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Sample records for enhances protective immunity

  1. Sculpting humoral immunity through dengue vaccination to enhance protective immunity

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    Wayne eCrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important mosquito transmitted viral pathogens infecting humans. DENV infection produces a spectrum of disease, most commonly causing a self-limiting flu-like illness known as dengue fever; yet with increased frequency, manifesting as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Waning cross-protective immunity from any of the four dengue serotypes may enhance subsequent infection with another heterologous serotype to increase the probability of DHF. Decades of effort to develop dengue vaccines are reaching the finishing line with multiple candidates in clinical trials. Nevertheless, concerns remain that imbalanced immunity, due to the prolonged prime-boost schedules currently used in clinical trials, could leave some vaccinees temporarily unprotected or with increased susceptibility to enhanced disease. Here we develop a DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 DNA vaccine with the immunodominant cross-reactive B cell epitopes associated with immune enhancement removed. We compare wild-type (WT with this cross-reactivity reduced (CRR vaccine and demonstrate that both vaccines are equally protective against lethal homologous DENV-1 challenge. Under conditions mimicking natural exposure prior to acquiring protective immunity, WT vaccinated mice enhanced a normally sub-lethal heterologous DENV-2 infection resulting in DHF-like disease and 95% mortality in AG129 mice. However, CRR vaccinated mice exhibited redirected serotype-specific and protective immunity, and significantly reduced morbidity and mortality not differing from naïve mice. Thus, we demonstrate in an in vivo DENV disease model, that non-protective vaccine-induced immunity can prime vaccinees for enhanced DHF-like disease and that CRR DNA immunization significantly reduces this potential vaccine safety concern. The sculpting of immune memory by the modified vaccine and resulting redirection of humoral immunity provide insight into DENV vaccine induced immune

  2. Therapeutic enhancement of protective immunity during experimental leishmaniasis.

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    Senad Divanovic

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropics. Available therapies are problematic due to toxicity, treatment duration and emerging drug resistance. Mouse models of leishmaniasis have demonstrated that disease outcome depends critically on the balance between effector and regulatory CD4(+ T cell responses, something mirrored in descriptive studies of human disease. Recombinant IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (rIL-2/DTx, a drug that is FDA-approved for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, has been reported to deplete regulatory CD4(+ T cells.We investigated the potential efficacy of rIL-2/DTx as adjunctive therapy for experimental infection with Leishmania major. Treatment with rIL-2/DTx suppressed lesional regulatory T cell numbers and was associated with significantly increased antigen-specific IFN-γ production, enhanced lesion resolution and decreased parasite burden. Combined administration of rIL-2/DTx and sodium stibogluconate had additive biological and therapeutic effects, allowing for reduced duration or dose of sodium stibogluconate therapy.These data suggest that pharmacological suppression of immune counterregulation using a commercially available drug originally developed for cancer therapy may have practical therapeutic utility in leishmaniasis. Rational reinvestigation of the efficacy of drugs approved for other indications in experimental models of neglected tropical diseases has promise in providing new candidates to the drug discovery pipeline.

  3. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

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    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  4. Allicin enhances host pro-inflammatory immune responses and protects against acute murine malaria infection

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    Feng Yonghui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malaria infection, multiple pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, TNF and nitric oxide (NO play a crucial role in the protection against the parasites. Modulation of host immunity is an important strategy to improve the outcome of malaria infection. Allicin is the major biologically active component of garlic and shows anti-microbial activity. Allicin is also active against protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, which is thought to be mediated by inhibiting cysteine proteases. In this study, the immunomodulatory activities of allicin were assessed during acute malaria infection using a rodent malaria model Plasmodium yoelii 17XL. Methods To determine whether allicin modulates host immune responses against malaria infection, mice were treated with allicin after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Mortality was checked daily and parasitaemia was determined every other day. Pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-4 were quantified by ELISA, while NO level was determined by the Griess method. The populations of dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, CD4+ T and regulatory T cells (Treg were assessed by FACS. Results Allicin reduced parasitaemia and prolonged survival of the host in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is at least partially due to improved host immune responses. Results showed that allicin treatment enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12p70 and NO. The absolute numbers of CD4+ T cells, DCs and macrophages were significantly higher in allicin-treated mice. In addition, allicin promoted the maturation of CD11c+ DCs, whereas it did not cause major changes in IL-4 and the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Conclusions Allicin could partially protect host against P. yoelii 17XL through enhancement of the host innate and adaptive immune responses.

  5. Stimulation of TLR7 with Gardiquimod Enhances Protection and Activation of Immune Cells from γ-Irradiation Exposure

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    Yang, Young-Mi; Bang, Ji-Young; Lee, Suhl-Hyeong; Moon, Tae-Min; Jung, Yu-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer patients is based on the radiation-induced cell death, but high dose of radiation is able to cause break of immune system. Thus, protection of immune cells from radiation damage is required to enhance the efficiency and reduce the harmful side effects during cancer radiotherapy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important not only in initiating innate immunity against microbial infection, but also inducing Th1-mediated immunity with producing cytokines and chemokines. Cell stimulation via TLRs leads to downstream activation of NF-kB and other transcription factors. Consequently, several genes encoding mediators and effector molecules of the innate as well as the adaptive immune response are transcribed. There are several previous findings that activated immune cells via TLR9 inducing pathways are resistant to chemical or radiation exposure. But it is not clear that the other TLRs also have the same abilities to protect immune cells against cellular damages including γ-irradiation. This research was performed to evaluate protective effect of immune cells from γ-irradiation through TLR-7 activation pathway

  6. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

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    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies.

  7. Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Enhances TsPmy’s Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis Infection in a Murine Model

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    Lei Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available TsPmy is a paramyosin expressed by parasitic Trichinella spiralis and confers a protective immunity when its recombinant protein or DNA was used as an immunogen. To improve its immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy, we conducted a heterologous prime-boost strategy by orally delivering one dose of TsPmy DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207, followed by two doses of recombinant TsPmy intramuscularly. This strategy effectively induced intestinal mucosal sIgA response and an enhanced and balanced Th1/Th2 immune responses that improve protection against T. spiralis larval challenge, with 55.4% muscle larvae reduction and 41.8% adult worm reduction compared to PBS control. The muscle larvae reduction induced by heterologous prime-boost regimen was significant higher than that induced by the homologous DNA or protein prime-boost regimens, which could act as a practical prophylactic approach to prevent T. spiralis infection.

  8. A booster vaccine expressing a latency-associated antigen augments BCG induced immunity and confers enhanced protection against tuberculosis.

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    Bappaditya Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of a consistent protection against tuberculosis (TB in children, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG fails to provide adequate protection against the disease in adults as well as against reactivation of latent infections or exogenous reinfections. It has been speculated that failure to generate adequate memory T cell response, elicitation of inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens and inability to impart long-term immunity against M. tuberculosis infections are some of the key factors responsible for the limited efficiency of BCG in controlling TB. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluated the ability of a DNA vaccine expressing α-crystallin--a key latency antigen of M. tuberculosis to boost the BCG induced immunity. 'BCG prime-DNA boost' regimen (B/D confers robust protection in guinea pigs along with a reduced pathology in comparison to BCG vaccination (1.37 log(10 and 1.96 log(10 fewer bacilli in lungs and spleen, respectively; p<0.01. In addition, B/D regimen also confers enhanced protection in mice. Further, we show that B/D immunization in mice results in a heightened frequency of PPD and antigen specific multi-functional CD4 T cells (3(+ simultaneously producing interferon (IFNγ, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results clearly indicate the superiority of α-crystallin based B/D regimen over BCG. Our study, also demonstrates that protection against TB is predictable by an increased frequency of 3(+ Th1 cells with superior effector functions. We anticipate that this study would significantly contribute towards the development of superior booster vaccines for BCG vaccinated individuals. In addition, this regimen can also be expected to reduce the risk of developing active TB due to reactivation of latent infection.

  9. Recombinant TgHSP70 Immunization Protects against Toxoplasma gondii Brain Cyst Formation by Enhancing Inducible Nitric Oxide Expression

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    Neide M. Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause congenital infection in humans and animals and severe disease in immunocompromised individuals; consequently development of vaccines against the parasite is highly necessary. Under stress conditions, T. gondii expresses the highly immunogenic heat shock protein 70 (TgHSP70. Here, we assessed the protective efficacy of rTgHSP70 immunization combined with Alum in oral ME-49 T. gondii infection and the mechanisms involved on it. It was observed that immunized mice with rTgHSP70 or rTgHSP70 adsorbed in Alum presented a significantly reduced number of cysts in the brain that was associated with increased iNOS+ cell numbers in the organ, irrespective the use of the adjuvant. Indeed, ex vivo experiments showed that peritoneal macrophages pre-stimulated with rTgHSP70 presented increased NO production and enhanced parasite killing, and the protein was able to directly stimulate B cells toward antibody producing profile. In addition, rTgHSP70 immunization leads to high specific antibody titters systemically and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response, with predominance of IgG1 production. Nonetheless, it was observed that the pretreatment of the parasite with rTgHSP70 immune sera was not able to control T. gondii internalization and replication by NIH fibroblast neither peritoneal murine macrophages, nor anti-rTgHSP70 antibodies were able to kill T. gondii by complement-mediated lysis, suggesting that these mechanisms are not crucial to resistance. Interestingly, when in combination with Alum, rTgHSP70 immunization was able to reduce inflammation in the brain of infected mice and in parallel anti-rTgHSP70 immune complexes in the serum. In conclusion, immunization with rTgHSP70 induces massive amounts of iNOS expression and reduced brain parasitism, suggesting that iNOS expression and consequently NO production in the brain is a protective mechanism induced by TgHSP70 immunization, therefore rTgHSP70 can be a good candidate for

  10. Enhanced protection in mice induced by immunization with inactivated whole viruses compare to spike protein of middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

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    Deng, Yao; Lan, Jiaming; Bao, Linlin; Huang, Baoying; Ye, Fei; Chen, Yingzhu; Yao, Yanfeng; Wang, Wenling; Qin, Chuan; Tan, Wenjie

    2018-04-04

    The persistent public health threat of infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) highlights the need for an effective and safe MERS-CoV vaccine. In this study, we prepared and vaccinated mice with either a Spike (S) protein or inactivated whole MERS-CoV (IV) with a combined adjuvant (alum+CpG) as a vaccine formulation. Similar levels of the anti-S protein IgG response and neutralizing activity were induced by both the S protein and IV vaccines. In addition, immune responses against three other structural proteins, the envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins, were also detected in sera of mice that received IV. No antigen-specific T-cell immunity was detected after vaccination based on the interferon-γ ELISpot assay. Mice were transduced with Ad5-hDPP4 after the final immunization and were then challenged with MERS-CoV (1 × 10 5 plaque-forming units). Compared with the control group (adjuvant alone), mice immunized with the S protein or IV showed slightly lower pathological damage in the lung, as well as reduced antigen expression and lung virus titers. Mice that received IV formulations also showed increased protective immunity (almost no live virus was isolated from the lung). In conclusion, our data indicate that immunization with our IV formulation induced enhanced protection in mice compared to immunization with the S protein against MERS-CoV, which should be further tested in camels and clinical trials.

  11. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus.

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    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-04-21

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses.

  12. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

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    Xianliang Ji

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs composed of the hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA and matrix protein (M1 of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1 with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB or ricin toxin B (RTB as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival. Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses.

  13. Nanoparticle formulation enhanced protective immunity provoked by PYGPI8p-transamidase related protein (PyTAM) DNA vaccine in Plasmodium yoelii malaria model.

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    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kodama, Yukinobu; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Yui, Katsuyuki; Tien, Nguyen Huy; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-04-07

    We have previously reported the new formulation of polyethylimine (PEI) with gamma polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanoparticle (NP) to have provided Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-1 (PyMSP-1) plasmid DNA vaccine with enhanced protective cellular and humoral immunity in the lethal mouse malaria model. PyGPI8p-transamidase-related protein (PyTAM) was selected as a possible candidate vaccine antigen by using DNA vaccination screening from 29 GPI anchor and signal sequence motif positive genes picked up using web-based bioinformatics tools; though the observed protection was not complete. Here, we observed augmented protective effect of PyTAM DNA vaccine by using PEI and γ-PGA complex as delivery system. NP-coated PyTAM plasmid DNA immunized mice showed a significant survival rate from lethal P. yoelii challenge infection compared with naked PyTAM plasmid or with NP-coated empty plasmid DNA group. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2b subclass antibody levels, proportion of CD4 and CD8T cells producing IFN-γ in the splenocytes and IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α levels in the sera and in the supernatants from ex vivo splenocytes culture were all enhanced by the NP-coated PyTAM DNA vaccine. These data indicates that NP augments PyTAM protective immune response, and this enhancement was associated with increased DC activation and concomitant IL-12 production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined mTOR inhibition and OX40 agonism enhances CD8(+) T cell memory and protective immunity produced by recombinant adenovirus vaccines.

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    Bassett, Jennifer D; Swift, Stephanie L; VanSeggelen, Heather; Hammill, Joanne A; McGray, A J Robert; Evelegh, Carole; Wan, Yonghong; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2012-04-01

    The memory CD8(+) T cell population elicited by immunization with recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (rHuAd5) vaccines is composed primarily of effector and effector memory cells (T(EM)) with limited polyfunctionality. In this study, we investigated whether treatment with immunomodulators could enhance and/or redistribute the CD8(+) memory population elicited by rHuAd5. Vaccination in combination with both rapamycin (to modulate differentiation) and an OX40 agonist (to enhance costimulation) increased both the quantity and polyfunctionality of the CD8(+) memory T cell population, with expansion of the T(EM) and memory precursor populations. Furthermore, this intervention enhanced protection against multiple virus challenges. Attenuation of adenovirus transgene expression was required to enable the combination rapamycin + OX40 agonist immunomodulatory treatment to further enhance skewing towards central memory formation, indicating that persistence of antigen expression ultimately limits development of this memory population following rHuAd5 immunization. These results demonstrate that during the expansion phase following adenovirus immunization, the level of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, the amount of costimulation and the duration of antigen availability act together to define the magnitude, phenotype, and functionality of memory CD8(+) T cells. Modulation of these factors can be used to selectively manipulate memory formation.

  15. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

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    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancement of the immune response and protection induced by probiotic lactic acid bacteria against furunculosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

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    Balcázar, José Luis; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; Vendrell, Daniel; Gironés, Olivia; Muzquiz, José Luis

    2007-10-01

    We analysed the effect of probiotic strains on the cellular and humoral immune responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and their capacity to prevent furunculosis during a challenge trial. Probiotic strains (Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis CLFP 100, Leuconostoc mesenteroides CLFP 196, and Lactobacillus sakei CLFP 202) were administered orally to fish for 2 weeks at 10(6) CFU g(-1) of feed. In comparison to untreated control fish, the phagocytic activity of head kidney leukocytes and the alternative complement activity in serum were significantly greater in all probiotic groups at the end of the second week. With the exception of the group fed with Lactobacillus sakei, superoxide anion production was also significantly increased in the probiotic groups. Analysis of lysozyme activity did not exhibit any significant difference in the probiotic and control groups. Fifteen days after the start of the probiotic feeding, fish were challenged with Aeromonas salmonicida ssp. salmonicida. The fish supplemented with probiotics exhibited survival rates ranging from 97.8% to 100%, whereas survival was 65.6% in fish not treated with the probiotics. These results demonstrate that probiotic supplementation to fish can reduce the severity of furunculosis, and suggest that this reduction may be associated with enhanced humoral and cellular immune response.

  17. An enhanced immune response of Mclk1⁺/⁻ mutant mice is associated with partial protection from fibrosis, cancer and the development of biomarkers of aging.

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    Dantong Wang

    Full Text Available The immune response is essential for survival by destroying microorganisms and pre-cancerous cells. However, inflammation, one aspect of this response, can result in short- and long-term deleterious side-effects. Mclk1⁺/⁻ mutant mice can be long-lived despite displaying a hair-trigger inflammatory response and chronically activated macrophages as a result of high mitochondrial ROS generation. Here we ask whether this phenotype is beneficial or simply tolerated. We used models of infection by Salmonella serovars and found that Mclk1⁺/⁻ mutants mount a stronger immune response, control bacterial proliferation better, and are resistant to cell and tissue damage resulting from the response, including fibrosis and types of oxidative damage that are considered to be biomarkers of aging. Moreover, these same types of tissue damage were found to be low in untreated 23 months-old mutants. We also examined the initiation of tumour growth after transplantation of mouse LLC1 carcinoma cells into Mclk1⁺/⁻ mutants, as well as during spontaneous tumorigenesis in Mclk1⁺/⁻Trp53⁺/⁻ double mutants. Tumour latency was increased by the Mclk1⁺/⁻ genotype in both models. Furthermore, we used the transplantation model to show that splenic CD8⁺ T lymphocytes from Mclk1⁺/⁻ graft recipients show enhanced cytotoxicity against LLC1 cells in vitro. Mclk1⁺/⁻ mutants thus display an association of an enhanced immune response with partial protection from age-dependent processes and from pathologies similar to those that are found with increased frequency during the aging process. This suggests that the immune phenotype of these mutants might contribute to their longevity. We discuss how these findings suggest a broader view of how the immune response might impact the aging process.

  18. Immunization with electroporation enhances the protective effect of a DNA vaccine candidate expressing prME antigen against dengue virus serotype 2 infection.

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    Chen, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Na; Sheng, Ziyang; Fan, Dongying; Feng, Kaihao; Liao, Xianzheng; An, Jing

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to use the dengue virus (DV) serotype 2 as a proof of principal for testing the efficacy of a DNA vaccine candidate via in vivo electroporation in mice and rabbits prior to the development of a tetravalent vaccine. Different dosages of DNA pVAX1-D2ME encoding DV2 prME genes were vaccinated in mice via intramuscular injection or in vivo electroporation, immune responses and protection were determined. In DNA-vaccinated rabbits via electroporation, antibody titer and protein expression were tested. In mice, 50μg of pVAX1-D2ME via electroporation elicited effective anti-DV2 responses and conferred significant protection against DV2 challenge. Moreover, anti-DV2 IgG and neutralizing antibodies were successfully induced in rabbits immunized with pVAX1-D2ME via electroporation and the expression of the interest protein was observed at local sites. Enhanced immunogenicity and protective effect conferred by pVAX1-D2ME via electroporation show great promise for the development of a dengue tetravalent DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. M cell-targeting strategy facilitates mucosal immune response and enhances protection against CVB3-induced viral myocarditis elicited by chitosan-DNA vaccine.

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    Ye, Ting; Yue, Yan; Fan, Xiangmei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-07-31

    Efficient delivery of antigen to mucosal associated lymphoid tissue is a first and critical step for successful induction of mucosal immunity by vaccines. Considering its potential transcytotic capability, M cell has become a more and more attractive target for mucosal vaccines. In this research, we designed an M cell-targeting strategy by which mucosal delivery system chitosan (CS) was endowed with M cell-targeting ability via conjugating with a CPE30 peptide, C terminal 30 amino acids of clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and then evaluated its immune-enhancing ability in the context of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-specific mucosal vaccine consisting of CS and a plasmid encoding CVB3 predominant antigen VP1. It had shown that similar to CS-pVP1, M cell-targeting CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine appeared a uniform spherical shape with about 300 nm diameter and +22 mV zeta potential, and could efficiently protect DNA from DNase I digestion. Mice were orally immunized with 4 doses of CPE30-CS-pVP1 containing 50 μg pVP1 at 2-week intervals and challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with CS-pVP1 vaccine, CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine had no obvious impact on CVB3-specific serum IgG level and splenic T cell immune responses, but significantly increased specific fecal SIgA level and augmented mucosal T cell immune responses. Consequently, much milder myocarditis and lower viral load were witnessed in CPE30-CS-pVP1 immunized group. The enhanced immunogenicity and immunoprotection were associated with the M cell-targeting ability of CPE30-CS-pVP1 which improved its mucosal uptake and transcytosis. Our findings indicated that CPE30-CS-pVP1 may represent a novel prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis, and this M cell-targeting strategy indeed could be applied as a promising and universal platform for mucosal vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Addition of a TLR7 agonist to an acellular pertussis vaccine enhances Th1 and Th17 responses and protective immunity in a mouse model.

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    Misiak, Alicja; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Allen, Aideen C; Galletti, Bruno; Baudner, Barbara C; D'Oro, Ugo; O'Hagan, Derek T; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Seubert, Anja; Mills, Kingston H G

    2017-09-18

    A resurgence of whooping cough (pertussis) has been observed in recent years in a number of developed countries, despite widespread vaccine coverage. Although the exact reasons of the recurrence of pertussis are not clear, there are a number of potential causes, like antigenic variation in the circulating strains of Bordetella pertussis, changes in surveillance and diagnostic tools, and potential differences in protection afforded by current acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines compared to more reactogenic whole cell (wP) vaccines, which they replaced. Studies in animal models have shown that induction of cellular as well as humoral immune responses are key to conferring effective and long lasting protection against B. pertussis. wP vaccines induce robust Th1/Th17 responses, which are associated with good protection against lung infection. In contrast, aP vaccines induce mixed Th2/Th17 responses. One research option is to modify current aP vaccines with the intention of inducing protective T cell responses, without compromising on their low reactogenicity profile. Here we found that formulation of an aP vaccine with a novel adjuvant based on a Toll-like receptor 7 agonist (TLR7a) adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (alum) enhanced B. pertussis-specific Th1 and Th17 responses and serum IgG2a/b antibodies, which had greater functional capacity than those induced by aP formulated with alum alone. Furthermore, addition of a TLR7a enhanced the protective efficacy of the aP vaccine against B. pertussis aerosol challenge; protection was comparable to that of a wP vaccine. These findings suggest that alum-TLR7a is a promising adjuvant for clinical development of next generation pertussis vaccines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Prophylactic Sublingual Immunization with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Subunit Vaccine Incorporating the Natural Killer T Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide Enhances Protective Immunity to Limit Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Bacterial Burden in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a major global concern and the available Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine is poorly efficacious in adults. Therefore, alternative vaccines and delivery strategies focusing on Mtb antigens and appropriate immune stimulating adjuvants are needed to induce protective immunity targeted to the lungs, the primary sites of infections and pathology. We present here evidence in support of mucosal vaccination by the sublingual route in mice using the subunit Mtb antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 adjuvanted with the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a potent natural killer T (NKT cell agonist. Vaccinated animals exhibited strong antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells responses in the spleen, cervical lymph nodes and lungs. In general, inclusion of the α-GalCer adjuvant significantly enhanced these responses that persisted over 50 days. Furthermore, aerosolized Mtb infection of vaccinated mice resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial load of the lungs and spleens as compared to levels seen in naïve controls or those vaccinated with subunit proteins, adjuvant , or BCG alone. The protection induced by the Mtb antigens and-GalCer vaccine through sublingual route correlated with a TH1-type immunity mediated by antigen-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 producing T cells.

  2. Enhanced immune response and protective effects of nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine encoding T cell epitopes of Esat-6 and FL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganzhu Feng

    Full Text Available Development of a novel and effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb is a challenging for preventing TB infection. In this study, a novel nanoparticle-based recombinant DNA vaccine was developed, which contains Esat-6 three T cell epitopes (Esat-6/3e and fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL genes (termed Esat-6/3e-FL, and was enveloped with chitosan (CS nanoparticles (nano-chitosan. The immunologic and protective efficacy of the nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine (termed nano-Esat-6/3e-FL was assessed in C57BL/6 mice after intramuscular prime vaccination with the plasmids DNA and nasal boost with the Esat-6/3e peptides. The results showed that the immunized mice remarkably elicited enhanced T cell responses and protection against M.tb H37Rv challenge. These findings indicate that the nano-chitosan can significantly elevate the immunologic and protective effects of the DNA vaccine, and the nano-Esat-6/3e-FL is a useful vaccine for preventing M.tb infection in mice.

  3. Protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi provided by oral immunization with Phytomonas serpens: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinge-Filho, P; Peron, J P S; de Moura, T R; Menolli, R A; Graça, V K; Estevão, D; Tadokoro, C E; Jankevicius, J V; Rizzo, L V

    2005-01-31

    We have previously demonstrated that Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoa that causes Chagas' disease. These antigens are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in Balb/c mice. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 mice treated with the nitric oxide inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 50 mg kg(-1)) infected with T. cruzi, were used to demonstrate the role of nitric oxide (NO) to host protection against T. cruzi infection achieved by oral immunization with live P. serpens. A reduction in parasitaemia and an increase in survival were observed in C57BL/6 infected mice and previously immunized with P. serpens, when compared to non-immunized mice. iNOS (KO) mice immunized and C57BL/6 immunized and treated with AG presented parasitaemia and mortality rates comparable to those of infected and non-immunized mice. By itself, immunization with P. serpens did not induce inflammation in the myocardium, but C57BL/6 mice so immunized showed fewer amastigotes nests in the heart following an acute T. cruzi infection than those in non-immunized mice. These results suggest that protective immunity against T. cruzi infection induced by immunization with P. serpens is dependent upon enhanced NO production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection.

  4. Priming Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae with heat-killed bacterial cells induced an enhanced immune protection against Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 and the role of innate immunity in the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongqing; Zhao, Zengyang; Liu, Chunlin; Qiu, Lihong

    2014-04-01

    The current study investigated the characteristics and mechanism of the invertebrate immune priming using Galleria mellonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae (host) and Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 (pathogen) as a model. The following parameters of the G. mellonella larvae primed by hemocoel injection of heat-killed cells of TT01 or Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1 were determined at designated times after priming and then compared and analyzed systematically: mortality of the primed larvae against TT01 infection (immune protection level), hemocyte density, phagocytosis and encapsulation abilities ofhemocyte, and antibacterial activity of cell free hemolymph (major innate parameters). The results showed that 1) immune priming increased survival of the larvae against a lethal infection of TT01 and the levels and periods of protection correlated positively to the priming dose; 2) the changes on the levels of protection and the major innate parameters of the larvae primed with either TT01 or HD-1 followed a similar pattern of the convex curve, although the levels and the timing of changes differed significantly among the four innate immune parameters and between two priming bacteria; and 3) the immune protection level at a time after priming was correlated to the overall level of four innate immune parameters of the primed larvae. The current study demonstrated that the immune priming phenomenon of G. mellonella larvae has low level of specificity, and it was achieved mainly by the regulation on the quantity and activity of major innate immune parameters, such as hemocytes, antimicrobial peptides, and enzymes.

  5. Human monoclonal antibodies against anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen act independently to protect against Bacillus anthracis infection and enhance endogenous immunity to anthrax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Mark T.; Li, Han; Williamson, E. Diane; LeButt, Chris S.; Flick-Smith, Helen C.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Westra, Hans; Galloway, Darrell; Mateczun, Alfred; Goldman, Stanley; Groen, Herman; Baillie, Les W. J.

    2007-01-01

    The unpredictable nature of bioterrorism and the absence of real-time detection systems have highlighted the need for an efficient postexposure therapy for Bacillus anthracis infection. One approach is passive immunization through the administration of antibodies that mitigate the biological action

  6. Community Immunity: How Vaccines Protect Us All

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... October 2011 Print this issue Community Immunity How Vaccines Protect Us All Send us your comments Parents ... NIH and others proves that the benefits of vaccines in preventing illness and death greatly outweigh the ...

  7. Enhancement of Th1-biased protective immunity against avian influenza H9N2 virus via oral co-administration of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interferon-α and interleukin-18 along with an inactivated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Md

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of currently circulating re-assorted low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI H9N2 is a major concern for both animal and human health. Thus, an improved LPAI H9N2 vaccination strategy is needed to induce complete immunity in chickens against LPAI H9N2 virus strains. Cytokines play a crucial role in mounting both the type and extent of an immune response generated following infection with a pathogen or after vaccination. To improve the efficacy of inactivated LPAI H9N2 vaccine, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was used for oral co-administration of chicken interferon-α (chIFN-α and chicken interleukin-18 (chIL-18 as natural immunomodulators. Results Oral co-administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18, prior to vaccination with inactivated AI H9N2 vaccine, modulated the immune response of chickens against the vaccine antigen through enhanced humoral and Th1-biased cell-mediated immunity, compared to chickens that received single administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing either chIFN-α or chIL-18. To further test the protective efficacy of this improved vaccination regimen, immunized chickens were intra-tracheally challenged with a high dose of LPAI H9N2 virus. Combined administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18 showed markedly enhanced protection compared to single administration of the construct, as determined by mortality, clinical severity, and feed and water intake. This enhancement of protective immunity was further confirmed by reduced rectal shedding and replication of AIV H9N2 in different tissues of challenged chickens. Conclusions Our results indicate the value of combined administration of chIFN-α and chIL-18 using a Salmonella vaccine strain to generate an effective immunization strategy in chickens against LPAI H9N2.

  8. EPSP of L. casei BL23 Protected against the Infection Caused by Aeromonas veronii via Enhancement of Immune Response in Zebrafish

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    Chubin Qin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector in the world, and it supplies nearly 50% of the global food fish supply. However, disease outbreaks have become a major problem in the fish farming industry. The beneficial contribution of probiotic bacteria to aquatic animals’ health has been widely described, and they have been widely used in aquaculture for disease control and growth promotion. However, the action of probiotic bacterial components and mechanisms underlying protection against pathogens afforded by probiotic bacteria remain poorly understood. In the present study, we pre-colonized zebrafish larvae (before hatching with 17 potential probiotic bacterial strains and screened for those possessing anti-infective effects against Aeromonas veronii. We found that Lactobacillus casei BL23 significantly increased the survival of zebrafish larvae upon A. veronii infection. Using a germ-free (GF zebrafish model and gut microbiota transplant experiment, we showed that L. casei BL23 per se has anti-infective effects in zebrafish larvae, which does not involve microbiota. Furthermore, we identified an exopolysaccharide-protein complex (EPSP extracted from L. casei BL23 cells, which consisted of a 40–45 KD size protein and an exopolysaccharide composed of α-Rha, α-Glc, β-GlcNAc, and β-GalNAc. EPSP significantly increased the survival rate of GF zebrafish at a dose of 10–20 μg/ml after A. veronii infection (P < 0.01. In addition, the EPSP induced a higher expression of TLR1 and TLR2, and modulated the expression profile of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in zebrafish liver (ZFL cells. Our data indicated that the anti-infective effect of EPSP from L. casei BL23 was mediated by enhancement of immune responses in zebrafish, which might involve the TLR1/TLR2 signal pathway.

  9. EPSP of L. casei BL23 Protected against the Infection Caused by Aeromonas veronii via Enhancement of Immune Response in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chubin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Yibing; Li, Shuning; Ran, Chao; Hu, Jun; Xie, Yadong; Li, Weifen; Zhou, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector in the world, and it supplies nearly 50% of the global food fish supply. However, disease outbreaks have become a major problem in the fish farming industry. The beneficial contribution of probiotic bacteria to aquatic animals' health has been widely described, and they have been widely used in aquaculture for disease control and growth promotion. However, the action of probiotic bacterial components and mechanisms underlying protection against pathogens afforded by probiotic bacteria remain poorly understood. In the present study, we pre-colonized zebrafish larvae (before hatching) with 17 potential probiotic bacterial strains and screened for those possessing anti-infective effects against Aeromonas veronii . We found that Lactobacillus casei BL23 significantly increased the survival of zebrafish larvae upon A. veronii infection. Using a germ-free (GF) zebrafish model and gut microbiota transplant experiment, we showed that L. casei BL23 per se has anti-infective effects in zebrafish larvae, which does not involve microbiota. Furthermore, we identified an exopolysaccharide-protein complex (EPSP) extracted from L. casei BL23 cells, which consisted of a 40-45 KD size protein and an exopolysaccharide composed of α-Rha, α-Glc, β-GlcNAc, and β-GalNAc. EPSP significantly increased the survival rate of GF zebrafish at a dose of 10-20 μg/ml after A. veronii infection ( P casei BL23 was mediated by enhancement of immune responses in zebrafish, which might involve the TLR1/TLR2 signal pathway.

  10. Virus subversion of protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Eric W; Dugan, Gillian E

    2004-09-01

    The major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway plays a pivotal role in immunity to viruses. MHC class I molecules are expressed on the cell surface of all nucleated cells and present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), which then eliminate virally infected cells. However, many viruses have evolved proteins to inhibit the MHC class I pathway, thus enabling virally infected cells to escape CTL lysis. In this review, we summarize recent findings about viral inhibition of the MHC class I pathway.

  11. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection

    OpenAIRE

    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at...

  12. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A; Greenberg, Harry B

    2012-08-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses (RVs) have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at an early age. Studies in developing countries indicate that rotavirus-specific serum IgA levels are not an optimal correlate of protection following vaccination, and better correlates need to be identified. Protection against rotavirus following vaccination is substantially heterotypic; nonetheless, a role for homotypic immunity in selection of circulating postvaccination strains needs further study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Built-In CpG Adjuvant in RSV F Protein DNA Vaccine Drives a Th1 Polarized and Enhanced Protective Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most significant cause of acute lower respiratory infection in children. However, there is no licensed vaccine available. Here, we investigated the effect of five or 20 copies of C-Class of CpG ODN (CpG-C motif incorporated into a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding RSV fusion (F glycoprotein on the vaccine-induced immune response. The addition of CpG-C motif enhanced serum binding and virus-neutralizing antibody responses in BALB/c mice immunized with the DNA vaccines. Moreover, mice vaccinated with CpG-modified vaccines, especially with the higher 20 copies, resulted in an enhanced shift toward a Th1-biased antibody and T-cell response, a decrease in pulmonary pathology and virus replication, and a decrease in weight loss after RSV challenge. This study suggests that CpG-C motif, cloned into the backbone of DNA vaccine encoding RSV F glycoprotein, functions as a built-in adjuvant capable of improving the efficacy of DNA vaccine against RSV infection.

  14. Enhancing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    When a new radiotherapy center in Gezira, Sudan, delivers its first therapeutic dose to a cancer patient, two things happen: A young man begins to regain his health and looks forward to being better able to support his family and contribute to his community; and a developing nation realizes an important step toward deriving the social and economic benefits of nuclear science. The strategic application of nuclear technology in particular fields- human health, industry, food and agriculture, energy, water resources and environmental protection - has enormous potential to help shape the future of developing countries. But past radiological incidents, several of which involved high levels of exposure or death (Bolivia, Brazil, Cost Rica, Georgia, Ghana, Morocco, Panama and Thailand), underscore the inherent and very serious risks. For this reason, the IAEA's Departments of Technical Cooperation and Nuclear Safety and Security partner closely, particularly in the area of radiation protection. They strive to consider every minute detail in the equation that brings together radiation sources, modern technologies, people and the environment. Launched in 1996, the Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (the Model Project) aimed to help Member States: achieve capacities that underpin the safe and secure application of nuclear technologies; establish a legislative framework and regulatory infrastructure; develop exposure control mechanisms to protect workers, medical patients, the public and the environment; and achieve preparedness and planned response to radiological emergencies. In fact, the hospital scenario above typically marks several years of intense collaboration amongst scientists, legislators, regulators, politicians and administrators from both Member States and the IAEA, orchestrated and aided by regional managers and technical experts from the IAEA. As radiation protection team members can attest, every application of nuclear technology

  15. In vivo targeting of human DC-SIGN drastically enhances CD8⁺ T-cell-mediated protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Christina; Ginter, Wiebke; Förg, Theresa; Mayer, Christian T; Baru, Abdul Mannan; Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Unger, Wendy W J; Kalay, Hakan; van Kooyk, Yvette; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2013-10-01

    Vaccination is one of the oldest yet still most effective methods to prevent infectious diseases. However, eradication of intracellular pathogens and treatment of certain diseases like cancer requiring efficient cytotoxic immune responses remain a medical challenge. In mice, a successful approach to induce strong cytotoxic CD8⁺ T-cell (CTL) reactions is to target antigens to DCs using specific antibodies against surface receptors in combination with adjuvants. A major drawback for translating this strategy into one for the clinic is the lack of analogous targets in human DCs. DC-SIGN (DC-specific-ICAM3-grabbing-nonintegrin/CD209) is a C-type lectin receptor with potent endocytic capacity and a highly restricted expression on human immature DCs. Therefore, DC-SIGN represents an ideal candidate for DC targeting. Using transgenic mice that express human DC-SIGN under the control of the murine CD11c promoter (hSIGN mice), we explored the efficacy of anti-DC-SIGN antibodies to target antigens to DCs and induce protective immune responses in vivo. We show that anti-DC-SIGN antibodies conjugated to OVA induced strong and persistent antigen-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell responses, which efficiently protected from infection with OVA-expressing Listeria monocytogenes. Thus, we propose DC targeting via DC-SIGN as a promising strategy for novel vaccination protocols against intracellular pathogens. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. CD40L-adjuvanted DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara simian immunodeficiency virus SIV239 vaccine enhances SIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity and improves protection against a heterologous SIVE660 mucosal challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwa, Suefen; Lai, Lilin; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Siddiqui, Mariam; Pillai, Vinod B; Labranche, Celia; Yu, Tianwei; Moss, Bernard; Montefiori, David C; Robinson, Harriet L; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Amara, Rama Rao

    2014-09-01

    It remains a challenge to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine that is capable of preventing infection. Here, we utilized the benefits of CD40L, a costimulatory molecule that can stimulate both dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells, as an adjuvant for our simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques. We coexpressed the CD40L with our DNA/SIV vaccine such that the CD40L is anchored on the membrane of SIV virus-like particle (VLP). These CD40L containing SIV VLPs showed enhanced activation of DCs in vitro. We then tested the potential of DNA/SIV-CD40L vaccine to adjuvant the DNA prime of a DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine in rhesus macaques. Our results demonstrated that the CD40L adjuvant enhanced the functional quality of anti-Env antibody response and breadth of anti-SIV CD8 and CD4 T cell responses, significantly delayed the acquisition of heterologous mucosal SIV infection, and improved viral control. Notably, the CD40L adjuvant enhanced the control of viral replication in the gut at the site of challenge that was associated with lower mucosal CD8 immune activation, one of the strong predictors of disease progression. Collectively, our results highlight the benefits of CD40L adjuvant for enhancing antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, leading to enhanced protection against a pathogenic SIV. A single adjuvant that enhances both humoral and cellular immunity is rare and thus underlines the importance and practicality of CD40L as an adjuvant for vaccines against infectious diseases, including HIV-1. Despite many advances in the field of AIDS research, an effective AIDS vaccine that can prevent infection remains elusive. CD40L is a key stimulator of dendritic cells and B cells and can therefore enhance T cell and antibody responses, but its overly potent nature can lead to adverse effects unless used in small doses. In order to modulate local expression of CD40L at relatively lower levels, we expressed

  17. Studies on the transfer of protective immunity with lymphoid cells from mice immune to malaria sporozoites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhave, J.P.; Strickland, G.T.; Jaffe, H.A.; Ahmed, A.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms involved in the protective immunity to malarial sporozoites, an A/J mouse/Plasmodium berghei model was studied. Protective immunity could consistently be adoptively transferred only by using sublethal irradiation of recipients (500 R); a spleen equivalent (100 x 10 6 ) of donor cells from immune syngeneic mice; and a small booster immunization (1 x 10 4 ) of recipients with irradiation-attenuated sporozoites. Recipient animals treated in this manner were protected from lethal challenge with 1 x 10 4 nonattenuated sporozoites. Immune and nonimmune serum and spleen cells from nonimmune animals did not protect recipient mice. Fewer immune spleen cells (50 x 10 6 ) protected some recipients. In vitro treatment of immune spleen cells with anti-theta sera and complement abolished their ability to transfer protection. This preliminary study suggests that protective sporozoite immunity can be transferred with cells, and that it is T cell dependent

  18. Distributed Computation Environment Protection Based on Artificial Immune System Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Andreevich Krasnopevtsev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to a new approach to Grid-network protection against malware, based on artificial immune system usage. In the article possible Grid-network attacks, immune system coordinator architecture, immune system modules architecture, Grid-network system protection architecture are described.

  19. Enhancing protection for vulnerable waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Irena F.; Lane, Charles R.; Serran, Jacqueline N.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Basu, Nandita B.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Christensen, Jay R.; Cohen, Matthew J.; Craft, Christopher; D'Amico, Ellen; Dekeyser, Edward; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E.; Jawitz, James W.; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L. Katherine; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G.; Lewis, David B.; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L.; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C.; Rains, Kai C.; Smith, Lora

    2017-11-01

    Governments worldwide do not adequately protect their limited freshwater systems and therefore place freshwater functions and attendant ecosystem services at risk. The best available scientific evidence compels enhanced protections for freshwater systems, especially for impermanent streams and wetlands outside of floodplains that are particularly vulnerable to alteration or destruction. New approaches to freshwater sustainability -- implemented through scientifically informed adaptive management -- are required to protect freshwater systems through periods of changing societal needs. One such approach introduced in the US in 2015 is the Clean Water Rule, which clarified the jurisdictional scope for federally protected waters. However, within hours of its implementation litigants convinced the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit to stay the rule, and the subsequently elected administration has now placed it under review for potential revision or rescission. Regardless of its outcome at the federal level, policy and management discussions initiated by the propagation of this rare rulemaking event have potential far-reaching implications at all levels of government across the US and worldwide. At this timely juncture, we provide a scientific rationale and three policy options for all levels of government to meaningfully enhance protection of these vulnerable waters. A fourth option, a 'do-nothing' approach, is wholly inconsistent with the well-established scientific evidence of the importance of these vulnerable waters.

  20. Distributed Computations Environment Protection Using Artificial Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Moiseev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors describe possibility of artificial immune systems applying for distributed computations environment protection from definite types of malicious impacts.

  1. Immunomodulator-based enhancement of anti smallpox immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmarie Martínez

    Full Text Available The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists, and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein.We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation.The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections.These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform.

  2. Protective Effect of Panax notoginseng Root Water Extract against Influenza A Virus Infection by Enhancing Antiviral Interferon-Mediated Immune Responses and Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Gi Choi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory illness caused by the influenza A virus, which causes economic losses and social disruption mainly by increasing hospitalization and mortality rates among the elderly and people with chronic diseases. Influenza vaccines are the most effective means of preventing seasonal influenza, but can be completely ineffective if there is an antigenic mismatch between the seasonal vaccine virus and the virus circulating in the community. In addition, influenza viruses resistant to antiviral drugs are emerging worldwide. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines and antiviral drugs against these viruses. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo analyses of the antiviral effect of Panax notoginseng root (PNR, which is used as an herbal medicine and nutritional supplement in Korea and China. We confirmed that PNR significantly prevented influenza virus infection in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. In addition, PNR pretreatment inhibited viral protein (PB1, PB2, HA, NA, M1, PA, M2, and NP and viral mRNA (NS1, HA, PB2, PA, NP, M1, and M2 expression. PNR pretreatment also increased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6] and interferon (IFN-beta and the phosphorylation of type-I IFN-related proteins (TANK-binding kinase 1, STAT1, and IRF3 in vitro. In mice exposed to the influenza A H1N1 virus, PNR treatment decreased mortality by 90% and prevented weight loss (by approximately 10% compared with the findings in untreated animals. In addition, splenocytes from PNR-administered mice displayed significantly enhanced natural killer (NK cell activity against YAC-1 cells. Taking these findings together, PNR stimulates an antiviral response in murine macrophages and mice that protects against viral infection, which may be attributable to its ability to stimulate NK cell activity. Further investigations are needed to reveal the molecular

  3. An Increase in Antimycobacterial Th1-Cell Responses by Prime-Boost Protocols of Immunization Does Not Enhance Protection against Tuberculosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majlessi, L.; Šimšová, Marcela; Jarvis, Zdeňka; Brodin, P.; Rojas, M. J.; Bauche, C.; Nouzé, C.; Ladant, D.; Cole, S. T.; Šebo, Peter; Leclerc, C.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2006), s. 2128-2137 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : adenylate cyclase * mycobacterium tuberculosis * immunity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.004, year: 2006

  4. Protective immunity against recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infection requires antibody and interleukin-17A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Christopher P; Daniels, Melvin; Zhao, Fan; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Chong, Anita S; Daum, Robert S

    2014-05-01

    Although many microbial infections elicit an adaptive immune response that can protect against reinfection, it is generally thought that Staphylococcus aureus infections fail to generate protective immunity despite detectable T and B cell responses. No vaccine is yet proven to prevent S. aureus infections in humans, and efforts to develop one have been hampered by a lack of animal models in which protective immunity occurs. Our results describe a novel mouse model of protective immunity against recurrent infection, in which S. aureus skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) strongly protected against secondary SSTI in BALB/c mice but much less so in C57BL/6 mice. This protection was dependent on antibody, because adoptive transfer of immune BALB/c serum or purified antibody into either BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice resulted in smaller skin lesions. We also identified an antibody-independent mechanism, because B cell-deficient mice were partially protected against secondary S. aureus SSTI and adoptive transfer of T cells from immune BALB/c mice resulted in smaller lesions upon primary infection. Furthermore, neutralization of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) abolished T cell-mediated protection in BALB/c mice, whereas neutralization of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enhanced protection in C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, protective immunity against recurrent S. aureus SSTI was advanced by antibody and the Th17/IL-17A pathway and prevented by the Th1/IFN-γ pathway, suggesting that targeting both cell-mediated and humoral immunity might optimally protect against secondary S. aureus SSTI. These findings also highlight the importance of the mouse genetic background in the development of protective immunity against S. aureus SSTI.

  5. Differential protective effects of immune lymphoid cells against transplanted line Ib leukemia and immune polioencephalomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, P.S.; Lukasewycz, O.A.; Olson, D.S.; Murphy, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The capacity of immune cells obtained from the major lymphoid compartments to protect C58 mice from transplanted line Ib leukemia, and from an age-dependent autoimmune CNS disease (immune polioencephalomyelitis = IPE) elicited by immunizing old C58 mice with inactivated Ib cells was quantified. Cells used for comparative adoptive protection tests were harvested from the major lymphoid compartments 14 to 15 days after young C58 mice were immunized with inactivated Ib cell preparations. Regression curves were plotted from survival data and the log 10 PD 50 values were determined. Immune spleen (ISC) and peritoneal cells (IPEC) were significantly more protective against transplanted Ib cells than immune lymph node (ILNC), thymic (ITC), and marrow cells (IMC). In contrast, IPEC and IMC were not protective against IPE and ITC were only marginally protective. ILNC afforded significant protection to transplantable leukemia but were only marginally protective to IPE. When ISC were treated with anti-thy 1.2 serum and complement, protection against transplanted leukemia and IPE was reduced > 99%. When donors of immune lymphoid cells were treated with 12.5 mg of cortisone acetate daily for 2 days before lymphoid cells were harvested, protection against transplanted Ib cells by ISC was reduced by approximately 90% whereas protection against IPE was totally eliminated. Considered together, these results indicate that the protective mechanisms to transplantable leukemia and IPE differ significantly in the same indicator mouse strain

  6. Enhancing crop innate immunity: new promising trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Yao eHuang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to potentially pathogenic microbes present in their surrounding environment. Due to the activation of the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI response that largely relies on accurate detection of pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, plants are resistant to the majority of potential pathogens. However, adapted pathogens may avoid recognition or repress plant PTI and resulting diseases significantly affect crop yield worldwide. PTI provides protection against a wide range of pathogens. Reinforcement of PTI through genetic engineering may thus generate crops with broad-spectrum field resistance. In this review, new approaches based on fundamental discoveries in PTI to improve crop immunity are discussed. Notably, we highlight recent studies describing the interfamily transfer of PRRs or key regulators of PTI signalling.

  7. Sublingual immunization with a live attenuated influenza a virus lacking the nonstructural protein 1 induces broad protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jung Park

    Full Text Available The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of influenza A virus (IAV enables the virus to disarm the host cell type 1 IFN defense system. Mutation or deletion of the NS1 gene leads to attenuation of the virus and enhances host antiviral response making such live-attenuated influenza viruses attractive vaccine candidates. Sublingual (SL immunization with live influenza virus has been found to be safe and effective for inducing protective immune responses in mucosal and systemic compartments. Here we demonstrate that SL immunization with NS1 deleted IAV (DeltaNS1 H1N1 or DeltaNS1 H5N1 induced protection against challenge with homologous as well as heterosubtypic influenza viruses. Protection was comparable with that induced by intranasal (IN immunization and was associated with high levels of virus-specific antibodies (Abs. SL immunization with DeltaNS1 virus induced broad Ab responses in mucosal and systemic compartments and stimulated immune cells in mucosa-associated and systemic lymphoid organs. Thus, SL immunization with DeltaNS1 offers a novel potential vaccination strategy for the control of influenza outbreaks including pandemics.

  8. Sublingual immunization with a live attenuated influenza a virus lacking the nonstructural protein 1 induces broad protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jung; Ferko, Boris; Byun, Young-Ho; Song, Joo-Hye; Han, Gye-Yeong; Roethl, Elisabeth; Egorov, Andrej; Muster, Thomas; Seong, Baiklin; Kweon, Mi-Na; Song, Manki; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Nguyen, Huan H

    2012-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus (IAV) enables the virus to disarm the host cell type 1 IFN defense system. Mutation or deletion of the NS1 gene leads to attenuation of the virus and enhances host antiviral response making such live-attenuated influenza viruses attractive vaccine candidates. Sublingual (SL) immunization with live influenza virus has been found to be safe and effective for inducing protective immune responses in mucosal and systemic compartments. Here we demonstrate that SL immunization with NS1 deleted IAV (DeltaNS1 H1N1 or DeltaNS1 H5N1) induced protection against challenge with homologous as well as heterosubtypic influenza viruses. Protection was comparable with that induced by intranasal (IN) immunization and was associated with high levels of virus-specific antibodies (Abs). SL immunization with DeltaNS1 virus induced broad Ab responses in mucosal and systemic compartments and stimulated immune cells in mucosa-associated and systemic lymphoid organs. Thus, SL immunization with DeltaNS1 offers a novel potential vaccination strategy for the control of influenza outbreaks including pandemics.

  9. Pathological and protective immunity to Pneumocystis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddens, Taylor; Kolls, Jay K

    2015-03-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a common opportunistic infection in the HIV-positive population and is re-emerging as a growing clinical concern in the HIV-negative immunosuppressed population. Newer targeted immunosuppressive therapies and the discovery of rare genetic mutations have furthered our understanding of the immunity required to clear Pneumocystis infection. The immune system can also mount a pathologic response against Pneumocystis following removal of immunosuppression and result in severe damage to the host lung. The current review will examine the most recent epidemiologic studies about the incidence of Pneumocystis in the HIV-positive and HIV-negative populations in the developing and developed world and will detail methods of diagnosis for Pneumocystis pneumonia. Finally, this review aims to summarize the known mediators of immunity to Pneumocystis and detail the pathologic immune response leading to Pneumocystis-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  10. Indirect effects by meningococcal vaccines: herd protection versus herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael

    2011-08-01

    The term "herd immunity" for the indirect effect of meningococcal conjugate vaccines is inaccurate. A more appropriate term is "herd protection," because this term correctly describes the public effects imparted by vaccination campaigns against the meningococcus.

  11. Induction of protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that mice immunized by pcROP1 with or without alum produced high Th1 immune response compared with control groups. This type of DNA vaccine prolonged slightly the survival time. The current study showed that ROP1 DNA vaccine can induced partial protective response against toxoplasmosis.

  12. Active protection against rotavirus infection of mice following intraperitoneal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, M M; Sheridan, J F; Ward, R L

    1992-11-01

    Active immunity to rotavirus has been demonstrated following oral inoculation with live virus but little is known about the effects of parenteral immunization. In this study, adult mice were immunized by intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation with live rotaviruses and later orally challenged with murine rotavirus (EDIM) to measure active immunity against infection. Three doses of EDIM (8 micrograms/dose) given intraperitoneally (ip) provided full protection against EDIM infection, whether administered with or without Freund's adjuvant. Only partial protection was found when the quantity of immunogen was reduced to protection of all mice. Significant protection was also observed after inoculation with one or three doses (2 micrograms/dose) of heterologous rotaviruses. Protection provided by the heterologous strains did not correlate with neutralizing antibody to EDIM, which indicated that neutralizing antibody to the challenge virus was not required for protection. uv-Inactivated EDIM also provided significant protection against EDIM, thus demonstrating that viral replication was not required for protection. These results suggest that parenteral immunization may be an effective method to vaccinate against rotavirus disease.

  13. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  14. Protective immune responses in lawsonia intracellularis infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Boutrup, Torsten

    and no increase in acute phase response after challenge with a pathogenic isolate. Here we show results from measurements of serology as well as cell-mediated immune responses from this experiment. We found that Lawsonia-specific IgA peaked in serum around day 17-24 after a primary infection in experimentally......, but exhibited a high, but short-lasting peak after re-infection. Specific IFN responses were also measured using a whole blood IFN-γ assay. These were very high in challenge infected and re-infected animals as compared to controls. These specific immune responses may contribute to the explanation of mechanisms......Lawsonia intracellularis is the cause of porcine proliferative enteropathy, one of the major causes of antibiotics usage in modern pig production. L. intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium preferable infecting epithelial cells of pigs intestine. We have demonstrated earlier...

  15. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    , through recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers loaded with relevant peptides, has opened a new vista to include CTL responses in the evaluation of protective immune responses. Here, we review different immune markers and new candidates for correlates of a protective vaccine......Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers...... of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against...

  16. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajikawa, A.; Satoh, E.; Leer, R.J.; Yamamoto, S.; Igimi, S.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization

  17. Enhancement of Immune Memory Responses to Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0360 TITLE: Enhancement of Immune Memory Responses to Respiratory Infection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORs: Dr Min Chen PhD...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancement of Immune Memory Responses to Respiratory Infection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0360 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...entitled “ENHANCEMENT OF IMMUNE MEMORY RESPONSES TO RESPIRATORY INFECTION : AUTOPHAGY IN MEMORY B-CELLS RESPONSE TO INFLUENZA VACCINE (AMBRIV

  18. rEnolase maternal immunization confers caries protection on offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, M; Trigo, G; Chaves, N; Fonseca, A J M M; Ribeiro, A; Tavares, D; Cabrita, A M S; Ferreira, P

    2011-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccination with Streptococcus sobrinus recombinant enolase (rEnolase) protects rats from dental caries. Here, we investigated the effect that maternal rEnolase vaccination before pregnancy had on the offspring's immune response to S. sobrinus oral infection and dental caries progression. Female Wistar rats were immunized by intranasal and subcutaneous routes with rEnolase adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant or similarly treated with the adjuvant alone (sham-immunized). Ten days after the last administration, the immunized females were paired with a male rat. The oral immune responses to S. sobrinus infection and dental caries in the offspring were evaluated. The results showed that pups born from rEnolase-immunized mothers had higher levels of rEnolase-specific salivary IgA and IgG antibodies (indicating a placental antibody transfer) and lower sulcal and proximal enamel caries scores than rats born from sham-immunized mothers. In conclusion, rEnolase maternal immunization before pregnancy provides offspring with protection against S. sobrinus-induced dental caries.

  19. Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    protection against rotavirus infection of mice stimulated by intranasal immunization with chimeric VP4 or VP6 protein. J Virol 1999;73(9):7574–81. [13] Choi...McNeal MM, Rae MN, Bean JA, Ward RL. Antibody-dependent and -independent protection following intranasal immunization of mice with rotavirus particles. J...Williamson ED, Sharp GJ, Eley SM, Vesey PM, Pepper TC, Titball RW, et al. Local and systemic immune response to a microencapsu- lated sub-unit vaccine for

  20. Restoration of innate immune activation accelerates Th1-cell priming and protection following pulmonary mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rocky; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Shaler, Christopher R; Damjanovic, Daniela; Khera, Amandeep; Horvath, Carly; Ashkar, Ali A; Xing, Zhou

    2014-05-01

    The immune mechanisms underlying delayed induction of Th1-type immunity in the lungs following pulmonary mycobacterial infection remain poorly understood. We have herein investigated the underlying immune mechanisms for such delayed responses and whether a selected innate immune-modulating strategy can accelerate Th1-type responses. We have found that, in the early stage of pulmonary infection with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb H37Ra), the levels of infection in the lung continue to increase logarithmically until days 14 and 21 postinfection in C57BL/6 mice. The activation of innate immune responses, particularly DCs, in the lung is delayed. This results in a delay in the subsequent downstream immune responses including the migration of antigen-bearing DCs to the draining lymph node (dLN), the Th1-cell priming in dLN, and the recruitment of Th1 cells to the lung. However, single lung mucosal exposure to the TLR agonist FimH postinfection is able to accelerate protective Th1-type immunity via facilitating DC migration to the lung and draining lymph nodes, enhancing DC antigen presentation and Th1-cell priming. These findings hold implications for the development of immunotherapeutic and vaccination strategies and suggest that enhancement of early innate immune activation is a viable option for improving Th1-type immunity against pulmonary mycobacterial diseases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Cytomegalovirus in the Neonate: Immune Correlates of Infection and Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Schleiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal and neonatal infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (CMV are important causes of morbidity and occasional mortality. Development of a vaccine against congenital CMV infection is a major public health priority. Vaccine design is currently focused on strategies that aim to elicit neutralizing antibody and T-cell responses, toward the goal of preventing primary or recurrent infection in women of child-bearing age. However, there has been relatively little attention given to understanding the mechanisms of immune protection against acquisition of CMV infection in the fetus and newborn and how this information might be exploited for vaccine design. There has similarly been an insufficient study of what deficits in the immune response to CMV, both for mother and fetus, may increase susceptibility to congenital infection and disease. Protection of the fetus against vertical transmission can likely be achieved by protection of the placenta, which has its own unique immunological milieu, further complicating the analysis of the correlates of protective immunity. In this review, the current state of knowledge about immune effectors of protection against CMV in the maternal, placental, and fetal compartments is reviewed. A better understanding of immune responses that prevent and/or predispose to infection will help in the development of novel vaccine strategies.

  2. Cytomegalovirus in the Neonate: Immune Correlates of Infection and Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiss, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (CMV) are important causes of morbidity and occasional mortality. Development of a vaccine against congenital CMV infection is a major public health priority. Vaccine design is currently focused on strategies that aim to elicit neutralizing antibody and T-cell responses, toward the goal of preventing primary or recurrent infection in women of child-bearing age. However, there has been relatively little attention given to understanding the mechanisms of immune protection against acquisition of CMV infection in the fetus and newborn and how this information might be exploited for vaccine design. There has similarly been an insufficient study of what deficits in the immune response to CMV, both for mother and fetus, may increase susceptibility to congenital infection and disease. Protection of the fetus against vertical transmission can likely be achieved by protection of the placenta, which has its own unique immunological milieu, further complicating the analysis of the correlates of protective immunity. In this review, the current state of knowledge about immune effectors of protection against CMV in the maternal, placental, and fetal compartments is reviewed. A better understanding of immune responses that prevent and/or predispose to infection will help in the development of novel vaccine strategies. PMID:24023565

  3. Protective and Pathological Immunity during Central Nervous System Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Robyn S; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-06-20

    The concept of immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has dominated the study of inflammatory processes in the brain. However, clinically relevant models have highlighted that innate pathways limit pathogen invasion of the CNS and adaptive immunity mediates control of many neural infections. As protective responses can result in bystander damage, there are regulatory mechanisms that balance protective and pathological inflammation, but these mechanisms might also allow microbial persistence. The focus of this review is to consider the host-pathogen interactions that influence neurotropic infections and to highlight advances in our understanding of innate and adaptive mechanisms of resistance as key determinants of the outcome of CNS infection. Advances in these areas have broadened our comprehension of how the immune system functions in the brain and can readily overcome immune privilege. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Co-administration of rIpaB domain of Shigella with rGroEL of S. Typhi enhances the immune responses and protective efficacy against Shigella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitradevi, Sekar Tamil Selvi; Kaur, Gurpreet; Uppalapati, Sivaramakrishna; Yadav, Anandprakash; Singh, Dependrapratap; Bansal, Anju

    2015-11-01

    Shigella species cause severe bacillary dysentery in humans and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The Invasion plasmid antigen (IpaB) protein, which is conserved across all Shigella spp., induces macrophage cell death and is required to invade host cells. The present study evaluates the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant (r) domain region of IpaB (rIpaB) of S. flexneri. rIpaB was administered either alone or was co-administered with the rGroEL (heat shock protein 60) protein from S. Typhi as an adjuvant in a mouse model of intranasal immunization. The IpaB domain region (37 kDa) of S. flexneri was amplified from an invasion plasmid, cloned, expressed in BL21 Escherichia coli cells and purified. Immunization with the rIpaB domain alone stimulated both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Furthermore, robust antibody (IgG, IgA) and T-cell responses were induced when the rIpaB domain was co-administered with rGroEL. Antibody isotyping revealed higher IgG1 and IgG2a antibody titers and increased interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) secretion in the co-administered group. Immunization of mice with the rIpaB domain alone protected 60%-70% of the mice from lethal infection by S. flexneri, S. boydii and S. sonnei, whereas co-administration with rGroEL increased the protective efficacy to 80%-85%. Organ burden and histopathological studies also revealed a significant reduction in lung infection in the co-immunized mice compared with mice immunized with the rIpaB domain alone. This study emphasizes that the co-administration of the rIpaB domain and rGroEL protein improves immune responses in mice and increases protective efficacy against Shigella infection. This is also the first report to evaluate the potential of the GroEL (Hsp 60) protein of S. Typhi as an adjuvant molecule, thereby overcoming the need for commercial adjuvants.

  5. Protective immunization against Tetrahymena sp. infection in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettri, J Kumar; Leibowitz, M Pimenta; Ofir, R; Zilberg, D

    2009-08-01

    Systemic tetrahymenosis constitutes a serious problem in guppy (Poecilia reticulata) production worldwide and no therapeutic solution is available for this disease. Three immunization trials were conducted, testing the effectiveness of different Tetrahymena preparations applied by intraperitoneal injection (IP) with or without Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and with or without booster dose. In trial 1, immunization with the pathogenic Tet-NI 6 lysate and live attenuated Tet-NI 1 did not provide significant protection from infection, although infection rates were significantly lower in the Tet-NI 6-immunized group than in controls. In trial 2, mortality in Tet-NI 6 + FCA-immunized fish was 10%, significantly lower than in all other treatment groups, including Tet-NI 6 lysate, live attenuated Tet-NI 1 and controls (77, 67 and 73%, respectively). In trial 3, the lowest mortality rates were obtained in the Tet-NI 6 + FCA + booster-immunized group (15%). These levels were lower but not significantly different from the non-boostered Tet-NI 6-immunized group (28%) and the groups immunized with Tet-NI 1, with and without booster (32 and 34%, respectively). Mortality in these four groups was significantly lower than in controls, including adjuvant- and PBS-injected groups (72 and 81%, respectively). Body homogenates of immunized fish immobilized Tetrahymena in-vitro, as compared to no or very little immobilization in controls. Lysozyme levels in the Tet-NI 6 + FCA + booster group were significantly higher than in all other treatments in trial 2 and controls in trial 3. There was no significant difference in anti-protease activity among the differently immunized fish. We conclude that immunization with Tetrahymena lysates in FCA confers a high degree of protection from infection, suggesting this preparation as a basis for vaccine development.

  6. Intranasal immunization with influenza VLPs incorporating membrane-anchored flagellin induces strong heterosubtypic protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Zhong Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated previously that the incorporation of a membrane-anchored form of flagellin into influenza virus-like particles (VLPs improved the immunogenicity of VLPs significantly, inducing partially protective heterosubtypic immunity by intramuscular immunization. Because the efficacy of mucosal vaccination is highly dependent on an adjuvant, and is particularly effective for preventing mucosal infections such as influenza, we determined whether the membrane-anchored flagellin is an efficient adjuvant for VLP vaccines by a mucosal immunization route. We compared the adjuvant effect of membrane-anchored and soluble flagellins for immunization with influenza A/PR8 (H1N1 VLPs by the intranasal route in a mouse model. The results demonstrate that membrane-anchored flagellin is an effective adjuvant for intranasal (IN immunization, inducing enhanced systemic and mucosal antibody responses. High cellular responses were also observed as shown by cytokine production in splenocyte cultures when stimulated with viral antigens. All mice immunized with flagellin-containing VLPs survived challenge with a high lethal dose of homologous virus as well as a high dose heterosubtypic virus challenge (40 LD(50 of A/Philippines/82, H3N2. In contrast, no protection was observed with a standard HA/M1 VLP group upon heterosubtypic challenge. Soluble flagellin exhibited a moderate adjuvant effect when co-administered with VLPs by the mucosal route, as indicated by enhanced systemic and mucosal responses and partial heterosubtypic protection. The membrane-anchored form of flagellin incorporated together with antigen into influenza VLPs is effective as an adjuvant by the mucosal route and unlike standard VLPs, immunization with such chimeric VLPs elicits protective immunity to challenge with a distantly related influenza A virus.

  7. Highly efficient expression of interleukin-2 under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene enhances protective immune responses of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS DNA vaccine in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Du

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV had caused catastrophic losses in swine industry in China. The current inactivated vaccine provided only limited protection, and the attenuated live vaccine could protect piglets against the HP-PRRSV but there was a possibility that the attenuated virus returned to high virulence. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1© was modified under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene and the modified vector pMVAX1© was constructed. Porcine interleukin-2 (IL-2 and GP3-GP5 fusion protein of HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN were highly expressed by pMVAX1©. Mice inoculated with pMVAX1©-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody responses and T cell proliferation than those vaccinated with pVAX1©-GP35. pMVAX1©-GP35 was selected as PRRS DNA vaccine candidate and co-administrated with pVAX1©-IL-2 or pMVAX1©-IL-2 in pigs. pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 could provide enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody responses, T cell proliferation, Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine responses and CTL responses than pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35. Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, similar with attenuated PRRS vaccine group, pigs inoculated with pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 showed no clinical signs, almost no lung lesions and no viremia, as compared to those in pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 groups. It indicated that pMVAX1©-IL-2 effectively increases humoral and cell mediated immune responses of pMVAX1©-GP35. Co-administration of pMVAX1©-IL-2 and pMVAX1©-GP35 might be attractive candidate vaccines for preventing HP-PRRSV infections.

  8. Highly efficient expression of interleukin-2 under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene enhances protective immune responses of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) DNA vaccine in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yijun; Lu, Yu; Wang, Xinglong; Qi, Jing; Liu, Jiyu; Hu, Yue; Li, Feng; Wu, Jiaqiang; Guo, Lihui; Liu, Junzhen; Tao, Haiying; Sun, Wenbo; Chen, Lei; Cong, Xiaoyan; Ren, Sufang; Shi, Jianli; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao; Huang, Baohua; Wan, Renzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) had caused catastrophic losses in swine industry in China. The current inactivated vaccine provided only limited protection, and the attenuated live vaccine could protect piglets against the HP-PRRSV but there was a possibility that the attenuated virus returned to high virulence. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1© was modified under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene and the modified vector pMVAX1© was constructed. Porcine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and GP3-GP5 fusion protein of HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN were highly expressed by pMVAX1©. Mice inoculated with pMVAX1©-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody responses and T cell proliferation than those vaccinated with pVAX1©-GP35. pMVAX1©-GP35 was selected as PRRS DNA vaccine candidate and co-administrated with pVAX1©-IL-2 or pMVAX1©-IL-2 in pigs. pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 could provide enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody responses, T cell proliferation, Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine responses and CTL responses than pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35. Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, similar with attenuated PRRS vaccine group, pigs inoculated with pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 showed no clinical signs, almost no lung lesions and no viremia, as compared to those in pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 groups. It indicated that pMVAX1©-IL-2 effectively increases humoral and cell mediated immune responses of pMVAX1©-GP35. Co-administration of pMVAX1©-IL-2 and pMVAX1©-GP35 might be attractive candidate vaccines for preventing HP-PRRSV infections.

  9. Stimulation of local immunity and protection in mice by intramuscular immunization with triple- or double-layered rotavirus particles and QS-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, M M; Rae, M N; Conner, M E; Ward, R L

    1998-03-30

    Based on studies in animal models, parenteral immunization has become recognized as a potential vaccination strategy against rotavirus. Using an adult mouse model, the effects of the saponin adjuvant QS-21 on protection against murine rotavirus (strain EDIM) infection was determined following two intramuscular (i.m.) immunizations with purified EDIM particles including triple-layered (tl) infectious particles, tl particles inactivated with psoralen/UV, and double-layered (dl) inactivated particles. All three particles stimulated large serum rotavirus IgG responses and small amounts of serum rotavirus IgA, but undetectable stool rotavirus IgA. Inclusion of QS-21 during immunization increased the serum responses approximately 2- to 10-fold and also stimulated low levels of stool rotavirus IgA. Protection based on reduced shedding of rotavirus following EDIM challenge was significant (P immunized group and was enhanced (P immunization. Mice immunized with either live or inactivated tl particles and QS-21 were almost fully protected. Furthermore, animals inoculated with dl particles and the adjuvant shed significantly (P = .02) less virus following challenge than mice immunized with inactivated tl particles even though the latter induced measurable titers of neutralizing antibody to EDIM. These results demonstrate significant protection against rotavirus following i.m. immunization with both dl and tl EDIM particles which is consistently enhanced with QS-21.

  10. Protective immunity against Naegleria fowleri infection on mice immunized with the rNfa1 protein using mucosal adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyoung; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Hee-kyoung; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    The free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes a fatal disease called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. Of the pathogenic mechanism of N. fowleri concerning host tissue invasion, the adherence of amoeba to hose cells is the most important. We previously cloned the nfa1 gene from N. fowleri. The protein displayed immunolocalization in the pseudopodia, especially the food-cups structure, and was related to the contact-dependent mechanism of the amoebic pathogenicity in N. fowleri infection. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) have been used as potent mucosal adjuvants via the parenteral route of immunization in most cases. In this study, to examine the effect of protective immunity of the Nfa1 protein for N. fowleri infection with enhancement by CTB or LTB adjuvants, intranasally immunized BALB/c mice were infected with N. fowleri trophozoites for the development of PAM. The mean time to death of mice immunized with the Nfa1 protein using LTB or CTB adjuvant was prolonged by 5 or 8 days in comparison with that of the control mice. In particular, the survival rate of mice immunized with Nfa1 plus CTB was 100% during the experimental period. The serum IgG levels were significantly increased in mice immunized with Nfa1 protein plus CTB or LTB adjuvants. These results suggest that the Nfa1 protein, with CTB or LTB adjuvants, induces strong protective immunity in mice with PAM due to N. fowleri infection.

  11. Induction of protective immune responses in mice by double DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a double DNA vaccine encoding of Brucella melitensis omp31 gene and of Escherichia coli eae gene in inducing protective immune response in a mouse model. Methods: After performing PCR assays and cloning both the eae and omp31 genes, the generated DNA vaccines were ...

  12. Induction of protective immune responses in mice by double DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a double DNA vaccine encoding of Brucella melitensis omp31 gene and of Escherichia coli eae gene in inducing protective immune response in a mouse model. Methods: After performing PCR assays and cloning both the eae and omp31 genes, the generated. DNA vaccines were ...

  13. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  14. Mice immunization with radioattenuated Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells: protective immunity induction evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Estefania M.N.; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN-MG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br; antero@cdtn.br; Reis, Bernardo S.; Goes, Alfredo M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia]. E-mail: brsgarbi@mono.icb.ufmg.br; goes@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a chronic systemic disease prevalent in Latin America. To date, there is no effective vaccine. The potential of gamma radiation for pathogens attenuation and vaccine development was explored in this work. In our laboratory was developed radioattenuated yeast cells of P. brasiliensis and the aim of this work was to evaluate the protection elicited by the immunization with this cells. To check the protector effect BALB/c mice were divided in two groups. The mice of group 1 were immunized once and those of group 2 twice, at two weeks intervals, using 10{sup 5} radioattenuated yeast cells. The mice were sacrificed 30 and 90 days after challenge. The removed organs were used for colony-forming units (CFUs) recover and histopathologic analysis. The gamma irradiated yeast loses its virulence since fails in producing infection in BALB/c mice. An efficient protection against highly infective forms of P. brasiliensis was developed in the group of mice immunized two times. The immunization was able to reduce the initial infection and elicited a long lasted protection. We concluded that the radioattenuated yeast cells are a valuable tool for the protective immunity study in the PCM and for vaccine research. (author)

  15. Irradiated tumor cells of lipopolysaccharide stimulation elicit an enhanced anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuli; Shen, Guobo; Nie, Wen; Li, Zhimian; Sang, Yaxiong; Zhang, Binglan; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the outer surface membrane of Gram-negative bacteria which has been proved an effective immune enhancer. Here, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of irradiated tumor cells that stimulated by LPS in mouse xenografts models. Tumor cells were irradiated after stimulation with 1 μg/mL LPS for 48 h. The C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously with irradiated tumor cells. The anti-tumor effect of lymphocytes of immunized mice was investigated. The cytotoxicity of spleen lymphocytes from immunized mice was determined by a standard (51)Cr-release assay. The roles of immune cell subsets in anti-tumor activity were assessed by injected intraperitoneally with monoclonal antibodies. We observed that the vaccine of irradiated tumor cell with LPS-stimulated elicited a stronger protective anti-tumor immunity than other controls. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes of immunized mice showed that the cellular immune response was involved in the anti-tumor effect. And this effect was achieved by activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response and reduction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, Gr1(+) CD11b (+) ), which were confirmed by depletion of immune cell subsets and flow cytometry analysis. In summary, our study showed that stimulation of LPS was able to enhance anti-tumor immunity of vaccination with tumor cells after irradiation treatment, which might be a new strategy for cancer therapy.

  16. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Peters

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  17. BCG and protection against inflammatory and auto-immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Locht, Camille

    2017-07-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine against tuberculosis. Although its protective efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis is still under debate, it provides protection against other mycobacterial diseases. BCG is also an effective therapy against superficial bladder cancer and potentially decreases overall childhood mortality. Areas covered: The purpose of this paper is to provide a state-of-the-art summary of the beneficial effects of BCG in inflammatory and auto-immune diseases. As a strong inducer of Th1 type immunity, BCG has been reported to protect against atopic conditions, such as allergic asthma, a Th2-driven disorder. Its protective effect has been well documented in mice, but still awaits definitive evidence in humans. Similarly, murine studies have shown a protective effect of BCG against auto-immune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and insulin-dependent diabetes, but studies in humans have come to conflicting conclusions. Expert commentary: Studies in mice have shown a beneficial effect of the BCG vaccine against allergic asthma, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. However, the understanding of its mechanism is still fragmentary and requires further in depth research. Some observational or intervention studies in humans have also suggested a beneficial effect, but definitive evidence for this requires confirmation in carefully conducted prospective studies.

  18. Intranasal immunization with novel EspA-Tir-M fusion protein induces protective immunity against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruqin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Yiduo; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao; Long, Beiguo; Li, Yawen; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Xianbo; Fan, Hongying

    2017-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Due to the risks associated with antibiotic treatment against EHEC O157:H7 infection, vaccines represent a promising method for prevention of EHEC O157:H7 infection. Therefore, we constructed the novel bivalent antigen EspA-Tir-M as a candidate EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. We then evaluated the immunogenicity of this novel EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. Immune responses to the fusion protein administered by intranasal and subcutaneous routes were compared in mice. Results showed higher levels of specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses induced by intranasal as compared to subcutaneous immunization. Intranasal immunization enhanced the concentration of interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and interferon-γ, while subcutaneous immunization enhanced only the latter two. In addition, intranasal immunization protected against EHEC O157:H7 colonization and infection in mice at a rate of 90%.Histopathological analysis revealed that vaccination reduced colon damage, especially when administered intranasally. In contrast, subcutaneous immunization elicited a weak immune response and exhibited a low protection rate. These findings demonstrate that intranasal immunization with the fusion protein induces both humoral and cellular immune (Th1/Th2) responses in mice. The novel EspA-Tir-M novel fusion protein therefore represents a promising subunit vaccine against EHEC O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of anti-schistosomal chemotherapy on immune responses, protection and immunity. II. Concomitant immunity and immunization with irradiated cercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, A.F.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance of mice to challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni was evaluated before and after elimination of their primary, established S. mansoni infections with the chemotherapeutic drug praziquantel. Mice treated after either 10 or 20 weeks of primary infection were challenged 6 or 10 weeks after treatment. Mice infected for for 10 weeks prior to treatment expressed progressively less resistance 6 and 10 weeks after treatment. By 10 weeks after treatment significant levels of protection were no longer observed. Resistance waned more slowly if mice were treated 20 weeks after infection, and there was still significant expression of resistance to challenge 10 weeks after treatment. A separate set of experiments evaluated the use of highly irradiated cercariae as a vaccine in mice that had been previously infected with S. mansoni and cured with praziquantel. It was observed that effective immunizations were possible in previously infected mice. These studies demonstrate that established resistance waned after treatment and the rate of loss of protection was dependent upon the duration of infection prior to treatment. Furthermore, the irradiated cercarial vaccine studies indicate that in the murine model induction of immunological resistance was feasible following chemotherapeutic treatment of infected populations

  20. Immunity to Babesia in mice I. Adoptive transfer of immunity to Babesia rodhaini with immune spleen cells and the effect of irradiation on the protection of immune mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuil, H.; Zivkovic, D.; Seinen, W.; Albers-van Bemmel, C.M.G.; Speksnijder, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Immunisation of Balb/c mice against Babesia rodhaini by an amicarbalide- controlled infection resulted in a solid immunity which lasted for 216 days. With spleen cells of immune mice protection could be transferred both to naive mice pretreated with cyclophosphamide. Treatment of naive mice with

  1. Clustered epitopes within the Gag-Pol fusion protein DNA vaccine enhance immune responses and protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolesta, Elizabeth; Gzyl, Jaroslaw; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Kmieciak, Dariusz; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Kaneko, Yutaro; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy; Kozbor, Danuta

    2005-01-01

    We have generated a codon-optimized hGagp17p24-Polp51 plasmid DNA expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-Pol fusion protein that consists of clusters of highly conserved cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes presented by multiple MHC class I alleles. In the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct, the ribosomal frameshift site had been deleted together with the potentially immunosuppressive Gag nucleocapsid (p15) as well as Pol protease (p10) and integrase (p31). Analyses of the magnitude and breadth of cellular responses demonstrated that immunization of HLA-A2/K b transgenic mice with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct induced 2- to 5-fold higher CD8 + T-cell responses to Gag p17-, p24-, and Pol reverse transcriptase (RT)-specific CTL epitopes than the full-length hGag-PolΔFsΔPr counterpart. The increases were correlated with higher protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVVs) expressing gag and pol gene products. Consistent with the profile of Gag- and Pol-specific CD8 + T cell responses, an elevated level of type 1 cytokine production was noted in p24- and RT-stimulated splenocyte cultures established from hGagp17p24-Polp51-immunized mice compared to responses induced with the hGag-PolΔFsΔPr vaccine. Sera of mice immunized with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 vaccine also exhibited an increased titer of p24- and RT-specific IgG2 antibody responses. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting the breadth of Gag- and Pol-specific immune responses

  2. Topical calcitriol protects from UV-induced genetic damage but suppresses cutaneous immunity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L; Kim, Young Jin; Dixon, Katie M; Halliday, Gary M; Javeri, Arash; Mason, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Calcitriol, the biologically active form of vitamin D, has been reported to cause both suppressive and protective immune effects in mice. Its immune effects in vivo in humans are unclear. We investigated the in vivo effects of topical calcitriol on minimal erythema dose and skin immune responses in healthy volunteers. We found that calcitriol did not protect from ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema (sunburn) when applied either 24 h before or immediately after irradiation, although it decreased the density of sunburn cells and thymine dimers seen on biopsy when applied 24 h before and again immediately after irradiation. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we found that topical calcitriol applied at high total doses reduced the Mantoux responses of nearby untreated, unirradiated skin, suggesting a para-local or systemic immunosuppressive effect not observed with lower calcitriol doses. We then measured UV-induced suppression of Mantoux reactions at vehicle-treated sites and sites treated with low-dose calcitriol, and found that calcitriol neither reduced nor enhanced UV-induced immunosuppression. Despite calcitriol reducing UV-induced DNA damage, which should protect the immune system, it has immunosuppressive effects in our model which may help to explain the efficacy of analogues such as calcipotriol in the treatment of psoriasis.

  3. Staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide protects against Caenorhabditis elegans immune defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Begun

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections that have become increasingly difficult to treat due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in these organisms. The ability of staphylococci to produce biofilm is an important virulence mechanism that allows bacteria both to adhere to living and artificial surfaces and to resist host immune factors and antibiotics. Here, we show that the icaADBC locus, which synthesizes the biofilm-associated polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA in staphylococci, is required for the formation of a lethal S. epidermidis infection in the intestine of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Susceptibility to S. epidermidis infection is influenced by mutation of the C. elegans PMK-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase or DAF-2 insulin-signaling pathways. Loss of PIA production abrogates nematocidal activity and leads to reduced bacterial accumulation in the C. elegans intestine, while overexpression of the icaADBC locus in S. aureus augments virulence towards nematodes. PIA-producing S. epidermidis has a significant survival advantage over ica-deficient S. epidermidis within the intestinal tract of wild-type C. elegans, but not in immunocompromised nematodes harboring a loss-of-function mutation in the p38 MAP kinase pathway gene sek-1. Moreover, sek-1 and pmk-1 mutants are equally sensitive to wild-type and icaADBC-deficient S. epidermidis. These results suggest that biofilm exopolysaccharide enhances virulence by playing an immunoprotective role during colonization of the C. elegans intestine. These studies demonstrate that C. elegans can serve as a simple animal model for studying host-pathogen interactions involving staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide and suggest that the protective activity of biofilm matrix represents an ancient conserved function for resisting predation.

  4. Adjuvant properties of thermal component of hyperthermia enhanced transdermal immunization: effect on dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Joshi

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia enhanced transdermal (HET immunization is a novel needle free immunization strategy employing application of antigen along with mild local hyperthermia (42°C to intact skin resulting in detectable antigen specific Ig in serum. In the present study, we investigated the adjuvant effect of thermal component of HET immunization in terms of maturation of dendritic cells and its implication on the quality of the immune outcome in terms of antibody production upon HET immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT. We have shown that in vitro hyperthermia exposure at 42°C for 30 minutes up regulates the surface expression of maturation markers on bone marrow derived DCs. This observation correlated in vivo with an increased and accelerated expression of maturation markers on DCs in the draining lymph node upon HET immunization in mice. This effect was found to be independent of the antigen delivered and depends only on the thermal component of HET immunization. In vitro hyperthermia also led to enhanced capacity to stimulate CD4+ T cells in allo MLR and promotes the secretion of IL-10 by BMDCs, suggesting a potential for Th2 skewing of T cell response. HET immunization also induced a systemic T cell response to TT, as suggested by proliferation of splenocytes from immunized animal upon in vitro stimulation by TT. Exposure to heat during primary immunization led to generation of mainly IgG class of antibodies upon boosting, similar to the use of conventional alum adjuvant, thus highlighting the adjuvant potential of heat during HET immunization. Lastly, we have shown that mice immunized by tetanus toxoid using HET route exhibited protection against challenge with a lethal dose of tetanus toxin. Thus, in addition to being a painless, needle free delivery system it also has an immune modulatory potential.

  5. Natural killer cells enhance the immune surveillance of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Nouroz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune system (IS is comprised of molecules, cells, tissues and organs involved in host defense mechanism from infectious agents or tumor cells. On crossing the cell barriers by these infectious agents, the defense mechanism is alerted by the immune system to respond against these invading microbes. Innate immune response (IIR and acquired immune response (AIR are working in parallel to control these invading microbes. IIR is composed of various types of phagocytes and lymphocytes, while AIR is comprised of T and B lymphocytes. All the cells of the immune system cooperatively work against infectious agents and cancerous cells but Natural killer (NK cells are playing an important role to respond to tumor by enhancing the expression of complementary domain (CD86 on dendritic cells (DCs and production of IL-12. NK cells demolished tumor through perforin and granzyme, which are important for immune surveillance and death of tumor cells induced by cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF, Fas ligand (CD178, interferon-γ (IFN-γ and IL-10. These cytokines have inhibited proliferation of tumor by inducing anti-angiogenic factors and maintaining cross talk with other immune cells. Natural products like transfer factor plus, immune modulator mix, ascorbic acid, Ganoderma lucidum, Agaricus blazei teas, nitrogenated soy extract, Andrographis paniculata and several phytochemicals enhanced the efficiency of NK cells in controlling cancers. Further studies will unravel the impact of NK cells in cancer control and how NK efficiency can be further enhanced.

  6. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhihong [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Quan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Wang, Zaishi [China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Zhongqiu [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100125 (China); Guo, Pengju [Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong 510640 (China); Zhao, Deming, E-mail: zhaodm@cau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the immunoadjuvant effects of HVJ-E on killed PRRSV vaccine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HVJ-E enhanced the humoral and cellular responses of the piglets to PRRSV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is suggested that HVJ-E could be developed as a new-type adjuvant for mammals. -- Abstract: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-{gamma} production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV.

  7. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Zhihong; Zhang, Quan; Wang, Zaishi; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Guo, Pengju; Zhao, Deming

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the immunoadjuvant effects of HVJ-E on killed PRRSV vaccine. ► HVJ-E enhanced the humoral and cellular responses of the piglets to PRRSV. ► It is suggested that HVJ-E could be developed as a new-type adjuvant for mammals. -- Abstract: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV.

  8. Intranasal immunization with LACK-DNA promotes protective immunity in hamsters challenged with Leishmania chagasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Oliveira Gomes, Daniel Claudio; DA Silva Costa Souza, Beatriz Lilian; DE Matos Guedes, Herbert Leonel; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira

    2011-12-01

    LACK (Leishmania analogue of the receptor kinase C) is a conserved protein in protozoans of the genus Leishmania which is associated with the immunopathogenesis and susceptibility of BALB/c mice to L. major infection. Previously, we demonstrated that intranasal immunization with a plasmid carrying the LACK gene of Leishmania infantum (LACK-DNA) promotes protective immunity in BALB/c mice against Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi. In the present study, we investigated the protective immunity achieved in hamsters intranasally vaccinated with 2 doses of LACK-DNA (30 μg). Compared with controls (PBS and pCI-neo plasmid), animals vaccinated with LACK-DNA showed significant reduction in parasite loads in the spleen and liver, increased lymphoproliferative response and increased nitric oxide (NO) production by parasite antigen-stimulated splenocytes. Furthermore, hamsters vaccinated with LACK-DNA presented high IgG and IgG2a serum levels when compared to control animals. Our results showed that intranasal vaccination with LACK-DNA promotes protective immune responses in hamsters and demonstrated the broad spectrum of intranasal LACK-DNA efficacy in different host species, confirming previous results in murine cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis.

  9. Differential protective effects of immune lymphoid cells against transplanted line Ib leukemia and immune polioencephalomyelitis. [X radiation, mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, P.S.; Lukasewycz, O.A.; Olson, D.S.; Murphy, W.H.

    1978-12-01

    The capacity of immune cells obtained from the major lymphoid compartments to protect C58 mice from transplanted line Ib leukemia, and from an age-dependent autoimmune CNS disease (immune polioencephalomyelitis = IPE) elicited by immunizing old C58 mice with inactivated Ib cells was quantified. Cells used for comparative adoptive protection tests were harvested from the major lymphoid compartments 14 to 15 days after young C58 mice were immunized with inactivated Ib cell preparations. Regression curves were plotted from survival data and the log/sub 10/PD/sub 50/ values were determined. Immune spleen (ISC) and peritoneal cells (IPEC) were significantly more protective against transplanted Ib cells than immune lymph node (ILNC), thymic (ITC), and marrow cells (IMC). In contrast, IPEC and IMC were not protective against IPE and ITC were only marginally protective. ILNC afforded significant protection to transplantable leukemia but were only marginally protective to IPE. When ISC were treated with anti-thy 1.2 serum and complement, protection against transplanted leukemia and IPE was reduced > 99%. When donors of immune lymphoid cells were treated with 12.5 mg of cortisone acetate daily for 2 days before lymphoid cells were harvested, protection against transplanted Ib cells by ISC was reduced by approximately 90% whereas protection against IPE was totally eliminated. Considered together, these results indicate that the protective mechanisms to transplantable leukemia and IPE differ significantly in the same indicator mouse strain.

  10. A Recombinant Measles Vaccine with Enhanced Resistance to Passive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julik, Emily; Reyes-Del Valle, Jorge

    2017-09-21

    Current measles vaccines suffer from poor effectiveness in young infants due primarily to the inhibitory effect of residual maternal immunity on vaccine responses. The development of a measles vaccine that resists such passive immunity would strongly contribute to the stalled effort toward measles eradication. In this concise communication, we show that a measles virus (MV) with enhanced hemagglutinin (H) expression and incorporation, termed MVvac2-H2, retained its enhanced immunogenicity, previously established in older mice, when administered to very young, genetically modified, MV-susceptible mice in the presence of passive anti-measles immunity. This immunity level mimics the sub-neutralizing immunity prevalent in infants too young to be vaccinated. Additionally, toward a more physiological small animal model of maternal anti-measles immunity interference, we document vertical transfer of passive anti-MV immunity in genetically-modified, MV susceptible mice and show in this physiological model a better MVvac2-H2 immunogenic profile than that of the parental vaccine strain. In sum, these data support the notion that enhancing MV hemagglutinin incorporation can circumvent in vivo neutralization. This strategy merits additional exploration as an alternative pediatric measles vaccine.

  11. Protective antigens against glanders identified by expression library immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Whitlock

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia (B. mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that IL-2 and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-and tumor necrosis factor-are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine.

  12. Immune response to Echinococcus infection: parasite avoidance and host protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelin, D

    1997-12-01

    The life cycles of Echinococcus spp, involve two phases that have quite different immunological relationships with the host--the parenteral metacestode and the enteral adult. Immune control of the metacestode (at least of E. granulosus) by vaccination is now a real possibility, but there seems little prospect of similar control of the adult worms. Vaccination against metacestodes must not only induce effective responses but also prevent the parasite modulating these in such a way as to render them ineffective. This requires a much fuller understanding of the basis of parasite avoidance mechanisms, in particular an understanding of the balance of parasite- and host-protective mechanisms that involve the activity of T lymphocyte subsets. Protective responses against adult worms in the intestine appear weak and ineffective, although it is clear that the worms are immunogenic and there is some evidence that the host can become immune. Again, a more complete insight into the nature of the worm's association with the mucosal immune system is required, and a fuller understanding of the variables that influence this association; host genetic variation may prove to be an important factor that determines the outcome of adult worm infections.

  13. No protection in chickens immunized by the oral or intra-muscular immunization route with Ascaridia galli soluble antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Janne Pleidrup; Norup, Liselotte R.; Dalgaard, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate the induction of protective immune responses to A. galli soluble antigen by different immunization routes. Chickens were immunized with a crude extract of A. galli via an oral or intra-muscular route using cholera toxin B subunit as adjuvant and subsequently challenged with A...

  14. Tetanus vaccination with a dissolving microneedle patch confers protective immune responses in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, E Stein; Romanyuk, AndreyA; Vassilieva, Elena V; Jacob, Joshy; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2016-08-28

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus claim tens of thousands lives every year in developing countries, but could be prevented by hygienic practices and improved immunization of pregnant women. This study tested the hypothesis that skin vaccination can overcome the immunologically transformed state of pregnancy and enhance protective immunity to tetanus in mothers and their newborns. To achieve this goal, we developed microneedle patches (MNPs) that efficiently delivered unadjuvanted tetanus toxoid to skin of pregnant mice and demonstrated that this route induced superior immune responses in female mice conferring 100% survival to tetanus toxin challenge when compared to intramuscular vaccination. Mice born to MNP-vaccinated mothers showed detectable tetanus-specific IgG antibodies up to 12weeks of age and complete protection to tetanus toxin challenge up at 6weeks of age. In contrast, none of the 6-week old mice born to intramuscularly vaccinated mothers survived challenge. Although pregnant mice vaccinated with unadjuvanted tetanus toxoid had 30% lower IgG and IgG1 titers than mice vaccinated intramuscularly with Alum®-adjuvanted tetanus toxoid vaccine, IgG2a titers and antibody affinity maturation were similar between these groups. We conclude that skin immunization with MNPs containing unadjuvanted tetanus toxoid can confer potent protective efficacy to mothers and their offspring using a delivery method well suited for expanding vaccination coverage in developing countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary immunodeficiencies of protective immunity to primary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousfiha, Aziz; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Ailal, Fatima; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2010-05-01

    The vast majority of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) predispose affected individuals to recurrent or chronic infectious diseases, because they affect protective immunity to both primary and secondary or latent infections. We discuss here three recently described groups of PIDs that seem to impair immunity to primary infections without compromising immunity to secondary and latent infections. Patients with mutations in IL12B or IL12RB1 typically present mycobacterial disease in childhood with a favorable progression thereafter. Cross-protection between mycobacterial infections has even been observed. Patients with mutations in IRAK4 or MYD88 suffer from pyogenic bacterial diseases, including invasive pneumococcal diseases in particular. These diseases often recur, although not always with the same serotype, but the frequency of these recurrences tails off, with no further infections observed from adolescence onwards. Finally, mutations in UNC93B1 and TLR3 are associated with childhood herpes simplex encephalitis, which strikes only once in most patients, with almost no recorded cases of more than two bouts of this disease. Unlike infections in patients with other PIDs, the clinical course of which typically deteriorates with age even if appropriate treatment is given, the prognosis of patients with these three newly described PIDs tends to improve spontaneously with age, provided, of course, that the initial infection is properly managed. In other words, although life-threatening in early childhood, these new PIDs are associated with a favorable outcome in adulthood. They provide proof-of-principle that infectious diseases of childhood striking only once may result from single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Continuous and Discontinuous Cigarette Smoke Exposure Differentially Affects Protective Th1 Immunity against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaler, Christopher R.; Horvath, Carly N.; McCormick, Sarah; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Khera, Amandeep; Zganiacz, Anna; Kasinska, Joanna; Stampfli, Martin R.; Xing, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the leading cause of death due to a bacterial pathogen. Emerging epidemiologic evidence suggests that the leading risk factor associated with TB mortality is cigarette smoke exposure. Despite this, it remains poorly understood what is the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on anti-TB immunity and whether its potential detrimental effect can be reversed by cigarette smoking cessation. In our current study, we have investigated the impact of both continuous and discontinuous cigarette smoke exposure on the development of anti-mycobacterial type 1 immunity in murine models. We find that while continuous cigarette smoke exposure severely impairs type 1 immunity in the lung, a short-term smoking cessation allows rapid restoration of anti-mycobacterial immunity. The ability of continuous cigarette smoke exposure to dampen type 1 protective immunity is attributed locally to its affects on innate immune cells in the lung. Continuous cigarette smoke exposure locally, by not systemically, impairs APC accumulation and their production of TNF, IL-12, and RANTES, blunts the recruitment of CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells to the lung, and weakens the formation of granuloma. On the other hand, smoking cessation was found to help restore type 1 immunity by rapidly improving the functionality of lung APCs, enhancing the recruitment of CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells to the lung, and promoting the formation of granuloma. Our study for the first time demonstrates that continuous, but not discontinuous, cigarette smoke exposure severely impedes the lung expression of anti-TB Th1 immunity via inhibiting innate immune activation and lung T cell recruitment. Our findings thus suggest cigarette smoking cessation to be beneficial to the control of pulmonary TB. PMID:23527127

  17. Protective Immunity against Hepatitis C: Many Shades of Grey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S Abdel-Hakeem

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of individuals who become acutely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV develop chronic infection and suffer from progressive liver damage while approximately 25% are able to eliminate the virus spontaneously. Despite the recent introduction of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs, there is still no vaccine for HCV. As a result, new infections and reinfections will remain a problem in developing countries and among high risk populations like injection drug users (IDUs who have limited access to treatment and who continue to be exposed to the virus. The outcome of acute HCV is determined by the interplay between the host genetics, the virus and the virus-specific immune response. Studies in humans and chimpanzees have demonstrated the essential role of HCV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in protection against viral persistence. Recent data suggest that antibody responses play a more important role than what was previously thought. Individuals who spontaneously resolve acute HCV infection develop long-lived memory T cells and are less likely to become persistently infected upon re-exposure. New studies examining high risk cohorts are identifying correlates of protection during real life exposures and reinfections. In this review, we discuss correlates of protective immunity during acute HCV and upon reexposure. We draw parallels between HCV and the current knowledge about protective memory in other models of chronic viral infections. Finally, we discuss some of the yet unresolved questions about key correlates of protection and their relevance for vaccine development against HCV.

  18. Room Temperature Stable PspA-Based Nanovaccine Induces Protective Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle A. Wagner-Muñiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative agent of pneumonia, a debilitating disease particularly in young and elderly populations, and is the leading worldwide cause of death in children under the age of five. While there are existing vaccines against S. pneumoniae, none are protective across all serotypes. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA, a key virulence factor of S. pneumoniae, is an antigen that may be incorporated into future vaccines to address the immunological challenges presented by the diversity of capsular antigens. PspA has been shown to be immunogenic and capable of initiating a humoral immune response that is reactive across approximately 94% of pneumococcal strains. Biodegradable polyanhydrides have been studied as a nanoparticle-based vaccine (i.e., nanovaccine platform to stabilize labile proteins, to provide adjuvanticity, and enhance patient compliance by providing protective immunity in a single dose. In this study, we designed a room temperature stable PspA-based polyanhydride nanovaccine that eliminated the need for a free protein component (i.e., 100% encapsulated within the nanoparticles. Mice were immunized once with the lead nanovaccine and upon challenge, presented significantly higher survival rates than animals immunized with soluble protein alone, even with a 25-fold reduction in protein dose. This lead nanovaccine formulation performed similarly to protein adjuvanted with Alum, however, with much less tissue reactogenicity at the site of immunization. By eliminating the free PspA from the nanovaccine formulation, the lead nanovaccine was efficacious after being stored dry for 60 days at room temperature, breaking the need for maintaining the cold chain. Altogether, this study demonstrated that a single dose PspA-based nanovaccine against S. pneumoniae induced protective immunity and provided thermal stability when stored at room temperature for at least 60 days.

  19. The Immune Response in Measles: Virus Control, Clearance and Protective Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Measles is an acute systemic viral infection with immune system interactions that play essential roles in multiple stages of infection and disease. Measles virus (MeV) infection does not induce type 1 interferons, but leads to production of cytokines and chemokines associated with nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasome. This restricted response allows extensive vir...

  20. Immunization with Live Human Rhinovirus (HRV 16 Induces Protection in Cotton Rats against HRV14 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira C. Patel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRVs are the main cause of cold-like illnesses, and currently no vaccine or antiviral therapies against HRVs are available to prevent or mitigate HRV infection. There are more than 150 antigenically heterogeneous HRV serotypes, with ∼90 HRVs belonging to major group species A and B. Development of small animal models that are susceptible to infection with major group HRVs would be beneficial for vaccine research. Previously, we showed that the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus is semi-permissive to HRV16 (major group, species HRV-A virus infection, replicating in the upper and lower respiratory tracts with measurable pathology, mucus production, and expression of inflammatory mediators. Herein, we report that intranasal infection of cotton rats with HRV14 (major group, species HRV-B virus results in isolation of infectious virus from the nose and lung. Similar to HRV16, intramuscular immunization with live HRV14 induces homologous protection that correlated with high levels of serum neutralizing antibodies. Vaccination and challenge experiments with HRV14 and HRV16 to evaluate the development of cross-protective immunity demonstrate that intramuscular immunization with live HRV16 significantly protects animals against HRV14 challenge. Determination of the immunological mechanisms involved in heterologous protection and further characterization of infection with other major HRV serotypes in the cotton rat could enhance the robustness of the model to define heterotypic relationships between this diverse group of viruses and thereby increase its potential for development of a multi-serotype HRV vaccine.

  1. 75 FR 45562 - Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ...This action extends the comment period for an NPRM on enhancing airline passenger protections that was published in the Federal Register on June 8, 2010. The Department of Transportation is extending the period for interested persons to submit comments on this rulemaking from August 9, 2010, to September 23, 2010. This extension is a result of requests from a number of airline associations, one airport association, and two airlines to extend the comment period for the proposal.

  2. Adjuvanted influenza vaccine administered intradermally elicits robust long-term immune responses that confer protection from lethal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del P Martin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory illnesses caused by influenza virus can be dramatically reduced by vaccination. The current trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is effective in eliciting systemic virus-specific antibodies sufficient to control viral replication. However, influenza protection generated after parenteral immunization could be improved by the induction of mucosal immune responses.Transcutaneous immunization, a non-invasive vaccine delivery method, was used to investigate the quality, duration and effectiveness of the immune responses induced in the presence of inactivated influenza virus co-administered with retinoic acid or oleic acid. We observed an increased migration of dendritic cells to the draining lymph nodes after dermal vaccination. Here we demonstrate that this route of vaccine delivery in combination with certain immunomodulators can induce potent immune responses that result in long-term protective immunity. Additionally, mice vaccinated with inactivated virus in combination with retinoic acid show an enhanced sIgA antibody response, increased number of antibody secreting cells in the mucosal tissues, and protection from a higher influenza lethal dose.The present study demonstrates that transdermal administration of inactivated virus in combination with immunomodulators stimulates dendritic cell migration, results in long-lived systemic and mucosal responses that confer effective protective immunity.

  3. Dengue vaccine safety signal: Immune enhancement, waning immunity, or chance occurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D; Halsey, Neal

    2017-06-14

    A new dengue vaccine was associated with increased risk of hospitalized virologically-confirmed disease during year 3 of follow-up among children age 2-5years. Among hypotheses to explain this finding, we could not distinguish definitively between antibody dependent enhancement, waning immunity, or chance occurrence. However, any theory must account for the following: (a) the signal occurred mainly because of decreased dengue among controls rather than increased dengue among vaccinees; (b) among 48 data points, a statistically significant increase in hospitalization among vaccinated children occurred for only one age group, during one year, and in one region; (c) cumulative risk was similar for vaccinated vs. control children age 2-5years at the end of year 5 and lower for vaccinated vs. control children among older age groups; (d) the protective effect of vaccine against hospitalization decreased from years 1-2 to years 3-5 of follow-up for all age groups and regions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of immune and viral correlates of norovirus protective immunity through comparative study of intra-cluster norovirus strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhu

    Full Text Available Whether or not primary norovirus infections induce protective immunity has become a controversial issue, potentially confounded by the comparison of data from genetically distinct norovirus strains. Early human volunteer studies performed with a norovirus-positive inoculum initially led to the conclusion that primary infection does not generate long-term, protective immunity. More recently though, the epidemiological pattern of norovirus pandemics has led to the extrapolation that primary norovirus infection induces herd immunity. While these are seemingly discordant observations, they may in fact reflect virus strain-, cluster-, or genogroup-specific differences in protective immunity induction. Here, we report that highly genetically related intra-cluster murine norovirus strains differ dramatically in their ability to induce a protective immune response: Primary MNV-3 infection induced robust and cross-reactive protection, whereas primary MNV-1 infection induced modest homotypic and no heterotypic protection. In addition to this fundamental observation that intra-cluster norovirus strains display remarkable differences in protective immunity induction, we report three additional important observations relevant to norovirus:host interactions. First, antibody and CD4⁺ T cells are essential to controlling secondary norovirus infections. Second, the viral minor structural protein VP2 regulates the maturation of antigen presenting cells and protective immunity induction in a virus strain-specific manner, pointing to a mechanism by which MNV-1 may prevent the stimulation of memory immune responses. Third, VF1-mediated regulation of cytokine induction also correlates with protective immunity induction. Thus, two highly genetically-related norovirus strains displayed striking differences in induction of protective immune responses, strongly suggesting that the interpretation of norovirus immunity and vaccine studies must consider potential virus

  5. Immunization with truncated envelope protein of Zika virus induces protective immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Feng; Qiu, Yang; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Han-Xiao; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The global spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) as well as its unexpected link to infant microcephaly have resulted in serious public health concerns. No antiviral drugs against ZIKV is currently available, and vaccine development is of high priority to prepare for potential ZIKV pandemic. In the present study, a truncated E protein with the N-terminal 90% region reserved (E90) from a contemporary ZIKV strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by a Ni-NTA column, and characterized by Western blotting assays. Immunization with recombinant E90 induced robust ZIKV-specific humoral response in adult BALB/c mice. Passive transfer of the antisera from E90-immunized mice conferred full protection against lethal ZIKV challenge in a neonatal mice model. Our results indicate that recombinant ZIKV E90 described here represents as a promising ZIKV subunit vaccine that deserves further clinical development.

  6. Using nursing students to enhance one college's immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, S B; Magaldi, M A; Kresse, E

    2001-11-01

    In New York State, all college students who were born on or after January 1, 1957, are required to show proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) before the 1st day of classes. Colleges have established immunization programs so that those students who do not have the required proof can be given the necessary injections. Often, our health service office does not have enough staff to administer the MMR shots during the registration period, resulting in long lines of students waiting to be immunized. In this article, the authors describe how one college used nursing students to assist with and enhance its immunization program. The 45 nursing students who participated in this project administered 694 injections over a 5-day period, They received credit from the nursing department for clinical time and all of the participants agree that the project was a success.

  7. Pertussis Maternal Immunization: Narrowing the Knowledge Gaps on the Duration of Transferred Protective Immunity and on Vaccination Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Emilia Gaillard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal safety through pertussis vaccination and subsequent maternal–fetal-antibody transfer are well documented, but information on infant protection from pertussis by such antibodies and by subsequent vaccinations is scarce. Since mice are used extensively for maternal-vaccination studies, we adopted that model to narrow those gaps in our understanding of maternal pertussis immunization. Accordingly, we vaccinated female mice with commercial acellular pertussis (aP vaccine and measured offspring protection against Bordetella pertussis challenge and specific-antibody levels with or without revaccination. Maternal immunization protected the offspring against pertussis, with that immune protection transferred to the offspring lasting for several weeks, as evidenced by a reduction (4–5 logs, p < 0.001 in the colony-forming-units recovered from the lungs of 16-week-old offspring. Moreover, maternal-vaccination-acquired immunity from the first pregnancy still conferred protection to offspring up to the fourth pregnancy. Under the conditions of our experimental protocol, protection to offspring from the aP-induced immunity is transferred both transplacentally and through breastfeeding. Adoptive-transfer experiments demonstrated that transferred antibodies were more responsible for the protection detected in offspring than transferred whole spleen cells. In contrast to reported findings, the protection transferred was not lost after the vaccination of infant mice with the same or other vaccine preparations, and conversely, the immunity transferred from mothers did not interfere with the protection conferred by infant vaccination with the same or different vaccines. These results indicated that aP-vaccine immunization of pregnant female mice conferred protective immunity that is transferred both transplacentally and via offspring breastfeeding without compromising the protection boostered by subsequent infant vaccination. These results

  8. Pertussis Maternal Immunization: Narrowing the Knowledge Gaps on the Duration of Transferred Protective Immunity and on Vaccination Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, María Emilia; Bottero, Daniela; Zurita, María Eugenia; Carriquiriborde, Francisco; Martin Aispuro, Pablo; Bartel, Erika; Sabater-Martínez, David; Bravo, María Sol; Castuma, Celina; Hozbor, Daniela Flavia

    2017-01-01

    Maternal safety through pertussis vaccination and subsequent maternal–fetal-antibody transfer are well documented, but information on infant protection from pertussis by such antibodies and by subsequent vaccinations is scarce. Since mice are used extensively for maternal-vaccination studies, we adopted that model to narrow those gaps in our understanding of maternal pertussis immunization. Accordingly, we vaccinated female mice with commercial acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine and measured offspring protection against Bordetella pertussis challenge and specific-antibody levels with or without revaccination. Maternal immunization protected the offspring against pertussis, with that immune protection transferred to the offspring lasting for several weeks, as evidenced by a reduction (4–5 logs, p maternal-vaccination-acquired immunity from the first pregnancy still conferred protection to offspring up to the fourth pregnancy. Under the conditions of our experimental protocol, protection to offspring from the aP-induced immunity is transferred both transplacentally and through breastfeeding. Adoptive-transfer experiments demonstrated that transferred antibodies were more responsible for the protection detected in offspring than transferred whole spleen cells. In contrast to reported findings, the protection transferred was not lost after the vaccination of infant mice with the same or other vaccine preparations, and conversely, the immunity transferred from mothers did not interfere with the protection conferred by infant vaccination with the same or different vaccines. These results indicated that aP-vaccine immunization of pregnant female mice conferred protective immunity that is transferred both transplacentally and via offspring breastfeeding without compromising the protection boostered by subsequent infant vaccination. These results—though admittedly not necessarily immediately extrapolatable to humans—nevertheless enabled us to test hypotheses under

  9. Effects of immunosuppression on avian coccidiosis: cyclosporin A but not hormonal bursectomy abrogates host protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillehoj, H S

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment and hormonal bursectomy on Eimeria tenella infection of chickens were investigated to evaluate the role of humoral antibody and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the host protective immunity to an intestinal protozoan disease, coccidiosis. Hormonal bursectomy had no significant effect on the host response to E. tenella. CsA treatment had a differential effect on the course of disease depending on how CsA was given relative to infection. Daily administration of CsA for 7 days beginning 1 day before primary infection with E. tenella enhanced disease resistance, whereas a single dose of CsA given before primary infection enhanced disease susceptibility compared with that of untreated controls. Chickens treated with CsA during the primary infection were resistant to reinfection at 5 weeks post-primary infection. Treatment of chickens immune to E. tenella with CsA at the time of secondary infection abrogated their resistance to reinfection despite the presence of high levels of coccidia-specific secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G. Splenic lymphocytes obtained after CsA treatment demonstrated a substantially depressed concanavalin A response, but not a depressed lipopolysaccharide response. Because CsA was not directly toxic to parasites in vivo when administered during the secondary infection, these results suggest that CsA interacts with the immune system to allow priming during the primary infection, while interfering with the effector function of CMI during the secondary infection. Taken together, present findings indicate that CMI plays a major role in host protective immunity to E. tenella. PMID:3496277

  10. The roles of immune memory and aging in protective immunity and endogenous reactivation of tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Guzzetta

    Full Text Available Finding more effective vaccines against tuberculosis (TB and improved preventive treatments against endogenous reactivation of latent TB is strategic to block transmission and reach the WHO goal of eliminating TB by 2050. Key related open questions in TB research include: i what are the determinants of a strong memory response upon primary infection? ii what is the role of cytokines towards protective memory response against a secondary infection? iii what are the mechanisms responsible for the increased risk of reactivation in elderly individuals? To address these questions, we explored a computational model of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis including a mathematical description of immunosenescence and the generation and maintenance of immune memory. Sensitivity analysis techniques, together with extensive model characterization and in silico experiments, were applied to identify key mechanisms controlling TB reactivation and immunological memory. Key findings of this study are summarized by the following model predictions: i increased strength and duration of memory protection is associated with higher levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-[Formula: see text] (TNF during primary infection; ii production of TNF, but not of interferon-[Formula: see text], by memory T cells during secondary infection is a major determinant of effective protection; iii impaired recruitment of CD4+ T cells may promote reactivation of latent TB infections in aging hosts. This study is a first attempt to consider the immune dynamics of a persistent infection throughout the lifetime of the host, taking into account immunosenescence and memory. While the model is TB specific, the results are applicable to other persistent bacterial infections and can aid in the development, evaluation and refinement of TB treatment and/or vaccine protocols.

  11. Review: Natural killer cells enhance the immune surveillance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the cells of the immune system cooperatively work against infectious agents and cancerous cells but Natural killer (NK) cells are playing an important role to respond to tumor by enhancing the expression of complementary domain (CD86) on dendritic cells (DCs) and production of IL-12. NK cells demolished tumor ...

  12. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  13. Construction, immune protection and innate immune response of shuffled polyvalent ompAs vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Nan; Cheng, Zhi-Xue; Ling, Xiao-Peng; Chu, Xiao; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Li, Hui

    2018-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that molecular breeding via DNA shuffling directs the evolution of polyvalent vaccines with desired traits, which leads to generation of polyvalent ompA vaccines using Vibrio alginolyticus VA0764 primers. Here, we replaced VA0764 primers with Edwardsiella tarda ompA primers to generate new polyvalent ompA vaccines by DNA shuffling of the same five ompA genes from four species of bacteria E. tarda, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus and Escherichia coli. We identified four polyvalent vaccine candidates from a eukaryotic expressing library EompAs-FE containing 82 ompAs using active immune protection against V. alginolyticus and E. tarda. Furthermore, we explored mechanisms of polyvalent vaccine candidates by investigation of the innate immune response to these ompAs, and found that expression of IL-1β, IL-8, IL-15, COX-2, IFN-γ, TLR-1, TLR-3 and C3b genes was elevated as a characteristic feature of these polyvalent vaccine candidates. These results indicate that use of different primers to construct a DNA library selects new evolution of polyvalent vaccines with desired traits, and polyvalent ompA vaccines elicit high innate immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juli Broggi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects. However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers.

  15. Super-enhancers: Asset management in immune cell genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Steven; O'Shea, John J; Vahedi, Golnaz

    2015-09-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs) are regions of the genome consisting of clusters of regulatory elements bound with very high amounts of transcription factors, and this architecture appears to be the hallmark of genes and noncoding RNAs linked with cell identity. Recent studies have identified SEs in CD4(+) T cells and have further linked these regions to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with immune-mediated disorders, pointing to an important role for these structures in the T cell differentiation and function. Here we review the features that define SEs, and discuss their function within the broader understanding of the mechanisms that define immune cell identity and function. We propose that SEs present crucial regulatory hubs, coordinating intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation signals, and argue that delineating these regions will provide important insight into the factors and mechanisms that define immune cell identity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anaplasma marginale attenuated by irradiation: Kinetics of immunity and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, L.A.; Higuera, B.O.; Castro, J.; Chavez, M.; Ruiz, O.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts were made to attenuate Anaplasma marginale by gamma irradiation using a dose of 900 Gy. Parasites were either irradiated once and after infection of an animal isolated and re-irradiated, or irradiated and cultured in vitro for four days and then re-irradiated. In the first two treatments the animals reacted as severely as a control group that received non-irradiated organisms; upon subsequent challenge with a virulent heterologous A. marginale strain, all animals had reasonable levels of protective immunity. The group that received irradiated and cultured organisms twice was not protected upon subsequent challenge and the animals reacted as severely as controls. Antibody responses were monitored. In all instances, after patent parasitaemia, an initial IgM response was followed by an IgG 1 and IgG 2 response. It is concluded that a virulent parasite population suitable for use as a vaccine was not obtained through irradiation and further use of this technique is discouraged. (author). 17 refs, 3 figs

  17. Progranulin Protects Hippocampal Neurogenesis via Suppression of Neuroinflammatory Responses Under Acute Immune Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbo; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2017-07-01

    Immune stress is well known to suppress adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We have demonstrated that progranulin (PGRN) has a mitogenic effect on neurogenesis under several experimental conditions. We have also shown that PGRN suppresses excessive neuroinflammatory responses after traumatic brain injury. However, the role of PGRN in modulating neurogenesis under acute immune stress is yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of PGRN in neurogenesis and inflammatory responses in the hippocampus using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune stress model. Treatment of mice with LPS significantly increased the expression of PGRN in activated microglia and decreased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. PGRN deficiency increased CD68-immunoreactive area and exacerbated suppression of neurogenesis following LPS treatment. The expression levels of lysosomal genes including lysozyme M, macrophage expressed gene 1, and cathepsin Z were higher in PGRN-deficient than in wild-type mice, while PGRN deficiency decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mRNA levels, suggesting that PGRN suppresses excessive lysosomal biogenesis by promoting mTOR signaling. LPS treatment also increased the expression of proinflammatory genes such as interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the hippocampus, and PGRN deficiency further enhanced gene expression of IL-6 and mPGES-1. These results suggest that PGRN plays a protecting role in hippocampal neurogenesis at least partially by attenuating neuroinflammatory responses during LPS-induced acute immune stress.

  18. A candidate H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Steitz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2009 a new pandemic disease appeared and spread globally. The recent emergence of the pandemic influenza virus H1N1 first isolated in Mexico and USA raised concerns about vaccine availability. We here report our development of an adenovirus-based influenza H1N1 vaccine tested for immunogenicity and efficacy to confer protection in animal model.We generated two adenovirus(Ad5-based influenza vaccine candidates encoding the wildtype or a codon-optimized hemagglutinin antigen (HA from the recently emerged swine influenza isolate A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm. After verification of antigen expression, immunogenicity of the vaccine candidates were tested in a mouse model using dose escalations for subcutaneous immunization. Sera of immunized animals were tested in microneutalization and hemagglutination inhibition assays for the presence of HA-specific antibodies. HA-specific T-cells were measured in IFNgamma Elispot assays. The efficiency of the influenza vaccine candidates were evaluated in a challenge model by measuring viral titer in lung and nasal turbinate 3 days after inoculation of a homologous H1N1 virus.A single immunization resulted in robust cellular and humoral immune response. Remarkably, the intensity of the immune response was substantially enhanced with codon-optimized antigen, indicating the benefit of manipulating the genetic code of HA antigens in the context of recombinant influenza vaccine design. These results highlight the value of advanced technologies in vaccine development and deployment in response to infections with pandemic potential. Our study emphasizes the potential of an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine platform with the benefits of speed of manufacture and efficacy of a single dose immunization.

  19. Coimmunization with Complementary Glucosyltransferase Peptides Results in Enhanced Immunogenicity and Protection against Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Martin A.; Smith, Daniel J.; Holmberg, Cynthia J.; Eastcott, Jean W.

    2000-01-01

    Peptide constructs from the catalytic (CAT) and glucan-binding (GLU) regions of the mutans streptococcal glucosyltransferase enzymes (GTF) can provide immunity to dental caries infection. A strategy of coimmunization was tested to determine whether protection could be enhanced. Rats were immunized with one of the previously described peptide constructs from the CAT or GLU region of the GTF of mutans streptococci or coimmunized with a combination of these constructs (CAT-GLU). Coimmunized animals demonstrated significantly higher serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and salivary IgA antibody levels to CAT or GTF than rats immunized with either construct alone. To assess the functional significance of coimmunization with these constructs, animals were immunized as above or with Streptococcus sobrinus GTF and then infected with S. sobrinus to explore the effects of immunization on immunological, microbiological, and disease (dental caries) parameters. Serum antibody from the communized group inhibited S. sobrinus GTF-mediated insoluble glucan synthesis in vitro above that of the individual-construct-immunized groups. Immunization with CAT or GLU constructs resulted in significantly reduced dental caries after infection with S. sobrinus compared with sham-immunized animals. Coimmunization produced greater reductions in caries than after immunization with either CAT or GLU. Also, significant elevations in lymphocyte proliferative responses to CAT, GLU, and GTF were observed after coimmunization with CAT-GLU compared with the responses after immunization with the individual constructs. The results suggested that increased numbers of memory T cells, which could proliferate to CAT, were generated by coimmunization. The experiments support the functional significance of these GTF domains in dental caries pathogenesis and present coimmunization as a simple alternative to intact GTF to enhance protective immunity against cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:10768962

  20. Protective immunity differs between routes of administration of attenuated malaria parasites independent of parasite liver load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeberlein, S.; Chevalley-Maurel, S.; Ozir-Fazalalikhan, A.; Koppejan, H.; Winkel, B.M.F.; Ramesar, J.; Khan, S.M.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Roestenberg, M.; Janse, C.J.; Smits, H.H.; Franke-Fayard, B.

    2017-01-01

    In humans and murine models of malaria, intradermal immunization (ID-I) with genetically attenuated sporozoites that arrest in liver induces lower protective immunity than intravenous immunization (IV-I). It is unclear whether this difference is caused by fewer sporozoites migrating into the liver

  1. Social immunity and the superorganism: Behavioral defenses protecting honey bee colonies from pathogens and parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) have a number of traits that effectively reduce the spread of pathogens and parasites throughout the colony. These mechanisms of social immunity are often analogous to the individual immune system. As such social immune defences function to protect the colony or superorga...

  2. Ophiopogon polysaccharide liposome can enhance the non-specific and specific immune response in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yunpeng; Ma, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Lin; Gao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Weimin; Song, Xiaoping; Hou, Weifeng; Guo, Chao; Tong, Dewen

    2015-03-30

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the immune-enhancing activity of ophiopogon polysaccharide liposome (OPL). In non-specific immune response experiment, the phagocytosis and cytokines secretion of peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo were performed. In specific immune response experiment, the activity of OPL was measured on chickens which were vaccinated with Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine and then challenged with ND virus at 49-old-day. The results showed that OPL could significantly promote the phagocytosis of macrophages and induce the secretion of IL-2 and IL-6 in vitro; OPL at high and medium doses could significantly improve the phagocytosic index, promote lymphocyte proliferation, increase the proportion of T lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4(+) and CD8(+)), enhance antibody titer and improve the protective rate in vivo. Moreover, its efficacy was significantly better than ophiopogon polysaccharide (OP). These results indicated that the immune-enhancing activity of OP was significantly improved after encapsulated with liposome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen

    2006-01-01

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28 4 were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d 3 DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD 5 ) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d 3 DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response

  4. Discovering naturally processed antigenic determinants that confer protective T cell immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Spencer, Charles T; Conant, Stephanie B

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (TCD8) confer protective immunity against many infectious diseases, suggesting that microbial TCD8 determinants are promising vaccine targets. Nevertheless, current T cell antigen identification approaches do not discern which epitopes drive protective immunity during active infectio...

  5. Discovery of stimulation-responsive immune enhancers with CRISPR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Boontanrart, Mandy; Roth, Theodore L.; Gagnon, John D.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Lee, Youjin; Bray, Nicolas L.; Chan, Alice Y.; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Nguyen, Michelle L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Subramaniam, Meena; Li, Zhongmei; Woo, Jonathan M.; Mitros, Therese; Ray, Graham J.; Curie, Gemma L.; Naddaf, Nicki; Chu, Julia S.; Ma, Hong; Boyer, Eric; Van Gool, Frederic; Huang, Hailiang; Liu, Ruize; Tobin, Victoria R.; Schumann, Kathrin; Daly, Mark J.; Farh, Kyle K; Ansel, K. Mark; Ye, Chun J.; Greenleaf, William J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Corn, Jacob E.; Marson, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The majority of genetic variants associated with common human diseases map to enhancers, non-coding elements that shape cell-type-specific transcriptional programs and responses to extracellular cues1–3. Systematic mapping of functional enhancers and their biological contexts is required to understand the mechanisms by which variation in non-coding genetic sequences contributes to disease. Functional enhancers can be mapped by genomic sequence disruption4–6, but this approach is limited to the subset of enhancers that are necessary in the particular cellular context being studied. We hypothesized that recruitment of a strong transcriptional activator to an enhancer would be sufficient to drive target gene expression, even if that enhancer was not currently active in the assayed cells. Here we describe a discovery platform that can identify stimulus-responsive enhancers for a target gene independent of stimulus exposure. We used tiled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa)7 to synthetically recruit a transcriptional activator to sites across large genomic regions (more than 100 kilobases) surrounding two key autoimmunity risk loci, CD69 and IL2RA. We identified several CRISPRa-responsive elements with chromatin features of stimulus-responsive enhancers, including an IL2RA enhancer that harbours an autoimmunity risk variant. Using engineered mouse models, we found that sequence perturbation of the disease-associated Il2ra enhancer did not entirely block Il2ra expression, but rather delayed the timing of gene activation in response to specific extracellular signals. Enhancer deletion skewed polarization of naive T cells towards a pro-inflammatory T helper (TH17) cell state and away from a regulatory T cell state. This integrated approach identifies functional enhancers and reveals how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs. PMID:28854172

  6. Discovery of stimulation-responsive immune enhancers with CRISPR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Boontanrart, Mandy; Roth, Theodore L.; Gagnon, John D.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Lee, Youjin; Bray, Nicolas L.; Chan, Alice Y.; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Nguyen, Michelle L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Subramaniam, Meena; Li, Zhongmei; Woo, Jonathan M.; Mitros, Therese; Ray, Graham J.; Curie, Gemma L.; Naddaf, Nicki; Chu, Julia S.; Ma, Hong; Boyer, Eric; van Gool, Frederic; Huang, Hailiang; Liu, Ruize; Tobin, Victoria R.; Schumann, Kathrin; Daly, Mark J.; Farh, Kyle K.; Ansel, K. Mark; Ye, Chun J.; Greenleaf, William J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Corn, Jacob E.; Marson, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The majority of genetic variants associated with common human diseases map to enhancers, non-coding elements that shape cell-type-specific transcriptional programs and responses to extracellular cues. Systematic mapping of functional enhancers and their biological contexts is required to understand the mechanisms by which variation in non-coding genetic sequences contributes to disease. Functional enhancers can be mapped by genomic sequence disruption, but this approach is limited to the subset of enhancers that are necessary in the particular cellular context being studied. We hypothesized that recruitment of a strong transcriptional activator to an enhancer would be sufficient to drive target gene expression, even if that enhancer was not currently active in the assayed cells. Here we describe a discovery platform that can identify stimulus-responsive enhancers for a target gene independent of stimulus exposure. We used tiled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) to synthetically recruit a transcriptional activator to sites across large genomic regions (more than 100 kilobases) surrounding two key autoimmunity risk loci, CD69 and IL2RA. We identified several CRISPRa-responsive elements with chromatin features of stimulus-responsive enhancers, including an IL2RA enhancer that harbours an autoimmunity risk variant. Using engineered mouse models, we found that sequence perturbation of the disease-associated Il2ra enhancer did not entirely block Il2ra expression, but rather delayed the timing of gene activation in response to specific extracellular signals. Enhancer deletion skewed polarization of naive T cells towards a pro-inflammatory T helper (TH17) cell state and away from a regulatory T cell state. This integrated approach identifies functional enhancers and reveals how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs.

  7. Scheduling of cogeneration plants considering electricity wheeling using enhanced immune algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sungling Chen; Mingtong Tsay; Hongjey Gow [Cheng-Shiu Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2005-01-01

    A new method based on immune algorithm (IA) is presented to solve the scheduling of cogeneration plants in a deregulated market. The objective function includes fuel cost, population cost, and electricity wheeling cost, subjective to the use of mixed fuels, operational limits, emissions constraints, and transmission line flow constraints. Enhanced immune algorithm (EIA) is proposed by an improved crossover and mutation mechanism with a competition and auto-adjust scheme to avoid prematurity. Table lists with heuristic rules are also employed in the searching process to enhance the performance. EIA is also compared with the original IA. Test results verify that EIA can offer an efficient way for cogeneration plants to solve the problem of economic dispatch, environmental protection, and electricity wheeling. (Author)

  8. "The Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" - Meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, Cesar; Eichelberg, Katrin; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Shea, Jaqueline; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Behar, Samuel; Ernst, Joel D; Porcelli, Steven A; Maeurer, Markus; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2017-06-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the major cause of death from infectious diseases around the world, particularly in HIV infected individuals. TB vaccine design and development have been focused on improving Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and evaluating recombinant and viral vector expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins, for boosting BCG-primed immunity, but these approaches have not yet yielded significant improvements over the modest effects of BCG in protecting against infection or disease. On March 7-8, 2016, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) convened a workshop on "The Impact of Mtb Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" with the goal of defining immune mechanisms that could be targeted through novel research approaches, to inform vaccine design and immune therapeutic interventions for prevention of TB. The workshop addressed early infection events, the impact of Mtb evolution on the development and maintenance of an adaptive immune response, and the factors that influence protection against and progression to active disease. Scientific gaps and areas of study to revitalize and accelerate TB vaccine design were discussed and prioritized. These included a comprehensive evaluation of innate and Mtb-specific adaptive immune responses in the lung at different stages of disease; determining the role of B cells and antibodies (Abs) during Mtb infection; development of better assays to measure Mtb burden following exposure, infection, during latency and after treatment, and approaches to improving current animal models to study Mtb immunogenicity, TB disease and transmission. Copyright © 2017.

  9. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  10. Demonstration of cross-protective vaccine immunity against an emerging pathogenic Ebolavirus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa E Hensley

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in developing vaccines for emerging pathogens is their continued evolution and ability to escape human immunity. Therefore, an important goal of vaccine research is to advance vaccine candidates with sufficient breadth to respond to new outbreaks of previously undetected viruses. Ebolavirus (EBOV vaccines have demonstrated protection against EBOV infection in nonhuman primates (NHP and show promise in human clinical trials but immune protection occurs only with vaccines whose antigens are matched to the infectious challenge species. A 2007 hemorrhagic fever outbreak in Uganda demonstrated the existence of a new EBOV species, Bundibugyo (BEBOV, that differed from viruses covered by current vaccine candidates by up to 43% in genome sequence. To address the question of whether cross-protective immunity can be generated against this novel species, cynomolgus macaques were immunized with DNA/rAd5 vaccines expressing ZEBOV and SEBOV glycoprotein (GP prior to lethal challenge with BEBOV. Vaccinated subjects developed robust, antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses against the GP from ZEBOV as well as cellular immunity against BEBOV GP, and immunized macaques were uniformly protected against lethal challenge with BEBOV. This report provides the first demonstration of vaccine-induced protective immunity against challenge with a heterologous EBOV species, and shows that Ebola vaccines capable of eliciting potent cellular immunity may provide the best strategy for eliciting cross-protection against newly emerging heterologous EBOV species.

  11. Envelope-specific T-helper and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses associated with protective immunity to equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmyer, Tara L; Craigo, Jodi K; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2007-04-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses provides a valuable model for examining the natural immunological control of lentivirus infection and disease and the mechanisms of protective and enhancing vaccine immunity. We have previously hypothesized that the EIAV envelope (Env) proteins gp90 and gp45 are major determinants of vaccine efficacy, and that the development of protective immunity by attenuated viral vaccines may be associated with the progressive redirection of immune responses from immunodominant, variable Env segments to immunorecessive, conserved Env sequences. Whilst the antibody-neutralization determinants of Env have been defined, there are to date no comprehensive analyses of the lymphoproliferative (T-helper, Th) and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) epitopes of the EIAV Env proteins. Thus, in the current study, synthetic-peptide methodologies were used to define regions of EIAV Env associated with protective vaccine immunity in a panel of 12 horses inoculated with the attenuated EIAV(D9) vaccine and two asymptomatic carrier horses infected experimentally with the virulent EIAV(PV) strain expressing the same Env protein as the vaccine strain. The results of these studies identified 17 broadly reactive Th peptides and six broadly reactive CTL peptides in the Env proteins of EIAV that were associated with protective immunity. Thus, these data provide for the first time a comprehensive mapping of EIAV Env-specific cellular regions that can be used to examine the development of protective immunity and to evaluate potential cellular immune determinants of protective immunity.

  12. Synthetic RORγ agonists regulate multiple pathways to enhance antitumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Liu, Xikui; Moisan, Jacques; Wang, Yahong; Lesch, Charles A.; Spooner, Chauncey; Morgan, Rodney W.; Zawidzka, Elizabeth M.; Mertz, David; Bousley, Dick; Majchrzak, Kinga; Kryczek, Ilona; Taylor, Clarke; Van Huis, Chad; Skalitzky, Don; Hurd, Alexander; Aicher, Thomas D.; Toogood, Peter L.; Glick, Gary D.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Zou, Weiping; Carter, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RORγt is the key transcription factor controlling the development and function of CD4+ Th17 and CD8+ Tc17 cells. Across a range of human tumors, about 15% of the CD4+ T cell fraction in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are RORγ+ cells. To evaluate the role of RORγ in antitumor immunity, we have identified synthetic, small molecule agonists that selectively activate RORγ to a greater extent than the endogenous agonist desmosterol. These RORγ agonists enhance effector function of Type 17 cells by increasing the production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17A and GM-CSF, augmenting expression of co-stimulatory receptors like CD137, CD226, and improving survival and cytotoxic activity. RORγ agonists also attenuate immunosuppressive mechanisms by curtailing Treg formation, diminishing CD39 and CD73 expression, and decreasing levels of co-inhibitory receptors including PD-1 and TIGIT on tumor-reactive lymphocytes. The effects of RORγ agonists were not observed in RORγ−/− T cells, underscoring the selective on-target activity of the compounds. In vitro treatment of tumor-specific T cells with RORγ agonists, followed by adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing mice is highly effective at controlling tumor growth while improving T cell survival and maintaining enhanced IL-17A and reduced PD-1 in vivo. The in vitro effects of RORγ agonists translate into single agent, immune system-dependent, antitumor efficacy when compounds are administered orally in syngeneic tumor models. RORγ agonists integrate multiple antitumor mechanisms into a single therapeutic that both increases immune activation and decreases immune suppression resulting in robust inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, RORγ agonists represent a novel immunotherapy approach for cancer. PMID:28123897

  13. Disease tolerance and immunity in host protection against infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Teixeira, Luis; Moita, Luis F

    2017-02-01

    The immune system probably evolved to limit the negative effects exerted by pathogens on host homeostasis. This defence strategy relies on the concerted action of innate and adaptive components of the immune system, which sense and target pathogens for containment, destruction or expulsion. Resistance to infection refers to these immune functions, which reduce the pathogen load of an infected host as the means to preserve homeostasis. Immune-driven resistance to infection is coupled to an additional, and arguably as important, defence strategy that limits the extent of dysfunction imposed on host parenchymal tissues during infection, without exerting a direct negative effect on pathogens. This defence strategy, known as disease tolerance, relies on tissue damage control mechanisms that prevent the deleterious effects of pathogens and that uncouples immune-driven resistance mechanisms from immunopathology and disease. In this Review, we provide a unifying view of resistance and disease tolerance in the framework of immunity to infection.

  14. Immunization of pregnant gilts with PRCV induces lactogenic immunity for protection of nursing piglets from challenge with TGEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, R D; Woods, R D

    1993-12-01

    The level of passive protection against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was evaluated by experimentally infecting 12 pregnant gilts with different doses of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) and challenging their litters at 4 days of age. An overall survival rate of 70% was found for piglets nursing the 12 PRCV-infected gilts, compared to a 16% survival rate for piglets of nine uninfected control gilts. Six of the PRCV-infected gilts had adequate levels of immunity to resist infection with TGEV following the challenge of their litters. These six completely immuned gilts also solidly protected their litters from TGEV as shown by a 96% piglet survival rate through weaning at 3 weeks of age. The results suggest that respiratory infection with PRCV induces a substantial degree of protective lactogenic immunity against TGEV.

  15. Th1-Th17 cells mediate protective adaptive immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We sought to define protective mechanisms of immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans bloodstream infections in mice immunized with the recombinant N-terminus of Als3p (rAls3p-N vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH(3 adjuvant, or adjuvant controls. Deficiency of IFN-gamma but not IL-17A enhanced susceptibility of control mice to both infections. However, vaccine-induced protective immunity against both infections required CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-gamma and IL-17A, and functional phagocytic effectors. Vaccination primed Th1, Th17, and Th1/17 lymphocytes, which produced pro-inflammatory cytokines that enhanced phagocytic killing of both organisms. Vaccinated, infected mice had increased IFN-gamma, IL-17, and KC, increased neutrophil influx, and decreased organism burden in tissues. In summary, rAls3p-N vaccination induced a Th1/Th17 response, resulting in recruitment and activation of phagocytes at sites of infection, and more effective clearance of S. aureus and C. albicans from tissues. Thus, vaccine-mediated adaptive immunity can protect against both infections by targeting microbes for destruction by innate effectors.

  16. Synthetic ROR? agonists regulate multiple pathways to enhance antitumor immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiao; Liu, Xikui; Moisan, Jacques; Wang, Yahong; Lesch, Charles A.; Spooner, Chauncey; Morgan, Rodney W.; Zawidzka, Elizabeth M.; Mertz, David; Bousley, Dick; Majchrzak, Kinga; Kryczek, Ilona; Taylor, Clarke; Van Huis, Chad; Skalitzky, Don

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ROR?t is the key transcription factor controlling the development and function of CD4+ Th17 and CD8+ Tc17 cells. Across a range of human tumors, about 15% of the CD4+ T cell fraction in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are ROR?+ cells. To evaluate the role of ROR? in antitumor immunity, we have identified synthetic, small molecule agonists that selectively activate ROR? to a greater extent than the endogenous agonist desmosterol. These ROR? agonists enhance effector function of Type 17...

  17. Protective effects of HemoHIM on immune and hematopoietic systems against γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Yee, Sung-Tae; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2014-02-01

    We examined the effect of HemoHIM on the protective efficacy of hematopoietic stem cells and on the recovery of immune cells against sublethal doses of ionizing radiation. Two-month-old mice were exposed to γ-rays at a dose of 8, 6.5, or 5 Gy for a30-day survival study, endogenous spleen colony formation, or other experiments, respectively. HemoHIM was injected intraperitoneally before and after irradiation. Our results showed that HemoHIM significantly decreased the mortality of sublethally irradiated mice. The HemoHIM administration decreased the apoptosis of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice. On the other hand, HemoHIM increased the formation of endogenous spleen colony in irradiated mice. In irradiated mice, the recovery of total leukocytes in the peripheral blood and lymphocytes in the spleen were enhanced significantly by HemoHIM. Moreover, the function of B cells, T cells, and NK cells regenerated in irradiated mice were significantly improved by the administration of HemoHIM. HemoHIM showed an ideal radioprotector for protecting hematopoietic stem cells and for accelerating the recovery of immune cells. We propose HemoHIM as a beneficial supplement drug during radiotherapy to alleviate adverse radiation-induced effects for cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Mutations in Cas9 Enhance the Rate of Acquisition of Viral Spacer Sequences during the CRISPR-Cas Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heler, Robert; Wright, Addison V; Vucelja, Marija; Bikard, David; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2017-01-05

    CRISPR loci and their associated (Cas) proteins encode a prokaryotic immune system that protects against viruses and plasmids. Upon infection, a low fraction of cells acquire short DNA sequences from the invader. These sequences (spacers) are integrated in between the repeats of the CRISPR locus and immunize the host against the matching invader. Spacers specify the targets of the CRISPR immune response through transcription into short RNA guides that direct Cas nucleases to the invading DNA molecules. Here we performed random mutagenesis of the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to look for variants that provide enhanced immunity against viral infection. We identified a mutation, I473F, that increases the rate of spacer acquisition by more than two orders of magnitude. Our results highlight the role of Cas9 during CRISPR immunization and provide a useful tool to study this rare process and develop it as a biotechnological application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CD47 Promotes Protective Innate and Adaptive Immunity in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarathna, Dhammika H. M. L. P.; Stein, Erica V.; Lessey-Morillon, Elizabeth C.; Nayak, Debasis; Martin-Manso, Gema; Roberts, David D.

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed receptor that regulates immunity by engaging its counter-receptor SIRPα on phagocytes and its secreted ligand thrombospondin-1. Mice lacking CD47 can exhibit enhanced or impaired host responses to bacterial pathogens, but its role in fungal immunity has not been examined. cd47-/- mice on a C57BL/6 background showed significantly increased morbidity and mortality following Candida albicans infection when compared with wild-type mice. Despite normal fungal colonization at earlier times, cd47-/- mice at four days post-infection had increased colonization of brain and kidneys accompanied by stronger inflammatory reactions. Neutrophil and macrophage numbers were significantly elevated in kidneys and neutrophils in the brains of infected cd47-/- mice. However, no defect in phagocytic activity towards C. albicans was observed in cd47-/- bone-marrow-derived macrophages, and neutrophil and macrophage killing of C. albicans was not impaired. CD47-deficiency did not alter the early humoral immune response to C. albicans. Th1, Th2, and Th17 population of CD4+ T cells were expanded in the spleen, and gene expression profiles of spleen and kidney showed stronger pro-inflammatory signaling in infected cd47-/- mice. The chemoattractant chemokines MIP-2α and MIP-2β were highly expressed in infected spleens of cd47-/- mice. G-CSF, GM-CSF, and the inflammasome component NLRP3 were more highly expressed in infected cd47-/- kidneys than in infected wild-type controls. Circulating pro- (TNF-α, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) were significantly elevated, but IL-17 was decreased. These data indicate that CD47 plays protective roles against disseminated candidiasis and alters pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive pathways known to regulate innate and T cell immunity. PMID:26010544

  20. A prime-boost immunization regimen based on a simian adenovirus 36 vectored multi-stage malaria vaccine induces protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jairo A; McCaffery, Jessica N; Kashentseva, Elena; Singh, Balwan; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Moreno, Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Malaria remains a considerable burden on public health. In 2015, the WHO estimates there were 212 million malaria cases causing nearly 429,000 deaths globally. A highly effective malaria vaccine is needed to reduce the burden of this disease. We have developed an experimental vaccine candidate (PyCMP) based on pre-erythrocytic (CSP) and erythrocytic (MSP1) stage antigens derived from the rodent malaria parasite P. yoelii. Our protein-based vaccine construct induces protective antibodies and CD4 + T cell responses. Based on evidence that viral vectors increase CD8 + T cell-mediated immunity, we also have tested heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens that included human adenovirus serotype 5 vector (Ad5), obtaining protective CD8 + T cell responses. While Ad5 is commonly used for vaccine studies, the high prevalence of pre-existing immunity to Ad5 severely compromises its utility. Here, we report the use of the novel simian adenovirus 36 (SAd36) as a candidate for a vectored malaria vaccine since this virus is not known to infect humans, and it is not neutralized by anti-Ad5 antibodies. Our study shows that the recombinant SAd36PyCMP can enhance specific CD8 + T cell response and elicit similar antibody titers when compared to an immunization regimen including the recombinant Ad5PyCMP. The robust immune responses induced by SAd36PyCMP are translated into a lower parasite load following P. yoelii infectious challenge when compared to mice immunized with Ad5PyCMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenotypes of Heligmosomoides polygyrus selected to survive protective immunity in quackenbush mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Dobson, C; McManus, D P

    1995-12-01

    The survival of Heligmosomoides polygyrus phenotypes passaged selectively through naive (Hpn) and immune (Hpa) outbred Quackenbush (Q) mice was compared in Q mice immunized passively with normal (NMS) and immune mouse serum (IMS). IMS raised against Hpn(Q) worms (IMS-N) was 93% and 92% protective against Hpn(Q) and Hpa(Q) phenotypes, respectively; IMS against Hpa(Q) (IMS-A) conferred 93% protection against the Hpn(Q) phenotype but gave only 45% protection against the adapted Hpa(Q) parasites (P anti-parasite IgG reactivity than did IMS-N (P immunity than did Hpn(Q) worms and that Hpa(Q) and Hpn(Q) phenotypes had different antigens, which, however, did not lead to phenotype-specific immunity. This reflects the complexity of host-parasite interactions.

  2. Protective Immunity to Pre-Erythrocytic Stage Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    latent infection [68] might help to maintain multi-func- tional TEM cells in the peripheral tissue. The highly suc- cessful yellow fever vaccine targets... reactivation of persistent leishmaniasis and control of concomitant immunity. J. Exp. Med. 200, 201–210 46 Casares, S. andRichie, T. (2009...Wille-Reece, U. et al. (2005) Immunization with HIV -1 Gag protein conjugated to a TLR7/8 agonist results in the generation of HIV -1 Gag- specific Th1 and

  3. Arctigenin protects against liver injury from acute hepatitis by suppressing immune cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Huafeng; Yang, Jinlai; Cheng, Yingnan; Wang, Dan; Yang, Fengrui; Li, Yan; Zhou, Dongmei; Wang, Yanxia; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Luhong; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2018-03-23

    As a phenylpropanoid and dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan present in medical plants, such as those used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine, including Arctium lappa (Niubang), arctigenin exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the protective role of arctigenin in Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatitis in mice. Arctigenin remarkably reduced the congestion and necroinflammation of livers, and improved hepatic function (ALT and AST) in ConA-induced acute hepatitis in vivo. The infiltration of CD4 T, NKT and macrophages into the livers was found to be reduced with arctigenin treatment. Arctigenin suppressed ConA-induced T lymphocyte proliferations that might have resulted from enhanced IL-10 production by macrophages and CD4 T cells. These results suggested that arctigenin could be a powerful drug candidate for acute hepatitis through immune suppression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Humoral immunity through immunoglobulin M protects mice from an experimental actinomycetoma infection by Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2004-10-01

    An experimental model of infection with Nocardia brasiliensis, used as an example of a facultative intracellular pathogen, was tested. N. brasiliensis was injected into the rear foot pads of BALB/c mice to establish an infection. Within 30 days, infected animals developed a chronic actinomycetoma infection. Batch cultures of N. brasiliensis were used to purify P61, P38, and P24 antigens; P61 is a catalase, and P38 is a protease with strong caseinolytic activity. Active and passive immunizations of BALB/c mice with these three purified soluble antigens were studied. Protection was demonstrated for actively immunized mice. However, immunity lasted only 30 days. Other groups of immunized mice were bled at different times, and their sera were passively transferred to naive recipients that were then infected with N. brasiliensis. Sera collected 5, 6, and 7 days after donor immunization conferred complete, long-lasting protection. The protective effect of passive immunity decreased when sera were collected 2 weeks after donor immunization. However, neither the early sera (1-, 2-, and 3-day sera) nor the later sera (30- or 45-day sera) prevented the infection. Hyperimmune sera with the highest levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to N. brasiliensis antigens did not protect at all. The antigens tested induced two IgM peaks. The first peak was present 3 days after immunization but was not antigen specific and did not transfer protection. The second peak was evident 7 days after immunization, was an IgM response, was antigen specific, and conferred protection. This results clearly demonstrate that IgM antibodies protect the host against a facultative intracellular bacterium.

  5. A role for immune responses against non-CS components in the cross-species protection induced by immunization with irradiated malaria sporozoites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Mauduit

    Full Text Available Immunization with irradiated Plasmodium sporozoites induces sterile immunity in rodents, monkeys and humans. The major surface component of the sporozoite the circumsporozoite protein (CS long considered as the antigen predominantly responsible for this immunity, thus remains the leading candidate antigen for vaccines targeting the parasite's pre-erythrocytic (PE stages. However, this role for CS was questioned when we recently showed that immunization with irradiated sporozoites (IrrSpz of a P. berghei line whose endogenous CS was replaced by that of P. falciparum still conferred sterile protection against challenge with wild type P. berghei sporozoites. In order to investigate the involvement of CS in the cross-species protection recently observed between the two rodent parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii, we adopted our gene replacement approach for the P. yoelii CS and exploited the ability to conduct reciprocal challenges. Overall, we found that immunization led to sterile immunity irrespective of the origin of the CS in the immunizing or challenge sporozoites. However, for some combinations, immune responses to CS contributed to the acquisition of protective immunity and were dependent on the immunizing IrrSpz dose. Nonetheless, when data from all the cross-species immunization/challenges were considered, the immune responses directed against non-CS parasite antigens shared by the two parasite species played a major role in the sterile protection induced by immunization with IrrSpz. This opens the perspective to develop a single vaccine formulation that could protect against multiple parasite species.

  6. The serological response to heartwater immunization in cattle is an indicator of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrence, J A; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Whiteland, A P

    1995-01-01

    vaccination, all were completely or partially immune to challenge. Ten of the 14 animals which failed to seroconvert were immune but the proportion was not significantly different from that in the unvaccinated controls (4/10). Of 29 animals vaccinated and treated simultaneously with a slow-release doxycycline...... implant, 13 failed to seroconvert, and of these, four were completely susceptible to challenge....

  7. Protection against HIV-disease progression: From immune activation to T-cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.B.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection undermines the immune system by causing a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells. Eventually, the weakened immune system is no longer able to offer resistance to opportunistic infections and the HIV-infected individual will develop AIDS. Even after 30 years of intensive research on HIV, there is

  8. Immunization to protect the US Armed Forces: heritage, current practice, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstein, John D; Pittman, Phillip R; Greenwood, John T; Engler, Renata J M

    2006-01-01

    Americans serving with the US Armed Forces need protection from the dangerous infections that they can contract during training, based on occupation, during overseas deployment, or because of underlying health status. For over 230 years, the military health-care system has immunized troops to protect them personally and to help them accomplish their missions. Military researchers have invented, developed, and improved vaccines and immunization delivery methods against more than 20 diseases. This article consolidates content from several previous historical reviews, adds additional sources, and cites primary literature regarding military contributions and accomplishments. Discussion emphasizes smallpox, typhoid fever, tetanus, influenza, meningococcal disease, adenovirus, yellow fever, pneumococcal disease, and anthrax. Delivery issues include documentation, simultaneous immunization, seroscreening, safety surveillance, jet injection, and cold-chain management. Immunization policies for each major US conflict are described. Military immunization programs need to be individualized on the basis of personal contraindications and prior immunity. The proper conduct of military immunization programs respects the need for detailed education of military personnel, maximizes quality in immunization delivery, and supports quality clinical care to prevent and treat adverse events after immunization. Military immunization programs maintain the health of soldiers, marines, sailors, airmen, and coast guardsmen, the resources most critical to military success.

  9. Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID: An Acute Response to Ocular Insult Protects from Future Immune-Mediated Damage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Cone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The “immune privilege” that inhibits immune defense mechanisms that could lead to damage to sensitive ocular tissue is based on the expression of immunosuppressive factors on ocular tissue and in ocular fluids. In addition to this environmental protection, the injection of antigen into the anterior chamber or infection in the anterior chamber induces a systemic suppression of potentially damaging cell-mediated and humoral responses to the antigen. Here we discuss evidence that suggests that Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID a is initiated by an ocular response to moderate inflammation that leads to a systemic immunoregulatory response. Injection into the anterior chamber induces a rise in TNF-α and MCP-1 in aqueous humor and an infiltration of circulating F4/80 + monocytes that home to the iris. The induction of ACAID is dependent on this infiltration of circulating monocytes that eventually emigrate to the thymus and spleen where they induce regulatory T cells that inhibit the inductive or effector phases of a cell-mediated immune response. ACAID therefore protects the eye from the collateral damage of an immune response to infection by suppressing a future potentially damaging response to infection.

  10. Bisphosphonates target B cells to enhance humoral immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonti, Elena; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Galliverti, Gabriele; Moseman, E. Ashley; Di Lucia, Pietro; Amabile, Angelo; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Giovanni, Marco; Sironi, Laura; Chevrier, Nicolas; Sitia, Giovanni; Gennari, Luigi; Guidotti, Luca G.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that are widely used to inhibit loss of bone mass in patients. We show here that the administration of clinically relevant doses of bisphosphonates in mice increases antibody responses to live and inactive viruses, proteins, haptens and existing commercial vaccine formulations. Bisphosphonates exert this adjuvant-like activity in the absence of CD4+ and γδ T cells, neutrophils or dendritic cells and their effect does not rely on local macrophage depletion nor does it depend upon Toll-like receptor signaling or the inflammasome. Rather, bisphosphonates target directly B cells and enhance B cell expansion and antibody production upon antigen encounter. These data establish bisphosphonates as a novel class of adjuvants that boost humoral immune responses. PMID:24120862

  11. Bisphosphonates Target B Cells to Enhance Humoral Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tonti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that are widely used to inhibit loss of bone mass in patients. We show here that the administration of clinically relevant doses of bisphosphonates in mice increases antibody responses to live and inactive viruses, proteins, haptens, and existing commercial vaccine formulations. Bisphosphonates exert this adjuvant-like activity in the absence of CD4+ and γδ T cells, neutrophils, or dendritic cells, and their effect does not rely on local macrophage depletion, Toll-like receptor signaling, or the inflammasome. Rather, bisphosphonates target directly B cells and enhance B cell expansion and antibody production upon antigen encounter. These data establish bisphosphonates as an additional class of adjuvants that boost humoral immune responses.

  12. Strain-specific protective effect of the immunity induced by live malarial sporozoites under chloroquine cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Cheesman, Sandra; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Carter, Richard; Pathirana, Sisira

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of a whole-sporozoite malaria vaccine would partly be determined by the strain-specificity of the protective responses against malarial sporozoites and liver-stage parasites. Evidence from previous reports were inconsistent, where some studies have shown that the protective immunity induced by irradiated or live sporozoites in rodents or humans were cross-protective and in others strain-specific. In the present work, we have studied the strain-specificity of live sporozoite-induced immunity using two genetically and immunologically different strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi, Pc746 and PcCeylon, in toque monkeys. Two groups of monkeys were immunized against live sporozoites of either the Pc746 (n = 5), or the PcCeylon (n = 4) strain, by the bites of 2-4 sporozoite-infected Anopheles tessellates mosquitoes per monkey under concurrent treatments with chloroquine and primaquine to abrogate detectable blood infections. Subsequently, a group of non-immunized monkeys (n = 4), and the two groups of immunized monkeys were challenged with a mixture of sporozoites of the two strains by the bites of 2-5 infective mosquitoes from each strain per monkey. In order to determine the strain-specificity of the protective immunity, the proportions of parasites of the two strains in the challenge infections were quantified using an allele quantification assay, Pyrosequencing™, based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the parasites' circumsporozoite protein gene. The Pyrosequencing™ data showed that a significant reduction of parasites of the immunizing strain in each group of strain-specifically immunized monkeys had occurred, indicating a stronger killing effect on parasites of the immunizing strain. Thus, the protective immunity developed following a single, live sporozoite/chloroquine immunization, acted specifically against the immunizing strain and was, therefore, strain-specific. As our experiment does not allow us to determine the parasite stage at

  13. VAR2CSA and protective immunity against pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Salanti, A

    2007-01-01

    People living in areas with stable transmission of P. falciparum parasites acquire protective immunity to malaria over a number of years and following multiple disease episodes. Immunity acquired this way is mediated by IgG with specificity for parasite-encoded, clonally variant surface antigens...... that the selective placental accumulation of IEs that characterizes pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is caused by an immunologically and functionally unique subset of VSA (VSAPAM) that is only expressed by parasites infecting pregnant women, and that protective immunity to PAM is mediated by IgG with specificity...

  14. Osteopontin is not crucial to protective immunity during murine tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Wieland, Catharina W.; Wiersinga, Willem J.; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Upon infection with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis, the development of a strong T helper 1 (Th1)-mediated adaptive immune response is considered as being most important for containment of the infection. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is chemotactic for inflammatory cells

  15. Immunity to Lutzomyia whitmani Saliva Protects against Experimental Leishmania braziliensis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Regis; Cavalcanti, Katrine; Teixeira, Clarissa; Carvalho, Augusto M; Mattos, Paulo S; Cristal, Juqueline R; Muniz, Aline C; Miranda, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Camila I; Barral, Aldina

    2016-11-01

    Previous works showed that immunization with saliva from Lutzomyia intermedia, a vector of Leishmania braziliensis, does not protect against experimental infection. However, L. braziliensis is also transmitted by Lutzomyia whitmani, a sand fly species closely related to Lu. intermedia. Herein we describe the immune response following immunization with Lu. whitmani saliva and the outcome of this response after L. braziliensis infection. BALB/c mice immunized with Lu. whitmani saliva developed robust humoral and cellular immune responses, the latter characterized by an intense cellular infiltrate and production of IFN-γ and IL-10, by both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Mice immunized as above and challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. whitmani saliva displayed significantly smaller lesions and parasite load at the challenge site. This protection was associated with a higher (p<0.05) IFN-γ production in response to SLA stimulation. Long-term persisting immunity was also detected in mice immunized with Lu. whitmani saliva. Furthermore, individuals residing in an endemic area for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) presented antibody responses to Lu. whitmani saliva. However CL patients, with active lesions, displayed a lower humoral response to Lu. whitmani saliva compared to individuals with subclinical Leishmania infection. Pre-exposure to Lu. whitmani saliva induces protection against L. braziliensis in a murine model. We also show that Lu. whitmani salivary proteins are immunogenic in naturally exposed individuals. Our results reinforce the importance of investigating the immunomodulatory effect of saliva from different species of closely related sand flies.

  16. Enhancement of anamnestic immunospecific antibody response in orally immunized chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayo, Susan; Carlsson, Hans-Erik; Zagon, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Production of immunospecific egg yolk antibodies (IgY antibodies) in egg laying hens through oral immunization is an attractive alternative to conventional antibody production in mammals for economic reasons as well as for animal welfare reasons. Oral immunization results in a systemic humoral...... response, but oral booster immunizations lack efficiency. The aim of the present study was to develop immunization schemes in which the concentration of immunospecific IgY would increase following oral booster immunizations. Two groups of egg laying hens (5 in each group) were immunized orally (each...... and one oral dose with BSA+RV. The eggs of the chickens in this group had a significantly higher immunospecific anti BSA IgY-concentration than did any of the eggs from the orally immunized chickens. One of the immunization regimes (immunizations in weeks 1, 7 and 18) clearly included a booster effect...

  17. IMMUNE SUPPRESSION OF CHALLENGED VACCINATES AS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT OF STERILE PROTECTION BY LENTIVIRAL VACCINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAVPV) challenge [1,2]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any infecting EIAV. At two months post-challenge the horses were all protected from virulent-virus challenge, evidenced by a lack of EIA signs and detectable challenge plasma viral RNA. Upon immune suppression, 6/12 horses displayed clinical EIA. Post-immune suppression characterizations demonstrated that the attenuated vaccine evidently prevented detectable challenge virus infection in 50% of horses. These data highlight the utility of post-challenge immune suppression for evaluating persistent viral vaccine protective efficacy. PMID:17023099

  18. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vintiñi Elisa O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV and heat-killed (LcM was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Results Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I. These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and

  19. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintiñi, Elisa O; Medina, Marcela S

    2011-08-11

    At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA) for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV) and heat-killed (LcM) was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I). These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M) induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and LcM were found. Live and heat-killed L

  20. Protective immunity to Salmonella enterica is partially serogroup specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Dennis L; Agin, Tonia S; Bade, Donald; Dearwester, Don A; Jolie, Rika; Keich, Robin L; Lohse, Robert M; Reed, Maryke; Rosey, Everett L; Schneider, Patricia A; Taylor, Lucas P; Willy, Michael S

    2013-09-01

    Pre-harvest reduction of Salmonella carriage by swine would benefit both animal health and food quality. While vaccination is an attractive pre-harvest intervention to reduce Salmonella levels in swine, the large number of potential Salmonella enterica serovars found in swine makes it critical that vaccines provide broad serotype efficacy. In order to directly compare the relative efficacy of Salmonella vaccines against serogroup-matched and serogroup-unmatched Salmonella, we vaccinated pigs with two commercially available Salmonella vaccines (either serogroup B or serogroup C1) and challenged with serovar-matched, serogroup-matched or serogroup-unmatched challenge strains. We found that while serogroup-matched vaccines provided relatively better efficacy than unmatched vaccines, serotype-unmatched vaccines also provided significant reduction of Salmonella carriage and shed. In addition, by measuring serogroup specific cell mediated (IFN-γ ELISPOT) and humoral (anti-LPS ELISA) immunity, we found that this serogroup specific efficacy correlates primarily with humoral immunity, while cell mediated immunity was mostly non-serogroup specific. While the practical relevance to pork quality of this serogroup-specific efficacy remains to be demonstrated, the large predominance of serogroup B Salmonella in swine suggests that a serogroup B Salmonella vaccine for swine would be of value to pre-harvest food safety interventions in swine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mx bio adjuvant for enhancing immune responses against influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Soleimani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: These data revealed that Mx1 as biological adjuvant was able to increase antibody titer and induction memory immune responses against influenza immunization without causing any side effects.

  2. Natural killer cells enhance the immune surveillance of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nouroz, Faisal; Bibi, Farzana; Noreen, Shumaila; Masood, Nosheen

    2016-01-01

    Immune system (IS) is comprised of molecules, cells, tissues and organs involved in host defense mechanism from infectious agents or tumor cells. On crossing the cell barriers by these infectious agents, the defense mechanism is alerted by the immune system to respond against these invading microbes. Innate immune response (IIR) and acquired immune response (AIR) are working in parallel to control these invading microbes. IIR is composed of various types of phagocytes and lymphocytes, while A...

  3. Enhancement of broiler performance and immune response by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... immune response. The significant increase in lymphocytes might also indicate the specific and non- specific immune stimulant role of E. purpurea. Bauer .... extract from root significantly increased in vivo the number of leucocytes and lymphocytes. It is reported that Echinacea activates rat immune system.

  4. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    Full Text Available Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  5. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S; Anthony, Scott M; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  6. Pertussis Maternal Immunization: Narrowing the Knowledge Gaps on the Duration of Transferred Protective Immunity and on Vaccination Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard, María Emilia; Bottero, Daniela; Zurita, María Eugenia; Carriquiriborde, Francisco; Martin Aispuro, Pablo; Bartel, Erika; Sabater-Martínez, David; Bravo, María Sol; Castuma, Celina; Hozbor, Daniela Flavia

    2017-01-01

    Maternal safety through pertussis vaccination and subsequent maternal–fetal-antibody transfer are well documented, but information on infant protection from pertussis by such antibodies and by subsequent vaccinations is scarce. Since mice are used extensively for maternal-vaccination studies, we adopted that model to narrow those gaps in our understanding of maternal pertussis immunization. Accordingly, we vaccinated female mice with commercial acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine and measured of...

  7. Complex immune correlates of protection in HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaras, Georgia D; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2017-01-01

    Development of an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine is a major priority for improving human health worldwide. Vaccine-mediated protection against human pathogens can be achieved through elicitation of protective innate, humoral, and cellular responses. Identification of specific immune responses responsible for pathogen protection enables vaccine development and provides insights into host defenses against pathogens and the immunological mechanisms that most effectively fight infection. Defining immunological correlates of transmission risk in preclinical and clinical HIV-1 vaccine trials has moved the HIV-1 vaccine development field forward and directed new candidate vaccine development. Immune correlate studies are providing novel hypotheses about immunological mechanisms that may be responsible for preventing HIV-1 acquisition. Recent results from HIV-1 immune correlates work has demonstrated that there are multiple types of immune responses that together, comprise an immune correlate-thus implicating polyfunctional immune control of HIV-1 transmission. An in depth understanding of these complex immunological mechanisms of protection against HIV-1 will accelerate the development of an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mucosal immunization confers long-term protection against intragastrically established Neospora caninum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Teixeira-Coelho, Maria; Osório, Hugo; Teixeira, Luzia; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2016-12-07

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite responsible for heavy economic losses in dairy and beef cattle farms worldwide. Although vaccination is widely regarded as the preferable strategy to prevent neosporosis no commercial vaccine is currently available. We have previously shown that intranasal immunization with an N. caninum antigen extract enriched in hydrophobic proteins plus CpG adjuvant protected mice against intragastrically established neosporosis. Nevertheless, the antigen specificity as well as the long-term protective effect of this immunization strategy were not determined. Here, we show that the protective effect of this intranasal immunization procedure lasted for at least 20weeks. Protection was accompanied by long-lasting elevated levels of parasite-specific serum IgG and intestinal IgA. Moreover, spleen and mesenteric lymph node cells obtained from non-infected long-term immunized mice responded by producing interferon-γ following in vitro parasite-antigen recall. Analysis of serum IgG and intestinal IgA antibody reactivity in immunized mice identified dense granule antigen 7 (NcGRA7) and microneme associated protein 1 (NcMIC1) as immunodominant antigens respectively recognized by those antibody fractions. In summary, this work shows that a previously reported mucosal immunization strategy against N. caninum infection established through the gastrointestinal tract is effective in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unexpected role for IL-17 in protective immunity against hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Slight, Samantha; Uche, Uzodinma; Blanchard, Emmeline; Fallert Junecko, Beth A; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Stallings, Christina L; Reinhart, Todd A; Kolls, Jay K; Kaushal, Deepak; Nagarajan, Uma; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects one third of the world's population. Among these infections, clinical isolates belonging to the W-Beijing appear to be emerging, representing about 50% of Mtb isolates in East Asia, and about 13% of all Mtb isolates worldwide. In animal models, infection with W-Beijing strain, Mtb HN878, is considered "hypervirulent" as it results in increased mortality and causes exacerbated immunopathology in infected animals. We had previously shown the Interleukin (IL) -17 pathway is dispensable for primary immunity against infection with the lab adapted Mtb H37Rv strain. However, it is not known whether IL-17 has any role to play in protective immunity against infection with clinical Mtb isolates. We report here that lab adapted Mtb strains, such as H37Rv, or less virulent Mtb clinical isolates, such as Mtb CDC1551, do not require IL-17 for protective immunity against infection while infection with Mtb HN878 requires IL-17 for early protective immunity. Unexpectedly, Mtb HN878 induces robust production of IL-1β through a TLR-2-dependent mechanism, which supports potent IL-17 responses. We also show that the role for IL-17 in mediating protective immunity against Mtb HN878 is through IL-17 Receptor signaling in non-hematopoietic cells, mediating the induction of the chemokine, CXCL-13, which is required for localization of T cells within lung lymphoid follicles. Correct T cell localization within lymphoid follicles in the lung is required for maximal macrophage activation and Mtb control. Since IL-17 has a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity against TB, our results have far reaching implications for the design of vaccines and therapies to prevent and treat emerging Mtb strains. In addition, our data changes the existing paradigm that IL-17 is dispensable for primary immunity against Mtb infection, and instead suggests a differential role for IL-17 in early protective immunity against

  10. Cross-protective mucosal immunity mediated by memory Th17 cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Jiang, B; Guo, Y; Li, W; Tian, Y; Sonnenberg, G F; Weiser, J N; Ni, X; Shen, H

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of the current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced, and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology, and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong T-helper type 17 (Th17) responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4 + T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by interleukin-17A (IL-17A) blockade. Transfer of memory CD4 + T cells from IL-17A-knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells had a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype-independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells.

  11. Cross-protective immune responses elicited by live attenuated influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yo Han; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-03-01

    The desired effect of vaccination is to elicit protective immune responses against infection with pathogenic agents. An inactivated influenza vaccine is able to induce the neutralizing antibodies directed primarily against two surface antigens, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. These two antigens undergo frequent antigenic drift and hence necessitate the annual update of a new vaccine strain. Besides the antigenic drift, the unpredictable emergence of the pandemic influenza strain, as seen in the 2009 pandemic H1N1, underscores the development of a new influenza vaccine that elicits broadly protective immunity against the diverse influenza strains. Cold-adapted live attenuated influenza vaccines (CAIVs) are advocated as a more appropriate strategy for cross-protection than inactivated vaccines and extensive studies have been conducted to address the issues in animal models. Here, we briefly describe experimental and clinical evidence for cross-protection by the CAIVs against antigenically distant strains and discuss possible explanations for cross-protective immune responses afforded by CAIVs. Potential barriers to the achievement of a universal influenza vaccine are also discussed, which will provide useful guidelines for future research on designing an ideal influenza vaccine with broad protection without causing pathogenic effects such as autoimmunity or attrition of protective immunity against homologous infection.

  12. Enhanced personal protection system for the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    During the first long shutdown (LS1) a new safety system will be installed in the primary beam areas of the PS complex in order to bring the standard of personnel radiation protection at the PS into line with that of the LHC.   Pierre Ninin, deputy group leader of GS-ASE and responsible for the installation of the new PS complex safety system, in front of a new access control system. The LHC access control systems are state-of-the-art, whereas those of the injection chain accelerators were running the risk of becoming obsolete. For the past two years a project to upgrade the access and safety systems of the first links in the LHC accelerator chain has been underway to bring them into compliance with nuclear safety standards. These systems provide the personnel with automatic protection by limiting access to hazardous areas and by ensuring that nobody is present in the areas when the accelerator is in operation. By the end of 2013, the project teams will ha...

  13. Induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia muridarum intracervical infection in DBA/1j mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lingli; Yang, Zhangsheng; Zhang, Hongbo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Arulanandam, Bernard; Baseman, Joel; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-03-10

    We previously reported that intracervical inoculation with Chlamydia muridarum induced hydrosalpinx in DBA/1j mice, but intravaginal inoculation failed to do so. In the current study, we found unexpectedly that intrabursal inoculation of live chlamydial organisms via the oviduct failed to induce significant hydrosalpinx. We further tested whether primary infection via intravaginal or intrabursal inoculation could induce protective immunity against hydrosalpinx following intracervical challenge infection. Mice infected intravaginally with C. muridarum were fully protected from developing hydrosalpinx, while intrabursal inoculation offered partial protection. We then compared immune responses induced by the two genital tract inoculations. Both inoculations induced high IFNγ and IL-17 T cell responses although the ratio of IgG2a versus IgG1 in intravaginally infected mice was significantly higher than in mice infected intrabursally. When the antigen-specificities of antibody responses were compared, both groups of mice dominantly recognized 24 C. muridarum antigens, while each group preferentially recognized unique sets of antigens. Thus, we have demonstrated that intrabursal inoculation is neither effective for causing hydrosalpinx nor efficient in inducing protective immunity in DBA/1j mice. Intravaginal immunization, in combination with intracervical challenge infection in DBA/1j mice, can be a useful model for understanding mechanisms of chlamydial pathogenicity and protective immunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunization with Bivalent Flagellin Protects Mice against Fatal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Behrouz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections present a major challenge to healthcare systems worldwide because they are commonly associated with high morbidity and mortality. Here, we demonstrate the protective efficacy of type a and b flagellins (bivalent flagellin against acute fatal pneumonia in mice. Mice immunized intranasally with a bivalent flagellin vaccine were challenged by different flagellated strains of P. aeruginosa in an acute pneumonia model. Besides the protective effect of the vaccine, we further measured the host innate and cellular immunity responses. The immunized mice in our study were protected against both strains. Remarkably, active immunization with type a or b flagellin significantly improved survival of mice against heterologous strain compared to flagellin a or b antisera. We also showed that after an intranasal challenge by P. aeruginosa strain, neutrophils are recruited to the airways of vaccinated mice, and that the bivalent flagellin vaccine was proved to be protective by the generated CD4+IL-17+ Th17 cells. In conclusion, bivalent flagellin vaccine can confer protection against different strains of P. aeruginosa in an acute pneumonia mouse model by eliciting effective cellular and humoral immune responses, including increased IL-17 production and improved opsonophagocytic killing.

  15. Engineering intranasal mRNA vaccines to enhance lymph node trafficking and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Li, You; Peng, Ke; Wang, Ying; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin; Sun, Xun

    2017-12-01

    Intranasal mRNA vaccination provides immediate immune protection against pandemic diseases. Recent studies have shown that diverse forms of polyethyleneimine (PEI) have potent mucosal adjuvant activity, which could significantly facilitate the delivery of intranasal mRNA vaccines. Nevertheless, optimizing the chemical structure of PEI to maximize its adjuvanticity and decrease its toxicity remains a challenge. Here we show that the chemical structure of PEI strongly influences how well nanocomplexes of PEI and mRNA migrate to the lymph nodes and elicit immune responses. Conjugating cyclodextrin (CD) with PEI600 or PEI2k yielded CP (CD-PEI) polymers with different CD/PEI ratios. We analyzed the delivery efficacy of CP600, CP2k, and PEI25k as intranasal mRNA vaccine carriers by evaluating the lymph nodes migration and immune responses. Among these polymers, CP2k/mRNA showed significantly higher in vitro transfection efficiency, stronger abilities to migrate to lymph nodes and stimulate dendritic cells maturation in vivo, which further led to potent humoral and cellular immune responses, and showed lower local and systemic toxicity than PEI25k/mRNA. These results demonstrate the potential of CD-PEI2k/mRNA nanocomplex as a self-adjuvanting vaccine delivery vehicle that traffics to lymph nodes with high efficiency. As we face outbreaks of pandemic diseases such as Zika virus, intranasal mRNA vaccination provides instant massive protection against highly variant viruses. Various polymer-based delivery systems have been successfully applied in intranasal vaccine delivery. However, the influence of molecular structure of the polymeric carriers on the lymph node trafficking and dendritic cell maturation is seldom studied for intranasal vaccination. Therefore, engineering polymer-based vaccine delivery system and elucidating the relationship between molecular structure and the intranasal delivery efficiency are essential for maximizing the immune responses. We hereby

  16. Gold nanoparticles conjugating recombinant influenza hemagglutinin trimers and flagellin enhanced mucosal cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhu, Wandi; Luo, Yuan; Wang, Bao-Zhong

    2018-04-09

    The immunogenicity of subunit vaccines can be augmented by formulating them into nanoparticles. We conjugated recombinant trimetric influenza A/Aichi/2/68(H3N2) hemagglutinin (HA) onto functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) surfaces in a repetitive, oriented configuration. To further improve the immunogenicity, we generated Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist flagellin (FliC)-coupled AuNPs as particulate adjuvants. Intranasal immunizations with an AuNP-HA and AuNP-FliC particle mixture elicited strong mucosal and systemic immune responses that protected hosts against lethal influenza challenges. Compared with the AuNP-HA alone group, the addition of AuNP-FliC improved mucosal B cell responses as characterized by elevated influenza specific IgA and IgG levels in nasal, tracheal, and lung washes. AuNP-HA/AuNP-FliC also stimulated antigen-specific interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4 + cell proliferation and induced strong effector CD8 + T cell activation. Our results indicate that intranasal co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant-displaying AuNPs enhanced vaccine efficacy by inducing potent cellular immune responses. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Genetic disruption of CD8+ Treg activity enhances the immune response to viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Holderried, Tobias A. W.; Lang, Philipp A.; Kim, Hye-Jung; Cantor, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions that regulate the immune response of T cells to viral infection are poorly understood. Here we report that in the absence of activity of CD8 regulatory T-cells (CD8 Treg cells), antiviral immunity is enhanced and the deleterious effects of viral infection are constrained. Using a genetically modified mouse model that displays defective regulatory activity of CD8 Treg cells, the immune response against viruses was substantially enhanced during the acute and chronic phase ...

  18. Roles of IFN-γ and γδ T cells in protective immunity against blood-stage malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichi eInoue

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is caused by infection with Plasmodium parasites. Various studies with knockout mice have indicated that IFN-γ plays essential roles in protective immunity against blood-stage Plasmodium infection. However, after Plasmodium infection, increased IFN-γ production by various types of cells is involved not only in protective immunity, but also in immunopathology. Recent reports have shown that IFN-γ acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine to induce not only the activation of macrophages, but also the generation of uncommon myelolymphoid progenitor cells after Plasmodium infection. However, the effects of IFN-γ on hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells are unclear. Therefore, the regulation of hematopoiesis by IFN-γ during Plasmodium infection remains to be clarified. Although there are conflicting reports concerning the significance of γδ T cells in protective immunity against Plasmodium infection, γδ T cells may respond to infection and produce IFN-γ as innate immune cells in the early phase of blood-stage malaria. Our recent studies have shown that γδ T cells express CD40 ligand and produce IFN-γ after Plasmodium infection, resulting in the enhancement of dendritic cell activation as part of the immune response to eliminate Plasmodium parasites. These data suggest that the function of γδ T cells is similar to that of NK cells. Although several reports suggest that γδ T cells have the potential to act as memory cells for various infections, it remains to be determined whether memory γδ T cells are generated by Plasmodium infection and whether memory γδ T cells can contribute to the host defense against re-infection with Plasmodium. Here, we summarize and discuss the effects of IFN-γ and the various functions of γδ T cells in blood-stage Plasmodium infection.

  19. Intranasal immunization of the combined lipooligosaccharide conjugates protects mice from the challenges with three serotypes of Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Ren

    Full Text Available There are no licensed vaccines available against Moraxella catarrhalis, a significant human respiratory pathogen. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS based conjugate vaccines derived from individual serotype M. catarrhalis only showed partial protection coverage. A vaccine combining LOS conjugates of two or three serotypes might provide a broader protection.Mice were immunized intranasally with the combined conjugates consisting of LOS from serotype A and B or serotype A, B, and C followed by challenge with different M. catarrhalis strains of three serotypes. Mouse lungs, nasal washes, and sera were collected after each challenge for bacterial counts, histological evaluation, cytokine profiles, antibody level and binding activity determinations.Intranasal administration of the combined LOS conjugates not only enhanced pulmonary bacterial clearance of all three serotypes of M. catarrhalis strains in vaccinated mice, but also elevated serotype-specific anti-LOS immunoglobulin (IgA and IgG titers in nasal wash and serum respectively. Mice vaccinated with the combined LOS conjugates also showed increased interferon (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-12, and IL-4 in the lungs after challenges. Compared to the control group, mice immunized with the combined LOS conjugates also showed reduced lung inflammation after M. catarrhalis infections. The hyperimmune sera induced by the combined conjugates exhibited a broad cross-reactivity toward all three serotypes of M. catarrhalis under transmission electron microscopy.The combined vaccine of serotype A and B LOS conjugates provides protection against most M. catarrhalis strains by eliciting humoral and cellular immune responses.

  20. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  1. DNA Immunization with the Gene Encoding P4 Nuclease of Leishmania amazonensis Protects Mice against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kimberly; Diao, Hong; Ji, Jiaxiang; Soong, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis can cause diverse clinical forms of leishmaniasis. Immunization with purified P4 nuclease protein has been shown to elicit a protective response in mice challenged with L. amazonensis and L. pifanoi. To explore the potential of a DNA-based vaccine, we tested the L. amazonensis gene encoding P4 nuclease as well as adjuvant constructs encoding murine interleukin-12 (IL-12) and L. amazonensis HSP70. Susceptible BALB/c mice were immunized with the DNA encoding P4 alone, P4/IL-12, or P4/HSP70 prior to challenge with L. amazonensis promastigotes. Mice given P4/IL-12 exhibited no lesion development and had a 3- to 4-log reduction in tissue parasite burdens compared to controls. This protection corresponded to significant increases in gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha production and a reduction in parasite-specific immunoglobulin G1, suggesting an enhancement in Th1 responses. Moreover, we immunized mice with the L. amazonensis vaccines to determine if this vaccine regimen could provide cross-protection against a genetically diverse species, L. major. While the P4/HSP70 vaccine led to self-healing lesions, the P4/IL-12 vaccine provided negligible protection against L. major infection. This is the first report of successful use of a DNA vaccine to induce protection against L. amazonensis infection. Additionally, our results indicate that different vaccine combinations, including DNA encoding P4, HSP70, or IL-12, can provide significant protection against both Old World and New World cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:14573646

  2. Loss of the innate immunity negative regulator IRAK-M leads to enhanced host immune defense against tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qifa; Gan, Lu; Wang, Jianxia; Wilson, Ingred; Li, Liwu

    2010-01-01

    IRAK-M is a negative regulator of innate immunity signaling processes. Although attenuation of innate immunity may help to prevent excessive inflammation, it may also lead to compromised immune surveillance of tumor cells and contribute to tumor formation and growth. Here, we demonstrate that IRAK-M−/− mice are resistant to tumor growth upon inoculation with transplantable tumor cells. Immune cells from IRAK-M−/− mice are responsible for the anti-tumor effect, since adoptive transfer of splenocytes from IRAK-M−/− mice to wild type mice can transfer the tumor-resistant phenotype. Upon tumor cell challenge, there are elevated populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a decreased population of CD4+ CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in IRAK-M −/− splenocytes. Furthermore, we observe that IRAK-M deficiency leads to elevated proliferation and activation of T cells and B cells. Enhanced NFκB activation directly caused by IRAK-M deficiency may explain elevated activation of T and B cells. In addition, macrophages from IRAK-M−/− mice exhibit enhanced phagocytic function toward acetylated LDL and apoptotic thymocytes. Collectively, we demonstrate that IRAK-M is directly involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune signaling processes, and deletion of IRAK-M enhances host anti-tumor immune response. PMID:17477969

  3. Use of plasmid DNA for induction of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines based on plasmid DNA have been tested for a number of fish pathogens but so far it is only in case of the rhabdoviruses, where the technology has been a real break through in vaccine research. Aspects of dose, time-course and mechanisms of protection, as well as practical use are discussed....

  4. serological evaluation of protective immunity against tetanus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    women (aged 11-45 years) were used to assess their level of protection against tetanus. Details on client's age, socio-economic status and number of tetanus toxoid injections received during antenatal visits were obtained using structured questionnaire method. Blood samples were collected and analysed for serum and ...

  5. Protective immune mechanisms against pre-erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium berghei depend on the target antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke S. Bergmann-Leitner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines are believed to either stop the injected sporozoites from reaching the liver or to direct cellular immune responses towards eliminating infected hepatocytes. The present study reveals for the first time the anatomical sites at which these immune mechanisms act against the malaria parasites. To determine the mechanisms leading to protection mediated by two previously characterized vaccines against either the circumsporozoite protein (CSP or the cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS, mice were immunized and subsequently challenged by subcutaneous injection of salivary gland sporozoites of luciferase-transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites. The In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS was used to identify the anatomical site where the vaccine-induced immune response eliminates sporozoites after injection. The data demonstrate that CSP-based immunity acts at the site of infection (skin whereas CelTOS-based immunity is only partially efficient in the skin and allows reduced levels of liver infection that can be subsequently cleared. The results of this study challenge assumptions regarding CSP-mediated immune mechanisms and call into question the validity of some commonly used assays to evaluate anti-CSP immune responses. The knowledge of the mechanism and events leading to infection or immune defense will guide supportive treatment with drugs or combination therapies and thus accelerate the development of effective antimalarial strategies.

  6. Protective immunization with homologous and heterologous antigens against Helicobacter suis challenge in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahou, Bram; Hellemans, Ann; Meyns, Tom; Duchateau, Luc; Chiers, Koen; Baele, Margo; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard

    2009-02-25

    Helicobacter (H.) suis colonizes the stomach of more than 60% of slaughter pigs and is also of zoonotic importance. Recently, this bacterium was isolated in vitro, enabling the use of pure cultures for research purposes. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with whole bacterial cell lysate of H. suis or the closely related species H. bizzozeronii and H. cynogastricus, and subsequently challenged with H. suis. Control groups consisted of non-immunized and non-challenged mice (negative control group), as well as of sham-immunized mice that were inoculated with H. suis (positive control group). Urease tests on stomach tissue samples at 7 weeks after challenge infection were negative in all negative control mice, all intranasally immunized mice except one, and in all and 3 out of 5 animals of the H. cynogastricus and H. suis subcutaneously immunized groups, respectively. H. suis DNA was detected by PCR in the stomach of all positive control animals and all subcutaneously immunized/challenged animals. All negative control animals and some intranasally immunized/challenged mice were PCR-negative. In conclusion, immunization using antigens derived from the same or closely related bacterial species suppressed gastric colonization with H. suis, but complete protection was only achieved in a minority of animals following intranasal immunization.

  7. Protective Effect of Akkermansia muciniphila against Immune-Mediated Liver Injury in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrui Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that gut microbiota participates in the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases. The severity of immune-mediated liver injury is associated with different microbial communities. Akkermansia muciniphila can regulate immunologic and metabolic functions. However, little is known about its effects on gut microbiota structure and function. This study investigated the effect of A. muciniphila on immune-mediated liver injury and potential underlying mechanisms. Twenty-two C57BL/6 mice were assigned to three groups (N = 7–8 per group and continuously administrated A. muciniphila MucT or PBS by oral gavage for 14 days. Mouse feces were collected for gut microbiota analysis on the 15th day, and acute liver injury was induced by Concanavalin A (Con A, 15 mg/kg injection through the tail vein. Samples (blood, liver, ileum, colon were assessed for liver injury, systemic inflammation, and intestinal barrier function. We found that oral administration of A. muciniphila decreased serum ALT and AST and alleviated liver histopathological damage induced by Con A. Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12p40, MCP-1, MIP-1a, MIP-1b were substantially attenuated. A. muciniphila significantly decreased hepatocellular apoptosis; Bcl-2 expression increased, but Fas and DR5 decreased. Further investigation showed that A. muciniphila enhanced expression of Occludin and Tjp-1 and inhibited CB1 receptor, which strengthened intestinal barriers and reduced systemic LPS level. Fecal 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicated that A. muciniphila increased microbial richness and diversity. The community structure of the Akk group clustered distinctly from that of mice pretreated with PBS. Relative abundance of Firmicutes increased, and Bacteroidetes abundance decreased. Correlation analysis showed that injury-related factors (IL-12p40, IFN-γ, DR5 were negatively associated with specific genera

  8. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell García-Quintanilla

    Full Text Available The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010, one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  9. Immune complex-based vaccine for pig protection against parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roić, B; Cajavec, S; Ergotić, N; Lipej, Z; Madić, J; Lojkić, M; Pokrić, B

    2006-02-01

    The insoluble immune complexes (ICs) were prepared under the conditions of double immunodiffusion in gel, using the suspension of the ultrasound treated PK-15 cell-line infected with porcine parvovirus (PPV) containing both viral particles and viral proteins, as well as pig or rabbit anti-PPV polyclonal immune sera. The immunodiffusion performed in an agarose gel allows only viral subunits with a molecular mass equal to or less than 1000 kDa, rather than the viral particles, to diffuse through the gel and reach the point where the immunoprecipitate is to be formed. The immunoprecipitation under the conditions of the diffusion ensures the optimal, i.e. equimolar ratio of both immunoprecipitating components, antibody/antigen in the IC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the Western blot analyses showed the ICs were composed of two proteins, a protein in which molecular mass corresponded to the VP2 of the PPV and a protein with a molecular mass of the IgG. This suggests that the ICs are mainly composed of the VP2 antigen and IgG class antibodies. The potency of the IC-vaccines prepared in the form of a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion was compared with that of a commercially available, inactivated oil vaccine. The vaccination of gilts, 6 weeks before mating, with the IC containing allogeneic pig antibodies, resulted in the development of high and long-lasting anti-PPV antibody titres, similar to those generated by the licenced vaccine (P > 0.01). The content of the virus material administered by the IC was twice lower than that in the licenced vaccine. Neither systemic nor local reactions were observed in the gilts during the period of the trial with the IC vaccine. The number of viable piglets per litter varied between 9 and 12 and no signs of the PPV infection were detected. Rabbits were used as one of the alternative laboratory animal models accepted for the testing of the vaccine against the PPV. The rabbit humoral immune response

  10. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Mortensen

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

  11. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis; Hansen, Lasse Bøllehuus; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersen, Peter; Dietrich, Jes

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

  12. Outer membrane vesicles of Gallibacterium anatis induce protective immunity in egg-laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Susanne Elisabeth; Pedersen, Ida Just; Skjerning, Ragnhild Bager

    2016-01-01

    Gallibacterium anatis causes infections in the reproductive tract of egg-laying hens and induce increased mortality and decreased egg production. New prophylactic measures are needed in order to improve animal welfare and production efficiency. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have...... previously shown promising results in protection against infections and we hypothesized that OMVs could serve as an immunogen to protect egg-laying hens against G. anatis. To investigate the immunogenic potential of G. anatis OMVs, two in vivo studies in egg-laying hens were made. The trials assessedthe...... degree of protection provided by immunization with G. anatis OMV against challenge and the IgY responses in serum after immunization and challenge, respectively. A total of 64 egg-laying hens were included in the trials. OMVs for immunization were produced and purified from a high-producing G. anatis...

  13. Immune and Genetic Correlates of Vaccine Protection Against Mucosal Infection by SIV in Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letvin, Norman L; Rao, Srinivas S; Montefiori, David C; Seaman, Michael S; Sun, Yue; Lim, So-Yon; Yeh, Wendy W; Asmal, Mohammed; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shen, Ling; Whitney, James B; Seoighe, Cathal; Lacerda, Miguel; Keating, Sheila; Norris, Philip J; Hudgens, Michael G; Gilbert, Peter B; Buzby, Adam P; Mach, Linh V; Zhang, Jinrong; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Shaw, George M; Schmidt, Stephen D; Todd, John-Paul; Dodson, Alan; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2011-05-04

    The RV144 vaccine trial in Thailand demonstrated that an HIV vaccine could prevent infection in humans and highlights the importance of understanding protective immunity against HIV. We used a nonhuman primate model to define immune and genetic mechanisms of protection against mucosal infection by the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). A plasmid DNA prime/recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boost vaccine regimen was evaluated for its ability to protect monkeys from infection by SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 isolates after repeat intrarectal challenges. Although this prime-boost vaccine regimen failed to protect against SIVmac251 infection, 50% of vaccinated monkeys were protected from infection with SIVsmE660. Among SIVsmE660-infected animals, there was about a one-log reduction in peak plasma virus RNA in monkeys expressing the major histocompatibility complex class I allele Mamu-A*01, implicating cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the control of SIV replication once infection is established. Among Mamu-A*01-negative monkeys challenged with SIVsmE660, no CD8(+) T cell response or innate immune response was associated with protection against virus acquisition. However, low levels of neutralizing antibodies and an envelope-specific CD4(+) T cell response were associated with vaccine protection in these monkeys. Moreover, monkeys that expressed two TRIM5 alleles that restrict SIV replication were more likely to be protected from infection than monkeys that expressed at least one permissive TRIM5 allele. This study begins to elucidate the mechanisms of vaccine protection against immunodeficiency viruses and highlights the need to analyze these immune and genetic correlates of protection in future trials of HIV vaccine strategies.

  14. Probiotic Enhanced Intestinal Immunity in Broilers against Subclinical Necrotic Enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesong Wang

    2017-11-01

    positively changing contents and/or mRNA expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins. These findings indicate that BS15 supplementation may prevent SNE-affected growth decline mainly through enhancing intestinal immunity in broilers.

  15. Involvement of CD8+ T cell-mediated immune responses in LcrV DNA vaccine induced protection against lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixia; Goguen, Jon D; Li, Fusheng; Lu, Shan

    2011-09-09

    Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) is the causative pathogen of plague, a highly fatal disease for which an effective vaccine, especially against mucosal transmission, is still not available. Like many bacterial infections, antigen-specific antibody responses have been traditionally considered critical, if not solely responsible, for vaccine-induced protection against Y. pestis. Studies in recent years have suggested the importance of T cell immune responses against Y. pestis infection but information is still limited about the details of Y. pestis antigen-specific T cell immune responses. In current report, studies are conducted to identify the presence of CD8+ T cell epitopes in LcrV protein, the leading antigen of plague vaccine development. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ T cells in LcrV DNA vaccinated Balb/C mice led to reduced protection against lethal intranasal challenge of Y. pestis. These findings establish that an LcrV DNA vaccine is able to elicit CD8+ T cell immune responses against specific epitopes of this key plague antigen and that a CD8+ T cell immune response is involved in LcrV DNA vaccine-elicited protection. Future studies in plague vaccine development will need to examine if the presence of detectable T cell immune responses, in particular CD8+ T-cell immune responses, will enhance the protection against Y. pestis in higher animal species or humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Different immunization routes induce protection against Aeromonas salmonicida through different immune mechanisms in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Raida, Martin Kristian

    in fish immunology and vaccinology, resulting in the development of both oral, immersion and injectable vaccine strategies over time. Applying mineral oil adjuvants, injectable vaccines inducing high levels of protection in salmon (Salmo salar) rose to prominence in the 1990’s. In general injectable......, adjuvanted vaccines have been shown to induce long-lasting increases in specific antibody levels. In general the majority of the published work concerning vaccination against A. salmonicida has been conducted on salmon. Using injectable oil-adjuvanted vaccines, we have previously shown that the induced level...... against A. salmonicida. The effect of immersion vaccination against A. salmonicida has been questioned over time. While some have presented excellent protection as a result of immersion vaccines, others have reported limited or absent protective effects. We have performed experiments on the protection...

  17. Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent (Shoshone-Paiute Nation, Duck Valley Indian Reservation, Owyhee, NV)

    2000-01-01

    The Duck Valley Indian Reservations' Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect the critical riparian areas, natural springs, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project was begun in 1997 with the hiring of a fisheries biologist and the creation of a new department for the Tribes. The project's goals are to protect and enhance the springs, Owyhee River, its tributaries, and to develop a database that can be used by other fisheries professionals which includes information on water quality and fish composition, health, abundance, and genetic makeup. One habitat portion of the project is a focus on protection the numerous springs that provide clean, cool water to the Owyhee River. This will be accomplished through enclosure fences of the spring heads and water troughs to provide clean cool drinking water for wildlife and livestock. Another habitat portion of the project involves protecting headwater areas of streams with native fish populations. This is accomplished through enclosure fencing and riparian plantings on any eroded or degraded banks in the enclosure area. Finally, we monitor and evaluate the areas protected and enhanced. This is accomplished through biological sampling for temperature, Oxygen, sedimentation, and measurements of water depth, bank height and undercut, and width of stream. With the habitat and biological indices we will be able to evaluate how well protective measures are doing, and where to focus future efforts.

  18. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell

  19. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Paterson, Suzanna; Chiu, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies) that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell generation and

  20. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Paterson, Suzanna; Chiu, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies) that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell generation and

  1. 76 FR 44512 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... research could reasonably place the subjects at risk of criminal or civil liability or be damaging to the... and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 50 and 56 Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing Burden, Delay, and Ambiguity for Investigators AGENCIES: The...

  2. 76 FR 54408 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 50 and 56 Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing Burden, Delay, and Ambiguity for Investigators; Extension of... Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in coordination with the Office of Science...

  3. Age and long-term protective immunity in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, R D; Thiel, B; Mukhtar, E; Sharp, P; Larson, L J

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination can provide an immune response that is similar in duration to that following a natural infection. In general, adaptive immunity to viruses develops earliest and is highly effective. Such anti-viral immune responses often result in the development of sterile immunity and the duration of immunity (DOI) is often lifelong. In contrast, adaptive immunity to bacteria, fungi or parasites develops more slowly and the DOI is generally short compared with most systemic viral infections. Sterile immunity to these infectious agents is less commonly engendered. Old dogs and cats rarely die from vaccine-preventable infectious disease, especially when they have been vaccinated and immunized as young adults (i.e. between 16 weeks and 1 year of age). However, young animals do die, often because vaccines were either not given or not given at an appropriate age (e.g. too early in life in the presence of maternally derived antibody [MDA]). More animals need to be vaccinated to increase herd (population) immunity. The present study examines the DOI for core viral vaccines in dogs that had not been revaccinated for as long as 9 years. These animals had serum antibody to canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) and canine adenovirus type-1 (CAV-1) at levels considered protective and when challenged with these viruses, the dogs resisted infection and/or disease. Thus, even a single dose of modified live virus (MLV) canine core vaccines (against CDV, cav-2 and cpv-2) or MLV feline core vaccines (against feline parvovirus [FPV], feline calicivirus [FCV] and feline herpesvirus [FHV]), when administered at 16 weeks or older, could provide long-term immunity in a very high percentage of animals, while also increasing herd immunity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Strategies to enhance immune function for marathon runners : what can be done?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Pedersen, Bente K

    2007-01-01

    Marathoners are at an increased risk of developing upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) following races and periods of hard training, which are associated with temporary changes in the immune system. The majority of the reported changes are decreases in function or concentration of certain...... immune cells. During this period of immune suppression, by some referred to as an 'open window' in immune function, it has been hypothesised that viruses and bacteria might gain a foothold, which would increase the risk of infections. In light of this, nutritional interventions that can enhance immune...

  5. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  6. Physical protection enhancements in Japan and the role of JNES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Seishi

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of terrorist attacks on nuclear material and nuclear facilities has posed a continuing threat since the events of September 11, 2001. The Japanese government has strengthened its physical protection regime, including legislative amendments, due to the necessity of upgrading the degree of protection of nuclear facilities to be equivalent to international levels, in order to cope effectively with the threat of theft of nuclear material and sabotage of nuclear facilities. In relation to these enhancements of the physical protection regime in Japan, the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) gives technical support to the regulatory agency, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), in the area of physical protection examination and inspection, through the development of technical guides for inspectors and operators, acquisition, analysis, and evaluation of related information, and international cooperation. This support is aimed at ensuring the consistent implementation of physical protection measures in Japan. In the future also, the JNES will provide further support to the NISA aimed at a well-developed physical protection framework in Japan, giving consideration to international physical protection enhancements such as publication of IAEA nuclear security series documents, inter alia Recommendations for physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities being also Revision 5 of INFCIRC 225. (author)

  7. Reciprocal interference of maternal and infant immunization in protection against pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feunou, Pascal Feunou; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Locht, Camille

    2016-02-17

    Because of the current re-emergence of pertussis, vaccination during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy is recommended in several countries in order to protect neonates by placental transfer of maternal antibodies. Here, we examined the potential reciprocal interference of mother and infant vaccination in protection against pertussis in mice. Female mice were vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines and protection against Bordetella pertussis challenge, as well as functional antibodies were measured in their offspring with or without re-vaccination. Maternal immunization protected the offspring against B. pertussis challenge, but protection waned quickly and was lost after vaccination of the infant mice with the same vaccine. Without affecting antibody titers, infant vaccination reduced the protective functions of maternally-derived antibodies, evidenced both in vitro and in vivo. Protection induced by infant vaccination was also affected by maternal antibodies. However, when mothers and infants were immunized with two different vaccines, no interference of infant vaccination on the protective effects of maternal antibodies was noted. It may be important to determine the functionality of antibodies to evaluate potential interference of maternal and infant vaccination in protection against pertussis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, the major killer disease of the century requires a multi-pronged approach and among the latest modalities of treatments, Immunotherapy occupies a promising role. Immunotherapy for cancer was first started to be practised in the NIH and cell based immunotherapy for cancer is in practice for the past three decades. [1, 2] There are several literatures from various countries on the successful application of cell based Immunotherapies for various solid tumours and haematological malignancies. [3-8] Our team’s association with immune cells started when I was working on RNA transcriptome analysis to understand the immune system in HIV carriers which in turn required in vitro expansion of human Natural Killer (NK cells. [9] This led to the customization of protocols which has resulted in successful in vitro expansion, activation of NK cells and T cells for Immunotherapy. The purpose of Biotherapy institute of Japan (BIJ is to support research and clinical application of immune cells like NK cells, γδT cells, αβT cells, Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and Dendritic cells (DC for application as Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET to fight against cancer. AIET using NK cells, CTLs, DCs etc have been administered for more than 5000 patients since 2004 till date by BIJ. Principle of AIET: For AIET using NK cells, the process involves separation of lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of the patient followed by selective NK cell expansion using the expansion kit (BINKIT, BIJ, JAPAN without feeder layers and then infusion of the expanded-activated NK cells. [10,11] As reports suggest that the activity of peripheral blood NK cells are lower in cancer patients compared to normal individuals [12] and as in vitro expansion of NK cells increases the cytotoxic ability 5 to 10 fold, [13] the NK cells are expanded in vivo and then infused to the patient in AIET. We are also working on combination immunotherapy using NK cells and CTLs and also NK

  9. Partial protective effect of intranasal immunization with recombinant Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein 17 against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Long Wang

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects a variety of mammals, including humans. An effective vaccine for this parasite is therefore needed. In this study, RH strain T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 was expressed in bacteria as a fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST and the recombinant proteins (rTgROP17 were purified via GST-affinity chromatography. BALB/c mice were nasally immunised with rTgROP17, and induction of immune responses and protection against chronic and lethal T. gondii infections were investigated. The results revealed that mice immunised with rTgROP17 produced high levels of specific anti-rTgROP17 IgGs and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response of IgG2a predominance. The systemic immune response was associated with increased production of Th1 (IFN-γand IL-2 and Th2 (IL-4 cytokines, and enhanced lymphoproliferation (stimulation index, SI in the mice immunised with rTgROP17. Strong mucosal immune responses with increased secretion of TgROP17-specific secretory IgA (SIgA in nasal, vaginal and intestinal washes were also observed in these mice. The vaccinated mice displayed apparent protection against chronic RH strain infection as evidenced by their lower liver and brain parasite burdens (59.17% and 49.08%, respectively than those of the controls. The vaccinated mice also exhibited significant protection against lethal infection of the virulent RH strain (survival increased by 50% compared to the controls. Our data demonstrate that rTgROP17 can trigger strong systemic and mucosal immune responses against T. gondii and that ROP17 is a promising candidate vaccine for toxoplasmosis.

  10. Immunization with crude antigens plus aluminium hydroxide protects cattle from Fasciola hepatica infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasconi, L; Serradell, M C; Borgonovo, J; Garro, A P; Varengo, H; Caffe, G; Masih, D T

    2012-03-01

    The ability of total homogenate (TH) of Fasciola hepatica conjugated with aluminium hydroxide (alum) or Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) to protect cattle against experimental fasciolosis was evaluated. Compared with the infected group, the immunized animals with alum-TH and FCA-TH presented a significant reduction in fluke burden (85.9% and 96.8%, respectively), a higher percentage of short-sized worms, a marked reduction in the released eggs in faeces (89% and 57%, respectively), as well as an increased production of specific antibodies before infection. The alum-TH immunized group also showed a significant increase in the antigen-specific proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as early as 4 weeks before infection. Although both immunized groups (alum-TH and FCA-TH) were able to develop an efficient protective immune response to metacercarial challenge, an earlier PBMC response, lower hepatic damage and less effect on weight gain were found in alum-immunized animals. Therefore, alum is a good candidate for future immunization against bovine fasciolosis.

  11. Protective immunity induced by immunization with a live, cultured anaplasma marginale strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite significant economic losses resulting from infection with Anaplasma marginale, a tick-transmitted rickettsial disease of cattle, available vaccines provide, at best, only partial protection against clinical disease. The green-fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing mutant of the A. marginale St...

  12. Reprogramming Intestinal Immunity by Novel L. Acidophilus Strains Results in Protective Immunity against Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    particular, gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation and the predisposition to cancer. Probiotic lactobacilli have received much attention as examples of... genetic mutations that can potentially render the neoplasm less dependent on the immediate tumor microenvironment. To test the protective or otherwise...superimposition of a secondary genetic event on the tumor suppressor APC genetic defect. Large scale studies have revealed loss of heterozygosity at

  13. Trans-generational immune priming in the mealworm beetle protects eggs through pathogen-dependent mechanisms imposing no immediate fitness cost for the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinaut, Julien; Chogne, Manon; Moret, Yannick

    2018-02-01

    Immune-challenged mothers can improve their offspring immunity through trans-generational immune priming (TGIP). In insects, TGIP endows the offspring with lifetime immunity, including the eggs, which are likely exposed soon after maternal infection. Egg protection may rely on the transfer of maternal immune effectors to the egg or/and the induction of egg immune genes. These respective mechanisms are assumed to have early-life fitness costs of different magnitude for the offspring. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that enhanced egg immunity following a maternal immune challenge is achieved by both of these mechanisms but in a pathogen-dependent manner. While previously found having late-life fitness costs for the offspring, TGIP here improved egg hatching success and early larval survival, in addition of improving offspring immunity. These results suggest that early-life of primed offspring is critical in the optimization of life history trajectory of this insect under trans-generational pathogenic threats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective immunity to Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection: evidence from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteiger, Byron E; Xu, Fujie; Johnson, Robert E; Rekart, Michael L

    2010-06-15

    Background. Some screening and treatment programs implemented to control Chlamydia trachomatis genital infections and their complications have shown initial reductions in infection prevalence, followed by increases to preprogram levels or higher. One hypothesis is that treatment shortens duration of infection, attenuates development of protective immunity, and thereby, increases risk of reinfection. Methods. A literature review was undertaken to assess evidence supporting the concept of protective immunity,its characteristics, and its laboratory correlates in human chlamydial infection. The discussion is organized around key questions formulated in preparation for the Chlamydia Immunology and Control Expert Advisory Meeting held by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in April 2008. Results. Definitive human studies are not available, but cross-sectional studies show that chlamydia prevalence,organism load, and concordance rates in couples decrease with age, and organism load is lower in those with repeat infections, supporting the concept of protective immunity. The protection appears partial and can be overcome after reexposure, similar to what has been found in rodent models of genital infection. No data are available to define the duration of infection required to confer a degree of immunity or the time course of immunity after resolution of untreated infection. In longitudinal studies involving African sex workers, a group presumed to have frequent and ongoing exposure to chlamydial infection, interferon-g production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to chlamydial heat-shock protein 60 was associated with low risk of incident infection.In cross-sectional studies, relevant T helper 1-type responses were found in infected persons, paralleling the studies in animal models. Conclusions. The data support the concept that some degree of protective immunity against reinfection develops after human genital infection, although it appears, at

  15. Clinical disease, immunity and protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in populations living in endemic areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L

    1998-01-01

    reviews of malarial immunity exist; rather than attempting to add another, this review summarises some of the recent evidence on how protective immunity is acquired in humans and what precipitates clinical disease, specifically as it relates to populations living in areas where the disease is endemic......Malaria remains one of the biggest health problems in large parts of the world. In sub-Saharan Africa alone, it is currently estimated that there are more than 150 million clinical cases annually, and that about 2 million people die from the disease every year. The bulk of malaria-related morbidity...... and mortality in an endemic setting (malaria is regularly found) is concentrated in children below the age of five years, and the increasing resistance to infection and disease with age is conventionally thought to reflect a slow and gradual acquisition of protective immunity. Many recent and comprehensive...

  16. Transfer of maternal immunity to piglets is involved in early protection against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøl; Hagedorn-Olsen, Tine; Jungersen, Gregers

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae causes arthritis in pigs older than 12 weeks. The role of colostrum in protection of piglets against M. hyosynoviae infection is not clear. Our objective was therefore to investigate whether transfer of maternal immunity to piglets was involved in early protection against...... the infection. Experimental infections were carried out in three groups of weaners receiving different levels of M. hyosynoviae-specific colostrum components; Group NC derived from Mycoplasma free sows and possessed no specific immunity to M. hyosynoviae. Group CAb pigs, siblings of the NC group, received....... The course of infection was measured through clinical observations of lameness, cultivation of M. hyosynoviae from tonsils, blood and synovial fluid and observation for gross pathological lesions in selected joints. Specific immune status in the pigs was evaluated through detection of antibodies...

  17. Can VHS virus bypass the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination in rainbow trout?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus...... in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non......DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability...

  18. Immune Mediators of protective and pathogenic immune responses in patients with mild and fatal human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Nahed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a bacterial pathogen that causes fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME that mimic toxic shock-like syndrome. Murine studies indicate that over activation of cellular immunity followed by immune suppression plays a central role in mediating tissue injury and organ failure during fatal HME. However, there are no human studies that examine the correlates of resistance or susceptibility to severe and fatal HME. Results In this study, we compared the immune responses in two patients with mild/non fatal and severe/fatal HME who had marked lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes. The levels of different immunological factors in the blood of those patients were examined and compared to healthy controls. Our data showed that fatal HME is associated with defective production of Th1 cytokines such as ( IFNγ and IL-2, increased anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and IL-13 and pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 cytokines, increased levels of macrophages, T cells, and NK cells chemokines such as MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, but not RANTES and IP-10, increased levels of neutrophils chemokine and growth factor (IL-8 and G-CSF, and elevated expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR, and toll like receptors 2 and 4 compared to patients with non fatal HME and healthy controls. Conclusions Fatal Ehrlichia-induced toxic shock is associated with defective Th1 responses, possible immune suppression mediated by IL-10. In addition, marked leukopenia observed in patients with fatal disease could be attributed to enhanced apoptosis of leukocytes and/or elevated chemokine production that could promote migration of immune cells to sites of infection causing tissue injury.

  19. Senecavirus A infection in market weight gilts, sows and neonates with subsequent protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize SVA infection in market weight pigs, late-gestation sows, and neonates and 2) examine protective immunity in late-gestation gilts Materials and Methods: For Part 1 of the study 15 gilts were inoculated with SVA, bled regularly for 2 we...

  20. Senecavirus A infection in sows, neonates, and market weight gilts with subsequent protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize SVA infection late-gestation sows, neonates, and market weight gilts and 2) examine protective immunity in late-gestation gilts Methods: For Part 1, 15 market weight gilts were inoculated with SVA, bled regularly, and clinical observat...

  1. Development of vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum malaria: taking lessons from naturally acquired protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The acquisition of substantial anti-malarial protection in people naturally exposed to P. falciparum is often cited as evidence that malaria vaccines can be developed, but is rarely used to guide the development. We are pursuing the development of vaccines based on antigens and immune responses...

  2. Three pectin methylesterase inhibitors protect cell wall integrity for arabidopsis immunity to Botrytis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Fabri, Eleonora; Caroli, Monica De

    2017-01-01

    Infection by necrotrophs is a complex process that starts with the breakdown of the cell wall (CW) matrix initiated by CW-degrading enzymes and results in an extensive tissue maceration. Plants exploit induced defense mechanisms based on biochemical modification of the CW components to protect th...... integrity maintenance in plant immunity....

  3. Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from...... cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through...... regulation of immune and inflammatory functions, and exercise may be pursued as anticancer treatment through incorporation into standard oncological therapy to the benefit of the cancer patients....

  4. A re-evaluation of the role of B cells in protective immunity to Chlamydia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of the most commonly reported bacterial sexual transmitted infection (STI) in North America and Europe. The control of Chlamydia infection is hindered by the asymptomatic nature of initial infection but the consequence of untreated infection seriously threatens the reproductive health of young women. Unfortunately, there is no licensed vaccine for Chlamydia vaccine, in part due to our incomplete understanding of the immune response to Chlamydia urogenital infection. It has been well established that T cell-mediated immunity plays a dominant role in protective immunity against Chlamydia and thus the importance of B cells is somewhat underappreciated. Here, we summarize recent progress on understanding the role of B cells during Chlamydia genital tract infections and discuss how B cells and humoral immunity make an effective contribution to host defense against important intracellular pathogens, including Chlamydia. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Recombinant Toxoplasma gondii phosphoglycerate mutase 2 confers protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wen, Li-Min; Pei, Yan-Jiang; Wang, Fen; Yin, Li-Tian; Bai, Ji-Zhong; Guo, Rui; Wang, Chun-Fang; Yin, Guo-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses worldwide. It has a high incidence and can result in severe disease in humans and livestock. Effective vaccines are needed to limit and prevent infection with Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, we evaluated the immuno-protective efficacy of a recombinant Toxoplasma gondii phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (rTgPGAM 2) against T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. We report that the mice nasally immunised with rTgPGAM 2 displayed significantly higher levels of special IgG antibodies against rTgPGAM 2 (including IgG1, IgG2a and IgAs) and cytokines (including IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4) in their blood sera and supernatant of cultured spleen cells compared to those of control animals. In addition, an increased number of spleen lymphocytes and enhanced lymphocyte proliferative responses were observed in the rTgPGAM 2-immunised mice. After chronic infection and lethal challenge with the highly virulent T. gondii RH strain by oral gavage, the survival time of the rTgPGAM 2-immunised mice was longer (P < 0.01) and the survival rate (70%) was higher compared with the control mice (P < 0.01). The reduction rate of brain and liver tachyzoites in rTgPGAM 2-vaccinated mice reached approximately 57% and 69% compared with those of the control mice (P < 0.01). These results suggest that rTgPGAM 2 can generate protective immunity against T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice and may be a promising antigen in the further development of an effective vaccine against T. gondii infection. © H.-L. Wang et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  6. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  7. Immunization with Toxoplasma gondii GRA17 Deletion Mutant Induces Partial Protection and Survival in Challenged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lei Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis remains a world-threatening disease largely because of the lack of a fully effective vaccine. Here, we created a ΔGRA17 mutant by disrupting the virulence factor GRA17 using CRISPR-Cas9 method. Then, we tested whether ΔGRA17 tachyzoites can be used as a live-attenuated vaccine against acute, chronic, and congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice. Immune response evoked by ΔGRA17 immunization suggested a sequential Th1 and Th2 T cell response, indicated by high levels of Th1 and a mixed Th1/Th2 cytokines at 28 and 70 days after immunization, respectively. ΔGRA17-mediated immunity fully protected mice against lethal infection with wild-type (wt RH strain, heterologous challenge with PYS, and TgC7 strains of the Chinese ToxoDB#9 genotype, and T. gondii Pru strain. Although parasite cysts were detected in 8 out of 10 immunized mice, cyst burden in the brain was significantly reduced (P < 0.05 in immunized mice (53 ± 15 cysts/brain compared to non-immunized mice (4,296 ± 687 cysts/brain. In respect to congenital infection, the litter size, survival rate, and body weight (BW of pups born to ΔGRA17-immunized dams were not different compared to pups born to naïve control dams (P = 0.24. However, a marked reduction in the litter size (P < 0.001, survival rate, and BW (P < 0.01 of pups born to non-immunized and infected dams was detected. Also, immunized dams infected with type II Pru strain had significantly (P < 0.001 less cyst burden in the brain compared with non-immunized and infected dams. These findings show that immunization with ΔGRA17 strain evokes cell-mediated and neutralizing antibody responses and confers some degree of protection against challenge with homologous and heterologous virulent T. gondii strains.

  8. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), but not measles virus iscoms, protect dogs against CDV infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe potential of immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), a novel form of antigenic presentation, for the induction of protective immunity against morbillivirus infection was shown by immunizing dogs with canine distemper virus (CDV) iscoms, which contained the fusion (F) protein and a

  9. Long-Term Protective Immune Response Elicited by Vaccination with an Expression Genomic Library of Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Fachado, Alberto; Rodriguez, Alexandro; Molina, Judith; Silvério, Jaline C.; Marino, Ana P. M. P.; Pinto, Luzia M. O.; Angel, Sergio O.; Infante, Juan F.; Traub-Cseko, Yara; Amendoeira, Regina R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2003-01-01

    Immunization of BALB/c mice with an expression genomic library of Toxoplasma gondii induces a Th1-type immune response, with recognition of several T. gondii proteins (21 to 117 kDa) and long-term protective immunity against a lethal challenge. These results support further investigations to achieve a multicomponent anti-T. gondii DNA vaccine.

  10. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, Genevieve M.; Liwski, Robert S.; Mansour, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments

  11. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Genevieve M. [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada); Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Liwski, Robert S. [Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Room 206E, Dr. D. J. Mackenzie Building, Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 5788 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Mansour, Marc [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada)

    2011-08-05

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  12. AIM2 Co-immunization with VP1 Is Associated with Increased Memory CD8 T Cells and Mounts Long Lasting Protection against Coxsackievirus B3 Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liang; Chai, Dafei; Yue, Yan; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2017-01-01

    The recurrent Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection is the most important cause of intractable myocarditis which often leads to chronic myocarditis and even dilated cardiomyopathy. Therefore, enhanced DNA vaccines capable of memory CD8 T cells are essential for long-lasting immunological protection against CVB3 infection. In this study, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) was used as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of memory CD8 T cells elicited by VP1 (viral capsid protein 1) vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly injected with 50 μg AIM2 plasmid and equal amount of VP1 plasmid (pAIM2/pVP1) vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals. We observed that the protection of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine against CVB3 challenge was evidenced by significantly improved cardiac function, reduced myocardial injuries, and increased survival rate when compared with immunization with pVP1. Co-immunization with pAIM2/pVP1 robustly augmented T lymphocytes proliferation and CVB3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Importantly, 16 weeks after the last immunization, pAIM2/pVP1 co-immunization significantly enhanced the expression of Bcl-6, SOCS3, and Sca-1 which are critical for memory CD8 T cells as compared with pVP1 immunization. Notably, CD8 T cells that are likely vaccine-induced memory T cells were responsible for the protective efficacy of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine by abolition of a CD8 T cell immune response following a lethal dose of CVB3 infection. Our results indicate that AIM2-adjuvanted vaccine could be a potential and promising approach to promote a long-lasting protection against CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  13. AIM2 Co-immunization with VP1 Is Associated with Increased Memory CD8 T Cells and Mounts Long Lasting Protection against Coxsackievirus B3 Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recurrent Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 infection is the most important cause of intractable myocarditis which often leads to chronic myocarditis and even dilated cardiomyopathy. Therefore, enhanced DNA vaccines capable of memory CD8 T cells are essential for long-lasting immunological protection against CVB3 infection. In this study, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2 was used as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of memory CD8 T cells elicited by VP1 (viral capsid protein 1 vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly injected with 50 μg AIM2 plasmid and equal amount of VP1 plasmid (pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals. We observed that the protection of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine against CVB3 challenge was evidenced by significantly improved cardiac function, reduced myocardial injuries, and increased survival rate when compared with immunization with pVP1. Co-immunization with pAIM2/pVP1 robustly augmented T lymphocytes proliferation and CVB3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Importantly, 16 weeks after the last immunization, pAIM2/pVP1 co-immunization significantly enhanced the expression of Bcl-6, SOCS3, and Sca-1 which are critical for memory CD8 T cells as compared with pVP1 immunization. Notably, CD8 T cells that are likely vaccine-induced memory T cells were responsible for the protective efficacy of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine by abolition of a CD8 T cell immune response following a lethal dose of CVB3 infection. Our results indicate that AIM2-adjuvanted vaccine could be a potential and promising approach to promote a long-lasting protection against CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  14. Fusion of foreign T-cell epitopes and addition of TLR agonists enhance immunity against Neospora caninum profilin in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, F C; Quintana, M E; Cardoso, N P; Capozzo, A V

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated recently that immunization with recombinant Neospora caninum profilin (rNcPRO) induces limited protection and a regulatory T-cell response in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response elicited by rNcPRO in cattle and assess a strategy to enhance its immunogenicity, combining the addition of T-cell epitopes and immune modulators. We developed a chimeric recombinant profilin fused to functional T-cell epitopes present in the N-terminal sequence of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein G (rNcPRO/G). Groups of three cattle were immunized with two doses (2 weeks apart) of rNcPRO or rNcPRO/G formulated with alum hydroxide or a nanoparticulated soya-based adjuvant enriched with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9 agonists, aimed to tackle the MyD88 pathway (AVECplus). rNcPRO induced only a primary immune response (IgM mediated), while antibodies in rNcPRO/G-vaccinated animals switched to IgG1 after the booster. The vaccine formulated with rNcPRO/G and AVECplus improved the production of systemic IFN-γ and induced long-term recall B-cell responses. Overall, our study provides data supporting the use of T-cell epitopes from VSV glycoprotein G and TLR agonists to enhance and modulate immunity to peptide antigens in bovines, particularly when using small proteins from parasites for which immune responses are usually feeble. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Inhibition of priming for bovine respiratory syncytial virus-specific protective immune responses following parenteral vaccination of passively immune calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Gow, Sheryl; Bolton, Michael; Burdett, William; Nordstrom, Scott

    2014-12-01

    The effect of maternal antibodies (MatAb) on immunological priming by neonatal parenteral vaccination for bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was addressed for the first time in experimental infection in 34 Holstein calves. Both vaccinated and control calves developed moderate to severe respiratory disease characteristic of acute BRSV infection. There were no differences in clinical signs, BRSV shed, arterial oxygen concentrations, or mortality between vaccinated and control calves after BRSV challenge approximately 11 wk after vaccination. There were no anamnestic antibody or cytokine responses in the vaccinates after challenge. Lung lesions were extensive in both groups, and although there was a statistically significant (P = 0.05) difference between groups, this difference was considered not biologically significant. These data indicate that stimulation of protective immune responses was inhibited by maternal antibodies when a combination modified-live BRSV vaccine was administered parenterally to young passively immune calves. Alternate routes of administration or different vaccine formulations should be used to successfully immunize young calves with good passive antibody transfer.

  16. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Sung Tae; Shin, Seong Hae; Kim, Do Sun; Heo, Ji Yun; Kang, Hye In [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells centre dot Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcepsilonRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  17. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Sung Tae; Shin, Seong Hae; Kim, Do Sun; Heo, Ji Yun; Kang, Hye In

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. · Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment · Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice · Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells · Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcεRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  18. Immune Protection against Lethal Fungal-Bacterial Intra-Abdominal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Lilly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymicrobial intra-abdominal infections (IAIs are clinically prevalent and cause significant morbidity and mortality, especially those involving fungi. Our laboratory developed a mouse model of IAI and demonstrated that intraperitoneal inoculation with Candida albicans or other virulent non-albicans Candida (NAC species plus Staphylococcus aureus resulted in 70 to 80% mortality in 48 to 72 h due to robust local and systemic inflammation (sepsis. Surprisingly, inoculation with Candida dubliniensis or Candida glabrata with S. aureus resulted in minimal mortality, and rechallenge of these mice with lethal C. albicans/S. aureus (i.e., coninfection resulted in >90% protection. The purpose of this study was to define requirements for C. dubliniensis/S. aureus-mediated protection and interrogate the mechanism of the protective response. Protection was conferred by C. dubliniensis alone or by killed C. dubliniensis plus live S. aureus. S. aureus alone was not protective, and killed S. aureus compromised C. dubliniensis-induced protection. C. dubliniensis/S. aureus also protected against lethal challenge by NAC plus S. aureus and could protect for a long-term duration (60 days between primary challenge and C. albicans/S. aureus rechallenge. Unexpectedly, mice deficient in T and B cells (Rag-1 knockouts [KO] survived both the initial C. dubliniensis/S. aureus challenge and the C. albicans/S. aureus rechallenge, indicating that adaptive immunity did not play a role. Similarly, mice depleted of macrophages prior to rechallenge were also protected. In contrast, protection was associated with high numbers of Gr-1hi polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs in peritoneal lavage fluid within 4 h of rechallenge, and in vivo depletion of Gr-1+ cells prior to rechallenge abrogated protection. These results suggest that Candida species can induce protection against a lethal C. albicans/S. aureus IAI that is mediated by PMNLs and postulated to be a unique form of

  19. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  20. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migneault Martine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Results Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL, which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16low targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. Conclusion MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in

  1. Immunization with Brugia malayi Myosin as Heterologous DNA Prime Protein Boost Induces Protective Immunity against B. malayi Infection in Mastomys coucha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available The current control strategies employing chemotherapy with diethylcarbamazine, ivermectin and albendazole have reduced transmission in some filaria-endemic areas, there is growing interest for complementary approaches, such as vaccines especially in light of threat of parasite developing resistance to mainstay drugs. We earlier demonstrated recombinant heavy chain myosin of B. malayi (Bm-Myo as a potent vaccine candidate whose efficacy was enhanced by heterologous DNA prime/protein boost (Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo vaccination in BALB/c mice. BALB/c mouse though does not support the full developmental cycle of B. malayi, however, the degree of protection may be studied in terms of transformation of challenged infective larvae (L3 to next stage (L4 with an ease of delineating the generated immunological response of host. In the current investigation, DNA vaccination with Bm-Myo was therefore undertaken in susceptible rodent host, Mastomys coucha (M. coucha which sustains the challenged L3 and facilitates their further development to sexually mature adult parasites with patent microfilaraemia. Immunization schedule consisted of Myo-pcD and Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo followed by B. malayi L3 challenge and the degree of protection was evaluated by observing microfilaraemia as well as adult worm establishment. Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo immunized animals not only developed 78.5% reduced blood microfilarial density but also decreased adult worm establishment by 75.3%. In addition, 75.4% of the recovered live females revealed sterilization over those of respective control animals. Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo triggered higher production of specific IgG and its isotypes which induced marked cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to microfilariae (mf and L3 in vitro. Both Th1 and Th2 cytokines were significantly up-regulated displaying a mixed immune response conferring considerable protection against B. malayi establishment by engendering a long-lasting effective immune response and therefore emerges

  2. A Promising Listeria-Vectored Vaccine Induces Th1-Type Immune Responses and Confers Protection Against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelan Yin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB is rising and accounted for 1.4 million deaths in 2015 many of which were due to drug-resistant bacteria. Vaccines represent an important medical intervention, but the current Bacilli Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine is not ideal for the protection of teenagers and adults. Therefore, a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. In this study, we designed a novel vaccine using an attenuated Listeria monocytogenes strain carrying fusion antigen FbpB-ESAT-6 (rLM and characterized its safety and protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb infection in mice. Compared to the wild type strain yzuLM4 and parental strain LMΔactA/plcB (LM1-2, the virulence of rLM was significantly reduced as judged by its infectious kinetics and LD50 dose. Further characterization of intravenous immunization showed that prime-boost vaccination significantly increased the levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-6, and enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL CTLs activity, suggesting that rLM could elicit potent Th1/Th17 responses. More importantly, rLM significantly conferred the protection against M.tb H37Rv challenge. Collectively, our findings indicated that rLM is a novel and useful tool to prevent M.tb infection, and can be potentially be used to boost BCG-primed immunity.

  3. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  4. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyun Chul; Shin, Ick Hyun; Lee, Hyung Kyung; Choe, Kwan Kyoo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012

  5. Protection against avian metapneumovirus subtype C in turkeys immunized via the respiratory tract with inactivated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ra Mi; Khatri, Mahesh; Sharma, Jagdev M

    2011-01-10

    Avian metapneumovirus subtype C (aMPV/C) causes a severe upper respiratory tract (URT) infection in turkeys. Turkeys were inoculated oculonasally with inactivated aMPV/C adjuvanted with synthetic double-stranded RNA polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (Poly IC). Immunized turkeys had elevated numbers of mucosal IgA+ cells in the URT and increased levels of virus-specific IgG and IgA in the lachrymal fluid and IgG in the serum. After 7 or 21 days post immunization, turkeys were challenged oculonasally with pathogenic aMPV/C. Immunized groups were protected against respiratory lesions induced by the challenge virus. Further, the viral copy number of the challenge virus in the URT were significantly lower in the immunized turkeys than in the unimmunized turkeys (P<0.05). These results showed that inactivated aMPV/C administered by the respiratory route induced protective immunity against pathogenic virus challenge. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of tumour-specific immune responses in vivo by 'MHC loading-enhancer' (MLE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Dickhaut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Class II MHC molecules (MHC II are cell surface receptors displaying short protein fragments for the surveillance by CD4+ T cells. Antigens therefore have to be loaded onto this receptor in order to induce productive immune responses. On the cell surface, most MHC II molecules are either occupied by ligands or their binding cleft has been blocked by the acquisition of a non-receptive state. Direct loading with antigens, as required during peptide vaccinations, is therefore hindered. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show, that the in vivo response of CD4+ T cells can be improved, when the antigens are administered together with 'MHC-loading enhancer' (MLE. MLE are small catalytic compounds able to open up the MHC binding site by triggering ligand-release and stabilizing the receptive state. Their enhancing effect on the immune response was demonstrated here with an antigen from the influenza virus and tumour associated antigens (TAA derived from the NY-ESO-1 protein. The application of these antigens in combination with adamantane ethanol (AdEtOH, an MLE compound active on human HLA-DR molecules, significantly increased the frequency of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in mice transgenic for the human MHC II molecule. Notably, the effect was evident only with the MLE-susceptible HLA-DR molecule and not with murine MHC II molecules non-susceptible for the catalytic effect of the MLE. CONCLUSION: MLE can specifically increase the potency of a vaccine by facilitating the efficient transfer of the antigen onto the MHC molecule. They may therefore open a new way to improve vaccination efficacy and tumour-immunotherapy.

  7. Mucosal immunization with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors protects against influenza virus challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Fontana

    Full Text Available Recent reports highlight the potential for integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLV to be developed as vaccines due to their ability to elicit cell-mediated and humoral immune responses after intramuscular administration. Differently from their integrase-competent counterpart, whose utility for vaccine development is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis, IDLV possess a mutation in their integrase gene that prevents genomic integration. Instead, they are maintained as episomal DNA circles that retain the ability to stably express functional proteins. Despite their favorable profile, it is unknown whether IDLV elicit immune responses after intranasal administration, a route that could be advantageous in the case of infection with a respiratory agent. Using influenza as a model, we constructed IDLV expressing the influenza virus nucleoprotein (IDLV-NP, and tested their ability to generate NP-specific immune responses and protect from challenge in vivo. We found that administration of IDLV-NP elicited NP-specific T cell and antibody responses in BALB/c mice. Importantly, IDLV-NP was protective against homologous and heterosubtypic influenza virus challenge only when given by the intranasal route. This is the first report demonstrating that IDLV can induce protective immunity after intranasal administration, and suggests that IDLV may represent a promising vaccine platform against infectious agents.

  8. Immune correlates of protection for dengue: State of the art and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Harris, Eva

    2017-08-24

    Dengue viruses (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses estimated to cause up to ∼400 million infections and ∼100 million dengue cases each year. Factors that contribute to protection from and risk of dengue and severe dengue disease have been studied extensively but are still not fully understood. Results from Phase 3 vaccine efficacy trials have recently become available for one vaccine candidate, now licensed for use in several countries, and more Phase 2 and 3 studies of additional vaccine candidates are ongoing, making these issues all the more urgent and timely. At the "Summit on Dengue Immune Correlates of Protection", held in Annecy, France, on March 8-9, 2016, dengue experts from diverse fields came together to discuss the current understanding of the immune response to and protection from DENV infection and disease, identify key unanswered questions, discuss data on immune correlates and plans for comparison of results across assays/consortia, and propose a research agenda for investigation of dengue immune correlates, all in the context of both natural infection studies and vaccine trials. Copyright © 2017.

  9. Poly(I:C)-Encapsulating Nanoparticles Enhance Innate Immune Responses to the Tuberculosis Vaccine Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) via Synergistic Activation of Innate Immune Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Martin T; Repnik, Urska; Müller, Elisabeth; Spanier, Julia; Kalinke, Ulrich; Corthay, Alexandre; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-11-06

    The attenuated live vaccine strain bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), but is largely ineffective against adult pulmonary TB, the most common disease form. This is in part due to BCG's ability to interfere with the host innate immune response, a feature that might be targeted to enhance the potency of this vaccine. Here, we investigated the ability of chitosan-based nanoparticles (pIC-NPs) containing polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), an inducer of innate immunity via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), to enhance the immunogenicity of BCG in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in vitro. Incorporation of poly(I:C) into NPs protected it against degradation by ribonucleases and increased its uptake by mouse BMDM. Whereas soluble poly(I:C) was ineffective, pIC-NPs strongly enhanced the proinflammatory immune response of BCG-infected macrophages in a synergistic fashion, as evident by increased production of cytokines and induction of nitric oxide synthesis. Using macrophages from mice deficient in key signaling molecules involved in the pathogen recognition response, we identified combined activation of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent TLR signaling pathways to be essential for the synergistic effect between BCG and NP. Moreover, synergy was strongly dependent on the order of the two stimuli, with TLR activation by BCG functioning as the priming event for the subsequent pIC-NP stimulus, which acted through an auto-/paracrine type I interferon (IFN) feedback loop. Our results provide a foundation for a promising new approach to enhance BCG-vaccine immunogenicity by costimulation with NPs. They also contribute to a molecular understanding of the observed synergistic interaction between the pIC-NPs and BCG vaccine.

  10. A plant-produced vaccine protects mice against lethal West Nile virus infection without enhancing Zika or dengue virus infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huafang; Paul, Amber M; Sun, Haiyan; He, Junyun; Yang, Ming; Bai, Fengwei; Chen, Qiang

    2018-03-27

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused multiple global outbreaks with increased frequency of neuroinvasive disease in recent years. Despite many years of research, there are no licensed therapeutics or vaccines available for human use. One of the major impediments of vaccine development against WNV is the potential enhancement of infection by related flaviviruses in vaccinated subjects through the mechanism of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE). For instance, the recent finding of enhancement of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection by pre-exposure to WNV further complicates the development of WNV vaccines. Epidemics of WNV and the potential risk of ADE by current vaccine candidates demand the development of effective and safe vaccines. We have previously reported that the domain III (DIII) of the WNV envelope protein can be readily expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, purified to homogeneity, and promote antigen-specific antibody response in mice. Herein, we further investigated the in vivo potency of a plant-made DIII (plant-DIII) in providing protective immunity against WNV infection. Furthermore, we examined if vaccination with plant-DIII would enhance the risk of a subsequent infection by ZIKV and Dengue virus (DENV). Plant-DIII vaccination evoked antigen-specific cellular immune responses as well as humoral responses. DIII-specific antibodies were neutralizing and the neutralization titers met the threshold correlated with protective immunity by vaccines against multiple flaviviruses. Furthermore, passive administration of anti-plant DIII mouse serum provided full protection against a lethal challenge of WNV infection in mice. Notably, plant DIII-induced antibodies did not enhance ZIKV and DENV infection in Fc gamma receptor-expressing cells, addressing the concern of WNV vaccines in inducing cross-reactive antibodies and sensitizing subjects to subsequent infection by heterologous flavivirus. This study provides the first report of a WNV subunit vaccine

  11. Longevity and determinants of protective humoral immunity after pandemic influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya; Begom, Shaima; Hoschler, Katja; Bermingham, Alison; Adamson, Walt; Carman, William; Riley, Steven; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Antibodies to influenza hemagglutinin are the primary correlate of protection against infection. The strength and persistence of this immune response influences viral evolution and consequently the nature of influenza epidemics. However, the durability and immune determinants of induction of humoral immunity after primary influenza infection remain unclear. The spread of a novel H1N1 (A[H1N1]pdm09) virus in 2009 through an unexposed population offered a natural experiment to assess the nature and longevity of humoral immunity after a single primary influenza infection. We followed A(H1N1)pdm09-seronegative adults through two influenza seasons (2009-2011) as they developed A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection or were vaccinated. Antibodies to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were measured by hemagglutination-inhibition assay in individuals with paired serum samples collected preinfection and postinfection or vaccination to assess durability of humoral immunity. Preexisting A(H1N1)pdm09-specific multicytokine-secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells were quantified by multiparameter flow cytometry to test the hypothesis that higher frequencies of CD4(+) T-cell responses predict stronger antibody induction after infection or vaccination. Antibodies induced by natural infection persisted at constant high titer for a minimum of approximately 15 months. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the fold increase in A(H1N1)pdm09-specific antibody titer after infection was inversely correlated to the frequency of preexisting circulating A(H1N1)pdm09-specific CD4(+)IL-2(+)IFN-γ(-)TNF-α(-) T cells (r = -0.4122; P = 0.03). The longevity of protective humoral immunity after influenza infection has important implications for influenza transmission dynamics and vaccination policy, and identification of its predictive cellular immune correlate could guide vaccine development and evaluation.

  12. Innate lymphoid cells: models of plasticity for immune homeostasis and rapid responsiveness in protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, F F; Belz, G T

    2016-09-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have stormed onto the immune landscape as "newly discovered" cell types. These tissue-resident sentinels are enriched at mucosal surfaces and engage in complex cross talk with elements of the adaptive immune system and microenvironment to orchestrate immune homeostasis. Many parallels exist between innate cells and T cells leading to the initial partitioning of ILCs into rather rigid subsets that reflect their "adaptive-like" effector cytokines profiles. ILCs themselves, however, have unique attributes that are only just beginning to be elucidated. These features result in complementarity with, rather than complete duplication of, functions of the adaptive immune system. Key transcription factors determine the pathway of differentiation of progenitors towards an ILC1, ILC2, or ILC3 subset. Once formed, flexibility in the responses of these subsets to stimuli unexpectedly allows transdifferentation between the different subsets and the acquisition of altered phenotypes and function. This provides a mechanism for rapid innate immune responsiveness. Here, we discuss the models of differentiation for maintenance and activation of tissue-resident ILCs in maintaining immune homeostasis and protection.

  13. Protective immunization with B16 melanoma induces antibody response and not cytotoxic T cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarzotti, M.; Sriyuktasuth, P.; Klimpel, G.R.; Cerny, J.

    1986-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice immunized with three intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic, irradiated B16 melanoma cells, became resistant to B16 tumor challenge. Immunized mice had high levels of serum antibody against a membrane antigen of B16 cells. The B16 antigen recognized by the anti-B16 sera formed a major band of 90 KD in gel electrophoresis. The anti-B16 antibody was partially protective when mixed with B16 cells and injected into normal recipient mice. Surprisingly, B16 resistance mice were incapable of generating cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific for the B16 tumor. Both spleen and lymph node cell populations from immunized mice did not generate B16-specific CTL. Allogeneic mice (DBA/2 or C3H) were also unable to generate B16-specific CTL: however, alloreactive CTL produced in these strains of mice by immunization with C57BL/6 lymphocytes, did kill B16 target cells. Interestingly, spleen cells from syngeneic mice immunized with B16 tumor produced 6-fold more interleukin-2 (IL-2) than normal spleen cells, in vitro. These data suggest that immunization with B16 tumor activates a helper subset of T cells (for antibody and IL-2 production) but not the effector CTL response

  14. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrick, Meggan; Theis, Kara; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-06-05

    Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI.

  15. Protection enhances community and habitat stability: evidence from a mediterranean marine protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraschetti, Simonetta; Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; Terlizzi, Antonio; Boero, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Rare evidences support that Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) enhance the stability of marine habitats and assemblages. Based on nine years of observation (2001-2009) inside and outside a well managed MPA, we assessed the potential of conservation and management actions to modify patterns of spatial and/or temporal variability of Posidonia oceanica meadows, the lower midlittoral and the shallow infralittoral rock assemblages. Significant differences in both temporal variations and spatial patterns were observed between protected and unprotected locations. A lower temporal variability in the protected vs. unprotected assemblages was found in the shallow infralittoral, demonstrating that, at least at local scale, protection can enhance community stability. Macrobenthos with long-lived and relatively slow-growing invertebrates and structurally complex algal forms were homogeneously distributed in space and went through little fluctuations in time. In contrast, a mosaic of disturbed patches featured unprotected locations, with small-scale shifts from macroalgal stands to barrens, and harsh temporal variations between the two states. Opposite patterns of spatial and temporal variability were found for the midlittoral assemblages. Despite an overall clear pattern of seagrass regression through time, protected meadows showed a significantly higher shoot density than unprotected ones, suggesting a higher resistance to local human activities. Our results support the assumption that the exclusion/management of human activities within MPAs enhance the stability of the structural components of protected marine systems, reverting or arresting threat-induced trajectories of change.

  16. Dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide enhances neonatal immune responses in chickens during natural exposure to Eimeria spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Gerardo M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control and eradication of intestinal infections caused by protozoa are important biomedical challenges worldwide. Prophylactic control of coccidiosis has been achieved with the use of anticoccidial drugs; however, the increase in anticoccidial resistance has raised concerns about the need for new alternatives for the control of coccidial infections. In fact, new strategies are needed to induce potent protective immune responses in neonatal individuals. Methods The effects of a dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide (yeast cell wall; YCW on the local, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and intestinal replication of coccidia were evaluated in a neonatal animal model during natural exposure to Eimeria spp. A total of 840 one-day-old chicks were distributed among four dietary regimens: A Control diet (no YCW plus anticoccidial vaccine; B Control diet plus coccidiostat; C YCW diet plus anticoccidial vaccination; and D YCW diet plus coccidiostat. Weight gain, feed consumption and immunological parameters were examined within the first seven weeks of life. Results Dietary supplementation of 0.05% of YCW increased local mucosal IgA secretions, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and reduced parasite excretion in feces. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of yeast cell wall in neonatal animals can enhance the immune response against coccidial infections. The present study reveals the potential of YCW as adjuvant for modulating mucosal immune responses.

  17. Rabies virus expressing dendritic cell-activating molecules enhances the innate and adaptive immune response to vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongjun; Wang, Hualei; Wu, Hua; Yang, Fuhe; Tripp, Ralph A; Hogan, Robert J; Fu, Zhen F

    2011-02-01

    Our previous studies indicated that recruitment and/or activation of dendritic cells (DCs) is important in enhancing the protective immune responses against rabies virus (RABV) (L. Zhao, H. Toriumi, H. Wang, Y. Kuang, X. Guo, K. Morimoto, and Z. F. Fu, J. Virol. 84:9642-9648). To address the importance of DC activation for RABV vaccine efficacy, the genes for several DC recruitment and/or activation molecules, e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), were individually cloned into RABV. The ability of these recombinant viruses to activate DCs was determined in vitro and in vivo. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived DCs with each of the recombinant viruses resulted in DC activation, as shown by increased surface expression of CD11c and CD86 as well as an increased level of alpha interferon (IFN-α) production compared to levels observed after infection with the parent virus. Intramuscular infection of mice with each of the viruses recruited and/or activated more DCs and B cells in the periphery than infection with the parent virus, leading to the production of higher levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, a single immunization with recombinant RABV expressing GM-CSF or MDC protected significantly more mice against intracerebral challenge with virulent RABV than did immunization with the parental virus. Yet, these viruses did not show more virulence than the parent virus, since direct intracerebral inoculation with each virus at up to 1 × 10(7) fluorescent focus units each did not induce any overt clinic symptom, such as abnormal behavior, or any neurological signs. Together, these data indicate that recombinant RABVs expressing these molecules activate/recruit DCs and enhance protective immune responses.

  18. Enhancement of broiler performance and immune response by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the present study was to compare short and long term application of Echinacea purpurea root powder on growth performance and immunity response of broiler chicks. Three replicate trials involving a total of 600 day-old Ross chicks were used in this study. In each trial, a total of 200 chicks were randomly ...

  19. The immune enhancer, thymoquinone, and the hope of utilizing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insects have developed an efficient defence system against microorganisms, which involves both humoral and cellular mechanisms. Recent studies on insect defence system are aimed at utilizing it in the battle against mosquito-borne diseases. However, mounting immune responses of insects has proved to impose fitness ...

  20. Natural killer cells enhance the immune surveillance of cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faisal Nouroz

    2015-09-11

    Sep 11, 2015 ... is carried out to treat cancer [6]. 3. Role of Natural killer cells. Natural killer (NK) cells were first discovered in humans and mice in 1975 and are large granular population of leukocytes, that can directly kill the virus infected or tumor cells [4]. NK cells of the immune system specially lyse the tumor cells and.

  1. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  2. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerod A Skyberg

    Full Text Available γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/- mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-, and GMCSF(-/- mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/- mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  3. Strategies to enhance immune function for marathon runners : what can be done?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Pedersen, Bente K

    2007-01-01

    immune cells. During this period of immune suppression, by some referred to as an 'open window' in immune function, it has been hypothesised that viruses and bacteria might gain a foothold, which would increase the risk of infections. In light of this, nutritional interventions that can enhance immune......Marathoners are at an increased risk of developing upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) following races and periods of hard training, which are associated with temporary changes in the immune system. The majority of the reported changes are decreases in function or concentration of certain...... function and reduce the risk of URTIs have been sought. This paper focuses on the effect of glutamine, vitamin C, bovine colostrum and glucose. Although, some of these supplements can affect the physiological and immune changes associated with marathon racing, none of the supplements discussed have...

  4. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Devendra K.; Segundo, Fayna Diaz-San; Schafer, Elizabeth; Burrage, Thomas G.; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Santos, Teresa de los; Hoeprich, Paul D.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses with histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co 2+ affinity columns. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays showed that the 6xHis FMDVs readily assembled into antigen: adjuvant complexes in solution, by conjugating with Ni 2+ -chelated nanolipoprotein and monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant (MPLA:NiNLP). Animals Immunized with the inactivated 6xHis-FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine acquired enhanced protective immunity against FMDV challenge compared to virions alone. Induction of anti-6xHis and anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies in the immunized animals could be exploited in the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals needed for the improvement of FMD control measures. The novel marker vaccine/nanolipid technology described here has broad applications for the development of distinctive and effective immune responses to other pathogens of importance. - Highlights: • 6xHis-tags in A 24 FMDV enable purification and biding to adjuvants via metal ions. • 6xHis A 24 FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine enhanced protective immunity against FMDV. • Surface exposed capsid tags allow distinction of infected from vaccinated animals.

  5. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Devendra K.; Segundo, Fayna Diaz-San [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science, CANR, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Schafer, Elizabeth [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Burrage, Thomas G. [Department of Homeland Security, S & T, Targeted Advance Development, Virus, Cellular and Molecular Imaging Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Rodriguez, Luis L.; Santos, Teresa de los [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Hoeprich, Paul D. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Rieder, Elizabeth, E-mail: Elizabeth.Rieder@ars.usda.gov [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses with histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co{sup 2+} affinity columns. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays showed that the 6xHis FMDVs readily assembled into antigen: adjuvant complexes in solution, by conjugating with Ni{sup 2+}-chelated nanolipoprotein and monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant (MPLA:NiNLP). Animals Immunized with the inactivated 6xHis-FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine acquired enhanced protective immunity against FMDV challenge compared to virions alone. Induction of anti-6xHis and anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies in the immunized animals could be exploited in the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals needed for the improvement of FMD control measures. The novel marker vaccine/nanolipid technology described here has broad applications for the development of distinctive and effective immune responses to other pathogens of importance. - Highlights: • 6xHis-tags in A{sub 24} FMDV enable purification and biding to adjuvants via metal ions. • 6xHis A{sub 24} FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine enhanced protective immunity against FMDV. • Surface exposed capsid tags allow distinction of infected from vaccinated animals.

  6. Carbohydrates in plant immunity and plant protection: roles and potential application as foliar sprays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Poinssot, Benoît; Gauthier, Adrien; Paris, Franck; Guillier, Christelle; Combier, Maud; Trdá, Lucie; Daire, Xavier; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest is devoted to carbohydrates for their roles in plant immunity. Some of them are elicitors of plant defenses whereas other ones act as signaling molecules in a manner similar to phytohormones. This review first describes the main classes of carbohydrates associated to plant immunity, their role and mode of action. More precisely, the state of the art about perception of "PAMP, MAMP, and DAMP (Pathogen-, Microbe-, Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns) type" oligosaccharides is presented and examples of induced defense events are provided. A particular attention is paid to the structure/activity relationships of these compounds. The role of sugars as signaling molecules, especially in plant microbe interactions, is also presented. Secondly, the potentialities and limits of foliar sprays of carbohydrates to stimulate plant immunity for crop protection against diseases are discussed, with focus on the roles of the leaf cuticle and phyllosphere microflora.

  7. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-17

    Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA.

  8. The role of CD4 T cell memory in generating protective immunity to novel and potentially pandemic strains of influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony eDiPiazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have made it clear that potentially pandemic strains of influenza regularly pose a threat to human populations. Therefore, it is essential that we develop better strategies to enhance vaccine design and evaluation, to predict those that will be poor responders to vaccination and to identify those that are at particular risk of disease-associated complications following infection. Simplified animal models have revealed the discrete functions that CD4 T cells play in the developing immune response and to influenza immunity. However, humans have a complex immunological history with influenza through periodic infection and vaccination with seasonal variants, leading to the establishment of heterogeneous memory populations of CD4 T cells that participate in subsequent responses. The continual evolution of the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire involves both specificity and function and overlays other restrictions on CD4 T cell activity derived from viral antigen handling and MHC class II:peptide epitope display. Together, these complexities in the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire constitute a formidable obstacle to predicting protective immune response to potentially pandemic strains of influenza and in devising optimal vaccine strategies to potentiate these responses. We suggest that more precise efforts to identify and enumerate both the positive and negative contributors within the CD4 T cell compartment will aid significantly in achievement of these goals.

  9. YopP-expressing variant of Y. pestis activates a potent innate immune response affording cross-protection against yersiniosis and tularemia [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Zauberman

    Full Text Available Plague, initiated by Yersinia pestis infection, is a rapidly progressing disease with a high mortality rate if not quickly treated. The existence of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains emphasizes the need for the development of novel countermeasures against plague. We previously reported the generation of a recombinant Y. pestis strain (Kim53ΔJ+P that over-expresses Y. enterocolitica YopP. When this strain was administered subcutaneously to mice, it elicited a fast and effective protective immune response in models of bubonic, pneumonic and septicemic plague. In the present study, we further characterized the immune response induced by the Kim53ΔJ+P recombinant strain. Using a panel of mouse strains defective in specific immune functions, we observed the induction of a prompt protective innate immune response that was interferon-γ dependent. Moreover, inoculation of mice with Y. pestis Kim53ΔJ+P elicited a rapid protective response against secondary infection by other bacterial pathogens, including the enteropathogen Y. enterocolitica and the respiratory pathogen Francisella tularensis. Thus, the development of new therapies to enhance the innate immune response may provide an initial critical delay in disease progression following the exposure to highly virulent bacterial pathogens, extending the time window for successful treatment.

  10. Transfer of maternal immunity to piglets is involved in early protection against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, K Tølbøll; Hagedorn-Olsen, T; Jungersen, G; Riber, U; Stryhn, H; Friis, N F; Lind, P; Kristensen, B

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae causes arthritis in pigs older than 12 weeks. The role of colostrum in protection of piglets against M. hyosynoviae infection is not clear. Our objective was therefore to investigate whether transfer of maternal immunity to piglets was involved in early protection against the infection. Experimental infections were carried out in three groups of weaners receiving different levels of M. hyosynoviae-specific colostrum components; Group NC derived from Mycoplasma free sows and possessed no specific immunity to M. hyosynoviae. Group CAb pigs, siblings of the NC group, received colostrum with M. hyosynoviae-specific antibodies immediately after birth. Group CCE pigs were born and raised by infected sows and presumably had the full set of colostrally transferred factors, including specific antibodies. When 4½ weeks old, all pigs were inoculated intranasally with M. hyosynoviae. The course of infection was measured through clinical observations of lameness, cultivation of M. hyosynoviae from tonsils, blood and synovial fluid and observation for gross pathological lesions in selected joints. Specific immune status in the pigs was evaluated through detection of antibodies by immunoblotting and measurement of M. hyosynoviae-specific T-cell proliferation. The latter analysis may possibly indicate that M. hyosynoviae infection induces a T-cell response. The CCE piglets were significantly protected against development of lameness and pathology, as well as infection with M. hyosynoviae in tonsils, blood and joints, when compared to the two other groups. Raising the CCE pigs in an infected environment until weaning, with carrier sows as mothers, apparently made them resistant to M. hyosynoviae-arthritis when challenge-infected at 4½ weeks of age. More pigs in group NC had M. hyosynoviae related pathological lesions than in group CAb, a difference that was significant for cubital joints when analysed on joint type level. This finding indicates a partially

  11. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  12. Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2017-08-15

    Exercise training has been extensively studied in cancer settings as part of prevention or rehabilitation strategies, yet emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can also directly affect tumor-specific outcomes. The underlying mechanisms for this exercise-dependent cancer protection are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through regulation of immune and inflammatory functions, and exercise may be pursued as anticancer treatment through incorporation into standard oncological therapy to the benefit of the cancer patients. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Jungle Honey Enhances Immune Function and Antitumor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Miki; Kobayashi, Kengo; Hirono, Yuriko; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Ishida, Takahiro; Ejiogu, Emenike C.; Sawai, Masaharu; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Takeuchi, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Jungle honey (JH) is collected from timber and blossom by wild honey bees that live in the tropical forest of Nigeria. JH is used as a traditional medicine for colds, skin inflammation and burn wounds as well as general health care. However, the effects of JH on immune functions are not clearly known. Therefore, we investigated the effects of JH on immune functions and antitumor activity in mice. Female C57BL/6 mice were injected with JH (1 mg/mouse/day, seven times intra-peritoneal). After seven injections, peritoneal cells (PC) were obtained. Antitumor activity was assessed by growth of Lewis Lung Carcinoma/2 (LL/2) cells. PC numbers were increased in JH-injected mice compared to control mice. In Dot Plot analysis by FACS, a new cell population appeared in JH-injected mice. The percent of Gr-1 surface antigen and the intensity of Gr-1 antigen expression of PC were increased in JH-injected mice. The new cell population was neutrophils. JH possessed chemotactic activity for neutrophils. Tumor incidence and weight were decreased in JH-injected mice. The ratio of reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing cells was increased in JH-injected mice. The effective component in JH was fractionized by gel filtration using HPLC and had an approximate molecular weight (MW) of 261. These results suggest that neutrophils induced by JH possess potent antitumor activity mediated by ROS and the effective immune component of JH is substrate of MW 261. PMID:19141489

  14. Jungle Honey Enhances Immune Function and Antitumor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Fukuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jungle honey (JH is collected from timber and blossom by wild honey bees that live in the tropical forest of Nigeria. JH is used as a traditional medicine for colds, skin inflammation and burn wounds as well as general health care. However, the effects of JH on immune functions are not clearly known. Therefore, we investigated the effects of JH on immune functions and antitumor activity in mice. Female C57BL/6 mice were injected with JH (1 mg/mouse/day, seven times intra-peritoneal. After seven injections, peritoneal cells (PC were obtained. Antitumor activity was assessed by growth of Lewis Lung Carcinoma/2 (LL/2 cells. PC numbers were increased in JH-injected mice compared to control mice. In Dot Plot analysis by FACS, a new cell population appeared in JH-injected mice. The percent of Gr-1 surface antigen and the intensity of Gr-1 antigen expression of PC were increased in JH-injected mice. The new cell population was neutrophils. JH possessed chemotactic activity for neutrophils. Tumor incidence and weight were decreased in JH-injected mice. The ratio of reactive oxygen species (ROS producing cells was increased in JH-injected mice. The effective component in JH was fractionized by gel filtration using HPLC and had an approximate molecular weight (MW of 261. These results suggest that neutrophils induced by JH possess potent antitumor activity mediated by ROS and the effective immune component of JH is substrate of MW 261.

  15. Pilot Study on the Use of DNA Priming Immunization to Enhance Y. pestis LcrV-Specific B Cell Responses Elicited by a Recombinant LcrV Protein Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that DNA immunization is powerful in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses in both animal and human studies. However, there is limited information on the mechanism of this effect. In particular, it is not known whether DNA immunization can also enhance the development of antigen-specific B cell development. In this report, a pilot study was conducted using plague LcrV immunogen as a model system to determine whether DNA immunization is able to enhance LcrV-specific B cell development in mice. Plague is an acute and often fatal infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis. Humoral immune responses provide critical protective immunity against plague. Previously, we demonstrated that a DNA vaccine expressing LcrV antigen can protect mice from lethal mucosal challenge. In the current study, we further evaluated whether the use of a DNA priming immunization is able to enhance the immunogenicity of a recombinant LcrV protein vaccine, and in particular, the development of LcrV-specific B cells. Our data indicate that DNA immunization was able to elicit high-level LcrV antibody responses when used alone or as part of a prime-boost immunization approach. Most significantly, DNA immunization was also able to increase the levels of LcrV-specific B cell development. The finding that DNA immunization can enhance antigen-specific B cell responses is highly significant and will help guide similar studies in other model antigen systems.

  16. Design concepts to enhance nuclear power plant protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Varnado, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Using a modern design for a nuclear power plant as a point of departure, this study examines the enhancement of protection which may be achieved by changes to the design. These changes include concepts such as complete physical separation of redundant trains of safety equipment, hardened enclosures for water storage tanks, and hardened shutdown heat removal systems. The degree of enhancement (value) is examined in terms such as the potential reduction in the number of vital areas and the increase in probability of adversary sequence interruption. The impacts considered include constraints imposed upon operations and maintenance personnel and increased capital and operating costs. The study concludes that structural design changes alone do not provide significant increases in protection

  17. Protection of pigs against genital Chlamydia trachomatis challenge by parenteral or mucosal DNA immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schautteet, Katelijn; De Clercq, Evelien; Jönsson, Yannick; Lagae, Stefanie; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2012-04-16

    The current study evaluates combined aerosol-vaginal delivery of a MOMP-based Chlamydia trachomatis (serovar E) DNA vaccine in a pig genital challenge model. Most non-replicating antigens are rather poor mucosal immunogens in comparison to replicating antigens. Therefore, a mucosal administered DNA vaccine, which actually mimics a live vaccine, could be promising. Protection was promoted by plasmids encoding the porcine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (pcDNA3.1zeo::GM-CSF), the Escherichia coli thermo-labile enterotoxin (LT) subunit A (plasmid PJV2004::LTa) and subunit B (plasmid PJV2005::LTb). Mucosal C. trachomatis DNA vaccination induced significant protection against genital C. trachomatis challenge although the infection could not be eradicated. Intradermal immunization was significantly less efficient in protecting experimentally infected pigs. Protection was correlated with efficient T cell priming and significantly higher serum IgA titers following primo vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sublingual Vaccination Induces Mucosal and Systemic Adaptive Immunity for Protection against Lung Tumor Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Anthony, Scott M.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge...

  19. Accelerated vaccination schedule provides protective levels of antibody and complete herd immunity to equine influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hage, C M; Savage, C J; Minke, J M; Ficorilli, N P; Watson, J; Gilkerson, J R

    2013-03-01

    During the 2007 Australian equine influenza (EI) outbreak, an accelerated primary course 14 day intervaccination schedule was proposed, but not widely implemented. Expert opinion was divided as to the efficacy of such a schedule given the lack of published data. This study determined the level and duration of humoral immunity following administration of a recombinant canarypox-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-EIV) with a primary intervaccination interval of 14 days and booster at 105 days. To examine whether protective levels of immunity of adequate duration were achieved following a primary course reduced from a minimum interval of 28 to 14 days. Antibody responses to 2 H3N8 American lineage virus strains (including A/equine/Sydney/6085/2007) were assessed and compared to previous challenge studies using ALVAC-EIV at conventional intervaccination intervals. Fourteen Thoroughbred horses and 2 ponies from a rural racehorse training property in Victoria, Australia, were vaccinated with ALVAC-EIV on Days 0, 14 and 105. Serial blood samples were collected over the next 32 weeks and tested with haemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis (SRH) in full assays to evaluate the serological response. All horses and ponies responded to the accelerated ALVAC-EIV vaccination schedule. Mean SRH antibodies remained above those consistent with clinical protection for the duration of the study period. All vaccinates demonstrated high SRH antibodies 14 days following V2, thereby achieving 100% herd immunity to homologous viral challenge. An accelerated vaccination schedule conferred long-lasting protective antibody levels despite a >50% reduction in the recommended V1-V2 interval. High levels of rapidly acquired herd immunity are critical in containing an outbreak of such a highly contagious pathogen as EIV. In a strategic vaccination programme, it is important that horses remain protected for sufficient time to allow control programmes to succeed. An accelerated 14 day primary

  20. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  2. Is there a role for autoimmunity in immune protection against malaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel-Ribeiro Cláudio Tadeu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Much remains to be known about the mechanisms involved in protective immunity against malaria and the way it is acquired. This is probably the reason why, in spite of so much progress, it has not yet been possible to develop an anti-malaria vaccine able to induce parasite specific antibodies (Ab and/or T-cells. It has been considered in the early 80s that the induction of efficient protection against the blood stage forms of Plasmodium falciparum would not be possible without simultaneously eliciting an autoimmune (AI response against erythrocytes, even at the price of inducing an AI pathology. Despite the description of the reciprocal relationship, i.e. the protective effect of malaria on the development of AI diseases - demonstrated since 1970 - no effort has been made to verify the possible involvement of the AI response in protection against malaria. With this end in view - and in the light of the knowledge acquired in autoimmunity and the existence of the so called "natural" (not associated with pathology autoantibodies - we propose to examine the hypothesis that the participation of the AI response (not necessarily restricted to autologous erythrocyte antigens in the immune protection against malaria is possible or even necessary.

  3. Interleukin-21 receptor signalling is important for innate immune protection against HSV-2 infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sine K Kratholm

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL -21 is produced by Natural Killer T (NKT cells and CD4(+ T cells and is produced in response to virus infections, where IL-21 has been shown to be essential in adaptive immune responses. Cells from the innate immune system such as Natural Killer (NK cells and macrophages are also important in immune protection against virus. These cells express the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R and respond to IL-21 with increased cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Currently, however it is not known whether IL-21 plays a significant role in innate immune responses to virus infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 and IL-21R in the innate immune response to a virus infection. We used C57BL/6 wild type (WT and IL-21R knock out (KO mice in a murine vaginal Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection model to show that IL-21 - IL-21R signalling is indeed important in innate immune responses against HSV-2. We found that the IL-21R was expressed in the vaginal epithelium in uninfected (u.i WT mice, and expression increased early after HSV-2 infection. IL-21R KO mice exhibited increased vaginal viral titers on day 2 and 3 post infection (p.i. and subsequently developed significantly higher disease scores and a lower survival rate compared to WT mice. In addition, WT mice infected with HSV-2 receiving intra-vaginal pre-treatment with murine recombinant IL-21 (mIL-21 had decreased vaginal viral titers on day 2 p.i., significantly lower disease scores, and a higher survival rate compared to infected untreated WT controls. Collectively our data demonstrate the novel finding that the IL-21R plays a critical role in regulating innate immune responses against HSV-2 infection.

  4. TLR 9 involvement in early protection induced by immunization with rPb27 against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Elis Araujo; Chame, Daniela Ferreira; Melo, Eliza Mathias; de Carvalho Oliveira, Junnia Alvarenga; de Paula, Ana Cláudia Chagas; Peixoto, Andiara Cardoso; da Silva Santos, Lílian; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Russo, Remo Castro; de Goes, Alfredo Miranda

    2016-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is caused by fungi of the Paracoccidioides genus and constitutes the most prevalent deep mycosis in Latin America. Toll-like receptors promote immune response against infectious agents. Recently, it was reported that TLR9 is crucial for mice survival during the first 48 h of P. brasiliensis infection. In this study, we used CPG oligodeoxynucleotide motif as an adjuvant with and without rPb27 to immunize mice against Paracoccidioidomycosis. CPG adjuvant induced differential recruitment of lymphocytes in the inflammatory process and a lower recruitment of neutrophils. In addition, CPG induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12; increased phagocytic ability and microbicidal activity by macrophages; and induced differential production of lgG2a and lgG2b, subtypes of Ig. Knockout mice for TLR9 and IL-12 showed higher fungal loads and rates of mortality compared to control mice after 30 days of infection. The association between CPG and rPb27 induced a high level of protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis after the first 30 days of infection but not at 60 days. Our findings demonstrate that TLR 9 plays a role in the protection induced by immunization with rPb27 and confirms the importance of TLR9 in the initial protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. RNA immunization can protect mice against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Miguel Rodríguez; Sobrino, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita

    2010-03-01

    In previous work we have reported the immunization of swine using in vitro-transcribed foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA. With the aim of testing whether RNA-induced immunization can mediate protection against viral infection, a group of Swiss adult mice was inoculated with FMDV infectious transcripts. In most inoculated animals viral RNA was detected in serum at 48-72h postinoculation. A group of the RNA-inoculated mice (11 out of 19) developed significant titers of neutralizing antibodies against FMDV. Among those animals that were successfully challenged with infectious virus (15 out of 19), three out of the eight animals immunized upon RNA inoculation were protected, as infectious virus could not be isolated from sera but specific anti-FMDV antibodies could be readily detected. These results suggest the potential of the inoculation of genetically engineered FMDV RNA for virulence and protection assays in the murine model and allow to explore the suitability of RNA-based FMDV vaccination in natural host animals.

  6. Enhancement of mucosal immune responses by chimeric influenza HA/SHIV virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lizheng; Lu Xiaoyan; Kang, S.-M.; Chen Changyi; Compans, Richard W.; Yao Qizhi

    2003-01-01

    To enhance mucosal immune responses using simian/human immunodeficiency virus-like particles (SHIV VLPs), we have produced novel phenotypically mixed chimeric influenza HA/SHIV VLPs and used them to immunize C57BL/6J mice intranasally. Antibody and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses as well as cytokine production in both systemic and mucosal sites were compared after immunization with SHIV VLPs or chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA to the HIV envelope protein (Env) were found to be highest in the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Furthermore, the highest titer of serum neutralizing antibody against HIV Env was found with the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Analysis of the IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicated that a T H 1-oriented immune response resulted from these VLP immunizations. HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice also showed significantly higher CTL responses than those observed in SHIV VLP-immunized mice. Moreover, a MHC class I restricted T-cell activation ELISPOT assay showed a mixed type of T H 1/T H 2 cytokines in the HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice, indicating that the chimeric VLPs can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the HIV Env protein at multiple mucosal and systemic sites. The results indicate that incorporation of influenza HA into heterotypic VLPs may be highly effective for targeting vaccines to mucosal surfaces

  7. Shigella IpaB and IpaD displayed on L. lactis bacterium-like particles induce protective immunity in adult and infant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Shannon J; Franco-Mahecha, Olga L; Chen, Xiaotong; Choudhari, Shyamal; Blackwelder, William C; van Roosmalen, Maarten L; Leenhouts, Kees; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-08-01

    Shigella spp. are among the enteric pathogens with the highest attributable incidence of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age living in endemic areas. There are no vaccines available to prevent this disease. In this work, we investigated a new Shigella vaccine concept consisting of nonliving, self-adjuvanted, Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLP) displaying Shigella invasion plasmid antigen (Ipa) B and IpaD and examined its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in adult and newborn/infant mice immunized via the nasal route. Unique advantages of this approach include the potential for broad protection due to the highly conserved structure of the Ipas and the safety and practicality of a probiotic-based mucosal/adjuvant delivery platform. Immunization of adult mice with BLP-IpaB and BLP-IpaD (BLP-IpaB/D) induced high levels of Ipa-specific serum IgG and stool IgA in a dose-dependent manner. Immune responses and protection were enhanced by BLP delivery. Vaccine-induced serum antibodies exhibited opsonophagocytic and cytotoxic neutralizing activity, and IpaB/D IgG titers correlated with increased survival post-challenge. Ipa-specific antibody secreting cells were detected in nasal tissue and lungs, as well as IgG in bronchoalveolar lavage. Bone marrow cells produced IpaB/D-specific antibodies and contributed to protection after adoptive transfer. The BLP-IpaB/D vaccine conferred 90% and 80% protection against S. flexneri and S. sonnei, respectively. Mice immunized with BLP-IpaB/D as newborns also developed IpaB and IpaD serum antibodies; 90% were protected against S. flexneri and 44% against S. sonnei. The BLP-IpaB/D vaccine is a promising candidate for safe, practical and potentially effective immunization of children against shigellosis.

  8. Improving vaccine registries through mobile technologies: a vision for mobile enhanced Immunization information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine M; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    Immunization registries or information systems are critical to improving the quality and evaluating the ongoing success of immunization programs. However, the completeness of these systems is challenged by a myriad of factors including the fragmentation of vaccine administration, increasing mobility of individuals, new vaccine development, use of multiple products, and increasingly frequent changes in recommendations. Mobile technologies could offer a solution, which mitigates some of these challenges. Engaging individuals to have more control of their own immunization information using their mobile devices could improve the timeliness and accuracy of data in central immunization information systems. Other opportunities presented by mobile technologies that could be exploited to improve immunization information systems include mobile reporting of adverse events following immunization, the capacity to scan 2D barcodes, and enabling bidirectional communication between individuals and public health officials. Challenges to utilizing mobile solutions include ensuring privacy of data, access, and equity concerns, obtaining consent and ensuring adoption of technology at sufficiently high rates. By empowering individuals with their own health information, mobile technologies can also serve as a mechanism to transfer immunization information as individuals cross local, regional, and national borders. Ultimately, mobile enhanced immunization information systems can help realize the goal of the individual, the healthcare provider, and public health officials always having access to the same immunization information. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Induction of partial immunity in both males and females is sufficient to protect females against sexual transmission of Chlamydia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, C P; Armitage, C W; Kollipara, A; Andrew, D W; Trim, L; Plenderleith, M B; Beagley, K W

    2016-07-01

    Sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis causes infertility, and because almost 90% of infections are asymptomatic, a vaccine is required for its eradication. Mathematical modeling studies have indicated that a vaccine eliciting partial protection (non-sterilizing) may prevent Chlamydia infection transmission, if administered to both sexes before an infection. However, reducing chlamydial inoculum transmitted by males and increasing infection resistance in females through vaccination to elicit sterilizing immunity has yet to be investigated experimentally. Here we show that a partially protective vaccine (chlamydial major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and ISCOMATRIX (IMX) provided sterilizing immunity against sexual transmission between immunized mice. Immunizing male or female mice before an infection reduced chlamydial burden and disease development, but did not prevent infection. However, infection and inflammatory disease responsible for infertility were absent in 100% of immunized female mice challenged intravaginally with ejaculate collected from infected immunized males. In contrast to the sterilizing immunity generated following recovery from a previous chlamydial infection, protective immunity conferred by MOMP/IMX occurred independent of resident memory T cells. Our results demonstrate that vaccination of males or females can further protect the opposing sex, whereas vaccination of both sexes can synergize to elicit sterilizing immunity against Chlamydia sexual transmission.

  10. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  11. Characterization of protective immune responses induced by pneumococcal surface protein A in fusion with pneumolysin derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelly Goulart

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA and Pneumolysin derivatives (Pds are important vaccine candidates, which can confer protection in different models of pneumococcal infection. Furthermore, the combination of these two proteins was able to increase protection against pneumococcal sepsis in mice. The present study investigated the potential of hybrid proteins generated by genetic fusion of PspA fragments to Pds to increase cross-protection against fatal pneumococcal infection. Pneumolisoids were fused to the N-terminus of clade 1 or clade 2 pspA gene fragments. Mouse immunization with the fusion proteins induced high levels of antibodies against PspA and Pds, able to bind to intact pneumococci expressing a homologous PspA with the same intensity as antibodies to rPspA alone or the co-administered proteins. However, when antibody binding to pneumococci with heterologous PspAs was examined, antisera to the PspA-Pds fusion molecules showed stronger antibody binding and C3 deposition than antisera to co-administered proteins. In agreement with these results, antisera against the hybrid proteins were more effective in promoting the phagocytosis of bacteria bearing heterologous PspAs in vitro, leading to a significant reduction in the number of bacteria when compared to co-administered proteins. The respective antisera were also capable of neutralizing the lytic activity of Pneumolysin on sheep red blood cells. Finally, mice immunized with fusion proteins were protected against fatal challenge with pneumococcal strains expressing heterologous PspAs. Taken together, the results suggest that PspA-Pd fusion proteins comprise a promising vaccine strategy, able to increase the immune response mediated by cross-reactive antibodies and complement deposition to heterologous strains, and to confer protection against fatal challenge.

  12. A Whole Virus Pandemic Influenza H1N1 Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Protective in Active Immunization and Passive Protection Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A.; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G.; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus c...

  13. Insights into the mechanisms of protective immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans infection using a mouse model of pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Wozniak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening pneumonia and meningoencephalitis in immune compromised individuals. Previous studies have shown that immunization of BALB/c mice with an IFN-gamma-producing C. neoformans strain, H99gamma, results in complete protection against a second pulmonary challenge with an otherwise lethal cryptococcal strain. The current study evaluated local anamnestic cell-mediated immune responses against pulmonary cryptococcosis in mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma compared to mice immunized with heat-killed C. neoformans (HKC.n.. Mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma had significantly reduced pulmonary fungal burden post-secondary challenge compared to mice immunized with HKC.n. Protection against pulmonary cryptococcosis was associated with increased pulmonary granulomatous formation and leukocyte infiltration followed by a rapid resolution of pulmonary inflammation, which protected the lungs from severe allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM-pathology that developed in the lungs of mice immunized with HKC.n. Pulmonary challenge of interleukin (IL-4 receptor, IL-12p40, IL-12p35, IFN-gamma, T cell and B cell deficient mice with C. neoformans strain H99gamma demonstrated a requirement for Th1-type T cell-mediated immunity, but not B cell-mediated immunity, for the induction of H99gamma-mediated protective immune responses against pulmonary C. neoformans infection. CD4(+ T cells, CD11c(+ cells, and Gr-1(+ cells were increased in both proportion and absolute number in protected mice. In addition, significantly increased production of Th1-type/pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and conversely, reduced Th2-type cytokine production was observed in the lungs of protected mice. Interestingly, protection was not associated with increased production of cytokines IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha in lungs of protected mice. In conclusion, immunization with C

  14. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Epidemics with Multistrain Interactions: Cross Immunity and Antibody-Dependent Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Simone; Shaw, Leah

    2008-03-01

    Dynamics of epidemic spread is a problem of global interest. In this work we investigate the dynamical properties of a multistrain disease in a population where the strains interact via antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) and cross immunity. ADE is a property of some multistrain diseases, such as dengue fever and Ebola, in which the antibodies generated by a primary infection with a strain tend to increase the infectiousness of a secondary infection with a different strain. After a primary infection, cross immunity provides temporary reduced susceptibility to the other strains. The presence of chaotic outbreaks and desynchronization between strains has already been observed in a model with no cross immunity if the ADE is sufficiently strong. The addition of weak cross immunity provides a stabilizing effect, while strong cross immunity leads to large amplitude chaotic outbreaks. A stochastic version of the model is also considered.

  16. Nasal Acai Polysaccharides Potentiate Innate Immunity to Protect against Pulmonary Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Skyberg, Jerod A.; Rollins, MaryClare F.; Holderness, Jeff S.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Goodyear, Andrew; Dow, Steven W.; Jutila, Mark A.; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections are highly lethal in untreated patients, and current antibiotic regimens are not always effective. Activating the innate immune system provides an alternative means of treating infection and can also complement antibiotic therapies. Several natural agonists were screened for their ability to enhance host resistance to infection, and polysaccharides derived from the Acai berry (Acai PS) were found to have potent abilitie...

  17. Toll-like receptor agonist augments virus-like particle-mediated protection from Ebola virus with transient immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A O Martins

    Full Text Available Identifying safe and effective adjuvants is critical for the advanced development of protein-based vaccines. Pattern recognition receptor (PRR agonists are increasingly being explored as potential adjuvants, but there is concern that the efficacy of these molecules may be dependent on potentially dangerous levels of non-specific immune activation. The filovirus virus-like particle (VLP vaccine protects mice, guinea pigs, and nonhuman primates from viral challenge. In this study, we explored the impact of a stabilized dsRNA mimic, polyICLC, on VLP vaccination of C57BL/6 mice and Hartley guinea pigs. We show that at dose levels as low as 100 ng, the adjuvant increased the efficacy of the vaccine in mice. Antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and antibody responses increased significantly upon inclusion of adjuvant. To determine whether the efficacy of polyICLC correlated with systemic immune activation, we examined serum cytokine levels and cellular activation in the draining lymph node. PolyICLC administration was associated with increases in TNFα, IL6, MCP1, MIP1α, KC, and MIP1β levels in the periphery and with the activation of dendritic cells (DCs, NK cells, and B cells. However, this activation resolved within 24 to 72 hours at efficacious adjuvant dose levels. These studies are the first to examine the polyICLC-induced enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses in the context of non-specific immune activation, and they provide a framework from which to consider adjuvant dose levels.

  18. BacMam immunization partially protects pigs against sublethal challenge with African swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argilaguet, Jordi M; Pérez-Martín, Eva; López, Sergio; Goethe, Martin; Escribano, J M; Giesow, Katrin; Keil, Günther M; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Lack of vaccines and efficient control measures complicate the control and eradication of African swine fever (ASF). Limitations of conventional inactivated and attenuated virus-based vaccines against African swine fever virus (ASFV) highlight the need to use new technologies to develop efficient and safe vaccines against this virus. With this aim in mind, in this study we have constructed BacMam-sHAPQ, a baculovirus based vector for gene transfer into mammalian cells, expressing a fusion protein comprising three in tandem ASFV antigens: p54, p30 and the extracellular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (secretory hemagglutinin, sHA), under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (CMVie). Confirming its correct in vitro expression, BacMam-sHAPQ induced specific T-cell responses directly after in vivo immunization. Conversely, no specific antibody responses were detectable prior to ASFV challenge. The protective potential of this recombinant vaccine candidate was tested by a homologous sublethal challenge with ASFV following immunization. Four out of six immunized pigs remained viremia-free after ASFV infection, while the other two pigs showed similar viremic titres to control animals. The protection afforded correlated with the presence of a large number of virus-specific IFNγ-secreting T-cells in blood at 17 days post-infection. In contrast, the specific antibody levels observed after ASFV challenge in sera from BacMam-sHAPQ immunized pigs were indistinguishable from those found in control pigs. These results highlight the importance of the cellular responses in protection against ASFV and point towards BacMam vectors as potential tools for future vaccine development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dual expression profile of type VI secretion system immunity genes protects pandemic Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah T Miyata

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system (T6SS assembles as a molecular syringe that injects toxic protein effectors into both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We previously reported that the V. cholerae O37 serogroup strain V52 maintains a constitutively active T6SS to kill other Gram-negative bacteria while being immune to attack by kin bacteria. The pandemic O1 El Tor V. cholerae strain C6706 is T6SS-silent under laboratory conditions as it does not produce T6SS structural components and effectors, and fails to kill Escherichia coli prey. Yet, C6706 exhibits full resistance when approached by T6SS-active V52. These findings suggested that an active T6SS is not required for immunity against T6SS-mediated virulence. Here, we describe a dual expression profile of the T6SS immunity protein-encoding genes tsiV1, tsiV2, and tsiV3 that provides pandemic V. cholerae strains with T6SS immunity and allows T6SS-silent strains to maintain immunity against attacks by T6SS-active bacterial neighbors. The dual expression profile allows transcription of the three genes encoding immunity proteins independently of other T6SS proteins encoded within the same operon. One of these immunity proteins, TsiV2, protects against the T6SS effector VasX which is encoded immediately upstream of tsiV2. VasX is a secreted, lipid-binding protein that we previously characterized with respect to T6SS-mediated virulence towards the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our data suggest the presence of an internal promoter in the open reading frame of vasX that drives expression of the downstream gene tsiV2. Furthermore, VasX is shown to act in conjunction with VasW, an accessory protein to VasX, to compromise the inner membrane of prokaryotic target cells. The dual regulatory profile of the T6SS immunity protein-encoding genes tsiV1, tsiV2, and tsiV3 permits V. cholerae to tightly control T6SS gene expression while maintaining immunity to T6SS activity.

  20. Experimental Ascaris suum infection in the pig: protective memory response after three immunizations and effect of intestinal adult worm population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Eriksen, Lis; Roepstorff, Allan

    1999-01-01

    The protective immune response to larval migration in pigs, with or without adult intestinal worm populations, 10 weeks after 3 weekly Ascaris suum inoculations, was studied in 45 pigs. Controlled adult worm populations were achieved by oral transfer of 10 adult worms to previously immunized pigs...... unreported 10 kDa band, specific to the L2 larval stage and egg hatch fluid, emerged in all pigs after challenge, while the major adult body fluid constituent, ABA-1, remained unrecognized. No significant effect of an intestinal adult worm burden on the larval recovery after a challenge inoculation...... or on the immune response before or after challenge inoculation could be detected. These results indicate that a significant protective memory immune response to A. suum challenge inoculation can be induced in pigs, and that this protective immunity is not significantly modulated by the presence of adult parasites...

  1. Recombinant Secreted Antigens from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Delivered as a Cocktail Vaccine Enhance the Immune Response of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Vanessa; Simionatto, Simone; Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Klabunde, Gustavo Henrique Ferrero; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), which is a respiratory disease responsible for huge economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. The commercially available vaccines provide only partial protection and are expensive. Thus, the development of alternatives for the prophylaxis of EP is critical for improving pig health. The use of multiple antigens in the same immunization may represent a promising alternative. In the present study, seven secreted proteins of M. hyopneumoniae were cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and evaluated for antigenicity using serum from naturally and experimentally infected pigs. In addition, the immunogenicity of the seven recombinant proteins delivered individually or in protein cocktail vaccines was evaluated in mice. In Western blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, most of the recombinant proteins evaluated were recognized by convalescent-phase serum from the animals, indicating that they are expressed during the infectious process. The recombinant proteins were also immunogenic, and most induced a mixed IgG1/IgG2a humoral immune response. The use of these proteins in a cocktail vaccine formulation enhanced the immune response compared to their use as antigens delivered individually, providing evidence of the efficacy of the multiple-antigen administration strategy for the induction of an immune response against M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:23803903

  2. Adaptation of Candida albicans to environmental pH induces cell wall remodelling and enhances innate immune recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Sherrington

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is able to proliferate in environments that vary dramatically in ambient pH, a trait required for colonising niches such as the stomach, vaginal mucosal and the GI tract. Here we show that growth in acidic environments involves cell wall remodelling which results in enhanced chitin and β-glucan exposure at the cell wall periphery. Unmasking of the underlying immuno-stimulatory β-glucan in acidic environments enhanced innate immune recognition of C. albicans by macrophages and neutrophils, and induced a stronger proinflammatory cytokine response, driven through the C-type lectin-like receptor, Dectin-1. This enhanced inflammatory response resulted in significant recruitment of neutrophils in an intraperitoneal model of infection, a hallmark of symptomatic vaginal colonisation. Enhanced chitin exposure resulted from reduced expression of the cell wall chitinase Cht2, via a Bcr1-Rim101 dependent signalling cascade, while increased β-glucan exposure was regulated via a non-canonical signalling pathway. We propose that this "unmasking" of the cell wall may induce non-protective hyper activation of the immune system during growth in acidic niches, and may attribute to symptomatic vaginal infection.

  3. Mucosal Immunity and Protective Efficacy of Intranasal Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Is Improved by Chitosan Nanoparticle Delivery in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Dhakal

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Annually, swine influenza A virus (SwIAV causes severe economic loss to swine industry. Currently used inactivated SwIAV vaccines administered by intramuscular injection provide homologous protection, but limited heterologous protection against constantly evolving field viruses, attributable to the induction of inadequate levels of mucosal IgA and cellular immune responses in the respiratory tract. A novel vaccine delivery platform using mucoadhesive chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs administered through intranasal (IN route has the potential to elicit strong mucosal and systemic immune responses in pigs. In this study, we evaluated the immune responses and cross-protective efficacy of IN chitosan encapsulated inactivated SwIAV vaccine in pigs. Killed SwIAV H1N2 (δ-lineage antigens (KAg were encapsulated in chitosan polymer-based nanoparticles (CNPs-KAg. The candidate vaccine was administered twice IN as mist to nursery pigs. Vaccinates and controls were then challenged with a zoonotic and virulent heterologous SwIAV H1N1 (γ-lineage. Pigs vaccinated with CNPs-KAg exhibited an enhanced IgG serum antibody and mucosal secretory IgA antibody responses in nasal swabs, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluids, and lung lysates that were reactive against homologous (H1N2, heterologous (H1N1, and heterosubtypic (H3N2 influenza A virus strains. Prior to challenge, an increased frequency of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, and recall IFN-γ secretion by restimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in CNPs-KAg compared to control KAg vaccinates were observed. In CNPs-KAg vaccinated pigs challenged with heterologous virus reduced severity of macroscopic and microscopic influenza-associated pulmonary lesions were observed. Importantly, the infectious SwIAV titers in nasal swabs [days post-challenge (DPC 4] and BAL fluid (DPC 6 were significantly (p < 0.05 reduced in CNPs-KAg vaccinates but not in KAg vaccinates when compared

  4. Enhancement of Zika virus pathogenesis by preexisting antiflavivirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Susana V; Bunduc, Paul; Tripathi, Shashank; Duehr, James; Frere, Justin J; Brown, Julia A; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Foster, Gregory A; Krysztof, David; Tortorella, Domenico; Stramer, Susan L; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Krammer, Florian; Lim, Jean K

    2017-04-14

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is spreading rapidly into regions around the world where other flaviviruses, such as dengue virus (DENV) and West Nile virus (WNV), are endemic. Antibody-dependent enhancement has been implicated in more severe forms of flavivirus disease, but whether this also applies to ZIKV infection is unclear. Using convalescent plasma from DENV- and WNV-infected individuals, we found substantial enhancement of ZIKV infection in vitro that was mediated through immunoglobulin G engagement of Fcγ receptors. Administration of DENV- or WNV-convalescent plasma into ZIKV-susceptible mice resulted in increased morbidity-including fever, viremia, and viral loads in spinal cord and testes-and increased mortality. Antibody-dependent enhancement may explain the severe disease manifestations associated with recent ZIKV outbreaks and highlights the need to exert great caution when designing flavivirus vaccines. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M

    2001-01-01

    to identify TAA, mice were immunized with mixtures of peptides representing putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from one of the gene products. Indeed, such immunized mice were partially protected against subsequent tumor challenge. Despite being immunized with bona fide self antigens, no clinical signs...... imprints, which may be used to identify patient-specific arrays of TAA. This may enable a multi-epitope based immunotherapy with improved prospects of clinical tumor rejection....

  6. A Probiotic Adjuvant Lactobacillus rhamnosus Enhances Specific Immune Responses after Ocular Mucosal Immunization with Chlamydial Polymorphic Membrane Protein C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Inic-Kanada

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the development of chlamydia vaccines, using live-attenuated or ultraviolet light-inactivated chlamydia, are paving the way for new possibilities to oppose the societal challenges posed by chlamydia-related diseases, such as blinding trachoma. An effective subunit vaccine would mitigate the risks associated with the use of a whole-cell vaccine. Our rationale for the design of an efficient subunit vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct is based on the membrane proteins involved in the initial Ct-host cell contact and on the route of immunization that mimics the natural infection process (i.e., via the ocular mucosa. The first aim of our study was to characterize the specific conjunctival and vaginal immune responses following eye drop immunization in BALB/c mice, using the N-terminal portion of the Ct serovar E polymorphic membrane protein C (N-PmpC as the subunit vaccine antigen. Second, we aimed to examine the adjuvant properties of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LB when formulated with N-PmpC. N-PmpC applied alone stimulated the production of N-PmpC- and Ct serovar B-specific antibodies in serum, tears and vaginal washes, whereas the combination with LB significantly enhanced these responses. The N-PmpC/LB combination initiated a T cell response characterized by an elevated percentage of CD25+ T cells and CD8+ effector T cells, enhanced CD4+ T-helper 1 skewing, and increased regulatory T cell responses. Together, these results show that eye drop vaccination with combined use of N-PmpC and a live probiotic LB stimulates specific cellular and humoral immune responses, not only locally in the conjunctiva but also in the vaginal mucosa, which could be a promising approach in Ct vaccine development.

  7. Immune response in bovine neosporosis: Protection or contribution to the pathogenesis of abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almería, Sonia; Serrano-Pérez, Beatriz; López-Gatius, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite with a preference for cattle and dogs as hosts. When N. caninum infection occurs in cattle it induces abortion, bovine neosporosis being a main cause of abortion worldwide. In dairy cattle, the economic burden of neosporosis-associated abortion is so great that it might results in closure of a farm. However, not all infected cows abort and it is not yet understood why this occurs. At present there is no effective treatment or vaccine. This review provides insights on how immune response against the parasite determines protection or contribution to abortion. Aspects on markers of risk of abortion are also discussed. Humoral immune responses are not protective against N. caninum but seropositivity and antibody level can be good markers for a diagnosis of bovine neosporosis and its associated abortion risk. In addition, humoral mechanisms against N. caninum infection and abortion differ in pure-breed and cross-breed pregnant dairy and beef cattle. Concentrations of Pregnancy Associated glycoprotein -2 (PAG-2) can also be used to predict abortion. A partially protective immune response encompasses increased IFN-γ expression, which has to be counterbalanced by other cytokines such as IL-12 and IL-10, especially towards the end of pregnancy. Although IFN-γ is required to limit parasite proliferation a critical threshold of the IFN-γ response is also required to limit adverse effects on pregnancy. In clinical terms, it may be stated that IFN-γ production and cross-breed pregnancy can protect Neospora-infected dairy cows against abortion. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The immune response against Chlamydia suis genital tract infection partially protects against re-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Evelien; Devriendt, Bert; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2014-09-25

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the characteristic features of genital Chlamydia suis infection and re-infection in female pigs by studying the immune response, pathological changes, replication of chlamydial bacteria in the genital tract and excretion of viable bacteria. Pigs were intravaginally infected and re-infected with C. suis strain S45, the type strain of this species. We demonstrated that S45 is pathogenic for the female urogenital tract. Chlamydia replication occurred throughout the urogenital tract, causing inflammation and pathology. Furthermore, genital infection elicited both cellular and humoral immune responses. Compared to the primo-infection of pigs with C. suis, re-infection was characterized by less severe macroscopic lesions and less chlamydial elementary bodies and inclusions in the urogenital tract. This indicates the development of a certain level of protection following the initial infection. Protective immunity against re-infection coincided with higher Chlamydia-specific IgG and IgA antibody titers in sera and vaginal secretions, higher proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), higher percentages of blood B lymphocytes, monocytes and CD8⁺ T cells and upregulated production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by PBMC.

  9. Chlamydial Type III Secretion System Needle Protein Induces Protective Immunity against Chlamydia muridarum Intravaginal Infection

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    Ekaterina A. Koroleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis imposes serious health problems and causes infertility. Because of asymptomatic onset, it often escapes antibiotic treatment. Therefore, vaccines offer a better option for the prevention of unwanted inflammatory sequelae. The existence of serologically distinct serovars of C. trachomatis suggests that a vaccine will need to provide protection against multiple serovars. Chlamydia spp. use a highly conserved type III secretion system (T3SS composed of structural and effector proteins which is an essential virulence factor. In this study, we expressed the T3SS needle protein of Chlamydia muridarum, TC_0037, an ortholog of C. trachomatis CdsF, in a replication-defective adenoviral vector (AdTC_0037 and evaluated its protective efficacy in an intravaginal Chlamydia muridarum model. For better immune responses, we employed a heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol in which mice were intranasally primed with AdTC_0037 and subcutaneously boosted with recombinant TC_0037 and Toll-like receptor 4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A mixed in a squalene nanoscale emulsion. We found that immunization with TC_0037 antigen induced specific humoral and T cell responses, decreased Chlamydia loads in the genital tract, and abrogated pathology of upper genital organs. Together, our results suggest that TC_0037, a highly conserved chlamydial T3SS protein, is a good candidate for inclusion in a Chlamydia vaccine.

  10. Immune responses and protection in children in developing countries induced by oral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Firdausi; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Sack, David A; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2013-01-07

    Oral mucosal vaccines have great promise for generating protective immunity against intestinal infections for the benefit of large numbers of people especially young children. There however appears to be a caveat since these vaccines have to overcome the inbuilt resistance of mucosal surfaces and secretions to inhibit antigen stimulation and responses. Unfortunately, these vaccines are not equally immunogenic nor protective in different populations. When compared to industrialized countries, children living in developing countries appear to have lower responses, but the reasons for these lowered responses are not clearly defined. The most likely explanations relate to undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, microbial overload on mucosal surfaces, alteration of microbiome and microbolom and irreversible changes on the mucosa as well as maternal antibodies in serum or breast milk may alter the mucosal pathology and lower immune responses to interventions using oral vaccines. The detrimental effect of adverse environment and malnutrition may bring about irreversible changes in the mucosa of children especially in the first 1000 days of life from conception to after birth and up to two years of age. This review aims to summarize the information available on lowered immune responses to mucosal vaccines and on interventions that may help address the constraints of these vaccines when they are used for children living under the greatest stress and under harmful adverse circumstances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E; O'Donnell, Aidan J; Cunningham, Emma J A

    2012-06-22

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns.

  12. Neonatal Fc Receptor Expression in Dendritic Cells Mediates Protective Immunity Against Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B.; Arthur, Janelle C.; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D.; Odze, Robert D.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. IgG and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system which we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DC) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8+ T cells which drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DC activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC) as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12 (IL-12), both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn–IgG IC interaction in murine and human DC. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance. PMID:24290911

  13. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E.; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns. PMID:22357264

  14. Elicitation of protective immune responses using a bivalent H5N1 VLP vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Ted M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently licensed human vaccines are subtype-specific and do not protect against pandemic H5N1 viruses. Previously, our group has reported on the construction of an influenza virus-like particle (VLP as a new generation candidate vaccine. A mixture of influenza H5N1 VLPs representing clade 1 and 2 viruses were examined for the ability to elicit protective immunity against isolates from various clades and subclades of H5N1. Results Mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with each VLP individually, the mixture of VLPs, a mixture of purified recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA, or mock vaccinated. Elicited antibodies were assayed for the hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI activity against clades 1 and clade 2 isolates. Mice vaccinated with each VLP individually or in a mixture had robust HAI responses against homologous viruses and HAI responses against the clade 2.3 virus, Anh/05. However, these vaccines did not induce an HAI response against the clade 2.2 virus, WS/05. Interestingly, clade 2 VLP vaccinated mice were protected against both clade 1 and 2 H5/PR8 viruses, but clade 1 VLP vaccinated mice were only protected against the clade 1 virus. Mice vaccinated with a mixture of VLPs were protected against both clade 1 and 2 viruses. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a mixture of rHA survived challenge, but lost ~15% of original weight by days 5–7 post-challenge. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a multivalent influenza VLP vaccine representing different genetic clades is a promising strategy to elicit protective immunity against isolates from emerging clades and subclades of H5N1.

  15. Protective immunity and safety of a genetically modified influenza virus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Polidoro Alves Barbosa

    Full Text Available Recombinant influenza viruses are promising viral platforms to be used as antigen delivery vectors. To this aim, one of the most promising approaches consists of generating recombinant viruses harboring partially truncated neuraminidase (NA segments. To date, all studies have pointed to safety and usefulness of this viral platform. However, some aspects of the inflammatory and immune responses triggered by those recombinant viruses and their safety to immunocompromised hosts remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we generated a recombinant influenza virus harboring a truncated NA segment (vNA-Δ and evaluated the innate and inflammatory responses and the safety of this recombinant virus in wild type or knock-out (KO mice with impaired innate (Myd88 -/- or acquired (RAG -/- immune responses. Infection using truncated neuraminidase influenza virus was harmless regarding lung and systemic inflammatory response in wild type mice and was highly attenuated in KO mice. We also demonstrated that vNA-Δ infection does not induce unbalanced cytokine production that strongly contributes to lung damage in infected mice. In addition, the recombinant influenza virus was able to trigger both local and systemic virus-specific humoral and CD8+ T cellular immune responses which protected immunized mice against the challenge with a lethal dose of homologous A/PR8/34 influenza virus. Taken together, our findings suggest and reinforce the safety of using NA deleted influenza viruses as antigen delivery vectors against human or veterinary pathogens.

  16. Interferon-gamma--central mediator of protective immune responses against the pre-erythrocytic and blood stage of malaria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCall, M.B.B.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Immune responses against Plasmodium parasites, the causative organisms of malaria, are traditionally dichotomized into pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage components. Whereas the central role of cellular responses in pre-erythrocytic immunity is well established, protection against blood-stage

  17. Enhancement of Immune Memory Responses to Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Unlimited Distribution 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Maintenance of long - term immunological memory against pathogens is crucial for the rapid...highly expressed in memory B cells in mice, and Atg7 is required for maintenance of long - term memory B cells needed to protect against influenza...remains unknown. Further, COPD exacerbation due to influenza results in large number of hospitalization and increased mortality in smokers. Completion of

  18. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 107 tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio < 1 was detected in the immunized mice before and after infection, indicative of a predominant T helper type 1 immune response, no increased production of interferon-γ was detected in the spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes of the immunized mice. Altogether, these results show that mucosal immunization with N. caninum membrane proteins plus CpG adjuvant protect against intragastrically established neosporosis and indicate that parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. PMID:24128071

  19. The immune enhancer, thymoquinone, and the hope of utilizing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... these results, this study suggests that enhancing the humoral activity by thymoquinone proved to be costly in terms of triggering follicular ... mosquito midgut is also a recent technology used as a tool to block transmission of ... to its essential oil components (Hajhashemi et al., 2004). The main compounds ...

  20. Immunization with Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae-live attenuated oocysts protect goat kids from clinical coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Antonio; Muñoz, María Carmen; Molina, José Manuel; Hermosilla, Carlos; Andrada, Marisa; Lara, Pedro; Bordón, Elisa; Pérez, Davinia; López, Adassa María; Matos, Lorena; Guedes, Aránzazu Carmen; Falcón, Soraya; Falcón, Yaiza; Martín, Sergio; Taubert, Anja

    2014-01-17

    Caprine coccidiosis, affecting mainly young goat kids around the weaning period, is worldwide the most important disease in the goat industry. Control of caprine coccidiosis is increasingly hampered by resistances developed against coccidiostatic drugs leading to an enhanced need for anticoccidial vaccines. In the current study we conducted an oral immunization trial with live attenuated sporulated Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae oocysts. Sporulated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts were attenuated by X-irradiation technique. The experimental design included a total of 18 goat kids divided into the following groups: (i) animals immunized with attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 5 weeks of age and challenged 3 weeks later with non-irradiated homologous oocysts (group 1); (ii) animals infected with non-attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 5 weeks of age and challenged 3 weeks later with non-attenuated homologous oocysts (group 2); (iii) animals primary-infected with untreated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 8 weeks of age (control of the challenge infection, group 3); (iv) non-infected control animals (group 4). Goat kids immunized with live attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts (group 1) excreted significantly less oocysts in the faeces (95.3% reduction) than kids infected with non-attenuated ones (group 2). Furthermore, immunization with live but attenuated oocysts resulted in ameliorated clinical coccidiosis compared to goat kids infected with untreated oocysts (group 2) and resulted in equally reduced signs of coccidiosis after challenge infection compared to acquired immunity driven by non-attenuated oocysts. Overall, the present study demonstrates for the first time that live attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts orally administered showed almost no pathogenicity but enough immunogenicity in terms of immunoprotection. Importantly, vaccinated animals still shed low amounts of oocysts, guaranteeing environmental contamination and consecutive booster

  1. Protective immune response of oral rabies vaccine in stray dogs, corsacs and steppe wolves after a single immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugunissov, K; Bulatov, Ye; Taranov, D; Yershebulov, Z; Koshemetov, Zh; Abduraimov, Ye; Kondibayeva, Zh; Samoltyrova, A; Amanova, Zh; Khairullin, B; Sansyzbay, A

    2017-11-01

    In this study the safety and protective immunity of an oral rabies vaccine, based on the live, modified rabies virus strain VRC-RZ2, was examined in stray dogs (Canis Sp.), corsacs (Vulpes corsac) and steppe wolves (Canis lupus campestris). In the safety group (dogs, n=6; corsacs, n=3; wolves, n=3) which was vaccinated with a 10-times field dose/animal, no animals showed any signs of disease or changes in behavior or appetite during the period of clinical observation, similar to the animals in the negative control group. Saliva samples taken from animals prior and post (5 th and 10 th days) vaccination failed to demonstrate rabies virus antigen. Observations of immunogenicity in vaccinated carnivores (dogs, corsacs and wolves) during a 180 day period showed the titers of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) in the blood sera of vaccinated dogs to be within 0.59-1.37 IU/mL. On 14 days post vaccination (dpv), all the wild carnivores had detectable levels of neutralizing antibodies, with mean titers ranging from 0.50 ± 0.07 IU/mL (for wolves) to 0.59 ± 0.10 IU/mL (for corsacs). Weeks after vaccination, all the vaccinated wolves and corsacs had higher levels of neutralizing antibodies: 0.70 ± 0.10 - 0.71 ± 0.08 IU/mL at 30 dpv, 1.06 ± 0.08 - 1.28 ± 0.21 IU/mL at 60 dpv and 0.41 ± 0.09 - 047 ± 0.06 at 180 dpv. The highest level of VNA (˃1.0 IU/ml) was detected at 60 dpv, in all vaccinated animals. After challenge all vaccinated dogs remained healthy for 180 days. Control animals (unvaccinated dogs) developed symptoms of rabies on day 6 post administration of a virulent virus and died of rabies on days 11-13. Of note, the VNA titers in all the wild carnivores (corsacs and wolves) immunized with VRC-RZ2 were higher than 0.5 IU/ml (0.59 ± 0.11 IU/ml), even as early as 14 days post vaccination. These, presumably protective, titers of antibodies to rabies virus were present in the dogs and wild carnivores examined in this study for at

  2. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  3. Host immunity in the protective response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paessler Slobodan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed initial cell, cytokine and complement depletion studies to investigate the possible role of these effectors in response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei in a susceptible BALB/c mouse model of infection. Results While protection with heat-killed bacilli did not result in sterilizing immunity, limited protection was afforded against an otherwise lethal infection and provided insight into potential host protective mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that mice depleted of either B cells, TNF-α or IFN-γ exhibited decreased survival rates, indicating a role for these effectors in obtaining partial protection from a lethal challenge by the intraperitoneal route. Additionally, complement depletion had no effect on immunoglobulin production when compared to non-complement depleted controls infected intranasally. Conclusion The data provide a basis for future studies of protection via vaccination using either subunit or whole-organism vaccine preparations from lethal infection in the experimental BALB/c mouse model. The results of this study demonstrate participation of B220+ cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α in protection following HK vaccination.

  4. Immunization with cholera toxin B subunit induces high-level protection in the suckling mouse model of cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Price

    Full Text Available Cholera toxin (CT is the primary virulence factor responsible for severe cholera. Vibrio cholerae strains unable to produce CT show severe attenuation of virulence in animals and humans. The pentameric B subunit of CT (CTB contains the immunodominant epitopes recognized by antibodies that neutralize CT. Although CTB is a potent immunogen and a promising protective vaccine antigen in animal models, immunization of humans with detoxified CT failed to protect against cholera. We recently demonstrated however that pups reared from mice immunized intraperitoneally (IP with 3 doses of recombinant CTB were well protected against a highly lethal challenge dose of V. cholerae N16961. The present study investigated how the route and number of immunizations with CTB could influence protective efficacy in the suckling mouse model of cholera. To this end female mice were immunized with CTB intranasally (IN, IP, and subcutaneously (SC. Serum and fecal extracts were analyzed for anti-CTB antibodies by quantitative ELISA, and pups born to immunized mothers were challenged orogastrically with a lethal dose of V. cholerae. Pups from all immunized groups were highly protected from death by 48 hours (64-100% survival. Cox regression showed that percent body weight loss at 24 hours predicted death by 48 hours, but we were unable to validate a specific amount of weight loss as a surrogate marker for protection. Although CTB was highly protective in all regimens, three parenteral immunizations showed trends toward higher survival and less weight loss at 24 hours post infection. These results demonstrate that immunization with CTB by any of several routes and dosing regimens can provide protection against live V. cholerae challenge in the suckling mouse model of cholera. Our data extend the results of previous studies and provide additional support for the inclusion of CTB in the development of a subunit vaccine against V. cholerae.

  5. Immunization of mice with YscF provides protection from Yersinia pestis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley David S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a pathogen with a tremendous ability to cause harm and panic in populations. Due to the severity of plague and its potential for use as a bioweapon, better preventatives and therapeutics for plague are desirable. Subunit vaccines directed against the F1 capsular antigen and the V antigen (also known as LcrV of Y. pestis are under development. However, these new vaccine formulations have some possible limitations. The F1 antigen is not required for full virulence of Y. pestis and LcrV has a demonstrated immunosuppressive effect. These limitations could damper the ability of F1/LcrV based vaccines to protect against F1-minus Y. pestis strains and could lead to a high rate of undesired side effects in vaccinated populations. For these reasons, the use of other antigens in a plague vaccine formulation may be advantageous. Results Desired features in vaccine candidates would be antigens that are conserved, essential for virulence and accessible to circulating antibody. Several of the proteins required for the construction or function of the type III secretion system (TTSS complex could be ideal contenders to meet the desired features of a vaccine candidate. Accordingly, the TTSS needle complex protein, YscF, was selected to investigate its potential as a protective antigen. In this study we describe the overexpression, purification and use of YscF as a protective antigen. YscF immunization triggers a robust antibody response to YscF and that antibody response is able to afford significant protection to immunized mice following challenge with Y. pestis. Additionally, evidence is presented that suggests antibody to YscF is likely not protective by blocking the activity of the TTSS. Conclusion In this study we investigated YscF, a surface-expressed protein of the Yersinia pestis type III secretion complex, as a protective antigen against experimental plague infection. Immunization of

  6. Why does silane enhance the protective properties of epoxy films?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Schaefer, Dale W

    2008-12-02

    Using neutron reflectivity, the protection mechanisms of a novel one-step epoxy-silane coating system were investigated in terms of coating structure and water response behavior. By comparing pure epoxy and epoxy-silane mixtures in various aqueous environments, the effects of the addition of silane were determined. Specifically, a bridged bis-silane coupling agent with six alkoxy moieties and a polysulfur bridge was investigated. The key mechanisms of silane-enhanced protection are (1) the silane is enriched at the substrate-coating interface, forming a hydrophobic dense interfacial layer and good adhesion to the substrate, and (2) the silane serves as a cross-linker, resulting in a denser and less hydrophilic bulk film compared to the neat epoxy. The hydrophobic nature of bis-sulfur silane also increases the overall hydrophobicity of the mixed film.

  7. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Andrea da; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19 + B, CD3 + CD4 + or CD3 + CD8 + T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19 + or CD3 + CD8 + lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3 + CD4 + (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  8. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Andrea da; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: andreacosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Medicina Tropical; Zorgi, Nahiara Estevez [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19{sup +} B, CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  9. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  10. Enhanced pulmonary immunization with aerosolized inactivated influenza vaccine containing delta inulin adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugappan, Senthil; Frijlink, Henderik W; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2015-01-23

    Vaccination is the primary intervention to contain influenza virus spread during seasonal and pandemic outbreaks. Pulmonary vaccination is gaining increasing attention for its ability to induce both local mucosal and systemic immune responses without the need for invasive injections. However, pulmonary administration of whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine induces a Th2 dominant systemic immune response while a more balanced Th1/Th2 vaccine response may be preferred and only induces modest nasal immunity. This study evaluated immunity elicited by pulmonary versus intramuscular (i.m.) delivery of WIV, and tested whether the immune response could be improved by co-administration of delta (δ)-inulin, a novel carbohydrate-based particulate adjuvant. After pulmonary administration both unadjuvanted and δ-inulin adjuvanted WIV induced a potent systemic immune response, inducing higher serum anti-influenza IgG titers and nasal IgA titers than i.m. administration. Moreover, the addition of δ-inulin induced a more balanced Th1/Th2 response and induced higher nasal IgA titers versus pulmonary WIV alone. Pulmonary WIV alone or with δ-inulin induced hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers>40, titers which are considered protective against influenza virus. In conclusion, in this study we have shown that δ-inulin adjuvanted WIV induces a better immune response after pulmonary administration than vaccine alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of immune protective genes of Eimeria maxima through cDNA expression library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XinChao; Li, MengHui; Liu, JianHua; Ji, YiHong; Li, XiangRui; Xu, LiXin; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai

    2017-02-16

    Eimeria maxima is one of the most prevalent Eimeria species causing avian coccidiosis, and results in huge economic loss to the global poultry industry. Current control strategies, such as anti-coccidial medication and live vaccines have been limited because of their drawbacks. The third generation anticoccidial vaccines including the recombinant vaccines as well as DNA vaccines have been suggested as a promising alternative strategy. To date, only a few protective antigens of E. maxima have been reported. Hence, there is an urgent need to identify novel protective antigens of E. maxima for the development of neotype anticoccidial vaccines. With the aim of identifying novel protective genes of E. maxima, a cDNA expression library of E. maxima sporozoites was constructed using Gateway technology. Subsequently, the cDNA expression library was divided into 15 sub-libraries for cDNA expression library immunization (cDELI) using parasite challenged model in chickens. Protective sub-libraries were selected for the next round of screening until individual protective clones were obtained, which were further sequenced and analyzed. Adopting the Gateway technology, a high-quality entry library was constructed, containing 9.2 × 10 6 clones with an average inserted fragments length of 1.63 kb. The expression library capacity was 2.32 × 10 7 colony-forming units (cfu) with an average inserted fragments length of 1.64 Kb. The expression library was screened using parasite challenged model in chickens. The screening yielded 6 immune protective genes including four novel protective genes of EmJS-1, EmRP, EmHP-1 and EmHP-2, and two known protective genes of EmSAG and EmCKRS. EmJS-1 is the selR domain-containing protein of E. maxima whose function is unknown. EmHP-1 and EmHP-2 are the hypothetical proteins of E. maxima. EmRP and EmSAG are rhomboid-like protein and surface antigen glycoproteins of E. maxima respectively, and involved in invasion of the parasite. Our

  12. Vaccination of goats with fresh extract from Sarcoptes scabiei confers partial protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Protective immunity has been known to develop in animals infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. However, our previous attempt to induce protective immunity in goats by vaccination with fractions of soluble or insoluble mite proteins had been unsuccessful. Degradation or denaturation of protective antigens occurred during vaccine preparation was suggested as one possible cause of the failure. In this study, mite proteins that used to immunise animals were prepared rapidly in order to prevent protein degradation or denaturation. About 150 mg of freshly isolated mites were rapidly homogenised, centrifuged then separated into supernatant and pellet fractions. Twenty-eight goats were allocated equally into 4 groups. Group-1 goats were vaccinated with the whole mite homogenate supernatant, group 2 with the supernatant, group 3 with the pellet, and group 4 with PBS (unvaccinated control. Vaccination was conducted three times, with three-week intervals between vaccinations, using Quil A as adjuvant, and each vaccination using fresh mite homogenates. One week after the last vaccination, all animals were challenged with approximately 2000 live mites. The severity of lesions, scored from 0 (no lesions to 5 (>75% infested auricle affected, were determined one day, two days, then every week after challenge. Mite challenge caused the development of skin lesions in all animals. No significant differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated animals were observed in regards to the severity of lesions. However, the mite densities in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (P=0.015 than those in unvaccinated control. This study indicates that the protective antigens of S. scabiei are liable to degradation or denaturation and exist in a very low concentration or have vary low antigenicity. This implies isolation of the protective antigens by the conventional approach, fracionation of the whole mite proteins and testing each fractions in vaccination trials, is

  13. Sendai Virus Mucosal Vaccination Establishes Lung-Resident Memory CD8 T Cell Immunity and Boosts BCG-Primed Protection against TB in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhidong; Wong, Ka-Wing; Zhao, Hui-Min; Wen, Han-Li; Ji, Ping; Ma, Hui; Wu, Kang; Lu, Shui-Hua; Li, Feng; Li, Zhong-Ming; Shu, Tsugumine; Xu, Jian-Qing; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2017-05-03

    Accumulating evidence has shown the protective role of CD8 + T cells in vaccine-induced immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) despite controversy over their role in natural immunity. However, the current vaccine BCG is unable to induce sufficient CD8 + T cell responses, especially in the lung. Sendai virus, a respiratory RNA virus, is here engineered firstly as a novel recombinant anti-TB vaccine (SeV85AB) that encodes Mtb immuno-dominant antigens, Ag85A and Ag85B. A single mucosal vaccination elicited potent antigen-specific T cell responses and a degree of protection against Mtb challenge similar to the effect of BCG in mice. Depletion of CD8 + T cells abrogated the protective immunity afforded by SeV85AB vaccination. Interestingly, only SeV85AB vaccination induced high levels of lung-resident memory CD8 + T (T RM ) cells, and this led to a rapid and strong recall of antigen-specific CD8 + T cell responses against Mtb challenge infection. Furthermore, when used in a BCG prime-SeV85AB boost strategy, SeV85AB vaccine significantly enhanced protection above that seen after BCG vaccination alone. Our findings suggest that CD8 + T RM cells that arise in lungs responding to this mucosal vaccination might help to protect against TB, and SeV85AB holds notable promise to improve BCG's protective efficacy in a prime-boost immunization regimen. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxazolone-induced contact hypersensitivity reduces lymphatic drainage but enhances the induction of adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aebischer

    Full Text Available Contact hypersensitivity (CHS induced by topical application of haptens is a commonly used model to study dermal inflammatory responses in mice. Several recent studies have indicated that CHS-induced skin inflammation triggers lymphangiogenesis but may negatively impact the immune-function of lymphatic vessels, namely fluid drainage and dendritic cell (DC migration to draining lymph nodes (dLNs. On the other hand, haptens have been shown to exert immune-stimulatory activity by inducing DC maturation. In this study we investigated how the presence of pre-established CHS-induced skin inflammation affects the induction of adaptive immunity in dLNs. Using a mouse model of oxazolone-induced skin inflammation we observed that lymphatic drainage was reduced and DC migration from skin to dLNs was partially compromised. At the same time, a significantly stronger adaptive immune response towards ovalbumin (OVA was induced when immunization had occurred in CHS-inflamed skin as compared to uninflamed control skin. In fact, immunization with sterile OVA in CHS-inflamed skin evoked a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response comparable to the one induced by conventional immunization with OVA and adjuvant in uninflamed skin. Striking phenotypic and functional differences were observed when comparing DCs from LNs draining uninflamed or CHS-inflamed skin. DCs from LNs draining CHS-inflamed skin expressed higher levels of co-stimulatory molecules and MHC molecules, produced higher levels of the interleukin-12/23 p40 subunit (IL-12/23-p40 and more potently induced T cell activation in vitro. Immunization experiments revealed that blockade of IL-12/23-p40 during the priming phase partially reverted the CHS-induced enhancement of the adaptive immune response. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHS-induced skin inflammation generates an overall immune-stimulatory milieu, which outweighs the potentially suppressive effect of reduced lymphatic vessel function.

  15. Passive immunization to outer membrane proteins MLP and PAL does not protect mice from sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Catherine H; Hellman, Judith; Beasley-Topliffe, Laura K; Bagchi, Aranya; Warren, H Shaw

    2006-01-01

    Multiple older studies report that immunoglobulin directed to rough mutant bacteria, such as E. coli J5, provides broad protection against challenge with heterologous strains of Gram-negative bacteria. This protection was initially believed to occur through binding of immunoglobulin to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in attempting to develop clinically-effective anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies without success, and no study has shown that IgG from this antiserum binds LPS. Identification of the protective mechanism would facilitate development of broadly protective human monoclonal antibodies for treating sepsis. IgG from this antiserum binds 2 bacterial outer membrane proteins: murein lipoprotein (MLP) and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL). Both of these outer membrane proteins are highly conserved, have lipid domains that are anchored in the bacterial membrane, are shed from bacteria in blebs together with LPS, and activate cells through Toll-like receptor 2. Our goal in the current work was to determine if passive immunization directed to MLP and PAL protects mice from Gram-negative sepsis. Neither monoclonal nor polyclonal IgG directed to MLP or PAL conferred survival protection in 3 different models of sepsis: cecal ligation and puncture, an infected burn model, and an infected fibrin clot model mimicking peritonitis. Our results are not supportive of the hypothesis that either anti-MLP or anti-PAL IgG are the protective antibodies in the previously described anti-rough mutant bacterial antisera. These studies suggest that a different mechanism of protection is involved.

  16. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol Dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis.

  17. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis. PMID:28267809

  18. Protective immune responses of recombinant VP2 subunit antigen of infectious bursal disease virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Satya Narayan; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Roy, Parimal; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri; Antony, Usha

    2012-08-15

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of Gumboro disease and poses a huge threat to poultry industry. The risks associated with conventional attenuated viral vaccines make it indispensable to probe into the development of novel and rationally designed subunit vaccines which are safer as well as effective. VP2 is the major host-protective antigen found in IBDV capsid. It encompasses different independent epitopes responsible for the induction of neutralizing antibody. Here, we report the efficacy of the immunodominant fragment of VP2 which induces both humoral and cellular immunity against infectious bursal disease. A 366 bp fragment (52-417 bp) of the VP2 gene from an IBDV field isolate was amplified and expressed in Escherichia coli as a 21 kDa recombinant protein. The efficacy of rVP2(52-417) antigen was compared with two commercial IBDV whole virus vaccine strains. The rVP2(52-417) induced significantly high antibody titres in chicken compared to commercial vaccines and the anti-rVP2(52-417) sera showed reactivity with viral antigens from both commercial strains (P<0.0001) and field isolates. Also, the chicken splenocytes from rVP2(52-417) immunized group showed a significantly high proliferation (P<0.01) compared to other groups, which implies that the rVP2(52-417) fragment contains immunogenic epitopes capable of eliciting both B and T cell responses. Further, rVP2(52-417) conferred 100% protection against vIBDV challenge in the immunized chickens which was significantly higher (P<0.001) compared to 55-60% protection by commercial vaccine strains. Hence, the study confirms the efficacy of the immunodominant VP2 fragment that could be used as a potent vaccine against IBDV infection in chicken. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ‘Trans-generational immune priming’: specific enhancement of the antimicrobial immune response in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Yannick

    2006-01-01

    Encounters with parasites and pathogens are often unpredictable in time. However, experience of an infection may provide the host with reliable cues about the future risk of infection for the host itself or for its progeny. If the parental environment predicts the quality of the progeny's environment, then parents may further enhance their net reproductive success by differentially providing their offspring with phenotypes to cope with potential hazards such as pathogen infection. Here, I test for the occurrence of such an adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. A pathogenic environment was mimicked by injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides for two generations of insects. I found that parental challenge enhanced offspring immunity through the inducible production of antimicrobial peptides in the haemolymph. PMID:16777729

  1. "Trans-generational immune priming": specific enhancement of the antimicrobial immune response in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Yannick

    2006-06-07

    Encounters with parasites and pathogens are often unpredictable in time. However, experience of an infection may provide the host with reliable cues about the future risk of infection for the host itself or for its progeny. If the parental environment predicts the quality of the progeny's environment, then parents may further enhance their net reproductive success by differentially providing their offspring with phenotypes to cope with potential hazards such as pathogen infection. Here, I test for the occurrence of such an adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. A pathogenic environment was mimicked by injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides for two generations of insects. I found that parental challenge enhanced offspring immunity through the inducible production of antimicrobial peptides in the haemolymph.

  2. Innovative vaccination protocol against vibriosis in Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) juveniles: improvement of immune parameters and protection to challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Marco; Romano, Nicla; Volpatti, Donatella; Bulfon, Chiara; Brunetti, Andrea; Tiscar, Pietro Giorgio; Mosca, Francesco; Bertoni, Fabrizio; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella; Abelli, Luigi

    2013-02-06

    The effect of vaccination on immune parameters of European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, is not fully established, as well as surveyed throughout rearing till the commercial size. Furthermore, available information on the possible role of booster treatments is scarce. Sea bass juveniles were vaccinated against Listonella anguillarum using a commercial bivalent formulation administered by immersion (priming: 95 dph; booster: 165 dph) or by immersion (priming: 95 dph; booster: 165 dph) and subsequent i.p. injection (booster: 233 dph). Serum specific IgM and numbers of IgM(+) cells in head kidney and spleen evidenced B-cell responses mainly after the immersion booster, accompanied by increased TcR-β transcripts and leucocyte respiratory burst. Immune enhancement was confirmed by the protection towards i.p. challenges with a virulent strain. RPS accounted for >70% in fish immersion-boosted and near 100% in fish further boosted i.p. Differently from usual farm practices, this innovative vaccination protocol proved to be highly effective. Booster treatments are therefore strongly recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  4. Biodegradable nanoparticle-entrapped vaccine induces cross-protective immune response against a virulent heterologous respiratory viral infection in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Dwivedi

    Full Text Available Biodegradable nanoparticle-based vaccine development research is unexplored in large animals and humans. In this study, we illustrated the efficacy of nanoparticle-entrapped UV-killed virus vaccine against an economically important respiratory viral disease of pigs called porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. We entrapped PLGA [poly (lactide-co-glycolides] nanoparticles with killed PRRSV antigens (Nano-KAg and detected its phagocytosis by pig alveolar macrophages. Single doses of Nano-KAg vaccine administered intranasally to pigs upregulated innate and PRRSV specific adaptive responses. In a virulent heterologous PRRSV challenge study, Nano-KAg vaccine significantly reduced the lung pathology and viremia, and the viral load in the lungs. Immunologically, enhanced innate and adaptive immune cell population and associated cytokines with decreased secretion of immunosuppressive mediators were observed at both mucosal sites and blood. In summary, we demonstrated the benefits of intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based viral vaccine in eliciting cross-protective immune response in pigs, a potential large animal model.

  5. Molecular events by which dendritic cells promote Th2 immune protection in helmith infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    Helminth parasites are a major cause of global infectious diseases, affecting nearly one quarter of the world's population. The common feature of helminth infections is to skew the immune system towards a T-helper 2 (Th2) response that helps to control disease. Dendritic cells (DCs), which are professional antigen-presenting cells, play a critical role for Th2 skewing against helminth parasites. However, the molecular mechanisms by which helminth antigens activate DCs for Th2 polarization have not yet been clearly defined. This review provides a focused update on the major role of DCs for inducing and/or enhancing Th2 immune responses in helminthic infection and will discuss the main signalling-dependent and independent mechanisms by which helminth antigens activate DCs for Th2 skewing.

  6. Helminth Protein Vaccine Induced Follicular T Helper Cell for Enhancement of Humoral Immunity against Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein vaccines combined with adjuvants have been widely used to induce immune responses, especially the humoral immune response, against molecular targets including parasites. Follicular T helper (Tfh cells are the specialized providers of B-cell help, however, the induction of Tfh cells in protein vaccination has been rarely studied. Here, we report that the Schistosoma japonicum recombinant protein (SjGST-32 combined with tacrolimus (FK506 augmented the induction of Tfh cells, which expressed the canonical markers CXCR5, BCL6, and IL-21, and enhanced the humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the expression of IL-21R on germinal center (GC B cells and memory B cells increased in immunized mice, which indicated that IL-21 from the induced Tfh cells interacted with IL-21R for activation of B cells and maintenance of long-lived humoral immunity. Our results suggest that helminth protein vaccine combined with FK506 induces Tfh cell for stimulating humoral immune responses and inducing long-lived humoral immunity.

  7. Heat killed multi-serotype Shigella immunogens induced humoral immunity and protection against heterologous challenge in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Barman, Soumik; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Shinoda, Sumio; Chakrabarti, M K; Koley, Hemanta

    2015-11-01

    Recently we have shown the homologous protective efficacy of heat killed multi-serotype Shigella (HKMS) immunogens in a guinea pig colitis model. In our present study, we have advanced our research by immunizing rabbits with a reduced number of oral doses and evaluating the host's adaptive immune responses. The duration of immunogenicity and subsequently protective efficacy was determined against wild type heterologous Shigella strains in a rabbit luminal model. After three successive oral immunizations with HKMS immunogens, serum and lymphocyte supernatant antibody titer against the heterologous shigellae were reciprocally increased and remained at an elevated level up to 180 days. Serogroup and serotype specific O-antigen of lipopolysaccharide and immunogenic proteins of heterologous challenge strains were detected by immunoblot assay. Up-regulation of IL-12p35, IFN-γ and IL-10 mRNA expression was detected in immunized rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after stimulation with HKMS in vitro. HKMS-specific plasma cell response was confirmed by production of a relatively higher level of HKMS-specific IgG in immunized PBMC supernatant compared to control group. Furthermore, the immunized groups of rabbits exhibited complete protection against wild type heterologous shigellae challenge. Thus HKMS immunogens induced humoral and Th1-mediated adaptive immunity and provided complete protection in a rabbit model. These immunogens could be a broad spectrum non-living vaccine candidate for human use in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 10(7) tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio neosporosis and indicate that parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Enhancement of radiological protection through an internal quality assessment cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Filipe Morais de; Gama, Zenewton Andre da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the level of quality in radiation protection of patients during radiological examination, evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at enhancing the quality of such a protection. Materials and Methods: A quality improvement cycle was implemented in a radiology service of the Regional Health Administration, in Algarve, Portugal. Based on six quality criteria, an initial evaluation was performed and followed by an intervention focused on the most problematic points (over an eight-month period) and a subsequent quality reassessment. A random sampling (n = 60) has allowed the authors to infer the point estimates and confidence intervals for each criterion, as well as calculating the statistical significance of the results by means of the Z-test. Results: Initially, deficiencies were observed in relation to all the quality criteria. After the intervention, a minimum relative improvement of 33% was observed in five of the six criteria, with statistical significance (p < 0.05) in two of them. The absolute frequency of noncompliance decreased from 38 (first evaluation) to 21 (second evaluation), corresponding to a 44.7% improvement. Conclusion: The first institutional evaluation cycle showed a seemingly incipient improvement margin. However, the implemented intervention was effective in stimulating good practices and improving the level of radiological protection of patients. (author)

  10. Constructing vulnerabilty and protective measures indices for the enhanced critical infrastructure protection program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R. E.; Buehring, W. A.; Whitfield, R. G.; Bassett, G. W.; Dickinson, D. C.; Haffenden, R. A.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; LANL

    2009-10-14

    The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) - and to conduct site visits for these and other high-risk assets as part of the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) Program. During each such visit, the PSA documents information about the facility's current CIKR protection posture and overall security awareness. The primary goals for ECIP site visits (DHS 2009) are to: (1) inform facility owners and operators of the importance of their facilities as an identified high-priority CIKR and the need to be vigilant in light of the ever-present threat of terrorism; (2) identify protective measures currently in place at these facilities, provide comparisons of CIKR protection postures across like assets, and track the implementation of new protective measures; and (3) enhance existing relationships among facility owners and operators; DHS; and various Federal, State, local tribal, and territorial partners. PSAs conduct ECIP visits to assess overall site security; educate facility owners and operators about security; help owners and operators identify gaps and potential improvements; and promote communication and information sharing among facility owners and operators, DHS, State governments, and other security partners. Information collected during ECIP visits is used to develop metrics; conduct sector-by-sector and cross-sector vulnerability comparisons; identify security gaps and trends across CIKR sectors and subsectors; establish sector baseline security survey results; and track progress toward improving CIKR security through activities, programs, outreach, and training (Snyder 2009). The data being collected are used in a framework consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) risk criteria (DHS 2009). The

  11. Immunity induced shortly after DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against rhabdoviruses protects against heterologous virus but not against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2002-01-01

    It was recently reported that DNA vaccination of rainbow trout fingerlings against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) induced protection within 8 days after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA. In order to analyse the specificity of this early immunity, fish were vaccinated with plasmid...... DNA encoding the VHSV or the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein genes and later challenged with homologous or heterologous pathogens. Challenge experiments revealed that immunity established shortly after vaccination was cross-protective between the two viral pathogens...... whereas no increased survival was found upon challenge with bacterial pathogens. Within two months after vaccination, the cross-protection disappeared while the specific immunity to homologous virus remained high. The early immunity induced by the DNA vaccines thus appeared to involve short-lived non...

  12. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  13. Leishmania infantum FML pulsed-dendritic cells induce a protective immune response in murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholam-Reza; Sarkari, Bahador; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of FML loaded dendritic cells (DCs) in protection against visceral leishmaniasis. Mice were immunized with FML- or soluble Leishmania antigen-loaded DCs as well as FML or soluble Leishmania antigen in saponin and challenged with parasite. The levels of cytokines before and after challenge were detected by ELISA. Parasite burden (total Leishman-Donovan unit) was determined after parasite challenge. FML-saponin induced the highest IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio among vaccinated groups, though this ratio was higher in FML-loaded DCs group subsequent to challenge with Leishmania infantum. Moreover, the greatest reduction in parasite number was detected in mice vaccinated with FML-loaded DCs compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice (p = 0.002). FML-loaded DCs are one of the promising tools for protection against murine visceral leishmaniasis.

  14. Immunization with LJM11 salivary protein protects against infection with Leishmania braziliensis in the presence of Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Jurema M; Abbehusen, Melissa; Suarez, Martha; Valenzuela, Jesus; Teixeira, Clarissa R; Brodskyn, Cláudia I

    2018-01-01

    Leishmania is transmitted in the presence of sand fly saliva. Protective immunity generated by saliva has encouraged identification of a vector salivary-based vaccine. Previous studies have shown that immunization with LJM11, a salivary protein from Lutzomyia longipalpis, is able to induce a Th1 immune response and protect mice against bites of Leishmania major-infected Lutzomyia longipalpis. Here, we further investigate if immunization with LJM11 recombinant protein is able to confer cross-protection against infection with Leishmania braziliensis associated with salivary gland sonicate (SGS) from Lutzomyia intermedia or Lu. longipalpis. Mice immunized with LJM11 protein exhibited an increased production of anti-LJM11 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a and a DTH response characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate with the presence of CD4 + IFN-γ + T cells. LJM11-immunized mice were intradermally infected in the ear with L. braziliensis in the presence of Lu. longipalpis or Lu. intermedia SGS. A significant reduction of parasite numbers in the ear and lymph node in the group challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. longipalpis SGS was observed, but not when the challenge was performed with L. braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia SGS. A higher specific production of IFN-γ and absence of IL-10 by lymph node cells were only observed in LJM11 immunized mice after infection. After two weeks, a similar frequency of CD4 + IFN-γ + T cells was detected in LJM11 and BSA groups challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. longipalpis SGS, suggesting that early events possibly triggered by immunization are essential for protection against Leishmania infection. Our findings support the specificity of saliva-mediated immune responses and reinforce the importance of identifying cross-protective salivary antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunization with mannosylated peptide induces poor T cell effector functions despite enhanced antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kel, J.M.; Geus, E.D. de; Stipdonk, M.J. van; Drijfhout, J.W.; Koning, F.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the development of T cell responses in mice after administration of a mannosylated ovalbumin peptide (M-OVA323-339). Immunization with M-OVA323-339 in complete adjuvant resulted in enhanced antigen presentation in draining lymph nodes. Monitoring the fate of

  16. Dermatopathology of Caprine Scabies and Protective Immunity in Sensitised Goats Against Sarcoptes scabiei Reinfestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare macroscopic dermatopathology in naïve and sensitised goats, and to assess protective immunity possessed by sensitised goats against Sarcoptes scabiei challenge. Eighteen goats were allocated evenly into 3 groups; group 1 sensitised with the mite twice, group 2 once and group 3 was not sensitised (naïve. Sensitisation was done by infesting goats with the mites on the auricle and infestation was allowed to progress for 7 weeks, then the goats were treated with Ivermectin to obtain complete recovery. After sensitisation, all sensitised and naïve goats were infested with the mites on the auricles. Infestation in the sensitised goat caused severe immediate hypersensitivity that resulted in severe peracute pustular dermatitis. After one week, however, the lesion waned slowly. At 7 weeks post infestation, the remnant of lesion could only be perceived by palpation on the primary site of infestation as a mild papular dermatitis. Infestation on the naïve goats, in contrast, produced slowly progressing lesions which at 7-week post infestation, it ended up with severe crusted scabies affecting almost the whole skin. Antigens responsible for the immediate hypersensitivity which are supposedly contained in the mite secretions or excretions are immunologically protective but unlikely to have the capacity to induce a complete protection against mite challenge in immunised animals. This notion is based on the fact obtained from this study that goats sensitised twice did not possess a higher immune protection against mite challenge than goats sensitised once.

  17. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  18. An Alphavirus Vector-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Rapid and Protective Immune Response in Macaques That Differs Qualitatively from Immunity Induced by Live Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariol, Carlos A.; Mattocks, Melissa D.; Wahala M. P. B., Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L.; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V.; Martinez, Melween I.; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans. PMID:23302884

  19. Vaccination with antioxidant enzymes confers protective immunity against challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip T LoVerde

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni, an intravascular parasite, lives in a hostile environment in close contact with host humoral and cellular cytotoxic factors. To establish itself in the host, the parasite has evolved a number of immune evasion mechanisms, such as antioxidant enzymes. Our laboratory has demonstrated that the expression of antioxidant enzymes is developmentally regulated, with the highest levels present in the adult worm, the stage least susceptible to immune elimination, and the lowest levels in the larval stages, the most susceptible to immune elimination. Vaccination of mice with naked DNA constructs containing Cu/Zn cytosolic superoxide dismutase (CT-SOD, signal-peptide containing SOD or glutathione peroxidase (GPX showed significant levels of protection compared to a control group. We have further shown that vaccination with SmCT-SOD but not SmGPX results in elimination of adult worms. Anti-oxidant enzyme vaccine candidates offer an advance over existing vaccine strategies that all seem to target the larval developmental stages in that they target adult worms and thus may have therapeutic as well as prophylactic value. To eliminate the potential for cross-reactivity of SmCT-SOD with human superoxide dismutase, we identified parasite-specific epitope-containing peptides. Our results serve as a basis for developing a subunit vaccine against schistosomiasis.

  20. PML-RARA-targeted DNA vaccine induces protective immunity in a mouse model of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Rose Ann; Larghero, Jerome; Robin, Marie; le Pogam, Carol; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Muszlak, Sacha; Fric, Jan; West, Robert; Rousselot, Philippe; Phan, Thi Hai; Mudde, Liesbeth; Teisserenc, Helene; Carpentier, Antoine F; Kogan, Scott; Degos, Laurent; Pla, Marika; Bishop, J Michael; Stevenson, Freda; Charron, Dominique; Chomienne, Christine

    2003-11-01

    Despite improved molecular characterization of malignancies and development of targeted therapies, acute leukemia is not curable and few patients survive more than 10 years after diagnosis. Recently, combinations of different therapeutic strategies (based on mechanisms of apoptosis, differentiation and cytotoxicity) have significantly increased survival. To further improve outcome, we studied the potential efficacy of boosting the patient's immune response using specific immunotherapy. In an animal model of acute promyelocytic leukemia, we developed a DNA-based vaccine by fusing the human promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML-RARA) oncogene to tetanus fragment C (FrC) sequences. We show for the first time that a DNA vaccine specifically targeted to an oncoprotein can have a pronounced effect on survival, both alone and when combined with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). The survival advantage is concomitant with time-dependent antibody production and an increase in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We also show that ATRA therapy on its own triggers an immune response in this model. When DNA vaccination and conventional ATRA therapy are combined, they induce protective immune responses against leukemia progression in mice and may provide a new approach to improve clinical outcome in human leukemia.

  1. Interleukin-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) as a central regulator of the protective immune response against Giardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protozoan parasite Giardia is a highly prevalent intestinal pathogen with a wide host range. Data obtained in mice, cattle and humans revealed the importance of IL-17A in the development of a protective immune response against Giardia. The aim of this study was to further unravel the protective ...

  2. CD44 enhances macrophage phagocytosis and plays a protective role in Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Wei, Zigong; Xiao, Pingping; Chen, Yaosheng; Liu, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is an important pathogen associated with a wide range of diseases in many mammalian species. CD44 is a transmembrane adhesion molecule involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. The aim of this study was to determine the protective role of CD44 during S. zooepidemicus infection. CD44-deficient mice exhibited reduced macrophage accumulation in the bronchoalveolar space and enhanced bacterial outgrowth and dissemination, which resulted in reduced mouse survival. An in vitro analysis revealed that CD44 can directly bind to S. zooepidemicus. Additionally, S. zooepidemicus interacted with macrophage-associated CD44, as reflected by the reduced uptake of S. zooepidemicus by CD44-deficient macrophages. These data suggest that CD44 contributes to effective antibacterial defense during S. zooepidemicus infection, thereby limiting the accompanying injury and death. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Active immunizations with peptide-DC vaccines and passive transfer with antibodies protect neutropenic mice against disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong

    2016-01-04

    We previously report that peptide-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, which targeting two peptides (Fba and Met6) expressed on the cell surface of Candida albicans, can induce high degree of protection against disseminated candidiasis in immunocompetent mice. Passive transfer of immune sera from the peptide immunized mice or peptide-related monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that protection was medicated by peptide-specific antibodies. In this study the efficacy of active and passive immunization against disseminated candidiasis was tested in mice with cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia. Peptide-DC vaccines were given to mice prior to induction of neutropenia. We show active immunization with either Fba or Met6 peptide-DC vaccine significantly improved the survival and reduced the fungal burden of disseminated candidiasis in those immunocompromised mice. Importantly, we show that administration of two protective monoclonal antibodies also protect neutropenic mice against the disease, implying possibility of developing a successful passive immunotherapy strategy to treat the disease and protect against disseminated candidiasis. The results of this study are crucial as they address the fundamental questions as to whether the synthetic peptide vaccine induced immunity protects the host during a neutropenic episode. We anticipate that this peptide-vaccine study will serve as the foundation of future investigations into new peptide vaccines comprised of cell surface peptides from other medically important Candida species, as well as other fungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Protective immunity against Megalocytivirus infection in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) following CpG ODN administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwa; Lee, Jehee; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Perez, Luis; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2017-06-27

    Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) disease in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) remains an unsolved problem in Korea aquaculture farms. CpG ODNs are known as immunostimulant, can improve the innate immune system of fish providing resistance to diseases. In this study, we evaluated the potential of CpG ODNs to induce anti-viral status protecting rock bream from different RBIV infection conditions. We found that, when administered into rock bream, CpG ODN 1668 induces better antiviral immune responses compared to other 5 CpG ODNs (2216, 1826, 2133, 2395 and 1720). All CpG ODN 1668 administered fish (1/5µg) at 2days before infection (1.1×10 7 ) held at 26°C died even though mortality was delayed from 8days (1µg) and 4days (5µg). Similarly, CpG ODN 1668 administered (5µg) at 2days before infection (1.2×10 6 ) held at 23/20°C had 100% mortality; the mortality was delayed from 9days (23°C) and 11days (20°C). Moreover, when CpG ODN 1668 administered (1/5/10µg) at 2/4/7days before infection or virus concentration was decreased to 1.1×10 4 and held at 20°C had mortality rates of 20/60/30% (2days), 30/40/60% (4days) and 60/60/20% (7days), respectively, for the respective administration dose, through 100 dpi. To investigate the development of a protective immune response, survivors were re-infected with RBIV (1.1×10 7 ) at 100 and 400 dpi, respectively. While 100% of the previously unexposed fish died, 100% of the previously infected fish survived. The high survival rate of fish following re-challenge with RBIV indicates that protective immunity was established in the surviving rock bream. Our results showed the possibility of developing preventive measures against RBIV using CpG ODN 1668 by reducing RBIV replication speed (i.e. water temperature of 20°C and infection dose of 1.1×10 4 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intramuscular Delivery of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vector Expressing Humanized Protective Antigen Induces Rapid Protection against Anthrax That May Bypass Intranasally Originated Preexisting Adenovirus Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a s...

  6. Stabilization of influenza vaccine enhances protection by microneedle delivery in the mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Shi Quan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Simple and effective vaccine administration is particularly important for annually recommended influenza vaccination. We hypothesized that vaccine delivery to the skin using a patch containing vaccine-coated microneedles could be an attractive approach to improve influenza vaccination compliance and efficacy.Solid microneedle arrays coated with inactivated influenza vaccine were prepared for simple vaccine delivery to the skin. However, the stability of the influenza vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination activity, was found to be significantly damaged during microneedle coating. The addition of trehalose to the microneedle coating formulation retained hemagglutination activity, indicating stabilization of the coated influenza vaccine. For both intramuscular and microneedle skin immunization, delivery of un-stabilized vaccine yielded weaker protective immune responses including viral neutralizing antibodies, protective efficacies, and recall immune responses to influenza virus. Immunization using un-stabilized vaccine also shifted the pattern of antibody isotypes compared to the stabilized vaccine. Importantly, a single microneedle-based vaccination using stabilized influenza vaccine was found to be superior to intramuscular immunization in controlling virus replication as well as in inducing rapid recall immune responses post challenge.The functional integrity of hemagglutinin is associated with inducing improved protective immunity against influenza. Simple microneedle influenza vaccination in the skin produced superior protection compared to conventional intramuscular immunization. This approach is likely to be applicable to other vaccines too.

  7. Gut symbiotic microbes imprint intestinal immune cells with the innate receptor SLAMF4 which contributes to gut immune protection against enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabinian, Allison; Sinsimer, Daniel; Tang, May; Jang, Youngsoon; Choi, Bongkum; Laouar, Yasmina; Laouar, Amale

    2018-05-01

    Interactions between host immune cells and gut microbiota are crucial for the integrity and function of the intestine. How these interactions regulate immune cell responses in the intestine remains a major gap in the field. We have identified the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule family member 4 (SLAMF4) as an immunomodulator of the intestinal immunity. The aim is to determine how SLAMF4 is acquired in the gut and what its contribution to intestinal immunity is. Expression of SLAMF4 was assessed in mice and humans. The mechanism of induction was studied using GFP tg bone marrow chimaera mice, lymphotoxin α and TNLG8A-deficient mice, as well as gnotobiotic mice. Role in immune protection was revealed using oral infection with Listeria monocytogenes and Cytobacter rodentium . SLAMF4 is a selective marker of intestinal immune cells of mice and humans. SLAMF4 induction occurs directly in the intestinal mucosa without the involvement of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Gut bacterial products, particularly those of gut anaerobes, and gut-resident antigen-presenting cell (APC) TNLG8A are key contributors of SLAMF4 induction in the intestine. Importantly, lack of SLAMF4 expression leads the increased susceptibility of mice to infection by oral pathogens culminating in their premature death. SLAMF4 is a marker of intestinal immune cells which contributes to the protection against enteric pathogens and whose expression is dependent on the presence of the gut microbiota. This discovery provides a possible mechanism for answering the long-standing question of how the intertwining of the host and gut microbial biology regulates immune cell responses in the gut. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Proteomic Identification of saeRS-Dependent Targets Critical for Protective Humoral Immunity against Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fan; Cheng, Brian L; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Daum, Robert S; Chong, Anita S; Montgomery, Christopher P

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common despite detectable antibody responses, leading to the belief that the immune response elicited by these infections is not protective. We recently reported that S. aureus USA300 SSTI elicits antibodies that protect against recurrent SSTI in BALB/c but not C57BL/6 mice, and in this study, we aimed to uncover the specificity of the protective antibodies. Using a proteomic approach, we found that S. aureus SSTI elicited broad polyclonal antibody responses in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and identified 10 S. aureus antigens against which antibody levels were significantly higher in immune BALB/c serum. Four of the 10 antigens identified are regulated by the saeRS operon, suggesting a dominant role for saeRS in protection. Indeed, infection with USA300Δsae failed to protect against secondary SSTI with USA300, despite eliciting a strong polyclonal antibody response against antigens whose expression is not regulated by saeRS. Moreover, the antibody repertoire after infection with USA300Δsae lacked antibodies specific for 10 saeRS-regulated antigens, suggesting that all or a subset of these antigens are necessary to elicit protective immunity. Infection with USA300Δhla elicited modest protection against secondary SSTI, and complementation of USA300Δsae with hla restored protection but incompletely. Together, these findings support a role for both Hla and other saeRS-regulated antigens in eliciting protection and suggest that host differences in immune responses to saeRS-regulated antigens may determine whether S. aureus infection elicits protective or nonprotective immunity against recurrent infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Immune protection duration and efficacy stability of DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhao, Xiaofang; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2017-04-01

    In our previous study, an effective DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 was constructed. In the present study, the immunization dose of the DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 was further optimized. With the optimized dose, the dynamics of antibodies induced by the DNA vaccine was determined using indirect ELISA. To evaluate the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized twice and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella at 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21weeks post the last immunization (PLI) separately. To evaluate the efficacy stability of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were immunized with 3 batches of the DNA vaccine, and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella. The results showed that the optimal dose was 25μg. The induced antibody level persisted until 10weeks PPI. For the challenge time of 5 and 9weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs of 182.28 and 162.23 beyond 160, showing effective protection. However, for the challenge time of 13, 17 and 21weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs below 160 which means poor protection. Therefore, the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccination was at least 9weeks PLI. DNA immunization with three batches DNA vaccine resulted in ACIs of 187.52, 191.57 and 185.22, which demonstrated that efficacies of the three batches DNA vaccine were effective and stable. Overall, our results indicate that DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 has the potential to be developed as effective vaccine against coccidiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of alteration of the immune system by ionizing radiations: a basis for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourguignon, M. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France); Perez, M.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carosella, E. [CEA, Service de Recherches en Hemato -Immunologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Alterations of the immune system appear in relationship with exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in different situations, e.g., accidents, radiation therapy of cancer, prenatal irradiation, some human diseases with hypersensitivity to IR and aging. Thus, the comprehension of the mechanisms of the alterations of the immune system by IR is necessary to elaborate strategies of protection and to pave the way for future possible therapies. At least 9 mechanisms of alterations can be identified: 1- Apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key mechanism of the natural regulation of the immune system and plays also a key role in the response to IR: lymphocytes die rapidly by apoptosis after exposure. Different pathways of induction of apoptosis have been identified, and include p53 dependent and mitochondria mediated pathways, as well as CD95 and ROS initiation; 2- TCR mutations. The T cell antigen receptor is responsible to discriminate between self and non self. Mutations of the TCR may result from exposure to IR; 3- Modification of the Th1-Th2 balance. T helper cells may express 2 distinct secretion patterns: Th1 cytokines promote cell-mediated immunity while Th2 cytokines favor humoral immunity. Although the effects of IR on the Th1/Th2 balance remains controversial, an imbalance towards a Th2 profile is likely and patients with cancer and systemic auto-immune disease often present a switch from Th1 to Th2; 4- Bystander effects and genetic instability. Stimulatory effect or genomic instability have been observed in haematopoietic cells exposed to IR and related to a bystander mechanism. 5- Shift toward an inflammatory profile. Ionizing radiation may induce a persistent inflammatory profile as a result of dis-regulation of cytokine production; such a status of persistent inflammation has been observed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. 6- Modification of antigen presentation. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells is an essential function preceding

  11. Mechanisms of alteration of the immune system by ionizing radiations: a basis for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourguignon, M.; Perez, M.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Carosella, E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Alterations of the immune system appear in relationship with exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in different situations, e.g., accidents, radiation therapy of cancer, prenatal irradiation, some human diseases with hypersensitivity to IR and aging. Thus, the comprehension of the mechanisms of the alterations of the immune system by IR is necessary to elaborate strategies of protection and to pave the way for future possible therapies. At least 9 mechanisms of alterations can be identified: 1- Apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key mechanism of the natural regulation of the immune system and plays also a key role in the response to IR: lymphocytes die rapidly by apoptosis after exposure. Different pathways of induction of apoptosis have been identified, and include p53 dependent and mitochondria mediated pathways, as well as CD95 and ROS initiation; 2- TCR mutations. The T cell antigen receptor is responsible to discriminate between self and non self. Mutations of the TCR may result from exposure to IR; 3- Modification of the Th1-Th2 balance. T helper cells may express 2 distinct secretion patterns: Th1 cytokines promote cell-mediated immunity while Th2 cytokines favor humoral immunity. Although the effects of IR on the Th1/Th2 balance remains controversial, an imbalance towards a Th2 profile is likely and patients with cancer and systemic auto-immune disease often present a switch from Th1 to Th2; 4- Bystander effects and genetic instability. Stimulatory effect or genomic instability have been observed in haematopoietic cells exposed to IR and related to a bystander mechanism. 5- Shift toward an inflammatory profile. Ionizing radiation may induce a persistent inflammatory profile as a result of dis-regulation of cytokine production; such a status of persistent inflammation has been observed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. 6- Modification of antigen presentation. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells is an essential function preceding

  12. Recombinant BCG Expressing ESX-1 of Mycobacterium marinum Combines Low Virulence with Cytosolic Immune Signaling and Improved TB Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschel, Matthias I; Sayes, Fadel; Shin, Sung Jae; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Orgeur, Mickael; Canetti, Robin; Honoré, Nadine; Simeone, Roxane; van der Werf, Tjip S; Bitter, Wilbert; Cho, Sang-Nae; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2017-03-14

    Recent insights into the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of human tuberculosis, is recognized by cytosolic nucleotide sensors have opened new avenues for rational vaccine design. The only licensed anti-tuberculosis vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, provides limited protection. A feature of BCG is the partial deletion of the ESX-1 type VII secretion system, which governs phagosomal rupture and cytosolic pattern recognition, key intracellular phenotypes linked to increased immune signaling. Here, by heterologously expressing the esx-1 region of Mycobacterium marinum in BCG, we engineered a low-virulence, ESX-1-proficient, recombinant BCG (BCG::ESX-1 Mmar ) that induces the cGas/STING/TBK1/IRF-3/type I interferon axis and enhances AIM2 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity, resulting in both higher proportions of CD8 + T cell effectors against mycobacterial antigens shared with BCG and polyfunctional CD4 + Th1 cells specific to ESX-1 antigens. Importantly, independent mouse vaccination models show that BCG::ESX-1 Mmar confers superior protection relative to parental BCG against challenges with highly virulent M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein expressed in insect cells form protein nanoparticles that induce protective immunity in cotton rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is an important viral agent causing severe respiratory tract disease in infants and children as well as in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The lack of a safe and effective RSV vaccine represents a major unmet medical need. RSV fusion (F surface glycoprotein was modified and cloned into a baculovirus vector for efficient expression in Sf9 insect cells. Recombinant RSV F was glycosylated and cleaved into covalently linked F2 and F1 polypeptides that formed homotrimers. RSV F extracted and purified from insect cell membranes assembled into 40 nm protein nanoparticles composed of multiple RSV F oligomers arranged in the form of rosettes. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of purified RSV F nanoparticles was compared to live and formalin inactivated RSV in cotton rats. Immunized animals induced neutralizing serum antibodies, inhibited virus replication in the lungs, and had no signs of disease enhancement in the respiratory track of challenged animals. RSV F nanoparticles also induced IgG competitive for binding of palivizumab neutralizing monoclonal antibody to RSV F antigenic site II. Antibodies to this epitope are known to protect against RSV when passively administered in high risk infants. Together these data provide a rational for continued development a recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine candidate.

  14. Antibodies are not required to a protective immune response against dengue virus elicited in a mouse encephalitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Jaime Henrique; dos Santos Alves, Rúbens Prince; Bizerra, Raíza; Araújo Pereira, Sara; Ramos Pereira, Lennon; Nascimento Fabris, Denicar Lina; Santos, Robert Andreata; Romano, Camila Malta; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Generating neutralizing antibodies have been considered a prerequisite to control dengue virus (DENV) infection. However, T lymphocytes have also been shown to be important in a protective immune state. In order to investigate the contribution of both humoral and cellular immune responses in DENV immunity, we used an experimental model in which a non-lethal DENV2 strain (ACS46) is used to intracranially prime Balb/C mice which develop protective immunity against a lethal DENV2 strain (JHA1). Primed mice generated envelope-specific antibodies and CD8(+) T cell responses targeting mainly non-structural proteins. Immune sera from protected mice did not confer passive protection to naïve mice challenged with the JHA1 strain. In contrast, depletion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes significantly reduced survival of ACS46-primed mice challenged with the JHA1 strain. Collectively, results presented in this study show that a cellular immune response targeting non-structural proteins are a promising way in vaccine development against dengue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunogenicity is unrelated to protective immunity when induced by soluble and particulate antigens from Nocardia brasiliensis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Ramos, Alma I; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2006-08-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a major role in protection against intracellular microbes. Nocardia brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes chronic actinomycetoma. In this work, we injected BALB/c mice with soluble P24 and particulate antigens from N. brasiliensis. A higher antibody titer and lymphocyte proliferation was induced by the particulate antigen than by the soluble antigen. However, five months after antigen injection, antibody concentration and lymphocyte proliferation were similar. An increase in CD45R and CD4 T cells was unrelated to protective immunity. Active immunization with soluble or particulate antigens induced complete protection during the primary immune response. This protective response was IgM mediated. The higher immunogenicity was not related to protective immunity since the particulate antigen induced protection similar to the soluble antigen. Using particulate antigens for vaccination guarantees a stronger immune response, local and systemic side effects, but not necessarily protection.

  16. Immune modulation with sulfasalazine attenuates immunopathogenesis but enhances macrophage-mediated fungal clearance during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although T cells are critical for host defense against respiratory fungal infections, they also contribute to the immunopathogenesis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP. However, the precise downstream effector mechanisms by which T cells mediate these diverse processes are undefined. In the current study the effects of immune modulation with sulfasalazine were evaluated in a mouse model of PcP-related Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (PcP-IRIS. Recovery of T cell-mediated immunity in Pneumocystis-infected immunodeficient mice restored host defense, but also initiated the marked pulmonary inflammation and severe pulmonary function deficits characteristic of IRIS. Sulfasalazine produced a profound attenuation of IRIS, with the unexpected consequence of accelerated fungal clearance. To determine whether macrophage phagocytosis is an effector mechanism of T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance and whether sulfasalazine enhances clearance by altering alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity, a novel multispectral imaging flow cytometer-based method was developed to quantify the phagocytosis of Pneumocystis in vivo. Following immune reconstitution, alveolar macrophages from PcP-IRIS mice exhibited a dramatic increase in their ability to actively phagocytose Pneumocystis. Increased phagocytosis correlated temporally with fungal clearance, and required the presence of CD4(+ T cells. Sulfasalazine accelerated the onset of the CD4(+ T cell-dependent alveolar macrophage phagocytic response in PcP-IRIS mice, resulting in enhanced fungal clearance. Furthermore, sulfasalazine promoted a TH2-polarized cytokine environment in the lung, and sulfasalazine-enhanced phagocytosis of Pneumocystis was associated with an alternatively activated alveolar macrophage phenotype. These results provide evidence that macrophage phagocytosis is an important in vivo effector mechanism for T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance, and that macrophage phenotype can be altered

  17. The HyVac4 subunit vaccine efficiently boosts BCG-primed anti-mycobacterial protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Billeskov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current vaccine against tuberculosis (TB, BCG, has failed to control TB worldwide and the protective efficacy is moreover limited to 10-15 years. A vaccine that could efficiently boost a BCG-induced immune response and thus prolong protective immunity would therefore have a significant impact on the global TB-burden. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study we show that the fusion protein HyVac4 (H4, consisting of the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and TB10.4, given in the adjuvant IC31® or DDA/MPL effectively boosted and prolonged immunity induced by BCG, leading to improved protection against infection with virulent M. tuberculosis (M.tb. Increased protection correlated with an increased percentage of TB10.4 specific IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2 or TNFα/IL-2 producing CD4 T cells at the site of infection. Moreover, this vaccine strategy did not compromise the use of ESAT-6 as an accurate correlate of disease development/vaccine efficacy. Indeed both CD4 and CD8 ESAT-6 specific T cells showed significant correlation with bacterial levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H4-IC31® can efficiently boost BCG-primed immunity leading to an increased protective anti-M.tb immune response dominated by IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2 or TNFα/IL2 producing CD4 T cells. H4 in the CD4 T cell inducing adjuvant IC31® is presently in clinical trials.

  18. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  19. Cloned defective interfering influenza virus protects ferrets from pandemic 2009 influenza A virus and allows protective immunity to be established.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J Dimmock

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population, causing epidemics in the winter, and occasional worldwide pandemics. In addition there are periodic outbreaks in domestic poultry, horses, pigs, dogs, and cats. Infections of domestic birds can be fatal for the birds and their human contacts. Control in man operates through vaccines and antivirals, but both have their limitations. In the search for an alternative treatment we have focussed on defective interfering (DI influenza A virus. Such a DI virus is superficially indistinguishable from a normal virus but has a large deletion in one of the eight RNAs that make up the viral genome. Antiviral activity resides in the deleted RNA. We have cloned one such highly active DI RNA derived from segment 1 (244 DI virus and shown earlier that intranasal administration protects mice from lethal disease caused by a number of different influenza A viruses. A more cogent model of human influenza is the ferret. Here we found that intranasal treatment with a single dose of 2 or 0.2 µg 244 RNA delivered as A/PR/8/34 virus particles protected ferrets from disease caused by pandemic virus A/California/04/09 (A/Cal; H1N1. Specifically, 244 DI virus significantly reduced fever, weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and infectious load. 244 DI RNA, the active principle, was amplified in nasal washes following infection with A/Cal, consistent with its amelioration of clinical disease. Animals that were treated with 244 DI RNA cleared infectious and DI viruses without delay. Despite the attenuation of infection and disease by DI virus, ferrets formed high levels of A/Cal-specific serum haemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies and were solidly immune to rechallenge with A/Cal. Together with earlier data from mouse studies, we conclude that 244 DI virus is a highly effective antiviral with activity potentially against all influenza A subtypes.

  20. SEVERAL MUCOSAL VACCINATION ROUTES CONFER IMMUNITY AGAINST ENTERIC REDMOUTH DISEASE IN RAINBOW TROUT, BUT THE PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS ARE DIFFERENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    Vaccination is a keystone in prophylactic strategies preventing outbreaks of fish pathogenic bacterial diseases in aquaculture. The first commercial fish vaccine consisted of a bacterin of Yersinia ruckeri serotype O1 biotype 1. The vaccine has been very successful and has been used for more than...... 35 years. A vast experience has been gained concerning the applications of the vaccine, which can be utilized through several mucosal immunization routes such as bath, oral and anal application, all resulting in significantly increased survival compared to un-vaccinated control groups during bath...... challenge experiments. Little is known regarding the nature of the protective immune response. We have shown that even low titers of Y. ruckeri specific antibodies confer protective immunity in vivo, and shown that is possible to pass immunity to naïve fish by passing serum containing Y. ruckeri specific...

  1. Protective immunity to Schistosoma haematobium infection is primarily an anti-fecundity response stimulated by the death of adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kate M; Mutapi, Francisca; Savill, Nicholas J; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2012-08-14

    Protective immunity against human schistosome infection develops slowly, for reasons that are not yet fully understood. For many decades, researchers have attempted to infer properties of the immune response from epidemiological studies, with mathematical models frequently being used to bridge the gap between immunological theory and population-level data on schistosome infection and immune responses. Here, building upon earlier model findings, stochastic individual-based models were used to identify model structures consistent with observed field patterns of Schistosoma haematobium infection and antibody responses, including their distributions in cross-sectional surveys, and the observed treatment-induced antibody switch. We found that the observed patterns of infection and antibody were most consistent with models in which a long-lived protective antibody response is stimulated by the death of adult S. haematobium worms and reduces worm fecundity. These findings are discussed with regard to current understanding of human immune responses to schistosome infection.

  2. Lactobacillus plantarum DK119 as a probiotic confers protection against influenza virus by modulating innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus plantarum DK119 (DK119 isolated from the fermented Korean cabbage food was used as a probiotic to determine its antiviral effects on influenza virus. DK119 intranasal or oral administration conferred 100% protection against subsequent lethal infection with influenza A viruses, prevented significant weight loss, and lowered lung viral loads in a mouse model. The antiviral protective efficacy was observed in a dose and route dependent manner of DK119 administration. Mice that were treated with DK119 showed high levels of cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a low degree of inflammation upon infection with influenza virus. Depletion of alveolar macrophage cells in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages completely abrogated the DK119-mediated protection. Modulating host innate immunity of dendritic and macrophage cells, and cytokine production pattern appeared to be possible mechanisms by which DK119 exhibited antiviral effects on influenza virus infection. These results indicate that DK119 can be developed as a beneficial antiviral probiotic microorganism.

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum DK119 as a Probiotic Confers Protection against Influenza Virus by Modulating Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Kyung; NGO, Vu; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Young-Tae; Yoo, Sieun; Cho, Young-Hee; Hong, Sung-Moon; Hwang, Hye Suk; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Moon, Dae-Won; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Yu-Na; Jang, Ji-Hun; Oh, Joon-Suk; Kim, Cheol-Hyun; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum DK119 (DK119) isolated from the fermented Korean cabbage food was used as a probiotic to determine its antiviral effects on influenza virus. DK119 intranasal or oral administration conferred 100% protection against subsequent lethal infection with influenza A viruses, prevented significant weight loss, and lowered lung viral loads in a mouse model. The antiviral protective efficacy was observed in a dose and route dependent manner of DK119 administration. Mice that were treated with DK119 showed high levels of cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a low degree of inflammation upon infection with influenza virus. Depletion of alveolar macrophage cells in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages completely abrogated the DK119-mediated protection. Modulating host innate immunity of dendritic and macrophage cells, and cytokine production pattern appeared to be possible mechanisms by which DK119 exhibited antiviral effects on influenza virus infection. These results indicate that DK119 can be developed as a beneficial antiviral probiotic microorganism. PMID:24124485

  4. Mucosal Immunization with Newcastle Disease Virus Vector Coexpressing HIV-1 Env and Gag Proteins Elicits Potent Serum, Mucosal, and Cellular Immune Responses That Protect against Vaccinia Virus Env and Gag Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Sunil K; Manoharan, Vinoth; Bhattarai, Bikash; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Samal, Siba K

    2015-07-21

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) avirulent strain LaSota was used to coexpress gp160 Env and p55 Gag from a single vector to enhance both Env-specific and Gag-specific immune responses. The optimal transcription position for both Env and Gag genes in the NDV genome was determined by generating recombinant NDV (rNDV)-Env-Gag (gp160 located between the P and M genes and Gag between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Gag-Env (Gag located between the P and M genes and gp160 between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Env/Gag (gp160 followed by Gag located between the P and M genes), and rNDV-Gag/Env (Gag followed by gp160 located between the P and M genes). All the recombinant viruses replicated at levels similar to those seen with parental NDV in embryonated chicken eggs and in chicken fibroblast cells. Both gp160 and Gag proteins were expressed at high levels in cell culture, with gp160 found to be incorporated into the envelope of NDV. The Gag and Env proteins expressed by all the recombinants except rNDV-Env-Gag self-assembled into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus-like particles (VLPs). Immunization of guinea pigs by the intranasal route with these rNDVs produced long-lasting Env- and Gag-specific humoral immune responses. The Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses and Gag-specific humoral immune responses were higher in rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag than in the other recombinants. rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag were also more efficient in inducing cellular as well as protective immune responses to challenge with vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Env and Gag in mice. These results suggest that vaccination with a single rNDV coexpressing Env and Gag represents a promising strategy to enhance immunogenicity and protective efficacy against HIV. A safe and effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses is needed to control HIV-1. In this study, we showed that coexpression of Env and Gag proteins of HIV-1 performed using a single

  5. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future. © 2015 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  6. Lack of microbiota reduces innate responses and enhances adaptive immunity against Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Seidel, Daniel; Bland, Paul W; Zarzycka, Agnieszka; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Visekruna, Alexander; Steinhoff, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    The intestinal microbiota influences not only metabolic processes, but also the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we compare innate and adaptive immune responses against the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in germfree (GF) and conventional mice. We show that animals without endogenous microbiota are highly susceptible to primary infection with impaired activation and accumulation of phagocytes to the site of infection. Unexpectedly, secondary infection with otherwise lethal dose resulted in survival of all GF animals which cleared bacteria more rapidly and developed a stronger antilisterial CD8(+) memory T-cell response compared to conventional mice. In summary, lack of the intestinal microbiota impairs early innate immunity, but enhances activation and expansion of memory T cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Previous encapsulation response enhances within individual protection against fungal parasite in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krams, Indrikis; Daukste, Janina; Kivleniece, Inese; Krama, Tatjana; Rantala, Markus J

    2013-12-01

    Immune defenses of insects show either broad reactions or specificity and durability of induced protection against attacking parasites and pathogens. In this study, we tested whether encapsulation response against nylon monofilament increases between two attempts of activation of immune system in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor, and whether previous exposure to nylon monofilament may also increase protection against an entomopathogenic fungus. We found that survival of beetles subjected to immune activation by nylon implant and subsequent fungal exposure a week later was significantly higher than survival of beetles which had been subjected to fungal infection only. This result suggests that previous immune activation by the nylon implant may be considered as broad spectrum "immune priming" which helps to fight not only the same intruder but also other parasites. © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Plasmodium falciparum synthetic LbL microparticle vaccine elicits protective neutralizing antibody and parasite-specific cellular immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Thomas J.; Tang, Jie; DeRome, Mary E.; Mitchell, Robert A.; Jacobs, Andrea; Deng, Yanhong; Palath, Naveen; Cardenas, Edwin; Boyd, James G.; Nardin, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of Plasmodium falciparum, the most pathogenic species of the malaria parasite, have been shown to elicit protective immunity in experimental animals and human volunteers. The mechanisms of immunity include parasite-neutralizing antibodies that can inhibit parasite motility in the skin at the site of infection and in the bloodstream during transit to the hepatocyte host cell and also block interaction with host cell receptors on hepatocytes. In add...

  9. Complete protection against lethal Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice immunized with a plasmid encoding the SAG1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H V; Lauemøller, S L; Christiansen, L

    1999-01-01

    gamma interferon production by CD8(+) T cells from p1tPASAG1-immunized mice was tested in an ELISPOT assay, and one new CTL epitope was identified. Adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells from p1tPASAG1-immunized to naïve mice showed partial protection. In conclusion, DNA vaccination with p1tPASAG1 gave...

  10. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jolene; O'Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G; Krug, Peter W; Gladue, Douglas P; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V

    2016-10-22

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms.

  11. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Carlson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV. There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4 virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi. This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms.

  12. Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations Report...00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-15-477, a report to congressional requesters May 2015 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD

  13. A Two-Component DNA-Prime/Protein-Boost Vaccination Strategy for Eliciting Long-Term, Protective T Cell Immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shivali; Garg, Nisha J

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the long-term efficacy of a two-component subunit vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with TcG2/TcG4 vaccine delivered by a DNA-prime/Protein-boost (D/P) approach and challenged with T. cruzi at 120 or 180 days post-vaccination (dpv). We examined whether vaccine-primed T cell immunity was capable of rapid expansion and intercepting the infecting T. cruzi. Our data showed that D/P vaccine elicited CD4+ (30-38%) and CD8+ (22-42%) T cells maintained an effector phenotype up to 180 dpv, and were capable of responding to antigenic stimulus or challenge infection by a rapid expansion (CD8>CD4) with type 1 cytokine (IFNγ+ and TFNα+) production and cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Subsequently, challenge infection at 120 or 180 dpv, resulted in 2-3-fold lower parasite burden in vaccinated mice than was noted in unvaccinated/infected mice. Co-delivery of IL-12- and GMCSF-encoding expression plasmids provided no significant benefits in enhancing the anti-parasite efficacy of the vaccine-induced T cell immunity. Booster immunization (bi) with recombinant TcG2/TcG4 proteins 3-months after primary vaccine enhanced the protective efficacy, evidenced by an enhanced expansion (1.2-2.8-fold increase) of parasite-specific, type 1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a potent CTL response capable of providing significantly improved (3-4.5-fold) control of infecting T. cruzi. Further, CD8+T cells in vaccinated/bi mice were predominantly of central memory phenotype, and capable of responding to challenge infection 4-6-months post bi by a rapid expansion to a poly-functional effector phenotype, and providing a 1.5-2.3-fold reduction in tissue parasite replication. We conclude that the TcG2/TcG4 D/P vaccine provided long-term anti-T. cruzi T cell immunity, and bi would be an effective strategy to maintain or enhance the vaccine-induced protective immunity against T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease.

  14. A Two-Component DNA-Prime/Protein-Boost Vaccination Strategy for Eliciting Long-Term, Protective T Cell Immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivali Gupta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the long-term efficacy of a two-component subunit vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with TcG2/TcG4 vaccine delivered by a DNA-prime/Protein-boost (D/P approach and challenged with T. cruzi at 120 or 180 days post-vaccination (dpv. We examined whether vaccine-primed T cell immunity was capable of rapid expansion and intercepting the infecting T. cruzi. Our data showed that D/P vaccine elicited CD4+ (30-38% and CD8+ (22-42% T cells maintained an effector phenotype up to 180 dpv, and were capable of responding to antigenic stimulus or challenge infection by a rapid expansion (CD8>CD4 with type 1 cytokine (IFNγ+ and TFNα+ production and cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL activity. Subsequently, challenge infection at 120 or 180 dpv, resulted in 2-3-fold lower parasite burden in vaccinated mice than was noted in unvaccinated/infected mice. Co-delivery of IL-12- and GMCSF-encoding expression plasmids provided no significant benefits in enhancing the anti-parasite efficacy of the vaccine-induced T cell immunity. Booster immunization (bi with recombinant TcG2/TcG4 proteins 3-months after primary vaccine enhanced the protective efficacy, evidenced by an enhanced expansion (1.2-2.8-fold increase of parasite-specific, type 1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a potent CTL response capable of providing significantly improved (3-4.5-fold control of infecting T. cruzi. Further, CD8+T cells in vaccinated/bi mice were predominantly of central memory phenotype, and capable of responding to challenge infection 4-6-months post bi by a rapid expansion to a poly-functional effector phenotype, and providing a 1.5-2.3-fold reduction in tissue parasite replication. We conclude that the TcG2/TcG4 D/P vaccine provided long-term anti-T. cruzi T cell immunity, and bi would be an effective strategy to maintain or enhance the vaccine-induced protective immunity against T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease.

  15. Diversion of the immune response to Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Th17 to Th1/Th2 by treatment with anti-transforming growth factor β antibody generates immunological memory and protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingru; Russell, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The immune response to Neisseria gonorrhoeae is poorly understood, but its extensive antigenic variability and resistance to complement are thought to allow it to evade destruction by the host's immune defenses. We propose that N. gonorrhoeae also avoids inducing protective immune responses in the first place. We previously found that N. gonorrhoeae induces interleukin-17 (IL-17)-dependent innate responses in mice and suppresses Th1/Th2-dependent adaptive responses in murine cells in vitro through the induction of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). In this study using a murine model of vaginal gonococcal infection, mice treated with anti-TGF-β antibody during primary infection showed accelerated clearance of N. gonorrhoeae, with incipient development of Th1 and Th2 responses and diminished Th17 responses in genital tract tissue. Upon secondary reinfection, mice that had been treated with anti-TGF-β during primary infection showed anamnestic recall of both Th1 and Th2 responses, with the development of antigonococcal antibodies in sera and secretions, and enhanced resistance to reinfection. In mouse knockout strains defective in Th1 or Th2 responses, accelerated clearance of primary infection due to anti-TGF-β treatment was dependent on Th1 activity but not Th2 activity, whereas resistance to secondary infection resulting from anti-TGF-β treatment during primary infection was due to both Th1- and Th2-dependent memory responses. We propose that N. gonorrhoeae proactively elicits Th17-driven innate responses that it can resist and concomitantly suppresses Th1/Th2-driven specific adaptive immunity that would protect the host. Blockade of TGF-β reverses this pattern of host immune responsiveness and facilitates the emergence of protective antigonococcal immunity. Pathogen-host interactions during infectious disease are conventionally thought of as two-way reactions, that of the host against the pathogen and vice versa, with the outcome dependent on which one

  16. Photodynamic therapy can induce non-specific protective immunity against a bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Kinoshita, Manabu; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer is known to induce an immune response against the tumor, in addition to its well-known direct cell-killing and vascular destructive effects. PDT is becoming increasingly used as a therapy for localized infections. However there has not to date been a convincing report of an immune response being generated against a microbial pathogen after PDT in an animal model. We have studied PDT as a therapy for bacterial arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse knee. We had previously found that PDT of an infection caused by injection of MRSA (5X107 CFU) into the mouse knee followed 3 days later by 1 μg of Photofrin and 635- nm diode laser illumination with a range of fluences within 5 minutes, gave a biphasic dose response. The greatest reduction of MRSA CFU was seen with a fluence of 20 J/cm2, whereas lower antibacterial efficacy was observed with fluences that were either lower or higher. We then tested the hypothesis that the host immune response mediated by neutrophils was responsible for most of the beneficial antibacterial effect. We used bioluminescence imaging of luciferase expressing bacteria to follow the progress of the infection in real time. We found similar results using intra-articular methylene blue and red light, and more importantly, that carrying out PDT of the noninfected joint and subsequently injecting bacteria after PDT led to a significant protection from infection. Taken together with substantial data from studies using blocking antibodies we believe that the pre-conditioning PDT regimen recruits and stimulates neutrophils into the infected joint which can then destroy bacteria that are subsequently injected and prevent infection.

  17. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. II. Active and passive immunization as protection against a lethal bacterial dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    Immunization against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and thymus-bearing LEW rats. Active immunization was performed with formalin-killed whole cell vaccine or sublethal infection prior to the lethal infection. After vaccination with killed bacteria the euthymic...... from immunized thymus grafted animals provided only limited protective effect, and treatment with cells from athymic animals had no effect. The study shows that although isogeneic thymus-grafted nude rats become resistent to reinfection with S. typhimurium, only large doses of spleen cells from...

  18. Endothelial Cells Elicit Immune-Enhancing Responses to Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Nadine A.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses cause two severe diseases that alter vascular fluid barrier functions, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Preexisting antibodies to dengue virus disposes patients to immune-enhanced edema (DSS) or hemorrhagic (DHF) disease following infection by a discrete dengue virus serotype. Although the endothelium is the primary vascular fluid barrier, direct effects of dengue virus on endothelial cells (ECs) have not been considered primary factors in pathogenesis. Here, we show that dengue virus infection of human ECs elicits immune-enhancing EC responses. Our results suggest that rapid early dengue virus proliferation within ECs is permitted by dengue virus regulation of early, but not late, beta interferon (IFN-β) responses. The analysis of EC responses following synchronous dengue virus infection revealed the high-level induction and secretion of immune cells (T cells, B cells, and mast cells) as well as activating and recruiting cytokines BAFF (119-fold), IL-6/8 (4- to 7-fold), CXCL9/10/11 (45- to 338-fold), RANTES (724-fold), and interleukin-7 (IL-7; 128-fold). Moreover, we found that properdin factor B, an alternative pathway complement activator that directs chemotactic anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a production, was induced 34-fold. Thus, dengue virus-infected ECs evoke key inflammatory responses observed in dengue virus patients which are linked to DHF and DSS. Our findings suggest that dengue virus-infected ECs directly contribute to immune enhancement, capillary permeability, viremia, and immune targeting of the endothelium. These data implicate EC responses in dengue virus pathogenesis and further rationalize therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of dengue virus disease. PMID:22496214

  19. Immunization of Mice with Recombinant Brucella abortus Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (Ohr) Protein Protects Against a Virulent Brucella abortus 544 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Brucella abortus ohr gene coding for an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was cloned into a maltose fusion protein expression system (pMAL), inserted into Escherichia coli, and purified, and its immunogenicity was evaluated by western blot analysis using Brucella-positive mouse sera. The purified recombinant Ohr (rOhr) was treated with adjuvant and injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. A protective immune response analysis revealed that rOhr induced a significant increase in both the IgG1 and IgG2a titers, and IgG2a reached a higher level than IgG1 after the second and third immunizations. Additionally, immunization with rOhr induced high production of IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF, MCP-1, IL-12p70, and IL-6, but a lesser amount of IL-10, suggesting that rOhr predominantly elicited a cell-mediated immune response. In addition, immunization with rOhr caused a significantly higher degree of protection against a virulent B. abortus infection compared with a positive control group consisting of mice immunized with maltose-binding protein. These findings showed that B. abortus rOhr was able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice, which suggested that this recombinant protein could be a potential vaccine candidate for animal brucellosis.

  20. Pleurocidin Peptide Enhances Grouper Anti-Vibrio harveyi Immunity Elicited by Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-Encapsulated Recombinant Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Huang, Wan-Ling; Kau, Sau-Wei; Yang, Yun-Pei; Yang, Chung-Da

    2014-05-14

    Outer membrane proteins, such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), are considered immunodominant antigens for eliciting protective immunity against Vibrio harveyi, the main etiological agent of vibriosis in fish. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as pleurocidin (PLE), play important roles in activating and recruiting immune cells, thereby contributing to subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, we aimed to use PLE peptide as a potent adjuvant to improve the immunogenicity of V. harveyi recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH). In order to prepare a controlled-release vaccine, PLE peptide and rGAPDH protein were simultaneously encapsulated into polymeric microparticles made from the biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) polymer. The resulting PLG-encapsulated PLE plus rGAPDH (PLG-PLE/rGAPDH) microparticles, 3.21-6.27 μm in diameter, showed 72%-83% entrapment efficiency and durably released both PLE and rGAPDH for a long 30-day period. Following peritoneal immunization in grouper (Epinephelus coioides), PLG-PLE/rGAPDH microparticles resulted in significantly higher (p PLE/rGAPDH microparticles conferred a high survival rate (85%), which was significantly higher (p PLE peptide exhibits an efficacious adjuvant effect to elicit not only improved immunity, but also enhanced protection against V. harveyi in grouper induced by rGAPDH protein encapsulated in PLG microparticles.

  1. Immunization-Elicited Broadly Protective Antibody Reveals Ebolavirus Fusion Loop as a Site of Vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuelian; Howell, Katie A; He, Shihua; Brannan, Jennifer M; Wec, Anna Z; Davidson, Edgar; Turner, Hannah L; Chiang, Chi-I; Lei, Lin; Fels, J Maximilian; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Turonis, Ashley N; Kuehne, Ana I; Liu, Guodong; Ta, Mi; Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Xiao, Yongli; Spence, Jennifer S; Doranz, Benjamin J; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Ward, Andrew B; Chandran, Kartik; Dye, John M; Qiu, Xiangguo; Li, Yuxing; Aman, M Javad

    2017-05-18

    While neutralizing antibodies are highly effective against ebolavirus infections, current experimental ebolavirus vaccines primarily elicit species-specific antibody responses. Here, we describe an immunization-elicited macaque antibody (CA45) that clamps the internal fusion loop with the N terminus of the ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) and potently neutralizes Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, and Reston viruses. CA45, alone or in combination with an antibody that blocks receptor binding, provided full protection against all pathogenic ebolaviruses in mice, guinea pigs, and ferrets. Analysis of memory B cells from the immunized macaque suggests that elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for ebolaviruses is possible but difficult, potentially due to the rarity of bNAb clones and their precursors. Unexpectedly, germline-reverted CA45, while exhibiting negligible binding to full-length GP, bound a proteolytically remodeled GP with picomolar affinity, suggesting that engineered ebolavirus vaccines could trigger rare bNAb precursors more robustly. These findings have important implications for developing pan-ebolavirus vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktails. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interleukin-27-Producing CD4(+) T Cells Regulate Protective Immunity during Malaria Parasite Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Daisuke; Miyakoda, Mana; Kimura, Kazumi; Honma, Kiri; Hara, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Hiroki; Yui, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-15

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a heterodimeric regulatory cytokine of the IL-12 family, which is produced by macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells upon stimulation through innate immune receptors. Here, we described regulatory CD4(+) T cells that produce IL-27 in response to T cell receptor stimulation during malaria infection, inhibiting IL-2 production and clonal expansion of other T cells in an IL-27-dependent manner. IL-27-producing CD4(+) T cells were Foxp3(-)CD11a(+)CD49d(+) malaria antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells and were distinct from interferon-γ (IFN-γ) producing Th1 or IL-10 producing Tr1 cells. In mice lacking IL-27 in T cells, IL-2 production was restored and clonal expansion and IFN-γ production by specific CD4(+) T cells were improved, culminating in reduced parasite burden. This study highlights a unique population of IL-27 producing regulatory CD4(+) T cells and their critical role in the regulation of the protective immune response against malaria parasites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Equol Inhibits LPS-Induced Oxidative Stress and Enhances the Immune Response in Chicken HD11 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyong Gou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: There has been increasing recent attention on the antioxidative capacity of equol. This study tested the effect of equol on oxidative stress induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and regulation of immunity in chicken macrophages. Methods: Chicken HD11 macrophages were challenged with LPS (100 ng/mL alone or with LPS (100 ng/mL and (±equol (10, 20, 40, 80, 160 μmol/L together for 24h. Evaluated responses included the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA and reduced glutathione (GSH, activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, transcript abundance of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, catalase (CAT, glutathione transferase (GST, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, and contents of the cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon beta (IFNβ. Results: Exposure to LPS induced oxidative stress as contents of MDA increased and GSH decreased in LPS-treated cells (P SOD2 and GST transcripts (P TLR4, TNFα and IL-1β (P < 0.05. And there were similar changes in contents of IL-1β, IL-2, IFNβ and TNFα in the cells (P < 0.05. Conclusions: It concluded that equol can protect chicken HD11 macrophages from oxidative stress induced by LPS through reducing lipid peroxidation products and enhancing contents of antioxidants, and activities of relevant antioxidase enzymes; effects were also seen in gene expression related to the immune response and increased contents of cytokines. The optimal concentration of equol on antioxidation and immune enhancement in chicken macrophages was 40 μmol/L.

  4. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 enhances innate immunity during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Barry

    Full Text Available Once acquired, Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong due to an inadequate innate and adaptive immune response. Our previous studies indicate that interactions among the various pathways of arginine metabolism in the host are critical determinants of outcomes following infection. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2 is essential for transport of L-arginine (L-Arg into monocytic immune cells during H. pylori infection. Once within the cell, this amino acid is utilized by opposing pathways that lead to elaboration of either bactericidal nitric oxide (NO produced from inducible NO synthase (iNOS, or hydrogen peroxide, which causes macrophage apoptosis, via arginase and the polyamine pathway. Because of its central role in controlling L-Arg availability in macrophages, we investigated the importance of CAT2 in vivo during H. pylori infection. CAT2(-/- mice infected for 4 months exhibited decreased gastritis and increased levels of colonization compared to wild type mice. We observed suppression of gastric macrophage levels, macrophage expression of iNOS, dendritic cell activation, and expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in CAT2(-/- mice suggesting that CAT2 is involved in enhancing the innate immune response. In addition, cytokine expression in CAT2(-/- mice was altered from an antimicrobial Th1 response to a Th2 response, indicating that the transporter has downstream effects on adaptive immunity as well. These findings demonstrate that CAT2 is an important regulator of the immune response during H. pylori infection.

  5. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Recombinant yellow fever viruses elicit CD8+ T cell responses and protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Tayar Nogueira

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a major public health problem affecting nearly 10 million in Latin America. Despite several experimental vaccines have shown to be immunogenic and protective in mouse models, there is not a current vaccine being licensed for humans or in clinical trial against T. cruzi infection. Towards this goal, we used the backbone of Yellow Fever (YF 17D virus, one of the most effective and well-established human vaccines, to express an immunogenic fragment derived from T. cruzi Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (ASP-2. The cDNA sequence of an ASP-2 fragment was inserted between E and NS1 genes of YF 17D virus through the construction of a recombinant heterologous cassette. The replication ability and genetic stability of recombinant YF virus (YF17D/ENS1/Tc was confirmed for at least six passages in Vero cells. Immunogenicity studies showed that YF17D/ENS1/Tc virus elicited neutralizing antibodies and gamma interferon (IFN-γ producing-cells against the YF virus. Also, it was able to prime a CD8(+ T cell directed against the transgenic T. cruzi epitope (TEWETGQI which expanded significantly as measured by T cell-specific production of IFN-γ before and after T. cruzi challenge. However, most important for the purposes of vaccine development was the fact that a more efficient protective response could be seen in mice challenged after vaccination with the YF viral formulation consisting of YF17D/ENS1/Tc and a YF17D recombinant virus expressing the TEWETGQI epitope at the NS2B-3 junction. The superior protective immunity observed might be due to an earlier priming of epitope-specific IFN-γ-producing T CD8(+ cells induced by vaccination with this viral formulation. Our results suggest that the use of viral formulations consisting of a mixture of recombinant YF 17D viruses may be a promising strategy to elicit protective immune responses against pathogens, in general.

  7. A lipidated peptide of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resuscitates the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine by evoking memory T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pradeep K; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Zeng, Weiguang; Nadeem, Sajid; Maurya, Sudeep K; Pahari, Susanta; Janmeja, Ashok K; Jackson, David C; Agrewala, Javed N

    2017-10-06

    The current BCG vaccine induces only short-term protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), suggesting its failure to generate long-lasting memory T cells. Previously, we have demonstrated that a self-adjuvanting peptide of Mtb (L91), successfully generated enduring memory Th1 cells. Consequently, we investigated if L91 was able to recuperate BCG potency in perpetuating the generation of memory T cells and protection against Mtb infected mice. In the present study, we evaluated the potency of a self adjuvanting Mtb peptide vaccine L91 in invigorating BCG immune response against Mtb in mice. Female BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG. Later, they were boosted twice with L91 or an antigenically irrelevant lipidated influenza virus hemagglutinin peptide (LH). Further, PBMCs obtained from BCG vaccinated healthy subjects were cultured in vitro with L91. T cell responses were determined by surface markers and intracellular cytokine staining. Secretion of cytokines was estimated in the culture supernatants (SNs) by ELISA. Compared to the BCG-vaccinated controls, L91 booster significantly enhanced the percentage of memory Th1 cells and Th17 cells and reduced the mycobacterial burden in BCG primed and L91-boosted (BCG-L91) group, even after 229 days of BCG vaccination. Further, substantial augmentation in the central (CD44 hi CD62L hi CD127 hi ) and effector memory (CD44 hi CD62L lo CD127 lo ) CD4 T cells was detected. Furthermore, greater frequency of polyfunctional Th1 cells (IFN-γ + TNF-α + ) and Th17 cells (IFN-γ + IL-17A + ) was observed. Importantly, BCG-L91 successfully prevented CD4 T cells from exhaustion by decreasing the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3. Additionally, augmentation in the frequency of Th1 cells, Th17 cells and memory CD4 T cells was observed in the PBMCs of the BCG-vaccinated healthy individuals following in vitro stimulation with L91. Our study demonstrated that L91 robustly reinvigorate BCG potency to invoke enduring protection against

  8. Synthetic Cationic Peptide IDR-1002 Provides Protection against Bacterial Infections through Chemokine Induction and Enhanced Leukocyte Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    , an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus......With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial...... aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor...

  9. Enhancement of humoral and cellular immune responses by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) as an adjuvant to the rabies vaccine in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaobo; Liu, Rui; Zhu, Naishuo

    2013-12-01

    The development of effective vaccines against the rabies virus could prevent infection with this fatal virus. However, the current rabies vaccine fails to provide a full range of protection because of its limited ability to elicit a cellular immune response and the requirement for repeat vaccination. Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is well known as a potent adjuvant to enhance immune responses against virus infection. Here we investigated the efficacy of MPLA as an adjuvant to improve the humoral and cellular immune responses to the rabies vaccine in BALB/c mice. Supplementation of the rabies vaccine with MPLA significantly accelerated the production of specific antibodies by 10 days compared to the original vaccines. Furthermore, MPLA promoted the induction of stronger cellular immune responses by the rabies vaccine, including the production of IL-4, IFN-γ and the activation of CD4⁺/CD8⁺ T cells, than those elicited without MPLA. Collectively, our findings indicated that MPLA enhances humoral and cellular immunity and is a promising adjuvant for the development of more effective rabies vaccines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutual Interference between Cytomegalovirus and Reconstitution of Protective Immunity after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddehase, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a therapy option for aggressive forms of hematopoietic malignancies that are resistant to standard antitumoral therapies. Hematoablative treatment preceding HCT, however, opens a “window of opportunity” for latent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) by releasing it from immune control with the consequence of reactivation of productive viral gene expression and recurrence of infectious virus. A “window of opportunity” for the virus represents a “window of risk” for the patient. In the interim between HCT and reconstitution of antiviral immunity, primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, initially low amounts of reactivated virus can expand exponentially, disseminate to essentially all organs, and cause multiple organ CMV disease, with interstitial pneumonia (CMV-IP) representing the most severe clinical manifestation. Here, I will review predictions originally made in the mouse model of experimental HCT and murine CMV infection, some of which have already paved the way to translational preclinical research and promising clinical trials of a preemptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease. Specifically, the mouse model has been pivotal in providing “proof of concept” for preventing CMV disease after HCT by adoptive transfer of preselected, virus epitope-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cells bridging the critical interim. However, CMV is not a “passive antigen” but is a pathogen that actively interferes with the reconstitution of protective immunity by infecting bone marrow (BM) stromal cells that otherwise form niches for hematopoiesis by providing the structural microenvironment and by producing hematopoietically active cytokines, the hemopoietins. Depending on the precise conditions of HCT, reduced homing of transplanted hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells to infected BM stroma and impaired colony growth and lineage differentiation can lead to “graft failure.” In consequence, uncontrolled virus spread

  11. Enhanced immunization via dissolving microneedle array-based delivery system incorporating subunit vaccine and saponin adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ji-Hui; Zhang, Qi-Bo; Liu, Bao; Piao, Xiang-Hua; Yan, Yu-Lu; Hu, Xiao-Ge; Zhou, Kuan; Zhang, Yong-Tai; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To enhance the immunogenicity of the model subunit vaccine, ovalbumin (OVA) was combined with platycodin (PD), a saponin adjuvant. To reduce the toxicity of PD, OVA, and adjuvant were loaded together into liposomes before being incorporated into a dissolving microneedle array. OVA- and PD-loaded liposomes (OVA-PD-Lipos) were prepared using the film dispersion method. Their uptake behavior, toxicity to mouse bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs), and hemolytic activity to rabbit red blood cells (RBCs) were evaluated. The OVA-PD-Lipos were incorporated into a dissolving microneedle array. The chemical stability of OVA and the physical stability of OVA-PD-Lipos in microneedle arrays were investigated. The immune response of Institute of Cancer Research mice and potential skin irritation reaction of rabbits to OVA-PD-Lipos-MNs were evaluated. The uptake of OVA by mouse BMDCs was greatly enhanced when OVA was prepared as OVA-PD-Lipos, and in this form, the toxicity of PD was dramatically reduced. OVA was chemically stable as OVA-PD-Lipos, when OVA-PD-Lipos was incorporated into a dissolving microneedle array. Institute of Cancer Research mice treated with OVA-PD-Lipos-MNs showed a significantly enhanced immune response. PD combined with OVA elicited a balanced Th1 and Th2 humoral immune response in mice, with minimal irritation in rabbit skin. The dissolving microneedle array-based system is a promising delivery vehicle for subunit vaccine and its adjuvant.

  12. Oral Vaccination with Salmonella enterica as a Cruzipain-DNA Delivery System Confers Protective Immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Silvia I.; Becker, Pablo D.; Frank, Fernanda M.; Ebensen, Thomas; Sartori, María J.; Corral, Ricardo S.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    To stimulate both local and systemic immune responses against Trypanosoma cruzi, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium aroA was exploited as a DNA delivery system for cruzipain (SCz). In a murine model we compared SCz alone (GI) or coadministered with Salmonella carrying a plasmid encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GII), as well as protocols in which SCz priming was followed by boosting with recombinant cruzipain (rCz) admixed with either CpG-ODN (GIII) or MALP-2, a synthetic derivative of a macrophage-activating lipopeptide of 2 kDa from Mycoplasma fermentans (GIV). The results showed that protocols that included four oral doses of SCz (GI) elicited mainly a mucosal response characterized by immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion and proliferation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue cells, with weak systemic responses. In contrast, the protocol that included a boost with rCz plus CpG (GIII) triggered stronger systemic responses in terms of Cz-specific serum IgG titers, splenocyte proliferation, gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion, and delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Trypomastigote challenge of vaccinated mice resulted in significantly lower levels of parasitemia compared to controls. Protection was abolished by depletion of either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Parasite control was also evident from the reduction of tissue damage, as revealed by histopathologic studies and serum levels of enzymes that are markers of muscle injury in chronic Chagas' disease (i.e., creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase). Enhanced release of IFN-γ and interleukin-2 was observed in GI and GII upon restimulation of splenocytes in the nonparasitic phase of infection. Our results indicate that Salmonella-mediated delivery of Cz-DNA by itself promotes the elicitation of an immune response that controls T. cruzi infection, thereby reducing parasite loads and subsequent damage to muscle tissues. PMID:17967857

  13. Role of IFN-gamma and IL-6 in a protective immune response to Yersinia enterocolitica in mice

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    Autenrieth Ingo B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia outer protein (Yop H is a secreted virulence factor of Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye, which inhibits phagocytosis of Ye and contributes to the virulence of Ye in mice. The aim of this study was to address whether and how YopH affects the innate immune response to Ye in mice. Results For this purpose, mice were infected with wild type Ye (pYV+ or a YopH-deficient Ye mutant strain (ΔyopH. CD11b+ cells were isolated from the infected spleen and subjected to gene expression analysis using microarrays. Despite the attenuation of ΔyopH in vivo, by variation of infection doses we were able to achieve conditions that allow comparison of gene expression in pYV+ and ΔyopH infection, using either comparable infection courses or splenic bacterial burden. Gene expression analysis provided evidence that expression levels of several immune response genes, including IFN-γ and IL-6, are high after pYV+ infection but low after sublethal ΔyopH infection. In line with these findings, infection of IFN-γR-/- and IL-6-/- mice with pYV+ or ΔyopH revealed that these cytokines are not necessarily required for control of ΔyopH, but are essential for defense against infection with the more virulent pYV+. Consistently, IFN-γ pretreatment of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM strongly enhanced their ability in killing intracellular Ye bacteria. Conclusion In conclusion, this data suggests that IFN-γ-mediated effector mechanisms can partially compensate virulence exerted by YopH. These results shed new light on the protective role of IFN-γ in Ye wild type infections.

  14. Microbiota is an essential element for mice to initiate a protective immunity against Vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Maurício T; Andrade, Ana C S P; Oliveira, Graziele P; Calixto, Rafael S; Oliveira, Danilo B; Souza, Éricka L S; Trindade, Giliane S; Nicoli, Jacques R; Kroon, Erna G; Martins, Flaviano S; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2016-02-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates harbors one of the most complex ecosystems known in microbial ecology and this indigenous microbiota almost always has a profound influence on host-parasite relationships, which can enhance or reduce the pathology of the infection. In this context, the impact of the microbiota during the infection of several viral groups remains poorly studied, including the family Poxviridae. Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a member of this family and is the causative agent of bovine vaccinia, responsible for outbreaks that affect bovines and humans. To determine the influence of the microbiota in the development of the disease caused by VACV, a comparative study using a murine model was performed. Germ-free and conventional, 6- to 7-week-old Swiss NIH mice were infected by tail scarification and intranasally with VACV. Moreover, immunosuppression and microbiota reposition were performed, to establish the interactions among the host's immune system, microbiota and VACV. The data demonstrate that the microbiota is essential for the effective immune response of mice against VACV in intranasal inoculation and to control the virus at the primary site of infection. Furthermore, this study is the first to show that Swiss conventional mice are refractory to the intranasal infection of VACV. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Protection of mice deficient in mature B cells from West Nile virus infection by passive and active immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draves, Kevin E.; Young, Lucy B.; Bryan, Marianne A.; Dresch, Christiane; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael

    2017-01-01

    B cell activating factor receptor (BAFFR)-/- mice have a profound reduction in mature B cells, but unlike μMT mice, they have normal numbers of newly formed, immature B cells. Using a West Nile virus (WNV) challenge model that requires antibodies (Abs) for protection, we found that unlike wild-type (WT) mice, BAFFR-/- mice were highly susceptible to WNV and succumbed to infection within 8 to 12 days after subcutaneous virus challenge. Although mature B cells were required to protect against lethal infection, infected BAFFR-/- mice had reduced WNV E-specific IgG responses and neutralizing Abs. Passive transfer of immune sera from previously infected WT mice rescued BAFFR-/- and fully B cell-deficient μMT mice, but unlike μMT mice that died around 30 days post-infection, BAFFR-/- mice survived, developed WNV-specific IgG Abs and overcame a second WNV challenge. Remarkably, protective immunity could be induced in mature B cell-deficient mice. Administration of a WNV E-anti-CD180 conjugate vaccine 30 days prior to WNV infection induced Ab responses that protected against lethal infection in BAFFR-/- mice but not in μMT mice. Thus, the immature B cells present in BAFFR-/- and not μMT mice contribute to protective antiviral immunity. A CD180-based vaccine may promote immunity in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:29176765

  16. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Prophylaxis During Live Malaria Sporozoite Immunization Induces Long-Lived, Homologous, and Heterologous Protective Immunity Against Sporozoite Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlotte V.; Anderson, Charles; Neal, Jillian; Sahu, Tejram; Conteh, Solomon; Voza, Tatiana; Langhorne, Jean; Borkowsky, William; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2017-01-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is widely used in malaria-endemic areas in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected children and HIV-uninfected, HIV-exposed children as opportunistic infection prophylaxis. Despite the known effects that TMP-SMX has in reducing clinical malaria, its impact on development of malaria-specific immunity in these children remains poorly understood. Using rodent malaria models, we previously showed that TMP-SMX, at prophylactic doses, can arrest liver stage development of malaria parasites and speculated that TMP-SMX prophylaxis during repeated malaria exposures would induce protective long-lived sterile immunity targeting pre-erythrocytic stage parasites in mice. Using the same models, we now demonstrate that repeated exposures to malaria parasites during TMP-SMX administration induces stage-specific and long-lived pre-erythrocytic protective anti-malarial immunity, mediated primarily by CD8+ T-cells. Given the HIV infection and malaria coepidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, clinical studies aimed at determining the optimum duration of TMP-SMX prophylaxis in HIV-infected or HIV-exposed children must account for the potential anti-infection immunity effect of TMP-SMX prophylaxis. PMID:28077589

  17. A single immunization with a recombinant canine adenovirus expressing the rabies virus G protein confers protective immunity against rabies in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianwei; Faber, Milosz; Papaneri, Amy; Faber, Marie-Luise; McGettigan, James P.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Rabies vaccines based on live attenuated rabies viruses or recombinant pox viruses expressing the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) hold the greatest promise of safety and efficacy, particularly for oral immunization of wildlife. However, while these vaccines induce protective immunity in foxes, they are less effective in other animals, and safety concerns have been raised for some of these vaccines. Because canine adenovirus 2 (CAV2) is licensed for use as a live vaccine for dogs and has an excellent efficacy and safety record, we used this virus as an expression vector for the RVG. The recombinant CAV2-RV G produces virus titers similar to those produced by wild-type CAV2, indicating that the RVG gene does not affect virus replication. Comparison of RVG expressed by CAV2-RV G with that of vaccinia-RV G recombinant virus (V-RG) revealed similar amounts of RV G on the cell surface. A single intramuscular or intranasal immunization of mice with CAV2-RVG induced protective immunity in a dose-dependent manner, with no clinical signs or discomfort from the virus infection regardless of the route of administration or the amount of virus

  18. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otfried Kistner

    Full Text Available The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  19. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael; Brühl, Peter; Kreil, Thomas R; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Barrett, P Noel

    2010-02-23

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  20. Mechanisms of stage-transcending protection following immunization of mice with late liver stage-arresting genetically attenuated malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by Plasmodium parasite infection, continues to be one of the leading causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Development of an effective vaccine has been encumbered by the complex life cycle of the parasite that has distinct pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of infection in the mammalian host. Historically, malaria vaccine development efforts have targeted each stage in isolation. An ideal vaccine, however, would target multiple life cycle stages with multiple arms of the immune system and be capable of eliminating initial infection in the liver, the subsequent blood stage infection, and would prevent further parasite transmission. We have previously shown that immunization of mice with Plasmodium yoelii genetically attenuated parasites (GAP that arrest late in liver stage development elicits stage-transcending protection against both a sporozoite challenge and a direct blood stage challenge. Here, we show that this immunization strategy engenders both T- and B-cell responses that are essential for stage-transcending protection, but the relative importance of each is determined by the host genetic background. Furthermore, potent anti-blood stage antibodies elicited after GAP immunization rely heavily on FC-mediated functions including complement fixation and FC receptor binding. These protective antibodies recognize the merozoite surface but do not appear to recognize the immunodominant merozoite surface protein-1. The antigen(s targeted by stage-transcending immunity are present in both the late liver stages and blood stage parasites. The data clearly show that GAP-engendered protective immune responses can target shared antigens of pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic parasite life cycle stages. As such, this model constitutes a powerful tool to identify novel, protective and stage-transcending T and B cell targets for incorporation into a multi-stage subunit vaccine.

  1. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-17

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl(-)]/[OH(-)] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  2. Aerosol vaccination with AERAS-402 elicits robust cellular immune responses in the lungs of rhesus macaques but fails to protect against high-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Patricia A; Bolton, Diane L; Lackner, Andrew A; Kaushal, Deepak; Aye, Pyone Pyone; Mehra, Smriti; Blanchard, James L; Didier, Peter J; Roy, Chad J; Rao, Srinivas S; Hokey, David A; Scanga, Charles A; Sizemore, Donata R; Sadoff, Jerald C; Roederer, Mario; Seder, Robert A

    2014-08-15

    Development of a vaccine against pulmonary tuberculosis may require immunization strategies that induce a high frequency of Ag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in the lung. The nonhuman primate model is essential for testing such approaches because it has predictive value for how vaccines elicit responses in humans. In this study, we used an aerosol vaccination strategy to administer AERAS-402, a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus (rAd) type 35 expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ags Ag85A, Ag85B, and TB10.4, in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed or unprimed rhesus macaques. Immunization with BCG generated low purified protein derivative-specific CD4 T cell responses in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage. In contrast, aerosolized AERAS-402 alone or following BCG induced potent and stable Ag85A/b-specific CD4 and CD8 effector T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage that largely produced IFN-γ, as well as TNF and IL-2. Such responses induced by BCG, AERAS-402, or both failed to confer overall protection following challenge with 275 CFUs M. tuberculosis Erdman, although vaccine-induced responses associated with reduced pathology were observed in some animals. Anamnestic T cell responses to Ag85A/b were not detected in blood of immunized animals after challenge. Overall, our data suggest that a high M. tuberculosis challenge dose may be a critical factor in limiting vaccine efficacy in this model. However, the ability of aerosol rAd immunization to generate potent cellular immunity in the lung suggests that using different or more immunogens, alternative rAd serotypes with enhanced immunogenicity, and a physiological challenge dose may achieve protection against M. tuberculosis.

  3. Enhanced immune responses by skin vaccination with influenza subunit vaccine in young hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Esser, E Stein; McMaster, Sean R; Kalluri, Priya; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Prausnitz, Mark R; Skountzou, Ioanna; Denning, Timothy L; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Compans, Richard W

    2015-09-08

    Skin has gained substantial attention as a vaccine target organ due to its immunological properties, which include a high density of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this vaccination route not only in animal models but also in adults. Young children represent a population group that is at high risk from influenza infection. As a result, this group could benefit significantly from influenza vaccine delivery approaches through the skin and the improved immune response it can induce. In this study, we compared the immune responses in young BALB/c mice upon skin delivery of influenza vaccine with vaccination by the conventional intramuscular route. Young mice that received 5 μg of H1N1 A/Ca/07/09 influenza subunit vaccine using MN demonstrated an improved serum antibody response (IgG1 and IgG2a) when compared to the young IM group, accompanied by higher numbers of influenza-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs) in the bone marrow. In addition, we observed increased activation of follicular helper T cells and formation of germinal centers in the regional lymph nodes in the MN immunized group, rapid clearance of the virus from their lungs as well as complete survival, compared with partial protection observed in the IM-vaccinated group. Our results support the hypothesis that influenza vaccine delivery through the skin would be beneficial for protecting the high-risk young population from influenza infection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Immune events associated with protection in C57BL/6 mice immunized with anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking protective antigens shared between gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model of Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Sherif H

    2010-01-01

    Immunoregulation is central for successful manipulation of schistosomiasis. Unlike schistosome vaccine development strategies that relied on direct selection of antigens from crude responses leading to selection of mildly protective antigens, the present study tested the utility of selection of potentially protective antigens encompassed rounds of immunoregulation via idiotypic network. Anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab2) were purified from sera of New Zealand white rabbits multiply immunized with gamma-irradiated cercariae of S. haematobium, using adult worm specific idiotypes (Ab1) purified from sera of subjects resistant to reinfection. Ab2 was used for immunization of C57BL/6 mice and consequences of immunization were monitored before and after challenge infection with S. haematobium. Results showed an increase of splenic T cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) upon immunization (average % stimulated cells 54.9 vs. 20.4, P anti-anti-ids (Ab3) reactivity against antigens of approximate molecular weight 40, 80 and 160 kDa of adult worms, which were also recognized by Ab1. However, in contrast to Ab1, Ab3 showed no surface binding to 3 hr schistosomula. Strikingly, mice immunized with Ab2 showed strong resistance to challenge infection (approximately 82% reduction in worm burden, P vaccine development strategy appears to filter out non-protective antigens. Indeed Ab3 recognizes much fewer numbers of antigens, which passed through two rounds of immune regulation. These antigens appear to represent a significant proportion of the protective response in the gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model as well, providing the basis for an alternative vaccine for schistosomiasis.

  6. Evaluation of the protection induced by the immunization with radioiodinated yeast cells of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Estefania Mara do Nascimento

    2007-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is fungus agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a chronic systemic disease prevalent in Latin American. To date, there is no effective vaccine. The potential of gamma radiation for pathogens attenuation and vaccine development was explored in this work. In our laboratory were developed yeast cells of P. brasiliensis attenuated by gamma radiation, which lose the reproductive ability, while retaining the morphology, the synthesis and secretion of proteins, the oxidative metabolism and the expression of the antigens present in the native yeast. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the protection elicited by the immunization with this cells in animal model. The virulence attenuated was evaluated in BALB/c and Nude-Nude mice. The protector effect was evaluated in BALB/c mice groups immunized once or twice. Each group was divided in three sub groups that were challenge 30, 45 or 60 days after the immunization. The mice were sacrificed 30 and 90 days after challenge. The removed organs were used for colony forming units (CFU's) recover, histopathological analysis and cytokine determination. The sera were collected weekly to evaluate the IgG antibody titers and the IgG1 and IgG2a pattern in the course of infection. To evaluate the type of elicited immune response the cytokines IFN - γ, TNF - α, IL - 10 and IL - 5 were determined by real time PCR. The radio attenuated yeast loses its virulence since fails in producing infection in BALB/c and Nude-Nude mice. No CFU's were recovered neither histological changes observed in the mice infected with the radio attenuated cells. The mice infected with the not irradiated P. brasiliensis showed a high level of antibody production while the infection with the radio attenuated yeast did not significantly change the antibody level. The mice infected with the radio attenuated yeast presented an increase in the IFN - γ and TNF - α production and an inhibition of the IL-10 synthesis, indicating a

  7. Dietary Fiber and Bacterial SCFA Enhance Oral Tolerance and Protect against Food Allergy through Diverse Cellular Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jian; McKenzie, Craig; Vuillermin, Peter J; Goverse, Gera; Vinuesa, Carola G; Mebius, Reina E; Macia, Laurence; Mackay, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs), which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103(+) DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103(+) DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary Fiber and Bacterial SCFA Enhance Oral Tolerance and Protect against Food Allergy through Diverse Cellular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs, which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103+ DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103+ DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens.

  9. Daily Plasmodium yoelii infective mosquito bites do not generate protection or suppress previous immunity against the liver stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Kurt A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human populations that are naturally subjected to Plasmodium infection do not acquire complete protection against the liver stage of this parasite despite prolonged and frequent exposure. However, sterile immunity against Plasmodium liver stage can be achieved after repeated exposure to radiation attenuated sporozoites. The reasons for this different response remain largely unknown, but a suppressive effect of blood stage Plasmodium infection has been proposed as a cause for the lack of liver stage protection. Methods Using Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL, the response generated in mice subjected to daily infective bites from normal or irradiated mosquitoes was compared. The effect of daily-infected mosquito bites on mice that were previously immunized against P. yoelii liver stage was also studied. Results It was observed that while the bites of normal infected mosquitoes do not generate strong antibody responses and protection, the bites of irradiated mosquitoes result in high levels of anti-sporozoite antibodies and protection against liver stage Plasmodium infection. Exposure to daily infected mosquito bites did not eliminate the protection acquired previously with a experimental liver stage vaccine. Conclusions Liver stage immunity generated by irradiated versus normal P. yoelii infected mosquitoes is essentially different, probably because of the blood stage infection that follows normal mosquito bites, but not irradiated. While infective mosquito bites do not induce a protective liver stage response, they also do not interfere with previously acquired liver stage protective responses, even if they induce a complete blood stage infection. Considering that the recently generated anti-malaria vaccines induce only partial protection against infection, it is encouraging that, at least in mouse models, immunity is not negatively affected by subsequent exposure and infection with the parasite.

  10. The evolutionarily conserved mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 links protective innate immune responses and xenobiotic detoxification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses.

  11. The evolutionarily conserved mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 links protective innate immune responses and xenobiotic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; McEwan, Deborah L; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2014-05-01

    Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses.

  12. Complete protection against lethal Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice immunized with a plasmid encoding the SAG1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H V; Lauemøller, S L; Christiansen, L

    1999-01-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is transmitted to humans from infected animals by tissue cysts and oocysts excreted by cats. Immunization with inactivated parasites or recombinant proteins has at best shown partial protection. We constructed a plasmid expressing the SAG1...... surface antigen of T. gondii, p1tPASAG1, and showed that animals immunized with the plasmid produce anti-SAG1 antibodies which recognize the native SAG1. Mice immunized with p1tPASAG1 showed 80 to 100% protection against challenge with the non-cyst-producing, virulent RH isolate, compared to an 80...... gamma interferon production by CD8(+) T cells from p1tPASAG1-immunized mice was tested in an ELISPOT assay, and one new CTL epitope was identified. Adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells from p1tPASAG1-immunized to naïve mice showed partial protection. In conclusion, DNA vaccination with p1tPASAG1 gave...

  13. Protective anti-tumour immune responses by murine dendritic cells pulsed with recombinant Tat-carcinoembryonic antigen derived from Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, M-Y; Cho, N-H; Seong, S-Y

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is over-expressed on various human cancer cells and has been the target of immunotherapies using dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with CEA-specific RNA or peptides, or transduced by CEA-expressing adenovirus or vaccinia virus. Because activated DCs do not phagocytose soluble protein antigens efficiently and pure immature DCs are not obtained easily ex vivo, an efficacious whole CEA protein-loaded DC vaccine has not been reported. To improve the antigen delivery into DCs, we utilized CEA conjugated to a protein-transduction domain, human immunodeficiency virus transactivating Tat. Furthermore, we purified the truncated non-glycosylated CEA from Escherichia coli to overcome the safety concerns and immunosuppressive functions associated with the native CEA protein. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescence activating cell sorter analysis, we demonstrated that the Tat-CEA protein entered the cytoplasm of DCs efficiently within 10 min of co-culture, compared with the negligible amount of CEA into DCs 30 min later. CEA-specific T cell proliferation and cytotoxic T cell responses were enhanced significantly in mice immunized with Tat-CEA-pulsed DCs [DC (Tat-CEA)] compared with those immunized with CEA-pulsed DCs [DC (CEA)]. T helper type 1 responses were more prominent in the DC (Tat-CEA) immunized mice whose splenocytes secreted more interferon-γ and less interleukin-4 than those from DC (CEA) immunized mice. In vivo, the DC (Tat-CEA) vaccine delayed tumour growth significantly and prolonged survival of tumour-bearing mice. These results suggest that protective epitopes are well preserved on bacteria-derived recombinant Tat-CEA. This strategy may provide a basic platform for DC-based anti-CEA vaccines that could be utilized in combination with advanced immune-enhancing therapeutics. PMID:19659778

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae Attenuated Strain SPY1 with an Artificial Mineral Shell Induces Humoral and Th17 Cellular Immunity and Protects Mice against Pneumococcal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyuan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen leading to substantial morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent S. pneumoniae infection. SPY1 is a pneumococcal vaccine candidate strain obtained in our previous study. To improve its stability and immunogencity, in this study, we constructed the SPY1ΔlytA strain that lacks autolysin activity and was coated with an artificial exterior surface calcium phosphate shell by in situ mineralization. The resulting strain SPY1ΔlytACaPi displayed enhanced thermal stability enabling storage at 37°C for 1 week. Furthermore, mucosal and subcutaneous immunization with the SPY1ΔlytACaPi strain induced better protective effects than SPY1ΔlytA in anti-colonization after challenging with 19F and anti-invasion by D39 in mice. Subcutaneous immunization with SPY1ΔlytACaPi elicited higher IgG level while mucosal immunization primarily elicited an immune response which is supposed to be related to Th17 cells. Taken together, the mineralized strain may be a promising candidate for an attenuated S. pneumoniae vaccine.

  15. Tetraspanin-3 regulates protective immunity against Eimera tenella infection following immunization with dendritic cell-derived exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of immunization with dendritic cell (DC) exosomes, which had been incubated or non-incubated with an anti-tetraspanin-3 (Tspan-3) blocking antibody (Ab), were studied using an experimental model of Eimeria tenella avian coccidiosis. Purified exosomes from cecal tonsil and splenic DCs exp...

  16. Adjuvanted poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticle-entrapped inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine elicits cross-protective immune response in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Ouyang, Kang; Wu, Yun; Lee, Ly James; Torrelles, Jordi B; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV), is an economically devastating disease, causing daily losses of approximately $3 million to the US pork industry. Current vaccines have failed to completely prevent PRRS outbreaks. Recently, we have shown that poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticle-entrapped inactivated PRRSV vaccine (NP-KAg) induces a cross-protective immune response in pigs. To further improve its cross-protective efficacy, the NP-KAg vaccine formulation was slightly modified, and pigs were coadministered the vaccine twice intranasally with a potent adjuvant: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole-cell lysate. In vaccinated virulent heterologous PRRSV-challenged pigs, the immune correlates in the blood were as follows: 1) enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody response with enhanced avidity of both immunoglobulin (Ig)-G and IgA isotypes, associated with augmented virus-neutralizing antibody titers; 2) comparable and increased levels of virus-specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody subtypes and production of high levels of both T-helper (Th)-1 and Th2 cytokines, indicative of a balanced Th1–Th2 response; 3) suppressed immunosuppressive cytokine response; 4) increased frequency of interferon-γ+ lymphocyte subsets and expanded population of antigen-presenting cells; and most importantly 5) complete clearance of detectable replicating challenged heterologous PRRSV and close to threefold reduction in viral ribonucleic acid load detected in the blood. In conclusion, intranasal delivery of adjuvanted NP-KAg vaccine formulation to growing pigs elicited a broadly cross-protective immune response, showing the potential of this innovative vaccination strategy to prevent PRRS outbreaks in pigs. A similar approach to control other respiratory diseases in food animals and humans appears to be feasible. PMID:24493925

  17. Immunization of mice with Vibrio cholerae outer-membrane vesicles protects against hyperinfectious challenge and blocks transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Bishop (Anne); A.A. Tarique; B. Patimalla (Bharathi); S.B. Calderwood; F. Qadri (Firdausi); A. Camilli (Andrew)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Vibrio cholerae excreted by cholera patients is "hyperinfectious" (HI), which can be modeled by passage through infant mice. Immunization of adult female mice with V. cholerae outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs) passively protects suckling mice from challenge. Although V. cholerae

  18. Interleukin-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) as a central regulator of the protective immune response against Giardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paerewijck, O. (Oonagh); Maertens, B. (Brecht); L. Dreesen (Leentje); Van Meulder, F. (Frederik); Peelaers, I. (Iris); Ratman, D. (Dariusz); Li, R.W. (Robert W.); E.W. Lubberts (Erik); K. De Bosscher; P. Geldhof (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe protozoan parasite Giardia is a highly prevalent intestinal pathogen with a wide host range. Data obtained in mice, cattle and humans revealed the importance of IL-17A in the development of a protective immune response against Giardia. The aim of this study was to further unravel the

  19. BCG Vaccination Protects against Experimental Viral Infection in Humans through the Induction of Cytokines Associated with Trained Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arts, Rob J W; Moorlag, Simone J C F M; Novakovic, Boris

    2018-01-01

    -wide epigenetic reprograming of monocytes and protected against experimental infection with an attenuated yellow fever virus vaccine strain. Epigenetic reprogramming was accompanied by functional changes indicative of trained immunity. Reduction of viremia was highly correlated with the upregulation of IL-1β...

  20. Genetically Engineered Ascorbic acid-deficient Live Mutants of Leishmania donovani induce long lasting Protective Immunity against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sneha; Madhubala, Rentala

    2015-06-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe systemic form of the disease. There are still no vaccines available for humans and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. Recently, we reported functional importance of Arabino-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) enzyme from L. donovani involved in ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we have shown that ΔALO parasites do not affect the ability of null mutants to invade visceral organs but severely impair parasite persistence beyond 16 week in BALB/c mice and hence are safe as an immunogen. Both short term (5 week) and long term (20 week) immunization with ΔALO parasites conferred sustained protection against virulent challenge in BALB/c mice, activated splenocytes and resulted in induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Protection in immunized mice after challenge correlated with the stimulation of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Antigen-mediated cell immunity correlated with robust nitrite and superoxide generation, macrophage-derived oxidants critical in controlling Leishmania infection. Our data shows that live attenuated ΔALO parasites are safe, induce protective immunity and can provide sustained protection against Leishmania donovani. We further conclude that the parasites attenuated in their anti-oxidative defence mechanism can be exploited as vaccine candidates.

  1. Mutant p53 shapes the enhancer landscape of cancer cells in response to chronic immune signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamoun, Homa; Lu, Hanbin; Duttke, Sascha H; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K; Lauberth, Shannon M

    2017-09-29

    Inflammation influences cancer development, progression, and the efficacy of cancer treatments, yet the mechanisms by which immune signaling drives alterations in the cancer cell transcriptome remain unclear. Using ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, and GRO-seq, here we demonstrate a global overlap in the binding of tumor-promoting p53 mutants and the master proinflammatory regulator NFκB that drives alterations in enhancer and gene activation in response to chronic TNF-α signaling. We show that p53 mutants interact directly with NFκB and that both factors impact the other's binding at diverse sets of active enhancers. In turn, the simultaneous and cooperative binding of these factors is required to regulate RNAPII recruitment, the synthesis of enhancer RNAs, and the activation of tumor-promoting genes. Collectively, these findings establish a mechanism by which chronic TNF-α signaling orchestrates a functional interplay between mutant p53 and NFκB that underlies altered patterns of cancer-promoting gene expression.Inflammation is known to affect cancer development, yet the mechanisms by which immune signaling drives transformation remain unclear. Here, the authors provide evidence that chronic TNF-α signaling promotes the enhancer binding and transcriptional interplay between mutant p53 and NFκB.

  2. [Ginkgo biloba extract enhances the immune function of spleen and thymus in SD rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Si, Lifang; Li, Xiangneng; Li, Zhansheng

    2015-06-01

    To study the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on the immune function of spleen and thymus in SD rats. Forty SD rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 rats each group). Three experimental groups were given GBE daily by gavage in doses of 40, 120, 360 mg/(kg.d), respectively. Animals in the control group were fed the same amount of PBS. After 28 days, the rats were sacrificed by chloral hydrate anesthesia. The spleen and thymus were harvested to determine the organ index first. MTT assay was used to detect the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenic lymphocyte proliferation and transformation. Neutral red assay was performed to measure the rat peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis. The ultrastructural changes of spleen and thymus were observed under scanning electron microscope. Administration of GBE in the rats increased the mass indexes of rat thymus and spleen, dose-dependently elevated the lymphocyte proliferative responses and enhanced the peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis. In experimental groups, the numbers of mature spleen and thymus lymphocytes were significantly raised in comparison with the control rats. GBE plays a regulatory role in immune function of the rat by increasing the mass of immune o