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Sample records for enhancing dynamic scanning

  1. Enhancing dynamic scanning force microscopy in air: as close as possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios-Lidon, E; Perez-Garcia, B; Colchero, J

    2009-01-01

    Frequency modulation dynamic scanning force microscopy has been implemented in ambient conditions using low oscillation amplitudes (<1 nm) to simultaneously record not only topographic but also additional channels of information, in particular contact potential images. The performance of this mode as compared to the conventional amplitude modulation mode is analyzed in detail using a biological molecule, turning yellow mosaic virus RNA, as the model sample. On the basis of scanning force microscopy imaging as well as spectroscopy experiments, we find that for such very small samples the frequency modulation mode is superior since it can be operated with smaller tip-sample interaction, smaller effective tip-sample distance and lower forces. Combined with Kelvin probe microscopy it results not only in considerably higher electrostatic resolution, but also in correct quantitative values for the contact potential as compared to traditional amplitude modulation scanning force microscopy.

  2. Evaluation of dynamic enhanced CT scanning in the differentiation of adrenal lipid-poor adenomas with metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiangming; Hu Chunhong; Hu Xiaoyun; Chen Hongwei; Wu Liyuan; Zou Xinnong; Qian Pingyan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dynamic enhanced CT in differentiating adrenal metastases from adrenal lipid-poor adenomas(ALPA). Methods: Both plain and dynamic enhanced CT scanning was performed in 9 metastases with 13 masses and 28 lipid-poor adenoma with 30 masses. The types of time-density curve according to peak time(PT) and relative washout percentage(Washr) besides shape, size, margin, internal structure, surrounding status and enhanced pattern of each lesion were measuerd and compared between the two groups of metastases and ALPA. Results: There is difference between metastases and ALPA in the aspects of shape, density, neighboring structure and the type of enhancement. The type of TDC of matastases was characterized by fast-washin and fast-washout, which was quite differed from the type of TDC of ALPA characterized by fast-washin and slow-washout. According to this, the sensitiveity and specificity for differentiating metastases from ALPA were 96.7%, 92.3%. Conclusion: The types of TDC of dynamic enhanced CT is of great value in differentiating metastases from ALPA. (authors)

  3. Dynamic Flaps Electronic Scan Antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A dynamic FLAPS(TM) electronic scan antenna was the focus of this research. The novelty S of this SBIR resides in the use of plasma as the main component of this dynamic X-Band phased S array antenna...

  4. Carcinoma of the uterine cervix. High-resolution turbo spin-echo MR imaging with contrast-enhanced dynamic scanning and T2-weighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Namimoto, T.; Takahashi, M.; Katabuchi, H.; Tanaka, N.; Okamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare high-resolution contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) dynamic MR imaging with T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging in the evaluation of uterine cervical carcinoma. Material and Methods: Thirty-two patients with cervical carcinoma underwent MR imaging on a 1.5 T superconductive unit to have the extension of the disease assessed before treatment. A phased-array coil was used in all patients. In 25 patients, surgical confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained after imaging. Radiation therapy was selected for the remaining 7 patients with advanced carcinoma. Qualitative and quantitative image analyses were also performed. Results: The cervical carcinomas showed maximum contrast in the cervical stroma and myometrium in the early dynamic phase. The tumor/cervical-stroma contrast in the early dynamic phase obtained with the T1-weighted TSE technique (contrast-to-noise ratio 22.6) was significantly higher than that obtained in T2-weighted TSE imaging (contrast-to-noise ratio 4.3). In the evaluation of parametrial invasion, the accuracy of T2-weighted imaging was 71.8% and contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging 81.2%. Conclusion: High-resolution contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) dynamic MR imaging in cervical cancer offers improved tumor/cervical-stroma contrast and provides useful information on parametrial invasion. (orig.)

  5. Contrast enhanced CT-scans are not comparable to non-enhanced scans in emphysema quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussel, C.P.; Kappes, J.; Hantusch, R.; Hartlieb, S.; Weinheimer, O.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Eberhardt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic, interventional and surgical treatments have gone new ways in treatment of emphysema. For longitudinal therapy monitoring and as end-points for clinical trials, quantification of the disease is necessary. Sensitive, easy to measure, as well as stable and reproducible parameters have to be characterized. One parameter that might affect emphysema quantification is IV contrast enhancement, which might also be indicated. Whether or not the contrast enhanced scan is also suited for emphysema quantification or an additional scan is necessary, a retrospective analysis of 12 adult patients undergoing clinically indicated both, a non-enhanced and enhanced thin section MSCT within a week (median 0 days, range 0-4 days) was done. The in-house YACTA software was used for automatic quantification of lung and emphysema volume, emphysema index, mean lung density, and 5th, 10th, 15th percentile. After IV contrast administration, the median CT derived lung volume decreased mild by 1.1%, while median emphysema volume decreased by relevant 11%. This results in a decrease of median emphysema index by 9%. The median lung density (15th percentile) increased after contrast application by 18 HU (9 HU). CT quantification delivers emphysema values that are clearly affected by IV contrast application. The detected changes after contrast application show the results of higher density in the lung parenchyma. Therefore the amount of quantified emphysema is reduced and the lung density increased after contrast enhancement. In longitudinal analyses, non-enhanced scans should be the reference, while enhanced scans cannot be used.

  6. An evaluation of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurement by xenon-enhanced dynamic CT with helical scanning technique and the functional imaging by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). Fundamental study and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the quantitative rCBF by xenon-enhanced dynamic CT with helical scanning technique on all brain regions, and also examined clinical usefulness of coronal and sagittal section images which are similar to SPECT images obtained by the functional multiplanar reconstitution (MPR) imaging of many successive flow maps. We used 14 clinical cases. The conventional xenon-enhanced CT was simple and ideal method to measure rCBF, however, it had disadvantages; it gives a few laminagraphical images or only the axial directional images, compared to SPECT or PET. There is a risk to overlook lesions out of the image or not to obtain the whole images of the lesion. Although the helical scanning technique has a methodological characteristics to use adjacent data for the image reconstitution, it is by no means inferior to the conventional method in the contrast resolution or the image resolution when the co-helical function and an appropriate reconstituted function were used. It has an advantage to scan all brain regions by only one cycle of scanning. Furthermore on making good use of the property that the helical scanning technique can give the successive data, we can observe rCBF by coronal and sagittal images when many flow maps were made up by reconstituted images of the narrow steps. This shows the clinical usefulness of this technique. One of the future problem to be solved is to decrease the exposure dose. (K.H.)

  7. Solitary Pulmonary Nodule on Helical Dynamic CT Scans: Analysis of the Enhancement Patterns Using a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Jung; Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Lee, Young Sun; Kweon, Keun Sang

    2008-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the usefulness of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system in assisting radiologists to diagnosis malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs), as compared with diagnosing SPNs with using direct personal drawing. Forty patients with SPNs were analyzed. After the pre-contrast scan was performed, an additional ten series of post-contrast images were obtained at 20-second intervals. Two investigators measured the attenuation values of the SPNs: a radiologist who drew the regions of interest (ROIs), and a technician who used a CAD system. The Bland and Altman plots were used to compare the net enhancement between a CAD system and direct personal drawing. The diagnostic characteristics of the malignant SPNs were calculated by considering the CAD and direct personal drawing and with using Fisher's exact test. On the Bland and Altman plot, the net enhancement difference between the CAD system and direct personal drawing was not significant (within ± 2 standard deriation). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of diagnosing malignant SPNs using CAD was 92%, 85%, 75%, 96% and 88%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of diagnosing malignant SPNs using direct drawing was 92%, 89%, 79%, 92% and 88%, respectively. The CAD system was a useful tool for diagnosing malignant SPNs

  8. Significance and problems of the dynamic CT scan for the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral infarctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akio; Teraoka, Akira

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic CT scan is a very useful method for the diagnosis of cerebral infarctions and other ischemic disorders. We have used this method for 1) the ultra-early stage diagnosis of major infarctions, 2) the detection of the recanalization and the disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and 3) the detection of latent ischemic lesions. In this report we discussed the clinical cases and the usual use of this dynamic CT scan. We used a GE CT/T8800 scanner for dynamic CT scanning. Manual bolus-contrast-medium injection was done simultaneously with the first scanning, and 6 sequential scannings (scan time: 4.8 s; scan interval: 1.4 s) were done on the same slice level. Especially in major infarctions (e.g., MCA occlusion), OM 40 was the most preferred slice. In cases of ultra-early stage infarctions (i.e., no abnormal lesions in non-enhanced CT), we used this dynamic CT scan immediately after the non-enhanced CT; we could thus obtain information on the ischemic lesions and the ischemic degree. After that we repeated this examination on Days 3, 7, and 14 for the evaluation of the recanalization and blood-brain-barrier disruption. In the cases of TIA and impending or progressing strokes, dynamic CT scan could disclose latent ischemic lesions; in there instances, we treated the patients with intensive to prevent the prognosis from worsening. These benefits and also some problems were discussed. (author)

  9. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissick, David J.; Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges.

  10. Evaluation of delayed contrast-enhanced CT scan in diagnosing hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianding; Liang Chenyang; Zhang Hua; Zhang Yuezhen; Li Rui

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of delayed CT contrast enhancement patterns in hilar cholangiocarcinoma based on two-phased dynamic incremental CT scanning. Methods: Fifty-two patients with suspected hilar tumor and bile duct obstruction underwent spiral CT scan. The scan time for one revolution of the X-ray tube was 1 second. To elucidate the delay time for optimal imaging, all proved cholangiocarcinoma with delayed (6, 8, 10, 15, 20, 30 minutes) post-equilibrium-phase contrast-enhanced CT scans were acquired with unenhanced, dynamic contrast-enhanced, and delayed images. Degree of delayed enhancement was compared with that of surrounding liver parenchyma. Results: (1) 8-15 minutes after IV injection of contrast material was the delay time for optimal imaging. (2) Of 29 cholangiocarcinomas, the early CT showed hypo-attenuating (lower than that of liver parenchyma) in 23 tumors, iso-attenuating (equal to that of the liver) in 4 tumors, and hyper-attenuating (higher than that of liver) in 2 tumors. The delayed CT scan showed iso-attenuating in 8 tumors, hyper-attenuating in 21 tumors, and no hypo-attenuating. Most of delay imaging of hilar cholangiocarcinoma may appear hyper-attenuating (U = -4.3073, P 2 = 9.09, P < 0.01). Conclusion: When assessing hilar tumor, delayed CT contrast enhancement patterns based on two-phase dynamic incremental CT scans is useful in the detection and characterization of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

  11. 14'' x 17'' film recorder for computer-enhanced scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.C. Jr.; Barclay, T.R.; Akin, T.E.; Hansard, M.C.; Gibbs, W.D.; Modzelewski, C.U.

    1976-01-01

    Physician acceptance of computer-enhanced radionuclide scan results, presented in the form of small Polaroid pictures, has been very limited for a number of subjective reasons. A new recorder was designed and constructed that presents the results of computer augmented scans through a medium that is quite familiar to doctors, the standard 14 in. x 17 in. x-ray film

  12. Dynamic CT scan in cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Oka, Nobuo; Mitsuhashi, Hiromitsu

    1984-01-01

    Forty-two dynamic CT studies were performed on 27 patients with cerebral infarction (11 to 75 years of age), and perfusion patterns of low density areas on plain CT were evaluated. The initial studies were performed 1.5 hours to 60 days after acute onset. The following results were obtained. 1) The perfusion pattern in the low density area on plain CT varies among patients at any periods after onset, ranging from absent perfusion pattern to hyperfusion pattern. No consisitent perfusion pattern was obtained at any given time after onset. 2) Repeat dynamic CT revealed that the perfusion pattern in the low density area changed with time variously. 3) The perfusion pattern or change of perfusion pattern did not correlate with outcome of the patient. 4) At an acute stage, when no abnormal findings were obtained on plain CT, dynamic CT revealed abnormal perfusion pattern, enabling early diagnosis of cerebral infarction and estimation of blood perfusion in the infarcted area. In determining the treatment for the cerebral infarction at an acute stage, it is important to know the condition of the blood perfusion in the infarcted area. For the patients in whom recanalization has already taken place, mannitol or steroid might be effective, providing protection against severe brain edema and hemorrhagic infarction. On the other hand, if recanalization has not taken place, revascularization therapy might be worth trying within 6 hours since the onset. It has been said that ischemic brain damage may not be reversed by the revascularization after 6 hours. Dynamic CT is safe, less invasive, convenient and very useful for early diagnosis of the cerebral infarction and determination of the treatment at the acute stage. (J.P.N.)

  13. Dynamic computed tomography scanning of benign bone lesions: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, E.; Neff, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The majority of benign bone lesions can be evaluated adequately using conventional radiologic techniques. However, it is not always possible to differentiate reliably between different types of benign bone lesions on the basis of plain film appearances alone. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanning provides a means for further characterizing such lesions by assessing their degree of vascularity. Thus, it may help in distinguishing an osteoid osteoma, which has a hypervascular nidus, from a Brodie's abscess, which is avascular. Dynamic CT scanning may also help in the differentiation between a fluid-containing simple bone cyst, which is avascular, and other solid or semi-solid benign bone lesions which slow varying degrees of vascularity. However, because of the additional irradiation involved, dynamic CT scanning should be reserved for evaluation of selected patients with benign bone lesions in whom the plain film findings are not definitive and in whom the CT findings may have a significant influence on management. (orig.)

  14. Advanced radiographic scanning, enhancement and electronic data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoie, C.; Rivest, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that radiographs deteriorate with time. Substantial cost is attributed to cataloguing and storage. To eliminate deterioration issues and save time retrieving radiographs, laser scanning techniques were developed in conjunction with viewing and enhancement software. This will allow radiographs to be successfully scanned and stored electronically for future reference. Todays radiographic laser scanners are capable Qf capturing images with an optical density of up to 4.1 at 256 grey levels and resolutions up to 4096 pixels per line. An industrial software interface was developed for the nondestructive testing industry so that, certain parameters such as scan resolution, number of scans, file format and location to be saved could be adjusted as needed. Once the radiographs have been scanned, the tiff images are stored, or retrieved into Radiance software (developed by Rivest Technologies Inc.), which will help to properly interpret the radiographs. Radiance was developed to allow the user to quickly view the radiographs correctness or enhance its defects for comparison and future evaluation. Radiance also allows the user to zoom, measure and annotate areas of interest. Physical cost associated with cataloguing, storing and retrieving radiographs can be eliminated. You can now successfully retrieve and view your radiographs from CD media or dedicated hard drive at will. For continuous searches and/or field access, dedicated hard drives controlled by a server would be the media of choice. All scanned radiographs will be archived to CD media (CD-R). Laser scanning with a proper acquisition interface and easy to use viewing software will permit a qualified user to identify areas of interest and share this information with his/her colleagues via e-mail or web data access. (author)

  15. Computed tomography of liver tumors, 2. Differential diagnosis between hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic tumor by dynamic CT scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Akira; Fukuoka, Haruhito; Kashiwado, Kouzou; Ichiki, Toshio; Makidono, Yoko [Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    1984-02-01

    Differential diagnosis between hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic tumor was attempted using dynamic CT scanning. Homogeneous and patchy types were peculiar to hepatocellular carcinoma, and ring-like type to metastatic hepatic tumor. However, with no enhancement, hepatocellular carcinoma could not be denied. Hepatocellular carcinoma was characterized by the enhancement shown on the early stage of dynamic CT. Ring enhancement was not visualized on dynamic CT but visualized on conventional contrast enhanced CT in hepatocellular carcinomas; it was visualized on conventional contrast enhanced CT and on dynamic CT in metastatic hepatic tumors.

  16. CT study of pancreatic diseases with modified dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Minghui; Zhu Guangying

    1990-01-01

    Experience of 20 cases modified dynamic CT scanning is presented. With a slight increased X-ray tube burden, it is possible to investigate tumor blood supply and find small pancreatic insulinoma with this method. The capsular sign typical for chronic traumatic pancreatic hematoma on CT is presented

  17. A Continuous Dynamic Traffic Assignment Model From Plate Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, A.; Gallego, I.; Sanchez-Cambronero, S.; Ruiz-Ripoll, L.; Barba, R.M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the dynamic estimation of traffic flows on all links of a network from observable field data assuming the first-in-first-out (FIFO) hypothesis. The traffic flow intensities recorded at the exit of the scanned links are propagated to obtain the flow waves on unscanned links. For that, the model calculates the flow-cost functions through information registered with the plate scanning technique. The model also responds to the concern about the parameter quality of flow-cost functions to replicate the real traffic flow behaviour. It includes a new algorithm for the adjustment of the parameter values to link characteristics when its quality is questionable. For that, it is necessary the a priori study of the location of the scanning devices to identify all path flows and to measure travel times in all links. A synthetic network is used to illustrate the proposed method and to prove its usefulness and feasibility. (Author)

  18. Diagnosis of pituitary adenoma by dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Sumiyoshi; Uede, Teiji; Daibo, Masahiko; Niwa, Jun; Hashi, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    The advantage of high resolution CT in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas has been established, but the diagnosis becomes more difficult when the pituitary microadenoma is less than 5 mm in diameter. We have studied the usefulness of dynamic CT scans particularly for diagnosis of small microadenomas. The dynamic CT scans were performed for 61 normal pituitary glands and 68 pituitary adenomas (36 microadenomas, 32 macroadenomas) with a GECT/T 9800 scanner. Coronal sections of 1.5 mm thickness were taken at the plane just in front of the pituitary stalk of the pituitary gland. Following a bolus intra-venous injection of 40 - 60 ml of contrast media using an automatic injector, ten consecutive CT scans of 2 seconds scan time were obtained, beginning 2 seconds from the start of intravenous injection. The first seven scans were taken with an interval of 2.3 seconds, and the last three scans with an interval of 10 seconds. Then, time-density curves were obtained at the ROI which were set on the anterior pituitary gland, the vascular bed of the pituitary gland, the pituitary stalk and the area of the pituitary adenoma respectively. In a normal pituitary gland, the density increases gradually and makes an S shaped curve, then attains the maximum density value (92.3 CT number) approximately 60 seconds after the administration of contrast media. The pituitary vascular bed is located in midline on the upper surface of the pituitary gland, and shows a symmetrical square, triangular or rhomboid shape. In case of pituitary adenoma, the time-density curve makes a plateau curve and attains the maximum density value (60.1 CT number) approximately 60 seconds after the administration of contrast media. In microadenoma, the pituitary vascular bed is either deformed or compressed, showing an asymmetrical shape. (author)

  19. Dynamic bone scanning in the diagnosis and management of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandsman, E.J.; Deutsch, S.D.; Tyson, I.B.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure using 99m Tc-MDP (Methylene Diphosphonate) was divided into two parts: a dynamic portion designed to obtain data to calculate the blood flow to the specific bones or joints being evaluated and a static portion that consisted of a routine bone scan. This method was applied to 30 patients with osteomyelitis of various bones. The dynamic study showed a pronounced increase in flow on the affected side. This was accompanied always by a significant increase in flow in the areas proximal and distal to the area of involvement. Ten patients had sequential scans during the course of antibiotic treatment. In all ten patients the flow became more symmetrical during the course of the treatment indicating the effect of the antibiotics. In seven of these patients the flow became completely symmetrical at the end of the therapy. The static bone images remained unchanged during the antibiotic treatment and did not reflect its effect. The method of dynamic bone scanning in osteomyelitis thus provides a way to determine the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy

  20. Resolution Enhancement of Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope Using Transverse Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, D. S.; Park, J. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the resolution enhancement of a novel scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) using transverse waves. Mode conversion of the ultrasonic wave takes place at the liquid-solid interface and some energy of the insonifying longitudinal waves in the water will convert to transverse wave energy within the solid specimen. The resolution of SLAM depends on the size of detecting laser spot and the wavelength of the insonifying ultrasonic waves. Science the wavelength of the transverse wave is shorter than that of the longitudinal wave, we are able to achieve the high resolution by using transverse waves. In order to operate SLAM in the transverse wave mode, we made wedge for changing the incident angle. Our experimental results with model 2140 SLAM and an aluminum specimen showed higher contrast of the SLAM image in the transverse wave mode than that in the longitudinal wave mode

  1. Osmotic blood-brain barrier modification: clinical documentation by enhanced CT scanning and/or radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuwelt, E.A.; Specht, H.D.; Howieson, J.; Haines, J.E.; Bennett, M.J.; Hill, S.A.; Frenkel, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Results of initial clinical trials of brain tumor chemotherapy after osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption are promising. In general, the procedure is well tolerated. The major complication has been seizures. In this report, data are presented which indicate that the etiology of these seizures is related to the use of contrast agent (meglumine iothalamate) to monitor barrier modification. A series of 19 patients underwent a total of 85 barrier modification procedures. Documentation of barrier disruption was monitored by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning, radionuclide brain scanning, or a combination of both techniques. In 56 procedures (19 patients) monitored by enhanced CT, seizures occurred a total of 10 times in eight patients. Twenty-three barrier modification procedures (in nine of these 19 patients) documented by nuclear brain scans alone, however, resulted in only one focal motor seizure in each of two patients. In eight of the 19 patients who had seizures after barrier disruption and enhanced CT scan, four subsequently had repeat procedures monitored by radionuclide scan alone. In only one of these patients was further seizure activity noted; a single focal motor seizure was observed. Clearly, the radionuclide brain scan does not have the sensitivity and spatial resolution of enhanced CT, but at present it appears safer to monitor barrier modification by this method and to follow tumor growth between barrier modifications by enhanced CT. Four illustrative cases showing methods, problems, and promising results are presented

  2. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J., E-mail: gsimpson@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  3. Diagnosis of tracheomalacia using tracheal dynamic respiratory-scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Teruo; Watabe, Hideki; Ikeda, Sadao

    1995-01-01

    We performed tracheal-dynamic respiratory scan (T-DRS) in 54 cases which were thought to be tracheomalacia clinically. T-DRS was performed by TOSHIBA TCT-900S at the level of the aortic arch under the condition of 120 kV (140 kV), 100 mA, 5 mm of slice width for 20 seconds when the patient was directed to breath rapidly or slowly. In 19 cases, which underwent both T-DRS and bronchoscopy, could evaluate the results. Only one case was overestimated by T-DRS than bronchoscopic findings, while 9 cases were underestimated and 9 cases were equal. Though T-DRS tended to underestimate the degree of the stenosis of tracheomalacia than bronchoscopic finding. T-DRS can do more objective evaluation than bronchoscopy non-invasively and thought to be useful for the evaluation of tracheomalalcia. (author)

  4. Prevalence and characteristics of intravertebral enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT scans in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasselet, Benjamin [Medical Imaging Department and Biostatistics Department, Montpellier University Hospital, 191 Avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34 295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Larbi, Ahmed; Viala, Pierre [Medical Imaging Department, Nimes University Hospital, 4 rue du Professeur Robert Debré, 30029 Nîmes (France); Molinari, Nicolas [Biostatistics Department, Montpellier University Hospital, 191 Avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34 295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Tetreau, Raphael [Medical Imaging Department, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), 208 Avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Faruch-Bilfeld, Marie [Medical Imaging Department, Toulouse University Hospital, Place du Docteur Baylac, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Taourel, Patrice [Medical Imaging Department and Biostatistics Department, Montpellier University Hospital, 191 Avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34 295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Cyteval, Catherine, E-mail: c-cyteval@chu-montpellier.fr [Medical Imaging Department and Biostatistics Department, Montpellier University Hospital, 191 Avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34 295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • 2.8% of collateral venous circulation seen on CT scan in a cancer population. • 37% of intravertebral enhancement in this population with collateral venous circulation. • 80.8% of intravertebral enhancements are located between C6 and. • 73% of intravertebral enhancements are located ipsilateral to the injection side. -  Abstract: Study design: This was a single center, retrospective observational study. Objective: to investigate—in a cancer population—the prevalence and hallmarks of intravertebral enhancement (IVE) detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Summary of background data: Intravertebral enhancements secondary to iodinated contrast stagnation have been described. Cancer patients have an increased risk of perivertebral venous thrombosis or stenosis secondary to several risk factors (cancer or drug induced hypercoagulability, deterioration of venous flow linked to catheter insertion, prolonged immobilization). In case of a high density lesion identified on CT, the diagnostic choice between metastasis and contrast media within bone marrow vessels may be an issue, especially as oncologic follow-up CT scans are usually performed with contrast medium injection. Methods: 2572 contrast-enhanced body CT scans performed in cancer patients over 3 months in the medical imaging department of a university hospital were retrospectively reviewed. IVE was sought when paravertebral venous collateral circulation was detected and bone metastasis ruled out and classified as linear or nodular. Their locations within vertebra, their relation to the injection side and the predominant collateral venous network side were evaluated. Results: Sixty-seven (2.8%) patients had a collateral paravertebral venous system and among them 21 had IVE (37%). There were 208 IVE locations involving 75 vertebrae. 199 IVE were linear-shaped (95.7%) and 9 nodular-shaped (4.3%). 80.8% were located between C6 and T4. 88.9% were localized in the vertebral body. 73.1% were located

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of intravertebral enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT scans in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasselet, Benjamin; Larbi, Ahmed; Viala, Pierre; Molinari, Nicolas; Tetreau, Raphael; Faruch-Bilfeld, Marie; Taourel, Patrice; Cyteval, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 2.8% of collateral venous circulation seen on CT scan in a cancer population. • 37% of intravertebral enhancement in this population with collateral venous circulation. • 80.8% of intravertebral enhancements are located between C6 and. • 73% of intravertebral enhancements are located ipsilateral to the injection side. -  Abstract: Study design: This was a single center, retrospective observational study. Objective: to investigate—in a cancer population—the prevalence and hallmarks of intravertebral enhancement (IVE) detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Summary of background data: Intravertebral enhancements secondary to iodinated contrast stagnation have been described. Cancer patients have an increased risk of perivertebral venous thrombosis or stenosis secondary to several risk factors (cancer or drug induced hypercoagulability, deterioration of venous flow linked to catheter insertion, prolonged immobilization). In case of a high density lesion identified on CT, the diagnostic choice between metastasis and contrast media within bone marrow vessels may be an issue, especially as oncologic follow-up CT scans are usually performed with contrast medium injection. Methods: 2572 contrast-enhanced body CT scans performed in cancer patients over 3 months in the medical imaging department of a university hospital were retrospectively reviewed. IVE was sought when paravertebral venous collateral circulation was detected and bone metastasis ruled out and classified as linear or nodular. Their locations within vertebra, their relation to the injection side and the predominant collateral venous network side were evaluated. Results: Sixty-seven (2.8%) patients had a collateral paravertebral venous system and among them 21 had IVE (37%). There were 208 IVE locations involving 75 vertebrae. 199 IVE were linear-shaped (95.7%) and 9 nodular-shaped (4.3%). 80.8% were located between C6 and T4. 88.9% were localized in the vertebral body. 73.1% were located

  6. A scanning fluid dynamic gauging technique for probing surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Patrick W; Chew, Y M John; Wilson, D Ian; Brooker, Anju D M; York, David W

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) is a technique for measuring the thickness of soft solid deposit layers immersed in a liquid environment, in situ and in real time. This paper details the performance of a novel automated, scanning FDG probe (sFDG) which allows the thickness of a sample layer to be monitored at several points during an experiment, with a resolution of ±5 µm. Its application is demonstrated using layers of gelatine, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and baked tomato purée deposits. Swelling kinetics, as well as deformation behaviour—based on knowledge of the stresses imposed on the surface by the gauging flow—can be determined at several points, affording improved experimental data. The use of FDG as a surface scanning technique, operating as a fluid mechanical analogue of atomic force microscopy on a millimetre length scale, is also demonstrated. The measurement relies only on the flow behaviour, and is thus suitable for use in opaque fluids, does not contact the surface itself and does not rely on any specific physical properties of the surface, provided it is locally stiff

  7. Scan cell design for enhanced delay fault testability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brakel, Gerrit; van Brakel, G.; Xing, Yizi; Xing, Y.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    1992-01-01

    Problems in testing scannable sequential circuits for delay faults are addressed. Modifications to improve circuit controllability and observability for the testing of delay faults are implemented efficiently in a scan cell design. A layout on a gate array is designed and evaluated for this scan

  8. Alveolar architecture of clear cell renal carcinomas (≤5.0 cm) show high attenuation on dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Wakao, Fumihiko; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Tobisu, Kenichi; Kakizoe, Tadao; Sakamoto, Michiie

    1999-01-01

    To establish the correlation between tumor appearance on CT and tumor histology in renal cell carcinomas. The density and attenuation patterns of 96 renal cell carcinomas, each ≤5 cm in greatest diameter, were studied by non-enhanced CT and early and late after bolus injection of contrast medium using dynamic CT. The density and attenuation patterns and pathological maps of each tumor were individually correlated. High attenuated areas were present in 72 of the 96 tumors on early enhanced dynamic CT scanning. All 72 high attenuated areas were of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma and had alveolar architecture. The remaining 24 tumors that did not demonstrate high attenuated foci on early enhanced scanning included three clear cell, nine granular cell, six papillary, five chromophobe and one collecting duct type. With respect to tumor architecture, all clear cell tumors of alveolar architecture demonstrated high attenuation on early enhanced scanning. Clear cell renal cell carcinomas of alveolar architecture show high attenuation on early enhanced dynamic CT scanning. A larger number of patients are indispensable to obtaining clear results. However, these findings seem to be an important clue to the diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas as having an alveolar structure. (author)

  9. Reducing radiation dose in liver enhanced CT scan by setting mAs according to plain scan noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shangwen; He Jian; Yang Xianfeng; Zhou Kefeng; Xin Xiaoyan; Hu Anning; Zhu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of setting mAs in liver enhanced CT scan according to plain scan noise with fixed mA CT scanner, in order to reduce the radiation dose. Methods: One hundred continuous patients underwent liver enhanced CT scan (group A) prospectively. Two hundred and fifty mAs was used in plain and enhanced CT scans. Noises of plain and venous phase CT images were measured, and the image quality was evaluated. The equation between mAs of enhanced scan and noise of plain scan image was derived. Another 100 continuous patients underwent liver enhanced CT scan (group B). Enhanced scan mAs was calculated from noise on plain scan by using the equation above. Noises on venous phase images were measured and the image quality was measured. Based on body mass index (BMI), patients in groups A and B were divided into three subgroups respectively: BMI < 18.5 kg/m 2 , 18.5 kg/m 2 ≤ BMI < 25.0 kg/m 2 and BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 . Image quality score was compared with nonparametric rank sum test, CT dose index (CTDI) and effective dose (ED) were measured and compared between each subgroup with 2 independent samples t or t' test. Results: The equation between enhanced scan mAs (mAsX) and plain scan noise (SDp) was as follows: mAsX = mAs1 × [(0.989 × SDp + 1.06) /SDx] 2 , mAs1 = 250 mAs, SDx = 13. In patients with BMI < 18.5 kg/m 2 , ED of group A [(6.86 ± 0.38) mSv, n = 12] was significantly higher than group B [(2.66 ± 0.46) mSv, n = 10)] (t = 18.52, P < 0.01). In patients with 18.5 kg/m 2 ≤ BMI < 25.0 kg/m 2 , ED of group A [(7.08 ± 0.91) mSv, n = 66] was significantly higher than group B [(4.50 ± 1.41) mSv, n = 73] (t' = 10.57, P < 0.01). In patients with BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 , there was no significant difference between EDs of group A (7.54 ± 0.62 mSv, n = 22) and group B [(8.19 ± 3.16) mSv, n = 17] (t' = 0.89, P = 0.39). Image quality of 5 patients in group A and none in group B did not meet the diagnostic requirement

  10. The Enhancement of 3D Scans Depth Resolution Obtained by Confocal Scanning of Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martisek, Dalibor; Prochazkova, Jana

    2017-12-01

    The 3D reconstruction of simple structured materials using a confocal microscope is widely used in many different areas including civil engineering. Nonetheless, scans of porous materials such as concrete or cement paste are highly problematic. The well-known problem of these scans is low depth resolution in comparison to the horizontal and vertical resolution. The degradation of the image depth resolution is caused by systematic errors and especially by different random events. Our method is focused on the elimination of such random events, mainly the additive noise. We use an averaging method based on the Lindeberg-Lévy theorem that improves the final depth resolution to a level comparable with horizontal and vertical resolution. Moreover, using the least square method, we also precisely determine the limit value of a depth resolution. Therefore, we can continuously evaluate the difference between current resolution and the optimal one. This substantially simplifies the scanning process because the operator can easily determine the required number of scans.

  11. The Enhancement of 3D Scans Depth Resolution Obtained by Confocal Scanning of Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martisek Dalibor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction of simple structured materials using a confocal microscope is widely used in many different areas including civil engineering. Nonetheless, scans of porous materials such as concrete or cement paste are highly problematic. The well-known problem of these scans is low depth resolution in comparison to the horizontal and vertical resolution. The degradation of the image depth resolution is caused by systematic errors and especially by different random events. Our method is focused on the elimination of such random events, mainly the additive noise. We use an averaging method based on the Lindeberg-Lévy theorem that improves the final depth resolution to a level comparable with horizontal and vertical resolution. Moreover, using the least square method, we also precisely determine the limit value of a depth resolution. Therefore, we can continuously evaluate the difference between current resolution and the optimal one. This substantially simplifies the scanning process because the operator can easily determine the required number of scans.

  12. The value of contrast-enhanced CT scan in prediction of development of contusional hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kazuhiro; Kyoi, Kikuo; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Kinugawa, Kazuhiko; Morimoto, Tetsuya

    1983-01-01

    It is often experienced that even if there are no significant findings on the initial plain CT scan in the patient with cerebral contusion, the patient has thereafter a serious clinical course and requires emergency operation for so-called contusional hemorrhage. In order to predict of the development of contusional hemorrhage we performed contrast-enhanced CT scan at the time of patient's arrival within 12 hours after injury, if there was cerebral contusion on the initial plain CT scan, and repeated plain CT scan 24 hours after the contrast-enhanced CT scan. If enhancement was demonstrated on the contrastenhanced CT scan, we predicted the development of contusional hemorrhage and if not demonstrated, we predicted no more development of contusional hemorrhage and then we studied the correlation between the prediction and the plain CT 24 hours after the contrast-enhanced CT scan. The results were as follows: 1) The prediction was correct in 13 cases out of 16 cases in which the development of contusional hemorrhage was observed. In 18 cases where no development of contusional hemorrhage was observed, the prediction was correct without exception. 2) Most of the cases in which enhancement was demonstrated were ones examined not before 3 hours after injury. 3) The extent of enhancement shown on contrastenhanced CT scan was well consistent with that of contusional hemorrhage on the plain CT scan 24 hours after the contrast-enhanced CT scan. From these results, the contrast-enhanced CT scan in acute stage of head injury was considered to by very useful in prediction of the development of contusional hemorrhage. (author)

  13. Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Amir; Tripathi, V K

    2006-01-01

    The field enhancement factor of a carbon nanotube (CNT) placed in a cluster of CNTs is smaller than an isolated CNT because the electric field on one tube is screened by neighbouring tubes. This screening depends on the length of the CNTs and the spacing between them. We have derived an expression to compute the field enhancement factor of CNTs under any positional distribution of CNTs using a model of a floating sphere between parallel anode and cathode plates. Using this expression we can compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in a cluster (non-uniformly distributed CNTs). This expression is used to compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in an array (uniformly distributed CNTs). Comparison has been shown with experimental results and existing models

  14. A Resonant Scanning Dipole-Antenna Probe for Enhanced Nanoscale Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, L.; van 't Oever, Jan Joannes Frederik; van Hulst, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a scanning antenna probe that provides 35 nm optical hotspots with a 16-fold excitation enhancement. A resonant optical antenna, tuned to operation in the visible, is carved into the aluminum-coated scanning probe. The antenna resonances, field localization, excitation, and polarization

  15. Vascular anatomy of the liver and porta hepatis with dynamic CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Wada, Mitsuyoshi; Nakajima, Teiichi; Tonooka, Reiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiko

    1983-01-01

    Vascular anatomy of the liver and porta heaptis demonstrated by dynamic CT scan was studied Identification of the individual vessels was sometimes difficult due to slight differencies in respiratory depths among the scans. Limitation in the number of slices also made the evalution of the vascular anatomy difficult. Angiography was therefore utilized for comparison in identifying the vessels. Dynamic CT scan was proved to be usefull in demonstrating the anteroposterior relationship of the vessels and surrounding structures, which is difficult with convetional angiography without multiple projections. Three dimensional understanding of the vessels was then possible with dynamic CT scan and angiography. When combined with recently advancing digital subtraction angiography, dynamic CT scan might reduce the necessity for conventional angiography with Seldinger's technique. (author)

  16. Validation of enhanced and dynamic computed tomography for cerebral ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Kenichiro; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Wada, Kojiro; Takahara, Takashi; Shirotani, Toshiki; Shimizu, Akira [Japan Self-Defense Forces Central Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hatanaka, Kosuke [Japan Self-Defense Forces Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    This paper shows the usefulness of enhanced and dynamic CT for ischemic stroke patients. Sixteen patients with disturbance of consciousness or neurological sign who did not have low-density area on plain CT were selected for this study. We performed enhanced CT sequentially. Enhanced CT image, time-density curve and functional image were compared with final infarcted area and occlusion level of cerebral artery. Three patients whose enhanced CT images showed obvious laterality had occlusion of internal carotid (IC) or horizontal portion of middle cerebral artery (M1). Four of five patients whose functional image and time density curve revealed abnormal region had ischemia because of more peripheral vessel occlusion or IC stenosis. Others with no abnormality on all images had lacunar infarction or did not have infarction finally. Occlusion of cerebral artery proximal portion could be diagnosed only with enhanced CT images. If selected slice was fit to the lesion, more distant level of ischemic area could be determined 100% by time-density curve and functional image. This examination takes only about ten minutes without transferring the patient. Enhanced CT and dynamic scan is useful tool to determine the diagnosis and management for ischemic stroke patients. (author)

  17. Validation of enhanced and dynamic computed tomography for cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kenichiro; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Wada, Kojiro; Takahara, Takashi; Shirotani, Toshiki; Shimizu, Akira; Hatanaka, Kosuke

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows the usefulness of enhanced and dynamic CT for ischemic stroke patients. Sixteen patients with disturbance of consciousness or neurological sign who did not have low-density area on plain CT were selected for this study. We performed enhanced CT sequentially. Enhanced CT image, time-density curve and functional image were compared with final infarcted area and occlusion level of cerebral artery. Three patients whose enhanced CT images showed obvious laterality had occlusion of internal carotid (IC) or horizontal portion of middle cerebral artery (M1). Four of five patients whose functional image and time density curve revealed abnormal region had ischemia because of more peripheral vessel occlusion or IC stenosis. Others with no abnormality on all images had lacunar infarction or did not have infarction finally. Occlusion of cerebral artery proximal portion could be diagnosed only with enhanced CT images. If selected slice was fit to the lesion, more distant level of ischemic area could be determined 100% by time-density curve and functional image. This examination takes only about ten minutes without transferring the patient. Enhanced CT and dynamic scan is useful tool to determine the diagnosis and management for ischemic stroke patients. (author)

  18. Fast-scan em with digital image processing for dynamic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles W. McMillin; Fred C. Billingsley; Robert E. Frazer

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of accessory instrumentation capable of display at television scan rates suggests a broadened application for the scanning electron microscope - the direct observation of motion (dynamic events) at magnifactions otherwise unattainable. In one illustrative experiment, the transverse surface of southern pine was observed when subjected to large...

  19. A case of severe acute pancreatitis with near total pancreatic necrosis diagnosed by dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazunori; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Amikura, Katsumi; Miyagawa, Kikuo; Matsuno, Seiki; Sato, Toshio

    1987-01-01

    A 42 year-old woman with severe acute pancreatitis had drainage of the pancreatic bed, cholecystostomy and jejunostomy on admission, but symptoms were not improved. Fourteen days after admission, clinical sepsis and septisemia were recognized. Dynamic CT scanning of the pancreas showed near total pancreatic necrosis. Symptoms were improved after necrosectomy of the pancreas and debridement of the peripancreatic necrotic tissue were performed. Our experience suggests the usefulness of dynamic CT scanning for detection of pancreatic necrosis in severe acute pancreatitis. (author)

  20. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  1. Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.A.; Choyke, P.L.; Carvlin, M.; Inscoe, S.; Austin, H.; Dwyer, A.J.; Girton, M.; Black, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes dynamic enhanced renal MR imaging, a new method of identifying specific derangements in renal function. Various diuretics were employed in 45 animal experiments to demonstrate the effects on the normal renal enhancement pattern (EP) after Gd-DTPA. Since different diuretics, osmotic (O), carbonic anhydrase (CA), and loop (L), are active at different sites, specific EP alterations are observed. Imaging was performed with 32 5.1-second sequential gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state images following a bolus of Gd-DTPA

  2. Comparison of MRI fast SPGR single slice scan and continuous dynamic scan in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xinyu [Department of Radiology, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, Qingdao 266003 (China)], E-mail: myginny2@sina.com; Yang Xue [Department of Radiology, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, Qingdao 266003 (China)], E-mail: yangxueqyfy@126.com; Hua Hui [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao (China)], E-mail: huahuisky@163.com; Chen Jingjing [Department of Radiology, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, Qingdao 266003 (China)], E-mail: chenjingjingsky@126.com

    2009-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the application value of MRI fast SPGR single slice scan in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome when comparing the images between fast SPGR single slice scan and continuous dynamic scan. Methods: Eighteen patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome were examined by fast SPGR single slice scan and continuous dynamic scan in turn. Fast SPGR single slice scans were conducted when the phases of apnea, inspiration and expiration appeared on the respiratory wave of the subjects. Fast SPGR continuous dynamic scans were conducted when the patients were awake and apneic. The scan planes were median sagittal plane and axial planes (the slice of middle part of palate, the slice of inferior part of palate, the slice of middle part of lingual root and the slice of 0.5 cm beneath the free margin of epiglottis). The obstructed sites and the cross-sectional areas of upper airway were compared between the two scan methods. Results: Seven cases showed complete obstruction at the narrowest sites of upper airway when apnea appeared; eleven cases showed marked decrease in cross-sectional areas at the narrowest sites compared with the areas when the patients were awake; two cases manifested multiple narrowness. The obstructed sites showed by the two scan methods were same. The difference of the cross-sectional areas of upper airway between the two scan methods was insignificant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Fast SPGR single slice scan can accurately reflect the obstructed sites of upper airway when the breath breaks off and is the complementary method of continuous dynamic scan. Sometimes, single slice scan can replace continuous dynamic scan.

  3. Hybrid imaging with contrast enhanced CT scan: A nuclear physician's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houzard, C.; Tychyj-Pinel, C.; Defez, D.; Valette, P.J.; Giammarile, F.; Houzard, C.; Valette, P.J.; Giammarile, F.

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing development of hybrid imaging, with physical association of CT scan and PET or SPECT scan, allows integrating morphological and functional information on a single exam. This important technological evolution changes diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in a major manner, essentially in oncology. The possibility to inject intravenously iodinated contrast media in order to enhance CT image contrast is still a controversial question in France. We present our experience in this domain by approaching technical problems and diagnostic advantages. (authors)

  4. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A; Nielsen, Agnete Hedemann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn'sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic...

  5. Semiquantifying regional cerebral blood flow by dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Totaro; Kasahara, Eishi; Takahashi, Eriko; Kojima, Seiichi; Ogawa, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keiko; Miyamae, Tatsuya; Yamazaki, Setsuo.

    1990-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the semi-quantitative significance of the absolute value obtained by calculating the regional cerebral blood flow index (rCBFI) from dynamic CT in comparison with SPECT. rCBFI was calculated from mean transit time (MTT) and blood capacity index (BCI) obtained by rapidly infusing 50 ml of Omnipurk into the elbow vein by the use of Hitachi's W-600. [rCBFI=BCI/MTT unit/sec (U/S)] measurment of the rCBF by SPECT was made according to the semi-quantitative method by Matsuda et al. by the use of SHIMADZU's improved type HEADTOME SET-050 with rapid infusion of 123 I-IMP in 3.5 m Ci from the elbow vein. Patients in whom no abnormality was observed in the cardiopulmonary function were enrolled as subjects. The rCBFI in each intracranial site was calculated from dynamic CT in 10 normal adults (aged 35-60, averaging 46.7) as subjects and compared with the rCBF obtained from SPECT in the same cases and same site. Comparative investigation was made similarly between rCBFI and rCBF regarding 10 patients with tracranial diseases (age 29-65, averaging 51.2). The mean rCBFIs in the normal adults obtained from dynamic CT were 1.15±0.18 U/S in the frontal lobar cortex, 1.28±0.19 U/S in the temporal lobar cortex, 1.43±0.1 U/S in the occipital lobar cortex, 1.27±0.2 U/S in the basal ganglia region and 0.43±0.1 U/S in the white matter. On the other hand, the mean rCBFs by SPECT were 47.36±3.93 ml/100 g/min, 55.19±2.22 ml/100 g/min, 61.92±5.42 ml/100 g/min, 54.38±3.51 ml/100 g/min and 38.68±6.18 ml/100 g/min, respectively. Positive correlation was observed between rCBFIs and rCBFs of 10 normal adults and 10 patients with intracranial disease, totalling 20 cases (r=0.79, P<0.005). The rCBFI by dynamic CT has a correlation with the rCBF by SPECT, suggesting the possibility of its evaluation as an absolute value, though semi-quantitatively. (author)

  6. The optimization of scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Chang, Yong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Tirman, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the optimal scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and to evaluate a new timing method based on the arteriovenous circulation time. Eighty-nine contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiographic examinations were performed mainly in the extremities. A 1.5T scanner with a 3-D turbo-FLASH sequence was used, and during each study, two consecutive arterial phases and one venous phase were acquired. Scan delay time was calculated from the time-intensity curve by the traditional (n = 48) and/or the new (n = 41) method. This latter was based on arteriovenous circulation time rather than peak arterial enhancement time, as used in the traditional method. The numbers of first-phase images showing a properly enhanced arterial phase were compared between the two methods. Mean scan delay time was 5.4 sec longer with the new method than with the traditional. Properly enhanced first-phase images were found in 65% of cases (31/48) using the traditional timing method, and 95% (39/41) using the new method. When cases in which there was mismatch between the target vessel and the Time-intensity curve acquisition site are excluded, erroneous acquisition occurred in seven cases with the traditional method, but in none with the new method. The calculation of scan delay time on the basis of arteriovenous circulation time provides better timing for arterial phase acquisition than the traditional method

  7. Value of contrast enhanced CT scanning in the non-trauma emergency room patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, L.P.; Parisi, M.; Finch, I.J.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the value of performing contrast CT in addition to non-contrast CT in the evaluation of acute non-traumatic central nervous system disorders, we retrospectively reviewed 322 cases originating from the emergency room at our institution. The most common indication for scanning was seizure activity (34% of total), followed by headache (30%), focal neurological deficit (10%), and altered mental status (8%). 75% of the noncontrast scans were normal. The contrast enhanced scan revealed abnormalities not evident on the non-contrast scan in only three of these cases, and the information did not alter patient management. We conclude that in the acute setting, if a non-contrast CT is normal, a contrast study is usually unnecessary. Therefore, given the additional risks of contrast infusion, the contrast study, if needed, is generally best obtained at a later date, after more careful evaluation of the patient's history and medical records. If the non-contrast CT scan is abnormal, a contrast enhanced CT scan may be beneficial, but, again, is often not needed to direct acute patient management. (orig.)

  8. Lung cancer in hilar region: the resectability evaluation with dual phase enhanced EBCT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Guosheng; Zhou Xuhui; Li Xiangmin; Fan Miao; Meng Quanfei; Peng Qian; Tan Zhiyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of duralphase enhanced electronic beam computed tomography (EBCT) scans in resectability evaluation of lung cancer located in hilar region. Methods: Dual phase enhanced EBCT scans were available for 40 cases that were initially diagnosed as 'carcinoma of lung' in hilar region. The relations between masses and trachea, bronchi, hilar and mediastinal great vessels were analyzed and compared with operation. Results: 38 cases in our series confirmed by operation and pathological examination were divided two groups: respectable (28 cases) and non-resectable (10 cases) groups. 25 cases in the former group were consistent with operation, accounting for 89.3%, and 8 cases, in the latter group, accounting for 80%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of dural-phase enhanced EBCT scan evaluating the relations between masses and hilar and mediastinal structure were as follows: 92.6%, 72.7% and 86.8%. Conclusion: Dural-phase enhanced EBCT scans can provide precise and feasible pre-operative evaluation of lung cancer in hilar region. (authors)

  9. Enhancement pattern of small hepatic hemangioma: findings on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung In; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To compare the enhancement characteristics of small hemangiomas seen on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. Thirteen patients with 20 hepatic hemangiomas less than 25mm in diameter underwent both multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. All lesions were assigned to one of three classified into 3 categories according to the enhancement pattern seen on multiphase spiral CT : typical delayed pooling, atypical early enhancement, or continuous low attenuation. The enhancement patterns seen on spiral CT and on dynamic MRI were correlated. On CT scans, ten lesions (50%) showed delayed pooling. Six (30%) showed early arterial enhancement and four (20%) showed continuous low attenuation. On delayed-phase MRI, all lesions showed delayed high signal intensity compared to adjacent liver parenchyma. Four of six lesions with early enhancement on CT showed peripheral globular enhancement on early arterial-phase MRI. On multiphase spiral CT scans, small hemangiomas can show variable atypical enhancement features. In this situation, contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI is helpful for the diagnosis of hemangiomas

  10. Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound for therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John M. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Williams, Ross [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Sheeran, Paul S. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Milot, Laurent [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bjarnason, Georg A. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Toronto, and Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Burns, Peter N., E-mail: burns@sri.utoronto.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative imaging is a crucial component of the assessment of therapies that target the vasculature of angiogenic or inflamed tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) using microbubble contrast offers the advantages of being sensitive to perfusion, non-invasive, cost effective and well suited to repeated use at the bedside. Uniquely, it employs an agent that is truly intravascular. This papers reviews the principles and methodology of DCE-US, especially as applied to anti-angiogenic cancer therapies. Reproducibility is an important attribute of such a monitoring method: results are discussed. More recent technical advances in parametric and 3D DCE-US imaging are also summarised and illustrated.

  11. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  12. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced MRI of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha M Mehemed

    Full Text Available Oxygen causes an increase in the longitudinal relaxation rate of tissues through its T1-shortening effect owing to its paramagnetic properties. Due to such effects, MRI has been used to study oxygen-related signal intensity changes in various body parts including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space. Oxygen enhancement of CSF has been mainly studied using MRI sequences with relatively longer time resolution such as FLAIR, and T1 value calculation. In this study, fifteen healthy volunteers were scanned using fast advanced spin echo MRI sequence with and without inversion recovery pulse in order to dynamically track oxygen enhancement of CSF. We also focused on the differences of oxygen enhancement at sulcal and ventricular CSF. Our results revealed that CSF signal after administration of oxygen shows rapid signal increase in both sulcal CSF and ventricular CSF on both sequences, with statistically significant predominant increase in sulcal CSF compared with ventricular CSF. CSF is traditionally thought to mainly form from the choroid plexus in the ventricles and is absorbed at the arachnoid villi, however, it is also believed that cerebral arterioles contribute to the production and absorption of CSF, and controversy remains in terms of the precise mechanism. Our results demonstrated rapid oxygen enhancement in sulcal CSF, which may suggest inhaled oxygen may diffuse into sulcal CSF space rapidly probably due to the abundance of pial arterioles on the brain sulci.

  13. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzi, Roberto [Marie Curie Research Wing, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: robertoalonzi@btinternet.com; Padhani, Anwar R. [Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom); Synarc Inc. 575 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 (United States)], E-mail: anwar.padhani@paulstrickland-scannercentre.org.uk; Allen, Clare [Department of Imaging, University College Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.allen@uclh.nhs.uk

    2007-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an integral part of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is associated with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and is key to the growth and for metastasis of prostate cancer. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using small molecular weight gadolinium chelates enables non-invasive imaging characterization of tissue vascularity. Depending on the technique used, data reflecting tissue perfusion, microvessel permeability surface area product, and extracellular leakage space can be obtained. Two dynamic MRI techniques (T{sub 2}*-weighted or susceptibility based and T{sub 1}-weighted or relaxivity enhanced methods) for prostate gland evaluations are discussed in this review with reference to biological basis of observations, data acquisition and analysis methods, technical limitations and validation. Established clinical roles of T{sub 1}-weighted imaging evaluations will be discussed including lesion detection and localisation, for tumour staging and for the detection of suspected tumour recurrence. Limitations include inadequate lesion characterisation particularly differentiating prostatitis from cancer, and in distinguishing between BPH and central gland tumours.

  14. Analysis on the dynamic error for optoelectronic scanning coordinate measurement network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shendong; Yang, Linghui; Lin, Jiarui; Guo, Siyang; Ren, Yongjie

    2018-01-01

    Large-scale dynamic three-dimension coordinate measurement technique is eagerly demanded in equipment manufacturing. Noted for advantages of high accuracy, scale expandability and multitask parallel measurement, optoelectronic scanning measurement network has got close attention. It is widely used in large components jointing, spacecraft rendezvous and docking simulation, digital shipbuilding and automated guided vehicle navigation. At present, most research about optoelectronic scanning measurement network is focused on static measurement capacity and research about dynamic accuracy is insufficient. Limited by the measurement principle, the dynamic error is non-negligible and restricts the application. The workshop measurement and positioning system is a representative which can realize dynamic measurement function in theory. In this paper we conduct deep research on dynamic error resources and divide them two parts: phase error and synchronization error. Dynamic error model is constructed. Based on the theory above, simulation about dynamic error is carried out. Dynamic error is quantized and the rule of volatility and periodicity has been found. Dynamic error characteristics are shown in detail. The research result lays foundation for further accuracy improvement.

  15. Dynamics of decanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) studied by Scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Hairong; Sotthewes, Kai; Kumar, Avijit; Vancso, Gyula J.; Schön, Peter Manfred; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of decanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) surfaces using time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy at room temperature. The expected ordered phases (β, δ, χ*, and ) and a disordered phase (ε) were observed. Current–time traces with the feedback loop disabled

  16. SSC High Energy Booster resonance corrector and dynamic tune scanning simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    A resonance correction system for the High Energy Booster (HEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSCL) was investigated by means of dynamic multiparticle tracking. In the simulation the operating tune is scanned as a function of time so that the bunch goes through a resonance. The performance of the half integer and third integer resonance correction system is demonstrated.

  17. Feasibility of using intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans in lung cancer treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jianghong; Zhang Hong; Gong Youling; Fu Yuchuan; Tang Bin; Wang Shichao; Jiang Qingfeng; Li Ping

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning for lung cancers, respectively. Materials and methods: Twelve patients with bulky lung tumors and 14 patients with small lung tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient took two sets of CT in the same position with active breathing control (ABC) technique before and after intravenous contrast agent (CA) injections. Bulky tumors were planned with 3D-CRT, while SBRT plans were generated for patients with small tumors based on CT scans with intravenous CA. In addition, IMRT plans were generated for patients with bulky tumors to continue on a planning study. All plans were copied and replaced on the scans without intravenous CA. The radiation doses calculated from the two sets of CTs were compared with regard to planning volumes (PTV), the organ at-risk (OAR) and the lungs using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: In comparisons for 3D-CRT plans, CT scans with intravenous CA reduced the mean dose and the maximum dose of PTV with significant differences (p 95 ) for targets, respectively (p < 0.05). There was no statistical significance for lung parameters between two sets of scans in SBRT plans and IMRT plans. Conclusions: The enhanced CT scans can be used for both target delineation and treatment planning in 3D-CRT. The dose difference caused by intravenous CA is small. But for SBRT and IMRT, the minimum irradiation dose in targets may be estimated to be increased up to 2.71% while the maximum dose may be estimated to be decreased up to 1.36%. However, the difference in dose distribution in most cases were found to be clinical tolerable.

  18. Dynamic Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope Freeze Drying Observation for Fresh Water Algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, H.T.; Ghaly, W.A.; Zahran, N.F.; Helal, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    A new perpetration method for serving in dynamic examinations of the fresh water algae is developed in connection with the Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope (LV-SEM) freeze drying technique. Specimens are collected from fresh water of Ismailia channel then transferred directly to freeze by liquid nitrogen and dried in the chamber of the scanning electron microscope in the low vacuum mode. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the drying method presented the microstructure of algae. Dehydration in a graded ethanol series is not necessary in the new method. Dried algae specimen is observed in SEM high vacuum mode after conductive coating at higher resolution. Low-vacuum SEM freeze drying technique is a simple, time-saving and reproducible method for scanning electron microscopy that is applicable to various aquatic microorganisms covered with soft tissues.

  19. Scanning and contrast enhancement protocols for multi-slice CT in evaluation of the upper abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awai, Kazuo; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Takada, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Yasuo; Eguchi, Nobuko; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Hori, Shinichi

    2000-01-01

    The advent of multi-slice CT is one of the quantum leaps in computed tomography since the introduction of helical CT. Multi-slice CT can rapidly scan a large longitudinal (z-axis) volume with high longitudinal resolution and low image artifacts. The rapid volume coverage speed of multi-slice CT can increase the difficulty in optimizing the delay time between the beginning of contrast material injection and the acquisition of images and we need accurate knowledge about optimal temporal window for adequate contrast enhancement. High z-axis resolution of multi-slice can improve the quality of three-dimensional images and MPR images and we must select adequate slice thickness and slice intervals in each case. We discuss basic considerations for adequate contrast enhancement and scanning protocols by multi-slice CT scanner in the upper abdomen. (author)

  20. A quantitative damage imaging technique based on enhanced CCRTM for composite plates using 2D scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-10-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric wafer mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region in the vicinity of the PZT to capture the scattered wavefield. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, a reflectivity coefficients of the delamination is calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2D areal scans and 1D line scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  1. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm(-2) depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  2. Parameter scans and accuracy estimates of the dynamical aperture of the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannozzi, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Techniques to make use of large distributed computing facilities allow for denser parameter scans of the dynamic aperture, i.e., the domain in phase space where bounded single-particle motion prevails. Moreover, one can also increase the number of 'seeds' each of which represents a possible realization of multipolar components around the machine. In this paper the dependence of the dynamic aperture on the step size of the grid of initial conditions and on the number of seeds is studied. Estimates on the accuracy of the dynamic aperture are derived and the definition of an improved protocol for numerical simulations is presented.

  3. Differences in MRI findings in cases showing ring-enhancement on a CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwa, Kaichi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Miyasaka, Yoshio; Yada, Kenzoh; Kan, Shinichi; Takagi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    It is sometimes difficult to differentiate between a brain abscess and a tumor, for both show ring-enhancement on a CT scan. The present authors have studied the benefit of MRI for the differential diagnosis of these two lesions. The subjects of this study were 6 cases of brain abscess and 10 cases of brain tumor, all of them showing ring-enhancement on a CT scan. The MRI findings were compared with those of the CT scan taken at almost the same time, especially focussing on the difference in the ring-enhancement. In 5 out of the 6 cases of brain abscess, T 2 -weighted MRI demonstrated a comparatively thin and homogeneous low-intensity, round rim. In the cases of brain tumor, however, none of the cases demonstrated this typical low-intensity, round rim; rather, in them the rim was thick and irregular. The authors can conclude that those MRI findings can serve as important differential diagnostic findings between brain abscess and tumor; also, MRI may be used as a landmark for terminating the administration of antibiotics in cases of brain abscess. (author)

  4. Near-Field Enhanced Photochemistry of Single Molecules in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckmann, Hannes; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Raschke, Markus B; Wolf, Martin; Kumagai, Takashi

    2018-01-10

    Optical near-field excitation of metallic nanostructures can be used to enhance photochemical reactions. The enhancement under visible light illumination is of particular interest because it can facilitate the use of sunlight to promote photocatalytic chemical and energy conversion. However, few studies have yet addressed optical near-field induced chemistry, in particular at the single-molecule level. In this Letter, we report the near-field enhanced tautomerization of porphycene on a Cu(111) surface in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction. The light-induced tautomerization is mediated by photogenerated carriers in the Cu substrate. It is revealed that the reaction cross section is significantly enhanced in the presence of a Au tip compared to the far-field induced process. The strong enhancement occurs in the red and near-infrared spectral range for Au tips, whereas a W tip shows a much weaker enhancement, suggesting that excitation of the localized plasmon resonance contributes to the process. Additionally, using the precise tip-surface distance control of the STM, the near-field enhanced tautomerization is examined in and out of the tunneling regime. Our results suggest that the enhancement is attributed to the increased carrier generation rate via decay of the excited near-field in the STM junction. Additionally, optically excited tunneling electrons also contribute to the process in the tunneling regime.

  5. Intercomparison of two dynamic treatment techniques, ring scan and spot scan, for head and neck tumors with the Piotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, M.; Blattmann, H.; Pedroni, E.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation of the ring scan and the spot scan was made for the pion irradiation of head and neck tumors with the Piotron. For the geometry of the Piotron, with its 60 radially converging beams, two scanning techniques have been developed, ring scan and spot scan. They have different characteristics concerning achievable dose distributions and sensitivity to tissue inhomogenities. The optimized 3-dimensional dose distributions for the treatment with ring scan and spot scan techniques were calculated for two examples of the target volume. The comparison of the dose distributions has shown that the ring scan is better in sparing normal tissues than the spot scan for a simple shape target volume but not for an irregular shape target volume with the present status of the technique. The irradiation time needed for the ring scan is longer, for the present examples three times, than for the spot scan. From the practical view point the spot scan is preferable to the ring scan for the treatment of head and neck tumors with the Piotron

  6. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Zhu Xiaorong; Low, Daniel A.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Harms, William B.; Purdy, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Our clinic has been using dynamic wedge since 1993. We appreciate the customized wedge shaped distributions (independent of field size) and the positive aspects of replacing filters with dynamic jaw motion. Varian recently introduced enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) software. The EDW can be delivered over; a 30 cm field, asymmetric fields (in both wedged and non-wedged directions), and additional wedge angles (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60). The EDW software creates customized segmented treatment tables (STTs) for the desired wedge angle and field size. The STT is created from a 'golden' fluence profile of 60 deg. over 30 cm. The wedge STT is derived using ratio-of-tangents and the truncated field segment extracted from the 'golden' table. A review of our dosimetric studies will be presented as well as a discussion of clinical implementation issues including treatment planning and quality assurance. Methods and Materials: We tested a set of angle and field size combinations chosen to encompass clinical needs. The wedge factor (WF) was measured using an ionization chamber along central axis for symmetric fields ranging from 4 to 20 cm, and asymmetric fields to 30 cm. The non-wedged field dimension was found to be inconsequential. An algorithm was developed to predict the wedge factor for any angle and field dimension. Isodoses were measured with film and used for profile evaluation and treatment planning development. The 'golden' fluence table was used to create a universal 60 deg. 'physical' wedge for planning. The universal wedge is combined with an open field (to derive intermediate wedge angles) and blocked according to the treatment field segment. A quality assurance program was developed that relies on multi-point diode measurements. Results: We found the WF is a function of wedge angle and field settings of the final sweep position. There is a nearly linear dependence of WF vs. field size thus allowing a minimal WF table. This eliminates a

  7. In Situ Characterization of Inconel 718 Post-Dynamic Recrystallization within a Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Zouari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure evolution within the post-dynamic regime following hot deformation was investigated in Inconel 718 samples with different dynamically recrystallized volume fractions and under conditions such that no δ-phase particles were present. In situ annealing treatments carried out to mimic post-dynamic conditions inside the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM chamber suggest the occurrence of both metadynamic and static recrystallization mechanisms. Static recrystallization was observed in addition to metadynamic recrystallization, only when the initial dynamically recrystallized volume fraction was very small. The initial volume fraction of dynamically recrystallized grains appears to be decisive for subsequent microstructural evolution mechanisms and kinetics. In addition, the formation of annealing twins is observed along with the growth of recrystallized grains, but then the twin density decreases as the material enters the capillarity-driven grain growth regime.

  8. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mantena, P. R; Al-Ostaz, Ahmed; Cheng, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    ...) molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticle-enhanced composites and fly- ash based foams that are being considered for the future generation naval structures or retrofitting of existing ones...

  9. Intracranial ring enhancing lesions in dogs: a correlative CT scanning and neuropathologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Michael; Pedroia, Vince; Higgins, Robert J.; Koblik, Philip D.; Turrel, Jane M.; Owens, Jerry M.

    1995-01-01

    This retrospective analysis of 15 dogs with postcontrast ring enhancing brain lesions, each detected by a single Computed Tomography (CT) examination, searched for any association between their CT appearance and the pathologic diagnosis. In a subgroup of these dogs (n = 71) necropsied within 2 days of the last CT scan, we evaluated whether there was any anatomic correlation between the ring zone and the histopathologic features of the lesions. Our study consisted of eight dogs with primary brain tumors (3 meningiomas, 3 astrocytomas, 1 mixed glioma, 1 oligodendroglioma), 4 with metastatic brain tumors (2 fibrosarcomas, 1 mammary carcinoma, 1 melanoma) and 3 with non-neoplastic brain lesions (2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, 1 pyogranulomatous meningoencephalitis). The overall size and shape of the contrast enhancing CT lesions, as well as the thickness, surface texture and degree of enhancement of the ring were subjectively evaluated. No association was found between the CT lesion characteristics and the pathologic diagnosis. In the sub-group of dogs euthanatized within 2 days of the CT examination, distinct histologic features which anatomically correlated with the zone of ring enhancement were found in 3 of 7 lesions. The findings of this study are consistent with those of ring-enhancing lesions in people, and indicates that CT ring enhancement is a nonspecific phenomenon which can occur in a variety of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions in the dog

  10. Value of fat suppression and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of insulinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zengbin; Ruan Lingxiang; Peng Zhiyi; Zhang Minming; Xu Shunliang; Zhang Xidao

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of fat suppression and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the preoperative localization of insulinoma. Methods: Twelve cases with pathologically proven insulinoma were evaluated with MRI. SE T 1 WI, FSE T 2 WI, T 1 WI and T 2 WI with fat suppression, dynamic contrast-enhanced FMPSPGR sequences were used in MR scanning. Results: On SE T 1 WI, the lesions displayed hypointense in 4, isointense in 8 cases. Lesions showed hyperintense in 4, isointense in 8 cases on FSE T 2 WI. In contrast, 7 cases appeared as hypointense on T 1 WI with fat suppression and 6 cases appeared as hyperintense on T 2 WI with fat suppression. With dynamic contrast-enhanced FMPSPGR sequence 11 of 12 insulinomas were detected. In the arterial phase, the lesions presented as hyperintense with different degrees in 11 cases and isointense in 1 case. 6 cases remained hyperintense and 6 cases were isointense in pancreatic parenchymal and portal phase. 4 lesions were identified only in dynamic enhancement images. The diagnostic accuracy of insulinoma by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was 91.7% (11/12) as compared with histological study. Conclusion: The results indicate that dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is an sensitive and accurate method for the preoperative localization of insulinoma

  11. Atomic-scale structure of dislocations revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Morgenstern, K.; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations, the simulati......The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations......, the simulations can be used to determine dislocation structure and orientation in the near-surface region. In a similar way, the subsurface structure of other extended defects can be studied. The simulations show dislocations to reorient the partials in the surface region leading to an increased splitting width...

  12. A cryogenic scanning laser microscope for investigation of dynamical states in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    on measurements on different oscillator samples, performed with a novel Cryogenic Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM) having a spatial resolution of less than ±2.5 μm over a 500 μm×50 μm wide scanning area in the temperature range 2 K-300 K. Even though the dynamical states are extremely sensitive to external noise...... tunnel current is one of the most important internal junction parameters which together with the boundary conditions determine the dynamics, it is of vital importance to experimentally determine the current density throughout the entire junction with high spatial resolution. Here we report...... this microscope enables us to make stable in-situ measurements on operating Josephson junctions. Recent results are presented and discussed....

  13. Posterior Urethra Rupture: Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Scan and Urethrocystography Demonstrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Marks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the follow-up study of patients with pelvic fractures, rupture of the posterior urethra is registered in 3–25% of cases (Koraitim et al., 1996. The diagnostic gold standard for the assessment of hemodynamically stable trauma patients is contrast-enhanced CT scan, especially helical CT. Nevertheless, simultaneous suprapubic cystography and ascending urethrograms (the so-called up-and-downogram are the investigation of choice in assessing the site, severity, and length of urethral injuries. (Carlin and Resnick, 1995 This paper discusses the evaluation and diagnosis of urethral injury in multiple-trauma patient.

  14. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  15. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  16. Determination of entry site for acute type A aortic dissection by initial enhanced CT-scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mase, Takenori; Narumiya, Chihiro; Aoyama, Takahiko; Nagata, Yoshihisa

    2002-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection presents a surgical emergency because conservative therapy is not effective in the majority of instances. Enhanced CT-scan of the chest is commonly available and is considered to be an optimal diagnostic method for this disease. The operative strategy is to resect the primary tear to close the entry site of the aortic dissection and replace it with a tubular Dacron graft. Therefore, the existence of the entry site is important in determining the operative procedure. Based on the numerical value of the enhanced CT-scan inspection, the present study seeks to preoperatively identify the location of the presumed entry site in aortic dissection. From May 1996 to June 1999, 21 consecutive patients (Marfan's syndrome excluded) with acute type A aortic dissection underwent surgical treatment. Nineteen patients were preoperatively examined by enhanced CT-scan: 11 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 61 years. CT-scan slices used for early diagnosis were of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, and thoracoabdominal aorta. The largest diameters of the whole and true lumen were measured from cross-sectional aortic images with a personal computer, and the areas of the whole and true lumen were obtained by the manual tracing method. The true ratio was calculated for the largest diameter and area of the whole lumen. The nineteen patients were divided into two groups according to the location of the entry site based on the operating views. Seven patients with the entry site in the ascending aorta were classified as group A, and twelve patients with the entry site further in the aortic arch and descending aorta were classified as group B. Comparisons were performed by non-parametric analysis. Moreover, a discriminant analysis was applied to evaluate the classification between the two groups. The ratio of the largest diameter of the true lumen in group A at the level of the ascending and descending aorta was significantly greater than that

  17. Determination of entry site for acute type A aortic dissection by initial enhanced CT-scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, Takenori; Narumiya, Chihiro; Aoyama, Takahiko; Nagata, Yoshihisa [Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection presents a surgical emergency because conservative therapy is not effective in the majority of instances. Enhanced CT-scan of the chest is commonly available and is considered to be an optimal diagnostic method for this disease. The operative strategy is to resect the primary tear to close the entry site of the aortic dissection and replace it with a tubular Dacron graft. Therefore, the existence of the entry site is important in determining the operative procedure. Based on the numerical value of the enhanced CT-scan inspection, the present study seeks to preoperatively identify the location of the presumed entry site in aortic dissection. From May 1996 to June 1999, 21 consecutive patients (Marfan's syndrome excluded) with acute type A aortic dissection underwent surgical treatment. Nineteen patients were preoperatively examined by enhanced CT-scan: 11 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 61 years. CT-scan slices used for early diagnosis were of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, and thoracoabdominal aorta. The largest diameters of the whole and true lumen were measured from cross-sectional aortic images with a personal computer, and the areas of the whole and true lumen were obtained by the manual tracing method. The true ratio was calculated for the largest diameter and area of the whole lumen. The nineteen patients were divided into two groups according to the location of the entry site based on the operating views. Seven patients with the entry site in the ascending aorta were classified as group A, and twelve patients with the entry site further in the aortic arch and descending aorta were classified as group B. Comparisons were performed by non-parametric analysis. Moreover, a discriminant analysis was applied to evaluate the classification between the two groups. The ratio of the largest diameter of the true lumen in group A at the level of the ascending and descending aorta was significantly greater than

  18. Static and dynamic 3 dimensional studies of water in soil using computed tomographic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crestana, S.; Mascarenhas, S.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.

    1984-03-01

    Previous work of Petrovic, Siebert and Rieke demonstrated the possibility of using X-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) scanning for soil bulk density analysis in soil. We show in the present work that CT can also be used for the measurement of water content in soil. In our case we also show that CT can be applied to measure and follow dynamically the motion of water in soil in 3-dimensions. Further, more inhomogeneities of water content and motion in soil can be observed with this technique. Using a third generation CT scanner several different techniques can be applied such as differential, real time and spatial distribution scanning modes. A linear dependence was demonstrated for the Hounsfield Units (HU) used in CT and water content. The use of CT for water content and motion in soil in 3-dimensions opens new possibilities in this area of investigations. (author)

  19. Patients with liver FNH and HCC patients with negative AFP: plain and dynamic enhanced MRI and CT findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Mingtong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate plain and dynamic enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT findings in patients with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients with negative alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. MethodsA statistical analysis was performed on the clinical data of 124 cases of liver tumor admitted to Beijing Miyun County Hospital from April 2012 to April 2014. ResultsFifty-five of the 74 patients with FNH underwent CT examination, among whom 38 patients received three-phase dynamic enhanced scan and 16 received only plain scan; 62 cases had plain and enhanced MRI with the application of contrast agent Gd-BOPTA in 42 patients. Among the 50 HCC patients with negative AFP, CT examination was performed in 40 and 10 only had plain scan; 46 patients received plain and enhanced MRI with the use of contrast agent Gd-BOPTA in 30. Delayed scan after 1-2 h demonstrated low signal in 30 lesions of the 30 cases. ConclusionFor patients with liver FNH and AFP-negative HCC patients, their plain and dynamic enhanced MRI and CT scan have respective characteristics. A combination of multiple examination methods can significantly improve diagnostic yield of the two diseases.

  20. Charge dynamics in aluminum oxide thin film studied by ultrafast scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Maurizio; Sala, Vittorio; Irde, Gabriele; Pietralunga, Silvia Maria; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    The excitation dynamics of defects in insulators plays a central role in a variety of fields from Electronics and Photonics to Quantum computing. We report here a time-resolved measurement of electron dynamics in 100 nm film of aluminum oxide on silicon by Ultrafast Scanning Electron Microscopy (USEM). In our pump-probe setup, an UV femtosecond laser excitation pulse and a delayed picosecond electron probe pulse are spatially overlapped on the sample, triggering Secondary Electrons (SE) emission to the detector. The zero of the pump-probe delay and the time resolution were determined by measuring the dynamics of laser-induced SE contrast on silicon. We observed fast dynamics with components ranging from tens of picoseconds to few nanoseconds, that fits within the timescales typical of the UV color center evolution. The surface sensitivity of SE detection gives to the USEM the potential of applying pump-probe investigations to charge dynamics at surfaces and interfaces of current nano-devices. The present work demonstrates this approach on large gap insulator surfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch 2 . Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed. (topical review)

  2. Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Masashi, E-mail: ISHII.Masashi@nims.go.j [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-05-05

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch{sup 2}. Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed. (topical review)

  3. Dynamics of annular bright field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of image formation in the so-called annular bright field mode in scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereby an annular detector is used with detector collection range lying within the cone of illumination, i.e. the bright field region. We show that this imaging mode allows us to reliably image both light and heavy columns over a range of thickness and defocus values, and we explain the contrast mechanisms involved. The role of probe and detector aperture sizes is considered, as is the sensitivity of the method to intercolumn spacing and local disorder.

  4. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced dynamic CT in predicting the malignancy of solitary pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Song, Koun Sik; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Jin Seong; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether the maximal enhancement time in dynamic CT is different between benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN)s, and to evaluate the value of densitometry on dynamic CT in predicting the malignancy of SPN. Fifty-six patients with SPN of less than 4cm in diameter as seen on chest radiograph and SPN without benign pattern of calcification or fat, as seen on pre-enhance-ment spiral CT scans were included in this study. SPN with small cavitation sufficient to measure CT density, were also included. Thirty-four SPNs were diagnosed pathologically or radiologically as 20 malignant nodules and 14 benign nodules. Dynamic CT was performed by two techniques after injection of 50ml of nonionic contrast media at the rate of 2ml/sec. In 28 patients, incremental dynamic CT was performed before and of 15 seconds, 1 minute, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 4 minutes after injection of contrast media during shallow respiration. In 28 patients, double spiral CT was performed 2 minutes and 3 minutes after injection of contrast media during single breath hold. CT readings were taken at the central portion of SPNs, with a circular region of interest. The degree and time of maximal enhancement were recorded. In dynamic CT the maximal enhancement time of SPNs was not significantly different between malignant (2.73±1.27 minute) and benign nodules (2.56±1.24 minute). The enhancement of malignant nodules was significantly greater (21.42±12.17 HU) than of benign nodules (5.15±5.25 HU) (p<.0001). In dynamic CT of SPNs, there is no difference in maximal enhancement time between benign and malignant nodules;enhancement of the latter is significantly greater than that of the former. Maximal enhancement greater than 15 HU can be a good predictor of malignancy of SPNs

  6. Retinal nerve fiber layer measurements by scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Venkatesh, Chirravuri R; Vidyasagar, Kelli; Yadav, Ravi K; Addepalli, Uday K; Jude, Aarthi; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra S

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the (i) effects of biological (age and axial length) and instrument-related [typical scan score (TSS) and corneal birefringence] parameters on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements and (ii) repeatability of RNFL measurements with the enhanced corneal compensation (ECC) protocol of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) in healthy subjects. In a cross-sectional study, 140 eyes of 73 healthy subjects underwent RNFL imaging with the ECC protocol of SLP. Linear mixed modeling methods were used to evaluate the effects of age, axial length, TSS, and corneal birefringence on RNFL measurements. One randomly selected eye of 48 subjects from the cohort underwent 3 serial scans during the same session to determine the repeatability. Age significantly influenced all RNFL measurements. RNFL measurements decreased by 1 µm for every decade increase in age. TSS affected the overall average RNFL measurement (β=-0.62, P=0.003), whereas residual anterior segment retardance affected the superior quadrant measurement (β=1.14, P=0.01). Axial length and corneal birefringence measurements did not influence RNFL measurements. Repeatability, as assessed by the coefficient of variation, ranged between 1.7% for the overall average RNFL measurement and 11.4% for th nerve fiber indicator. Age significantly affected all RNFL measurements with the ECC protocol of SLP, whereas TSS and residual anterior segment retardance affected the overall average and the superior average RNFL measurements, respectively. Axial length and corneal birefringence measurements did not influence any RNFL measurements. RNFL measurements had good intrasession repeatability. These results are important while evaluating the change in structural measurements over time in glaucoma patients.

  7. Characterisation of Intensity Values on Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Recording Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer-Puig, M.; Molada-Tebar, A.; Marqués-Mateu, A.; Lerma, J. L.

    2017-08-01

    Mapping surveys based on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are common nowadays for different purposes such as documentation of cultural heritage assets. The chance to extract relevant information from TLS surveys depends not only on the fast acquisition of XYZ coordinates, but also on the meaningful intensity values of the fired objects. TLS behaviour depends on several known factors such as distance, texture, roughness, colour and albedo. This paper seeks to find out the mathematical relationship between the TLS intensity values and the colorimetric data using a colour chart. In order to do so, objective colour specification based on well-known colour spaces is needed. The approach used here started with scanning a colour chart containing a number of colour patches with known chromatic and reflection characteristics. After several transformations, the results allowed us to characterise the intensity behaviour of a time-of-flight laser scanner. The characterisation of the intensity values are tested indoor on the colour chart and outdoor on an archaeological shelter. Promising results are obtained to enhance the behaviour of the intensity values coming from the TLS.

  8. Automated Detection of Healthy and Diseased Aortae from Images Obtained by Contrast-Enhanced CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gayhart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We developed the next stage of our computer assisted diagnosis (CAD system to aid radiologists in evaluating CT images for aortic disease by removing innocuous images and highlighting signs of aortic disease. Materials and Methods. Segmented data of patient’s contrast-enhanced CT scan was analyzed for aortic dissection and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU. Aortic dissection was detected by checking for an abnormal shape of the aorta using edge oriented methods. PAU was recognized through abnormally high intensities with interest point operators. Results. The aortic dissection detection process had a sensitivity of 0.8218 and a specificity of 0.9907. The PAU detection process scored a sensitivity of 0.7587 and a specificity of 0.9700. Conclusion. The aortic dissection detection process and the PAU detection process were successful in removing innocuous images, but additional methods are necessary for improving recognition of images with aortic disease.

  9. Frequency-scanning interferometry using a time-varying Kalman filter for dynamic tracking measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xingyu; Liu, Zhigang; Tao, Long; Deng, Zhongwen

    2017-10-16

    Frequency scanning interferometry (FSI) with a single external cavity diode laser (ECDL) and time-invariant Kalman filtering is an effective technique for measuring the distance of a dynamic target. However, due to the hysteresis of the piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) actuator in the ECDL, the optical frequency sweeps of the ECDL exhibit different behaviors, depending on whether the frequency is increasing or decreasing. Consequently, the model parameters of Kalman filter appear time varying in each iteration, which produces state estimation errors with time-invariant filtering. To address this, in this paper, a time-varying Kalman filter is proposed to model the instantaneous movement of a target relative to the different optical frequency tuning durations of the ECDL. The combination of the FSI method with the time-varying Kalman filter was theoretically analyzed, and the simulation and experimental results show the proposed method greatly improves the performance of dynamic FSI measurements.

  10. Scanning laser techniques for dynamic thermo-magnetic recording onto stationary media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clegg, Warwick; Jenkins, David; Helian, Na; Windmill, James; Windmill, Robert; Atkinson, Ron; Hendren, Bill; Wright, C. David

    2002-09-01

    Scanning laser microscopes (SLMs) have been used to characterise the magnetic properties of materials for some time (J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 95(1) (1991); IEEE Trans. Magn. 31(6 Pt. 1) (1995)). An SLM has been designed to facilitate a number of operating modes: both for writing and reading magneto-optical data. The current SLM is capable of thermo-magnetically recording bits onto magneto-optical thin films. Unlike previous SLMs, the current instrument has been designed to write bits both statically and dynamically onto stationary media. It will be used to write to magneto-optic (MO) disk material thermo-magnetically prior to imaging. Images may be derived from the longitudinal and polar magneto-optic Kerr effects, which are wavelength dependent, using the appropriate laser wavelength. In this paper the two configurations for dynamic recording are described.

  11. Scanning laser techniques for dynamic thermo-magnetic recording onto stationary media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, Warwick; Jenkins, David; Helian, Na; Windmill, James; Windmill, Robert; Atkinson, Ron; Hendren, Bill; Wright, C. David

    2002-01-01

    Scanning laser microscopes (SLMs) have been used to characterise the magnetic properties of materials for some time (J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 95(1) (1991); IEEE Trans. Magn. 31(6 Pt. 1) (1995)). An SLM has been designed to facilitate a number of operating modes: both for writing and reading magneto-optical data. The current SLM is capable of thermo-magnetically recording bits onto magneto-optical thin films. Unlike previous SLMs, the current instrument has been designed to write bits both statically and dynamically onto stationary media. It will be used to write to magneto-optic (MO) disk material thermo-magnetically prior to imaging. Images may be derived from the longitudinal and polar magneto-optic Kerr effects, which are wavelength dependent, using the appropriate laser wavelength. In this paper the two configurations for dynamic recording are described

  12. Reduction of motion artifacts for PET imaging by respiratory correlated dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, K.-S.; Chen, T.-J.; Chang, C.-C.; Wu, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L.-C.; Liu, R.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Organ motion caused by respiration is a major challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This work proposes a technique to reduce smearing in PET imaging caused by respiratory motion. Dynamic scanning at 1 frame/s is used. A point source, used as a marker, is attached to the object's abdomen during the scan. The source position in the projection view moves with respiratory motion and can be used to represent the respiratory phase within the time interval in which each frame data are acquired. One hundred and twenty frames are obtained for each study. The range of the positions of the marker is divided into four groups, representing different respiratory phases. The frames in which the organ positions (phases) are the same summed to produce a static sub-sinogram. Each sub-sinogram then undergoes regular image reconstruction to yield a motion-free image. The technique is applied to one volunteer under both free and coached breathing conditions. A parameter called the volume reduction factor is adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of this motion-reduction technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed technique effectively reduces motion artifacts in the image. Coached breathing yields better results than free breathing condition. The advantages of this method are that (1) the scanning time remains the same; (2) free breathing is allowed during the acquisition of the image; and (3) no user intervention is required

  13. Development of dynamic 3-D surface profilometry using stroboscopic interferometric measurement and vertical scanning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, K-C [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, L-C [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, C-D [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Calvin C [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Centre for Measurement Standards, 321 Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Kuo, C-F [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Centre for Measurement Standards, 321 Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Chou, J-T [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Centre for Measurement Standards, 321 Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China)

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this technical advance is to provide a single optical interferometric framework and methodology to be capable of delivering both nano-scale static and dynamic surface profilometry. Microscopic interferometry is a powerful technique for static and dynamic characterization of micro (opto) electromechanical systems (M (O) EMS). In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry and the white light vertical scanning principle, was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry and characterization of MEMS devices. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterization of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field second-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 68.60 kHz can be fully characterized and 3-5 nm of vertical measurement resolution as well as tens of micrometers of vertical measurement range can be easily achieved.

  14. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise afte...

  15. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2009-12-01

    Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2pi to pi plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the pi range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2pi] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan pn(AF) by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans pn(P) from the same perfusion examination (typically N approximately 30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n = 1, ..., N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans pn(V) from the artificial full scan pn(AF). A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images fn(P), fn(AF), and fn(V). Subtracting the virtual partial scan image fn(V) from the artificial full scan image fn(AF) yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: fn(C) = fn(P) - fn(V) + fn(AF), where fn(C) is the corrected image. The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference values. The improvement in the root mean square errors between the full and the partial scans with respect to the errors between the full and the corrected scans is

  16. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Henkestrasse. 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2{pi} to {pi} plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the {pi} range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. Methods: In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2{pi}] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF} by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans p{sub n}{sup P} from the same perfusion examination (typically N{approx_equal}30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n=1,...,N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans p{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF}. A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images f{sub n}{sup P}, f{sub n}{sup AF}, and f{sub n}{sup V}. Subtracting the virtual partial scan image f{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan image f{sub n}{sup AF} yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: f{sub n}{sup C}=f{sub n}{sup P}-f{sub n}{sup V}+f{sub n}{sup AF}, where f{sub n}{sup C} is the corrected image. Results: The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference

  17. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2π to π plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the π range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. Methods: In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2π] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan p n AF by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans p n P from the same perfusion examination (typically N≅30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n=1,...,N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans p n V from the artificial full scan p n AF . A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images f n P , f n AF , and f n V . Subtracting the virtual partial scan image f n V from the artificial full scan image f n AF yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: f n C =f n P -f n V +f n AF , where f n C is the corrected image. Results: The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference values. The improvement in the root mean square errors between the full and the partial scans with respect to the errors between the full and the

  18. Dynamic optical bistability in resonantly enhanced Raman generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, I.; Phillips, D.F.; Zibrov, A.S.; Andre, A.; Walsworth, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    We report observations of novel dynamic behavior in resonantly enhanced stimulated Raman scattering in Rb vapor. In particular, we demonstrate a dynamic hysteresis of the Raman scattered optical field in response to changes of the drive laser field intensity and/or frequency. This effect may be described as a dynamic form of optical bistability resulting from the formation and decay of atomic coherence. We have applied this phenomenon to the realization of an all-optical switch

  19. Subendometrial enhancement and peritumoral enhancement for assessing endometrial cancer on dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Shinya; Kido, Aki; Baba, Tsukasa; Fujimoto, Koji; Daido, Sayaka; Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •We have assessed the peritumoral enhancement (PTE), which mimics SEE on DCE. •We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SEE for the myometrial invasion and the frequency of PTE. •We assessed the relationship between these enhancements and important pathologic factors. •PTE Type 1 is the main factor causing the overestimation of myometrial invasion using SEE on DCE. •PTE Type 2 correlates the myometrial invasion and may play an important role in the diagnosis of LVSI. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of subendometrial enhancement (SEE) in assessing the myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer, the frequency and clinical significance of peritumoral enhancement (PTE) on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging. Materials and methods: MR images of 147 patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively analyzed for intact SEE and PTEs: Type 1, a focal early enhancement peritumorally, and Type 2, an irregular thin-layered early intense enhancement peritumorally. Two radiologists independently assessed intact SEE and PTEs on DCE imaging and compared the lesions by the presence and depth of myometrial invasion, grade, lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI), and lymph node metastasis. The relationship between SEE, PTEs, and each factor was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy were calculated for SEE. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and diagnostic accuracy for myometrial invasion based on SEE disruption on DCE were 96.6%, 32.1–46.4%, 85.8–88.5%, 69.2–76.5%, and 84.4–87.1%. According to multivariate analysis, SEE significantly predicted myometrial invasion (p < 0.0001). PTE Type 2 significantly predicted myometrial invasion presence (p < 0.05) and depth (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Diagnosis of myometrial invasion only by using SEE might be difficult on DCE-MRI due to the

  20. Subendometrial enhancement and peritumoral enhancement for assessing endometrial cancer on dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Shinya [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago (Japan); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kido, Aki, E-mail: akikido@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Baba, Tsukasa [Departments of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujimoto, Koji; Daido, Sayaka [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo [Departments of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Togashi, Kaori [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We have assessed the peritumoral enhancement (PTE), which mimics SEE on DCE. •We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SEE for the myometrial invasion and the frequency of PTE. •We assessed the relationship between these enhancements and important pathologic factors. •PTE Type 1 is the main factor causing the overestimation of myometrial invasion using SEE on DCE. •PTE Type 2 correlates the myometrial invasion and may play an important role in the diagnosis of LVSI. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of subendometrial enhancement (SEE) in assessing the myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer, the frequency and clinical significance of peritumoral enhancement (PTE) on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging. Materials and methods: MR images of 147 patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively analyzed for intact SEE and PTEs: Type 1, a focal early enhancement peritumorally, and Type 2, an irregular thin-layered early intense enhancement peritumorally. Two radiologists independently assessed intact SEE and PTEs on DCE imaging and compared the lesions by the presence and depth of myometrial invasion, grade, lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI), and lymph node metastasis. The relationship between SEE, PTEs, and each factor was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy were calculated for SEE. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and diagnostic accuracy for myometrial invasion based on SEE disruption on DCE were 96.6%, 32.1–46.4%, 85.8–88.5%, 69.2–76.5%, and 84.4–87.1%. According to multivariate analysis, SEE significantly predicted myometrial invasion (p < 0.0001). PTE Type 2 significantly predicted myometrial invasion presence (p < 0.05) and depth (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Diagnosis of myometrial invasion only by using SEE might be difficult on DCE-MRI due to the

  1. Denni Algorithm An Enhanced Of SMS (Scan, Move and Sort) Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilsyah Lubis, Denni; Salim Sitompul, Opim; Marwan; Tulus; Andri Budiman, M.

    2017-12-01

    Sorting has been a profound area for the algorithmic researchers, and many resources are invested to suggest a more working sorting algorithm. For this purpose many existing sorting algorithms were observed in terms of the efficiency of the algorithmic complexity. Efficient sorting is important to optimize the use of other algorithms that require sorted lists to work correctly. Sorting has been considered as a fundamental problem in the study of algorithms that due to many reasons namely, the necessary to sort information is inherent in many applications, algorithms often use sorting as a key subroutine, in algorithm design there are many essential techniques represented in the body of sorting algorithms, and many engineering issues come to the fore when implementing sorting algorithms., Many algorithms are very well known for sorting the unordered lists, and one of the well-known algorithms that make the process of sorting to be more economical and efficient is SMS (Scan, Move and Sort) algorithm, an enhancement of Quicksort invented Rami Mansi in 2010. This paper presents a new sorting algorithm called Denni-algorithm. The Denni algorithm is considered as an enhancement on the SMS algorithm in average, and worst cases. The Denni algorithm is compared with the SMS algorithm and the results were promising.

  2. Angiogenesis and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of benign and malignant breast lesions: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Peifang; Bao Runxian; Niu Yun; Yu Yong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether dynamic contrast enhanced MRI features of early-phase enhancement rate, enhancement amplitude, and signal intensity (SI) time course are associated with the microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of malignant and benign breast lesions. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with histopathologically verified breast lesions underwent dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. SI changes during dynamic scanning were assessed quantitatively. Early-phase enhancement rate and enhancement amplitude were calculated. Time-SI curves of the lesions were obtained and classified according to their shapes as type I (which was steady enhancement to the end of the dynamic data acquisition at 7.5 min), type II (plateau of SI after avid initial contrast enhancement), or type III (washout of SI after avid initial contrast enhancement). the mean MVD and VEGF expression of the lesions were measured with immuno-histochemical staining method in all the histologic specimens by pathologists without the knowledge of the results of the MR examination. The relationships among dynamic contrast enhanced MRI features, MVD, and VEGF expression of benign and malignant breast lesions were analyzed. Results: Histology revealed 21 malignancies and 17 benign lesions. The mean MVD and VEGF expression for 21 malignant lesions were statistically higher than the mean MVD and VEGF expression for 17 benign lesions. High VEGF expression of benign and malignant breast lesions showed an association with increased MVD. Among all 38 lesions, greater (> 60%) MR early-phase enhancement rate and time-SI curve type II and III showed an association with increased MVD and higher VEGF expression level. All the differences mentioned above showed statistical significance except that the difference between VEGF expression and the distribution of curve types had no statistical significance. No significant relationships were observed between the mean of enhancement

  3. Whole-heart 3D late gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Investigation of optimal scan parameters and clinical usefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorimitsu, Misako; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Yoshino, Hideaki; Isono, Sachiko; Kuhara, Shigehide

    2012-01-01

    Whole-heart 3-dimensional (3D) late-gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (WH-LGE) uses respiratory gating combined with acquisition of 3D data for the entire heart in a single scan, which permits reconstruction of any plane with high resolution. We investigated the optimal scan parameters and compared WH-LGE with the conventional scanning method. We employed inversion recovery 3D fast field echo using a 1.5-tesla system and scan parameters: repetition time (TR), 6.6 ms; echo time (TE), 2.5 ms; number of segments, 2; parallel imaging factor, 1.8; matrix size, 128 x 256; field of view (FOV), 320 x 320 mm; and acquisition slice thickness, 3 mm (reconstruction slice thickness, 1.5 mm). Five healthy volunteers underwent scanning during free breathing with real-time motion correction, from which we determined optimal scan parameters. We then used those parameters to scan 25 patients with myocardial infarction to compare scan time and image quality between the WH-LGE and conventional 3D breath-holding methods (slice thickness, 10 mm; matrix size, 128 x 256). Results in volunteers showed optimal scan parameters of 12deg flip angle, fat suppression turned off in combination, and interleaved ordering. In clinical cases, scan times did not differ significantly. Sharpness of the margins of normal myocardium at the apex of the heart and contrast between enhanced and nonenhanced myocardium improved significantly with WH-LGE. WH-LGE yields high resolution images during free breathing and is considered useful for accurately estimating the area and transmural extent of myocardial infarction. (author)

  4. Diagnostic capability of scanning laser polarimetry with and without enhanced corneal compensation and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-del-Castillo, Javier; Martinez, Antonio; Regi, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    To compare the abilities of the current commercially available versions of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), SLP-variable corneal compensation (VCC), SLP-enhanced corneal compensation (ECC), and high-definition (HD) OCT, in discriminating between healthy eyes and those with early-to-moderate glaucomatous visual field loss. Healthy volunteers and patients with glaucoma who met the eligibility criteria were consecutively enrolled in this prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Subjects underwent complete eye examination, automated perimetry, SLP-ECC, SLP-VCC, and HD-OCT. Scanning laser polarimetry parameters were recalculated in 90-degree segments (quadrants) in the calculation circle to be compared. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCs) were calculated for every parameter in order to compare the ability of each imaging modality to differentiate between normal and glaucomatous eyes. Fifty-five normal volunteers (mean age 59.1 years) and 33 patients with glaucoma (mean age 63.8 years) were enrolled. Average visual field mean deviation was -6.69 dB (95% confidence interval -8.07 to -5.31) in the glaucoma group. The largest AUROCs were associated with nerve fiber indicator (0.880 and 0.888) for the SLP-VCC and SLP-ECC, respectively, and with the average thickness in the HD-OCT (0.897). The best performing indices for the SLP-VCC, SLP-ECC, and HD OCT gave similar AUROCs, showing moderate diagnostic accuracy in patients with early to moderate glaucoma. Further studies are needed to evaluate the ability of these technologies to discriminate between normal and glaucomatous eyes.

  5. Dynamic covalent chemistry of bisimines at the solid/liquid interface monitored by scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Artur; El Garah, Mohamed; Haar, Sébastien; Kovaříček, Petr; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic covalent chemistry relies on the formation of reversible covalent bonds under thermodynamic control to generate dynamic combinatorial libraries. It provides access to numerous types of complex functional architectures, and thereby targets several technologically relevant applications, such as in drug discovery, (bio)sensing and dynamic materials. In liquid media it was proved that by taking advantage of the reversible nature of the bond formation it is possible to combine the error-correction capacity of supramolecular chemistry with the robustness of covalent bonding to generate adaptive systems. Here we show that double imine formation between 4-(hexadecyloxy)benzaldehyde and different α,ω-diamines as well as reversible bistransimination reactions can be achieved at the solid/liquid interface, as monitored on the submolecular scale by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging. Our modular approach enables the structurally controlled reversible incorporation of various molecular components to form sophisticated covalent architectures, which opens up perspectives towards responsive multicomponent two-dimensional materials and devices.

  6. Angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation of single-level dynamic spiral CT scans in arterial phase and expression of α-smooth muscle actin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Min Pengqiu; Chen Weixia; Zhang Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the single-level dynamic spiral CT scans (SDCT) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in arterial phase (AP) and the immunohistochemistry expression of α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). Methods: 33 cases of suspected HCC undergoing spiral CT plain scan of the whole liver, the single-level dynamic scan of the target level of lesion in AP and finally the whole liver scan in portal-venous phase before operations and proved after were included into the study. After the SDCT, a time-density curve (T-DC) was drawn according to the density change of the region of interest (ROI) of the tumor parenchyma with some parameters calculated, and signs of enhancement evaluated. Slices of post-operation specimen underwent hemotoxylin-eosin (HE) and ASMA immunohistochemistry staining. Then the slices were evaluated with emphases on the ASMA-positive neovasculatures in the parenchyma and mesenchyma of carcinomas, and the average count in a low microscopic field (x 100) was recorded (5 low microscopic field were observed and then an average was calculated.). Finally the immunohistochemistry and histologic results were correlated with image findings. Results: According to the PV of the tumor parenchyma, T-DC was divided into type I, II and III in which the criteria were PV>80, 40 HU< PV< 80 HU and PV<40 HU respectively. In the 33 cases, type I, II and III of T-DC were 3, 17 and 13 cases with PV of 103.30, 57.65 and 33.55 HU respectively. In ASMA immunohistochemistry study, ASMA-positive neovasculatures were devided into type A with a thick wall and B with a thin wall. The mean count of neovasculatures of tumor parenchyma in type I, II and III of T-DC were 10, 4.59 and 1 respectively. Statistically, different types of T-DC were significantly correlated with the count of neovasculatures in the parenchyma of carcinomas (r=-0.567, P<0.01). Homogeneous and inhomogeneous enhancement of carcinomas during SDCT in AP were correlated with the

  7. Magnetosheath dynamic pressure enhancements: occurrence and typical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Archer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The first comprehensive statistical study of large-amplitude (> 100% transient enhancements of the magnetosheath dynamic pressure reveals events of up to ~ 15 times the ambient dynamic pressure with durations up to 3 min and an average duration of around 30 s, predominantly downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The dynamic pressure transients are most often dominated by velocity increases along with a small fractional increase in the density, though the velocity is generally only deflected by a few degrees. Superposed wavelet transforms of the magnetic field show that, whilst most enhancements exhibit changes in the magnetosheath magnetic field, the majority are not associated with changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF. However, there is a minority of enhancements that do appear to be associated with solar wind discontinuities which cannot be explained simply by random events. In general, it is found that during periods of magnetosheath dynamic pressure enhancements the IMF is steadier than usual. This suggests that a stable foreshock and hence foreshock structures or processes may be important in the generation of the majority of magnetosheath dynamic pressure enhancements.

  8. Non-Linear Structural Dynamics Characterization using a Scanning Laser Vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, P. F.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a scanning laser vibrometer and a signal decomposition method to characterize non-linear dynamics of highly flexible structures. A Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure transverse velocities of points on a structure subjected to a harmonic excitation. Velocity profiles at different times are constructed using the measured velocities, and then each velocity profile is decomposed using the first four linear mode shapes and a least-squares curve-fitting method. From the variations of the obtained modal \\ielocities with time we search for possible non-linear phenomena. A cantilevered titanium alloy beam subjected to harmonic base-excitations around the second. third, and fourth natural frequencies are examined in detail. Influences of the fixture mass. gravity. mass centers of mode shapes. and non-linearities are evaluated. Geometrically exact equations governing the planar, harmonic large-amplitude vibrations of beams are solved for operational deflection shapes using the multiple shooting method. Experimental results show the existence of 1:3 and 1:2:3 external and internal resonances. energy transfer from high-frequency modes to the first mode. and amplitude- and phase- modulation among several modes. Moreover, the existence of non-linear normal modes is found to be questionable.

  9. Dynamic autofocus for continuous-scanning time-delay-and-integration image acquisition in automated microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Zanoguera, Miguel E; Laris, Casey A; Nguyen, Lam K; Oliva, Mike; Price, Jeffrey H

    2007-01-01

    Efficient image cytometry of a conventional microscope slide means rapid acquisition and analysis of 20 gigapixels of image data (at 0.3-microm sampling). The voluminous data motivate increased acquisition speed to enable many biomedical applications. Continuous-motion time-delay-and-integrate (TDI) scanning has the potential to speed image acquisition while retaining sensitivity, but the challenge of implementing high-resolution autofocus operating simultaneously with acquisition has limited its adoption. We develop a dynamic autofocus system for this need using: 1. a "volume camera," consisting of nine fiber optic imaging conduits to charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, that acquires images in parallel from different focal planes, 2. an array of mixed analog-digital processing circuits that measure the high spatial frequencies of the multiple image streams to create focus indices, and 3. a software system that reads and analyzes the focus data streams and calculates best focus for closed feedback loop control. Our system updates autofocus at 56 Hz (or once every 21 microm of stage travel) to collect sharply focused images sampled at 0.3x0.3 microm(2)/pixel at a stage speed of 2.3 mms. The system, tested by focusing in phase contrast and imaging long fluorescence strips, achieves high-performance closed-loop image-content-based autofocus in continuous scanning for the first time.

  10. Automatic three-dimensional rib centerline extraction from CT scans for enhanced visualization and anatomical context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sowmya; Alvino, Christopher; Grady, Leo; Kiraly, Atilla

    2011-03-01

    We present a complete automatic system to extract 3D centerlines of ribs from thoracic CT scans. Our rib centerline system determines the positional information for the rib cage consisting of extracted rib centerlines, spinal canal centerline, pairing and labeling of ribs. We show an application of this output to produce an enhanced visualization of the rib cage by the method of Kiraly et al., in which the ribs are digitally unfolded along their centerlines. The centerline extraction consists of three stages: (a) pre-trace processing for rib localization, (b) rib centerline tracing, and (c) post-trace processing to merge the rib traces. Then we classify ribs from non-ribs and determine anatomical rib labeling. Our novel centerline tracing technique uses the Random Walker algorithm to segment the structural boundary of the rib in successive 2D cross sections orthogonal to the longitudinal direction of the ribs. Then the rib centerline is progressively traced along the rib using a 3D Kalman filter. The rib centerline extraction framework was evaluated on 149 CT datasets with varying slice spacing, dose, and under a variety of reconstruction kernels. The results of the evaluation are presented. The extraction takes approximately 20 seconds on a modern radiology workstation and performs robustly even in the presence of partial volume effects or rib pathologies such as bone metastases or fractures, making the system suitable for assisting clinicians in expediting routine rib reading for oncology and trauma applications.

  11. Spectrally enhanced imaging of occlusal surfaces and artificial shallow enamel erosions with a scanning fiber endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-07-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope, originally developed for cancer diagnosis, was used to image dental occlusal surfaces as well as shallow artificially induced enamel erosions from human extracted teeth (n=40). Enhanced image resolution of occlusal surfaces was obtained using a short-wavelength 405-nm illumination laser. In addition, artificial erosions of varying depths were also imaged with 405-, 404-, 532-, and 635-nm illumination lasers. Laser-induced autofluorescence images of the teeth using 405-nm illumination were also obtained. Contrast between sound and eroded enamel was quantitatively computed for each imaging modality. For shallow erosions, the image contrast with respect to sound enamel was greatest for the 405-nm reflected image. It was also determined that the increased contrast was in large part due to volume scattering with a smaller component from surface scattering. Furthermore, images obtained with a shallow penetration depth illumination laser (405 nm) provided the greatest detail of surface enamel topography since the reflected light does not contain contributions from light reflected from greater depths within the enamel tissue. Multilayered Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to confirm the experimental results.

  12. Differentiation of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules : value of contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyung Jin; Han, Heon; Lee, Hong Lyeol; Kim, Kwang Ho; Suh, Chang Hae

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging for differentiation of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Twenty-three patients with histologically or radiologically provened SPNs smaller than 40mm (14 benign, 9 malignant) underwent MR examination using the breath-hold fast multiplanar spoiled gradient echo (FMPSPGR) technique. Pre-enhancement MR examination was followed by serial scans obtained at one-minute intervals, beginning one-minute after the onset of bolus injection of paramagnetic contrast agent for a total of five scans. Signal intensities of SPNs were measured from pre- and post-contrast enhanced MR images and peak percentage increase in signal intensity (p%SI) was calculated. Mean percentage increase in signal intensity (m%SI) was also calculated and the time-m%SI curve was plotted. The enhancement patterns of SPNs were classified as homogeneous, peripheral rim-like, inhomogeneous, or no (or minimal) enhancement. We compared differences in p%SI, the pattern of the time-m%SI curve, and the pattern of enhancement between benign and malignant SPNs. On dynamic MR images, alignant SPNs (n=9) showed a significantly higher p%SI than benign SPNs (n=14) (malignant : mean 120.6, range 81.8-171.6; benign : mean 29.5, range 3.7-78.9)(p<0.0001). With 80 p%SI as the threshold for malignancy-positive, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. The m%SI of malignant SPNs rapidly increased at one minute after enhancement and decreased gradually thereafter, whereas that of benign SPNs increased more slowly to form a plateau. Eighty-nine percent (8/9) of malignant SPNs showed homogeneous enhancement. In contrast, among benign SPNs, peripheral rim-like enhancement and no (or minimal) enhancement occurred in the same proportion of cases : 50%(7/14). The superb demonstration of different enhancement characteristics obtained using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging is useful to discriminate malignant from benign SPNs

  13. Photonic limiters with enhanced dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononchuk, Rodion; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos; Anisimov, Igor; Vitebskiy, Ilya; Chabanov, Andrey

    2018-02-01

    Optical limiters transmit low intensity input light while blocking input light with the intensity exceeding certain limiting threshold. Conventional passive limiters utilize nonlinear optical materials, which are transparent at low light intensity and turn absorptive at high intensity. Strong nonlinear absorption, though, can result in over- heating and destruction of the limiter. Another problem is that the limiting threshold provided by the available optical material with nonlinear absorption is too high for many applications. To address the above problems, the nonlinear material can be incorporated in a photonic structure with engineered dispersion. At low intensity, the photonic structure can display resonant transmission via localized mode(s), while at high intensity the resonant transmission can disappear, and the entire stack can become highly re ective (not absorptive) within a broad frequency range. In the proposed design, the transition from the resonant transmission at low intensity to nearly total re ectivity at high intensity does not rely on nonlinear absorption; instead, it requires only a modest change in the refractive index of the nonlinear material. The latter implies a dramatic increase in the dynamic range of the limiter. The main idea is to eliminate the high-intensity resonant transmission by decoupling the localized (resonant) modes from the input light, rather than suppressing those modes using nonlinear absorption. Similar approach can be used for light modulation and switching.

  14. Breast dynamic contrast enhanced MRI: fibrocystic changes presenting as a non-mass enhancement mimicking malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosevic Zorica C.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to analyse the morphokinetic features of breast fibrocystic changes (nonproliferative lesions, proliferative lesions without atypia and proliferative lesions with atypia presenting as a non-mass enhancement (NMEin dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI examination.

  15. Beam-dynamic effects at the CMS BRIL van der Meer scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A.

    2018-03-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is responsible for the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS experiment. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors (luminometers), adequate for the experimental conditions associated with high values of instantaneous luminosity delivered by the CERN LHC . BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. Precise and accurate measurements of the delivered luminosity is of paramount importance for the CMS physics program. The absolute calibration of luminosity is achieved by the van der Meer method, which is carried out under specially tailored conditions. This paper presents models used to simulate of beam-dynamic effects arising due to the electromagnetic interaction of colliding bunches. These effects include beam-beam deflection and dynamic-β effect. Both effects are important to luminosity measurements and influence calibration constants at the level of 1-2%. The simulations are carried out based on 2016 CMS van der Meer scan data for proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  16. Dynamics of a nanoscale Josephson junction probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ast, Christian R.; Jaeck, Berthold; Eltschka, Matthias; Etzkorn, Markus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The Josephson effect is an intriguing phenomenon as it presents an interplay of different energy scales, such as the Josephson energy ε{sub J} (critical current), charging energy ε{sub C}, and temperature T. Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating at a base temperature of 15 mK, we create a nanoscale superconductor-vacuum-superconductor tunnel junction in an extremely underdamped regime (Q>>10). We observe extremely small retrapping currents also owing to strongly reduced ohmic losses in the well-developed superconducting gaps. While formally operating in the zero temperature limit, i.e. the temperature T is smaller than the Josephson plasma frequency ω{sub J} (k{sub B}T<<ℎω{sub J}=√(8ε{sub J}ε{sub C})), experimentally other phenomena, such as stray photons, may perturb the Josephson junction, leading to an effectively higher temperature. The dynamics of the Josephson junction can be addressed experimentally by looking at characteristic parameters, such as the switching current and the retrapping current. We discuss the dynamics of the Josephson junction in the context of reaching the zero temperature limit.

  17. Application of carbon nanotubes to topographical resolution enhancement of tapered fiber scanning near field optical microscopy probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, S. T.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2003-05-01

    Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) probes are typically tapered optical fibers with metallic coatings. The tip diameters are generally in excess of 300 nm and thus provide poor topographical resolution. Here we report on the attachment multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the probes in order to substantially enhance the topographical resolution, without adversely affecting the optical resolution.

  18. Quantum Coherent Dynamics Enhanced by Synchronization with Nonequilibrium Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Ryo; Uchiyama, Kazuharu; Hori, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    2018-05-01

    We report the discovery of the anomalous enhancement of quantum coherent dynamics (CD) due to a non-Markovian mechanism originating from not thermal-equilibrium phonon baths but nonequilibrium coherent phonons. CD is an elementary process for quantum phenomena in nanosystems, such as excitation transfer (ET) in semiconductor nanostructures and light-harvesting systems. CD occurs in homogeneous nanosystems because system inhomogeneity typically destroys coherence. In real systems, however, nanosystems behave as open systems surrounded by environments such as phonon systems. Typically, CD in inhomogeneous nanosystems is enhanced by the absorption and emission of thermal-equilibrium phonons, and the enhancement is described by the conventional master equation. On the other hand, CD is also enhanced by synchronization between population dynamics in nanosystems and coherent phonons; namely, coherent phonons, which are self-consistently induced by phase matching with Rabi oscillation, are fed back to enhance CD. This anomalous enhancement of CD essentially originates from the nonequilibrium and dynamical non-Markovian nature of coherent phonon environments, and the enhancement is firstly predicted by applying time-dependent projection operators to nonequilibrium and dynamical environments. Moreover, CD is discussed by considering ET from a donor to an acceptor. It is found that the enhancement of ET by synchronization with coherent phonons depends on the competition between the output time from a system to an acceptor and the formation time of coherent phonons. These findings in this study will stimulate the design and manipulation of CD via structured environments from the viewpoint of application to nano-photoelectronic devices.

  19. Application of 3D Laser Scanning Technology in Inspection and Dynamic Reserves Detection of Open-Pit Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhumin; Wei, Shiyu; Jiang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    The traditional open-pit mine mining rights verification and dynamic reserve detection means rely on the total station and RTK to collect the results of the turning point coordinates of mining surface contours. It resulted in obtaining the results of low precision and large error in the means that is limited by the traditional measurement equipment accuracy and measurement methods. The three-dimensional scanning technology can obtain the three-dimensional coordinate data of the surface of the measured object in a large area at high resolution. This paper expounds the commonly used application of 3D scanning technology in the inspection and dynamic reserve detection of open mine mining rights.

  20. High vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscope based on a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present the construction of a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) system that allows in situ sample preparation and measurement. A detailed description of the prototype instrument is presented with experimental validation of its use and novel ex situ experimental results using the HV-TERS system. The HV-TERS system includes three chambers held under a 10(-7) Pa vacuum. The three chambers are an analysis chamber, a sample preparation chamber, and a fast loading chamber. The analysis chamber is the core chamber and contains a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a Raman detector coupled with a 50 × 0.5 numerical aperture objective. The sample preparation chamber is used to produce single-crystalline metal and sub-monolayer molecular films by molecular beam epitaxy. The fast loading chamber allows ex situ preparation of samples for HV-TERS analysis. Atomic resolution can be achieved by the STM on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. We demonstrate the measurement of localized temperature using the Stokes and anti-Stokes TERS signals from a monolayer of 1,2-benzenedithiol on a gold film using a gold tip. Additionally, plasmonic catalysis can be monitored label-free at the nanoscale using our device. Moreover, the HV-TERS experiments show simultaneously activated infrared and Raman vibrational modes, Fermi resonance, and some other non-linear effects that are not observed in atmospheric TERS experiments. The high spatial and spectral resolution and pure environment of high vacuum are beneficial for basic surface studies.

  1. High vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscope based on a scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yurui [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603-146, Beijing 100190 (China); Bionanophotonics, Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, SE 41296 (Sweden); Zhang, Zhenglong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603-146, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, 710062 Xi’an (China); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Sun, Mengtao, E-mail: mtsun@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603-146, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we present the construction of a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) system that allows in situ sample preparation and measurement. A detailed description of the prototype instrument is presented with experimental validation of its use and novel ex situ experimental results using the HV-TERS system. The HV-TERS system includes three chambers held under a 10{sup −7} Pa vacuum. The three chambers are an analysis chamber, a sample preparation chamber, and a fast loading chamber. The analysis chamber is the core chamber and contains a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a Raman detector coupled with a 50 × 0.5 numerical aperture objective. The sample preparation chamber is used to produce single-crystalline metal and sub-monolayer molecular films by molecular beam epitaxy. The fast loading chamber allows ex situ preparation of samples for HV-TERS analysis. Atomic resolution can be achieved by the STM on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. We demonstrate the measurement of localized temperature using the Stokes and anti-Stokes TERS signals from a monolayer of 1,2-benzenedithiol on a gold film using a gold tip. Additionally, plasmonic catalysis can be monitored label-free at the nanoscale using our device. Moreover, the HV-TERS experiments show simultaneously activated infrared and Raman vibrational modes, Fermi resonance, and some other non-linear effects that are not observed in atmospheric TERS experiments. The high spatial and spectral resolution and pure environment of high vacuum are beneficial for basic surface studies.

  2. Pilots' Visual Scan Patterns and Attention Distribution During the Pursuit of a Dynamic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-San; Wang, Eric Min-Yang; Li, Wen-Chin; Braithwaite, Graham; Greaves, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The current research was to investigate pilots' visual scan patterns in order to assess attention distribution during air-to-air maneuvers. A total of 30 qualified mission-ready fighter pilots participated in this research. Eye movement data were collected by a portable head-mounted eye-tracking device, combined with a jet fighter simulator. To complete the task, pilots had to search for, pursue, and lock on a moving target while performing air-to-air tasks. There were significant differences in pilots' saccade duration (ms) in three operating phases, including searching (M = 241, SD = 332), pursuing (M = 311, SD = 392), and lock-on (M = 191, SD = 226). Also, there were significant differences in pilots' pupil sizes (pixel(2)), of which the lock-on phase was the largest (M = 27,237, SD = 6457), followed by pursuit (M = 26,232, SD = 6070), then searching (M = 25,858, SD = 6137). Furthermore, there were significant differences between expert and novice pilots in the percentage of fixation on the head-up display (HUD), time spent looking outside the cockpit, and the performance of situational awareness (SA). Experienced pilots have better SA performance and paid more attention to the HUD, but focused less outside the cockpit when compared with novice pilots. Furthermore, pilots with better SA performance exhibited a smaller pupil size during the operational phase of lock on while pursuing a dynamic target. Understanding pilots' visual scan patterns and attention distribution are beneficial to the design of interface displays in the cockpit and in developing human factors training syllabi to improve the safety of flight operations.

  3. Toward improved target conformity for two spot scanning proton therapy delivery systems using dynamic collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moignier, Alexandra; Gelover, Edgar; Smith, Blake R.; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kirk, Maura L.; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy D.; Lin, Alexander; Hyer, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify improvement in target conformity in brain and head and neck tumor treatments resulting from the use of a dynamic collimation system (DCS) with two spot scanning proton therapy delivery systems (universal nozzle, UN, and dedicated nozzle, DN) with median spot sizes of 5.2 and 3.2 mm over a range of energies from 100 to 230 MeV. Methods: Uncollimated and collimated plans were calculated with both UN and DN beam models implemented within our in-house treatment planning system for five brain and ten head and neck datasets in patients previously treated with spot scanning proton therapy. The prescription dose and beam angles from the clinical plans were used for both the UN and DN plans. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target between the uncollimated and collimated plans was calculated for the UN and the DN. Target conformity was analyzed using the mean dose to 1-mm thickness rings surrounding the target at increasing distances ranging from 1 to 10 mm. Results: The average reductions of the 10-mm ring mean dose for the UN and DN plans were 13.7% (95% CI: 11.6%–15.7%; p < 0.0001) and 11.5% (95% CI: 9.5%–13.5%; p < 0.0001) across all brain cases and 7.1% (95% CI: 4.4%–9.8%; p < 0.001) and 6.3% (95% CI: 3.7%–9.0%; p < 0.001), respectively, across all head and neck cases. The collimated UN plans were either more conformal (all brain cases and 60% of the head and neck cases) than or equivalent (40% of the head and neck cases) to the uncollimated DN plans. The collimated DN plans offered the highest conformity. Conclusions: The DCS added either to the UN or DN improved the target conformity. The DCS may be of particular interest for sites with UN systems looking for a more economical solution than upgrading the nozzle to improve the target conformity of their spot scanning proton therapy system. PMID:26936726

  4. Improved image quality and radiation dose reduction in liver dynamic CT scan with the protocol change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yu Jin; Cho, Pyong Kon [Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose is reducing radiation dose while maintaining of image quality in liver dynamic CT(LDCT) scan, by protocols generally used and the tube voltage set at a low level protocol compared to the radiation dose and image quality. The target is body mass index, 18.5-24 patients out of 40 patients who underwent the ACT(abdominal CT). Group A(tube voltage : 120 kVp, SAFIRE strength 1) of 20 people among 40 people, to apply the general abdominal CT scan protocol, group B(tube voltage : 100 kVp, apply SAFIRE strength 0-5) was 20 people, set a lower tube voltage. Image quality evaluation was setting a region of interest(ROI) in the liver parenchyma, aorta, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac trunk, visceral fat of arterial phase. In the ROI were compared by measuring the noise, signal to noise ratio(SNR), contrast to noise ratio(CNR), CT number. In addition, qualitative assessments to evaluate two people in the rich professional experience in Radiology by 0-3 points. We compared the total radiation dose, dose length product(DLP) and effective dose, volume computed tomography dose index(CTDIvol). The higher SAFIRE in the tube voltage 100 kVp, noise is reduced, CT number was increased. Thus, SNR and CNR was increased higher the SAFIRE step. Compared with the tube voltage 120 kVp, noise, SNR, CNR was most similar in SAFIRE strength 2 and 3. Qualitative assessment SAFIRE strength 2 is the most common SAFIRE strength 2 the most common qualitative assessment, if the tube voltage of 100 kVp when the quality of the images better evaluated was SAFIRE strength 1. Dose was reduced from 21.69%, in 100 kVp than 120 kVp. In the case of a relatively high BMI is not LDCT scan, When it is shipped from the factory tube voltage is set higher, unnecessary radiation exposure when considering the reality that is concerned, when according to the results of this study, set a lower tube voltage and adjust the SAFIRE strength to 1 or 2, the radiation without compromising image quality

  5. Dynamic enhanced computed tomographic findings of a perirenal capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Ryu, Jung Kyu; Lim, Sung Jig [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Hemangiomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms that rarely occur in the kidney and perirenal space. Perirenal hemangiomas can mimic the appearance of exophytic renal cell carcinoma or various retroperitoneal tumors. We report a case of perirenal hemangioma detected by dynamic enhanced computed tomography in a 43-year-old female.

  6. Value of fast dynamic enhanced MR imaging for the differential diagnosis between ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Jun; Wang Xiaomei; Xu Jianmin; Xu Hongli; Feng Xiaofeng; Gong Jingshan; Ling Rennan; Rao Zibin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of dynamic enhanced MRI in the differential diagnosis between subserosal uterine leiomyoma and ovarian fibroma which were iso-signal and low signal ones on T 2 WI. Methods: Plain and dynamic enhanced MRI findings of 45 patients with histologically proved subserosal leiomyoma or ovarian fibroma were analyzed. There were 35 cases of subserosal leiomyoma and 10 cases of ovarian fibroma. The enhancement index of early phase (100 sec after the contrast medial administration) and the time to peak during 200 sec after the contrast administration (TTP 200 ) were analyzed. Results: On plain scanning, both subserosal leiomyoma and ovarian fibrioma appeared similarly as intrapelvic masses with low signal on T 2 WI. On Gadolinium dynamic enhancement, subserosal leiomyomas showed early and evident enhancement while ovarian fibroma showed delayed and moderate enhancement. The difference of the enhancement index of early phase and TTP 200 was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: Gadolinium dynamic enhanced MR imaging was helpful in the differential diagnosis between subserosal uterine leiomyoma and ovarian fibroma by the difference in the enhancement pattern

  7. Enhanced Microgrid Dynamic Performance Using a Modulated Power Filter Based on Enhanced Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Othman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design of microgrid (MG with enhanced dynamic performance. Distributed energy resources (DER are widely used in MGs to match the various load types and profiles. DERs include solar PV cells, wind energy sources, fuel cells, batteries, micro gas-engines and storage elements. MG will include AC/DC circuits, developed power electronics devices, inverters and power electronic controllers. A novel modulated power filters (MPF device will be applied in MG design. Enhanced bacterial foraging optimization (EBFO will be proposed to optimize and set the MPF parameters to enhance and tune the MG dynamic response. Recent dynamic control is applied to minimize the harmonic reference content. EBFO will adapt the gains of MPF dynamic control. The present research achieves an enhancement of MG dynamic performance, in addition to ensuring improvements in the power factor, bus voltage profile and power quality. MG operation will be evaluated by the dynamic response to be fine-tuned by MPF based on EBFO. Digital simulations have validated the results to show the effectiveness and efficient improvement by the proposed strategy.

  8. High contrast enhancement aspect of dynamic computed tomography with arterial infusion - DCT-AI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Seishi; Iwasaki, Naoya; Matsumura, Yoshimitsu; Kuramae, Shigeru; Mishiro, Tadashi

    1983-01-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 112 cases possibly having hepatic tumors with intraarterial infusion of undiluted contrast into a selectively placed catheter following angiographies. Our dynamic program could evaluate not only early phase of enhancement but also late phase up to 120 sec. Reconstructed views from early scans and magnified views were very useful to evaluate minute sequential changes. Hepatic masses less than 5 cm in size were found in thirty-one cases. Patterns of tumor enhancement and time-density curves have been analysed to correlate them with histology. Four types of tumor enhancement were noted: (1) homogeneous (2) patchy (3) mottled (4) ringed. Characteristic changes were observed in hepatocellular carcinoma - HCC - (mostly mottled) and haemangioma (mostly patchy). The former was divided in two groups reflecting the cellular maturity. The metastatic tumor could be enhanced in a ringed form with dendritic pattern of supplying vascularities in some cases. To support the use of undiluted contrast and to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of high contrast enhancement, experiments were performed by taking transaxial views of an acrylic phantom immersed in different concentrations of contrast. Analysis of CT images taken at different HU values ranging from 0 to 450 demonstrated that the higher the concentration of contrast, the better the spatial resolution was. Also larger magnification could be expected by using higher concentration of contrast. Although our Dynamic Computed Tomography with Arterial Infusion of Contrast still has drawbacks and limited indications, we advocate it as a better way of enhancement to detect and evaluate the hepatic masses, which sometimes elude the examiner's grasp with conventional way of enhancement. (author)

  9. Analysis of normal tongue by dynamic enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Shimahara, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    We qualitatively evaluated dynamic enhanced MR images of normal tongues of 26 patients without oral malignancy, inflammatory diseases or systemic diseases. The selected slices were not affected by apparent artifacts including motion and susceptibility, and the tongue shape was delineated as symmetrical on coronal images, which were obtained using a T1 weighted spin echo pulse sequence (repetition time/echo time (TR/TE)=200/20). Slices at the incisor and molar levels were evaluated. Structures that could be identified on each pre-contrast image could also be identified on the post-contrast dynamic enhanced image. However, identification of the intrinsic tongue musculature was impossible on the images that were composed of symmetrical, relatively high signal areas surrounded by a low signal area. Both areas were gradually but apparently enhanced. The sublingual space was easily identified at the molar level, as it was rapidly enhanced and symmetrically delineated on each image, however, it was difficult to determine at the incisor level. Further, the lingual septum could also be identified in almost all images at the molar level, and showed no enhancement pattern, whereas, the mucosal surface of the dorsum tongue was rapidly enhanced, and identified on each image. (author)

  10. Dynamic PET scanning and compartmental model analysis to determine cellular level radiotracer distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.T.; Hubner, K.F.; Goodman, M.M.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to measure tissue radiotracer concentration in vivo. Radiochemical distribution can be determined with compartmental model analysis. A two compartment model describes the kinetics of N-13 ammonia ( 13 NH 3 ) in the myocardium. The model consists of a vascular space, Q 1 and a space for 13 NH 3 bound within the tissue, Q 2 . Differential equations for the model can be written: X(t) = AX(t) + BU( t), Y(t)= CX(t)+ DU(t) (1) where X(t) is a column vector [Q 1 (t); Q 2 (t)], U(t) is the arterial input activity measured from the left ventricular blood pool, and Y(t) is the measured tissue activity using PET. Matrices A, B, C, and D are dependent on physiological parameters describing the kinetics of 13 NH 3 in the myocardium. Estimated parameter matrices in Equation 1 have been validated in dog experiments by measuring myocardial perfusion with dynamic PET scanning and intravenous injection of 13 NH 3 . Tracer concentrations for each compartment can be calculated by direct integration of Equation 1. If the cellular level distribution of each compartment is known, the concentration of tracer within the intracellular and extracellular space can be determined. Applications of this type of modeling include parameter estimation for measurement of physiological processes, organ level dosimetry, and determination of cellular radiotracer distribution

  11. PHARMACEUTICAL AMORPHOUS ORGANIC MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION BY USING THE DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY AND DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Dranca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This research has been carried out in order to demonstrate the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC in detecting and measuring α- and β-relaxation processes in amorphous pharmaceutical systems. DSC has been employed to study amorphous samples of poly (vinylpyrrolidone (PVP, indomethacin (InM, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDA that are annealed at temperature (Ta around 0.8 of their glass transition temperature (Tg. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA is used to measure β- relaxation in PVP. Yet, the DSC has been used to study the glassy indomethacin aged at 0 and -10 oC for periods of time up to 109 and 210 days respectively. The results demonstrate the emergence of a small melting peak of the α-polymorph after aging for 69 days at 0°C and for 147 days at -10°C (i.e., ~55°C below the glass transition temperature that provides evidence of nucleation occurring in the temperature region of the β-relaxation.

  12. Dynamic CT brain scanning in the haemodynamic evaluation of cerebral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.M.; Melbourne Univ.; Tress, B.M.; Hopper, J.L.; Rossiter, S.C.; Kaye, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic cerebral CT scanning (DCT) was used to quantitatively analyse the haemodynamic effects of extracranial and intracranial arterial occlusive lesions in 17 patients with TIA's or minor cerebral infarcts. Using DCT and gamma variate curve fitting, mean transit times were determined for the terminal internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries and middle cerebral-supplied Sylvian cortex at the level of the Circle of Willis. Six patients were studied sequentially, four before and after transcranial bypass surgery. No arterial or tissue delays were found in patients without haemodynamic arterial lesions or cortical infarcts. Seven of nine patients with haemodynamic, extracranial carotid lesions showed ipsilateral delays in arterial or tissue transit times. Tissue delays usually correlated with CT or clinical evidence of infarction. Improved haemodynamics in patients re-studied correlated with the effects of surgery or clinical recovery. DCT has several important limitations but has the potential to provide additional haemodynamic information about the cerebral circulation in selected patients with cerebral arterial occlusive disease. (orig.)

  13. The 3-D alignment of objects in dynamic PET scans using filtered sinusoidal trajectories of sinogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostopoulos, Aristotelis E.; Happonen, Antti P.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    In this study, our goal is to employ a novel 3-D alignment method for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Because the acquired data (i.e. sinograms) often contain noise considerably, filtering of the data prior to the alignment presumably improves the final results. In this study, we utilized a novel 3-D stackgram domain approach. In the stackgram domain, the signals along the sinusoidal trajectory signals of the sinogram can be processed separately. In this work, we performed angular stackgram domain filtering by employing well known 1-D filters: the Gaussian low-pass filter and the median filter. In addition, we employed two wavelet de-noising techniques. After filtering we performed alignment of objects in the stackgram domain. The local alignment technique we used is based on similarity comparisons between locus vectors (i.e. the signals along the sinusoidal trajectories of the sinogram) in a 3-D neighborhood of sequences of the stackgrams. Aligned stackgrams can be transformed back to sinograms (Method 1), or alternatively directly to filtered back-projected images (Method 2). In order to evaluate the alignment process, simulated data with different kinds of additive noises were used. The results indicated that the filtering prior to the alignment can be important concerning the accuracy

  14. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. When the non-contrast-enhanced phase is unnecessary in abdominal computed tomography scans? A retrospective analysis of 244 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Danilo Manuel Cerqueira; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Monjardim, Rodrigo da Fonseca; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Torres, Lucas Rios; Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D' ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-06-15

    Objective: to evaluate the necessity of the non contrast-enhanced phase in abdominal computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study was developed, evaluating 244 consecutive abdominal computed tomography scans both with and without contrast injection. Initially, the contrast-enhanced images were analyzed (first analysis). Subsequently, the observers had access to the non-contrast-enhanced images for a second analysis. The primary and secondary diagnoses were established as a function of the clinical indications for each study (such as tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation for abdominal collection and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others). Finally, the changes in the diagnoses resulting from the addition of the non-contrast-enhanced phase were evaluated. Results: Only one (0.4%; p > 0.999; non-statistically significant) out of the 244 reviewed cases had the diagnosis changed after the reading of non-contrast-enhanced images. As the secondary diagnoses are considered, 35 (14%) cases presented changes after the second analysis, as follows: nephrolithiasis (10%), steatosis (3%), adrenal nodule (0.7%) and cholelithiasis (0.3%). Conclusion: For the clinical indications of tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation of abdominal collections and hepatocellular carcinoma, the non-contrast-enhanced phase can be excluded from abdominal computed tomography studies with no significant impact on the diagnosis. (author)

  17. Suspended Cell Culture ANalysis (SCAN) Tool to Enhance ISS On-Orbit Capabilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences and partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on-orbit immuno-based label-free Suspension Cell Culture ANalysis tool, SCAN tool, which...

  18. Polycystic ovary syndrome: dynamic contrast-enhanced ovary MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Bayar, Ulku; Erdem, L. Oktay; Barut, Aykut; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kaya, Erdal

    2004-07-01

    Objective: to determine the enhancement behaviour of the ovaries in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging and to compare these data with those of normal ovulating controls. Method: 24 women with PCOS and 12 controls underwent DCE-MR imaging. Dynamic images were acquired before and after injection of a contrast bolus at 30 s and the min of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. On postprocessing examination: (i) the ovarian volumes; (ii) the signal intensity value of each ovary per dynamic study; (iii) early-phase enhancement rate; (iv) time to peak enhancement (T{sub p}); and (v) percentage of washout of 5th min were determined. Data of the ovaries of the women with PCOS and controls were compared with Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: the mean values of T{sub p} were found to be significantly lower in women with PCOS than in controls (p<0.05). On the other hand, the mean values of ovarian volume, the early-phase enhancement rate, and percentage of washout of 5th min of ovaries were significantly higher in PCOS patients (p<0.05). Examination of the mean signal intensity-time curve revealed the ovaries in women with PCOS showed a faster and greater enhancement and wash-out. Conclusion: the enhancement behaviour of ovaries of women with PCOS may be significantly different from those of control subjects on DCE-MR imaging examination. In our experience, it is a valuable modality to highlight the vascularization changes in ovarian stroma with PCOS. We believe that improved DCE-MR imaging techniques may also provide us additional parameters in the diagnosis and treatment strategies of PCOS.

  19. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  20. Polycystic ovary syndrome: dynamic contrast-enhanced ovary MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Bayar, Ulku; Erdem, L. Oktay; Barut, Aykut; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kaya, Erdal

    2004-01-01

    Objective: to determine the enhancement behaviour of the ovaries in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging and to compare these data with those of normal ovulating controls. Method: 24 women with PCOS and 12 controls underwent DCE-MR imaging. Dynamic images were acquired before and after injection of a contrast bolus at 30 s and the min of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. On postprocessing examination: (i) the ovarian volumes; (ii) the signal intensity value of each ovary per dynamic study; (iii) early-phase enhancement rate; (iv) time to peak enhancement (T p ); and (v) percentage of washout of 5th min were determined. Data of the ovaries of the women with PCOS and controls were compared with Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: the mean values of T p were found to be significantly lower in women with PCOS than in controls (p<0.05). On the other hand, the mean values of ovarian volume, the early-phase enhancement rate, and percentage of washout of 5th min of ovaries were significantly higher in PCOS patients (p<0.05). Examination of the mean signal intensity-time curve revealed the ovaries in women with PCOS showed a faster and greater enhancement and wash-out. Conclusion: the enhancement behaviour of ovaries of women with PCOS may be significantly different from those of control subjects on DCE-MR imaging examination. In our experience, it is a valuable modality to highlight the vascularization changes in ovarian stroma with PCOS. We believe that improved DCE-MR imaging techniques may also provide us additional parameters in the diagnosis and treatment strategies of PCOS

  1. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1 and 30 (Experiment 2 ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing.

  2. A clinical study of major stroke cases of a low-perfusion pattern on a dynamic CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Kaneko, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Keisei; Sugiura, Masashi

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative dynamic CT scans have been done for the past 4 years in order to estimate the degree of ischemia in the region responsible. The hemodynamic patterns on the dynamic CT scans were consequently classified into three particular types: Type 1: The collateral flow was preserved considerably, and the peak value of the time-density curve exceeded 50 % of the opposite healthy side. Type 2: The residual flow was moderate, and the peak value was approximately from one-third to one-half of the normal side. Type 3: The residual flow was minimal, and the time-density curve was almost flat or the peak value did not reach even approximately one-third of the opposite side. In general, major stroke cases with a Type 1 pattern on the dynamic CT scan showed a considerably good recovery if the revascularization was completed within 6 hours after the attack. However, cases of the Type 3 pattern often developed into a massive cerebral infarction associated with a marked mid-line shift, and sometimes they were fulminent even after acute revascularization. In this paper, clinical results of 11 major stroke cases with the Type 2 pattern on dynamic CT scans were evaluated. All of them showed hemiplegia, with or without aphasia, just after the onset of the stroke, and dynamic CT scans were performed within 24 hours. The site of the occluded vessel was in the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 4 cases and in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in 6; severe stenosis in ICA and MCA was found in only one case. The functional recovery was rather poor. Only one was capable of self-care at home; four others required partial care at home, and the other six were bed-ridden. In the 4 surgical cases of acute revascularization, the clinical symptoms did not improve, and the functional recovery was almost equivalent to the natural course. (J.P.N.)

  3. Quantitative accuracy of denoising techniques applied to dynamic 82Rb myocardial blood flow PET/CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    with suspected ischemic heart disease underwent a dynamic 7 minute 82Rb scan under resting and adenosine induced hyperaemic conditions after injection of 1100 MBq of 82Rb on a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT. Dynamic images were filtered using HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) and a Hotelling filter of which...... the latter was evaluated using a range of 4 to 7 included factors and for both 2D and 3D filtering. Data were analyzed using Cardiac VUer and obtained MBF values were compared with those obtained when no denoising of the dynamic data was performed. Results: Both HYPR and Hotelling denoising could...

  4. Dynamic and delayed contrast enhancement in upper abdominal MRI studies: Comparison of gadoxetic acid and gadobutrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizka, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Sokolska 581, CZ-500 05 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: zizka@fnhk.cz; Klzo, Ludovit [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Sokolska 581, CZ-500 05 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ferda, Jiri [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Alej Svobody 80, CZ-306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mrklovsky, Milan [Department of Radiology and Imaging Centre Pardubice, Regional Hospital, Kyjevska 44, CZ-530 01 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Bukac, Josef [Department of Biophysics, Medical Faculty, Charles University, Simkova 870, CZ-500 38 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: To prospectively compare contrast properties of extracelullar (gadobutrol) and hepatospecific (gadoxetic acid) contrast agents in upper abdominal MRI studies. Materials and methods: Standardized (0.1 ml/kg) dose of gadobutrol (56 subjects) and gadoxetic acid (51 subjects) was administered intravenously by MRI-compatible injector at 2 ml/s, followed by 20 ml saline flush. MR signal intensity changes (SIC) between precontrast scans and arterial phase, portal venous phase, equilibrium, and delayed scans at 10 and 20 min were measured in abdominal aorta, portal vein, common bile duct, liver, and spleen. Mean SIC values for gadobutrol and gadoxetic acid were compared by a two-sample t-test with p-value <0.05 considered significant. Results: In abdominal aorta, the mean SIC in the arterial phase did not significantly differ between gadobutrol (330%) and gadoxetic acid (295%). In portal vein, the mean SIC in the portal venous phase significantly differed between gadobutrol (267%) and gadoxetic acid (176%). Liver parenchyma enhancement was significantly higher for gadobutrol than for gadoxetic acid in both arterial phase (28 versus 13%) and portal venous phase (81 versus 46%). On the contrary, gadobutrol reached significantly lower mean SIC in the liver on delayed scans at 10 min (47 versus 59%) and 20 min (40 versus 67%), as well as in common bile duct at 10 min (54 versus 133%) and 20 min (57 versus 457%), respectively. In the spleen, mean SIC for gadobutrol was significantly higher at all phases. Conclusion: Gadobutrol showed superior enhancement of upper abdominal structures in the dynamic phases whereas gadoxetic acid showed better enhancement of the hepatobiliary structures on delayed scans.

  5. Application of low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT scans in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Song, Lei; Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qifeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of using low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT examinations in children with congenital heart disease. Ninety patients with congenital heart disease were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac scans on a Discovery CT750 HD scanner. Group A received 270 mg I/mL iodixanol, and group B received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol contrast media and was scanned with prospective ECG triggering mode. Group C received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol and was scanned with conventional retrospective ECG gating mode. The same weight-based contrast injection protocol was used for all three groups. Images were reconstructed using a 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm and a 50% ASIR in groups A and B and a 30% ASIR in group C. The subjective and objective image quality evaluations, diagnostic accuracies, radiation doses and amounts of contrast media in the three groups were measured and compared. All images in the three groups met the diagnostic requirements, with the same diagnostic accuracy and image quality scores greater than 3 in a 4-point scoring system. However, ventricular enhancement and the objective noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality scores in group C were better than those in groups A and B (all Pcontrast dose (14% lower than that of groups B and C). Enhanced CT scan images with low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media can meet the diagnostic requirements for examining children with congenital heart disease while reducing the potential risk of radiation damage and contrast-induced nephropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An enhanced CCRTM (E-CCRTM) damage imaging technique using a 2D areal scan for composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric actuator mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region to capture the scattered wavefield in the vicinity of the PZT. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, the reflectivity coefficients of the delamination can be calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2-D areal scans and linear scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2-D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  7. Ischemic Preconditioning of One Forearm Enhances Static and Dynamic Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Rasmussen, Mads Reinholdt; Jattu, Timo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ischemic preconditioning enhances ergometer cycling and swimming performance. We evaluated whether ischemic preconditioning of one forearm (four times for 5 min) also affects static breath hold and underwater swimming, whereas the effect of similar preconditioning on ergometer rowing...... preconditioning reduced the forearm oxygen saturation from 65% ± 7% to 19% ± 7% (mean ± SD; P right thigh.......05). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that while the effect of ischemic preconditioning (of one forearm) on ergometer rowing was minimal, probably because of reduced muscle oxygenation during the warm-up, ischemic preconditioning does enhance both static and dynamic apnea, supporting that muscle ischemia is an important...

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: the value of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from fast dynamic imaging during initial enhancement in classifying lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, J.; Stoutjesdijk, M.; Mann, R.; Huisman, H.J.; Barentsz, J.O.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.

    2008-01-01

    The value of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from fast dynamic imaging during initial enhancement in characterizing breast lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Sixty-eight malignant and 34 benign lesions were included. In the scanning protocol, high temporal resolution imaging was combined with high spatial resolution imaging. The high temporal resolution images were recorded every 4.1 s during initial enhancement (fast dynamic analysis). The high spatial resolution images were recorded at a temporal resolution of 86 s (slow dynamic analysis). In the fast dynamic evaluation pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans , V e and k ep ) were evaluated. In the slow dynamic analysis, each lesion was scored according to the BI-RADS classification. Two readers evaluated all data prospectively. ROC and multivariate analysis were performed. The slow dynamic analysis resulted in an AUC of 0.85 and 0.83, respectively. The fast dynamic analysis resulted in an AUC of 0.83 in both readers. The combination of both the slow and fast dynamic analyses resulted in a significant improvement of diagnostic performance with an AUC of 0.93 and 0.90 (P = 0.02). The increased diagnostic performance found when combining both methods demonstrates the additional value of our method in further improving the diagnostic performance of breast MRI. (orig.)

  9. Dynamic performance enhancement of microgrids by advanced sliding mode controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofla, Mohammadhassan Abdollahi [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Dept., University of Toledo, Ohio (United States); Gharehpetian, Gevorg B. [Electrical Engineering Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Dynamics are the most important problems in the microgrid operation. In the islanded microgrid, the mismatch of parallel operations of inverters during dynamics can result in the instability. This paper considers severe dynamics which can occur in the microgrid. Microgrid can have different configurations with different load and generation dynamics which are facing voltage disturbances. As a result, microgrid has many uncertainties and is placed in the distribution network where is full of voltage disturbances. Moreover, characteristics of the distribution network and distributed energy resources in the islanded mode make microgrid vulnerable and easily lead to instability. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the suitable mathematical modeling based on microgrid characteristics and to design properly inner controllers to enhance the dynamics of microgrid with uncertain and changing parameters. This paper provides a method for inner controllers of inverter-based distributed energy resources to have a suitable response for different dynamics. Parallel inverters in distribution networks were considered to be controlled by nonlinear robust voltage and current controllers. Theoretical prove beyond simulation results, reveal evidently the effectiveness of the proposed controller. (author)

  10. Enhanced sympathetic arousal in response to FMRI scanning correlates with task induced activations and deactivations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Muehlhan

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA, as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults.

  11. Dynamic rayed aurora and enhanced ion-acoustic radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Blixt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation mechanism for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes is still debated. One important issue is how these enhancements are related to auroral activity. All events of enhanced ion-acoustic echoes observed simultaneously with the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and with high-resolution narrow field-of-view auroral imagers have been collected and studied. Characteristic of all the events is the appearance of very dynamic rayed aurora, and some of the intrinsic features of these auroral displays are identified. Several of these identified features are directly related to the presence of low energy (10-100eV precipitating electrons in addition to the higher energy population producing most of the associated light. The low energy contribution is vital for the formation of the enhanced ion-acoustic echoes. We argue that this type of aurora is sufficient for the generation of naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes. In one event two imagers were used to observe the auroral rays simultaneously, one from the radar site and one 7km away. The data from these imagers shows that the auroral rays and the strong backscattering filaments (where the enhanced echoes are produced are located on the same field line, which is in contrast to earlier statements in the litterature that they should be separated.

  12. Tip-enhanced near-field Raman spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope and side-illumination optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, K J; He, X N; Zhou, Y S; Xiong, W; Lu, Y F

    2008-07-01

    Conventional Raman spectroscopy (RS) suffers from low spatial resolution and low detection sensitivity due to the optical diffraction limit and small interaction cross sections. It has been reported that a highly localized and significantly enhanced electromagnetic field could be generated in the proximity of a metallic tip illuminated by a laser beam. In this study, a tip-enhanced RS system was developed to both improve the resolution and enhance the detection sensitivity using the tip-enhanced near-field effects. This instrument, by combining RS with a scanning tunneling microscope and side-illumination optics, demonstrated significant enhancement on both optical sensitivity and spatial resolution using either silver (Ag)-coated tungsten (W) tips or gold (Au) tips. The sensitivity improvement was verified by observing the enhancement effects on silicon (Si) substrates. Lateral resolution was verified to be below 100 nm by mapping Ag nanostructures. By deploying the depolarization technique, an apparent enhancement of 175% on Si substrates was achieved. Furthermore, the developed instrument features fast and reliable optical alignment, versatile sample adaptability, and effective suppression of far-field signals.

  13. Reply to comment on 'Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Amir; Tripathi, V K

    2010-01-01

    In the paper (Ahmad and Tripathi 2006 Nanotechnology 17 3798), we derived an expression to compute the field enhancement factor of CNTs under any positional distribution of CNTs by using the model of a floating sphere between parallel anode and cathode plates. Using this expression we can compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in a cluster (non-uniformly distributed CNTs). This expression was used to compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in an array (uniformly distributed CNTs). We used an approximation to calculate the field enhancement factor. Hence, our expressions are correct in that assumption only. Zhbanov et al (2010 Nanotechnology 21 358001) suggest a correction that can calculate the field enhancement factor without using the approximation. Hence, this correction can improve the applicability of this model. (reply)

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examination of atherosclerotic plaques: an animal study using rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mingli; Sun Jie; Chang Xiaoyan; Jin Zhengyu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The enhanced patterns of atherosclerotic plaque on dynamic contrast- enhanced MRI have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to explore the patterns of plaque enhancement and their underlying mechanism by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: Atherosclerotic plaques were induced in the aorta of 12 New Zealand White rabbits by a combination of endothelial denudation and high-cholesterol diet. Ten to sixteen weeks after surgery, DCE- MRI was performed with a fast spin echo T 1 weighted sequence. Thirty-five phases of images were obtained at 71-second intervals. Gd-DTPA was injected coincident with the third scan via marginal ear vein. Specimens were harvested within 12 hours after imaging for HE staining and CD31 immunohistochemical staining which was used to highlight neo-vessels. Plaque enhancement patterns were studied and compared with histological findings. Signal intensity of each plaque section was normalized to pre-contrast signal intensity of psoas muscle, after which signal intensity versus time curve was drawn. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to reveal association between histological neo-vessel count and descriptive parameters derived from signal intensity versus time curve. Results: Plaques were significantly enhanced by Gd-DTPA. Enhancement patterns could be described as 'fast-in and slow-out'. Differences in patterns of enhancement were observed between tissues, with fibrous tissue enhanced more than lipid aggregation and leukocyte foci. Peak enhancement (1.05±0.30), initial slope (0.82±0.28) and area under the curve at early phase (4.97± 1.67) derived from signal intensity-time curve had significant correlations with neo-vessel count (117.7± 93.3) (r=0.553, 0.468, 0.554 respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions: The enhanced patterns of atherosclerotic plaque by Gd-DTPA were 'fast- in and slow-out'. Neovascularization, increased endothelial permeability and extracellular matrix may be the reasons for

  15. Contour junctions defined by dynamic image deformations enhance perceptual transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2017-11-01

    The majority of work on the perception of transparency has focused on static images with luminance-defined contour junctions, but recent work has shown that dynamic image sequences with dynamic image deformations also provide information about transparency. The present study demonstrates that when part of a static image is dynamically deformed, contour junctions at which deforming and nondeforming contours are connected facilitate the deformation-based perception of a transparent layer. We found that the impression of a transparent layer was stronger when a dynamically deforming area was adjacent to static nondeforming areas than when presented alone. When contour junctions were not formed at the dynamic-static boundaries, however, the impression of a transparent layer was not facilitated by the presence of static surrounding areas. The effect of the deformation-defined junctions was attenuated when the spatial pattern of luminance contrast at the junctions was inconsistent with the perceived transparency related to luminance contrast, while the effect did not change when the spatial luminance pattern was consistent with it. In addition, the results showed that contour completions across the junctions were required for the perception of a transparent layer. These results indicate that deformation-defined junctions that involve contour completion between deforming and nondeforming regions enhance the perception of a transparent layer, and that the deformation-based perceptual transparency can be promoted by the simultaneous presence of appropriately configured luminance and contrast-other features that can also by themselves produce the sensation of perceiving transparency.

  16. Transient gyriform brightness on non-contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) brain scan of seven infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, P.J.; Carty, H.M.

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous gyriform brightness seen on CT scan is an unusual finding unless associated with arteriovenous malformations (AVM). There are sporadic case reports in the literature of its occurrence in association with herpex simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE), purulent meningitis, following chemotherapy for leukaemia, in a child with chronic renal failure, and in a child with folic acid deficiency. We present a series of seven cases exhibiting this phenomenon, none of whom have AVMs, who have been scanned at this hospital in the first 2 1/2 years following the installation of a CT scanner. Four of the cases had congenital heart disease requiring corrective surgery or cardiac catheterisation. The other three had probable meningo-encephalitis. In all cases the gyriform brightness followed an ischaemic insult to the child's brain. We hypothesise that this phenomenon is an ischaemic response in the immature brain and that its occurrence is not so rare as the literature may suggest. (orig.)

  17. Enhancing the early differential diagnosis of plateau iris and pupillary block using a-scan ultrasonography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yen Chen

    Full Text Available To distinguish the frequently misdiagnosed plateau iris eyes from pupillary block group and normal group, we compared the ocular biometrical parameters of them by A-scan ultrasongraphy.In total, we retrospectively reviewed general characteristics and ocular findings including ocular biometric measurements of 71 normal, 39 plateau iris, and 83 pupillary block eyes.The normal controls, plateau iris group and pupillary block group were significantly different in age, but not in gender. The anterior chamber depth tended to decrease and the lens thickness tended to increase from normal to plateau iris to pupillary block eyes. Compared to those of plateau iris group, the pupillary block group had significantly shallower anterior chamber depth (2.90mm vs. 2.33mm; p<0.001, thicker lens (4.77mm vs. 5.11mm; p<0.001, shorter axial length (23.16mm vs. 22.63mm; p<0.001, smaller relative lens position (2.28 vs. 2.16; p<0.001 and larger lens/axial length factor (2.06 vs. 2.26; p<0.001. However, when comparing plateau iris and normal eyes, only axial length and lens/axial length factor were significantly different (23.16 vs. 23.54; p<0.05 and 2.06 vs. 1.96; p<0.05.Measured by A-scan ultrasonography, the ocular biometrics of plateau iris were significantly different from those of pupillary block eyes. However, our A-scan ultrasongraphy generally found no significant biometric differences between plateau iris and normal eyes. These findings suggest that while A-scan ultrasonography might be used as a practical tool for differentiating plateau iris and papillary block eyes, a more meticulous gonioscopy and other assessments may be necessary to distinguish plateau iris from normal eyes.

  18. A dynamic collimation system for penumbra reduction in spot-scanning proton therapy: Proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyer, Daniel E., E-mail: daniel-hyer@uiowa.edu; Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system the lateral penumbra of spot scanning (SS) dose distributions delivered by low energy proton beams is highly dependent on the spot size. For current commercial equipment, spot size increases with decreasing proton energy thereby reducing the benefit of the SS technique. This paper presents a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for sharpening the lateral penumbra of proton therapy dose distributions delivered by SS. Methods: The collimation system presented here exploits the property that a proton pencil beam used for SS requires collimation only when it is near the target edge, enabling the use of trimmers that are in motion at times when the pencil beam is away from the target edge. The device consists of two pairs of parallel nickel trimmer blades of 2 cm thickness and dimensions of 2 cm × 18 cm in the beam's eye view. The two pairs of trimmer blades are rotated 90° relative to each other to form a rectangular shape. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. The blades travel on curved tracks to match the divergence of the proton source. An algorithm for selecting blade positions is developed to minimize the dose delivered outside of the target, and treatment plans are created both with and without the DCS. Results: The snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using currently available components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. For irregularly shaped fields, the use of the DCS reduces the mean dose outside of a 2D target of 46.6 cm{sup 2} by approximately 40% as compared to an identical plan without collimation. The use of the DCS increased treatment time by 1–3 s per energy layer. Conclusions: The spread of

  19. A dynamic collimation system for penumbra reduction in spot-scanning proton therapy: Proof of concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system the lateral penumbra of spot scanning (SS) dose distributions delivered by low energy proton beams is highly dependent on the spot size. For current commercial equipment, spot size increases with decreasing proton energy thereby reducing the benefit of the SS technique. This paper presents a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for sharpening the lateral penumbra of proton therapy dose distributions delivered by SS. Methods: The collimation system presented here exploits the property that a proton pencil beam used for SS requires collimation only when it is near the target edge, enabling the use of trimmers that are in motion at times when the pencil beam is away from the target edge. The device consists of two pairs of parallel nickel trimmer blades of 2 cm thickness and dimensions of 2 cm × 18 cm in the beam's eye view. The two pairs of trimmer blades are rotated 90° relative to each other to form a rectangular shape. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s 2 , respectively. The blades travel on curved tracks to match the divergence of the proton source. An algorithm for selecting blade positions is developed to minimize the dose delivered outside of the target, and treatment plans are created both with and without the DCS. Results: The snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm 2 and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm 2 . Using currently available components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. For irregularly shaped fields, the use of the DCS reduces the mean dose outside of a 2D target of 46.6 cm 2 by approximately 40% as compared to an identical plan without collimation. The use of the DCS increased treatment time by 1–3 s per energy layer. Conclusions: The spread of the lateral

  20. Characterization of Enhancing MS Lesions by Dynamic Texture Parameter Analysis of Dynamic Susceptibility Perfusion Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev K. Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate statistical differences with MR perfusion imaging features that reflect the dynamics of Gadolinium-uptake in MS lesions using dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA. Methods. We investigated 51 MS lesions (25 enhancing, 26 nonenhancing lesions of 12 patients. Enhancing lesions (n=25 were prestratified into enhancing lesions with increased permeability (EL+; n=11 and enhancing lesions with subtle permeability (EL−; n=14. Histogram-based feature maps were computed from the raw DSC-image time series and the corresponding texture parameters were analyzed during the inflow, outflow, and reperfusion time intervals. Results. Significant differences (p<0.05 were found between EL+ and EL− and between EL+ and nonenhancing inactive lesions (NEL. Main effects between EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL were observed during reperfusion (mainly in mean and standard deviation (SD: EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL, while EL− and NEL differed only in their SD during outflow. Conclusion. DTPA allows grading enhancing MS lesions according to their perfusion characteristics. Texture parameters of EL− were similar to NEL, while EL+ differed significantly from EL− and NEL. Dynamic texture analysis may thus be further investigated as noninvasive endogenous marker of lesion formation and restoration.

  1. Quantum dynamical simulations of local field enhancement in metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre, Christian F A; Perassi, Eduardo M; Coronado, Eduardo A; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2013-03-27

    Field enhancements (Γ) around small Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are calculated using a quantum dynamical simulation formalism and the results are compared with electrodynamic simulations using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) in order to address the important issue of the intrinsic atomistic structure of NPs. Quite remarkably, in both quantum and classical approaches the highest values of Γ are located in the same regions around single NPs. However, by introducing a complete atomistic description of the metallic NPs in optical simulations, a different pattern of the Γ distribution is obtained. Knowing the correct pattern of the Γ distribution around NPs is crucial for understanding the spectroscopic features of molecules inside hot spots. The enhancement produced by surface plasmon coupling is studied by using both approaches in NP dimers for different inter-particle distances. The results show that the trend of the variation of Γ versus inter-particle distance is different for classical and quantum simulations. This difference is explained in terms of a charge transfer mechanism that cannot be obtained with classical electrodynamics. Finally, time dependent distribution of the enhancement factor is simulated by introducing a time dependent field perturbation into the Hamiltonian, allowing an assessment of the localized surface plasmon resonance quantum dynamics.

  2. Evaluation of radiation dose in chest scan with enhanced dual-source computed tomography in children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Zhihui; Lu Bin; Tang Xiang; Han Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiation dose from enhanced dual-source computed Tomography (DSCT) scan on children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: Seventy children with CHD, age from 1 month to 8 years old, were scanned with enhanced DSCT. Children were divided by age into 5 years old group. The differences among three groups were tested by F test. Then, the SNK test was used to compare the difference between each group. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test the relationship of dose length product (DLP) with the age, weight, voltage, current, pitch and scan sheet. Results: The average value of DLP was (144.46± 74.07) mGy·cm for all the 70 cases, and that of effective does (ED) was (4.68±2.34) mSv. There were significant differences of DLP among the 3 groups [ 5 years (208.00±73.87) mGy · cm, F=8.26, P=0.0009]. The SNK test showed statistical differences of DLP between 5 years old group (q=5.21, 6.52, P=0.009, 0.004). The difference of DLP between 1-5 years old group and > 5 years old group did not reach significant (q=0.28, P=0.48). The differences of ED was not statistically significant among the three groups [ 5 years (3.74±1.33) mSv, F=0.54, P=0.59]. DLP was positively correlated with age (4.3 years, r=0.54186, P=0.0008), weight (12.1 kg, r=0.56371, P=0.0004), voltage [(95.48±6.99) kV, r=0.63269, P<0.01], current [(138.55±40.67) mA, r=0.79608, P< 0.0001] and scan sheet (236.10±46.51, r=0.72192, P<0.01). DLP was negative correlated with pitch (0.48±0.03, r=-0.46693, P=0.0047). Conclusion: Higher DLP was observed in children over 1 year old under enhanced DSCT scan, but ED was not statistically significant among the three groups due to the higher K value in the children under 1 year old. (authors)

  3. Development of a Stirling System Dynamic Model with Enhanced Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2005-02-01

    The Stirling Convertor System Dynamic Model developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is a software model developed from first principles that includes the mechanical and mounting dynamics, the thermodynamics, the linear alternator, and the controller of a free-piston Stirling power convertor, along with the end user load. As such it represents the first detailed modeling tool for fully integrated Stirling convertor-based power systems. The thermodynamics of the model were originally a form of the isothermal Stirling cycle. In some situations it may be desirable to improve the accuracy of the Stirling cycle portion of the model. An option under consideration is to enhance the SDM thermodynamics by coupling the model with Gedeon Associates' Sage simulation code. The result will be a model that gives a more accurate prediction of the performance and dynamics of the free-piston Stirling convertor. A method of integrating the Sage simulation code with the System Dynamic Model is described. Results of SDM and Sage simulation are compared to test data. Model parameter estimation and model validation are discussed.

  4. Enhanced oil recovery methods studied by gamma tracer scanning at simulated reservoir conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, D.O.; Haugen, O.B.; Bjornstad, T.

    2009-01-01

    During recovery (production) of hydrocarbons pressure is maintained by injecting prepared sea water and recycled gas (lean gas) into dedicated injection wells. In one well at the Snorre field in the North Sea the injected gas was recycled too fast to enable support of pressure and squeezing of oil. To plug this high-permeable area the operator wanted to inject foam as a test of its possibilities to decrease gas permeability. As part of the project laboratory tests were included. In these tests we could for the first time map the foam inside the sandstone sample at simulated reservoir conditions. The tracers used were 22 Na + for the γ-scanning of the aqueous brine, tritiated water for permeability measurements, and 35 S-labeled organic sulfonic acid of the same compound as the surfactant. This method resulted in a 'negative' mapping of the foam, i.e. measurements of the absence or exclusion of the aqueous phase by the foam. This method was new and showed that radiotracer-based γ-scanning could give much more accurate measurements of the position of the foam than the standard method using measurements of pressure drops over parts of the core. (author)

  5. Enhancement of fluorescence confocal scanning microscopy lateral resolution by use of structured illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taejoong; Gweon, DaeGab; Lee, Jun-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is an optical imaging technique used to reconstruct three-dimensional images without physical sectioning. As with other optical microscopes, the lateral resolution of the confocal microscope cannot surpass the diffraction limit. This paper presents a novel imaging system, structured illumination confocal scanning microscopy (SICSM), that uses structured illumination to improve the lateral resolution of the confocal microscope. The SICSM can easily be implemented by introducing a structured illumination generating optics to conventional line-scanning fluorescence confocal microscopy. In this paper, we report our analysis of the lateral and axial resolutions of the SICSM by use of mathematical imaging theory. Numerical simulation results show that the lateral resolution of the SICSM is 1.43-fold better than that of the confocal microscope. In the axial direction, however, the resolution of the SICSM is ∼15% poorer than that of the confocal microscope. This deterioration arises because of a decrease in the axial cut-off frequency caused by the process of generating structured illumination. We propose the use of imaging conditions under which a compromise between the axial and lateral resolutions is chosen. Finally, we show simulated images of diversely shaped test objects to demonstrate the lateral and axial resolution performance of the SICSM

  6. Study on Dynamic Characteristics of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Shi, Fang; Qin, Wuying; Yan, Jing

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the demand for oil is increasing day by day. MEOR has the advantages of low cost and no pollution to the environment, attracted widespread attention. In this paper, the dynamic characteristics of microbial enhanced oil recovery were studied by laboratory experiments. The result showed that all the microbial flooding recovery rate could reach more than 5%, and the total recovery could reach more than 35% and if the injection period of microbial composite system was advanced, the whole oil displacement process could be shortened and the workload would be reduced.

  7. Fundamentals of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldino, Michael J; Barboriak, Daniel P

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MR imaging) has the power to provide information regarding physiologic characteristics of the microvasculature and is, therefore, of great potential value to the practice of oncology. In particular, these techniques could have a significant impact on the development of novel anticancer therapies as a promising biomarker of drug activity. Standardization of DCE-MR imaging acquisition and analysis to provide more reproducible measures of tumor vessel physiology is of crucial importance to realize this potential. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiologic basis and technical aspects of DCE-MR imaging techniques.

  8. Enhancement of dynamic myocardial perfusion PET images based on low-rank plus sparse decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Ma, Xiaomian; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Ma, Jianhua; Feng, Qianjin; Rahmim, Arman; Chen, Wufan

    2018-02-01

    The absolute quantification of dynamic myocardial perfusion (MP) PET imaging is challenged by the limited spatial resolution of individual frame images due to division of the data into shorter frames. This study aims to develop a method for restoration and enhancement of dynamic PET images. We propose that the image restoration model should be based on multiple constraints rather than a single constraint, given the fact that the image characteristic is hardly described by a single constraint alone. At the same time, it may be possible, but not optimal, to regularize the image with multiple constraints simultaneously. Fortunately, MP PET images can be decomposed into a superposition of background vs. dynamic components via low-rank plus sparse (L + S) decomposition. Thus, we propose an L + S decomposition based MP PET image restoration model and express it as a convex optimization problem. An iterative soft thresholding algorithm was developed to solve the problem. Using realistic dynamic 82 Rb MP PET scan data, we optimized and compared its performance with other restoration methods. The proposed method resulted in substantial visual as well as quantitative accuracy improvements in terms of noise versus bias performance, as demonstrated in extensive 82 Rb MP PET simulations. In particular, the myocardium defect in the MP PET images had improved visual as well as contrast versus noise tradeoff. The proposed algorithm was also applied on an 8-min clinical cardiac 82 Rb MP PET study performed on the GE Discovery PET/CT, and demonstrated improved quantitative accuracy (CNR and SNR) compared to other algorithms. The proposed method is effective for restoration and enhancement of dynamic PET images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  10. Investigation of phosphatidylcholine enhancing FITC-insulin across buccal mucosa by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weiqun; Su, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Gao, Qiuhua; Xu, Huibi

    2002-04-01

    The aim was to characterize the transport of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran and insulin with different resoluble compounds for peptides and proteins through buccal mucosa. The penetration rate of insulin molecules through porcine buccal mucosa (a nonkeratinized epithelium, comparable to human buccal mucosa) was investigated by measuring transbuccal fluxes and by analyzing the distribution of the fluorescent probe in the rabbit buccal mucosa epithelium, using confocal laser scanning microscopy for visualizing permeation pathways. The confocal images of the distribution pattern of FITC-dextran and FITC-insulin showed that the paracellular route is the major pathway of FITC-dextran through buccal mucosa epithelium, the intra-cellular route is the major pathway of FITC-insulin through buccal mucosa epithelium. The permeation rate can be increased by co-administration of soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC).

  11. Resonant-enhanced spectroscopy of molecular rotations with a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian Donat; Patthey, François; Brune, Harald

    2014-07-22

    We use rotational excitation spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope to investigate the rotational properties of molecular hydrogen and its isotopes physisorbed on the surfaces of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), grown on Ni(111), Ru(0001), and Rh(111). The rotational excitation energies are in good agreement with ΔJ = 2 transitions of freely spinning p-H2 and o-D2 molecules. The variations of the spectral line shapes for H2 among the different surfaces can be traced back to a molecular resonance-mediated tunneling mechanism. Our data for H2/h-BN/Rh(111) suggest a local intrinsic gating on this surface due to lateral static dipoles. Spectra on a mixed monolayer of H2, HD, and D2 display all three J = 0 → 2 rotational transitions, irrespective of tip position, thus pointing to a multimolecule excitation, or molecular mobility in the physisorbed close-packed layer.

  12. Spiral CT dual-phase scanning for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison study on the peripheral enhancement and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxia; Min Pengqiu; Zhou Xiangping; Song Bin; Liu Yan; Shen Mingen; Li Zhenlin; Yang Min

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the peripheral enhancement features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions in arterial and portal venous phases with histopathology, and to study the histopathologic bases of peripheral enhancement of the HCC lesions and how it affects the biologic behavior and prognosis. Methods: Forty-two histopathologically proven HCC patients were included. First, an unenhanced scanning covering the whole liver was done, and followed by arterial and portal venous phase scanning. The delay time was 20 sec and 60 sec after the injecting of contrast media. the slides of 5 μm thickness were stained with HE and the standard immunoperoxidase method using the polyclonal antibody of factor VIII-related antigen (F8RA). The pseudo capsule of the lesion, tumor invasion of the pseudo capsule, and the number of positive stained tumor vessels in the pseudo capsule were evaluated. Results: Among the 42 cases, in arterial phase, the pseudo capsule of the HCC lesions was demonstrated as hyper-or hypo-attenuation in 13 and 8 cases, respectively, and no marked pseudo capsule was perceived in 21 cases. In portal venous phase, hyper-attenuated pseudo capsule was shown in 27 cases, hypo-attenuated pseudo capsule in 2 cases, and no pseudo capsule in 13 cases. On CT scans, daughter foci were showed in 14 cases, in which 9 cases were single and 5 of 42 patients, and tumor cells invaded the pseudo capsule in 16 caes among these cases. F8RA immunohistochemical staining showed that the pseudo capsule contained rich positive staining neo-vascular structure in 15 of 25 cases, and the other 10 cases had thick pseudo capsule but few neo-vascular structure. HE staining showed no marked pseudo capsule in 17 cases, in which 8 cases exhibited no clear border between the tumor tissue and liver parenchyma. Conclusion: The peripheral enhancement features of HCC on spiral CT dural-phase scanning could reflect the histopathologic characteristics and predict the biologic behavior and prognosis

  13. Primary pulmonary low-grade angiosarcoma characterized by mismatch between {sup 18}F-FDG FET and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Eun Young; Lee, Ho Yun; Han, Joung Ho; Choi, Joon Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    We report a rare case of primary pulmonary low-grade angiosarcoma on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. A 38-year-old, asymptomatic woman was hospitalized because of an abnormality on chest radiography. A dynamic contrast-enhanced chest CT showed a 1.2 cm-sized irregular-margined nodule with strong and persistent enhancement in the right lower lobe. The lesion had low metabolic activity on an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan. The patient underwent a wedge resection for the lesion, and pathology revealed a primary pulmonary low-grade angiosarcoma.

  14. Cytochrome C Dynamics at Gold and Glassy Carbon Surfaces Monitored by in Situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Pedersen, Marianne Vind

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the absorption of cytochrome c on gold and glassy carbon substrates by in situ scanning tunnel microscopy under potentiostatic control of both substrate and tip. Low ionic strength and potential ranges where no Faradaic current flows were used. Cyt c aggregates into flat...

  15. Accelerated pharmacokinetic map determination for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI using frequency-domain based Tofts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajuvalli, Nithin N; Nayak, Krupa N; Geethanath, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) is widely used in the diagnosis of cancer and is also a promising tool for monitoring tumor response to treatment. The Tofts model has become a standard for the analysis of DCE-MRI. The process of curve fitting employed in the Tofts equation to obtain the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters is time-consuming for high resolution scans. Current work demonstrates a frequency-domain approach applied to the standard Tofts equation to speed-up the process of curve-fitting in order to obtain the pharmacokinetic parameters. The results obtained show that using the frequency domain approach, the process of curve fitting is computationally more efficient compared to the time-domain approach.

  16. Attenuation changes of the normal and ischemic canine kidney. Dynamic CT scanning after intravenous contrast medium bolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaschke, W.; Lipton, M.J.; Boyd, D.P.; Cann, C.; Strauss, L.; Sievers, R.S.

    The potential of CT scanning to explore total and regional renal blood flow was evaluated in a dog model with unilateral renal artery stenosis (n=7, reduction of renal blood flow: 32-75% of base line flow). Attenuation versus time curves were generated for the renal cortex and medulla, as well as for the aorta and renal vein. A fast CT scanner was used which allowed for up to 24 scans/minute at the same level (slice thickness: 10 mm). A total of 10 ml contrast medim was injected into a peripheral vein for each scan series taken. During baseline conditions, the curve of the renal cortex and medulla demonstrated 2 peaks. The first peak was mainly related to early vascular enhancement, whereas the second peak corresponded mainly to the appearance of contrast medium in the distal convolutes and collecting ducts. Ischemia of the kidney resulted in a reduction of the first peak and a flattening of the leading edge slope. Transport of contrast medium through the extravascular compartments of the kidney was delayed during ischemia. Relative renal blood flow was obtained from the CT data by dividing peak enhancement by rise-time as assessed from the cortical curve. All measurements were related to baseline flow and validated by flow measurements using radioactive labeled microspheres (n=5). Correlation was found to be r=0.97. (orig.).

  17. Resolution enhancement in neural networks with dynamical synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Alan Fung

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, information is represented by spike rates in the neural system. Here, we consider the ability of temporally modulated activities in neuronal networks to carry information extra to spike rates. These temporal modulations, commonly known as population spikes, are due to the presence of synaptic depression in a neuronal network model. We discuss its relevance to an experiment on transparent motions in macaque monkeys by Treue et al. in 2000. They found that if the moving directions of objects are too close, the firing rate profile will be very similar to that with one direction. As the difference in the moving directions of objects is large enough, the neuronal system would respond in such a way that the network enhances the resolution in the moving directions of the objects. In this paper, we propose that this behavior can be reproduced by neural networks with dynamical synapses when there are multiple external inputs. We will demonstrate how resolution enhancement can be achieved, and discuss the conditions under which temporally modulated activities are able to enhance information processing performances in general.

  18. Hemophilic arthropathy of the knee joint: static and dynamic Gd-DTPA - enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Bonn (Germany); Bruening, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kunze, V. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Bonn (Germany); Eickhoff, H. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Troisdorf (Germany); Koch, W. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Troisdorf (Germany); Reiser, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    A total of 17 patients with hemophilic arthropathy of the knee joint were studied with static and dynamic MRI before and after an IV bolus injection of Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA; 0.1 mmol/kg body weight). The T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (fast-field echo [FFE]) sequences were applied. The FFE sequences of eight consecutive scans carried out over a time interval of 160 s were used in order to determine the time to signal intensity (SI) curves of the synovial proliferations surrounding soft tissue, bone marrow, and joint effusion. After the administration of a contrast agent, synovial proliferations exhibited an increase on FFE and SE images of 47.7% (SD {+-} 14.3%) and 37.4% (SD {+-} 11.2%), respectively, whereas muscle and fatty tissue, tendons, bone marrow, and joint effusion revealed only a minor increase in SI. The gradient of SI (ratio SI/time) of pannus was 39.6%/min (SD {+-} 7.7%/min) and differed significantly (P < 0.001) from that of bone marrow, fatty tissue, muscle tissue, tendons, and joint effusion (P < 0.05). In contrast to synovial proliferations in rheumatoid arthritis, no differentiation between various pannus vascularities based on the degree of enhancement was possible. The Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI studies delineate and quantify the synovial proliferations in hemophilic arthropathy. Dynamic studies in hemophilic arthropathy do not provide qualitative assessment of the inflammatory process. (orig.)

  19. Hemophilic arthropathy of the knee joint: static and dynamic Gd-DTPA -enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Bruening, R.; Kunze, V.; Eickhoff, H.; Koch, W.; Reiser, M.

    1995-01-01

    A total of 17 patients with hemophilic arthropathy of the knee joint were studied with static and dynamic MRI before and after an IV bolus injection of Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA; 0.1 mmol/kg body weight). The T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (fast-field echo [FFE]) sequences were applied. The FFE sequences of eight consecutive scans carried out over a time interval of 160 s were used in order to determine the time to signal intensity (SI) curves of the synovial proliferations surrounding soft tissue, bone marrow, and joint effusion. After the administration of a contrast agent, synovial proliferations exhibited an increase on FFE and SE images of 47.7% (SD ± 14.3%) and 37.4% (SD ± 11.2%), respectively, whereas muscle and fatty tissue, tendons, bone marrow, and joint effusion revealed only a minor increase in SI. The gradient of SI (ratio SI/time) of pannus was 39.6%/min (SD ± 7.7%/min) and differed significantly (P < 0.001) from that of bone marrow, fatty tissue, muscle tissue, tendons, and joint effusion (P < 0.05). In contrast to synovial proliferations in rheumatoid arthritis, no differentiation between various pannus vascularities based on the degree of enhancement was possible. The Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI studies delineate and quantify the synovial proliferations in hemophilic arthropathy. Dynamic studies in hemophilic arthropathy do not provide qualitative assessment of the inflammatory process. (orig.)

  20. Radiation injury vs. recurrent brain metastasis: combining textural feature radiomics analysis and standard parameters may increase {sup 18}F-FET PET accuracy without dynamic scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Stegmayr, Carina; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Ceccon, Garry [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Rapp, Marion; Sabel, Michael; Kamp, Marcel A. [Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Filss, Christian P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Department of Neurology, Juelich (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Department of Neurology, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); University of Cologne, Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Cologne (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    We investigated the potential of textural feature analysis of O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) PET to differentiate radiation injury from brain metastasis recurrence. Forty-seven patients with contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 54) on MRI after radiotherapy of brain metastases underwent dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET. Tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and 62 textural parameters were determined on summed images 20-40 min post-injection. Tracer uptake kinetics, i.e., time-to-peak (TTP) and patterns of time-activity curves (TAC) were evaluated on dynamic PET data from 0-50 min post-injection. Diagnostic accuracy of investigated parameters and combinations thereof to discriminate between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury was compared. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 81 % for TBR{sub mean} alone to 85 % when combined with the textural parameter Coarseness or Short-zone emphasis. The accuracy of TBR{sub max} alone was 83 % and increased to 85 % after combination with the textural parameters Coarseness, Short-zone emphasis, or Correlation. Analysis of TACs resulted in an accuracy of 70 % for kinetic pattern alone and increased to 83 % when combined with TBR{sub max}. Textural feature analysis in combination with TBRs may have the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury, without the need for dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET scans. (orig.)

  1. Inflammatory pseudotumours of the liver--role of dynamic MRI scan and surgical exploration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hasan, W

    2011-02-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumours of the liver are extremely rare benign lesions. They were first described by Pack and Baker in 1953. They usually present with raised inflammatory markers and nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Most of these lesions are picked up incidentally on ultrasound scans. Diagnosis of these lesions poses a dilemma and a challenge due to their radiological similarities to other liver lesions such as hepatocellular carcinoma HCC. In this article we describe our experience in its diagnosis and management.

  2. Heterogeneous patterns enhancing static and dynamic texture classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Núbia Rosa da; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-01-01

    Some mixtures, such as colloids like milk, blood, and gelatin, have homogeneous appearance when viewed with the naked eye, however, to observe them at the nanoscale is possible to understand the heterogeneity of its components. The same phenomenon can occur in pattern recognition in which it is possible to see heterogeneous patterns in texture images. However, current methods of texture analysis can not adequately describe such heterogeneous patterns. Common methods used by researchers analyse the image information in a global way, taking all its features in an integrated manner. Furthermore, multi-scale analysis verifies the patterns at different scales, but still preserving the homogeneous analysis. On the other hand various methods use textons to represent the texture, breaking texture down into its smallest unit. To tackle this problem, we propose a method to identify texture patterns not small as textons at distinct scales enhancing the separability among different types of texture. We find sub patterns of texture according to the scale and then group similar patterns for a more refined analysis. Tests were performed in four static texture databases and one dynamical one. Results show that our method provide better classification rate compared with conventional approaches both in static and in dynamic texture.

  3. Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition CT scanner realizing 3D dynamic observation with low-dose scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Masahiro; Saito, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners have been continuously advancing as essential diagnostic imaging equipment for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases, including the three major disease classes of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Through the development of helical CT scanners and multislice CT scanners, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the Aquilion ONE, a CT scanner with a scanning range of up to 160 mm per rotation that can obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of the brain, heart, and other organs in a single rotation. We have now developed the Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition, a next-generation 320-row multislice CT scanner incorporating the latest technologies that achieves a shorter scanning time and significant reduction in dose compared with conventional products. This product with its low-dose scanning technology will contribute to the practical realization of new diagnosis and treatment modalities employing four-dimensional (4D) data based on 3D dynamic observations through continuous rotations. (author)

  4. Memory Transformation Enhances Reinforcement Learning in Dynamic Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W; Richards, Blake A

    2016-11-30

    Over the course of systems consolidation, there is a switch from a reliance on detailed episodic memories to generalized schematic memories. This switch is sometimes referred to as "memory transformation." Here we demonstrate a previously unappreciated benefit of memory transformation, namely, its ability to enhance reinforcement learning in a dynamic environment. We developed a neural network that is trained to find rewards in a foraging task where reward locations are continuously changing. The network can use memories for specific locations (episodic memories) and statistical patterns of locations (schematic memories) to guide its search. We find that switching from an episodic to a schematic strategy over time leads to enhanced performance due to the tendency for the reward location to be highly correlated with itself in the short-term, but regress to a stable distribution in the long-term. We also show that the statistics of the environment determine the optimal utilization of both types of memory. Our work recasts the theoretical question of why memory transformation occurs, shifting the focus from the avoidance of memory interference toward the enhancement of reinforcement learning across multiple timescales. As time passes, memories transform from a highly detailed state to a more gist-like state, in a process called "memory transformation." Theories of memory transformation speak to its advantages in terms of reducing memory interference, increasing memory robustness, and building models of the environment. However, the role of memory transformation from the perspective of an agent that continuously acts and receives reward in its environment is not well explored. In this work, we demonstrate a view of memory transformation that defines it as a way of optimizing behavior across multiple timescales. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3612228-15$15.00/0.

  5. Device localization and dynamic scan plane selection using a wireless MRI detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffe, Matthew J.; Yutzy, Stephen R.; Jiang, Yun; Twieg, Michael D.; Blumenthal, Colin J.; Hsu, Daniel P.; Pan, Li; Gilson, Wesley D.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Flask, Christopher A.; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Nakamoto, Dean; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A prototype wireless guidance device using single sideband amplitude modulation (SSB) is presented for a 1.5T MRI system. Methods The device contained three fiducial markers each mounted to an independent receiver coil equipped with wireless SSB technology. Acquiring orthogonal projections of these markers determined the position and orientation of the device, which was used to define the scan plane for a subsequent image acquisition. Device localization and scan plane update required approximately 30 ms, so it could be interleaved with high temporal resolution imaging. Since the wireless device is used for localization and doesn’t require full imaging capability, the design of the SSB wireless system was simplified by allowing an asynchronous clock between the transmitter and receiver. Results When coupled to a high readout bandwidth, the error caused by the lack of a shared frequency reference was quantified to be less than one pixel (0.78 mm) in the projection acquisitions. Image-guidance with the prototype was demonstrated with a phantom where a needle was successfully guided to a target and contrast was delivered. Conclusion The feasibility of active tracking with a wireless detector array is demonstrated. Wireless arrays could be incorporated into devices to assist in image-guided procedures. PMID:23900921

  6. Determination of the smoke-plume heights and their dynamics with ground-based scanning LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. Kovalev; A. Petkov; C. Wold; S. Urbanski; W. M. Hao

    2015-01-01

    Lidar-data processing techniques are analyzed, which allow determining smoke-plume heights and their dynamics and can be helpful for the improvement of smoke dispersion and air quality models. The data processing algorithms considered in the paper are based on the analysis of two alternative characteristics related to the smoke dispersion process: the regularized...

  7. Movement correction of the kidney in dynamic MRI scans using FFT phase difference movement detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giele, ELW; de Priester, JA; Blom, JA; den Boer, JA; van Engelshoven, JMA; Hasman, A; Geerlings, M

    2001-01-01

    To measure cortical and medullary MR renograms, regions of interest (ROIs) are placed on the kidney in images acquired using dynamic MRI. Since native kidneys move with breathing, and breath-holding techniques are not feasible, movement correction is necessary. In this contribution we compare three

  8. Spot Scanning and Passive Scattering Proton Therapy: Relative Biological Effectiveness and Oxygen Enhancement Ratio in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Shingo; Yamada, Maho; Shibata, Hiroki; Yasui, Keisuke; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Omachi, Chihiro; Tatekawa, Kotoha; Manabe, Yoshihiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and contribution of the indirect effect of spot scanning proton beams, passive scattering proton beams, or both in cultured cells in comparison with clinically used photons. The RBE of passive scattering proton beams at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was determined from dose-survival curves in 4 cell lines using 6-MV X rays as controls. Survival of 2 cell lines after spot scanning and passive scattering proton irradiation was then compared. Biological effects at the distal end region of the SOBP were also investigated. The OER of passive scattering proton beams and 6 MX X rays were investigated in 2 cell lines. The RBE and OER values were estimated at a 10% cell survival level. The maximum degree of protection of radiation effects by dimethyl sulfoxide was determined to estimate the contribution of the indirect effect against DNA damage. All experiments comparing protons and X rays were made under the same biological conditions. The RBE values of passive scattering proton beams in the 4 cell lines examined were 1.01 to 1.22 (average, 1.14) and were almost identical to those of spot scanning beams. Biological effects increased at the distal end of the SOBP. In the 2 cell lines examined, the OER was 2.74 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.80) and 3.08 (2.84-3.11), respectively, for X rays, and 2.39 (2.38-2.43) and 2.72 (2.69-2.75), respectively, for protons (Pcells between X rays and protons). The maximum degree of protection was significantly higher for X rays than for proton beams (P<.05). The RBE values of spot scanning and passive scattering proton beams were almost identical. The OER was lower for protons than for X rays. The lower contribution of the indirect effect may partly account for the lower OER of protons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Beam-dynamic effects at the CMS BRIL van der Meer scans

    CERN Document Server

    Babaev, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is responsible for the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS experiment. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors (luminometers), adequate for the experimental conditions associated with high values of instantaneous luminosity delivered by the CERN LHC. BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. Precise and accurate measurements of the delivered luminosity is of paramount importance for the CMS physics program. The absolute calibration of luminosity is achieved by the van der Meer method, which is carried out under specially tailored conditions. This paper presents models used to simulate of beam-dynamic effects arising due to the electromagnetic interaction of colliding bunches. These effects include beam-beam deflection and dynamic-beta effect. Both effects are important to luminosity measurements and influence calibrat...

  10. Dynamical 'in situ' observation of biological samples using variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedela, V

    2008-01-01

    Possibilities of 'in-situ' observation of non-conductive biological samples free of charging artefacts in dynamically changed surrounding conditions are the topic of this work. The observed biological sample, the tongue of a rat, was placed on a cooled Peltier stage. We studied the visibility of topographical structure depending on transition between liquid and gas state of water in the specimen chamber of VP SEM.

  11. Dynamical "in situ" observation of biological samples using variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 126, - (2008), 012046:1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2007 (EMAG 2007). Glasgow, 03.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0886; GA AV ČR KJB200650602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : biological sample * VP-SEM * dynamical experiments Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Evaluation of renal vascular in living donors before transplantation using dynamic contrast enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hong; Mu Xuetao; Zhong Xin; Dong Yuru; Dong Yue; Ma Yi; Wu Chunnan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (DCE MRA) can provide an effective assessment of renal vascular in living donors before transplantation. Methods: Thirty five healthy living renal donor candidates were scanned on MR system before transplantation. After injection of Gd-DTPA 1 ml in vein, a test-bolus scan was used to get the time delay of Gd-DTPA reaching renal artery. Then, a 3D T 1 -weighted fast low-angle shot sequence (3D FLASH) was performed in the coronal plane. The 3D FLASH scan would repeat four times with an inter-phase of 10 seconds. Thus, the imaging of the renal arterial, venous and collecting systems were got. Two radiologists observed renal arteries and veins on original imaging and MIP reconstmcted imaging. The quality of MR angiography was evaluated on a five- point scale and the vascular anatomy or variations of the arterial and venous systems were recorded, using intraoperative findings as a standard of reference. Results: The quality for all MRA was good or very good for the most of living renal donors. Among 70 renals, several variations of vascular were found, including 5 left accessory artery, 9 right accessory artery, 3 left proximal arterial branch and 6 right proximal arterial branch. Among 70 renal veins, 1 right accessory veins and 2 left varicocele were observed. One small accessory artery of right kidney was missed with DCE MRA, but identified by operation. Conclusion: DCE MRA was noninvasive tool for evaluation of the renal vasculature and variations with high accuracy. It would be a good modality in preoperative evaluation of living renal donors. (authors)

  13. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  14. Breast Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: Fibrocystic Changes Presenting as a Non-mass Enhancement Mimicking Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Zorica C; Nadrljanski, Mirjan M; Milovanovic, Zorka M; Gusic, Nina Z; Vucicevic, Slavko S; Radulovic, Olga S

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to analyse the morphokinetic features of breast fibrocystic changes (nonproliferative lesions, proliferative lesions without atypia and proliferative lesions with atypia) presenting as a non-mass enhancement (NME)in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) examination. Forty-six patients with histologically proven fibrocystic changes (FCCs) were retrospectively reviewed, according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. Prior to DCE-MRI examination, a unilateral breast lesion suspicious of malignancy was detected clinically, on mammography or breast ultrasonography. The predominant features of FCCs presenting as NME in DCE-MRI examination were: unilateral regional or diffuse distribution (in 35 patients or 76.1%), heterogeneous or clumped internal pattern of enhancement (in 36 patients or 78.3%), plateau time-intensity curve (in 25 patients or 54.3%), moderate or fast wash-in (in 31 patients or 67.4%).Nonproliferative lesions were found in 11 patients (24%), proliferative lesions without atypia in 29 patients (63%) and lesions with atypia in six patients (13%), without statistically significant difference of morphokinetic features, except of the association of clustered microcysts with proliferative dysplasia without atypia. FCCs presenting as NME in DCE-MRI examination have several morphokinetic features suspicious of malignancy, therefore requiring biopsy (BI-RADS 4). Nonproliferative lesions, proliferative lesions without atypia and proliferative lesions with atypia predominantly share the same predefined DCE-MRI morphokinetic features.

  15. Radiation injury vs. recurrent brain metastasis: combining textural feature radiomics analysis and standard parameters may increase 18F-FET PET accuracy without dynamic scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Ceccon, Garry; Rapp, Marion; Sabel, Michael; Filss, Christian P; Kamp, Marcel A; Stegmayr, Carina; Neumaier, Bernd; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the potential of textural feature analysis of O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET to differentiate radiation injury from brain metastasis recurrence. Forty-seven patients with contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 54) on MRI after radiotherapy of brain metastases underwent dynamic 18 F-FET PET. Tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) of 18 F-FET uptake and 62 textural parameters were determined on summed images 20-40 min post-injection. Tracer uptake kinetics, i.e., time-to-peak (TTP) and patterns of time-activity curves (TAC) were evaluated on dynamic PET data from 0-50 min post-injection. Diagnostic accuracy of investigated parameters and combinations thereof to discriminate between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury was compared. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 81 % for TBR mean alone to 85 % when combined with the textural parameter Coarseness or Short-zone emphasis. The accuracy of TBR max alone was 83 % and increased to 85 % after combination with the textural parameters Coarseness, Short-zone emphasis, or Correlation. Analysis of TACs resulted in an accuracy of 70 % for kinetic pattern alone and increased to 83 % when combined with TBR max . Textural feature analysis in combination with TBRs may have the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury, without the need for dynamic 18 F-FET PET scans. • Textural feature analysis provides quantitative information about tumour heterogeneity • Textural features help improve discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury • Textural features might be helpful to further understand tumour heterogeneity • Analysis does not require a more time consuming dynamic PET acquisition.

  16. Combined dynamic contrast-enhancement and serial 3D-subtraction analysis in magnetic resonance imaging of osteoid osteomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, T. von; Winkler, P. [Klinikum Stuttgart Olgahospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Stuttgart (Germany); Langendoerfer, M.; Fernandez, F.F. [Klinikum Stuttgart Olgahospital, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively correlate the results of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histological and clinical diagnoses in patients with osteoid osteomas. Fifty-four patients with the MR diagnosis of osteoid osteoma were studied. MRI (1.5 Tesla) consisted of thin-section STIR sequences, dynamic 3D T1 gradient echo sequences during application of contrast material, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation (maximum voxel size 0.6 x 0.6 x 3.0 mm). Evaluation was focused on serial image subtraction during the early phase after contrast injection and on time-intensity curves. The surrounding edema was helpful in finding the nidus in each lesion. In 49 of 54 patients (90.7%), the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was certain or highly probable (sensitivity 1.0, positive predictive value 0.91). A total of 38 of 54 osteoid osteomas were histologically proven. Five MRI diagnoses were regarded as false positives. A similar proportion has been reported for computed tomography. Tailored high-resolution MR examinations with dynamic contrast enhancement can reliably diagnose osteoid osteomas and exactly localize the nidus without radiation exposure. We propose a stepwise approach with STIR sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation. (orig.)

  17. Combined dynamic contrast-enhancement and serial 3D-subtraction analysis in magnetic resonance imaging of osteoid osteomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalle, T. von; Winkler, P.; Langendoerfer, M.; Fernandez, F.F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively correlate the results of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histological and clinical diagnoses in patients with osteoid osteomas. Fifty-four patients with the MR diagnosis of osteoid osteoma were studied. MRI (1.5 Tesla) consisted of thin-section STIR sequences, dynamic 3D T1 gradient echo sequences during application of contrast material, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation (maximum voxel size 0.6 x 0.6 x 3.0 mm). Evaluation was focused on serial image subtraction during the early phase after contrast injection and on time-intensity curves. The surrounding edema was helpful in finding the nidus in each lesion. In 49 of 54 patients (90.7%), the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was certain or highly probable (sensitivity 1.0, positive predictive value 0.91). A total of 38 of 54 osteoid osteomas were histologically proven. Five MRI diagnoses were regarded as false positives. A similar proportion has been reported for computed tomography. Tailored high-resolution MR examinations with dynamic contrast enhancement can reliably diagnose osteoid osteomas and exactly localize the nidus without radiation exposure. We propose a stepwise approach with STIR sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation. (orig.)

  18. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    the instantaneous transversal wake position which is quantitatively compared with the prediction of the Dynamic Wake Meandering model. The results, shown for two 10-min time series, suggest that the conjecture of the wake behaving as a passive tracer is a fair approximation; this corroborates and expands...... the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond, qualitatively...

  19. Serial dynamic CT scan in patients with acute basal ganglia infarctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Node, Yoji; Nakazawa, Shozo; Tsuji, Yukihide.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic computed tomography (CT) was performed on 15 patients (37 to 93 years of age) with acute basal ganglia infarctions, and the perfusion patterns of the infarcted regions on CT were evaluated. The initial dynamic CT was performed within 12 hours after onset, while the serial studies of the dynamic CT were performed on the 3rd and 7th days. The left-over-right ratio in the peak value in the basal ganglia in 15 normal subjects was 1.01 ± 0.03 (mean ± SD), so there were no differences in the peak values of the bilateral basal ganglia. We also examined the left-over-right ratio in the peak value and in the rapid-washout ratio in the basal ganglia in the 15 normal subjects. There was no difference in the peak values of the bilateral basal ganglia. The mean rapid-washout ratio was 0.62 ± 0.11 (mean ± SD). The prognoses of these patients three months after onset were as follows: 8 showed a good recovery, 5 had a moderate disability, and 2 had a severe disability. The perfusions on admission were as follows. 10 were hypoperfusions, 3 were hypo + late perfusions, one was a normoperfusion, and one was a late perfusion. There was a tendency for the rapid-washout ratio decrease more in the hypo + late perfusion group than in the other groups. Twelve patients showed an iso-density, while 3 showed a low density, on admission. The ''low-density'' group showed a decrease in the A/N ratio of the peak value. We performed serial dynamic CT in 11 cases. The group with severe disabilities (2 cases) showed a hypo + late perfusion in the initial CT, one case kept a hypo + late perfusion, and another case changed to a hypoperfusion; also, there was a tendency for there to be a poor improvement in the A/N ratio of the peak value in these two ''severe-disability'' patients. (J.P.N.)

  20. Electron dynamics of Cs covered Cu(111). A scanning tunneling spectroscopy inverstigation at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofe, T. von

    2005-01-01

    During this Ph.D. a scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra-high vacuum and at low temperatures was assembled and modified to allow operation at variable temperatures. Also, an additional vibration isolation stage was conceived and mounted. Measurements were performed on Cu(111)-Cs for different coverages. For a coverage of Θ=0:05 ML, the layer shows a commensurate (√(19) x √(19)R23.4 ) structure which may be stabilized by surface-state mediated adatom interactions. For higher coverages, the layer is incommensurate and rotated with respect to the substrate, where the angle of rotation depends on the coverage. At the saturation coverage Θ=0:25 ML, the layer, although commensurate, reveals many defects. The binding energy of the quantum well state (QWS) confined to the Cs layer decreases with increasing coverage as has been observed before for other systems. The lifetime of the QWS decreases with increasing binding energy. The comparatively short lifetime for Cu(111)-p(2 x 2)Cs led to the introduction of Brillouin Zone Backfolding as a new lifetime-limiting process. Acquisition of dispersion relations of the QWS for different coverages revealed that the effective mass of the excitations increases with decreasing binding energy. (Orig.)

  1. Atypical birefringence pattern and the diagnostic ability of scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Yadav, Ravi K; Begum, Viquar U; Addepalli, Uday K; Senthil, Sirisha; Choudhari, Nikhil S; Garudadri, Chandra S

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of typical scan score (TSS), when within the acceptable limits, on the diagnostic performance of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) parameters with the enhanced corneal compensation (ECC) protocol of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) in glaucoma. In a cross-sectional study, 203 eyes of 160 glaucoma patients and 140 eyes of 104 control subjects underwent RNFL imaging with the ECC protocol of SLP. TSS was used to quantify atypical birefringence pattern (ABP) images. Influence of TSS on the diagnostic ability of SLP parameters was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) regression models after adjusting for the effect of disease severity [based on mean deviation (MD)] on standard automated perimetry). Diagnostic abilities of all RNFL parameters of SLP increased when the TSS values were higher. This effect was statistically significant for TSNIT (coefficient: 0.08, p<0.001) and inferior average parameters (coefficient: 0.06, p=0.002) but not for nerve fibre indicator (NFI, coefficient: 0.03, p=0.21). In early glaucoma (MD of -5 dB), predicted area under ROC curve (AUC) for TSNIT average parameter improved from 0.642 at a TSS of 90 to 0.845 at a TSS of 100. In advanced glaucoma (MD of -15 dB), AUC for TSNIT average improved from 0.832 at a TSS of 90 to 0.947 at 100. Diagnostic performances of TSNIT and inferior average RNFL parameters with ECC protocol of SLP were significantly influenced by TSS even when the TSS values were within the acceptable limits. Diagnostic ability of NFI was unaffected by TSS values. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Geovisual analytics to enhance spatial scan statistic interpretation: an analysis of U.S. cervical cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Roth, Robert E; Naito, Adam T; Lengerich, Eugene J; Maceachren, Alan M

    2008-11-07

    Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic and its software implementation - SaTScan - are widely used for detecting and evaluating geographic clusters. However, two issues make using the method and interpreting its results non-trivial: (1) the method lacks cartographic support for understanding the clusters in geographic context and (2) results from the method are sensitive to parameter choices related to cluster scaling (abbreviated as scaling parameters), but the system provides no direct support for making these choices. We employ both established and novel geovisual analytics methods to address these issues and to enhance the interpretation of SaTScan results. We demonstrate our geovisual analytics approach in a case study analysis of cervical cancer mortality in the U.S. We address the first issue by providing an interactive visual interface to support the interpretation of SaTScan results. Our research to address the second issue prompted a broader discussion about the sensitivity of SaTScan results to parameter choices. Sensitivity has two components: (1) the method can identify clusters that, while being statistically significant, have heterogeneous contents comprised of both high-risk and low-risk locations and (2) the method can identify clusters that are unstable in location and size as the spatial scan scaling parameter is varied. To investigate cluster result stability, we conducted multiple SaTScan runs with systematically selected parameters. The results, when scanning a large spatial dataset (e.g., U.S. data aggregated by county), demonstrate that no single spatial scan scaling value is known to be optimal to identify clusters that exist at different scales; instead, multiple scans that vary the parameters are necessary. We introduce a novel method of measuring and visualizing reliability that facilitates identification of homogeneous clusters that are stable across analysis scales. Finally, we propose a logical approach to proceed through the analysis of

  3. Dynamic Vehicle Routing Problems with Enhanced Ant Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As we all know, there are a great number of optimization problems in the world. One of the relatively complicated and high-level problems is the vehicle routing problem (VRP. Dynamic vehicle routing problem (DVRP is a major variant of VRP, and it is closer to real logistic scene. In DVRP, the customers’ demands appear with time, and the unserved customers’ points must be updated and rearranged while carrying out the programming paths. Owing to the complexity and significance of the problem, DVRP applications have grabbed the attention of researchers in the past two decades. In this paper, we have two main contributions to solving DVRP. Firstly, DVRP is solved with enhanced Ant Colony Optimization (E-ACO, which is the traditional Ant Colony Optimization (ACO fusing improved K-means and crossover operation. K-means can divide the region with the most reasonable distance, while ACO using crossover is applied to extend search space and avoid falling into local optimum prematurely. Secondly, several new evaluation benchmarks are proposed, which can objectively and comprehensively estimate the proposed method. In the experiment, the results for different scale problems are compared to those of previously published papers. Experimental results show that the algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  4. Enhanced dynamic wedge and independent monitor unit verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, SJ.

    2005-01-01

    Some serious radiation accidents have occurred around the world during the delivery of radiotherapy treatment. The regrettable incident in Panama clearly indicated the need for independent monitor unit (MU) verification. Indeed the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), after investigating the incident, made specific recommendations for radiotherapy centres which included an independent monitor unit check for all treatments. Independent monitor unit verification is practiced in many radiotherapy centres in developed countries around the world. It is mandatory in USA but not yet in Australia. This paper describes development of an independent MU program, concentrating on the implementation of the Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) component. The difficult case of non centre of field (COF) calculation points under the EDW was studied in some detail. Results of a survey of Australasian centres regarding the use of independent MU check systems is also presented. The system was developed with reference to MU calculations made by Pinnacle 3 D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (RTP) system (ADAC - Philips) for 4MV, 6MV and 18MV X-ray beams used at the Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital (NMMH) in the clinical environment. A small systematic error was detected in the equation used for the EDW calculations. Results indicate that COF equations may be used in the non COF situation with similar accuracy to that achieved with profile corrected methods. Further collaborative work with other centres is planned to extend these findings

  5. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  6. Genetic algorithm enhanced by machine learning in dynamic aperture optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Cheng, Weixing; Yu, Li Hua; Rainer, Robert

    2018-05-01

    With the aid of machine learning techniques, the genetic algorithm has been enhanced and applied to the multi-objective optimization problem presented by the dynamic aperture of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Storage Ring. During the evolution processes employed by the genetic algorithm, the population is classified into different clusters in the search space. The clusters with top average fitness are given "elite" status. Intervention on the population is implemented by repopulating some potentially competitive candidates based on the experience learned from the accumulated data. These candidates replace randomly selected candidates among the original data pool. The average fitness of the population is therefore improved while diversity is not lost. Maintaining diversity ensures that the optimization is global rather than local. The quality of the population increases and produces more competitive descendants accelerating the evolution process significantly. When identifying the distribution of optimal candidates, they appear to be located in isolated islands within the search space. Some of these optimal candidates have been experimentally confirmed at the NSLS-II storage ring. The machine learning techniques that exploit the genetic algorithm can also be used in other population-based optimization problems such as particle swarm algorithm.

  7. NMR of insensitive nuclei enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miéville, Pascal; Jannin, Sami; Helm, Lothar; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Despite the powerful spectroscopic information it provides, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suffers from a lack of sensitivity, especially when dealing with nuclei other than protons. Even though NMR can be applied in a straightforward manner when dealing with abundant protons of organic molecules, it is very challenging to address biomolecules in low concentration and/or many other nuclei of the periodic table that do not provide as intense signals as protons. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is an important technique that provides a way to dramatically increase signal intensities in NMR. It consists in transferring the very high electron spin polarization of paramagnetic centers (usually at low temperature) to the surrounding nuclear spins with appropriate microwave irradiation. DNP can lead to an enhancement of the nuclear spin polarization by up to four orders of magnitude. We present in this article some basic concepts of DNP, describe the DNP apparatus at EPFL, and illustrate the interest of the technique for chemical applications by reporting recent measurements of the kinetics of complexation of 89Y by the DOTAM ligand.

  8. Scan direction induced charging dynamics and the application for detection of gate to S/D shorts in logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Tian, Qing; Wu, Kevin; Zhao, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Gate to source/drain (S/D) short is the most common and detrimental failure mechanism for advanced process technology development in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) device manufacturing. Especially for sub-1Xnm nodes, MOSFET device is more vulnerable to gate-S/D shorts due to the aggressive scaling. The detection of this kind of electrical short defect is always challenging for in-line electron beam inspection (EBI), especially new shorting mechanisms on atomic scale due to new material/process flow implementation. The second challenge comes from the characterization of the shorts including identification of the exact shorting location. In this paper, we demonstrate unique scan direction induced charging dynamics (SDCD) phenomenon which stems from the transistor level response from EBI scan at post metal contact chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) layers. We found that SDCD effect is exceptionally useful for gate-S/D short induced voltage contrast (VC) defect detection, especially for identification of shorting locations. The unique SDCD effect signatures of gate-S/D shorts can be used as fingerprint for ground true shorting defect detection. Correlation with other characterization methods on the same defective location from EBI scan shows consistent results from various shorting mechanism. A practical work flow to implement the application of SDCD effect for in-line EBI monitor of critical gate-S/D short defects is also proposed, together with examples of successful application use cases which mostly focus on static random-access memory (SRAM) array regions. Although the capability of gate-S/D short detection as well as expected device response is limited to passing transistors and pull-down transistors due to the design restriction from standard 6-cell SRAM structure, SDCD effect is proven to be very effective for gate-S/D short induced VC defect detection as well as yield learning for advanced technology development.

  9. Atomic structure of screw dislocations intersecting the Au(111) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Schiøtz, Jakob; Dahl-Madsen, Bjarke

    2006-01-01

    The atomic-scale structure of naturally occurring screw dislocations intersecting a Au(111) surface has been investigated both experimentally by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and theoretically using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The step profiles of 166 dislocations were measured using...... STM. Many of them exhibit noninteger step-height plateaus with different widths. Clear evidence was found for the existence of two different populations at the surface with distinct (narrowed or widened) partial-splitting widths. All findings are fully confirmed by the MD simulations. The MD...... simulations extend the STM-, i.e., surface-, investigation to the subsurface region. Due to this additional insight, we can explain the different partial-splitting widths as the result of the interaction between the partial dislocations and the surface....

  10. Probing Dirac fermion dynamics in topological insulator Bi2Se3 films with a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Can-Li; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2015-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy have been used to investigate the femtosecond dynamics of Dirac fermions in the topological insulator Bi2Se3 ultrathin films. At the two-dimensional limit, bulk electrons become quantized and the quantization can be controlled by the film thickness at a single quintuple layer level. By studying the spatial decay of standing waves (quasiparticle interference patterns) off steps, we measure directly the energy and film thickness dependence of the phase relaxation length lϕ and inelastic scattering lifetime τ of topological surface-state electrons. We find that τ exhibits a remarkable (E - EF)(-2) energy dependence and increases with film thickness. We show that the features revealed are typical for electron-electron scattering between surface and bulk states.

  11. Ultrafast photoinduced carrier dynamics in GaNAs probed using femtosecond time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yasuhiko; Aoyama, Masahiro; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2007-01-01

    The combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) with optical excitation using ultrashort laser pulses enables us, in principle, to simultaneously obtain ultimate spatial and temporal resolutions. We have developed the shaken-pulse-pair-excited STM (SPPX-STM) and succeeded in detecting a weak time-resolved tunnelling current signal from a low-temperature-grown GaNAs sample. To clarify the underlying physics in SPPX-STM measurements, we performed optical pump-probe reflectivity measurements with a wavelength-changeable ultrashort-pulse laser. By comparing the results obtained from the two methods with an analysis based on the nonlinear relationship between the photocarrier density and tunnelling current, we obtained a comprehensive explanation that the photocarrier dynamics is reflected in the SPPX-STM signal through the surface photovoltage effect

  12. An open tool for input function estimation and quantification of dynamic PET FDG brain scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrán, Martín; Martínez, Natalia; Carbajal, Guillermo; Fernández, Alicia; Gómez, Álvaro

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) analysis of clinical studies is mostly restricted to qualitative evaluation. Quantitative analysis of PET studies is highly desirable to be able to compute an objective measurement of the process of interest in order to evaluate treatment response and/or compare patient data. But implementation of quantitative analysis generally requires the determination of the input function: the arterial blood or plasma activity which indicates how much tracer is available for uptake in the brain. The purpose of our work was to share with the community an open software tool that can assist in the estimation of this input function, and the derivation of a quantitative map from the dynamic PET study. Arterial blood sampling during the PET study is the gold standard method to get the input function, but is uncomfortable and risky for the patient so it is rarely used in routine studies. To overcome the lack of a direct input function, different alternatives have been devised and are available in the literature. These alternatives derive the input function from the PET image itself (image-derived input function) or from data gathered from previous similar studies (population-based input function). In this article, we present ongoing work that includes the development of a software tool that integrates several methods with novel strategies for the segmentation of blood pools and parameter estimation. The tool is available as an extension to the 3D Slicer software. Tests on phantoms were conducted in order to validate the implemented methods. We evaluated the segmentation algorithms over a range of acquisition conditions and vasculature size. Input function estimation algorithms were evaluated against ground truth of the phantoms, as well as on their impact over the final quantification map. End-to-end use of the tool yields quantification maps with [Formula: see text] relative error in the estimated influx versus ground truth on phantoms. The main

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  14. Enhanced phase contrast transfer using ptychography combined with a pre-specimen phase plate in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao; Ercius, Peter [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Ophus, Colin, E-mail: clophus@lbl.gov [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The ability to image light elements in both crystalline and noncrystalline materials at near atomic resolution with an enhanced contrast is highly advantageous to understand the structure and properties of a wide range of beam sensitive materials including biological specimens and molecular hetero-structures. This requires the imaging system to have an efficient phase contrast transfer at both low and high spatial frequencies. In this work we introduce a new phase contrast imaging method in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a pre-specimen phase plate in the probe forming aperture, combined with a fast pixelated detector to record diffraction patterns at every probe position, and phase reconstruction using ptychography. The phase plate significantly enhances the contrast transfer of low spatial frequency information, and ptychography maximizes the extraction of the phase information at all spatial frequencies. In addition, the STEM probe with the presence of the phase plate retains its atomic resolution, allowing simultaneous incoherent Z-contrast imaging to be obtained along with the ptychographic phase image. An experimental image of Au nanoparticles on a carbon support shows high contrast for both materials. Multislice image simulations of a DNA molecule shows the capability of imaging soft matter at low dose conditions, which implies potential applications of low dose imaging of a wide range of beam sensitive materials. - Highlights: • This work demonstrates a phase contrast imaging method by combining a pre-specimen phase plate with ptychogrpahy. • This method is shown to have a high phase contrast transfer efficiency at both low and high spatial frequencies. • Unlike CTEM which uses a heavy defocus to gain contrast, the phase plate gives a linear phase contrast at zero defocus aberrations. • Image simulations of DNA suggest this method is highly attractive for imaging beam sensitive materials at a low dose.

  15. CT scans in studies of the dynamics of liposynthesis and lipolysis of the human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following an analysis of the most important metabolic disturbances and other diseases associated ith fatty degeneration of the liver, it is shown, basing on a previous study, by means of examples, that subtle diagnosis of changes of the fatty content of the liver can be achieved via CT density measurement. Lipolysis in alcoholic fatty liver is quantified during abstention from alcohol, and a lipolysis factor of 1% fatty decomposition per day is determined from the measurements. Observations in pancreatitis with liver lipid storage during the course of the disease, point to an enzymatic weakness in lipid metabolism. Case histories show fatty degeneration associated with an enhanced cortisone serum level (in adrenal adenoma and cortisone therapy) and in poorly stabilized diabetes mellitus. It is concluded from the studies that determination of the relative fatty content by CT densitometry should be conducted as a routine procedure and that pathological lipid content should stimulate subtle diagnosis of the pancreas and the adrenals. In addition, examinations repeated during the course of the disease with assessment of changes in fatty content, will be useful for assessing the value of the therapy employed. (orig.) [de

  16. CT scans in studies of the dynamics of liposynthesis and lipolysis of the human liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebener, K H; Schmitt, W G.H.

    1981-06-01

    Following an analysis of the most important metabolic disturbances and other diseases associated with fatty degeneration of the liver, it is shown, basing on a previous study, by means of examples, that subtle diagnosis of changes of the fatty content of the liver can be achieved via CT density measurement. Lipolysis in alcoholic fatty liver is quantified during abstention from alcohol, and a lipolysis factor of 1% fatty decomposition per day is determined from the measurements. Observations in pancreatitis with liver lipid storage during the course of the disease, point to an enzymatic weakness in lipid metabolism. Case histories show fatty degeneration associated with an enhanced cortisone serum level (in adrenal adenoma and cortisone therapy) and in poorly stabilized diabetes mellitus. It is concluded from the studies that determination of the relative fatty content by CT densitometry should be conducted as a routine procedure and that pathological lipid content should stimulate subtle diagnosis of the pancreas and the adrenals. In addition, examinations repeated during the course of the disease with assessment of changes in fatty content, will be useful for assessing the value of the therapy employed.

  17. Arterio-venous anastomoses in mice affect perfusion measurements with dynamic contrast enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabra, Peter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Shen, Gang; Xuan, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Accurate measurement of perfusion with dynamic contrast enhanced CT requires an arterial input curve (AIC) uncontaminated by venous sources. Arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) are sources of contamination if contrast is injected intravenously. We seek to identify AVAs in mice and associated errors in perfusion measurements. Six transgenic mice with spontaneous prostate tumor were scanned with a micro-CT scanner (GE Healthcare (GE)) using a high resolution anatomical and a lower resolution perfusion protocol. For the anatomical protocol, a CT scan was performed during injection of an iodinated contrast agent (Hypaque) into a tail vein. Images covering the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions at an isotropic resolution of 175 µm were reconstructed and rendered in 3D to show the arterial and venous tree (Advantage Window, GE). For the perfusion protocol, each mouse was continuously scanned for 40 s and the contrast agent (Hypaque) was injected via a tail vein 5 s into scanning. Tumor images were reconstructed every second. Tumor blood flow (BF) and volume (BV) maps were calculated with CT perfusion software (GE) using AIC measured either from abdominal aorta (AA) or tail (caudal) artery (TA). In all mice, there was an AVA from the bifurcation of the inferior vena cava to the tail artery shunting venous blood and portion of the contrast agent injected into the tail vein into the TA. Contrast arrival time at the TA preceded that at the AA by 3.3 ± 0.5 s (P < 0.05). Mean tumor BV and BF values calculated with AA versus TA were 10.0 ± 1.8 versus 4.8 ± 2.1 ml (100 g) −1 (P < 0.05) and 108.8 ± 26.5 versus 33.0 ± 8.5 ml min −1 100 g −1 (P < 0.05), respectively. AVA in the murine pelvic region can result in inaccurate and more variable measurements of pelvic organ/tissue perfusion when the tail artery is used as the AIC

  18. Measurement of Murine Single-Kidney Glomerular Filtration Rate Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Tang, Hui; Mishra, Prasanna K; Macura, Slobodan I; Lerman, Lilach O

    2018-06-01

    To develop and validate a method for measuring murine single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). This prospective study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. A fast longitudinal relaxation time (T 1 ) measurement method was implemented to capture gadolinium dynamics (1 s/scan), and a modified two-compartment model was developed to quantify GFR as well as renal perfusion using 16.4T MRI in mice 2 weeks after unilateral renal artery stenosis (RAS, n = 6) or sham (n = 8) surgeries. This approach was validated by comparing model-derived GFR and perfusion to those obtained by fluorescein isothiocyanante (FITC)-inulin clearance and arterial spin labeling (ASL), respectively, using the Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlations and Bland-Altman analysis. The compartmental model provided a good fitting to measured gadolinium dynamics in both normal and RAS kidneys. The proposed DCE-MRI method offered assessment of single-kidney GFR and perfusion, comparable to the FITC-inulin clearance (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.95 and Spearman's correlation coefficient ρ = 0.94, P < 0.0001, and mean difference -7.0 ± 11.0 μL/min) and ASL (r = 0.92 and ρ = 0.84, P < 0.0001, and mean difference 4.4 ± 66.1 mL/100 g/min) methods. The proposed DCE-MRI method may be useful for reliable noninvasive measurements of single-kidney GFR and perfusion in mice. Magn Reson Med 79:2935-2943, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Foot roll-over evaluation based on 3D dynamic foot scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, William; Van Hamme, Angèle; Sanchez, Stéphane; Chèze, Laurence; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Feipel, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Foot roll-over is commonly analyzed to evaluate gait pathologies. The current study utilized a dynamic foot scanner (DFS) to analyze foot roll-over. The right feet of ten healthy subjects were assessed during gait trials with a DFS system integrated into a walkway. A foot sole picture was computed by vertically projecting points from the 3D foot shape which were lower than a threshold height of 15 mm. A 'height' value of these projected points was determined; corresponding to the initial vertical coordinates prior to projection. Similar to pedobarographic analysis, the foot sole picture was segmented into anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) to process mean height (average of height data by ROI) and projected surface (area of the projected foot sole by ROI). Results showed that these variables evolved differently to plantar pressure data previously reported in the literature, mainly due to the specificity of each physical quantity (millimeters vs Pascals). Compared to plantar pressure data arising from surface contact by the foot, the current method takes into account the whole plantar aspect of the foot, including the parts that do not make contact with the support surface. The current approach using height data could contribute to a better understanding of specific aspects of foot motion during walking, such as plantar arch height and the windlass mechanism. Results of this study show the underlying method is reliable. Further investigation is required to validate the DFS measurements within a clinical context, prior to implementation into clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  1. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments (σ/μ 2 ) for the input function between 0.95 and 0.98, while the maximum enhancement differed by no more than 3.3%. The

  2. Comparison of arterial input functions measured from ultra-fast dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyang; Lu, Zhengfeng; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Jiang, Xia; Sammet, Steffen; Yousuf, Ambereen; Pineda, Federico; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of arterial input functions (AIFs) measured from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI following a low dose of contrast media injection. The AIFs measured from DCE computed tomography (CT) were used as ‘gold standard’. A total of twenty patients received CT and MRI scans on the same day. Patients received 120 ml Iohexol in DCE-CT and a low dose of (0.015 mM kg-1) of gadobenate dimeglumine in DCE-MRI. The AIFs were measured in the iliac artery and normalized to the CT and MRI contrast agent doses. To correct for different temporal resolution and sampling periods of CT and MRI, an empirical mathematical model (EMM) was used to fit the AIFs first. Then numerical AIFs (AIFCT and AIFMRI) were calculated based on fitting parameters. The AIFMRI was convolved with a ‘contrast agent injection’ function (AIFMRICON ) to correct for the difference between MRI and CT contrast agent injection times (~1.5 s versus 30 s). The results show that the EMMs accurately fitted AIFs measured from CT and MRI. There was no significant difference (p  >  0.05) between the maximum peak amplitude of AIFs from CT (22.1  ±  4.1 mM/dose) and MRI after convolution (22.3  ±  5.2 mM/dose). The shapes of the AIFCT and AIFMRICON were very similar. Our results demonstrated that AIFs can be accurately measured by MRI following low dose contrast agent injection.

  3. Parietal pleural invasion/adhesion of subpleural lung cancer: Quantitative 4-dimensional CT analysis using dynamic-ventilatory scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Kotaro, E-mail: ksakuma@ohara-hp.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, 6-11 Omachi, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo, E-mail: clatsune@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi, E-mail: hrshmoriya@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, 6-11 Omachi, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki, E-mail: sadayuki@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi, E-mail: h-ito@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • 4DCT can be used for assessment of pleural invasion/adhesion by lung cancer. • Quantitative 4DCT indices of lung cancer and adjacent structures are described. • An automatic analysis of pleural invasion/adhesion would be developed in the future. - Abstract: Purpose: Using 4-dimensional dynamic-ventilatory scanning by a 320-row computed tomography (CT) scanner, we performed a quantitative assessment of parietal pleural invasion and adhesion by peripheral (subpleural) lung cancers. Methods: Sixteen patients with subpleural lung cancer underwent dynamic-ventilation CT during free breathing. Neither parietal pleural invasion nor adhesion was subsequently confirmed by surgery in 10 patients, whereas the other 6 patients were judged to have parietal pleural invasion or adhesion. Using research software, we tracked the movements of the cancer and of an adjacent structure such as the rib or aorta, and converted the data to 3-dimensional loci. The following quantitative indices were compared by the Mann-Whitney test: cross-correlation coefficient between time curves for the distances moved from the inspiratory frame by the cancer and the adjacent structure, the ratio of the total movement distances (cancer/adjacent structure), and the cosine similarities between the inspiratory and expiratory vectors (from the cancer to the adjacent structure) and between vectors of the cancer and of the adjacent structure (from inspiratory to expiratory frames). Results: Generally, the movements of the loci of the lung cancer and the adjacent structure were similar in patients with parietal pleural invasion/adhesion, while they were independent in patients without. There were significant differences in all the parameters between the two patient groups (cross-correlation coefficient and the movement distance ratio, P < 0.01; cosine similarities, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These observations suggest that quantitative indices by dynamic-ventilation CT can be utilized as a

  4. Contrast enhancement technique in brain 3D-CTA studies. Optimizing the amount of contrast medium according to scan time based on TDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasawa, Kazuaki; Hatcho, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA), good reproducibility can be obtained by maintaining the maximum CT numbers (HU) at a specified level. However, the correlation between the scan time and the injection time showed that the maximum CT numbers increased and varied due to the additional contrast enhancement effect from recirculation of the injected contrast medium for longer injection times when the dose of iodinated contrast medium per unit time (mgI/s) was maintained at a specified level based on the time-density curve (TDC) of the phantom. The amount of contrast medium employed at our hospital has been optimized based on an iodinated contrast medium dose per unit time providing a contrast enhancement effect of 300 HU in the middle cerebral artery. Using this standard, a TDC phantom was employed to obtain an iodinated contrast medium dose per unit time, permitting equivalent maximum CT values (used as standard values) to be obtained by changing the injection time. A contrast-enhancement technique that accounts for the variation in the scan time was evaluated. Strong correlations were observed between the scan time and the injection time (R 2 =0.969) and between the injection time and the dose of iodinated contrast medium per unit body weight (R 2 =0.994). We conclude that adjusting the dose of iodinated contrast medium per unit body weight per unit time according to the scan time permits optimization of the contrast-enhancement technique. (author)

  5. Mammography combined with breast dynamic contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of early breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakun He; Guohui Xu; Jin Ren; Bin Feng; Xiaolei Dong; Hao Lu; Changjiu He

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the application of mammography combined with breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Methods Mammography and DCE-MRI were performed for 120 patients with breast cancer (malignant, 102; benign; 18). Results The sensitivity of mammography for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 66.67%, specificity was 77.78%, and accuracy was 68.33%. The sensitivity of MRI for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 94.12%, specificity was 88.89%, and accuracy was 93.33%. However, the sensitivity of mammography combined with DCE-MRI volume imaging with enhanced water signal (VIEWS) scanning for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 97.06%, specificity was 94.44%, and accuracy was 96.67%. Conclusion Mammography combined with DCE-MRI increased the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of diagnosing early breast cancer.

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound of Colorectal Liver Metastases as an Imaging Modality for Early Response Prediction to Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Marie Benzon; Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Henriksen, Birthe Merete

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) can detect early changes in perfusion of colorectal liver metastases after initiation of chemotherapy. Newly diagnosed patients with colorectal cancer with liver metastases were enrolled in this explorative prospective...... study. Patients were treated with capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. DCE-US was performed before therapy (baseline) and again 10 days after initiation of treatment. Change in contrast-enhancement in one liver metastasis (indicator lesion) was measured....... Treatment response was evaluated with a computed tomography (CT) scan after three cycles of treatment and the initially observed DCE-US change of the indicator lesion was related to the observed CT response. Eighteen patients were included. Six did not complete three series of chemotherapy...

  7. Effect of parallel radiofrequency transmission on arterial input function selection in dynamic contrast-enhanced 3 Tesla pelvic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafi, Hatim; Elias, Saba N; Nguyen, Huyen T; Friel, Harry T; Knopp, Michael V; Guo, BeiBei; Heymsfield, Steven B; Jia, Guang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether parallel radiofrequency transmission (mTX) can improve the symmetry of the left and right femoral arteries in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of prostate and bladder cancer. Eighteen prostate and 24 bladder cancer patients underwent 3.0 Tesla DCE-MRI scan with a single transmission channel coil. Subsequently, 21 prostate and 21 bladder cancer patients were scanned using the dual channel mTX upgrade. The precontrast signal ( S0) and the maximum enhancement ratio (MER) were measured in both the left and the right femoral arteries. Within the patient cohort, the ratio of S0 and MER in the left artery to that in the right artery ( S0_LR, MER_LR) was calculated with and without the use of mTX. Left to right asymmetry indices for S0 ( S0_LRasym) and MER ( MER_LRasym) were defined as the absolute values of the difference between S0_LR and 1, and the difference between MER_LR and 1, respectively. S0_LRasym, and MER_LRasym were 0.21 and 0.19 for prostate cancer patients with mTX, and 0.43 and 0.45 for the ones imaged without it (P enhancement. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparison of AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in the detection of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Hirose, Takashi; Karizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Amino, Saburou

    1994-01-01

    We performed AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in 12 cases of hepatic lesions. Nine of these were hepatocellular carcinomas. Two cases were metastatic liver tumors (the primary lesion was gastric in one and the other was gallbladder cancer). One case was suspected to be adenomatous hyperplasia. Thirty-two lesions were detected in T2-weighted SE images before AMI-25 administration, while 46 lesions were detected in AMI-25 enhanced MRI images. In particular, AMI-25 enhanced MRI was superior to plain MRI in lesions less than 10 mm in size. A total of 48 lesions were detected in helical dynamic CT. Although AMI-25 enhanced MRI almost equaled helical dynamic CT in the detection of liver tumors, helical dynamic CT was slightly superior to AMI-25 enhanced MRI in the detection of subphrenic lesions. It was possible to know the hemodynamics in each hepatic lesion by helical dynamic CT. AMI-25 enhanced MRI was useful to know the inclusion of reticuloendothelial system, and that yielded different diagnoses in adenomatous hyperplasia and well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Helical dynamic CT was useful for qualitative diagnosis. Both AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT contributed to the detection of liver tumor and qualitative diagnosis. (author)

  9. Enhanced dynamic wedge and independent monitor unit verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, S.J.; University of Newcastle, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Some serious radiation accidents have occurred around the world during the delivery of radiotherapy treatment. The regrettable incident in Panama clearly indicated the need for independent monitor unit (MU) verification. Indeed the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), after investigating the incident, made specific recommendations for radiotherapy centres which included an independent monitor unit check for all treatments. Independent monitor unit verification is practiced in many radiotherapy centres in developed countries around the world. It is mandatory in USA but not yet in Australia. The enhanced dynamic wedge factor (EDWF) presents some significant problems in accurate MU calculation, particularly in the case of non centre of field position (COF). This paper describes development of an independent MU program, concentrating on the implementation of the EDW component. The difficult case of non COF points under the EDW was studied in detail. A survey of Australasian centres regarding the use of independent MU check systems was conducted. The MUCalculator was developed with reference to MU calculations made by Pinnacle 3D RTP system (Philips) for 4MV, 6MV and 18MV X-ray beams from Varian machines used at the Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital (NMMH) in the clinical environment. Ionisation chamber measurements in solid water TM and liquid water were performed based on a published test data set. Published algorithms combined with a depth dependent profile correction were applied in an attempt to match measured data with maximum accuracy. The survey results are presented. Substantial data is presented in tabular form and extensive comparison with published data. Several different methods for calculating EDWF are examined. A small systematic error was detected in the Gibbon equation used for the EDW calculations. Generally, calculations were within +2% of measured values, although some setups exceeded this variation. Results indicate that COF

  10. Solution scanning as a key policy tool: identifying management interventions to help maintain and enhance regulating ecosystem services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Sutherland

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The major task of policy makers and practitioners when confronted with a resource management problem is to decide on the potential solution(s to adopt from a range of available options. However, this process is unlikely to be successful and cost effective without access to an independently verified and comprehensive available list of options. There is currently burgeoning interest in ecosystem services and quantitative assessments of their importance and value. Recognition of the value of ecosystem services to human well-being represents an increasingly important argument for protecting and restoring the natural environment, alongside the moral and ethical justifications for conservation. As well as understanding the benefits of ecosystem services, it is also important to synthesize the practical interventions that are capable of maintaining and/or enhancing these services. Apart from pest regulation, pollination, and global climate regulation, this type of exercise has attracted relatively little attention. Through a systematic consultation exercise, we identify a candidate list of 296 possible interventions across the main regulating services of air quality regulation, climate regulation, water flow regulation, erosion regulation, water purification and waste treatment, disease regulation, pest regulation, pollination and natural hazard regulation. The range of interventions differs greatly between habitats and services depending upon the ease of manipulation and the level of research intensity. Some interventions have the potential to deliver benefits across a range of regulating services, especially those that reduce soil loss and maintain forest cover. Synthesis and applications: Solution scanning is important for questioning existing knowledge and identifying the range of options available to researchers and practitioners, as well as serving as the necessary basis for assessing cost effectiveness and guiding implementation strategies. We

  11. Contrast between hypervascularized liver lesions and hepatic parenchyma. Early dynamic PET versus contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freesmeyer, M.; Winkens, T.; Schierz, J.-H.

    2014-01-01

    To detect hypervascularized liver lesions, early dynamic (ED) 18 F-FDG PET may be an alternative when contrast-enhanced (CE) imaging is infeasible. This retrospective pilot analysis compared contrast between such lesions and liver parenchyma, an important objective image quality variable, in ED PET versus CE CT. Twenty-eight hypervascularized liver lesions detected by CE CT [21 (75%) hepatocellular carcinomas; mean (range) diameter 4.9 ± 3.5 (1-14) cm] in 20 patients were scanned with ED PET. Using regions of interest, maximum and mean lesional and parenchymal signals at baseline, arterial and venous phases were calculated for ED PET and CE CT. Lesional/parenchymal signal ratio was significantly higher (P < 0.005) with ED PET versus CE CT at the arterial phase and similar between the methods at the venous phase. In liver imaging, ED PET generates greater lesional-parenchymal contrast during the arterial phase than does CE CT; these observations should be formally, prospectively evaluated. (author)

  12. Enhancement tuning and control for high dynamic range images in multi-scale locally adaptive contrast enhancement algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, Sascha D.; Schirris, Johan; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, visibility of details is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. If we display High Dynamic-Range (HDR) scenes whose contrast spans four or more orders of magnitude on a conventional monitor without additional processing, results are unacceptable. Compression of the dynamic range is therefore a compulsory part of any high-end video processing chain because standard monitors are inherently Low- Dynamic Range (LDR) devices with maximally two orders of display dynamic range. In real-time camera processing, many complex scenes are improved with local contrast enhancements, bringing details to the best possible visibility. In this paper, we show how a multi-scale high-frequency enhancement scheme, in which gain is a non-linear function of the detail energy, can be used for the dynamic range compression of HDR real-time video camera signals. We also show the connection of our enhancement scheme to the processing way of the Human Visual System (HVS). Our algorithm simultaneously controls perceived sharpness, ringing ("halo") artifacts (contrast) and noise, resulting in a good balance between visibility of details and non-disturbance of artifacts. The overall quality enhancement, suitable for both HDR and LDR scenes, is based on a careful selection of the filter types for the multi-band decomposition and a detailed analysis of the signal per frequency band.

  13. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the lung in asthma—Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei-Juan, E-mail: weijuan.zhang@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Biomedical Imaging Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Niven, Robert M., E-mail: robert.niven@uhsm.nhs.uk [North West Lung Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Young, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Young1@astrazeneca.com [Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Liu, Yu-Zhen, E-mail: yu-zhen.liu@astrazeneca.com [Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Parker, Geoffrey J.M., E-mail: Geoff.parker@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Biomedical Imaging Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Bioxydyn Limited, Rutherford House, Pencroft Way, Manchester M15 6SZ (United Kingdom); Naish, Josephine H., E-mail: Josephine.naish@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Biomedical Imaging Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen-enhanced MRI may have a role in the estimation of disease severity in asthma. • Heterogeneity of parameter maps reflects localized functional impairment in asthma. • OE-MRI provides non-ionising, spatial and temporal information on oxygen delivery. - Abstract: Objectives: To prospectively estimate the feasibility and reproducibility of dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OE-MRI) in the assessment of regional oxygen delivery, uptake and washout in asthmatic lungs. Materials and methods: The study was approved by the National Research Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained. Dynamic OE-MRI was performed twice at one month apart on four mild asthmatic patients (23 ± 5 years old, FEV{sub 1} = 96 ± 3% of predicted value) and six severe asthmatic patients (41 ± 12 years old, FEV{sub 1} = 60 ± 14% of predicted value) on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a two-dimensional T{sub 1}-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence. The enhancing fraction (EF), the maximal change in the partial pressure of oxygen in lung tissue (ΔPO{sub 2max{sub l}}) and arterial blood of the aorta (ΔPO{sub 2max{sub a}}), and the oxygen wash-in (τ{sub up{sub l}}, τ{sub up{sub a}}) and wash-out (τ{sub down{sub l}}, τ{sub down{sub a}}) time constants were extracted and compared between groups using the independent-samples t-test (two-tailed). Correlations between imaging readouts and clinical measurements were assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis. Bland–Altman analysis was used to estimate the levels of agreement between the repeat scans and the intra-observer agreement in the MR imaging readouts. Results: The severe asthmatic group had significantly smaller EF (70 ± 16%) and median ΔPO{sub 2max{sub l}} (156 ± 52 mmHg) and significantly larger interquartile range of τ{sub up{sub l}} (0.84 ± 0.26 min) than the mild asthmatic group (95 ± 3%, P = 0.014; 281 ± 40 mmHg, P = 0.004; 0.20 ± 0.07 min, P = 0

  14. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the lung in asthma—Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei-Juan; Niven, Robert M.; Young, Simon S.; Liu, Yu-Zhen; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.; Naish, Josephine H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxygen-enhanced MRI may have a role in the estimation of disease severity in asthma. • Heterogeneity of parameter maps reflects localized functional impairment in asthma. • OE-MRI provides non-ionising, spatial and temporal information on oxygen delivery. - Abstract: Objectives: To prospectively estimate the feasibility and reproducibility of dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OE-MRI) in the assessment of regional oxygen delivery, uptake and washout in asthmatic lungs. Materials and methods: The study was approved by the National Research Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained. Dynamic OE-MRI was performed twice at one month apart on four mild asthmatic patients (23 ± 5 years old, FEV 1 = 96 ± 3% of predicted value) and six severe asthmatic patients (41 ± 12 years old, FEV 1 = 60 ± 14% of predicted value) on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a two-dimensional T 1 -weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence. The enhancing fraction (EF), the maximal change in the partial pressure of oxygen in lung tissue (ΔPO 2max l ) and arterial blood of the aorta (ΔPO 2max a ), and the oxygen wash-in (τ up l , τ up a ) and wash-out (τ down l , τ down a ) time constants were extracted and compared between groups using the independent-samples t-test (two-tailed). Correlations between imaging readouts and clinical measurements were assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis. Bland–Altman analysis was used to estimate the levels of agreement between the repeat scans and the intra-observer agreement in the MR imaging readouts. Results: The severe asthmatic group had significantly smaller EF (70 ± 16%) and median ΔPO 2max l (156 ± 52 mmHg) and significantly larger interquartile range of τ up l (0.84 ± 0.26 min) than the mild asthmatic group (95 ± 3%, P = 0.014; 281 ± 40 mmHg, P = 0.004; 0.20 ± 0.07 min, P = 0.001, respectively). EF, median ΔPO 2max l and τ down l and the interquartile range of τ up l

  15. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Optimal interdependence enhances the dynamical robustness of complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rishu Kumar; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2017-08-01

    Although interdependent systems have usually been associated with increased fragility, we show that strengthening the interdependence between dynamical processes on different networks can make them more likely to survive over long times. By coupling the dynamics of networks that in isolation exhibit catastrophic collapse with extinction of nodal activity, we demonstrate system-wide persistence of activity for an optimal range of interdependence between the networks. This is related to the appearance of attractors of the global dynamics comprising disjoint sets ("islands") of stable activity.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT appearances of the intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Fengxiang; Zhou Jianjun; Zeng Mengsu; Zhou Kangrong; Ding Yuqin; He Deming; Shi Yuxin; Zhou Jun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the dynamic contrast-enhanced CT appearances of intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct and improve its diagnostic accuracy. Methods: Sixteen patients with intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct confirmed histopathologically after surgical operation underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced multi-detector row CT scans. All imaging data were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively in correlation with surgical and pathological findings. CT values of 38 well-visualized lesions in 12 of the 16 patients at the pre-contrast phase, arterial phase and venous phase were measured. Four of the 12 patients with 17 lesions had benign tumors, and 8 of the 12 patients with 21 lesions had malignant tumors. Comparisons of CT values at the three phases between the two groups were carried out using independent sample t test. The bile CT values were measured in these 12 cases, 40 normal volunteers, and 40 subjects with bile duct stones, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to compare the bile CT values between tumor group and the normal group and between tumor group and the bile duct stone group. The diameters of the bile ducts proximal to and distal to tumors were also measured, and Fisher exact method was carried to analyze the data. Results: Lesions located at the left lobe in 8 out of the 16 patients, the right lobe in 1 case, both the left and right lobes in 1 case, the hepatic hilum in 1 case, the common bile duct in 3 cases, and both the right lobe and the common bile duct in 2 cases. Eleven lesions appeared as papillary masses, 3 as flat masses, 1 as mixed papillary and flat masses. In one case, tumor mass could not be definitely visualized, and only dilated bile ducts and stones were demonstrated. The mean CT values of the benign tumors were (25.8 ± 8.0), (37.7 ± 10.3) and (51.7 ± 17.1) HU respectively at pre-contrast phase, arterial phase, and venous phase, and the malignant tumors were (38.4 ± 10.2), (56.6 ± 18.0) and (68.4

  18. Investigation of renovascular hypertension with 99mTC-DTPA dynamic renal scanning and digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavraka-Kakavakis, A.; Vlontjou, E.; Apostolopoulos, D.; Mourikis, D.; Venetsanakis, N.; Lazarou, S.; Vlahos, L.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-four selected hypertensive patients, aged 17-45 years, were evaluated for renovascular hypertension. They were studied with 99m TC-DTPA dynamic renal scanning (DRS) and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA). Intra-arterial DSA was further performed to demonstrate renal vascular anatomy in all disputable cases. Agreement of diagnosis occurred in 58 patients (32 with renal artery stenosis). There was one false positive with DRS and one false positive with IV-DSA. In another four patients with proven renovascular disease, IV-DSA was positive while DRS negative, but in two of them the stenotic lesion was considered insignificant, as they failed to respond to percutaneous transluminal dilatation (PTA). In contrast, nearly all patients whose hypertension improved after PTA or surgery had positive DRS and greater than 40% reduction of relative function of the affected kidney. IV-DSA yielded better results than DRS in the detection of renal arterial stenosis (especially whenever bilateral stenosis or rich collateral circulation was present), but DRS showed better correlation with the functional significance of a certain vascular abnormality. Thus the combination of the two methods seems to be a reasonable diagnostic approach to hypertensive patients with the aim of selecting those with curable hypertension due to renal vascular disease. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA radioaerosol lung scanning for the evaluation of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maini, C L; Marchetti, L; Bonetti, M G; Giordano, A; Pistelli, R; Antonelli Incalzi, R

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary clearance of small droplet /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA radioaerosol was studied in 100 patients (12 normal subjects, N; 10 asymptomatic healthy smoker, FA; 31 patients with interstitial lung diseases, IP; 47 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, BPCO). The first seven minutes of clearance were described with the function At=Ao*exp(-K*t) and the time constant K was considered representative of the /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance rate and hence of the alveolar-capillary barrier permeability. Groups FA, IP and BPCO showed a significant (p<0.05) or a highly significant (p<0.01) increase in permeability when compared to group N. No correlation was found between permeability and bronchial obstraction tests. The following conclusions were drawn: 1) /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA dynamic lung scanning is an easy, non-invasive method to assess derangements of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability secondary to epithelial damage; 2) permeability increase is a very early effect of cigarette smoke damafe to the epithelium; 3) other mechanisms of epithelial injury are present in diffuse lung disease; 4) while the clinical role of this new pathophysiological test is not yet clear, it is likely that it may become a very early marker of pulmonary epithelial damage in diffuse lung disease. 35 refs.

  20. Dynamic 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol lung scanning for the evaluation of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maini, C.L.; Marchetti, L.; Bonetti, M.G.; Giordano, A.; Pistelli, R.; Antonelli Incalzi, R.

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary clearance of small droplet 99m Tc-DTPA radioaerosol was studied in 100 patients (12 normal subjects, N; 10 asymptomatic healthy smoker, FA; 31 patients with interstitial lung diseases, IP; 47 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, BPCO). The first seven minutes of clearance were described with the function At=Ao*exp(-K*t) and the time constant K was considered representative of the 99m Tc-DTPA clearance rate and hence of the alveolar-capillary barrier permeability. Groups FA, IP and BPCO showed a significant (p 99m Tc-DTPA dynamic lung scanning is an easy, non-invasive method to assess derangements of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability secondary to epithelial damage; 2) permeability increase is a very early effect of cigarette smoke damafe to the epithelium; 3) other mechanisms of epithelial injury are present in diffuse lung disease; 4) while the clinical role of this new pathophysiological test is not yet clear, it is likely that it may become a very early marker of pulmonary epithelial damage in diffuse lung disease

  1. Molecular dimensions of dried glucose oxidase on a Au(1 1 1) surface studied by dynamic mode scanning force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Ichiro; Yaoita, Masashi; Nagashima, Seiichi; Higano, Michi

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular dimensions of a dried single glucose oxidase (GO) molecule adsorbed on a Au(1 1 1) surface with the UHV non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and tapping mode atomic force microcopy (TMAFM). The smallest air-dried GO particles in a TMAFM-measured size distribution are found to be 10-11 nm wide and 0.3-0.4 nm high. We find each collapsed ellipsoidal feature with a groove in a NC-AFM image, which measured 12 nm x 10 nm x 0.5 nm. The lateral dimensions (12 nm x 10 nm) of the observed feature is close to those of a GO monomer measured by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) [Quijin et al., 12.2 nm x 8.9 nm as the size of one wing of an opening butterfly (dimer) appeared in a STM image] and by contact mode AFM [Quinto et al., 14 nm x 8 nm]. Our value of the vertical dimension (0.5 nm) is consistent with AFM results and molecular dynamics simulations that suggest a surface-induced complete unfolding, showing the average diameter of amino acid residues

  2. The brain stem function in patients with brain bladder; Clinical evaluation using dynamic CT scan and auditory brainstem response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-11-01

    A syndrome of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is occasionally found in patients with brain bladder. To evaluate the brain stem function in cases of brain bladder, urodynamic study, dynamic CT scan of the brain stem (DCT) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were performed. The region of interest of DCT aimed at the posterolateral portion of the pons. The results were analysed in contrast with the presense of DSD in urodynamic study. DCT studies were performed in 13 cases with various brain diseases and 5 control cases without neurological diseases. Abnormal patterns of the time-density curve consisted of low peak value, prolongation of filling time and low rapid washout ratio (low clearance ratio) of the contrast medium. Four of 6 cases with DSD showed at least one of the abnormal patterns of the time-density curve bilaterally. In 7 cases without DSD none showed bilateral abnormality of the curve and in 2 of 7 cases only unilateral abnormality was found. ABR was performed in 8 patients with brain diseases. The interpeak latency of the wave I-V (I-V IPL) was considered to be prolonged in 2 cases with DSD compared to that of 4 without DSD. In 2 cases with DSD who had normal DCT findings, measurement of the I-V IPL was impossible due to abnormal pattern of the ABR wave. Above mentioned results suggests the presence of functional disturbance at the posterolateral portion of the pons in cases of brain bladder with DSD. (author).

  3. Dynamic random links enhance diversity-induced coherence in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tions among the units of complex biological and sociological systems. For small world ... of neuronal dynamics ranging from regular spiking to self-sustained chaotic bursting. Temporal ... The pulse interval is defined as, Sk(i) = Pramana – J.

  4. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with endorectal coil for local staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Kawaai, Yuriko; Shirase, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endorectal coil for assessing tumor invasion based on simple classification criteria. A total of 58 patients with operable primary rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI. An enhancement pattern in Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI with regard to tumor penetration was clarified. Retrospectively, two observers independently scored T2-weighted MRI and T2-weighted MRI combined with Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI for tumor penetration using the following criteria: With Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI, T1 tumors showed an early enhanced line around the tumor as rim enhancement; T2 tumors appeared as black lines or double layers, as the muscularis propria kept its integrity; T3 tumors showed partial discontinuity of the muscularis propria as a dotted line and a perforated area as an interrupted line. A confidence level scoring system was used, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. There were no significant differences at the T1 stage. There were significant differences for observer 1 (P=0.001 for observer 1) at the T2 stage. There were significant differences for both observers (P=0.001 for observer 1 and P=0.005 for observer 2) at the T3 stage. Our criteria for Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI were effective for T3 stage tumors. (author)

  5. A contrast enhancement and scanning techniques for CT angiography of head and neck. One phase injection method for simultaneous imaging of vessels and tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Noikura, Takenori

    1999-01-01

    We report on a method of CT-Angiography useful for examining lesion of the head and neck using three-dimensional images and measured CT value. This study focused on some of the important blood vessels in the head and neck. The aim of this method was to obtain high-contrast enhancement for both vessels and tumors at same time. A total amount of 100 ml nonionic contrast media (Omnipaque 240, 240 mg iodine per milliliter, Daiichi seiyaku, Tokyo, Japan) was injected intravenously with a flow of 1.5 ml/sec. Spiral scans, 24 rotations with 24 seconds, were started at a time when remaining amount of contrast media had become 30 to 20 ml. All CT scans were performed using double speed spiral scan technique with a slice thickness of 2 to 3 mm and table speeds from 3 to 5 mm/rotation. The patients populations consisted of 9 men and 6 women who ranged in age from 37 to 85 years. Sixteen CT-angiography were performed according to this method. Mean CT values of major blood vessels were measured in order to find out threshold at the level of submandibular gland in 13 examinations for 12 subjects. Important vessels like the common, internal, and the external artery, internal and external jugular vein were clearly visible in all subjects. Three dimensional images of these vessels could also be reconstructed for 15 of the subjects. Mean CT values were 211 Hounsfield units (HU) and 209 HU for the right and left internal carotid artery, respectively, and 204 HU and 206 HU for the right and left external carotid artery, respectively. Mean CT values for right and left internal jugular vein were 195 HU and 194 HU respectively. Measured CT values at each important blood vessels showed this method could yields acceptable enhancements. Good enhancement effect of tumor and blood vessels in the same scan seems to be mutually incompatible. One very important trade-off is the early enhancement effect at blood vessels versus the late enhancement effect at tumors. The other important trade

  6. Dynamic range enhancement and amplitude regeneration in single pump fibre optic parametric amplifiers using DPSK modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Seoane, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Input power dynamic range enhancement and amplitude regeneration of highly distorted signals are demonstrated experimentally for 40 Gbit/s RZ-DPSK in a single-pump fibre parametric amplifier with 22 dB smallsignal gain.......Input power dynamic range enhancement and amplitude regeneration of highly distorted signals are demonstrated experimentally for 40 Gbit/s RZ-DPSK in a single-pump fibre parametric amplifier with 22 dB smallsignal gain....

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography as a potential biomarker in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: preliminary results from the Danish Renal Cancer Group Study-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mains, Jill Rachel; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Erik Morre

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computer tomography (CT) as a biomarker in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with favorable or intermediate Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center risk group...... blinded to treatment group. The DCE-CT scans were performed at baseline, at weeks 5 and 10, and thereafter every third month. Blood flow (BF; mL/min/100 mL), peak enhancement (Hounsfield units), time to peak (seconds), and blood volume (BV; mL/100 g) were calculated. Parameters for DCE-CT were correlated...

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR of the prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: correlation with angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xinchu; Shen Junkang; Lu Zhian; Zhou Lijuan; Yang Xiaochun; Wang Guanzhong; Zhang Caiyuan; Wang Shuizhen; Qian Minghui; Chan Yuxi; Qian Nong; Xiang Jianpo; Pan Changjie; Rong Weiliang; Chen Jianguo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnose of prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and to determine the correlation between dynamic MRI findings with angiogenesis. Methods: Thirty-two cases of prostatic cancer and 40 cases of BPH underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. All the patients in this study were diagnosed by histopathology. The results of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI were evaluated by early-phase enhancement parameters and time-signal intensity curves (SI-T curves), and the curves were classified according to their shapes as type I, which had steady enhancement; type II, plateau of signal intensity; and type III, washout of signal intensity. The pathologic specimens of region of interest (ROI ) were obtained, and HE staining, immunohistochemical vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microvessel density (MVD) measurements were performed. The relationships among dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI features, VEGF, and MVD expression were analyzed. Results: In the early-phase enhancement parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, onset time, maximum signal intensity, and early-phase enhancement rate differed between prostatic cancer and BPH (P<0.01, 0.05, 0.01), but there were some overlaps between them. The intermediate and late post-contrast periods were characterized with the lesion SI-T curves. The SI-T curve of prostatic cancer was mainly type III (21 cases). Type II could be seen in both prostatic cancer (8 cases) and BPH (19 cases). Type I most appeared in BPH (18 cases). The distributions proved to have significant difference (P<0.001). The mean VEGF and MVD level of 32 prostatic cancer patients were significantly higher than those of 40 BPH patients (P<0.001). MVD level of prostatic cancer and BPH showed an association with VEGF level (P<0.01). The maximum signal intensity and early-phase enhancement rate in both prostatic cancer and BPH showed an association

  9. The role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in visualizing atherosclerotic carotid plaque vulnerability: Which injection protocol? Which scanning technique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iezzi, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.iezzi@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Petrone, Gianluigi [Institute of Pathology, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168, Rome (Italy); Ferrante, Angela [Department of Vascular Surgery, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Lauriola, Libero [Institute of Pathology, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168, Rome (Italy); Vincenzoni, Claudio [Department of Vascular Surgery, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Torre, Michele Fabio la [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Snider, Francesco [Department of Vascular Surgery, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Rindi, Guido [Institute of Pathology, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, “A. Gemelli” Hospital—Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • CEUS is a safe and efficacious technique for the identification and characterization of carotid plaque. • CEUS represents a diagnostic tool for the management of patients with carotid plaque, particularly in asymptomatic patients. • Improved diagnostic performance is achieved with the injection of 4 mL bolus of contrast-medium. • Improved diagnostic performance is achieved with the use of Dynamic Imaging rather than late-phase imaging. - Abstract: Purpose: To correlate the degree of plaque vulnerability as determined by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with histological findings. Secondary objectives were to optimize the CEUS acquisition technique and image evaluation methods. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive patients, either symptomatic and asymptomatic referring to our department in order to perform carotid endarterectomy (TEA), were enrolled. Each patient provided informed consent before undergoing CEUS. Ultrasound examination was performed using high-frequency (8–14 MHz) linear probe and a non-linear pulse inversion technique (mechanical index: 0.09–1.3). A double contrast media injection (Sonovue, 2 mL and 4 mL; Bracco, Italy) was performed. Two videotapes were recorded for every injection: early “dynamic” phase and late “flash” phase, performed with 6 high mechanical index impulses. Movies were quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation were statistically compared to immunohistological diagnosis of vulnerable plaque, considered as gold standard. Results: Qualitative CEUS evaluation obtained high statistical results when compared to immunohistological results, with values of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of 94%, 68%, 87%, 85% and 86%, respectively, which became higher if considering only asymptomatic patient, with a NPV of 91%. Nevertheless, quantitative software evaluation proved less

  10. The evaluation of slow injection dynamic CT scan for the vascular invasion of cancer of biliary system and pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Toshiyuki

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic CT body scans were performed under an injection rate of 3 ml/sec with a total amount of 100 ml angiografin by rapid table shift, upon 64 cancer patients, 21 patients with cancer of the bile duct, 21 with pancreatic cancer, 14 with cancer of the gallbladder and 8 with cancer of ampulla of papilla vater. In this study, the detectability of these cancers and the accuracy of their vascular invasion were compared between the above mentioned CT scan (slow injection D. CT) and angiography by our criteria. The detectability of the main tumors was 33.3 % by plain CT but 85.7 % by slow injection D. CT. The criteria of the vascular invasion by slow injection D. CT were classified to four types; separated type, contact type, contact invasive type and involved type. By this criteria, the diagnostic overall accuracy of the arterial invasion was 96.8 % in SMA, 98.4 % in celiac axis, 92.1 % in CH and 46.1 % in proper and bilateral hepatic arteries. The larger the arterial caliber was, the higher the diagnostic accuracy was in slow injection D. CT. On the other hand, the angiographic diagnostic accuracy of the arterial invasion was 79 % in SMA, 88.7 % in celiac axis, 90.3 % in CH and 98.4 % in proper and bilateral hepatic arteries. So, the smaller the arterial caliber was, the higher the diagnostic accuracy was in angiography. The overall accuracy of the portal venous invasion was 90.6 % by means of slow injection D. CT and 88.7 % by means of angiography. 33 of 64 cases were with portal venous invasion, and 15 of 33 cases were resectable by reconstraction of the portal vein. 4 of 15 were contact type, 10 of 15 were contact invasive type, 1 of 15 was involved type. 10 of 11 contact invasive type were resectable, and only 1 of 18 involved type was resectable, so it was safe to say the case of contact invasive type was resectable, and the case of involved type was unresectable. (author)

  11. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18 FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain, 0.09 h (liver, 0.007 h (spleen, 0.0006 h (adrenals, 0.013 h (kidneys and 0.005 h (stomach whereas it was 0.189 h (brain, 0.11 h (liver, 0.01 h (spleen, 0.0007 h (adrenals, 0.02 h (kidneys and 0.004 h (stomach in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  12. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from (18) FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D'Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and carefully weigh the risk-benefit ratios prior to every 18FDG whole body PET

  13. Optimized controllers for enhancing dynamic performance of PV interface system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Attia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic performance of PV interface system can be improved by optimizing the gains of the Proportional–Integral (PI controller. In this work, gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm are utilized to optimal tuning of PI controller gains. Performance comparison between the PV system with optimized PI gains utilizing different techniques are carried out. Finally, the dynamic behavior of the system is studied under hypothetical sudden variations in irradiance. The examination of the proposed techniques for optimal tuning of PI gains is conducted using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package. The main contribution of this work is investigating the dynamic performance of PV interfacing system with application of gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm for optimal PI parameters tuning. Keywords: Photovoltaic power systems, Gravitational search algorithm, Harmony search algorithm, Genetic algorithm, Artificial intelligence

  14. A digital strategy for manometer dynamic enhancement. [for wind tunnel monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Application of digital signal processing techniques to improve the non-linear dynamic characteristics of a sonar-type mercury manometer is described. The dynamic enhancement strategy quasi-linearizes the manometer characteristics and improves the effective bandwidth in the context of a wind-tunnel pressure regulation system. Model identification data and real-time hybrid simulation data demonstrate feasibility of approach.

  15. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Jun Hyun; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Young Ha; Chung, Soo Kyo [Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, including a sham operated group (n=3). Renal ischemia was induced for 30 minutes (group 1), 60 minutes (group 2) and 120 minutes (group 3). MR imaging was performed before ischemia as well as one hour, 24 hours, and 72 hours after reperfusion. A 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy was performed before ischemia, as well as 24 hours and 72 hours after reperfusion. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the T2WI, time-relative signal intensity (%RSI) curve on dynamic enhanced images, and relative left renal uptake (%) on DMSA scan were obtained and compared to the histologic findings. The SNR of the cortex on the T2WI changed significantly over the course of the reperfusion time (p<0.001), but was not significantly different among the ischemia groups. The area under the time-%RSI curve gradually decreased from cortex to inner medulla before ischemia, which was reversed and gradually increased after reperfusion. The areas under the time-%RSI curve of outer and inner medulla were significantly different among the ischemia groups (p=0.04, p=0.008). The relative renal uptake (%) of left kidney decreased significantly over the reperfusion time (p=0.03), and was also significantly different among the ischemia groups (p=0.005). Tubular cell necrosis was observed in 16 rabbits (76.2%). The histologic grades of group 3 were higher than those of group 1 and group 2 (p=0.002). Even in rabbits without tubular cell necrosis, the areas under the time-%RSI curves of the cortex, outer, and inner medulla after a 72 hour reperfusion time were significantly lower than those before ischemia (p=0.007, p=0.005, p=0.004). The results of this study suggest that dynamic enhanced MR imaging could be a useful tool for the evaluation of renal ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  16. Relationship between the natural history of chronic subdural hematoma and enhancement of the inner membrane on post-contrast CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimasu, Norio [Teraoka Memorial Hospital, Shinichi, Hiroshima (Japan); Tanishima, Takeo [Tokyo Kosei Nenkin Hospital (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the features and natural history of the inner membrane in CSDH (chronic subdural hemotoma) patients using pre- and post-contrast CT scans. Twenty-four patients with CSDH (28 hematomas) who underwent pre- and post-contrast CT scanning prior to surgery ware studied. CSDH was classified according to the internal architecture as the homogeneous (HM) type, the laminar (LM) type, the separated (SP) type, and the trabecular (TR) type. For each type, the enhancement of the inner membrane, the outer membrane, and trabeculae was evaluated. Enhancement of the inner membrane develops as the stage of CSDH progresses. Although the inner membrane was not enhanced in the HM type, it was enhanced in almost all of the patients with the other types (p <0.0001). In 13% of patients with the LM type, 29% with the SP type, and 40% with the TR type, the inner membrane was moderately or markedly enhanced. The outer membrane was not thickened in any patient. In 88% of the patients who had contralateral hemiparesis on admission and 42% of those who did not have hemiparesis, the inner membrane was clearly enhanced (p=0.0166). This indicated that blood flow to the inner membrane from the pia matter induced hypoperfusion of the brain parenchyma beneath the hematoma in addition to the effect of direct compression. Contrast CT scanning may be useful for diagnosing the extent of enlargement of the inner membrane, predicting the risk of local brain damage, and evaluating the stage in the natural history of CSDH. (author)

  17. Relationship between the natural history of chronic subdural hematoma and enhancement of the inner membrane on post-contrast CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimasu, Norio; Tanishima, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the features and natural history of the inner membrane in CSDH (chronic subdural hematoma) patients using pre- and post-contrast CT scans. Twenty-four patients with CSDH (28 hematomas) who underwent pre- and post-contrast CT scanning prior to surgery ware studied. CSDH was classified according to the internal architecture as the homogeneous (HM) type, the laminar (LM) type, the separated (SP) type, and the trabecular (TR) type. For each type, the enhancement of the inner membrane, the outer membrane, and trabeculae was evaluated. Enhancement of the inner membrane develops as the stage of CSDH progresses. Although the inner membrane was not enhanced in the HM type, it was enhanced in almost all of the patients with the other types (p <0.0001). In 13% of patients with the LM type, 29% with the SP type, and 40% with the TR type, the inner membrane was moderately or markedly enhanced. The outer membrane was not thickened in any patient. In 88% of the patients who had contralateral hemiparesis on admission and 42% of those who did not have hemiparesis, the inner membrane was clearly enhanced (p=0.0166). This indicated that blood flow to the inner membrane from the pia matter induced hypoperfusion of the brain parenchyma beneath the hematoma in addition to the effect of direct compression. Contrast CT scanning may be useful for diagnosing the extent of enlargement of the inner membrane, predicting the risk of local brain damage, and evaluating the stage in the natural history of CSDH. (author)

  18. Nuclear visions enhanced: chromatin structure, organization and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Meshorer, Eran; Herrmann, Harald; Raška, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The EMBO Workshop on ‘Chromatin Structure, Organization and Dynamics' took place in April 2011 in Prague, Czech Republic. Participants presented data on the generation of models of the genome, working to correlate changes in the organization of chromatin with the functional state of the genome.

  19. Distinct eye movement patterns enhance dynamic visual acuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palidis, Dimitrios J.; Wyder-Hodge, Pearson A.; Fooken, Jolande; Spering, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is the ability to resolve fine spatial detail in dynamic objects during head fixation, or in static objects during head or body rotation. This ability is important for many activities such as ball sports, and a close relation has been shown between DVA and sports expertise. DVA tasks involve eye movements, yet, it is unclear which aspects of eye movements contribute to successful performance. Here we examined the relation between DVA and the kinematics of smooth pursuit and saccadic eye movements in a cohort of 23 varsity baseball players. In a computerized dynamic-object DVA test, observers reported the location of the gap in a small Landolt-C ring moving at various speeds while eye movements were recorded. Smooth pursuit kinematics—eye latency, acceleration, velocity gain, position error—and the direction and amplitude of saccadic eye movements were linked to perceptual performance. Results reveal that distinct eye movement patterns—minimizing eye position error, tracking smoothly, and inhibiting reverse saccades—were related to dynamic visual acuity. The close link between eye movement quality and DVA performance has important implications for the development of perceptual training programs to improve DVA. PMID:28187157

  20. Distinct eye movement patterns enhance dynamic visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palidis, Dimitrios J; Wyder-Hodge, Pearson A; Fooken, Jolande; Spering, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is the ability to resolve fine spatial detail in dynamic objects during head fixation, or in static objects during head or body rotation. This ability is important for many activities such as ball sports, and a close relation has been shown between DVA and sports expertise. DVA tasks involve eye movements, yet, it is unclear which aspects of eye movements contribute to successful performance. Here we examined the relation between DVA and the kinematics of smooth pursuit and saccadic eye movements in a cohort of 23 varsity baseball players. In a computerized dynamic-object DVA test, observers reported the location of the gap in a small Landolt-C ring moving at various speeds while eye movements were recorded. Smooth pursuit kinematics-eye latency, acceleration, velocity gain, position error-and the direction and amplitude of saccadic eye movements were linked to perceptual performance. Results reveal that distinct eye movement patterns-minimizing eye position error, tracking smoothly, and inhibiting reverse saccades-were related to dynamic visual acuity. The close link between eye movement quality and DVA performance has important implications for the development of perceptual training programs to improve DVA.

  1. WE-D-17A-01: A Dynamic Collimation System for Spot Scanned Proton Therapy: Conceptual Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyer, D; Hill, P; Wang, D; Smith, B; Flynn, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system, the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy delivered at low energies is highly dependent on the spot size. This dependence, coupled with the fact that spot sizes increase with decreasing energy, reduces the benefit of the PBS technique for treating shallow tumors such as those found in the head and neck region. In order to overcome this limitation, a dynamic collimation system (DCS) was developed for sharpening the lateral penumbra of low energy proton therapy dose distributions delivered by PBS. Methods: The proposed DCS consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades which intercept the edges of the proton beam near the target edge in the beam's eye view. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s 2 , respectively. Two-dimensional treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σ-air) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm, representing a wide array of clinically available equipment. Results: In its current configuration, the snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm 2 and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm 2 . Using off the shelf components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. The treatment plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2–40.6% for spot sizes of 3–9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The DCS can be integrated with current or future proton therapy equipment and we believe it will serve as a useful tool to further improve the next generation of proton therapy delivery

  2. Enhancing pattern of gastric carcinoma at dynamic incremental CT: correlation with gross and histologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hong Seop; Lee, Dong Ho; Kim, Yoon Hwa; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Joo Won; Yoon, Yup

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the enhancing pattern of gastric carcinomas at dynamic incremental CT and to correlate it with pathologic findings. We retrospectively evaluated the enhancement pattern of stomach cancer on dynamic incremental CT of the 78 patients. All the lesions had been pathologically proved after surgery. The enhancement pattern was categorized as good or poor in the early phase;homogeneous, heterogeneous or ring enhancement;the presence or absence of delayed enhancement. There were 16 cases of early gastric cancer (EGC), and 62 cases of advanced gastric cancer(AGC). The Borrmann type of AGC were 1(n=1), 2(n=20), 3=(n=32), 4(n=8) and 5(n=1). The histologic patterns of AGC were tubular(n=49), signet ring cell(n=10), and mucinous(n=3). The enhancing patterns were compared with gross and histologic findings and delayed enhancement was correlated with pathologic evidence of desmoplasia. Good enhancement of tumor was seen in 24/41cases (58.5%) with AGC Borrmann type 3-5, in 6/21(28.6%) with AGC Borrmann type 1-2, and in 3/16(18.8%) with EGC (P<.05). By histologic pattern, good enhancement of tumor was seen in 8/10(80%) with signet ring cell type, in 21/49(42.9%) with tubular type, and in 1/3(33.3%) with mucinous type(P<.05). EGC was homogeneously enhanced in 14/16cases (87.5%), but AGC was heterogeneously enhanced in 33/62(53.2%), respectively(P<.01). There was no significant correlation between delayed enhancement and the presence of desmoplasia. AGC Borrmann type 3-5 and signet ring cell type have a tendency to show good enhancement and EGC is more homogeneously enhanced at dynamic incremental CT

  3. Enhancing protein adsorption simulations by using accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mücksch

    Full Text Available The atomistic modeling of protein adsorption on surfaces is hampered by the different time scales of the simulation ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s and experiment (up to hours, and the accordingly different 'final' adsorption conformations. We provide evidence that the method of accelerated molecular dynamics is an efficient tool to obtain equilibrated adsorption states. As a model system we study the adsorption of the protein BMP-2 on graphite in an explicit salt water environment. We demonstrate that due to the considerably improved sampling of conformational space, accelerated molecular dynamics allows to observe the complete unfolding and spreading of the protein on the hydrophobic graphite surface. This result is in agreement with the general finding of protein denaturation upon contact with hydrophobic surfaces.

  4. A dynamic model for the estimation of optimum timing of computed tomography scan for dose evaluation of 125I or 103Pd seed implant of prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Dicker, Adam P.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Nath, Ravinder; Waterman, Frank M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The dosimetric evaluation of permanent 125 I or 103 Pd prostate implant is based on the assumption that both prostate and seeds are static throughout the entire treatment time which lasts months. However, the prostate is often edematous after the surgical implantation of seeds. Therefore, both the volume of the prostate and the seed locations change dynamically as the edema resolves. This effect has impact on the validity of postimplant analysis based upon a CT scan. If a CT scan is taken too early after implantation while there is edema in the prostate, the dose delivered by the implant may be underestimated. If the imaging is delayed too long, the dose may be overestimated. The magnitude of this effect depends on both of the half-life of the isotope used and the half-life and magnitude of the edema. This study describes a dynamic biomathematical model which takes edema into account in calculating the dose delivered by the implant and is used to investigate the optimum time to obtain the postimplant CT scan. Materials and Methods: The dynamic biomathematical model is a numerical integration of the accumulated dose in which the prostate dimensions, the seed locations, and the source strength are all functions of time. The function which describes the change in prostate dimensions and seed locations as a function of time was determined in a separate study by analysis of serial postimplant CT scans. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the prostate for the total dose generated by the dynamic model are compared to DVHs generated by CT scans simulated for postimplant intervals ranging from 0 to 300 days after the implantation for 30 different combinations of the magnitude and duration of edema. Results: DVHs of the prostate calculated by taking edema into account show that the time of obtaining a CT scan for postimplant analysis is critical to the accuracy of dose evaluations. The comparison of the DVHs generated by the dynamic model to those generated by

  5. Contrast kinetics of the malignant breast tumour - border versus centre enhancement on dynamic midfield MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, M.; Torp-Pedersen, S.; Bentzon, N.

    2008-01-01

    receptor negative tumours. CONCLUSION: The border/centre enhancement difference in malignant breast tumours is easily visualized on midfield dynamic magnetic resonance mammography. The dynamic behaviour is significantly correlated to histological features and receptor status of the tumours Udgivelsesdato......PURPOSE: To quantify the border versus centre enhancement of malignant breast tumours on dynamic magnetic resonance mammography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two women diagnosed with primary breast cancer underwent dynamic magnetic resonance mammography (Omniscan 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight......) on a midfield scanner (0.6 T), prior to surgery. The following five variables were recorded from the border and centre regions of the tumours: Early Enhancement, Time to Peak, Wash-in rate, Wash-out rate and Area under Curve. Information on histology type, oestrogen and progesterone receptor status...

  6. Metropolitan food supply : case study Cairo : a quick scan study to enhance fresh food supply and minimize postharvest losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den W.H.A.M.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate options for “Metropolitan food production systems” in Egypt and specifically in the Cairo region, a ‘cold chain quick scan’ is conducted by Wageningen UR post-harvest specialists. The study comprehends a quick scan for market demand, market willingness and a search for trend

  7. Dynamic modeling method for infrared smoke based on enhanced discrete phase model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhendong; Yang, Chunling; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Hongbo

    2018-03-01

    The dynamic modeling of infrared (IR) smoke plays an important role in IR scene simulation systems and its accuracy directly influences the system veracity. However, current IR smoke models cannot provide high veracity, because certain physical characteristics are frequently ignored in fluid simulation; simplifying the discrete phase as a continuous phase and ignoring the IR decoy missile-body spinning. To address this defect, this paper proposes a dynamic modeling method for IR smoke, based on an enhanced discrete phase model (DPM). A mathematical simulation model based on an enhanced DPM is built and a dynamic computing fluid mesh is generated. The dynamic model of IR smoke is then established using an extended equivalent-blackbody-molecule model. Experiments demonstrate that this model realizes a dynamic method for modeling IR smoke with higher veracity.

  8. Tracer kinetic modelling of tumour angiogenesis based on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, Gunnar [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Griebel, Juergen [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Technical developments in both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have helped to reduce scan times and expedited the development of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques. Since the temporal change of the image signal following the administration of a diffusible, extracellular contrast agent (CA) is related to the local blood supply and the extravasation of the CA into the interstitial space, DCE imaging can be used to assess tissue microvasculature and microcirculation. It is the aim of this review to summarize the biophysical and tracer kinetic principles underlying this emerging imaging technique offering great potential for non-invasive characterization of tumour angiogenesis. In the first part, the relevant contrast mechanisms are presented that form the basis to relate signal variations measured by serial CT and MRI to local tissue concentrations of the administered CA. In the second part, the concepts most widely used for tracer kinetic modelling of concentration-time courses derived from measured DCE image data sets are described in a consistent and unified manner to highlight their particular structure and assumptions as well as the relationships among them. Finally, the concepts presented are exemplified by the analysis of representative DCE data as well as discussed with respect to present and future applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Depending on the specific protocol used for the acquisition of DCE image data and the particular model applied for tracer kinetic analysis of the derived concentration-time courses, different aspects of tumour angiogenesis can be quantified in terms of well-defined physiological tissue parameters. DCE imaging offers promising prospects for improved tumour diagnosis, individualization of cancer treatment as well as the evaluation of novel therapeutic concepts in preclinical and early-stage clinical trials. (orig.)

  9. Enhanced resolution imaging of ultrathin ZnO layers on Ag(111) by multiple hydrogen molecules in a scanning tunneling microscope junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyi; Shiotari, Akitoshi; Baugh, Delroy; Wolf, Martin; Kumagai, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    Molecular hydrogen in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction has been found to enhance the lateral spatial resolution of the STM imaging, referred to as scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy (STHM). Here we report atomic resolution imaging of 2- and 3-monolayer (ML) thick ZnO layers epitaxially grown on Ag(111) using STHM. The enhanced resolution can be obtained at a relatively large tip to surface distance and resolves a more defective structure exhibiting dislocation defects for 3-ML-thick ZnO than for 2 ML. In order to elucidate the enhanced imaging mechanism, the electric and mechanical properties of the hydrogen molecular junction (HMJ) are investigated by a combination of STM and atomic force microscopy. It is found that the HMJ shows multiple kinklike features in the tip to surface distance dependence of the conductance and frequency shift curves, which are absent in a hydrogen-free junction. Based on a simple modeling, we propose that the junction contains several hydrogen molecules and sequential squeezing of the molecules out of the junction results in the kinklike features in the conductance and frequency shift curves. The model also qualitatively reproduces the enhanced resolution image of the ZnO films.

  10. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Su-Chin; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s"−"1) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s"−"1, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  11. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Su-Chin [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, Republic of China and Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Cheng-Chieh [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chang, Hing-Chiu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Hui-Chu [Ph.D. Program of Technology Management, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Jui [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng-Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung, E-mail: peterjuancj@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan and Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s{sup −1}) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s{sup −1}, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  12. Satellite-Enhanced Dynamical Downscaling of Extreme Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A.

    2015-12-01

    Severe weather events can be the triggers of environmental disasters in regions particularly susceptible to changes in hydrometeorological conditions. In that regard, the reconstruction of past extreme weather events can help in the assessment of vulnerability and risk mitigation actions. Using novel modeling approaches, dynamical downscaling of long-term integrations from global circulation models can be useful for risk analysis, providing more accurate climate information at regional scales. Originally developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the Regional Spectral Model (RSM) is being used in the dynamical downscaling of global reanalysis, within the South American Hydroclimate Reconstruction Project. Here, RSM combines scale-selective bias correction with assimilation of satellite-based precipitation estimates to downscale extreme weather occurrences. Scale-selective bias correction is a method employed in the downscaling, similar to the spectral nudging technique, in which the downscaled solution develops in agreement with its coarse boundaries. Precipitation assimilation acts on modeled deep-convection, drives the land-surface variables, and therefore the hydrological cycle. During the downscaling of extreme events that took place in Brazil in recent years, RSM continuously assimilated NCEP Climate Prediction Center morphing technique precipitation rates. As a result, RSM performed better than its global (reanalysis) forcing, showing more consistent hydrometeorological fields compared with more sophisticated global reanalyses. Ultimately, RSM analyses might provide better-quality initial conditions for high-resolution numerical predictions in metropolitan areas, leading to more reliable short-term forecasting of severe local storms.

  13. Dynamic Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination for Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Barcos, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) is a key ingredient to boost the performance of co-channel Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). eICIC encompasses two main techniques: Almost Blank Subframes (ABS), during which the macro cell remains silent to reduce the interference, and biased...... and an opportunistic approach exploiting the varying cell conditions. Moreover, an autonomous fast distributed muting algorithm is presented, which is simple, robust, and well suited for irregular network deployments. Performance results for realistic network deployments show that the traditional semi-static e...

  14. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Bong Joo [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Sook [Department of Radiology, St. Paul Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Mokdong Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Youn [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  15. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Cha, Eun Suk; Kim, Ji Youn; Song, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  16. A wide variety of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR appearances of breast cancer: Pathologic correlation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Masayuki; Furukawa, Akira; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristic magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of breast cancers, as well as, its variations and to investigate the pathology providing different patterns of dynamic-MR appearances. Materials and methods: Fifty-two women with cancer underwent mastectomy (52 tumors resected) and had MR imaging at our institution between April 2001 and March 2004. MR images of T1WI, T2WI, dynamic-MRI and contrast-enhanced T1WI were obtained and evaluated. Dynamic-MR images were correlated with pathological findings. Results: Common MR appearance of breast cancer was a focal mass either with irregular or spiculated margins with similar signal intensity on T1WI as and similar to higher signal intensity on T2WI compared to the normal mammary gland. On static contrast-enhanced T1WI, apparent enhancement was typically observed. On dynamic MRI, tumor-rim-enhancement on an early phase image and washout enhancement pattern on dynamic images, both characteristic for breast cancer, were observed, however, the prevalence of them was relatively low, which could be explained by the variation of histopathology among breast cancer nodules. Conclusion: In diagnosing breast masses on MRI, as well as the common and characteristic findings of breast cancer, the variations of MR findings and their underlying histopathology should also be considered

  17. Negative viscosity can enhance learning of inertial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Felix C; Patton, James L; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2009-06-01

    We investigated how learning of inertial load manipulation is influenced by movement amplification with negative viscosity. Using a force-feedback device, subjects trained on anisotropic loads (5 orientations) with free movements in one of three conditions (inertia only, negative viscosity only, or combined), prior to common evaluation conditions (prescribed circular pattern with inertia only). Training with Combined-Load resulted in lower error (6.89±3.25%) compared to Inertia-Only (8.40±4.32%) and Viscosity-Only (8.17±4.13%) according to radial deviation analysis (% of trial mean radius). Combined-Load and Inertia-Only groups exhibited similar unexpected no-load trials (8.38±4.31% versus 8.91±4.70% of trial mean radius), which suggests comparable low-impedance strategies. These findings are remarkable since negative viscosity, only available during training, evidently enhanced learning when combined with inertia. Modeling analysis suggests that a feedforward after-effect of negative viscosity cannot predict such performance gains. Instead, results from Combined-Load training are consistent with greater feedforward inertia compensation along with a small increase in impedance control. The capability of the nervous system to generalize learning from negative viscosity suggests an intriguing new method for enhancing sensorimotor adaptation.

  18. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  19. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Investigating the Role of Global Histogram Equalization Technique for 99mTechnetium-Methylene diphosphonate Bone Scan Image Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Param Dev; Dheer, Pankaj; Parida, Girish Kumar; Goyal, Harish; Patel, Chetan; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    99m Technetium-methylene diphosphonate ( 99m Tc-MDP) bone scan images have limited number of counts per pixel, and hence, they have inferior image quality compared to X-rays. Theoretically, global histogram equalization (GHE) technique can improve the contrast of a given image though practical benefits of doing so have only limited acceptance. In this study, we have investigated the effect of GHE technique for 99m Tc-MDP-bone scan images. A set of 89 low contrast 99m Tc-MDP whole-body bone scan images were included in this study. These images were acquired with parallel hole collimation on Symbia E gamma camera. The images were then processed with histogram equalization technique. The image quality of input and processed images were reviewed by two nuclear medicine physicians on a 5-point scale where score of 1 is for very poor and 5 is for the best image quality. A statistical test was applied to find the significance of difference between the mean scores assigned to input and processed images. This technique improves the contrast of the images; however, oversaturation was noticed in the processed images. Student's t -test was applied, and a statistically significant difference in the input and processed image quality was found at P histogram equalization technique in combination with some other postprocessing technique is useful.

  1. Quantification of traumatic meningeal injury using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Williford, Joshua P.; Cota, Martin R.; MacLaren, Judy M.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Latour, Lawrence L.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic meningeal injury is a novel imaging marker of traumatic brain injury, which appears as enhancement of the dura on post-contrast T2-weighted FLAIR images, and is likely associated with inflammation of the meninges. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI provides a better discrimination of abnormally perfused regions. A method to properly identify those regions is presented. Images of seventeen patients scanned within 96 hours of head injury with positive traumatic meningeal injury were normalized and aligned. The difference between the pre- and last post-contrast acquisitions was segmented and voxels in the higher class were spatially clustered. Spatial and morphological descriptors were used to identify the regions of enhancement: a) centroid; b) distance to the brain mask from external voxels; c) distance from internal voxels; d) size; e) shape. The method properly identified thirteen regions among all patients. The method failed in one case due to the presence of a large brain lesion that altered the mask boundaries. Most false detections were correctly rejected resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9% and 93.6%, respectively.

  2. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, H.; Sieper, J.; Wolf, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study for the identification of different pannus formations. Twenty patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis of the knee joint were examined with MR imaging primary to surgery. The authors used a 1.5-T Magnetom unit, a circular surface coil for signal detection, 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA given as a bolus injection, fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence (TR, 30 msec; TE, 10 msec; 128 x 128 matrix; excitation angle, 70 degrees) repeated 30 times within 120 seconds, and a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence (Tr, 500 msec; TE, 22 msec) before and 2 minutes after contrast medium injection. Enhancement of pannus and joint effusion has been measured and standardized to muscle tissue

  3. Histopathologic diversity of gastric cancers: Relationship between enhancement pattern on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and histological type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Miyasaka, Mitsutoshi; Muraki, Toshio; Nishie, Akihiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Oki, Eiji; Oda, Yoshinao; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced computed tomography gastrography (CE-CTG) to predict the histological type of gastric cancer. We analyzed 47 consecutive patients with resectable advanced gastric cancer preoperatively evaluated by multiphasic dynamic contrast-enhanced CT. Two radiologists independently reviewed the CT images and they determined the peak enhancement phase, and then measured the CT attenuation value of the gastric lesion for each phase. The histological types of gastric cancers were assigned to three groups as differentiated-type, undifferentiated-type, and mixed-type. We compared the peak enhancement phase of the three types and compared the CT attenuation values in each phase. The peak enhancement was significantly different between the three types of gastric cancers for both readers (reader 1, p=0.001; reader 2, p=0.009); most of the undifferentiated types had peak enhancement in the delayed phase. The CT attenuation values of undifferentiated type were significantly higher than those of differentiated or mixed type in the delayed phase according to both readers (reader 1, p=0.002; reader 2, p=0.004). CE-CTG could provide helpful information in diagnosing the histological type of gastric cancers preoperatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI study of primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Xu Jianmin; Li Ying; Zhang Jingzhong; Zhu Jing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in the diagnosis and differentiation of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in the thoracic spine. Methods: The dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of 2 patients (3 times) with PNET in the thoracic spine proved by surgery and pathology were prospectively studied. Results: In the curves of SI-time and CER-time, PNET in the thoracic spine showed a rapid rise to the peak between 60 s and 120 s, then the flat level was kept and no obvious decline was detected after about 3.5 minute. Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI can help to make the diagnosis and differential diagnosis for PNET in the thoracic spine, offer reliable information for the choice of clinical management, and predict the prognosis

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MR angiography in intracranial vascular abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, K.; Ono, H.; Utsunomiya, H.; Okazaki, M.; Tanaka, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present our clinical experience with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) with subtraction for assessing intracranial vascular abnormalities. Ten patients with various cerebrovascular disorders underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA on a 1.0-T system. Thirty sections (2 mm) were acquired in 29-30 s. Maximum intensity projection images and subtracted source images were compared with those obtained by conventional angiography. In all cases, the presence or absence of abnormalities in the targeted vessels, as well as the morphology of the sagittal sinuses, was clearly visualized as in conventional angiography, without any obstructions such as hyperintense hematomas or thrombi, or intraluminal turbulence. Although the temporal and spatial resolutions with current hardware are insufficient, these preliminary results suggest that dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA with subtraction may be useful for assessing vascular lesions with hemorrhage or thrombus, and the dural sinuses. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  7. Startle Auditory Stimuli Enhance the Performance of Fast Dynamic Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training. PMID:24489967

  8. Startle auditory stimuli enhance the performance of fast dynamic contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Fernandez-Del-Olmo

    Full Text Available Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS; a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS; and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS. Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training.

  9. Hepatic blood perfusion estimated by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Inger Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and the slope method can provide absolute measures of hepatic blood perfusion from the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) at experimentally varied blood flow rates.......The aim of this study was to determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and the slope method can provide absolute measures of hepatic blood perfusion from the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) at experimentally varied blood flow rates....

  10. The Incidence, Classification, and Management of Acute Adverse Reactions to the Low-Osmolar Iodinated Contrast Media Isovue and Ultravist in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Yuhao; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenbo; Li, Xinyu; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-03-01

    Some epidemiologic surveillance studies have recorded adverse drug reactions to radiocontrast agents. We aimed to investigate the incidence and management of acute adverse reactions (AARs) to Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning.Data from 137,473 patients were analyzed. They had undergone enhanced CT scanning with intravenous injection of Ultravist-370 or Isovue-370 during the period of January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 in our hospital. We investigated and classified AARs according to the American College of Radiology and the Chinese Society of Radiology (CSR) guidelines for iodinated contrast media. We analyzed risk factors for AARs and compared the AARs induced by Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370.Four hundred and twenty-eight (0.31%) patients experienced AARs, which included 330 (0.24%) patients with mild AARs, 82 (0.06%) patients with moderate AARs, and 16 (0.01%) patients with severe AARs (including 3 cases of cardiac arrest and one case of death). The incidence of AARs was higher with Ultravist-370 than with Isovue-370 (0.38% vs 0.24%, P management, the symptoms and signs of 96.5% of the AARs resolved within 24 hours without sequelae.Ultravist-370 and Isovue-370 are safe for patients undergoing enhanced CT scanning. The incidence of AARs is higher with Ultravist-370 than with Isovue-370, but this difference is limited only to the mild AARs. The incidence of AARs could be affected by multiple factors.

  11. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-04-05

    Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0.36 and -1.716 for liver, -0.153 and -1.546 for pancreas, and 2.427 and 0.866 for renal cortex, all P> 0.05). Signal-to-noise ratio of the abdominal organs was significantly lower in Group A than in Group B (t = -8.11 for liver, -7.83 for pancreas, and -5.38 for renal cortex, all P 3, indicating clinically acceptable image quality. Single-phase, dual-energy spectral CT used for children with solid abdominal tumors can reduce contrast dose and radiation dose and can also maintain clinically acceptable image quality.

  12. Diagnositc value of 3D-gradient echo dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ik; Chung, Soo Young; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Yul; Chung, Bong Wha; Shim, Jeong Won

    1997-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of 3D-gradient echo dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (3D-DMRI) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and to determine the most useful parameter for this diagnosis. Using a 1.0T MR unit, (Magnetom, Siemens, Erlaugen, Germany), 3D-DMRI (TR/TE=3D30/12) with Gd-DTPA was performed in 38 cases of breast cancer, 22 of fibroadenoma, and in three normal volunteers. We retrospectively evaluated the findings according to the speed on dynamic study and maximal amount of contrast enhancement during the delayed phase;we calculated the contrast index and morphology of the cancers and compared diagnostic accuracy among these three diagnostic parameters. On conventional spin-echo T1-and T2-weighted images, there was no significant difference of signal intensity between benign fibroadenoma and breast carcinoma. Rapid contrast enhancement (within one minute) was noted in 35 breast cancer lesions (92.1%), but relatively low and slow contrast enhancement (after five minutes) was noted in three such lesions (7.9%). Gradual contrast enhancement was noted in 21 lesions of fibroadenoma(95.5%), but a moderate degree of rapid contrast enhancement (from three to five minutes) was noted in the other case (7.9%). of On the delayed enhanced phase of 3D-DMRI, the maximal amount of contrast enhancement showed no significant difference between fibroadenoma and cancer. On 3D-DMRI, an irregular, spiculated border, with high contrast enhancement was noted in all cases of breast cancer, in particular, irregular thick peripheral contrast enhancement with central necrosis was noted 11cases(28.9%). For the diagnosis of breast cancer, 3D-DMRI is a useful technique. Among the diagnostic criteria of speed, maximal amount of contrast enhancement and morphology, morphologic change after contrast enhancement study was the most useful diagnostic parameter.=20

  13. Diagnositc value of 3D-gradient echo dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik; Chung, Soo Young; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Yul; Chung, Bong Wha; Shim, Jeong Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-01

    To assess the usefulness of 3D-gradient echo dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (3D-DMRI) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and to determine the most useful parameter for this diagnosis. Using a 1.0T MR unit, (Magnetom, Siemens, Erlaugen, Germany), 3D-DMRI (TR/TE=3D30/12) with Gd-DTPA was performed in 38 cases of breast cancer, 22 of fibroadenoma, and in three normal volunteers. We retrospectively evaluated the findings according to the speed on dynamic study and maximal amount of contrast enhancement during the delayed phase;we calculated the contrast index and morphology of the cancers and compared diagnostic accuracy among these three diagnostic parameters. On conventional spin-echo T1-and T2-weighted images, there was no significant difference of signal intensity between benign fibroadenoma and breast carcinoma. Rapid contrast enhancement (within one minute) was noted in 35 breast cancer lesions (92.1%), but relatively low and slow contrast enhancement (after five minutes) was noted in three such lesions (7.9%). Gradual contrast enhancement was noted in 21 lesions of fibroadenoma(95.5%), but a moderate degree of rapid contrast enhancement (from three to five minutes) was noted in the other case (7.9%). of On the delayed enhanced phase of 3D-DMRI, the maximal amount of contrast enhancement showed no significant difference between fibroadenoma and cancer. On 3D-DMRI, an irregular, spiculated border, with high contrast enhancement was noted in all cases of breast cancer, in particular, irregular thick peripheral contrast enhancement with central necrosis was noted 11cases(28.9%). For the diagnosis of breast cancer, 3D-DMRI is a useful technique. Among the diagnostic criteria of speed, maximal amount of contrast enhancement and morphology, morphologic change after contrast enhancement study was the most useful diagnostic parameter.=20.

  14. Pioneer factors govern super-enhancer dynamics in stem cell plasticity and lineage choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rene C.; Yang, Hanseul; Rockowitz, Shira; Larsen, Samantha B.; Nikolova, Maria; Oristian, Daniel S.; Polak, Lisa; Kadaja, Meelis; Asare, Amma; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) reside in niches which balance self-renewal with lineage selection and progression during tissue homeostasis. Following injury, culture or transplantation, SCs outside their niche often display fate flexibility1-4. Here we show that super-enhancers5 underlie the identity, lineage commitment and plasticity of adult SCs in vivo. Using hair follicle (HF) as model, we map the global chromatin domains of HFSCs and their committed progenitors in their native microenvironments. We show that super-enhancers and their dense clusters (‘epicenters’) of transcription factor (TF) binding sites change upon lineage progression. New fate is acquired by decommissioning old and establishing new super-enhancers and/or epicenters, an auto-regulatory process that abates one master regulator subset while enhancing another. We further show that when outside their niche, either in vitro or in wound-repair, HFSCs dynamically remodel super-enhancers in response to changes in their microenvironment. Intriguingly, some key super-enhancers shift epicenters, enabling them to remain active and maintain a transitional state in an ever-changing transcriptional landscape. Finally, we identify SOX9 as a crucial chromatin rheostat of HFSC super-enhancers, and provide functional evidence that super-enhancers are dynamic, dense TF-binding platforms which are acutely sensitive to pioneer master regulators whose levels define not only spatial and temporal features of lineage-status, but also stemness, plasticity in transitional states and differentiation. PMID:25799994

  15. Dynamics of contrast enhancement in MR imaging and power Doppler ultrasonography of solid breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinikainen, H.; Paeaekkoe, E.; Suramo, I.; Paeivaensalo, M.; Rissanen, T.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dynamics of contrast enhancement in solid breast lesions at contrast-enhanced MR imaging and power Doppler ultrasonography (US) and to compare the methods to histology and to each other. Material and Methods: Forty breast lesions were prospectively examined with dynamic MR and power Doppler US. Time-signal intensity curves of enhancement were obtained for both methods. The shape of the curve was analyzed to be benign, indeterminate or malignant. The curves were also analyzed quantitatively by calculating the slope of the curve and the area under the curve (both methods), relative enhancement (MR), and time to peak (US). The lesions were divided into malignant lesions, fibroadenomas, and other benign lesions. The results were compared to histology. Results: In the subjective analysis of the MR curve in differentiating between benign and malignant lesions the accuracy was 90%. The MR curve also enabled differentiation between fibroadenomas and malignancies. The accuracy of the US curve was 38%. Quantitatively, statistically significant differences were found using all the MR variables, except between malignancies and fibroadenomas. Using the US variables, no significant difference was found between the groups. Conclusion: The dynamics of contrast-enhanced MR were reliable in the differential diagnosis of solid breast lesions, but contrast-enhanced power Doppler US was of limited value

  16. Evaluation of a short dynamic 18F-fluoride PET/CT scanning method to assess bone metabolic activity in spinal orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Marloes J M; Wierts, Roel; Jutten, Elisabeth M C; Halders, Servé G E A; Willems, Paul C P H; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-11-01

    A complication after spinal fusion surgery is pseudarthrosis, but its radiological diagnosis is of limited value. (18)F-fluoride PET with its ability to assess bone metabolism activity could be of value. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of calculating the static standardized uptake value (SUV) from a short dynamic scan without the use of blood sampling, thereby obtaining all dynamic and static parameters in a scan of only 30 min. This approach was tested on a retrospective patient population with persisting pain after spinal fusion surgery. In 16 patients, SUVs (SUV max, SUV mean) and kinetic parameters (K 1, k 2, k 3, v b, K i,NLR, K 1/k 2, k 3/(k 2 + k 3), K i,patlak) were derived from static and dynamic PET/CT scans of operated and control regions of the spine, after intravenous administration of 156-214 MBq (18)F-fluoride. Parameter differences between control and operated regions, as well as between pseudarthrosis and fused segments were evaluated. SUVmean at 30 and 60 min was calculated from kinetic parameters obtained from the dynamic data set (SUV mean,2TCM). Agreement between measured and calculated SUVs was evaluated through Bland-Altman plots. Overall, statistically significant differences between control and operated regions were observed for SUV max, SUV mean, K i,NLR, K i,patlak, K 1/k 2 and k 3/(k 2 + k 3). Diagnostic CT showed pseudarthrosis in 6/16 patients, while in 10/16 patients, segments were fused. Of all parameters, only those regarding the incorporation of bone [K i,NLR, K i,patlak, k 3/(k 2 + k 3)] differed statistically significant in the intervertebral disc space between the pseudarthrosis and fused patients group. The mean values of the patient-specific blood clearance rate [Formula: see text] differed statistically significant between the pseudarthrosis and the fusion group, with a p value of 0.011. This may correspond with the lack of statistical significance of the SUV values between pseudarthrosis and

  17. Mapping of gold nanostructure-enhanced near fields via laser scanning second-harmonic generation and ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiučenko, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    The optical near-field of metal films can be modified in a straightforward manner by incorporating nanostructures on the surface. The corresponding field enhancement, which may be due to the lightning rod effect as well as the excitation of plasmon modes, results in a local change of the optical ...

  18. Video Enhancement and Dynamic Range Control of HDR Sequences for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ramponi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CMOS video cameras with high dynamic range (HDR output are particularly suitable for driving assistance applications, where lighting conditions can strongly vary, going from direct sunlight to dark areas in tunnels. However, common visualization devices can only handle a low dynamic range, and thus a dynamic range reduction is needed. Many algorithms have been proposed in the literature to reduce the dynamic range of still pictures. Anyway, extending the available methods to video is not straightforward, due to the peculiar nature of video data. We propose an algorithm for both reducing the dynamic range of video sequences and enhancing its appearance, thus improving visual quality and reducing temporal artifacts. We also provide an optimized version of our algorithm for a viable hardware implementation on an FPGA. The feasibility of this implementation is demonstrated by means of a case study.

  19. Solitary hepatic infantile hemangioendothelioma: dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortele, Koenraad J.; Vanzieleghem, Bart; Mortele, Bart; Benoit, Yves; Ros, Pablo R.

    2002-01-01

    We report the MRI findings of a solitary hepatic infantile hemangioendothelioma (IHE) diagnosed in a 14-day-old girl. To the best of our knowledge, only one report has illustrated the dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging features of IHE previously. Compounding the rarity of presentation as a solitary mass, the gadolinium-enhanced MRI appearance in our case is unique, because the IHE showed an early rim-like pseudocapsular enhancement followed by progressive fill-in of the lesion on delayed imaging. (orig.)

  20. Some connections between importance sampling and enhanced sampling methods in molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, H C; Quer, J

    2017-11-21

    In molecular dynamics, enhanced sampling methods enable the collection of better statistics of rare events from a reference or target distribution. We show that a large class of these methods is based on the idea of importance sampling from mathematical statistics. We illustrate this connection by comparing the Hartmann-Schütte method for rare event simulation (J. Stat. Mech. Theor. Exp. 2012, P11004) and the Valsson-Parrinello method of variationally enhanced sampling [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 090601 (2014)]. We use this connection in order to discuss how recent results from the Monte Carlo methods literature can guide the development of enhanced sampling methods.

  1. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Parameters Measured by Scanning Laser Polarimetry with Enhanced Corneal Compensation in Normal and Glaucomatous Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Mirian; Ferreras, Antonio; Pajarin, Ana B; Calvo, Pilar; Figus, Michele; Frezzotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the intrasession repeatability and intersession reproducibility of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness parameters measured by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) with enhanced corneal compensation (ECC) in healthy and glaucomatous eyes. One randomly selected eye of 82 healthy individuals and 60 glaucoma subjects was evaluated. Three scans were acquired during the first visit to evaluate intravisit repeatability. A different operator obtained two additional scans within 2 months after the first session to determine intervisit reproducibility. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (COV), and test-retest variability (TRT) were calculated for all SLP parameters in both groups. ICCs ranged from 0.920 to 0.982 for intravisit measurements and from 0.910 to 0.978 for intervisit measurements. The temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal (TSNIT) average was the highest (0.967 and 0.946) in normal eyes, while nerve fiber indicator (NFI; 0.982) and inferior average (0.978) yielded the best ICC in glaucomatous eyes for intravisit and intervisit measurements, respectively. All COVs were under 10% in both groups, except NFI. TSNIT average had the lowest COV (2.43%) in either type of measurement. Intervisit TRT ranged from 6.48 to 12.84. The reproducibility of peripapillary RNFL measurements obtained with SLP-ECC was excellent, indicating that SLP-ECC is sufficiently accurate for monitoring glaucoma progression.

  2. Usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the evaluation of the viability of acute scaphoid fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larribe, Maud [Hopital La Conception, Service d' imagerie medicale, Marseille (France); Hopital Sainte Marguerite, Service d' imagerie medicale, Marseille (France); Gay, Andre [Hopital La Conception, Service de chirurgie de la main, Marseille (France); Freire, Veronique [Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Department of Radiology, Notre-Dame Hospital, Montreal, QC (Canada); Bouvier, Corinne [Hopital La Timone, Service d' anatomopathologie, Marseille (France); Chagnaud, Christophe; Souteyrand, Philippe [Hopital La Conception, Service d' imagerie medicale, Marseille (France)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing the viability of the proximal pole of the scaphoid in patients with acute scaphoid fractures. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute scaphoid fracture who underwent dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI 7 days or less before surgery were prospectively included between August 2011 and December 2012. All patients underwent MR imaging with unenhanced images, enhanced images, and dynamic enhanced images. A radiologist first classified the MRI results as necrotic or viable based on T1- and T2-weighted images only, followed by a second blinded interpretation, this time including analysis of pre- and post-gadolinium administration images and a third blinded interpretation based on the time-intensity curve of the dynamic enhanced study. The standard of reference was the histologic assessment of a cylindrical specimen of the proximal pole obtained during surgery in all patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for unenhanced, enhanced, and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI studies. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 67, 67, 50, and 80 % for unenhanced images, 83, 100, 100, and 92 for enhanced images, and 83, 92, 83, and 92 for dynamic contrast-enhanced images. Our data are consistent with previously reported data supporting contrast-enhanced MRI for assessment of viability, and showing that dynamic imaging with time-intensity curve analysis does not provide additional predictive value over standard delayed enhanced imaging for acute scaphoid fracture. (orig.)

  3. Usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the evaluation of the viability of acute scaphoid fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larribe, Maud; Gay, Andre; Freire, Veronique; Bouvier, Corinne; Chagnaud, Christophe; Souteyrand, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing the viability of the proximal pole of the scaphoid in patients with acute scaphoid fractures. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute scaphoid fracture who underwent dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI 7 days or less before surgery were prospectively included between August 2011 and December 2012. All patients underwent MR imaging with unenhanced images, enhanced images, and dynamic enhanced images. A radiologist first classified the MRI results as necrotic or viable based on T1- and T2-weighted images only, followed by a second blinded interpretation, this time including analysis of pre- and post-gadolinium administration images and a third blinded interpretation based on the time-intensity curve of the dynamic enhanced study. The standard of reference was the histologic assessment of a cylindrical specimen of the proximal pole obtained during surgery in all patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for unenhanced, enhanced, and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI studies. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 67, 67, 50, and 80 % for unenhanced images, 83, 100, 100, and 92 for enhanced images, and 83, 92, 83, and 92 for dynamic contrast-enhanced images. Our data are consistent with previously reported data supporting contrast-enhanced MRI for assessment of viability, and showing that dynamic imaging with time-intensity curve analysis does not provide additional predictive value over standard delayed enhanced imaging for acute scaphoid fracture. (orig.)

  4. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  5. Fibroadenomas of the breast: histopathological/dynamic contrast-enhanced MR correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)]|[CIERM, Hopital Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremin-Bicetre (France); Garnier, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)]|[CIERM, Hopital Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremin-Bicetre (France); Meingan, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)]|[CIERM, Hopital Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremin-Bicetre (France); Zemoura, L. [Dept. of Histopathology C, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Lucidarme, O. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Guinebretiere, J.M. [Dept. of Histopathology C, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Tardivon, A.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)]|[CIERM, Hopital Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremin-Bicetre (France); Arriagada, R. [Breast Cancer Study Group, Inst. Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif, (France)

    1995-12-31

    A total of 22 women with fibroadenomas had preoperative dynamic MR study (T1-weighted images every 47 s after injection of Gd-DOTA). Their age, hormonal status, breast MR studies and histopathological slides were retrospectively reviewed. Eleven pre- (n = 2) or post-menopausal (n = 9) women showed no early contrast enhancement. The absence of early contrast enhancement correlated with hyalin stromal component. Eleven pre- (n = 7) or post-menopausal (n = 4) women showed focal (n = 9) or diffuse (n = 2) early contrast enhancement. Early focal contrast enhancement correlated with myxoid (n = 9), mixed hyalin/myxoid (n = 1) or hyalin (n = 1) fibroadenomas. Early diffuse contrast enhancement of the breast correlated with myxoid (n = 1) or hyalin (n = 1) stromal component associated with proliferative fibrocystic disease of the breast parenchyma. The presence of contrast enhancement correlated with myxoid fibroadenomas, whereas absence of contrast enhancement correlated with hyalin fibroadenomas. As hyalin fibroadenomas occurs in post-menopausal women, the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MRI may be improved in this age group. (orig.)

  6. Fibroadenomas of the breast: histopathological/dynamic contrast-enhanced MR correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, R.; Garnier, C.; Meingan, P.; Zemoura, L.; Lucidarme, O.; Guinebretiere, J.M.; Tardivon, A.A.; Arriagada, R.

    1995-01-01

    A total of 22 women with fibroadenomas had preoperative dynamic MR study (T1-weighted images every 47 s after injection of Gd-DOTA). Their age, hormonal status, breast MR studies and histopathological slides were retrospectively reviewed. Eleven pre- (n = 2) or post-menopausal (n = 9) women showed no early contrast enhancement. The absence of early contrast enhancement correlated with hyalin stromal component. Eleven pre- (n = 7) or post-menopausal (n = 4) women showed focal (n = 9) or diffuse (n = 2) early contrast enhancement. Early focal contrast enhancement correlated with myxoid (n = 9), mixed hyalin/myxoid (n 1) or hyalin (n = 1) fibroadenomas. Early diffuse contrast enhancement of the breast correlated with myxoid (n = 1) or hyalin (n = 1) stromal component associated with proliferative fibrocystic disease of the breast parenchyma. The presence of contrast enhancement correlated with myxoid fibroadenomas, whereas absence of contrast enhancement correlated with hyalin fibroadenomas. As hyalin fibroadenomas occurs in post-menopausal women, the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MRI may be improved in this age group. (orig.)

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with luminal Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziech, M. L. W.; Lavini, C.; Caan, M. W. A.; Nio, C. Y.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; Bipat, S.; Ponsioen, C. Y.; Nederveen, A. J.; Stoker, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively assess dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-)MRI as compared to conventional sequences in patients with luminal Crohn's disease. Methods: Patients with Crohn's disease undergoing MRI and ileocolonoscopy within 1 month had DCE-MRI (3T) during intravenous contrast injection of

  8. Markov Processes: Exploring the Use of Dynamic Visualizations to Enhance Student Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuch, Maxine; Budgett, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Finding ways to enhance introductory students' understanding of probability ideas and theory is a goal of many first-year probability courses. In this article, we explore the potential of a prototype tool for Markov processes using dynamic visualizations to develop in students a deeper understanding of the equilibrium and hitting times…

  9. Evaluating automated dynamic contrast enhanced wrist 3T MRI in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rastogi, Anshul; Kubassova, Olga; Krasnosselskaia, Lada V

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has great potential to provide quantitative measure of inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis. There is no current benchmark to establish the stability of signal in the joints of healthy subjects when imaged with DCE-MRI longitudinally, which is crucial so...

  10. Data driven analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data in breast cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twellmann, T.

    2005-01-01

    In the European Union, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women. If diagnosed in an early stage, breast cancer has an encouraging cure rate. Thus, early detection of breast cancer continues to be the key for an effective treatment. Recently, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic

  11. Improving the arterial input function in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI by fitting the signal in the complex plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Frank F J; Sbrizzi, Alessandro; Beld, Ellis; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging is a widely used technique in oncologic imaging. An essential prerequisite for obtaining quantitative values from DCE-MRI is the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). However, it is very challenging to accurately estimate the AIF using MR. A comprehensive model, which uses complex data instead of either magnitude or phase, was developed to improve AIF estimation. The model was first applied to simulated data. Subsequently, the accuracy of the estimated contrast agent concentration was validated in a phantom. Finally the method was applied to existing DCE scans of 13 prostate cancer patients. The complex signal method combines the complementary strengths of the magnitude and phase method, increasing the precision and accuracy of concentration estimation in simulated and phantom data. The in vivo AIFs show a good agreement between arterial voxels (standard deviation in the peak and tail equal 0.4 mM and 0.12 mM, respectively). Furthermore, the dynamic behavior closely followed the AIF obtained with DCE-CT in the same patients (mean correlation coefficient: 0.92). By using the complex signal, the AIF estimation becomes more accurate and precise. This might enable patient specific AIFs, thereby improving the quantitative values obtained from DCE-MRI. Magn Reson Med 76:1236-1245, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma on MR diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Aisheng; Zuo Changjing; Tian Jianming; Lu Jianping; Wang Jian; Wang Li; Wang Fei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the findings of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on DWI and dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging. Methods: Eighty one patients with chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis underwent both DWI and dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI studies of the liver for HCC detection. MR data of were retrospectively analyzed. Two observers determined in consensus the location and the number of focal lesions. The signal manifestation of the lesions on DWI and dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging were analyzed. Results: DWI and Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR images detected 122 HCCs and 14 benign lesions. One hundred and sixteen HCCs (95.1%) showed hyperintensity on DWI and 6 HCCs in patients with severe cirrhosis showed isointensity. One hundred and five HCCs (86.1%) revealed hypointensity, 11 HCCs (9.0%) showed isointensity and 6 HCCs (4.9%) exhibited hyperintensity on T 1 weighted images. On Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR images, 101 HCCs(82.8%) were significantly enhanced on arterial phase and 99 HCCs showed hypointensity on portal and equilibrium phases. Twenty HCCs (16.4%), 18 of 20 less than 20 mm in diameter, showed isointensity on arterial phase and hyperintensity on DWI. Eight of 14 benign lesions showed hyperintensity and 6 isointensity on DWI. Five benign lesions with hypointensity on T 1 weighted images without contrast and hyperintensity on DWI showed no enhancement on Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR images; 6 benign lesions with isointensity on both T 1 weighted imaging without contrast and DWI exhibited avid enhancement on arterial phase and isointensty on portal and equilibrium phases; one of the two benign lesions, with isointensity before and after contrast images and hyperintentiy on DWI, was a regenerative nodule; another regenerative nodule with hyperintensity on both T 1 weighted images without contrast and DWI was greatly enhanced on arterial phase and showed isointensity on portal and equilibrium phases. Conclusions: Most of the HCCs were greatly enhanced on arterial phase on Gd-DTPA-enhanced

  13. Fast and robust wavelet-based dynamic range compression and contrast enhancement model with color restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unaldi, Numan; Asari, Vijayan K.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2009-05-01

    Recently we proposed a wavelet-based dynamic range compression algorithm to improve the visual quality of digital images captured from high dynamic range scenes with non-uniform lighting conditions. The fast image enhancement algorithm that provides dynamic range compression, while preserving the local contrast and tonal rendition, is also a good candidate for real time video processing applications. Although the colors of the enhanced images produced by the proposed algorithm are consistent with the colors of the original image, the proposed algorithm fails to produce color constant results for some "pathological" scenes that have very strong spectral characteristics in a single band. The linear color restoration process is the main reason for this drawback. Hence, a different approach is required for the final color restoration process. In this paper the latest version of the proposed algorithm, which deals with this issue is presented. The results obtained by applying the algorithm to numerous natural images show strong robustness and high image quality.

  14. Generated carrier dynamics in V-pit enhanced InGaN/GaN light emitting diode

    KAUST Repository

    Ajia, Idris A.

    2017-12-18

    We investigate the effects of V-pits on the optical properties of a state-of-the art highly efficient, blue InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well (MQW) light emitting diode (LED) with high internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of > 80%. The LED is structurally enhanced by incorporating pre-MQW InGaN strain-relief layer with low InN content and patterned sapphire substrate. For comparison, a conventional (unenhanced) InGaN/GaN MQW LED (with IQE of 46%) grown under similar conditions was subjected to the same measurements. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) reveals the absence of V-pits in the unenhanced LED, whereas in the enhanced LED, V-pits with {10-11} facets, emerging from threading dislocations (TDs) were prominent. Cathodoluminescence mapping reveals the luminescence properties near the V-pits, showing that the formation of V-pit defects can encourage the growth of defect-neutralizing barriers around TD defect states. The diminished contribution of TDs in the MQWs allows indium-rich localization sites to act as efficient recombination centers. Photoluminescence and time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggest that the V-pits play a significant role in the generated carrier rate and droop mechanism, showing that the quantum confined Stark effect is suppressed at low generated carrier density, after which the carrier dynamics and droop are governed by the carrier overflow effect.

  15. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South Univ., Changsha (China)], e-mail: doctoring@sina.com

    2013-02-15

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 {+-} 0.32, right 1.57 {+-} 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 {+-} 24.61, right 100.38 {+-} 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 {+-} 0.64 and 96.35 {+-} 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 {+-} 0.79 and 108.56 {+-} 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 {+-} 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 {+-} 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 {+-} 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 {+-} 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In

  16. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 ± 0.32, right 1.57 ± 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 ± 24.61, right 100.38 ± 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 ± 0.64 and 96.35 ± 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 ± 0.79 and 108.56 ± 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 ± 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 ± 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 ± 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 ± 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In patients with TLE interictal

  17. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  18. Designing topological defects in 2D materials using scanning probe microscopy and a self-healing mechanism: a density functional-based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor; Đurišić, Ivana; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-12-01

    Engineering of materials at the atomic level is one of the most important aims of nanotechnology. The unprecedented ability of scanning probe microscopy to address individual atoms opened up the possibilities for nanomanipulation and nanolitography of surfaces and later on of two-dimensional materials. While the state-of-the-art scanning probe lithographic methods include, primarily, adsorption, desorption and repositioning of adatoms and molecules on substrates or tailoring nanoribbons by etching of trenches, the precise modification of the intrinsic atomic structure of materials is yet to be advanced. Here we introduce a new concept, scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip, for engineering of the atomic structure of membranes based on two-dimensional materials. In order to indicate the viability of the concept, we present our theoretical research, which includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, Fourier analysis and electronic transport calculations. While stretching can be employed for fabrication of atomic chains only, our comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations indicate that nanomanipulation by scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip is capable of assembling a wide range of topological defects in two-dimensional materials in a rather controllable and reproducible manner. We analyze two possibilities. In the first case the probe tip is retracted from the membrane while in the second case the tip is released beneath the membrane allowing graphene to freely relax and self-heal the pore made by the tip. The former approach with the tip rotation can be achieved experimentally by rotation of the sample, which is equivalent to rotation of the tip, whereas irradiation of the membrane by nanoclusters can be utilized for the latter approach. The latter one has the potential to yield a yet richer diversity of topological defects on account of a lesser determinacy. If successfully realized experimentally the concept proposed here could

  19. The efficacy of fat suppressed and gadolinium enhanced dynamic MR imaging in pancreatic adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabata, Toshifumi

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of both fat suppressed T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging (dynamic MRI) was compared with conventional MR sequences and dynamic CT in 22 patients with histologically proven pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC). In the control group of 30 patients without pancreatic disease, the pancreas was shown as a markedly higher signal intensity on fat suppressed T1WI than on conventional MR sequences. The signal noise ratio (SNR) of the normal pancreas and the contrast noise ratio (CNR) between the normal pancreas and muscle were significantly higher on fat suppressed T1WI than the other MR sequences. In the group of PAC patients without chronic pancreatitis (n=14), CNR between the tumor and the normal pancreas significantly differed among imaging techniques, including fat suppressed T1WI, dynamic MRI, and the other conventional MR sequences. In the group of PAC with chronic pancreatitis (n=8), CNR between the tumor and the associated chronic pancreatitis was remarkably diminished on both fat suppressed T1WI and conventional T1WI; however, it was significantly higher on dynamic MRI than the other pulse sequences. The early phase of dynamic MRI clearly identified the tumors in the group of PAC. The capability of conventional T1WI and dynamic CT to demonstrate peripancreatic tumor extension was significantly higher than that of fat suppressed T1WI. In conclusion, fat suppressed T1WI and dynamic MRI were useful in detecting pancreatic carcinoma. (N.K.)

  20. High contrast enhancement aspect of dynamic computed tomography with arterial infusion - DCT-AI. Its clinical applications on hepatic tumors and basic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Seishi; Iwasaki, Naoya; Matsumura, Yoshimitsu; Kuramae, Shigeru; Mishiro, Tadashi

    1983-06-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 112 cases possibly having hepatic tumors with intraarterial infusion of undiluted contrast into a selectively placed catheter following angiographies. Our dynamic program could evaluate not only early phase of enhancement but also late phase up to 120 sec. Reconstructed views from early scans and magnified views were very useful to evaluate minute sequential changes. Hepatic masses less than 5 cm in size were found in thirty-one cases. Patterns of tumor enhancement and time-density curves have been analysed to correlate them with histology. Four types of tumor enhancement were noted: (1) homogeneous (2) patchy (3) mottled (4) ringed. Characteristic changes were observed in hepatocellular carcinoma - HCC - (mostly mottled) and haemangioma (mostly patchy). The former was divided in two groups reflecting the cellular maturity. The metastatic tumor could be enhanced in a ringed form with dendritic pattern of supplying vascularities in some cases. To support the use of undiluted contrast and to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of high contrast enhancement, experiments were performed by taking transaxial views of an acrylic phantom immersed in different concentrations of contrast. Analysis of CT images taken at different HU values ranging from 0 to 450 demonstrated that the higher the concentration of contrast, the better the spatial resolution was. Also larger magnification could be expected by using higher concentration of contrast. Although our Dynamic Computed Tomography with Arterial Infusion of Contrast still has drawbacks and limited indications, we advocate it as a better way of enhancement to detect and evaluate the hepatic masses, which sometimes elude the examiner's grasp with conventional way of enhancement. (author).

  1. Diagnostic usefulness of segmental and linear enhancement in dynamic breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, N.; Leutner, C.; Schild, H.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic usefulness of ductal or segmental enhancement in dynamic breast MRI. Segmental and ductal enhancement have been established as the breast MRI hallmarks of intraductal breast cancer (DCIS); however, the positive predictive value of this imaging finding is still unknown. In our study, we analysed the overall prevalence of a segmental or a linear enhancement pattern on breast MRI for an unselected cohort of patients. The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of segmental or linear enhancement. Second, we asked whether biopsy was necessary also in the absence of mammographic findings suggestive of DCIS. Prospective, consecutive evaluation of 1,003 patients undergoing bilateral dynamic breast MRI. Studies were interpreted by two experienced breast radiologists. A diagnostic or screening two-view mammogram was available for all patients. Biopsy or short-term breast MRI follow-up was recommended for patients showing a segmental or a linear enhancement pattern on breast MRI. The patients' final diagnoses were established by imaging guided excisional or core biopsy or by clinical plus conventional imaging follow-up for a period of 2 years. The prevalence of segmental or linear enhancement was determined for patients with a final diagnosis of benign breast disease compared with those with a diagnosis of breast cancer. One hundred twenty patients had invasive breast cancer, 24 patients had DCIS and 859 patients had unsuspicious breast MRI or benign breast disease. A segmental or a linear enhancement pattern was found for 50/1,003 (5%) patients (17 DCIS, 33 benign breast diseases). Accordingly, the positive predictive value of segmental and linear enhancement is 34% (17/50); the specificity of this criterion is 96% (826/859). For 4/24 (17%) patients, DCIS was visible as segmental or linear enhancement on dynamic breast MRI, whereas no abnormalities were visible on the corresponding mammogram. The overall

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma: correlation with angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, J.; Huan, Y.; Wang, H.; Chang, Y.-J.; Zhao, H.-T.; Ge, Y.-L.; Liu, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the diagnostic and differential diagnostic values of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) in prostatic diseases, and to investigate the correlation between the parameters of SI-T curves and angiogenesis. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with proven prostatic carcinoma (Pca) and 29 patients with proven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were examined using DCE MRI. Diagnostic characteristics for differentiation were examined using threshold values for maximum peak time, enhancement degree, and enhancement rate. Then, the signal intensity-time curves (SI-T curves) were analysed, and the correlations between the parameters of SI-T curves and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvascular density (MVD) were investigated. All patients underwent prostatectomy. DCE MRI and histological findings were correlated. Results: Pca showed stronger enhancement with an earlier peak time, higher enhancement, and enhancement rate (p 2 = 13.57, P < 0.005). The VEGF and MVD expression levels of Pca were higher than those of BPH. Peak time was negatively correlated with the expression levels of VEGF and MVD, whereas the enhancement degree and enhancement rate showed positive correlations (Pearson correlation, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Based on T2-weighted imaging, DCE MRI curves can help to differentiate benign from malignant prostate tissue. In the present study the type C curve was rarely seen with malignant disease, but these results need confirmation

  4. Statistical Characteristics of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Enhancements During Geomagnetic Storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-R. Choi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements are known to cause various types of disturbances to the magnetosphere. In particular, dynamic pressure enhancements may affect the evolution of magnetic storms when they occur during storm times. In this paper, we have investigated the statistical significance and features of dynamic pressure enhancements during magnetic storm times. For the investigation, we have used a total of 91 geomagnetic storms for 2001-2003, for which the Dst minimum (Dst_min is below -50 nT. Also, we have imposed a set of selection criteria for a pressure enhancement to be considered an event: The main selection criterion is that the pressure increases by ≥50% or ≥3nPa within 30 min and remains to be elevated for 10 min or longer. For our statistical analysis, we define the storm time to be the interval from the main Dst decrease, through Dst_min, to the point where the Dst index recovers by 50%. Our main results are summarized as follows. (i ~81% of the studied storms indicate at least one event of pressure enhancements. When averaged over all the 91 storms, the occurrence rate is 4.5 pressure enhancement events per storm and 0.15 pressure enhancement events per hour. (ii The occurrence rate of the pressure enhancements is about three times higher for CME-driven storm times than for CIR-driven storm times. (iii Only 21.1% of the pressure enhancements show a clear association with an interplanetary shock. (iv A large number of the pressure enhancement events are accompanied with a simultaneous change of IMF By and/or Bz: For example, 73.5% of the pressure enhancement events are associated with an IMF change of either |∆Bz|>2nT or |∆By|>2nT. This last finding suggests that one should consider possible interplay effects between the simultaneous pressure and IMF changes in many situations.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the prostate. Comparison of two different post-processing algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyersdorff, Dirk; Franiel, T.; Luedemann, L.; Dietz, E.; Galler, D.; Marchot, P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a commercially available post-processing software tool for detecting prostate cancer on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the results to those obtained with a custom-made post-processing algorithm already tested under clinical conditions. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with proven prostate cancer were examined by standard MRI supplemented by dynamic contrast-enhanced dual susceptibility contrast (DCE-DSC) MRI prior to prostatectomy. A custom-made post-processing algorithm was used to analyze the MRI data sets and the results were compared to those obtained using a post-processing algorithm from Invivo Corporation (Dyna CAD for Prostate) applied to dynamic T 1-weighted images. Histology was used as the gold standard. Results: The sensitivity for prostate cancer detection was 78 % for the custom-made algorithm and 60 % for the commercial algorithm and the specificity was 79 % and 82 %, respectively. The accuracy was 79 % for our algorithm and 77.5 % for the commercial software tool. The chi-square test (McNemar-Bowker test) yielded no significant differences between the two tools (p = 0.06). Conclusion: The two investigated post-processing algorithms did not differ in terms of prostate cancer detection. The commercially available software tool allows reliable and fast analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the detection of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  6. Renal scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003790.htm Renal scan To use the sharing features on this ... anaphylaxis . Alternative Names Renogram; Kidney scan Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Chernecky CC, ...

  7. CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  8. An enhanced particle swarm optimization for dynamic economic dispatch problem considering valve-point loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriyanyong, P. [King Mongkut' s Univ. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Teacher Training in Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This paper described the use of an enhanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) model to address the problem of dynamic economic dispatch (DED). A modified heuristic search method was incorporated into the PSO model. Both smooth and non-smooth cost functions were considered. The enhanced PSO model not only utilized the basic PSO algorithm in order to seek the optimal solution for the DED problem, but it also used a modified heuristic method to deal with constraints and increase the possibility of finding a feasible solution. In order to validate the enhanced PSO model, it was used and tested on 10-unit systems considering both smooth and non-smooth cost functions characteristics. The experimental results were also compared to other methods. The proposed technique was found to be better than other approaches. The enhanced PSO model outperformed others with respect to quality, stability and reliability. 23 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  9. Improved accuracy of quantitative parameter estimates in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT study with low temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mo, E-mail: Sunmo.Kim@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Yeung, Ivan W. T. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 2P9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: A previously proposed method to reduce radiation dose to patient in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT is enhanced by principal component analysis (PCA) filtering which improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of time-concentration curves in the DCE-CT study. The efficacy of the combined method to maintain the accuracy of kinetic parameter estimates at low temporal resolution is investigated with pixel-by-pixel kinetic analysis of DCE-CT data. Methods: The method is based on DCE-CT scanning performed with low temporal resolution to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. The arterial input function (AIF) with high temporal resolution can be generated with a coarsely sampled AIF through a previously published method of AIF estimation. To increase the SNR of time-concentration curves (tissue curves), first, a region-of-interest is segmented into squares composed of 3 × 3 pixels in size. Subsequently, the PCA filtering combined with a fraction of residual information criterion is applied to all the segmented squares for further improvement of their SNRs. The proposed method was applied to each DCE-CT data set of a cohort of 14 patients at varying levels of down-sampling. The kinetic analyses using the modified Tofts’ model and singular value decomposition method, then, were carried out for each of the down-sampling schemes between the intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the measured data in high temporal resolution (i.e., original scanning frequency) as the reference. Results: The patients’ AIFs were estimated to high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases of arterial impulse responses established in the previous paper. In addition, noise in the images was effectively reduced by using five principal components of the tissue curves for filtering. Kinetic analyses using the proposed method showed superior results compared to those with down-sampling alone; they were able to maintain the accuracy in the

  10. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  11. Hydration Effects on Skin Microstructure as Probed by High-Resolution Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mechanistic Implications to Enhanced Transcutaneous Delivery of Biomacromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; Lawson, Louise B.; He, Jibao; Freytag, Lucia C.; Clements, John D.; John, Vijay T.

    2010-01-01

    Although hydration is long known to improve the permeability of skin, penetration of macromolecules such as proteins is limited and the understanding of enhanced transport is based on empirical observations. This study uses high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy to visualize microstructural changes in the stratum corneum (SC) and enable a mechanistic interpretation of biomacromolecule penetration through highly hydrated porcine skin. Swollen corneocytes, separation of lipid bilayers in the SC intercellular space to form cisternae, and networks of spherical particulates are observed in porcine skin tissue hydrated for a period of 4–10 h. This is explained through compaction of skin lipids when hydrated, a reversal in the conformational transition from unilamellar liposomes in lamellar granules to lamellae between keratinocytes when the SC skin barrier is initially established. Confocal microscopy studies show distinct enhancement in penetration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) through skin hydrated for 4–10 h, and limited penetration of FITC-BSA once skin is restored to its natively hydrated structure when exposed to the environment for 2–3 h. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a 4–10 h hydration period to enhance transcutaneous penetration of large biomacromolecules without permanently damaging the skin. PMID:19582754

  12. Quantum-Enhanced Sensing Based on Time Reversal of Nonlinear Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, D; Strobel, H; Muessel, W; Schulz, J; Lewis-Swan, R J; Kheruntsyan, K V; Oberthaler, M K

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear detection scheme exploiting time-reversal dynamics that disentangles continuous variable entangled states for feasible readout. Spin-exchange dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates is used as the nonlinear mechanism which not only generates entangled states but can also be time reversed by controlled phase imprinting. For demonstration of a quantum-enhanced measurement we construct an active atom SU(1,1) interferometer, where entangled state preparation and nonlinear readout both consist of parametric amplification. This scheme is capable of exhausting the quantum resource by detecting solely mean atom numbers. Controlled nonlinear transformations widen the spectrum of useful entangled states for applied quantum technologies.

  13. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for submucosal palatal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hara, Marina; Katase, Naoki; Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Konouchi, Hironobu; Takenobu, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) for differentiating between benign and malignant tumors in the palate. Materials and methods: 26 patients with submucosal palatal tumors were preoperatively examined using DCE-MRI. Their maximum contrast index (CImax), time of CImax (Tmax), and washout ratios (WR300 and WR600) were determined from contrast index curves. The submucosal palatal tumors were divided into two groups according to their Tmax values: the early enhancement group (Tmax 2 = 0.92, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Tmax is a useful parameter for distinguishing between benign and malignant submucosal palatal tumors.

  14. Independent component analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, T S [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Ave, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yang, X [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Ave, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Bisdas, S [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Lim, C C T [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore)

    2006-10-07

    Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography images of cerebral tumours to extract spatial component maps of the underlying vascular structures, which correspond to different haemodynamic phases as depicted by the passage of the contrast medium. The locations of arteries, veins and tumours can be separately identified on these spatial component maps. As the contrast enhancement behaviour of the cerebral tumour differs from the normal tissues, ICA yields a tumour component map that reveals the location and extent of the tumour. Tumour outlines can be generated using the tumour component maps, with relatively simple segmentation methods. (note)

  15. An off Axis Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer and a Rapid Scan Spectrometer with a Room-Temperature External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunchen; Kang, Cheolhwa; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-06-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a new type of mid-infrared tunable diode lasers with superior output power and mode quality. Recent developments, such as room temperature operation, wide frequency tunability, and narrow line width, make QCLs an ideal light source for high resolution spectroscopy. Two slit jet infrared spectrometers, namely an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption (CEA) spectrometer and a rapid scan spectrometer with an astigmatic multi-pass cell assembly, have been coupled with a newly purchased room temperature tunable mod-hop-free QCL with a frequency coverage from 1592 cm^{-1} to 1698 cm^{-1} and a scan rate of 0.1 cm^{-1}/ms. Our aim is to utilize these two sensitive spectrometers, that are equipped with a molecular jet expansion, to investigate the chiral molecules-(water)_n clusters. To demonstrate the resolution and sensitivity achieved, the rovibrational transitions of the static N_2O gas and the bending rovibrational transitions of the Ar-water complex, a test system, at 1634 cm^{-1} have been measured. D. Hofstetter and J. Faist in High performance quantum cascade lasers and their applications, Vol.89 Springer-Verlag Berlin & Heidelberg, 2003, pp. 61-98. Y. Xu, X. Liu, Z. Su, R. M. Kulkarni, W. S. Tam, C. Kang, I. Leonov and L. D'Agostino, Proc. Spie, 2009, 722208 (1-11). M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 106, 3078-3089.

  16. Pharmacokinetic analysis of Gd-DTPA enhancement in dynamic MR of breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, T.; Knopp, M.V.; Hoffmann, U.; Brix, G.; Junkermann, H.; Zuna, I.; Fournier, D. von; Kaick, G. van

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced MR of the breast was performed in one single slice in 27 patients with suspicious nodular lesions. The results could be histologically verified in all cases. A rapid spin-echo sequence with a time resolution of 8.75 s was used for the dynamic examination. The signal changes were analysed using a pharmacokinetic model which allowed parametrization of the contrast enhancement and transformation of the data into colour coded parameter images. The parameters allowed reliable distinction of 9 benign from 18 malignant lesions (p 21 ''). One fibroadenoma could not be distinguished from the carcinomas. Lymph node metastases and the pharmacokinetic parameter amplitude correlated significantly (p<0.05). (orig.)

  17. Variation of beam characteristics for physical and enhanced dynamic wedge from a dual energy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varatharaj, C.; Ravikumar, M.; Sathiyan, S.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2008-01-01

    The use of Megavoltage X-ray sources of radiation, with their skin-sparing qualities in radiation therapy has been a boon in relieving patient discomfort and allowing higher tumor doses to be given with fewer restrictions due to radiation effects in the skin. The aim of this study was to compare few of the dosimetric characteristics of a physical and enhanced dynamic wedge from a dual energy (6-18 MV) linear accelerator

  18. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Jeroen J. N.; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Vos, Frans M.

    2017-01-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal

  19. Dynamic Displays Enhance the Ability to Discriminate Genuine and Posed Facial Expressions of Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Shushi; Kabir, Russell S.; Miyatani, Makoto; Nakao, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Accurately gauging the emotional experience of another person is important for navigating interpersonal interactions. This study investigated whether perceivers are capable of distinguishing between unintentionally expressed (genuine) and intentionally manipulated (posed) facial expressions attributed to four major emotions: amusement, disgust, sadness, and surprise. Sensitivity to this discrimination was explored by comparing unstaged dynamic and static facial stimuli and analyzing the results with signal detection theory. Participants indicated whether facial stimuli presented on a screen depicted a person showing a given emotion and whether that person was feeling a given emotion. The results showed that genuine displays were evaluated more as felt expressions than posed displays for all target emotions presented. In addition, sensitivity to the perception of emotional experience, or discriminability, was enhanced in dynamic facial displays, but was less pronounced in the case of static displays. This finding indicates that dynamic information in facial displays contributes to the ability to accurately infer the emotional experiences of another person. PMID:29896135

  20. Transcription factor assisted loading and enhancer dynamics dictate the hepatic fasting response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ido; Baek, Songjoon; Presman, Diego M.; Paakinaho, Ville; Swinstead, Erin E.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting elicits transcriptional programs in hepatocytes leading to glucose and ketone production. This transcriptional program is regulated by many transcription factors (TFs). To understand how this complex network regulates the metabolic response to fasting, we aimed at isolating the enhancers and TFs dictating it. Measuring chromatin accessibility revealed that fasting massively reorganizes liver chromatin, exposing numerous fasting-induced enhancers. By utilizing computational methods in combination with dissecting enhancer features and TF cistromes, we implicated four key TFs regulating the fasting response: glucocorticoid receptor (GR), cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB). These TFs regulate fuel production by two distinctly operating modules, each controlling a separate metabolic pathway. The gluconeogenic module operates through assisted loading, whereby GR doubles the number of sites occupied by CREB1 as well as enhances CREB1 binding intensity and increases accessibility of CREB1 binding sites. Importantly, this GR-assisted CREB1 binding was enhancer-selective and did not affect all CREB1-bound enhancers. Single-molecule tracking revealed that GR increases the number and DNA residence time of a portion of chromatin-bound CREB1 molecules. These events collectively result in rapid synergistic gene expression and higher hepatic glucose production. Conversely, the ketogenic module operates via a GR-induced TF cascade, whereby PPARA levels are increased following GR activation, facilitating gradual enhancer maturation next to PPARA target genes and delayed ketogenic gene expression. Our findings reveal a complex network of enhancers and TFs that dynamically cooperate to restore homeostasis upon fasting. PMID:28031249

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Håkon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfør, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile–time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile–time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile–time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile–time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile–time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  2. Regeneration of Achilles' tendon: the role of dynamic stimulation for enhanced cell proliferation and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongman; Guarino, Vincenzo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Tae, Giyoong; Kim, Young Ha; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The tissue engineering of tendon was studied using highly elastic poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds and focusing on the effect of dynamic tensile stimulation. Tenocytes from rabbit Achilles tendon were seeded (1.0 x 10(6) cells/scaffold) onto porous PLCL scaffolds and cultured for periods of 2 weeks and 4 weeks. This was performed in a static system and also in a bioreactor equipped with tensile modulation which mimicked the environmental surroundings of tendons with respect to tensile extension. The degradation of the polymeric scaffolds during the culture was relatively slow. However, there was an indication that cells accelerated the degradation of PLCL scaffolds. The scaffold/cell adducts from the static culture exhibited inferior strength (at 2 weeks 350 kPa, 4 weeks 300 kPa) compared to the control without cells (at 2 weeks 460 kPa, 4 weeks 340 kPa), indicating that the cells contributed to the enhanced degradation. On the contrary, the corresponding values of the adducts from the dynamic culture (at 2 weeks 430 kPa, 4 weeks 370 kPa) were similar to, or higher than, those from the control. This could be explained by the increased quantity of cells and neo-tissues in the case of dynamic culture compensating for the loss in tensile strength. Compared with static and dynamic culture conditions, mechanical stimulation played a crucial role in the regeneration of tendon tissue. In the case of the dynamic culture system, cell proliferation was enhanced and secretion of collagen type I was increased, as evidenced by DNA assay and histological and immunofluorescence analysis. Thus, tendon regeneration, indicated by improved mechanical and biological properties, was demonstrated, confirming the effect of mechanical stimulation. It could be concluded that the dynamic tensile stimulation appeared to be an essential factor in tendon/ligament tissue engineering, and that elastic PLCL co-polymers could be very beneficial in this process.

  3. Computed tomography scans of metastatic hepatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nemoto, Yutaka [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography scans of 114 metastatic hepatic tumors were reviewed. Central low density was found in 82 cases (71.9%) and seems to be characteristic to metastatic hepatic tumors. Dynamic CT was performed on 34 cases, and 21 (61.8%) of these had ring enhancement at the arterial phase. Most of metastatic hepatic tumors could be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma. However, metastatic hepatic tumors from renal cell carcinoma, renal rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma and leiomyosarcoma could not be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma, even with use of dynamic study.

  4. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Stockburger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer’s disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  5. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Carola; Miano, Davide; Pallas, Thea; Friedland, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  6. Differentiation of recurrent breast cancer from radiation fibrosis with dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.H.; Campana, F.; Fourquet, A.; Rahmouni, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the ability of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate radiation fibrosis from tumor recurrence of breast cancer after conservative treatment. Twenty-five women with previous breast cancer treated with radiation therapy underwent MR imaging examination. Tumor recurrence was suspected on palpation of masses (18 cases) or at mammography (7 cases). The MR imaging protocol was performed on a 0.5-T imager with a breast coil and included T1 and T2 spin-echo, short To inversion recovery (STIR), and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequenced to evaluate the hemokinetics of the lesion. Ratios of signal intensity of suspected lesions to that of fat, surrounding breast gland, and background noise were calculated. Percutaneous biopsies were performed in all cases after MR imaging. Curves of signal-to-noise ratio of recurrences (5 cases) showed an early enhancement within the first minutes after injection, although localized fibrosis (20 cases) was not significantly enhanced. T2 and STIR sequences were not contributive in differentiating fibrosis from tumor recurrence

  7. Geosynchronous magnetic field responses to fast solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements: MHD field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Sun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed global MHD simulations of the geosynchronous magnetic field in response to fast solar wind dynamic pressure (Pd enhancements. Taking three Pd enhancement events in 2000 as examples, we found that the main features of the total field B and the dominant component Bz can be efficiently predicted by the MHD model. The predicted B and Bz varies with local time, with the highest level near noon and a slightly lower level around mid-night. However, it is more challenging to accurately predict the responses of the smaller component at the geosynchronous orbit (i.e., Bx and By. In contrast, the limitations of T01 model in predicting responses to fast Pd enhancements are presented.

  8. Dynamic placement of plasmonic hotspots for super-resolution surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertsgaard, Christopher T; McKoskey, Rachel M; Rich, Isabel S; Lindquist, Nathan C

    2014-10-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic placement of locally enhanced plasmonic fields using holographic laser illumination of a silver nanohole array. To visualize these focused "hotspots", the silver surface was coated with various biological samples for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging. Due to the large field enhancements, blinking behavior of the SERS hotspots was observed and processed using a stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy algorithm enabling super-resolution localization of the hotspots to within 10 nm. These hotspots were then shifted across the surface in subwavelength (hotspots. Using this technique, we also show that such subwavelength shifting and localization of plasmonic hotspots has potential for imaging applications. Interestingly, illuminating the surface with randomly shifting SERS hotspots was sufficient to completely fill in a wide field of view for super-resolution chemical imaging.

  9. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients...

  10. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  11. Quantitative evaluation of contrast agent uptake in standard fat-suppressed dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Smith, Joely; Ledger, Araminta E; Scurr, Erica; Allen, Steven; Wilson, Robin M; O'Flynn, Elizabeth; Pope, Romney J E; Leach, Martin O; Schmidt, Maria A

    2018-01-01

    To propose a method to quantify T 1 and contrast agent uptake in breast dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) examinations undertaken with standard clinical fat-suppressed MRI sequences and to demonstrate the proposed approach by comparing the enhancement characteristics of lobular and ductal carcinomas. A standard fat-suppressed DCE of the breast was performed at 1.5 T (Siemens Aera), followed by the acquisition of a proton density (PD)-weighted sequence, also fat suppressed. Both sequences were characterized with test objects (T 1 ranging from 30 ms to 2,400 ms) and calibration curves were obtained to enable T 1 calculation. The reproducibility and accuracy of the calibration curves were also investigated. Healthy volunteers and patients were scanned with Ethics Committee approval. The effect of B 0 field inhomogeneity was assessed in test objects and healthy volunteers. The T 1 of breast tumors was calculated at different time points (pre-, peak-, and post-contrast agent administration) for 20 patients, pre-treatment (10 lobular and 10 ductal carcinomas) and the two cancer types were compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). The calibration curves proved to be highly reproducible (coefficient of variation under 10%). T 1 measurements were affected by B 0 field inhomogeneity, but frequency shifts below 50 Hz introduced only 3% change to fat-suppressed T 1 measurements of breast parenchyma in volunteers. The values of T 1 measured pre-, peak-, and post-contrast agent administration demonstrated that the dynamic range of the DCE sequence was correct, that is, image intensity is approximately directly proportional to 1/T 1 for that range. Significant differences were identified in the width of the distributions of the post-contrast T 1 values between lobular and ductal carcinomas (P contrast T 1 values, potentially related to their infiltrative growth pattern. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of fat-suppressed T 1 measurements as a tool for clinical studies. The

  12. Dopamine Dynamics during Continuous Intracranial Self-Stimulation: Effect of Waveform on Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine is heavily implicated in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Many drugs of abuse that affect ICSS behavior target the dopaminergic system, and optogenetic activation of dopamine neurons is sufficient to support self-stimulation. However, the patterns of phasic dopamine release during ICSS remain unclear. Early ICSS studies using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) rarely observed phasic dopamine release, which led to the surprising conclusion that it is dissociated from ICSS. However, several advances in the sensitivity (i.e., the use of waveforms with extended anodic limits) and analysis (i.e., principal component regression) of FSCV measurements have made it possible to detect smaller, yet physiologically relevant, dopamine release events. Therefore, this study revisits phasic dopamine release during ICSS using these tools. It was found that the anodic limit of the voltammetric waveform has a substantial effect on the patterns of dopamine release observed during continuous ICSS. While data collected with low anodic limits (i.e., +1.0 V) support the disappearance of phasic dopamine release observed in previous investigation, the use of high anodic limits (+1.3 V, +1.4 V) allows for continual detection of dopamine release throughout ICSS. However, the +1.4 V waveform lacks the ability to resolve narrowly spaced events, with the best balance of temporal resolution and sensitivity provided by the +1.3 V waveform. Ultimately, it is revealed that the amplitude of phasic dopamine release decays but does not fully disappear during continuous ICSS. PMID:27548680

  13. Dynamic enhanced MRI of the subacromial bursa: correlation with arthroscopic and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, S.; Yoneda, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Fukushima, S.; Wakitani, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess dynamic MRI with Gd-DTPA enhancement for evaluating inflammatory changes in the subacromial bursa. Design and patients: We detected the signal intensity changes in dynamic MRI of the subacromial bursa, and confirmed these macroscopically by arthroscopy and histologically. The signal intensity was measured using built-in software, and the enhancement ratio (E ratio) was calculated from dynamic MR images. In addition, as a parameter of the rate of the increase in the signal intensity from 0 to 80 s, the mean increase per second in the E ratio was obtained as the coefficient of enhancement (CE). The correlation was studied of the E ratio and CE with the arthroscopic findings (redness, villous formation, thickening and adhesion), and of the E ratio and CE with the histological findings (capillary proliferation, papillary hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration) of the subacromial bursa. Of patients with shoulder pain, this study included those with rotator cuff injury; patients with rheumatoid arthritis or pitching shoulder disorders were excluded. There were 27 patients (15 men, 12 women) ranging in age from 25 to 73 years (mean 49.1 years). Dynamic MRI of the shoulder was also performed on the healthy side of 10 patients and in five normal young volunteers. Results and conclusions: Changes in signal intensity on dynamic MRI were measured in the subacromial bursa. The E ratio (80 s) and CE (0-80 s) were significantly correlated with redness and villous formation as arthroscopic findings, positively correlated with capillary proliferation and papillary hyperplasia as histological findings (p < 0.05), and negatively correlated with fibrosis as a histological finding (p < 0.05) in the subacromial bursa. The patterns of dynamic curves were well correlated with the bursoscopic and histological findings of the synovium of the subacromial bursa. Dynamic MRI appears to correlate with inflammatory activity of synovium of the subacromial

  14. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Thomas F; Dannatt, Hugh R W; Barrow, Nathan S; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P; Newton, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to (1)H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlative Study of Angiogenesis and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.; Gao, Z.Q.; Yan, X.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the correlation between contrast-enhancement patterns on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and angiogenesis by analyzing microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and P53 protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material and Methods: MRI was performed with a GE Signa 5T MR scanner using SE and FMPSPGR sequences in 30 patients (38 lesions) during the period October 1998 to March 2000. All had histopathologically proven HCC. MR images were reviewed/analyzed retrospectively. The 30 patients were between 35 and 65 years of age. SE T1WI, PDWI, and T2WI were acquired initially. The FMPSPGR sequence was acquired in the same position. The DCE-MRI was performed in the arterial, portal vein, and delay phase after a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. The specimens were stained immunohistochemically for CD34, VEGF, and P53. MVD was highlighted by anti-CD34 antibody staining. The enhancement features of HCC lesions were studied correlatively with the tumor MVD, VEGF, and P53 expression at protein level. Results: In the arterial phase, the results showed that MVD of HCC in the high-enhancement group (229.76±80.96) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (173.09±61.38) and low-enhancement groups (153.00±108.58) (P <0.01, respectively). VEGF expression of HCC in the high-enhancement group (68.42%) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (36.36%) and low-enhancement groups (38.89%) (P <0.05, respectively). In the portal vein phase, MVD of HCC in the enhancement group (259.80±93.30) was higher than that in the non-enhancement group (178.64±92.65) (P <0.05). No significant correlation was found between VEGF expression and the enhancement feature in the portal vein phase. In the delay phase, MVD of HCC in the ring-enhancement group (269.06±57.89) was significantly higher than that in the non-ring-enhancement group (144.10±88.90) (P <0.01). There was a significant difference in VEGF

  16. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Zhongqi; Yu, Huimei; Cui, Ni; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei; Wu, Yao; Sun, Liankun; Wang, Guangyi

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy

  17. Dynamic iterative beam hardening correction (DIBHC) in myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrie, Marc

    2010-06-01

    In cardiac perfusion examinations with computed tomography (CT) large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle and in the descending aorta cause beam hardening artifacts that can lead to incorrect perfusion parameters. The aim of this study is to reduce these artifacts by performing an iterative correction and by accounting for the 3 materials soft tissue, bone, and iodine. Beam hardening corrections are either implemented as simple precorrections which cannot account for higher order beam hardening effects, or as iterative approaches that are based on segmenting the original image into material distribution images. Conventional segmentation algorithms fail to clearly distinguish between iodine and bone. Our new algorithm, DIBHC, calculates the time-dependent iodine distribution by analyzing the voxel changes of a cardiac perfusion examination (typically N approximately 15 electrocardiogram-correlated scans distributed over a total scan time up to T approximately 30 s). These voxel dynamics are due to changes in contrast agent. This prior information allows to precisely distinguish between bone and iodine and is key to DIBHC where each iteration consists of a multimaterial (soft tissue, bone, iodine) polychromatic forward projection, a raw data comparison and a filtered backprojection. Simulations with a semi-anthropomorphic dynamic phantom and clinical scans using a dual source CT scanner with 2 x 128 slices, a tube voltage of 100 kV, a tube current of 180 mAs, and a rotation time of 0.28 seconds have been carried out. The uncorrected images suffer from beam hardening artifacts that appear as dark bands connecting large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle, aorta, and bony structures. The CT-values of the affected tissue are usually underestimated by roughly 20 HU although deviations of up to 61 HU have been observed. For a quantitative evaluation circular regions of interest have been analyzed. After application of DIBHC the mean values obtained deviate by

  18. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the differential diagnosis of adrenal adenomas and malignant adrenal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Anik, Yonca; Balci, N. Cem; Demirci, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of dynamic MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of adrenal adenomas and malignant tumors, especially in cases with atypical adenomas. Materials and methods: Sixty-four masses (48 adenomas, 16 malignant tumors) were included in this prospective study. Signal loss of masses was evaluated using chemical shift MR imaging. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, with the acquisition starting simultaneously with i.v. contrast administration (0-100 s) followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minute). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained according to the SIs on the 0th, 25th, 50th 75th and 100th second. Also, the wash-in rate, maximum relative enhancement, time-to-peak, and wash-out of contrast at 100 s of masses in both groups were calculated. The statistical significance was determined by Mann-Whitney U test. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of the quantitative tests, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Chemical shift MR imaging was able to differentiate 44 out of 48 adenomas (91.7%) from non-adenomas. The 4 adenomas (8.3%) which could not be differentiated from non-adenomas by this technique did not exhibit signal loss on out-of-phase images. With a cut-off value of 30, SI indices of adenomas had a sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 100% and a positive predictive value of 100%. On visual evaluation of dynamic MR imaging, early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 75% and punctate in 20,83% of the adenomas; while patchy in 56.25% and peripheral in 25% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images 58.33% of the adenomas showed peripheral ring-shaped enhancement and 10.41% showed heterogeneous enhancement. All of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous

  19. SU-D-303-03: Impact of Uncertainty in T1 Measurements On Quantification of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryal, M; Cao, Y [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI requires native longitudinal relaxation time (T1) measurement. This study aimed to assess uncertainty in T1 measurements using two different methods. Methods and Materials: Brain MRI scans were performed on a 3T scanner in 9 patients who had low grade/benign tumors and partial brain radiotherapy without chemotherapy at pre-RT, week-3 during RT (wk-3), end-RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. T1-weighted images were acquired using gradient echo sequences with 1) 2 different flip angles (50 and 150), and 2) 5 variable TRs (100–2000ms). After creating quantitative T1 maps, average T1 was calculated in regions of interest (ROI), which were distant from tumors and received a total of accumulated radiation doses < 5 Gy at wk-3. ROIs included left and right normal Putamen and Thalamus (gray matter: GM), and frontal and parietal white matter (WM). Since there were no significant or even a trend of T1 changes from pre-RT to wk-3 in these ROIs, a relative repeatability coefficient (RC) of T1 as a measure of uncertainty was estimated in each ROI using the data pre-RT and at wk-3. The individual T1 changes at later time points were evaluated compared to the estimated RCs. Results: The 2-flip angle method produced small RCs in GM (9.7–11.7%) but large RCs in WM (12.2–13.6%) compared to the saturation-recovery (SR) method (11.0–17.7% for GM and 7.5–11.2% for WM). More than 81% of individual T1 changes were within T1 uncertainty ranges defined by RCs. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the impact of T1 uncertainty on physiological parameters derived from DCE MRI is not negligible. A short scan with 2 flip angles is able to achieve repeatability of T1 estimates similar to a long scan with 5 different TRs, and is desirable to be integrated in the DCE protocol. Present study was supported by National Institute of Health (NIH) under grant numbers; UO1 CA183848 and RO1 NS064973.

  20. Cooperative scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zukowski (Marcin); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractData mining, information retrieval and other application areas exhibit a query load with multiple concurrent queries touching a large fraction of a relation. This leads to individual query plans based on a table scan or large index scan. The implementation of this access path in most

  1. Scan-rate and vacuum pressure dependence of the nucleation and growth dynamics in a spin-crossover single crystal: the role of latent heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Rat, Sylvain; Salmon, Lionel; Nicolazzi, William; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2018-04-04

    Using optical microscopy we studied the vacuum pressure dependence (0.1-1000 mbar) of the nucleation and growth dynamics of the thermally induced first-order spin transition in a single crystal of the spin-crossover compound [Fe(HB(tz)3)2] (tz = 1,2,4-triazol-1-yl). A crossover between a quasi-static hysteresis regime and a temperature-scan-rate-dependent kinetic regime is evidenced around 5 mbar due to the change of the heat exchange coupling between the crystal and its external environment. Remarkably, the absorption/dissipation rate of latent heat was identified as the key factor limiting the switching speed of the crystal.

  2. Apparent diffusion coefficient values and dynamic contrast enhancement patterns in differentiating seminomas from nonseminomatous testicular neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsili, Athina C.; Sylakos, Anastasios; Ntorkou, Alexandra; Stavrou, Sotirios; Astrakas, Loukas G.; Sofikitis, Nikolaos; Argyropoulou, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Functional MRI in the characterization of testicular germ cell tumors was assessed. • ADC values proved useful in the characterization of testicular germ cell tumors. • Testicular germ cell tumors had similar enhancement patterns of dynamic MRI. - Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate the role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) patterns in differentiating seminomas from nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). Materials and methods: The MRI examinations of the scrotum of 26 men with histologically proven testicular GCTs were reviewed. DWI was performed in all patients, using a single shot, multi-slice spin-echo planar diffusion pulse sequence and b-values of 0 and 900 s/mm 2 . Subtraction DCE-MRI was performed in 20 cases using a 3D fast-field echo sequence after gadolinium administration. Time-signal intensity curves were created and semi-quantitative parameters (peak enhancement, time to peak, wash-in and wash-out rate) were calculated. The Student's t-test was used to compare the mean values of ADC, peak enhancement, time to peak, wash-in and wash-out rate between seminomas and NSGCTs. ROC analysis was also performed. Results: Histopathology disclosed the presence of 15 seminomas and 11 NSGCTs. The mean ± s.d. of ADC values (× 10 −3 mm 2 /s) of seminomas (0.59 ± 0.009) were significantly lower than those of NSGCTs (0.90 ± 0.33) (P = 0.01). The optimal ADC cut-off value was 0.68 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s. No differences between the two groups were observed for peak enhancement (P = 0.18), time to peak (P = 0.63) wash-in rate (P = 0.32) and wash-out rate (P = 0.18). Conclusions: ADC values may be used to preoperatively differentiate seminomas from NSGCTs

  3. Quadrant Dynamic with Automatic Plateau Limit Histogram Equalization for Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jagatheeswari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental and important preprocessing stage in image processing is the image contrast enhancement technique. Histogram equalization is an effective contrast enhancement technique. In this paper, a histogram equalization based technique called quadrant dynamic with automatic plateau limit histogram equalization (QDAPLHE is introduced. In this method, a hybrid of dynamic and clipped histogram equalization methods are used to increase the brightness preservation and to reduce the overenhancement. Initially, the proposed QDAPLHE algorithm passes the input image through a median filter to remove the noises present in the image. Then the histogram of the filtered image is divided into four subhistograms while maintaining second separated point as the mean brightness. Then the clipping process is implemented by calculating automatically the plateau limit as the clipped level. The clipped portion of the histogram is modified to reduce the loss of image intensity value. Finally the clipped portion is redistributed uniformly to the entire dynamic range and the conventional histogram equalization is executed in each subhistogram independently. Based on the qualitative and the quantitative analysis, the QDAPLHE method outperforms some existing methods in literature.

  4. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions.

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Wartski, Myriam [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Cherel, Pascal [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Radiologie, Saint-Cloud (France); Bellet, Dominique [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de medecine, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2013-08-15

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 {+-} 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 {+-} 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 {+-} 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  6. Dynamic contrast enhancement in widefield microscopy using projector-generated illumination patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, Edward Carlo; Blanca, Carlo Mar

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical protocol to realize contrast-enhancement imaging (such as dark-field, optical-staining and oblique illumination microscopy) of transparent samples on a conventional widefield microscope using commercial multimedia projectors. The projector functions as both light source and mask generator implemented by creating slideshows of the filters projected along the illumination planes of the microscope. The projected optical masks spatially modulate the distribution of the incident light to selectively enhance structures within the sample according to spatial frequency thereby increasing the image contrast of translucent biological specimens. Any amplitude filter can be customized and dynamically controlled so that switching from one imaging modality to another involves a simple slide transition and can be executed at a keystroke with no physical filters and no moving optical parts. The method yields an image contrast of 89-96% comparable with standard enhancement techniques. The polarization properties of the projector are then utilized to discriminate birefringent and non-birefringent sites on the sample using single-shot, simultaneous polarization and optical-staining microscopy. In addition to dynamic pattern generation and polarization, the projector also provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity through its red-green-blue (RGB) channels. We exploit this last property to explore the feasibility of using video projectors to selectively excite stained samples and perform fluorescence imaging in tandem with reflectance and polarization reflectance microscopy

  7. Characterization of breast masses by dynamic enhanced MR imaging. A logistic regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, O.; Morishita, S.; Kido, T.; Kitajima, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Okamura, K.; Fukuda, S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To identify features useful for differentiation between malignant and benign breast neoplasms using multivariate analysis of findings by MR imaging. Material and Methods: In a retrospective analysis, 61 patients with 64 breast masses underwent MR imaging and the time-signal intensity curves for precontrast dynamic postcontrast images were quantitatively analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using a logistic regression model, which was prospectively tested in another 34 patients with suspected breast masses. Results: Univariate analysis revealed that the reliable indicators for malignancy were first the appearance of the tumor border, followed by the washout ratio, internal architecture after contrast enhancement, and peak time. The factors significantly associated with malignancy were irregular tumor border, followed by washout ratio, internal architecture, and peak time. For differentiation between benignity and malignancy, the maximum cut-off point was to be found between 0.47 and 0.51. In a prospective application of this model, 91% of the lesions were accurately discriminated as benign or malignant lesions. Conclusion: Combination of contrast-enhanced dynamic and postcontrast-enhanced MR imaging provided accurate data for the diagnosis of malignant neoplasms of the breast. The model had an accuracy of 91% (sensitivity 90%, specificity 93%). (orig.)

  8. Observation of Dynamic Interfacial Layers in Li-Ion and Li-O_2 Batteries by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bülter, Heinz; Schwager, Patrick; Fenske, Daniela; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Imaging changes of solid electrolyte interphases on rinsed lithiated graphite. • Strongly non-uniform changes of SEI passivation properties. • In situ imaging of clogged gas diffusion electrodes of Li/O_2 batteries. - Abstract: The requirements of high energy density in modern batteries dictate the use of very high (oxidizing) or very low (reducing) potential for negative and positive electrode materials. These extreme potentials can cause molecular compounds to undergo electron transfer reactions at the interfaces. This is well documented for lithium-ion batteries, where a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) between the lithiated graphite electrode and the electrolyte is formed by the decomposition of electrolyte components mainly during the first charging process. Characterization of the SEI is a challenge because of the variety of chemically similar components and enclosed electrolyte species. Furthermore, ex situ analysis of the SEI requires separation and isolation of the SEI, which may change the content and the structure of the SEI. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provides in situ analysis of passivating layers formed at battery electrodes. Such approaches must deal with continuous changes of the studied interfaces. This is illustrated for the in situ investigation of the electron transport at SEI-covered lithiated graphite using 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxy benzene as SECM mediator in an inert atmosphere. With this setup, the influence of rinsing protocols on the passivating properties of the SEI was studied. An extensive rinsing compared to our previous studies [DOI 10.1002/anie.201403935] leads to much higher local variation of the SEI passivation properties which continue over the entire observation time of 54 h. The second example uses a SECM generation-collection experiment to detect gas permeation through a gas-diffusion electrode (GDE) of a Li-O_2 cell into a Li"+-containing organic electrolyte. The passivation of the

  9. Differentiation between early rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy persons by conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Ejbjerg, B J; Hetland, M L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameter that best differentiates healthy persons and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigated responsiveness to treatment of various MRI parameters. METHOD: Conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE...

  10. Transient Dynamics Simulation of Airflow in a CT-Scanned Human Airway Tree: More or Fewer Terminal Bronchi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouliang Qi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD method, the feasibility of simulating transient airflow in a CT-based airway tree with more than 100 outlets for a whole respiratory period is studied, and the influence of truncations of terminal bronchi on CFD characteristics is investigated. After an airway model with 122 outlets is extracted from CT images, the transient airflow is simulated. Spatial and temporal variations of flow velocity, wall pressure, and wall shear stress are presented; the flow pattern and lobar distribution of air are gotten as well. All results are compared with those of a truncated model with 22 outlets. It is found that the flow pattern shows lobar heterogeneity that the near-wall air in the trachea is inhaled into the upper lobe while the center flow enters the other lobes, and the lobar distribution of air is significantly correlated with the outlet area ratio. The truncation decreases airflow to right and left upper lobes and increases the deviation of airflow distributions between inspiration and expiration. Simulating the transient airflow in an airway tree model with 122 bronchi using CFD is feasible. The model with more terminal bronchi decreases the difference between the lobar distributions at inspiration and at expiration.

  11. Collateral Ventilation to Congenital Hyperlucent Lung Lesions Assessed on Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: an Initial Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug; Park, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the resistance to collateral ventilation in congenital hyperlucent lung lesions and to correlate that with the anatomic findings on xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Materials and Methods Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT was successfully and safely performed in eight children (median age: 5.5 years, 4 boys and 4 girls) with congenital hyperlucent lung lesions. Functional assessment of the lung lesions on the xenon map was done, including performing a ...

  12. Dynamic gradient descent learning algorithms for enhanced empirical modeling of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Atiya, Amir; Chong, K.T.

    1991-01-01

    A newly developed dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm is used to train a recurrent multilayer perceptron network for use in empirical modeling of power plants. The two main advantages of the proposed learning algorithm are its ability to consider past error gradient information for future use and the two forward passes associated with its implementation, instead of one forward and one backward pass of the backpropagation algorithm. The latter advantage results in computational time saving because both passes can be performed simultaneously. The dynamic learning algorithm is used to train a hybrid feedforward/feedback neural network, a recurrent multilayer perceptron, which was previously found to exhibit good interpolation and extrapolation capabilities in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. One of the drawbacks, however, of the previously reported work has been the long training times associated with accurate empirical models. The enhanced learning capabilities provided by the dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm are demonstrated by a case study of a steam power plant. The number of iterations required for accurate empirical modeling has been reduced from tens of thousands to hundreds, thus significantly expediting the learning process

  13. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI evaluation of porcine femoral head ischemia and reperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T. [Clinic for Orthopaedics and Sports Traumatology, Dreifaltigkeits-Krankenhaus GmbH, Aachener Str. 445-449, 50933 Koeln (Germany); Drescher, W. [Department of Orthopaedics, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany); Becker, C. [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sangill, R.; Stoedkilde-Joergensen, H. [Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tomography, University of Aarhus, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Heydthausen, M. [Computing Center, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hansen, E.S.; Buenger, C. [Spine Section, Department of Orthopaedics, University of Aarhus (Denmark)

    2003-02-01

    To examine the potential of gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced dynamic MRI in the detection of early femoral head ischemia. Furthermore, to apply a three-compartment model to achieve a clinically applicable MR index for femoral head perfusion during the steady state and arterial hip joint tamponade.Design and materials In a porcine model femoral head perfusion was measured by radioactive tracer microspheres and by using a dynamic Gd-enhanced MRI protocol. Femoral head perfusion measurements and MRI tests were performed unilaterally before, during and after the experimentally induced ischemia of one of the hip joints. Ischemia was induced by increasing intra-articular pressure to 250 mmHg. All pigs showed ischemia of the femoral head epiphysis under hip joint tamponade followed by reperfusion to the same level as before joint tamponade. In two cases perfusion after removal of tamponade continued to be low. In dynamic MRI measurements increases in signal intensity were seen after intravenous infusion of Gd-DTPA, followed by a slow decrease in signal intensity. The signal-intensity curve during femoral head ischemia had a minor increase. Also the coefficient determined was a helpful indicator of femoral head ischemia. Femoral head blood flow as measured by microspheres fell significantly under joint tamponade. Early detection of this disturbed regional blood flow was possible using a dynamic MRI procedure. A biomathematical model resulted from the evaluation of the intervals of signal intensity over time which allows detection of bone blood flow changes at a very early stage. Using this new method earlier detection of femoral head necrosis may be possible. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of dynamic enhancement of natural convection cooling by a discrete vibrating plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, L.A.; Harnoy, A. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Newark, NJ (United States)

    2006-12-15

    A dynamic means of locally enhancing laminar natural convection cooling in a vertical channel through the localized application of fluid oscillations is numerically investigated. The two-dimensional system considered for these purposes is a vertical channel with a small transversely oscillating plate placed near a constant heat flux channel wall. The flow and heat transfer in the system resulting from the combined effects of the natural convection and the oscillating plate were determined. The results indicate that for displacement amplitudes of at least one-third of the mean spacing and with dimensionless frequencies (Re/{radical}(Gr)) of at least 2{pi}, the local heat transfer coefficient can be enhanced by as much as 41%. (orig.)

  15. Gaussian process inference for estimating pharmacokinetic parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Liu, Peter; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new pharmacokinetic model for parameter estimation of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI by using Gaussian process inference. Our model is based on the Tofts dual-compartment model for the description of tracer kinetics and the observed time series from DCE-MRI is treated as a Gaussian stochastic process. The parameter estimation is done through a maximum likelihood approach and we propose a variant of the coordinate descent method to solve this likelihood maximization problem. The new model was shown to outperform a baseline method on simulated data. Parametric maps generated on prostate DCE data with the new model also provided better enhancement of tumors, lower intensity on false positives, and better boundary delineation when compared with the baseline method. New statistical parameter maps from the process model were also found to be informative, particularly when paired with the PK parameter maps.

  16. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva; Viger-Gravel, Jasmine; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Samantaray, Manoja; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Gurinov, Andrei; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Enhancing Passenger Cabin Comfort Using PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purusothaman, M.; Valarmathi, T. N.; Dada Mohammad, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine a cost effective way to enhance passenger cabin comfort by analyzing the effect of solar radiation of a open parked vehicle, which is exposed to constant solar radiation on a hot and sunny day. Maximum heat accumulation occurs in the car cabin due to the solar radiation. By means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, a simulation process is conducted for the thermal regulation of the passenger cabin using a layer of phase change material (PCM) on the roof structure of a stationary car when exposed to ambient temperature on a hot sunny day. The heat energy accumulated in the passenger cabin is absorbed by a layer of PCM for phase change process. The installation of a ventilation system which uses an exhaust fan to create a natural convection scenario in the cabin is also considered to enhance passenger comfort along with PCM.

  18. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  19. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in active and inactive immunoinflammatory gonarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Lorenzen, I; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    examined 16 clinically active (CAG), 7 clinically inactive (CIG) and 4 healthy knees. The synovium of a preselected slice was outlined. Its area and relative signal intensity increase after gadopentetate dimeglumine on T1-SE and FLASH (at each time t) were calculated. The CAG knees showed a mean signal...... intensity increase on early dynamic FLASH images higher by far than the CIG knees, while no significant difference was found on spin-echo images obtained 5 to 15 min after contrast injection. The early signal enhancement probably reflects the perfusion and capillary permeability of the synovium. The area...

  20. Final Project Report: Data Locality Enhancement of Dynamic Simulations for Exascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xipeng [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-04-27

    The goal of this project is to develop a set of techniques and software tools to enhance the matching between memory accesses in dynamic simulations and the prominent features of modern and future manycore systems, alleviating the memory performance issues for exascale computing. In the first three years, the PI and his group have achieves some significant progress towards the goal, producing a set of novel techniques for improving the memory performance and data locality in manycore systems, yielding 18 conference and workshop papers and 4 journal papers and graduating 6 Ph.Ds. This report summarizes the research results of this project through that period.

  1. Modeling Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Data with a Constrained Local AIF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Chong; Kallehauge, Jesper F.; Pérez-Torres, Carlos J

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to develop a constrained local arterial input function (cL-AIF) to improve quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data by accounting for the contrast-agent bolus amplitude error in the voxel-specific AIF. PROCEDURES....... RESULTS: When the data model included the cL-AIF, tracer kinetic parameters were correctly estimated from in silico data under contrast-to-noise conditions typical of clinical DCE-MRI experiments. Considering the clinical cervical cancer data, Bayesian model selection was performed for all tumor voxels...

  2. Enhanced Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Using Metadynamics, Replica-Exchange, and Temperature-Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Abrams

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We review a selection of methods for performing enhanced sampling in molecular dynamics simulations. We consider methods based on collective variable biasing and on tempering, and offer both historical and contemporary perspectives. In collective-variable biasing, we first discuss methods stemming from thermodynamic integration that use mean force biasing, including the adaptive biasing force algorithm and temperature acceleration. We then turn to methods that use bias potentials, including umbrella sampling and metadynamics. We next consider parallel tempering and replica-exchange methods. We conclude with a brief presentation of some combination methods.

  3. Ewing's sarcoma recurrence vs radiation necrosis in dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khadrawy, A.M.; Hoffer, F.A.; Reddick, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. We report a case of Ewing's sarcoma in the right distal femur in a 6-year-old male to demonstrate how dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DEMRI) findings predicted histopathology. Materials and methods. DEMRI was performed at presentation and during and after completion of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Histopathologic studies were done at presentation, at 77 weeks (20 weeks after a pathological fracture), and from the en bloc resection at 104 weeks. Results. DEMRI predicted the early tumor response, absence of tumor recurrence, presence of necrosis and lack of fracture healing, confirmed by histopathology. Conclusion. DEMRI is a clinically useful tool in managing Ewing's sarcoma. (orig.)

  4. Utility of bolus dynamic CT for the detection of hypervascular malignant hepatic tumors. Mainly referring to the comparison with delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiromichi; Abe, Kimihiko; Freeny, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to analyze the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, 84 patients who had hepatocellular carcinoma or suspected hypervascular metastases were studied with conventional incremental dynamic CT (CID-CT) or double helical CT (DH-CT). Delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT studies were consecutively performed in all patients. Thirty-six of 84 patients had malignant hepatic neoplasms; six had hepatocellular carcinoma and 30 had metastatic tumors. At first, the detectability of hepatic lesions was evaluated with bolus dynamic CT and delayed phase CT. Dynamic CT has detected more lesions than delayed CT. Some hepatic lesions described as isodensity were missed on CID-CT. Therefore, delayed phase CT cannot be eliminated when CID-CT is performed. Secondly, hepatic lesion detectability with CID-CT was compared with that of DH-CT. DH-CT did not miss the hepatic lesions picked up by delayed phase CT and was expected to provide excellent detectability of hypervascular hepatic neoplasms. In addition, first helical CT showed most hepatic lesions as areas of obvious hyperdensity, while CID-CT did not show their correct vascularities. So-called hypervascular hepatic tumors, however, were not always hypervascular and were demonstrated as areas of iso-hypodensity even on initial helical scanning. Second helical CT was useful to detect these so-called hypervascular, but actually hypovascular lesions. In conclusion, dynamic CT was helpful in detecting hypervascular hepatic malignant neoplasms, and DH-CT was more accurate than-CID-CT for the detection of hepatic lesions and the evaluation of vascular lesion. (author)

  5. Digital dissection - using contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning to elucidate hard- and soft-tissue anatomy in the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-04-01

    Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft- and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular their cranial soft tissues, are essentially absent from the literature. Here, we digitally dissect, identify, and document the soft-tissue anatomy of the Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) in detail, using the new approach of contrast-enhanced computed tomography using Lugol's iodine. The architecture of different muscle systems (adductor, depressor, ocular, hyoid, neck musculature), neurovascular, and other soft-tissue structures is three-dimensionally visualised and described in unprecedented detail. The three-dimensional model is further presented as an interactive PDF to facilitate the dissemination and accessibility of anatomical data. Due to the digital nature of the data derived from the computed tomography scanning and segmentation processes, these methods hold the potential for further computational analyses beyond descriptive and illustrative proposes. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  6. Three-dimensional scanning near field optical microscopy (3D-SNOM) imaging of random arrays of copper nanoparticles: implications for plasmonic solar cell enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezugwu, Sabastine; Ye, Hanyang; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2015-01-07

    In order to investigate the suitability of random arrays of nanoparticles for plasmonic enhancement in the visible-near infrared range, we introduced three-dimensional scanning near-field optical microscopy (3D-SNOM) imaging as a useful technique to probe the intensity of near-field radiation scattered by random systems of nanoparticles at heights up to several hundred nm from their surface. We demonstrated our technique using random arrays of copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) at different particle diameter and concentration. Bright regions in the 3D-SNOM images, corresponding to constructive interference of forward-scattered plasmonic waves, were obtained at heights Δz ≥ 220 nm from the surface for random arrays of Cu-NPs of ∼ 60-100 nm in diameter. These heights are too large to use Cu-NPs in contact of the active layer for light harvesting in thin organic solar cells, which are typically no thicker than 200 nm. Using a 200 nm transparent spacer between the system of Cu-NPs and the solar cell active layer, we demonstrate that forward-scattered light can be conveyed in 200 nm thin film solar cells. This architecture increases the solar cell photoconversion efficiency by a factor of 3. Our 3D-SNOM technique is general enough to be suitable for a large number of other applications in nanoplasmonics.

  7. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in bimetallic nanostructure-enhanced methylammonium lead bromide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarick, Holly F; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Puretzky, Alexander A; Talbert, Eric M; DeBra, Zachary R; Soetan, Naiya; Geohegan, David B; Bardhan, Rizia

    2017-01-26

    In this work, we examine the impact of hybrid bimetallic Au/Ag core/shell nanostructures on the carrier dynamics of methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr 3 ) mesoporous perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Plasmon-enhanced PSCs incorporated with Au/Ag nanostructures demonstrated improved light harvesting and increased power conversion efficiency by 26% relative to reference devices. Two complementary spectral techniques, transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and time-resolved photoluminescence (trPL), were employed to gain a mechanistic understanding of plasmonic enhancement processes. TAS revealed a decrease in the photobleach formation time, which suggests that the nanostructures improve hot carrier thermalization to an equilibrium distribution, relieving hot phonon bottleneck in MAPbBr 3 perovskites. TAS also showed a decrease in carrier decay lifetimes, indicating that nanostructures enhance photoinduced carrier generation and promote efficient electron injection into TiO 2 prior to bulk recombination. Furthermore, nanostructure-incorporated perovskite films demonstrated quenching in steady-state PL and decreases in trPL carrier lifetimes, providing further evidence of improved carrier injection in plasmon-enhanced mesoporous PSCs.

  8. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL.

  9. MR of normal pancreas : comparison of five pulse sequences and enhancing patterns on dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Hong, Sung Hwan; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1997-01-01

    To compare T1-weighted FLASH and turbo spin echo (SE) T2-weighted sequences with conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences in imaging normal pancreas and to describe the enhancing patterns on dynamic MR imging. Forty-four patients with presumed hepatic hemangiomas were studied at 1.0T or 1.5T by using conventional SE sequences (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and heavily T2-weighted), turbo-SE T2-weighted sequences, and breath-hold T1-weighted FLASH sequences acquired before, immediately on, and at 1, 2, 3, and 5 or 10 minutes after injection of a bolus of gadopentetate dimeglumine. No patients had either a history or its clinical features of pancreatic disease. Images were quantitatively analyzed for signal-difference-to noise ratios (SD/Ns) between the pancreas and peripancreatic fat. Percentage enhancement of the pancreas was measured on each dynamic MR image. Conspicuity of the pancreatic border was qualitatively evaluated according to a consensus, reached by three radiologists. Turbo-SE T2-weighted images had a significantly higher SD/N ratio (p<0.001) and better conspicuity of the pancreatic border (p<0.001) than SE T2- and heavily T2-weighted images;T1-weighted SE images had a significantly higher SD/N ratio than T1-weighted FLASH images (p<0.001), but there was no significant difference between tham in qualitative analysis (p=0.346). Percentage enhancement immediately on and at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after administration of contrast material was 39.9%, 44.5%, 42.9%, 40.8%, 36.3%, 29.9%, respectively, with peak enhancement at 1 minute. In MR imaging of normal pancreas, turbo-SE T2-weighted imaging is superior to SE T2- and heavily T2- weighted imaging, and SE T1-weighted imaging is superior to T1-weighted FLASH imaging. On serial gadolinium-enhanced FLASH imaging, normal pancreas shows peak enhancement at 1 minute

  10. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging of parasellar tumor using fast spin-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Ohue, Shiro; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Sakaki, Saburo; Miki, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have applied a new dynamic MRI technique that uses a fast spin-echo sequence to parasellar tumors. This sequence has less susceptible effect and better spatial resolution than a gradient echo sequence, providing faster images than a short spin-echo sequence does. Image was obtained in the coronal or sagittal plane using a 1.5T clinical MRI system, and then, dynamic MR images were acquired every 10 to 20 sec after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). The subjects were 12 patients (5 microadenomas, 5 macroadenomas and 2 Rathke's cleft cysts) and 5 normal volunteers. As for volunteers, the cavernous sinus, pituitary stalk and posterior pituitary gland were contrasted on the first image, followed by visualization of the proximal portion adjacent to the junction of the infundibulum and the anterior pituitary gland, and finally by contrasting the distal portion of the anterior pituitary gland. There was a difference with respect to tumor contrast between microadenomas and macroadenomas. In the case of the macroadenomas, the tumor was contrasted at the same time as, or faster than the anterior pituitary gland, while with the microadenomas the tumor was enhanced later than the anterior pituitary gland. No enhancement with contrast medium was seen in Rathke's cleft cysts. In addition, it was possible to differentiate a recurrent tumor from a piece of muscle placed at surgery since the images obtained by the fast spin-echo sequence were clearer than those obtained by gradient echo sequence. (author)

  11. Assessment of inflammatory activity in Crohn's disease by means of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, V A; Di Cesare, E; Frieri, G; Limbucci, N; Tanga, M; Masciocchi, C

    2007-09-01

    Our aim was to perform a dynamic study of contrast enhancement of the intestinal wall in patients with Crohn's disease to quantitatively assess local inflammatory activity. We studied a population of 50 patients with histologically proven Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a 1.5-T magnet with a phased-array coil and acquisition of T2-weighted single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) half Fourier sequences before intravenous administration of gadolinium, and T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient (FSPGR) fat-saturated sequences before and after contrast administration. Before the examination, patents received oral polyethylene glycol (PEG) (1,000 ml for adults; 10 ml/Kg of body weight for children). Regions of interest (ROI) were placed on the normal and diseased intestinal wall to assess signal intensity and rate of increase in contrast enhancement over time. Data were compared with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI). The diseased bowel wall showed early and intense uptake of contrast that increases over time until a plateau is reached. In patients in the remission phase after treatment, signal intensity was only slightly higher in diseased bowel loops than in healthy loops. There was a significant correlation between the peak of contrast uptake and CDAI. Dynamic MRI is a good technique for quantifying local inflammatory activity of bowel wall in patients with Crohn's disease.

  12. Bone scan in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.; Peters, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99m Tc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99m Tc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67 Ga citrate and 111 In white blood cells ( 111 In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  13. A dynamical systems model for combinatorial cancer therapy enhances oncolytic adenovirus efficacy by MEK-inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Neda; Shiina, Marisa; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Korn, W Michael

    2011-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses, such as ONYX-015, have been tested in clinical trials for currently untreatable tumors, but have yet to demonstrate adequate therapeutic efficacy. The extent to which viruses infect targeted cells determines the efficacy of this approach but many tumors down-regulate the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), rendering them less susceptible to infection. Disrupting MAPK pathway signaling by pharmacological inhibition of MEK up-regulates CAR expression, offering possible enhanced adenovirus infection. MEK inhibition, however, interferes with adenovirus replication due to resulting G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, enhanced efficacy will depend on treatment protocols that productively balance these competing effects. Predictive understanding of how to attain and enhance therapeutic efficacy of combinatorial treatment is difficult since the effects of MEK inhibitors, in conjunction with adenovirus/cell interactions, are complex nonlinear dynamic processes. We investigated combinatorial treatment strategies using a mathematical model that predicts the impact of MEK inhibition on tumor cell proliferation, ONYX-015 infection, and oncolysis. Specifically, we fit a nonlinear differential equation system to dedicated experimental data and analyzed the resulting simulations for favorable treatment strategies. Simulations predicted enhanced combinatorial therapy when both treatments were applied simultaneously; we successfully validated these predictions in an ensuing explicit test study. Further analysis revealed that a CAR-independent mechanism may be responsible for amplified virus production and cell death. We conclude that integrated computational and experimental analysis of combinatorial therapy provides a useful means to identify treatment/infection protocols that yield clinically significant oncolysis. Enhanced oncolytic therapy has the potential to dramatically improve non-surgical cancer treatment, especially in locally advanced

  14. Technical Note: A treatment plan comparison between dynamic collimation and a fixed aperture during spot scanning proton therapy for brain treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Blake, E-mail: bsmith34@wisc.edu; Gelover, Edgar; Moignier, Alexandra; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Hyer, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Lin, Liyong; Kirk, Maura; Solberg, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, TRC 2 West, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the advantages of energy-layer specific dynamic collimation system (DCS) versus a per-field fixed aperture for spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods: Five brain cancer patients previously planned and treated with SSPT were replanned using an in-house treatment planning system capable of modeling collimated and uncollimated proton beamlets. The uncollimated plans, which served as a baseline for comparison, reproduced the target coverage and organ-at-risk sparing of the clinically delivered plans. The collimator opening for the fixed aperture-based plans was determined from the combined cross sections of the target in the beam’s eye view over all energy layers which included an additional margin equivalent to the maximum beamlet displacement for the respective energy of that energy layer. The DCS-based plans were created by selecting appropriate collimator positions for each row of beam spots during a Raster-style scanning pattern which were optimized to maximize the dose contributions to the target and limited the dose delivered to adjacent normal tissue. Results: The reduction of mean dose to normal tissue adjacent to the target, as defined by a 10 mm ring surrounding the target, averaged 13.65% (range: 11.8%–16.9%) and 5.18% (2.9%–7.1%) for the DCS and fixed aperture plans, respectively. The conformity index, as defined by the ratio of the volume of the 50% isodose line to the target volume, yielded an average improvement of 21.35% (19.4%–22.6%) and 8.38% (4.7%–12.0%) for the DCS and fixed aperture plans, respectively. Conclusions: The ability of the DCS to provide collimation to each energy layer yielded better conformity in comparison to fixed aperture plans.

  15. Technical Note: A treatment plan comparison between dynamic collimation and a fixed aperture during spot scanning proton therapy for brain treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Blake; Gelover, Edgar; Moignier, Alexandra; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Lin, Liyong; Kirk, Maura; Solberg, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the advantages of energy-layer specific dynamic collimation system (DCS) versus a per-field fixed aperture for spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods: Five brain cancer patients previously planned and treated with SSPT were replanned using an in-house treatment planning system capable of modeling collimated and uncollimated proton beamlets. The uncollimated plans, which served as a baseline for comparison, reproduced the target coverage and organ-at-risk sparing of the clinically delivered plans. The collimator opening for the fixed aperture-based plans was determined from the combined cross sections of the target in the beam’s eye view over all energy layers which included an additional margin equivalent to the maximum beamlet displacement for the respective energy of that energy layer. The DCS-based plans were created by selecting appropriate collimator positions for each row of beam spots during a Raster-style scanning pattern which were optimized to maximize the dose contributions to the target and limited the dose delivered to adjacent normal tissue. Results: The reduction of mean dose to normal tissue adjacent to the target, as defined by a 10 mm ring surrounding the target, averaged 13.65% (range: 11.8%–16.9%) and 5.18% (2.9%–7.1%) for the DCS and fixed aperture plans, respectively. The conformity index, as defined by the ratio of the volume of the 50% isodose line to the target volume, yielded an average improvement of 21.35% (19.4%–22.6%) and 8.38% (4.7%–12.0%) for the DCS and fixed aperture plans, respectively. Conclusions: The ability of the DCS to provide collimation to each energy layer yielded better conformity in comparison to fixed aperture plans.

  16. Technical Note: A treatment plan comparison between dynamic collimation and a fixed aperture during spot scanning proton therapy for brain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Blake; Gelover, Edgar; Moignier, Alexandra; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Lin, Liyong; Kirk, Maura; Solberg, Tim; Hyer, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the advantages of energy-layer specific dynamic collimation system (DCS) versus a per-field fixed aperture for spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods: Five brain cancer patients previously planned and treated with SSPT were replanned using an in-house treatment planning system capable of modeling collimated and uncollimated proton beamlets. The uncollimated plans, which served as a baseline for comparison, reproduced the target coverage and organ-at-risk sparing of the clinically delivered plans. The collimator opening for the fixed aperture-based plans was determined from the combined cross sections of the target in the beam’s eye view over all energy layers which included an additional margin equivalent to the maximum beamlet displacement for the respective energy of that energy layer. The DCS-based plans were created by selecting appropriate collimator positions for each row of beam spots during a Raster-style scanning pattern which were optimized to maximize the dose contributions to the target and limited the dose delivered to adjacent normal tissue. Results: The reduction of mean dose to normal tissue adjacent to the target, as defined by a 10 mm ring surrounding the target, averaged 13.65% (range: 11.8%–16.9%) and 5.18% (2.9%–7.1%) for the DCS and fixed aperture plans, respectively. The conformity index, as defined by the ratio of the volume of the 50% isodose line to the target volume, yielded an average improvement of 21.35% (19.4%–22.6%) and 8.38% (4.7%–12.0%) for the DCS and fixed aperture plans, respectively. Conclusions: The ability of the DCS to provide collimation to each energy layer yielded better conformity in comparison to fixed aperture plans. PMID:27487886

  17. TU-CD-304-04: Scanning Field Total Body Irradiation Using Dynamic Arc with Variable Dose Rate and Gantry Speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, B; Xu, H; Mutaf, Y; Prado, K [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Enable a scanning field total body irradiation (TBI) technique, using dynamic arcs, which is biologically equivalent to a moving couch TBI. Methods: Patient is treated slightly above the floor and the treatment field scans across the patient by a moving gantry. MLC positions change during gantry motion to keep same field opening at the level of the treatment plane (170 cm). This is done to mimic the same geometry as the moving couch TBI technique which has been used in our institution for over 10 years. The dose rate and the gantry speed are determined considering a constant speed of the moving field, variations in SSD and slanted depths resulting from oblique gantry angles. An Eclipse (Varian) planning system is commissioned to accommodate the extended SSD. The dosimetric foundations of the technique have been thoroughly investigated using phantom measurements. Results: Dose uniformity better than 2% across 180 cm length at 10cm depth is achieved by moving the gantry from −55 to +55 deg. Treatment range can be extended by increasing gantry range. No device such as a gravity-oriented compensator is needed to achieve a uniform dose. It is feasible to modify the dose distribution by adjusting the dose rate at each gantry angle to compensate for body thickness differences. Total treatment time for 2 Gy AP/PA fields is 40–50 minutes excluding patient set up time, at the machine dose rate of 100 MU/min. Conclusion: This novel yet transportable moving field technique enables TBI treatment in a small treatment room with less program development preparation than other techniques. Treatment length can be extended per need, and. MLC-based thickness compensation and partial lung blocking are also possible.

  18. An enhanced dynamic model of battery using genetic algorithm suitable for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaifi, S.; Moulahoum, S.; Colak, I.; Merrouche, W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a developed dynamic battery model suitable for photovoltaic systems. • We used genetic algorithm optimization method to find parameters that gives minimized error. • The validation was carried out with real measurements from stand-alone photovoltaic string. - Abstract: Modeling of batteries in photovoltaic systems has been a major issue related to the random dynamic regime imposed by the changes of solar irradiation and ambient temperature added to the complexity of battery electrochemical and electrical behaviors. However, various approaches have been proposed to model the battery behavior by predicting from detailed electrochemical, electrical or analytical models to high-level stochastic models. In this paper, an improvement of dynamic electrical battery model is proposed by automatic parameter extraction using genetic algorithm in order to give usefulness and future implementation for practical application. It is highlighted that the enhancement of 21 values of the parameters of CEIMAT model presents a good agreement with real measurements for different modes like charge or discharge and various conditions.

  19. Apparent diffusion coefficient values and dynamic contrast enhancement patterns in differentiating seminomas from nonseminomatous testicular neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsili, Athina C., E-mail: a_tsili@yahoo.gr [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Sylakos, Anastasios, E-mail: anasylakos@yahoo.gr [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Ntorkou, Alexandra, E-mail: alexdorkou@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Stavrou, Sotirios, E-mail: s.sotiris@yahoo.gr [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Astrakas, Loukas G., E-mail: astrakas@uoi.gr [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Sofikitis, Nikolaos, E-mail: akrosnin@hotmail.com [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Argyropoulou, Maria I., E-mail: margyrop@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Functional MRI in the characterization of testicular germ cell tumors was assessed. • ADC values proved useful in the characterization of testicular germ cell tumors. • Testicular germ cell tumors had similar enhancement patterns of dynamic MRI. - Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate the role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) patterns in differentiating seminomas from nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). Materials and methods: The MRI examinations of the scrotum of 26 men with histologically proven testicular GCTs were reviewed. DWI was performed in all patients, using a single shot, multi-slice spin-echo planar diffusion pulse sequence and b-values of 0 and 900 s/mm{sup 2}. Subtraction DCE-MRI was performed in 20 cases using a 3D fast-field echo sequence after gadolinium administration. Time-signal intensity curves were created and semi-quantitative parameters (peak enhancement, time to peak, wash-in and wash-out rate) were calculated. The Student's t-test was used to compare the mean values of ADC, peak enhancement, time to peak, wash-in and wash-out rate between seminomas and NSGCTs. ROC analysis was also performed. Results: Histopathology disclosed the presence of 15 seminomas and 11 NSGCTs. The mean ± s.d. of ADC values (× 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) of seminomas (0.59 ± 0.009) were significantly lower than those of NSGCTs (0.90 ± 0.33) (P = 0.01). The optimal ADC cut-off value was 0.68 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. No differences between the two groups were observed for peak enhancement (P = 0.18), time to peak (P = 0.63) wash-in rate (P = 0.32) and wash-out rate (P = 0.18). Conclusions: ADC values may be used to preoperatively differentiate seminomas from NSGCTs.

  20. Assessment of ameloblastomas using MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Hisatomi, Miki; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Choi, Yong Suk; Kawai, Noriko; Konouchi, Hironobu; Kishi, Kanji

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance images (MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) of ameloblastomas. MRI and DCE-MRI were performed for 10 ameloblastomas. We obtained the following results from the MRI and DCE-MRI. (a) Ameloblastomas can be divided into solid and cystic portions on the basis of MR signal intensities. (b) Ameloblastomas show a predilection for intermediate signal intensity on T1WI, high signal intensity on T2WI, and well enhancement in the solid portion; they also show a homogeneous intermediate signal intensity on T1WI and homogeneous high signal intensity on T2WI, and no enhancement in the cystic portion. (c) The mural nodule or thick wall can be detected in ameloblastomas lesions. (d) CI curves of ameloblastomas show two patterns: the first pattern increases, reaches a plateau at 100-300 s, then sustains the plateau or decreases gradually to 600-900 s, while the other increases relatively rapidly, reaches a plateau at 90-120 s, then decreases relatively rapidly to 300 s, and decreases gradually thereafter. There was no difference in the CI curve patterns among primary and recurrent cases, a case with glandular odontogenic tumor in ameloblastoma or among histopathological types such as plexiform, follicular, mixed, desmoplastic, and unicystic type

  1. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahaliou, A; Skiadopoulos, S; Yiakoumelos, A; Costaridou, L; Vassiou, K; Kanavou, T

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.960±0.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  2. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  3. Tracer kinetic model-driven registration for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI time-series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A; O'Connor, James P B; Caunce, Angela; Roberts, Caleb; Cheung, Sue; Watson, Yvonne; Davies, Karen; Hope, Lynn; Jackson, Alan; Jayson, Gordon C; Parker, Geoffrey J M

    2007-11-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) time series data are subject to unavoidable physiological motion during acquisition (e.g., due to breathing) and this motion causes significant errors when fitting tracer kinetic models to the data, particularly with voxel-by-voxel fitting approaches. Motion correction is problematic, as contrast enhancement introduces new features into postcontrast images and conventional registration similarity measures cannot fully account for the increased image information content. A methodology is presented for tracer kinetic model-driven registration that addresses these problems by explicitly including a model of contrast enhancement in the registration process. The iterative registration procedure is focused on a tumor volume of interest (VOI), employing a three-dimensional (3D) translational transformation that follows only tumor motion. The implementation accurately removes motion corruption in a DCE-MRI software phantom and it is able to reduce model fitting errors and improve localization in 3D parameter maps in patient data sets that were selected for significant motion problems. Sufficient improvement was observed in the modeling results to salvage clinical trial DCE-MRI data sets that would otherwise have to be rejected due to motion corruption. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Shifty: A Weight-Shifting Dynamic Passive Haptic Proxy to Enhance Object Perception in Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Andre; Kruger, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    We define the concept of Dynamic Passive Haptic Feedback (DPHF) for virtual reality by introducing the weight-shifting physical DPHF proxy object Shifty. This concept combines actuators known from active haptics and physical proxies known from passive haptics to construct proxies that automatically adapt their passive haptic feedback. We describe the concept behind our ungrounded weight-shifting DPHF proxy Shifty and the implementation of our prototype. We then investigate how Shifty can, by automatically changing its internal weight distribution, enhance the user's perception of virtual objects interacted with in two experiments. In a first experiment, we show that Shifty can enhance the perception of virtual objects changing in shape, especially in length and thickness. Here, Shifty was shown to increase the user's fun and perceived realism significantly, compared to an equivalent passive haptic proxy. In a second experiment, Shifty is used to pick up virtual objects of different virtual weights. The results show that Shifty enhances the perception of weight and thus the perceived realism by adapting its kinesthetic feedback to the picked-up virtual object. In the same experiment, we additionally show that specific combinations of haptic, visual and auditory feedback during the pick-up interaction help to compensate for visual-haptic mismatch perceived during the shifting process.

  5. Prognostic value of preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion parameters for high-grade glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyte, Agne [Vilnius University, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius (Lithuania); Katsaros, Vasileios K. [General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Advanced Imaging Modalities - CT and MRI, Athens (Greece); University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Liouta, Evangelia; Stranjalis, Georgios [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Boskos, Christos [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Radiation Oncology, Athens (Greece); Papanikolaou, Nickolas [Champalimaud Foundation, Department of Radiology, Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon (Portugal); Usinskiene, Jurgita [National Cancer Institute, Vilnius (Lithuania); Affidea Lietuva, Vilnius (Lithuania); Bisdas, Sotirios [University College London Hospitals, Department of Neuroradiology, The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The prognostic value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI perfusion and its histogram analysis-derived metrics is not well established for high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate DCE perfusion transfer coefficient (K{sup trans}), vascular plasma volume fraction (v{sub p}), extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), reverse transfer constant (k{sub ep}), and initial area under gadolinium concentration time curve (IAUGC) as predictors of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG patients. Sixty-nine patients with suspected anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma underwent preoperative DCE-MRI scans. DCE perfusion whole tumor region histogram parameters, clinical details, and PFS and OS data were obtained. Univariate, multivariate, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were conducted. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was employed to identify perfusion parameters with the best differentiation performance. On univariate analysis, v{sub e} and skewness of v{sub p} had significant negative impacts, while k{sub ep} had significant positive impact on OS (P < 0.05). v{sub e} was also a negative predictor of PFS (P < 0.05). Patients with lower v{sub e} and IAUGC had longer median PFS and OS on Kaplan-Meier analysis (P < 0.05). K{sup trans} and v{sub e} could also differentiate grade III from IV gliomas (area under the curve 0.819 and 0.791, respectively). High v{sub e} is a consistent predictor of worse PFS and OS in HGG glioma patients. v{sub p} skewness and k{sub ep} are also predictive for OS. K{sup trans} and v{sub e} demonstrated the best diagnostic performance for differentiating grade III from IV gliomas. (orig.)

  6. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as imaging biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David O; Hooper, Clare E; Searle, Julie; Darby, Michael; White, Paul; Harvey, John E; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Maskell, Nick A; Masani, Vidan; Lyburn, Iain D

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET with computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to predict prognosis and monitor treatment in malignant pleural mesothelioma. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies carried out as part of the South West Area Mesothelioma Pemetrexed trial were used. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies were carried out before treatment, and after two cycles of chemotherapy, on patients treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin. A total of 73 patients were recruited, of whom 65 had PET/CT and DCE-MRI scans. Baseline measurements from F-FDG PET/CT (maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis) and DCE-MRI (integrated area under the first 90s of the curve and washout slope) were compared with overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses, and changes in imaging measurements were compared with disease progression. PET/CT and DCE-MRI measurements were not correlated with each other. Maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis were significantly related to OS with Cox regression analysis and Kaplan-Meir analysis, and DCE-MRI washout curve shape was significantly related to OS. DCE-MRI curve shape can be combined with F-FDG PET/CT to give additional prognostic information. Changes in measurements were not related to progression-free survival. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI give prognostic information in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Neither PET/CT nor DCE-MRI is useful for monitoring disease progression.

  7. Enhanced Emission from Single Isolated Gold Quantum Dots Investigated Using Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, Neranga; Kumar, Santosh; Sun, Kai; Mansfield, John F; Jin, Rongchao; Goodson, Theodore

    2016-12-21

    New approaches in molecular nanoscopy are greatly desired for interrogation of biological, organic, and inorganic objects with sizes below the diffraction limit. Our current work investigates emergent monolayer-protected gold quantum dots (nanoclusters, NCs) composed of 25 Au atoms by utilizing two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) at single NC concentrations. Here, we demonstrate an approach to synthesize and isolate single NCs on solid glass substrates. Subsequent investigation of the NCs using TPEF NSOM reveals that, even when they are separated by distances of several tens of nanometers, we can excite and interrogate single NCs individually. Interestingly, we observe an enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section for single Au 25 NCs that can be attributed to few-atom local field effects and to local field-induced microscopic cascading, indicating their potential for use in ultrasensitive sensing, disease diagnostics, cancer cell therapy, and molecular computers. Finally, we report room-temperature aperture-based TPEF NSOM imaging of these NCs for the first time at 30 nm point resolution, which is a ∼5-fold improvement compared to the previous best result for the same technique. This report unveils the unique combination of an unusually large TPA cross section and the high photostability of Au NCs to (non-destructively) investigate stable isolated single NCs using TPEF NSOM. This is the first reported optical study of monolayer-protected single quantum clusters, opening some very promising opportunities in spectroscopy of nanosized objects, bioimaging, ultrasensitive sensing, molecular computers, and high-density data storage.

  8. Local contrast-enhanced MR images via high dynamic range processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Shekhar S; Engstrom, Craig; Fripp, Jurgen; Neubert, Ales; Jin, Jin; Walker, Duncan; Salvado, Olivier; Ho, Charles; Crozier, Stuart

    2018-09-01

    To develop a local contrast-enhancing and feature-preserving high dynamic range (HDR) image processing algorithm for multichannel and multisequence MR images of multiple body regions and tissues, and to evaluate its performance for structure visualization, bias field (correction) mitigation, and automated tissue segmentation. A multiscale-shape and detail-enhancement HDR-MRI algorithm is applied to data sets of multichannel and multisequence MR images of the brain, knee, breast, and hip. In multisequence 3T hip images, agreement between automatic cartilage segmentations and corresponding synthesized HDR-MRI series were computed for mean voxel overlap established from manual segmentations for a series of cases. Qualitative comparisons between the developed HDR-MRI and standard synthesis methods were performed on multichannel 7T brain and knee data, and multisequence 3T breast and knee data. The synthesized HDR-MRI series provided excellent enhancement of fine-scale structure from multiple scales and contrasts, while substantially reducing bias field effects in 7T brain gradient echo, T 1 and T 2 breast images and 7T knee multichannel images. Evaluation of the HDR-MRI approach on 3T hip multisequence images showed superior outcomes for automatic cartilage segmentations with respect to manual segmentation, particularly around regions with hyperintense synovial fluid, across a set of 3D sequences. The successful combination of multichannel/sequence MR images into a single-fused HDR-MR image format provided consolidated visualization of tissues within 1 omnibus image, enhanced definition of thin, complex anatomical structures in the presence of variable or hyperintense signals, and improved tissue (cartilage) segmentation outcomes. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  10. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  11. Effects of spot size and spot spacing on lateral penumbra reduction when using a dynamic collimation system for spot scanning proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyer, Daniel E; Hill, Patrick M; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R; Flynn, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the reduction in lateral dose penumbra that can be achieved when using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for spot scanning proton therapy as a function of two beam parameters: spot size and spot spacing. This is an important investigation as both values impact the achievable dose distribution and a wide range of values currently exist depending on delivery hardware. Treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σ air ) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm as well as spot spacing intervals of 2, 4, 6 and 8 mm. Compared to un-collimated treatment plans, the plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2–40.6% for spot sizes of 3–9 mm, respectively. Increasing the spot spacing resulted in a decrease in the time penalty associated with using the DCS that was approximately proportional to the reduction in the number of rows in the raster delivery pattern. We conclude that dose distributions achievable when using the DCS are comparable to those only attainable with much smaller initial spot sizes, suggesting that the goal of improving high dose conformity may be achieved by either utilizing a DCS or by improving beam line optics. (note)

  12. A 2-D MEMS scanning mirror based on dynamic mixed mode excitation of a piezoelectric PZT thin film S-shaped actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kah How; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Lee, Chengkuo

    2011-07-18

    A novel dynamic excitation of an S-shaped PZT piezoelectric actuator, which is conceptualized by having two superimposed AC voltages, is characterized in this paper through the evaluation of the 2-D scanning characteristics of an integrated silicon micromirror. The device is micromachined from a SOI wafer with a 5 μm thick Si device layer and multilayers of Pt/Ti/PZT//Pt/Ti deposited as electrode and actuation materials. A large mirror (1.65 mm x 2mm) and an S-shaped PZT actuator are formed after the backside release process. Three modes of operation are investigated: bending, torsional and mixed. The resonant frequencies obtained for bending and torsional modes are 27Hz and 70Hz respectively. The maximum measured optical deflection angles obtained at 3Vpp are ± 38.9° and ± 2.1° respectively for bending and torsional modes. Various 2-D Lissajous patterns are demonstrated by superimposing two ac sinusoidal electrical signals of different frequencies (27 Hz and 70 Hz) into one signal to be used to actuate the mirror.

  13. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasali, N.; Cubuk, R.; Aricak, M.; Ozarar, M.; Saydam, B.; Nur, H.; Tuncbilek, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. Materials and methods: 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p < 0.05. Results: A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial

  14. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  15. Enhancement of neutral tc transitions in the model of dynamical breaking of electroweak symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, B.A.; Osipov, M.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of possible deviations from the standard model is considered in the framework of a variant of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. It comes clear, that the parameters of the theory, being obtained earlier and describing deviations from standard model in Z → b-barb decay, are also consistent with the existence of a nontrivial solution for vertex t-bar (Z, γ)c. The occurrence of this solution leads to a significant enhancement in neutral flavor changing transition t → c. The intensity of this transition is connected with the c-quark mass, that leads to estimates of probabilities of exotic decays t → c(Z, γ) and of the cross section of a single t-quark production in process e + e - → tc-bar, which threshold is already overcome at LEP2. The model is shown to be consistent with the totality of the existing data, the predictions allow its unambiguous check [ru

  16. Assessing Tumor Response to Treatment in Patients with Lung Cancer Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauch, Louise S; Eriksen, Rie Ø; Sandgaard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Only original research articles concerning treatment response in patients with lung cancer assessed with DCE-CT were included. To assess the validity of each study we implemented Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2). The initial search......The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the literature available on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) as a tool to evaluate treatment response in patients with lung cancer. This systematic review was compiled according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic...... yielded 651 publications, and 16 articles were included in this study. The articles were divided into groups of treatment. In studies where patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy with or without anti-angiogenic drugs, four out of the seven studies found a significant decrease in permeability...

  17. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Xing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  18. Simulation-based comparison of two approaches frequently used for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwick, Stefan; Brix, Gunnar; Tofts, Paul S.; Strecker, Ralph; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Laue, Hendrik; Semmler, Wolfhard; Kiessling, Fabian

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to compare two approaches for the acquisition and analysis of dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI data with respect to differences in the modelling of the arterial input-function (AIF), the dependency of the model parameters on physiological parameters and their numerical stability. Eight hundred tissue concentration curves were simulated for different combinations of perfusion, permeability, interstitial volume and plasma volume based on two measured AIFs and analysed according to the two commonly used approaches. The transfer constants (Approach 1) K trans and (Approach 2) k ep were correlated with all tissue parameters. K trans showed a stronger dependency on perfusion, and k ep on permeability. The volume parameters (Approach 1) v e and (Approach 2) A were mainly influenced by the interstitial and plasma volume. Both approaches allow only rough characterisation of tissue microcirculation and microvasculature. Approach 2 seems to be somewhat more robust than 1, mainly due to the different methods of CA administration. (orig.)

  19. THz-waves channeling in a monolithic saddle-coil for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macor, A.; de Rijk, E.; Annino, G.; Alberti, S.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2011-10-01

    A saddle coil manufactured by electric discharge machining (EDM) from a solid piece of copper has recently been realized at EPFL for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments (DNP-NMR) at 9.4 T. The corresponding electromagnetic behavior of radio-frequency (400 MHz) and THz (263 GHz) waves were studied by numerical simulation in various measurement configurations. Moreover, we present an experimental method by which the results of the THz-wave numerical modeling are validated. On the basis of the good agreement between numerical and experimental results, we conducted by numerical simulation a systematic analysis on the influence of the coil geometry and of the sample properties on the THz-wave field, which is crucial in view of the optimization of DNP-NMR in solids.

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with luminal Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziech, M.L.W.; Lavini, C.; Caan, M.W.A.; Nio, C.Y.; Stokkers, P.C.F.; Bipat, S.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Nederveen, A.J.; Stoker, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively assess dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-)MRI as compared to conventional sequences in patients with luminal Crohn's disease. Methods: Patients with Crohn's disease undergoing MRI and ileocolonoscopy within 1 month had DCE-MRI (3T) during intravenous contrast injection of gadobutrol, single shot fast spin echo sequence and 3D T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo sequence, a dynamic coronal 3D T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient were performed before and after gadobutrol. Maximum enhancement (ME) and initial slope of increase (ISI) were calculated for four colon segments (ascending colon + coecum, transverse colon, descending colon + sigmoid, rectum) and (neo)terminal ileum. C-reactive protein (CRP), Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), per patient and per segment Crohn's disease endoscopic index of severity (CDEIS) and disease duration were determined. Mean values of the (DCE-)MRI parameters in each segment from each patient were compared between four disease activity groups (normal mucosa, non-ulcerative lesions, mild ulcerative and severe ulcerative disease) with Mann–Whitney test with Bonferroni adjustment. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for continuous variables. Results: Thirty-three patients were included (mean age 37 years; 23 females, median CDEIS 4.4). ME and ISI correlated weakly with segmental CDEIS (r = 0.485 and r = 0.206) and ME per patient correlated moderately with CDEIS (r = 0.551). ME was significantly higher in segments with mild (0.378) or severe (0.388) ulcerative disease compared to normal mucosa (0.304) (p < 0.001). No ulcerations were identified at conventional sequences. ME correlated with disease duration in diseased segments (r = 0.492), not with CDAI and CRP. Conclusions: DCE-MRI can be used as a method for detecting Crohn's disease ulcerative lesions.

  1. Studying wedge factors and beam profiles for physical and enhanced dynamic wedges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Misbah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate variation in Varian′s Physical and Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Factors (WF as a function of depth and field size. The profiles for physical wedges (PWs and enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs were also measured using LDA-99 array and compared for confirmation of EDW angles at different depths and field sizes. WF measurements were performed in water phantom using cylindrical 0.66 cc ionization chamber. WF was measured by taking the ratio of wedge and open field ionization data. A normalized wedge factor (NWF was introduced to circumvent large differences between wedge factors for different wedge angles. A strong linear dependence of PW Factor (PWF with depth was observed. Maximum variation of 8.9% and 4.1% was observed for 60° PW with depth at 6 and 15 MV beams respectively. The variation in EDW Factor (EDWF with depth was almost negligible and less than two per cent. The highest variation in PWF as a function of field size was 4.1% and 3.4% for thicker wedge (60° at 6 and 15 MV beams respectively and decreases with decreasing wedge angle. EDWF shows strong field size dependence and significant variation was observed for all wedges at both photon energies. Differences in profiles between PW and EDW were observed on toe and heel sides. These differences were dominant for larger fields, shallow depths, thicker wedges and low energy beam. The study indicated that ignoring depth and field size dependence of WF may result in under/over dose to the patient especially doing manual point dose calculation.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with luminal Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziech, M.L.W., E-mail: m.l.ziech@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, C., E-mail: c.lavini@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caan, M.W.A., E-mail: m.w.a.caan@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y., E-mail: C.Y.Nio@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stokkers, P.C.F., E-mail: p.stokkers@slaz.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sint Lucas Andreas Ziekenhuis, Department of Gastroenterology, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061 AE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, S., E-mail: S.Bipat@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ponsioen, C.Y., E-mail: c.y.ponsioen@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nederveen, A.J., E-mail: a.j.nederveen@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, J., E-mail: j.stoker@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To prospectively assess dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-)MRI as compared to conventional sequences in patients with luminal Crohn's disease. Methods: Patients with Crohn's disease undergoing MRI and ileocolonoscopy within 1 month had DCE-MRI (3T) during intravenous contrast injection of gadobutrol, single shot fast spin echo sequence and 3D T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo sequence, a dynamic coronal 3D T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient were performed before and after gadobutrol. Maximum enhancement (ME) and initial slope of increase (ISI) were calculated for four colon segments (ascending colon + coecum, transverse colon, descending colon + sigmoid, rectum) and (neo)terminal ileum. C-reactive protein (CRP), Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), per patient and per segment Crohn's disease endoscopic index of severity (CDEIS) and disease duration were determined. Mean values of the (DCE-)MRI parameters in each segment from each patient were compared between four disease activity groups (normal mucosa, non-ulcerative lesions, mild ulcerative and severe ulcerative disease) with Mann-Whitney test with Bonferroni adjustment. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for continuous variables. Results: Thirty-three patients were included (mean age 37 years; 23 females, median CDEIS 4.4). ME and ISI correlated weakly with segmental CDEIS (r = 0.485 and r = 0.206) and ME per patient correlated moderately with CDEIS (r = 0.551). ME was significantly higher in segments with mild (0.378) or severe (0.388) ulcerative disease compared to normal mucosa (0.304) (p < 0.001). No ulcerations were identified at conventional sequences. ME correlated with disease duration in diseased segments (r = 0.492), not with CDAI and CRP. Conclusions: DCE-MRI can be used as a method for detecting Crohn's disease ulcerative lesions.

  3. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J; Son, J; Arun, B; Hazle, J; Hwang, K; Madewell, J; Yang, W; Dogan, B; Wang, K; Bayram, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the

  4. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Son, J; Arun, B; Hazle, J; Hwang, K; Madewell, J; Yang, W; Dogan, B [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, K; Bayram, E [GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the

  5. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  6. MR mammography: influence of menstrual cycle on the dynamic contrast enhancement of fibrocystic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, A.; Nuessle, K.; Merkle, E.; Tomczak, R.; Brambs, H.J.; Kreienberg, R.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) provides data regarding the nature of tumours based on contrast medium dynamics; fibrocystic changes in the breast, however, may lead to false-positive results. This study investigated whether the contrast medium dynamics of fibrocystic changes are dependent on the menstrual cycle. Twenty-four patients with palpable lumps but normal mammographies and ultrasound studies were examined. The MRM technique was performed during the first and second part of the menstrual cycle using a FLASH 3D sequence, both native and at 1, 2, 3 and 8 min after intravenous application of 0.15 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide. The calculated time-intensity curves were evaluated based on the following criteria: early percentage of contrast medium uptake in relation to the native value; formation of a plateau phenomenon after the second minute; the point of maximal contrast medium uptake; and calculation of the contrast enhancing index. During the second half of the menstrual cycle, a generally greater contrast medium uptake was observed. Nevertheless, when further diagnostic criteria, such as continuous contrast medium increase as a function of time, were considered, there was no increased rate of false-positive findings. The phase of the menstrual cycle may affect the specificity of the examination, if only the quantitative contrast medium uptake and the percentage of contrast medium uptake in the first 2 min are considered. A control MRM during the other half of the cycle may then be indicated and additional diagnostic criteria may improve specificity. (orig.)

  7. Creating Dynamic Learning Environment to Enhance Students’ Engagement in Learning Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyasa

    2017-04-01

    Learning geometry gives many benefits to students. It strengthens the development of deductive thinking and reasoning; it also provides an opportunity to improve visualisation and spatial ability. Some studies, however, have pointed out the difficulties that students encountered when learning geometry. A preliminary study by the author in Bali revealed that one of the main problems was teachers’ difficulties in delivering geometry instruction. It was partly due to the lack of appropriate instructional media. Coupling with dynamic geometry software, dynamic learning environments is a promising solution to this problem. Employing GeoGebra software supported by the well-designed instructional process may result in more meaningful learning, and consequently, students are motivated to engage in the learning process more deeply and actively. In this paper, we provide some examples of GeoGebra-aided learning activities that allow students to interactively explore and investigate geometry concepts and the properties of geometry objects. Thus, it is expected that such learning environment will enhance students’ internalisation process of geometry concepts.

  8. Improving visibility in limited-view scenarios with dynamic particle-enhanced optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Ding, Lu; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Limited-view artefacts affect most optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging systems due to geometrical constraints that impede achieving full tomographic coverage as well as limited light penetration into scattering and absorbing objects. Indeed, it has been theoretically established and experimentally verified that accurate optoacoustic images can only be obtained if the imaged sample is fully enclosed (orientations is hampered. These effects are of particular relevance in the case of hand-held scanners with the imaged volume only accessible from one side. Herein, a new approach termed dynamic particle-enhanced optoacoustic tomography (DPOT) is described for accurate structural imaging in limited-view scenarios. The method is based on the non-linear combination of a sequence of tomographic reconstructions representing sparsely distributed moving particles. Good performance of the method is demonstrated in experiments consisting of dynamic visualization of flow of suspended microspheres in three-dimensions. The method is expected to be applicable for improving accuracy of angiographic optoacoustic imaging in living organisms.

  9. Scanning holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natali, S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the scanning of 1000 holograms taken in HOBC at CERN. Each hologram is triggered by an interaction in the chamber, the primary particles being pions at 340 GeV/c. The aim of the experiment is the study of charm production. The holograms, recorded on 50 mm film with the ''in line'' technique, can be analyzed by shining a parallel expanded laser beam through the film, obtaining immediately above it the real image of the chamber which can then be scanned and measured with a technique half way between emulsions and bubble chambers. The results indicate that holograms can be analyzed as quickly and reliably as in other visual techniques and that to them is open the same order of magnitude of large scale experiments

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienze Morfologico-Biomediche, Sezione di Anatomia ed Istologia, Università di Verona, Verona, I-37194 (Italy)

    2002-06-05

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology

  12. In situ analysis of dynamic laminar flow extraction using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hua-Lin; Qiu, Yang; Chang, Yu-Long; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we performed micro-scale dynamic laminar flow extraction and site-specific in situ chloride concentration measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the diffusion process of chloride ions from an oil phase to a water phase under laminar flow. In contrast to common logic, we used SERS intensity gradients of Rhodamine 6G to quantitatively calculate the concentration of chloride ions at specific positions on a microfluidic chip. By varying the fluid flow rates, we achieved different extraction times and therefore different chloride concentrations at specific positions along the microchannel. SERS spectra from the water phase were recorded at these different positions, and the spatial distribution of the SERS signals was used to map the degree of nanoparticle aggregation. The concentration of chloride ions in the channel could therefore be obtained. We conclude that this method can be used to explore the extraction behaviour and efficiency of some ions or molecules that enhance the SERS intensity in water or oil by inducing nanoparticle aggregation.

  13. Association of dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MR Perfusion parameters with prognosis in elderly patients with glioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabehdar Maralani, Pejman [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Melhem, Elias R.; Herskovits, Edward H. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Sumei; Voluck, Matthew R.; Learned, Kim O.; Mohan, Suyash [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O' Rourke, Donald M. [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR perfusion in elderly patients with glioblastomas (GBM). Thirty five patients aged ≥65 and 35 aged <65 years old, (referred to as elderly and younger, respectively) were included in this retrospective study. The median relative cerebral volume (rCBV) from the enhancing region (rCBV{sub ER-Med}) and immediate peritumoral region (rCBV{sub IPR-Med}) and maximum rCBV from the enhancing region of the tumor (rCBV{sub ER-Max}) were compared and correlated with survival data. Analysis was repeated after rCBVs were dichotomized into high and low values and after excluding elderly patients who did not receive postoperative chemoradiation (34.3 %). Kaplan-Meyer survival curves and parametric and semi-parametric regression tests were used for analysis. All rCBV parameters were higher in elderly compared to younger patients (p < 0.05). After adjustment for age, none were independently associated with shorter survival (p > 0.05). After rCBV dichotomization into high and low values, high rCBV in elderly was independently associated with shorter survival compared to low rCBV in elderly, or any rCBV in younger patients (p < 0.05). rCBV can be an imaging biomarker to identify a subgroup of GBM patients in the elderly with worse prognosis compared to others. (orig.)

  14. Replica Exchange Gaussian Accelerated Molecular Dynamics: Improved Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; McCammon, J Andrew; Miao, Yinglong

    2018-04-10

    Through adding a harmonic boost potential to smooth the system potential energy surface, Gaussian accelerated molecular dynamics (GaMD) provides enhanced sampling and free energy calculation of biomolecules without the need of predefined reaction coordinates. This work continues to improve the acceleration power and energy reweighting of the GaMD by combining the GaMD with replica exchange algorithms. Two versions of replica exchange GaMD (rex-GaMD) are presented: force constant rex-GaMD and threshold energy rex-GaMD. During simulations of force constant rex-GaMD, the boost potential can be exchanged between replicas of different harmonic force constants with fixed threshold energy. However, the algorithm of threshold energy rex-GaMD tends to switch the threshold energy between lower and upper bounds for generating different levels of boost potential. Testing simulations on three model systems, including the alanine dipeptide, chignolin, and HIV protease, demonstrate that through continuous exchanges of the boost potential, the rex-GaMD simulations not only enhance the conformational transitions of the systems but also narrow down the distribution width of the applied boost potential for accurate energetic reweighting to recover biomolecular free energy profiles.

  15. The Permeability Enhancing Mechanism of DMSO in Ceramide Bilayers Simulated by Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notman, Rebecca; den Otter, Wouter K.; Noro, Massimo G.; Briels, W. J.; Anwar, Jamshed

    2007-01-01

    The lipids of the topmost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, represent the primary barrier to molecules penetrating the skin. One approach to overcoming this barrier for the purpose of delivery of active molecules into or via the skin is to employ chemical permeability enhancers, such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). How these molecules exert their effect at the molecular level is not understood. We have investigated the interaction of DMSO with gel-phase bilayers of ceramide 2, the predominant lipid in the stratum corneum, by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations satisfactorily reproduce the phase behavior and the known structural parameters of ceramide 2 bilayers in water. The effect of DMSO on the gel-phase bilayers was investigated at various concentrations over the range 0.0−0.6 mol fraction DMSO. The DMSO molecules accumulate in the headgroup region and weaken the lateral forces between the ceramides. At high concentrations of DMSO (≥0.4 mol fraction), the ceramide bilayers undergo a phase transition from the gel phase to the liquid crystalline phase. The liquid-crystalline phase of ceramides is expected to be markedly more permeable to solutes than the gel phase. The results are consistent with the experimental evidence that high concentrations of DMSO fluidize the stratum corneum lipids and enhance permeability. PMID:17513383

  16. Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of cervical cancers predict chemoradiotherapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Håkon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfør, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from pre-chemoradiotherapy dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of cervical cancer patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA before chemoradiotherapy. The pharmacokinetic Brix and Tofts models were fitted to contrast enhancement curves in all tumor voxels, providing histograms of several pharmacokinetic parameters (Brix: A Brix , k ep , k el , Tofts: K trans , ν e ). A percentile screening approach including log-rank survival tests was undertaken to identify the clinically most relevant part of the intratumoral parameter distribution. Clinical endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and locoregional control (LRC). Multivariate analysis including FIGO stage and tumor volume was used to assess the prognostic significance of the imaging parameters. Results: A Brix , k el , and K trans were significantly (P e was significantly positively correlated with PFS only. k ep showed no association with any endpoint. A Brix was positively correlated with K trans and ν e , and showed the strongest association with endpoint in the log-rank testing. k el and K trans were independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis with LRC as endpoint. Conclusions: Parameters estimated by pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MR images obtained prior to chemoradiotherapy may be used for identifying patients at risk of treatment failure

  17. Free Energy Calculations using a Swarm-Enhanced Sampling Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burusco, Kepa K; Bruce, Neil J; Alibay, Irfan; Bryce, Richard A

    2015-10-26

    Free energy simulations are an established computational tool in modelling chemical change in the condensed phase. However, sampling of kinetically distinct substates remains a challenge to these approaches. As a route to addressing this, we link the methods of thermodynamic integration (TI) and swarm-enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (sesMD), where simulation replicas interact cooperatively to aid transitions over energy barriers. We illustrate the approach by using alchemical alkane transformations in solution, comparing them with the multiple independent trajectory TI (IT-TI) method. Free energy changes for transitions computed by using IT-TI grew increasingly inaccurate as the intramolecular barrier was heightened. By contrast, swarm-enhanced sampling TI (sesTI) calculations showed clear improvements in sampling efficiency, leading to more accurate computed free energy differences, even in the case of the highest barrier height. The sesTI approach, therefore, has potential in addressing chemical change in systems where conformations exist in slow exchange. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. GBRN/DOE Project: Dynamic enhanced recovery technologies. Quarterly technical report, January 1994--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.N.

    1994-04-15

    Global Basins Research Network will perform a field demonstration of their ``Dynamic Enhanced Recovery Technology`` to test the concept that the growth faults in EI-330 field are conduits through which producing reservoirs are charged and that enhanced production can be developed by producing directly from the fault zone. The site, operated by Penzoil, is located in 250 feet of water the productive depth intervals include 4000 to 9000 feet. Previous work, which incorporated pressure, temperature, fluid flow, heat flow, seismic, production, and well log data, indicated active fluid flow along fault zones. The field demonstration will be accomplished by drilling and production test of growth fault systems associated with the EI-330 field. The project utilizes advanced 3-D seismic analysis, geochemical studies, structural and stratigraphic reservoir characterization, reservoir simulation, and compact visualization systems. The quarterly progress reports contains accomplishments to date for the following tasks: Management start-up; database management; field and demonstration equipment; reservoir characterization, modeling; geochemistry; and data integration.

  19. [Dynamic enhanced recovery techniques]. Quarterly technical report, April 1994--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.N.

    1994-07-15

    Global Basins Research Network will perform a field demonstration of their ``Dynamic Enhanced Recovery Technology`` to test the concept that the growth of faults in Eugene Island Block 330 (EI-330 field) are conduits through which producing reservoirs are charged and that enhanced production can be developed by producing directly from the fault zone. The site, operated by Penzoil, is located in 250 feet of water and the productive depth intervals include 4000 to 9000 feet. The field demonstration will be accomplished by drilling and production testing of growth fault systems associated with the EI-330 field. The project utilizes advanced 3-D seismic analysis, geochemical studies, structural and stratigraphic reservoir characterization, reservoir simulation, and compact visualization systems. In this quarterly report, progress reports are presented for the following tasks: Task one--management start-up; Task two--database management; Task three--field demonstration experiment; Task four--reservoir characterization; Task five--modeling; Task six--geochemistry; and Task seven--data integration.

  20. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging analysis of complex adnexal masses: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Balvay, Daniel; Aubert, Emilie; Bazot, Marc; Darai, Emile; Rouzier, Roman; Cuenod, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to differentiate malignant from benign adnexal tumours. Fifty-six women with 38 malignant and 18 benign tumours underwent MR imaging before surgery for complex adnexal masses. Microvascular parameters were extracted from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI series, using a pharmacokinetic model in the solid tissue of adnexal tumours. These parameters were tissue blood flow (F T ), blood volume fraction (Vb), permeability-surface area product (PS), interstitial volume fraction (Ve), lag time (Dt) and area under the enhancing curve (rAUC). Area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) was calculated as a descriptive tool to assess the overall discrimination of parameters. Malignant tumours displayed higher F T , Vb, rAUC and lower Ve than benign tumours (P T was the most relevant factor for discriminating malignant from benign tumours (AUROC = 0.86). Primary ovarian invasive tumours displayed higher F T and shorter Dt than borderline tumours. Malignant adnexal tumours with associated peritoneal carcinomatosis at surgery displayed a shorter Dt than those without peritoneal carcinomatosis at surgery (P = 0.01). Quantitative DCE-MRI is a feasible and accurate technique to differentiate malignant from benign adnexal tumours and could potentially help oncologists with management decisions. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging analysis of complex adnexal masses: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie - UMR 970 INSERM - Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Balvay, Daniel [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie - UMR 970 INSERM - Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Aubert, Emilie; Bazot, Marc [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Darai, Emile; Rouzier, Roman [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Gynaecology-Obstetrics, Paris (France); Cuenod, Charles A. [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie - UMR 970 INSERM - Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the ability of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to differentiate malignant from benign adnexal tumours. Fifty-six women with 38 malignant and 18 benign tumours underwent MR imaging before surgery for complex adnexal masses. Microvascular parameters were extracted from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI series, using a pharmacokinetic model in the solid tissue of adnexal tumours. These parameters were tissue blood flow (F{sub T}), blood volume fraction (Vb), permeability-surface area product (PS), interstitial volume fraction (Ve), lag time (Dt) and area under the enhancing curve (rAUC). Area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) was calculated as a descriptive tool to assess the overall discrimination of parameters. Malignant tumours displayed higher F{sub T}, Vb, rAUC and lower Ve than benign tumours (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0006, P = 0.04 and P = 0.0002, respectively). F{sub T} was the most relevant factor for discriminating malignant from benign tumours (AUROC = 0.86). Primary ovarian invasive tumours displayed higher F{sub T} and shorter Dt than borderline tumours. Malignant adnexal tumours with associated peritoneal carcinomatosis at surgery displayed a shorter Dt than those without peritoneal carcinomatosis at surgery (P = 0.01). Quantitative DCE-MRI is a feasible and accurate technique to differentiate malignant from benign adnexal tumours and could potentially help oncologists with management decisions. (orig.)

  2. Discrimination between benign and malignant breast lesions using volumetric quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Ziliang; Wu, Zhuo; Shen, Jun; Shi, Guangzi; Yi, Zhilong; Xie, Mingwei; Zeng, Weike; Song, Chao; Zheng, Chushan

    2018-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of volumetric quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (qDCE-MRI) in differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions. DCE-MRI was performed in 124 patients with 136 breast lesions. Quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters K trans , K ep , V e , V p and semi-quantitative parameters TTP, MaxCon, MaxSlope, AUC were obtained by using a two-compartment extended Tofts model and three-dimensional volume of interest. Morphologic features (lesion size, margin, internal enhancement pattern) and time-signal intensity curve (TIC) type were also assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of malignancy, followed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance. qDCE parameters (K trans , K ep , V p , TTP, MaxCon, MaxSlope and AUC), morphological parameters and TIC type were significantly different between malignant and benign lesions (P≤0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that K trans , K ep , MaxSlope, size, margin and TIC type were independent predictors of malignancy. The diagnostic accuracy of logistic models based on qDCE parameters alone, morphological features plus TIC type, and all parameters combined was 94.9%, 89.0%, and 95.6% respectively. qDCE-MRI can be used to improve diagnostic differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions in relation to morphology and kinetic analysis. (orig.)

  3. Security Enhancement for Multicast over Internet of Things by Dynamically Constructed Fountain Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Du

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT is expected to accommodate every object which exists in this world or likely to exist in the near future. The enormous scale of the objects is challenged by big security concerns, especially for common information dissemination via multicast services, where the reliability assurance for multiple multicast users at the cost of increasing redundancy and/or retransmissions also benefits eavesdroppers in successfully decoding the overheard signals. The objective of this work is to address the security challenge present in IoT multicast applications. Specifically, with the presence of the eavesdropper, an adaptive fountain code design is proposed in this paper to enhance the security for multicast in IoT. The main novel features of the proposed scheme include two folds: (i dynamical encoding scheme which can effectively decrease intercept probability at the eavesdropper; (ii increasing the transmission efficiency compared with the conventional nondynamical design. The analysis and simulation results show that the proposed scheme can effectively enhance information security while achieving higher transmission efficiency with a little accredited complexity, thus facilitating the secured wireless multicast transmissions over IoT.

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbarbati Andrea

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI at high field intensity (4.7 T. The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. Methods The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6 and 20-month-old (n = 6 rats. Results At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. Conclusion The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  5. Improvement of mitochondrial function and dynamics by the metabolic enhancer piracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Carola; Kurz, Christopher; Koch, Konrad A; Eckert, Schamim H; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic enhancer piracetam is used in many countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging, brain injuries, as well as dementia such as AD (Alzheimer's disease). As a specific feature of piracetam, beneficial effects are usually associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In previous studies we were able to show that piracetam enhanced ATP production, mitochondrial membrane potential as well as neurite outgrowth in cell and animal models for aging and AD. To investigate further the effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function, especially mitochondrial fission and fusion events, we decided to assess mitochondrial morphology. Human neuroblastoma cells were treated with the drug under normal conditions and under conditions imitating aging and the occurrence of ROS (reactive oxygen species) as well as in stably transfected cells with the human wild-type APP (amyloid precursor protein) gene. This AD model is characterized by expressing only 2-fold more human Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) compared with control cells and therefore representing very early stages of AD when Aβ levels gradually increase over decades. Interestingly, these cells exhibit an impaired mitochondrial function and morphology under baseline conditions. Piracetam is able to restore this impairment and shifts mitochondrial morphology back to elongated forms, whereas there is no effect in control cells. After addition of a complex I inhibitor, mitochondrial morphology is distinctly shifted to punctate forms in both cell lines. Under these conditions piracetam is able to ameliorate morphology in cells suffering from the mild Aβ load, as well as mitochondrial dynamics in control cells.

  6. Discrimination between benign and malignant breast lesions using volumetric quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Ziliang; Wu, Zhuo; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumour Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Medical Research Centre, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Shi, Guangzi; Yi, Zhilong; Xie, Mingwei; Zeng, Weike; Song, Chao; Zheng, Chushan [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2018-03-15

    To determine the diagnostic performance of volumetric quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (qDCE-MRI) in differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions. DCE-MRI was performed in 124 patients with 136 breast lesions. Quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, V{sub p} and semi-quantitative parameters TTP, MaxCon, MaxSlope, AUC were obtained by using a two-compartment extended Tofts model and three-dimensional volume of interest. Morphologic features (lesion size, margin, internal enhancement pattern) and time-signal intensity curve (TIC) type were also assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of malignancy, followed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance. qDCE parameters (K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub p}, TTP, MaxCon, MaxSlope and AUC), morphological parameters and TIC type were significantly different between malignant and benign lesions (P≤0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, MaxSlope, size, margin and TIC type were independent predictors of malignancy. The diagnostic accuracy of logistic models based on qDCE parameters alone, morphological features plus TIC type, and all parameters combined was 94.9%, 89.0%, and 95.6% respectively. qDCE-MRI can be used to improve diagnostic differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions in relation to morphology and kinetic analysis. (orig.)

  7. Thermal conductivity enhancement of paraffin by adding boron nitride nanostructures: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Changpeng; Rao, Zhonghao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Different contributions to thermal conductivity are obtained. • Thermal conductivity of paraffin could be improved by boron nitride. • Crystallization effect from boron nitride was the key factor. • Paraffin nanocomposite is the desirable candidate for thermal energy storage. - Abstract: While paraffin is widely used in thermal energy storage today, its low thermal conductivity has become a bottleneck for the further applications. Here, we construct two kinds of paraffin-based phase change material nanocomposites through introducing boron nitride (BN) nanostructures into n-eicosane to enhance the thermal conductivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was adopted to estimate their thermal conductivities and related thermal properties. The results indicate that, after adding BN nanostructures, the latent heat of composites is reduced compared with the pure paraffin and they both show a glass-like thermal conductivity which increases as the temperature rises. This happens because the increasing temperature leads to gradually smaller inconsistency in vibrational density of state along three directions and increasingly significant overlaps among them. Furthermore, by decomposing the thermal conductivity, it is found that the major contribution to the overall thermal conductivity comes from BN nanostructures, while the contribution of n-eicosane is insignificant. Though the thermal conductivity from n-eicosane term is small, it has been improved greatly compared with amorphous state of n-eicosane, mainly due to the crystallization effects from BN nanostructures. This work will provide microscopic views and insights into the thermal mechanism of paraffin and offer effective guidances to enhance the thermal conductivity.

  8. Detection of acute avascular necrosis with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadel, S.N.; Richardson, W.J.; Martinez, S.; Rizk, W.S.; Malizos, K.; Debatin, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Early detection of avascular necrosis (AVN) may allow earlier intervention and lead to improved treatment success. This paper is designed to compare standard and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in the detection of acute AVN. A previously described animal model of AVN was used. Five anesthetized dogs underwent right femoral head devascularization, including placement of a supercooling coil around the femoral neck. Within 3 hours the dogs were imaged in a 1.5-T Signa magnet. Standard T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and STIR images were obtained through both hips. A DiGrass sequence with 30 sequential 3.2-second T1-weighted images was used, and 0.2 mmol/kg gadoteridol was injected intravenously at the start of the sequence at 2 mL/sec with an automated injector. Following imaging, o