs (six per head) which are digitized by means of two 8-channel 12-bit 40-MHz ADCs in order to acquire the scintillation pulse, the charge division signals and the depth of interaction within the scintillator. At the digital section, a state-of-the-art FPGA is used as deserializer and also implements the DMA interface to the DSP processor by storing each digitized channel into a fast embedded FIFO memory. The system incorporates a high-speed USB 2.0 interface to the host computer

  7. Development of a geometric uncertainty model describing the accuracy of position-sensitive, coincidence neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L., E-mail: cory@psu.ed [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania, State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brenizer, J.S. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania, State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A diameter of uncertainty (D{sub u}) was derived from a geometric uncertainty model describing the error that would be introduced into position-sensitive, coincidence neutron detection measurements by charged-particle transport phenomena and experimental setup. The transport of {alpha} and Li ions, produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) {sup 7}Li reaction, through free-standing boro-phosphosilicate glass (BPSG) films was modeled using the Monte Carlo code SRIM, and the results of these simulations were used as input to determine D{sub u} for position-sensitive, coincidence techniques. The results of these calculations showed that D{sub u} is dependent on encoder separation, the angle of charged particle emission, and film thickness. For certain emission scenarios, the magnitude of D{sub u} is larger than the physical size of the neutron converting media that were being modeled. Spheres of uncertainty were developed that describe the difference in flight path times among the bounding-case emission scenarios that were considered in this work. It was shown the overlapping spheres represent emission angles and particle flight path lengths that would be difficult to resolve in terms of particle time-of-flight measurements. However, based on the timing resolution of current nuclear instrumentation, emission events that yield large D{sub u} can be discriminated by logical arguments during spectral deconvolution.

  8. Investigating the γ decay of 65Ni from particle-γ coincidence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, L. Crespo; Larsen, A. C.; Garrote, F. L. Bello; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Klintefjord, M.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.

    2017-07-01

    The γ decay of 65Ni has been studied from particle-γ coincidence data on the 64Ni(d ,p γ )65Ni reaction. γ -ray spectra at excitation energies below Ex≈2 MeV have been studied and compared with previous measurements. Coincidences corresponding to Ex≈4.4 -6.1 MeV have been used to constrain the shape of the nuclear level density and γ -strength function of 65Ni by means of the Oslo method. The experimental γ -strength function presents an enhancement at γ energies below Eγ≈3 MeV . In addition, a resonance-like structure centered at Eγ≈4.6 MeV is seen together with accumulated strength at Eγ≈2.6 -3.6 MeV . The obtained results contribute to the systematic study of γ decay in the Ni isotopes, which is of great interest for the understanding of both single-particle and collective nuclear structure phenomena.

  9. The manifestation of 18F-FDG imaging of coincidence SPECT in benign pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jisheng; Liu Jinjun; Wu Jiyong; Pan Huizhong; Wang Huoqiang; Shen Yi; Shi Degang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the uptake of the 18 F-FDG in the benign pulmonary diseases with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system. Methods: Scanning were performed with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system for patients with pulmonary diseases,the uptake and the imaging characteristic of the diseases were analysed. Results: 1) In 28 tuberculosis (TB) patients, 19 cases with a negative imaging (68%, 19/28), whereas 9 cases with a positive result (32%, 9/28). The T/N value of the TB is 1.7 +- 1.2, but the T/N of the lung cancer is 4.1 +- 2.4, significantly different from them. In the skin PPD test, 9 cases with positive scans showed a 16.2 (12 - 22) mm diameter red spot, but 7 cases of negative scans with a 8.6 (0 - 15) mm diameter, both also have a significant difference. 2) Out of the 8 patients suffered from sarcoidosis, among them 5 active stage with positive scans, whereas another 3 remission cases with negative results. 3) In 18 inflammation cases, positive imagings were showed in 6 patients with cryptococcosis, mycoplasma pneumonia, mycosis, organized pneumonia, lung abscess and bacteria pneumonia. Conclusions: In some benign pulmonary diseases, 18 F-FDG imaging can be positive also. Analysing the characteristic of the imaging could rise specificity in lung cancer and also give some new clues to treatment of these benign pulmonary diseases

  10. Dendritic calcium channels and their activation by synaptic signals in auditory coincidence detector neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Trillium; Kuo, Sidney P; Bender, Kevin J; Apostolides, Pierre F; Trussell, Laurence O

    2009-08-01

    The avian nucleus laminaris (NL) encodes the azimuthal location of low-frequency sound sources by detecting the coincidence of binaural signals. Accurate coincidence detection requires precise developmental regulation of the lengths of the fine, bitufted dendrites that characterize neurons in NL. Such regulation has been suggested to be driven by local, synaptically mediated, dendritic signals such as Ca(2+). We examined Ca(2+) signaling through patch clamp and ion imaging experiments in slices containing nucleus laminaris from embryonic chicks. Voltage-clamp recordings of neurons located in the NL showed the presence of large Ca(2+) currents of two types, a low voltage-activated, fast inactivating Ni(2+) sensitive channel resembling mammalian T-type channels, and a high voltage-activated, slowly inactivating Cd(2+) sensitive channel. Two-photon Ca(2+) imaging showed that both channel types were concentrated on dendrites, even at their distal tips. Single action potentials triggered synaptically or by somatic current injection immediately elevated Ca(2+) throughout the entire cell. Ca(2+) signals triggered by subthreshold synaptic activity were highly localized. Thus when electrical activity is suprathreshold, Ca(2+) channels ensure that Ca(2+) rises in all dendrites, even those that are synaptically inactive.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of {beta}-{gamma} coincidence system using plastic scintillators in 4{pi} geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares: IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: msdias@ipen.br; Piuvezam-Filho, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares: IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baccarelli, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica-PUC/SP-Rua Marques de Paranagua 111, 01303-050 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Takeda, M.N. [Universidade Santo Amaro, UNISA-Rua Prof. Eneas da Siqueira Neto 340, 04829-300 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Koskinas, M.F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares: IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-09-21

    A modified version of a Monte Carlo code called Esquema, developed at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory in IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been applied for simulating a 4{pi}{beta}(PS)-{gamma} coincidence system designed for primary radionuclide standardisation. This system consists of a plastic scintillator in 4{pi} geometry, for alpha or electron detection, coupled to a NaI(Tl) counter for gamma-ray detection. The response curves for monoenergetic electrons and photons have been calculated previously by Penelope code and applied as input data to code Esquema. The latter code simulates all the disintegration processes, from the precursor nucleus to the ground state of the daughter radionuclide. As a result, the curve between the observed disintegration rate as a function of the beta efficiency parameter can be simulated. A least-squares fit between the experimental activity values and the Monte Carlo calculation provided the actual radioactive source activity, without need of conventional extrapolation procedures. Application of this methodology to {sup 60}Co and {sup 133}Ba radioactive sources is presented and showed results in good agreement with a conventional proportional counter 4{pi}{beta}(PC)-{gamma} coincidence system.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of β-γ coincidence system using plastic scintillators in 4π geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.S.; Piuvezam-Filho, H.; Baccarelli, A.M.; Takeda, M.N.; Koskinas, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    A modified version of a Monte Carlo code called Esquema, developed at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory in IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been applied for simulating a 4πβ(PS)-γ coincidence system designed for primary radionuclide standardisation. This system consists of a plastic scintillator in 4π geometry, for alpha or electron detection, coupled to a NaI(Tl) counter for gamma-ray detection. The response curves for monoenergetic electrons and photons have been calculated previously by Penelope code and applied as input data to code Esquema. The latter code simulates all the disintegration processes, from the precursor nucleus to the ground state of the daughter radionuclide. As a result, the curve between the observed disintegration rate as a function of the beta efficiency parameter can be simulated. A least-squares fit between the experimental activity values and the Monte Carlo calculation provided the actual radioactive source activity, without need of conventional extrapolation procedures. Application of this methodology to 60 Co and 133 Ba radioactive sources is presented and showed results in good agreement with a conventional proportional counter 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence system

  13. Development of Simultaneous Beta-and-Coincidence-Gamma Imager for Plant Imaging Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine

    2016-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a novel imaging system that can simultaneously acquire beta and coincidence gamma images of positron sources in thin objects such as leaves of plants. This hybrid imager can be used to measure carbon assimilation in plants quantitatively and in real-time after C-11 labeled carbon-dioxide is administered. A better understanding of carbon assimilation, particularly under the increasingly elevated atmospheric CO2 level, is extremely critical for plant scientists who study food crop and biofuel production. Phase 1 of this project is focused on the technology development with 3 specific aims: (1) develop a hybrid detector that can detect beta and gamma rays simultaneously; (2) develop an imaging system that can differentiate these two types of radiation and acquire beta and coincidence gamma images in real-time; (3) develop techniques to quantify radiotracer distribution using beta and gamma images. Phase 2 of this project is to apply technologies developed in phase 1 to study plants using positron-emitting radionuclide such as 11C to study carbon assimilation in biofuel plants.

  14. Energy and resolution calibration of detectors for noble gas β-γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Li Qi; Wang Jun; Zhao Yungang; Zhang Xinjun; Fan Yuanqing

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty(CTBT). The energy and resolution calibration of detectors is the first key technique. This paper describes in detail the energy and resolution calibration methods of NaI (Tl) and plastic scintillator detectors for the noble gas β-γ coincidence system SAUNA II-Lab. NaI (Tl) detector's energy and resolution for γ-ray were calibrated with γ radioactive point sources. Plastic scintillator detector's energy and resolution for β-ray were calibrated by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs 661.66 keV γ-ray. And the results of β-ray energy resolution calibrated by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs were compared with the results of conversion electron of 131 Xe m . In conclusion,it is an easy and feasible method of calibrating plastic scintillator detector's energy by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs,but detector's resolution calibrated by Compton scattering electrons is higher than factual result. (authors)

  15. A new approach to beta-gamma coincidence counting. Advance report on the Samar electronic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, J. E. de; Granados, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    In 4π β-γ coincidence measurements, precision on the evaluation of coincidence counting losses is made difficult because of complex overlapping effects between theβ--and γ-side dead times due to pre cursive counted events. In this context the SAMAR electronic system is aimed to give a precise way of automatic counting and reduce the need for calculated corrections. This report describes its configuration and basic features. The SAMAR has been conceived in such a manner that both beta and gamma chains are sharing a common and non extending dead-time which is simultaneously applied to both channels. The shared dead time is made to be the only one inserted throughout the chains. Overlapping effects vanish and the three counting channels have identical transmission ratios. A new dead-time circuit based on fast linear gates as blocking elements has been developed. Application of the two-oscillator Muller's method evidences a fully non-extending character. Automatism is implemented by using a live timer corrective channel controlling the counting scalers. (Author) 21 refs

  16. Coincidences in analysis: Sigmund Freud and the strange case of Dr Forsyth and Herr von Vorsicht.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierri, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Freud's interest in thought transference opens the possibility for psychoanalytic research on the primary preverbal language and the maternal function, which the emphasis on verbal and paternal communication had hidden in the background of the setting. The author advances a new interpretation of coincidences in analysis and of the psychopathology of everyday life of the setting. Starting from a strange coincidence, new hypotheses are submitted following additional readings of the unpublished manuscript of the 'Forsyth case', recovered by the author, in regard to a significant moment of transformation, both in Freud and in psychoanalysis, at the end of the war. This phase corresponds first to a change of language, from German to English, as well as to the foundation of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis by Ernest Jones. In particular, the roots of the metapsychological turn of the 1920s are explored, together with the opening of private and productive thoughts in the area of 'telepathy' that joined Freud, Ferenczi, and Anna Freud in a true 'dialogue of unconsciouses'. The free association between A Child Is Being Beaten, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, and the clinical experience with 'Herr B.' is outlined in order to understand Freud's heroic self-analysis at the time when he was treating his daughter Anna and grieving the death of his beloved Sophie. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  17. Evidence of sequential interatomic decay in argon trimers obtained by electron-triple-ion coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X-J; Saito, N; Fukuzawa, H; Morishita, Y; Stoychev, S; Kuleff, A; Suzuki, I H; Tamenori, Y; Richter, R; Pruemper, G; Ueda, K

    2007-01-01

    Sequential interatomic decay, where the first step is an Auger decay with interatomic character and the second step is a pure interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD), is identified in Ar trimers Ar 3 . The 2p hole state in Ar 3 decays via the L 2,3 M 1 M 2,3 Auger to the one-site two-hole states Ar ++ (3s -1 3p -1 )-Ar-Ar that couples to the two-site satellite states Ar + (3p -2 nl)-Ar + (3p -1 )-Ar. These states are subject to ICD to the states Ar + (3p -1 )-Ar + (3p -1 )-Ar + (3p -1 ), in which the nl electron fills the 3p hole in the same Ar site and one of the 3p electrons in the third Ar site is emitted as a slow ICD electron. This ICD process is identified unambiguously by electron-ion-ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy in which the kinetic energy of the slow ICD electron and the kinetic energy release among the three Ar + ions are measured in coincidence. (fast track communication)

  18. Comparison of the Savannah River Site billet active well coincidence counter and two Californium Shufflers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, E.T.; Griffin, J.C.; Rinard, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    A Scrap Californium Shuffler at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was calibrated to assay the U-Al cores of billets (an intermediate step in the SRS reactor fuel fabrication cycle.) The precision of the Scrap Shuffler over several years has been approximately 0.50%. A typical total uncertainty for the assay of a core on the Scrap Shuffler is approximately 0.33% for a twelve minute assay. The precision over several months and a typical total uncertainty for the Billet Active Well (neutron) Coincidence Counter (BAWCC) are approximately 1.0% and 1.9%, respectively, for a fifteen minute assay. A new Billet Californium Shuffler specifically designed for assaying SRS billets has yielded precision (over one month) and total uncertainty results of 0.40% and 0.69%, respectively, for an eight minute assay. The introduction of a measurement point into the fuel fabrication cycle to replace estimates based upon material weight will greatly enhance material and process control in the Reactor Materials area of SRS. The use of all three instruments provides a comparison of the relative merits of Active Well (neutron) Coincidence Counters (AWCCs) and shufflers for assay of homogeneous and geometrically simple material containing 235 U. The measurement precisions, systematic and random uncertainties, as well as the procurement and operation of each instrument will be compared. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Resonant Auger electron-photoion coincidence study of the fragmentation dynamics of an acrylonitrile molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooser, K; Ha, D T; Granroth, S; Itaelae, E; Nommiste, E; Kukk, E [Department of Physics, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Partanen, L; Aksela, H, E-mail: kunkoo@utu.f [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-12-14

    Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to promote K-shell electrons of nitrogen and carbon from the cyano group (C {identical_to} N) of gaseous acrylonitrile (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}-CN) to the unoccupied antibonding {pi}*{sub C} {sub {identical_to} N} orbital. Photofragmentation of acrylonitrile molecules following selective resonant core excitations of carbon and nitrogen core electrons to the {pi}*{sub C} {sub {identical_to} N} orbital was investigated using the electron-energy-resolved photoelecton-photoion coincidence technique. The fragment ion mass spectra were recorded in coincidence with the resonant Auger electrons, emitted in the decay process of the core-excited states. Singly and triply deuterated samples were used for fragment identification. The results showed the initial core-hole localization to be of minor importance in determining the dissociation pattern of the molecular cation. The participator and spectator Auger transitions produce entirely different fragmentation patterns and the latter indicates that complex nuclear rearrangements take place. It is suggested that the calculated kinetic energy releases are caused by the existence of metastable states, which appear with the opening of the spectator Auger channels.

  20. Exploring short-GRB afterglow parameter space for observations in coincidence with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Resmi, L.; Misra, Kuntal; Pai, Archana; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Short duration Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) and their afterglows are among the most promising electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of Neutron Star (NS) mergers. The afterglow emission is broad-band, visible across the entire electromagnetic window from γ-ray to radio frequencies. The flux evolution in these frequencies is sensitive to the multidimensional afterglow physical parameter space. Observations of gravitational wave (GW) from BNS mergers in spatial and temporal coincidence with SGRB and associated afterglows can provide valuable constraints on afterglow physics. We run simulations of GW-detected BNS events and assuming that all of them are associated with a GRB jet which also produces an afterglow, investigate how detections or non-detections in X-ray, optical and radio frequencies can be influenced by the parameter space. We narrow down the regions of afterglow parameter space for a uniform top-hat jet model, which would result in different detection scenarios. We list inferences which can be drawn on the physics of GRB afterglows from multimessenger astronomy with coincident GW-EM observations.

  1. Determination of the absolute activity by the coincidences 4πβ-γ method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urcelay Silva, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The 4π beta-gamma coincidence method for absolute determination of activities is extremely important in the production of high-precision radioactive sources. By means of this method it is possible to obtain absolute measurements of decay to within 0.1%. Thanks to the high efficiency of the 4π counter, most of the corrections required - background, random coincidences, dead time, decay scheme and detector efficiency - are small. The paper describes the experimental set-up showing the pulses in the two branches of the system, together with the conditions under which the 4πbeta flux detector functions. To determine whether the system was functioning satisfactorily, the activity of four cobalt-60 standards (supplied by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures based at Sevres in France) was determined and the differences obtained were less than 0.5% with respect to the certificates accompanying the sources. Alterations to the flux detector are suggested so that higher accuracy may be obtained. (author)

  2. Correlation-Based Amplitude Estimation of Coincident Partials in Monaural Musical Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Garcia Arnal Barbedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for estimating the amplitude of coincident partials generated by harmonic musical sources (instruments and vocals. It was developed as an alternative to the commonly used interpolation approach, which has several limitations in terms of performance and applicability. The strategy is based on the following observations: (a the parameters of partials vary with time; (b such a variation tends to be correlated when the partials belong to the same source; (c the presence of an interfering coincident partial reduces the correlation; and (d such a reduction is proportional to the relative amplitude of the interfering partial. Besides the improved accuracy, the proposed technique has other advantages over its predecessors: it works properly even if the sources have the same fundamental frequency, it is able to estimate the first partial (fundamental, which is not possible using the conventional interpolation method, it can estimate the amplitude of a given partial even if its neighbors suffer intense interference from other sources, it works properly under noisy conditions, and it is immune to intraframe permutation errors. Experimental results show that the strategy clearly outperforms the interpolation approach.

  3. Hypernuclear weak decay experiments at KEK: n-n and n-p coincidence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outa, H.; Ajimura, S.; Aoki, K.; Banu, A.; Bhang, H.C.; Fukuda, T.; Hashimoto, O.; Hwang, J.I.; Kameoka, S.; Kang, B.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, M.J.; Maruta, T.; Miura, Y.; Miyake, Y.; Nagae, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, S.N.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Okayasu, Y.; Park, H.; Saha, P.K.; Sato, Y.; Sekimoto, M.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, H.; Tanida, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tsukada, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yim, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We performed a coincidence measurement of two nucleons emitted from the nonmesonic weak decay (NMWD) of 5 Λ He and 12 Λ C formed via the (π+,K+) reaction. In both of n+p and n+n pair coincidence spectra, we observed a clean back-to-back correlation coming from the two-body decay of Λp->np and Λn->nn, respectively. We obtained the ratio of the nucleon pair numbers, Nnn/Nnp ( 5 Λ He)=0.45-bar +/--bar 0.11-bar (stat)-bar +/--bar 0.03-bar (syst) in the kinematic region of cosθNN-0.8. Since each decay mode was exclusively detected, the measured ratio should be close to the ratio of Γ(Λp->nn)/Γ(Λn->np). The Γn/Γp ratio was measured also for the NMWD of 12 Λ C. It is also close to 0.5. Those ratios are consistent with recent theoretical calculations based on the heavy meson/direct quark exchange picture

  4. Quark seesaw mechanism, dark U (1 ) symmetry, and the baryon-dark matter coincidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Pei-Hong; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2017-09-01

    We attempt to understand the baryon-dark matter coincidence problem within the quark seesaw extension of the standard model where parity invariance is used to solve the strong C P problem. The S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B -L gauge symmetry of this model is extended by a dark U (1 )X group plus inclusion of a heavy neutral vector-like fermion χL ,R charged under the dark group which plays the role of dark matter. All fermions are Dirac type in this model. Decay of heavy scalars charged under U (1 )X leads to simultaneous asymmetry generation of the dark matter and baryons after sphaleron effects are included. The U (1 )X group not only helps to stabilize the dark matter but also helps in the elimination of the symmetric part of the dark matter via χ -χ ¯ annihilation. For dark matter mass near the proton mass, it explains why the baryon and dark matter abundances are of similar magnitude (the baryon-dark matter coincidence problem). This model is testable in low threshold (sub-keV) direct dark matter search experiments.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of activity measurements by means of 4πβ-γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Mauro N.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-01-01

    The methodology for simulating all detection processes in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system by means of the Monte Carlo technique is described. The goal is to predict the behavior of the observed activity as a function of the 4πβ detector efficiency. In this approach, the information contained in the decay scheme is used for determining the contribution of all radiations emitted by the selected radionuclide, to the measured spectra by each detector. This simulation yields the shape of the coincidence spectrum, allowing the choice of suitable gamma-ray windows for which the activity can be obtained with maximum accuracy. The simulation can predict a detailed description of the extrapolation curve, mainly in the region where the 4πβ detector efficiency approaches 100%, which is experimentally unreachable due to self absorption of low energy electrons in the radioactive source substrate. The theoretical work is being developed with MCNP Monte Carlo code, applied to a gas-flow proportional counter of 4π geometry, coupled to a pair of NaI(Tl) crystals. The calculated efficiencies are compared to experimental results. The extrapolation curve can be obtained by means of another Monte Carlo algorithm, being developed in the present work, to take into account fundamental characteristics of a complex decay scheme, including different types of radiation and transitions. The present paper shows preliminary calculated values obtained by the simulation and compared to predicted analytical values for a simple decay scheme. (author)

  6. Performance of coincidence-based PSD on LiF/ZnS Detectors for Multiplicity Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Stave, Sean C.; Lintereur, Azaree; Siciliano, Edward R.; Cowles, Christian C.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Behling, Richard S.

    2016-10-06

    Abstract: Mass accountancy measurement is a nuclear nonproliferation application which utilizes coincidence and multiplicity counters to verify special nuclear material declarations. With a well-designed and efficient detector system, several relevant parameters of the material can be verified simultaneously. 6LiF/ZnS scintillating sheets may be used for this purpose due to a combination of high efficiency and short die-away times in systems designed with this material, but involve choices of detector geometry and exact material composition (e.g., the addition of Ni-quenching in the material) that must be optimized for the application. Multiplicity counting for verification of declared nuclear fuel mass involves neutron detection in conditions where several neutrons arrive in a short time window, with confounding gamma rays. This paper considers coincidence-based Pulse-Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques developed to work under conditions of high pileup, and the performance of these algorithms with different detection materials. Simulated and real data from modern LiF/ZnS scintillator systems are evaluated with these techniques and the relationship between the performance under pileup and material characteristics (e.g., neutron peak width and total light collection efficiency) are determined, to allow for an optimal choice of detector and material.

  7. Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy of free molecules: New experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Volker; Barth, Silko; Lischke, Toralf; Joshi, Sanjeev; Arion, Tiberiu; Mucke, Melanie; Foerstel, Marko; Bradshaw, Alex M.; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy probes the dicationic states produced by Auger decay following the photoionization of core or inner valence levels in atoms, molecules or clusters. Moreover, the technique provides valuable insight into the dynamics of core hole decay. This paper serves the dual purpose of demonstrating the additional information obtained by this technique compared to Auger spectroscopy alone as well as of describing the new IPP/FHI apparatus at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The distinguishing feature of the latter is the capability to record both the photoelectron and Auger electron with good energy and angle resolution, for which purpose a large hemispherical electrostatic analyser is combined with several linear time-of-flight spectrometers. New results are reported for the K-shell photoionization of oxygen (O 2 ) and the subsequent KVV Auger decay. Calculations in the literature for non-coincident O 2 Auger spectra are found to be in moderately good agreement with the new data.

  8. Interacting dark energy models as an approach for solving Cosmic Coincidence Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Hamed

    Understanding the dark side of the Universe is one of the main tasks of physicists. As there is no thorough understanding of nature of the dark energy, this area is full of new ideas and there may be several discoveries, theoretical or experimental, in the near future. We know that dark energy, though not detected directly, exists and it is not just an exotic idea. The presence of dark energy is required by the observation of the acceleration of the universe. There are several questions regarding dark energy. What is the nature of dark energy? How does it interact with matter, baryonic or dark? Why is the density of dark energy so tiny, i.e. why rhoΛ ≈ 10--120 M4Pl ? And finally why does its density have the same order of magnitude as the density of matter does at the present time? The last question is one form of what is known as the "Cosmic Coincidence Problem" and in this work, I have been investigating one way to resolve this issue. Observations of Type Ia supernovae indicate that we are in an accelerating universe. A matter-dominated universe cannot be accelerating. A good fit is obtained if we assume that energy density parameters are O Λ = 0.7 and Om = 0.3. Here O Λ is related to dark energy, or cosmological constant in ΛCDM model. At the same time data from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and supernova surveys have placed a constraint on w, the equation of state for dark energy, which is actually the ratio of pressure and energy density. Any good theory needs to explain this coincidence problem and yields a value for w between -1.1 and -0.9. I have employed an interesting approach to solve this problem by assuming that there exists an interaction between dark energy and matter in the context of holographic dark energy. This interaction converts dark energy to matter or vice versa without violating the local conservation of energy in the universe. Holographic dark energy by itself indicates that the value of dark energy is related

  9. Instructive for disposal of fluorescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Vargas, Gerlin

    2014-01-01

    An instructive is established for the management system of waste fluorescent lamps, ensuring the storage, collection, transportation, and final disposal. The lamp is changed by an official of the Seccion de Matenimiento Construccion of the Oficina de Servicios Generales or is produced with the support of an official of the unit. The fluorescent should be deposited in stock of materials of the building maintenance section or unit specified with the help of a staff and in appropriate conditions. The fluorescent lamp is transported according to the guidelines in the manual. A responsible company is contracted by la Vicerrectoria de Administracion of the Universidad de Costa Rica dedicated to the transport and proper handling of fluorescent lamps [es

  10. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  11. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  12. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Katarzyna Anna; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta

    2018-04-18

    Nanoparticles have an extended surface and a large surface area, which is the ratio of the size of the surfacearea to the volume. A functionalized surface can give rise to more modifications and therefore allows this nanomaterial to have new properties. Fluorescent molecules contain fluorophore, which is capable of being excited via the absorption of light energy at a specific wavelength and subsequently emitting radiation energy of a longer wavelength. A chemically modified surface of nanodiamond (ND; by carboxylation) demonstrated biocompatibility with DNA, cytochrome C, and antigens. In turn, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) belong to a group of new nanomaterials. Their surface can be modified by joining functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amino, after which they can be employed as a fluorescence agent. Their fluorescent properties result from defects in the crystal lattice. FNDs reach dimensions of 4-100 nm, have attributes such as photostability, long fluorescence lifetimes (10 ns), and fluorescence emission between 600 and 700 nm. They are also nontoxic, chemically inert, biocompatible, and environmentally harmless. The main purpose of this article was to present the medical applications of various types of modified NDs.

  13. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  14. Measuring 226Ra and 232Th activity in soil and vegetation samples using a method of double γ-coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antovic, N.M.; Antovic, I.

    2010-01-01

    A coincidence method for measuring radium and thorium activity has been developed using the PRIPYAT-2M gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer, with six NaI(Tl) detectors and registration geometry close to 4π. It was tested by measuring soil samples from the Northern region of Montenegro, as well as vegetation samples from the same region. The results showed a good agreement with ones obtained by the HPGe spectrometer. (author)

  15. Standardization of iodine-129 by the TDCR liquid scintillation method and 4π β-γ coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, P.; Bouchard, J.; Chauvenet, B.

    1994-01-01

    Iodine-129 is a long-lived fission product, with physical and chemical properties that make it a good candidate for evaluating the environmental impact of the nuclear energy fuel cycle. To avoid solid source preparation problems, liquid scintillation has been used to standardize this nuclide for a EUROMET intercomparison. Two methods were used to measure the iodine-129 activity: triple-to-double-coincidence ratio liquid scintillation counting and 4π β-γ coincidence counting; the results are in good agreement.

  16. Financial market implications of monetary policy coincidences: Evidence from the UK and Euro Area government-bond markets

    OpenAIRE

    Arestis, Philip; Phelps, P

    2017-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the financial market impact of international monetary surprises arising on the same trading day. This paper estimates a suite of multi-security factor models, which captures international monetary surprise effects on UK and Euro Area government-bond markets over the period 1999–2014. In doing so, we shed light on the relative importance of coinciding, non-coinciding monetary surprises and non-monetary surprises across the yield curve. We find some support for ...

  17. Metrology and statistical analysis for the precise standardisation of cobalt-60 by 4πβ-γ coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    The major part of the thesis is devoted to the theoretical development of a comprehensive PC-based statistical package for the analysis of data from coincidence-counting experiments. This analysis is applied to primary standardizations of Co performed in Australia and Japan. The Australian standardisation, the accuracy of which is confirmed through international comparison, is used to re-calibrate the ionisation chamber. Both Australian and Japanese coincidence-counting systems are interfaced to personal computers to enable replicated sets of measurements to be made under computer control. Further research to confirm the validity of the statistical model includes an experimental investigation into the non-Poisson behaviour of radiation detectors due to the effect of deadtime. Experimental investigation is conducted to determine which areas are most likely to limit the ultimate accuracy achievable with coincidence counting. The thesis concludes by discussing the possibilities of digital coincidence counting and outlines the design of a prototype system presently under development. The accuracy of the Australian standardisation is confirmed by international comparison. From this result a more accurate Co calibration is obtained for the Australian working standard. Based on the work of this thesis, uncertainties in coincidence counting experiments can be better handled with resulting improvements in measurement reliability. The concept and benefits of digital coincidence counting are discussed and a proposed design is given for such a system. All of the data and software associated with this thesis is provided on computer discs. 237 refs., figs., tabs

  18. Polarisation-based coincidence event discrimination: an in silico study towards a feasible scheme for Compton-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; McNamara, A. L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) systems use temporally localised coincidence events discriminated by energy and time-of-flight information. The two annihilation photons are in an entangled polarisation state and, in principle, additional information from the polarisation correlation of photon pairs could be used to improve the accuracy of coincidence classification. In a previous study, we demonstrated that in principle, the polarisation correlation information could be transferred to an angular correlation in the distribution of scattered photon pairs in a planar Compton camera system. In the present study, we model a source-phantom-detector system using Geant4 and we develop a coincidence classification scheme that exploits the angular correlation of scattered annihilation quanta to improve the accuracy of coincidence detection. We find a 22% image quality improvement in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio when scattered coincidence events are discriminated solely by their angular correlation, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel classification scheme. By integrating scatter events (both single-single and single-only) with unscattered coincidence events discriminated using conventional methods, our results suggest that Compton-PET may be a promising candidate for optimal emission tomographic imaging.

  19. The origin of narrowing of the Si 2p coincidence photoelectron spectroscopy main line of Si(1 0 0) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The Si 2p coincidence photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) main line of Si(1 0 0) is calculated. → The PES main line shows an asymmetric line shape change compared to the singles one. → The narrowing of the coincidence Si 2p PES main line is well reproduced. → The inherent mechanism of APECS is explained by a many-body theory. - Abstract: The Si 2p photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) main line of Si(1 0 0) surface measured in coincidence with the singles (noncoincidence) Si L 2,3 -VV Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) elastic peak is calculated. The agreement with the experiment is good. The present work is the first many-body calculation of the experimental coincidence PES spectrum of solid surface. The narrowing of the coincidence Si 2p PES main line compared to the singles one is due to the mechanism inherent in the coincidence PES. The inherent mechanism is explained by a many-body theory by which photoemission and Auger-electron emission are treated on the same footing.

  20. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.