WorldWideScience

Sample records for enhancement evaluation workshop

  1. Enhancing teamwork among allied health students: evaluation of an interprofessional workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Mickan, Sharon; Marinac, Julie; Woodyatt, Gail

    2005-01-01

    This report outlines the teamwork learning outcomes of an interprofessional workshop conducted with a cohort of 81 graduate-entry students of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology, and audiology. This four-hour workshop was based around a case scenario of a child with developmental coordination disorder. This report describes and evaluates the development of knowledge and skills of teamwork that were facilitated through this workshop. Students completed questionnaires before and after the workshop about their knowledge of teamwork, requisites for working together, the utility of the workshop, and learning outcomes. The evaluation indicated that the workshop was successful from the students' perspectives in confirming the importance of teamwork and the processes of communication and collaborative goal setting. Students refined their own professional roles and developed an appreciation of the contribution of other professions and parents. This recognition of the comparative value of different professional contributions in providing holistic patient care is one of the starting points for education about interprofessional teamwork.

  2. Factors enhancing learning possibilities in digital workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of processes supporting student learning possibilities in digital workshops planned and held at art museums in Denmark. The investigation aims to provide insights into factors enhancing learning possibilities, including the educator’s dialogic performance, experiences of art, and perceived qualities of digital content creation processes in art museum education workshops. To address the research question of what conditional and processual factors can be said to support learning possibilities, a model was developed on the basis of fieldwork and theories of media education, art pedagogy and motivation. The model was then analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM on data collected (N= 502 after workshops in two museums. The results suggest that the dialogic performance of museum educators, a positive art experience and positive perceptions of working with digital media are factors that strongly support student participation and reflection – although to various degrees. The findings also show that, in cases in which students are disinterested and see little value in participating during the workshop, this amotivation is likely to be lower when their art experiences and their perceptions of the media production process are positive. 

  3. Factors enhancing learning possibilities in digital workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of processes supporting student learning possibilities in digital workshops planned and held at art museums in Denmark. The investigation aims to provide insights into factors enhancing learning possibilities, including the educator’s dialogic performance, experiences of art, and perceived qualities of digital content creation processes in art museum education workshops. To address the research question of what conditional and processual factors can be said to support learning possibilities, a model was developed on the basis of fieldwork and theories of media education, art pedagogy and motivation. The model was then analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM on data collected (N= 502 after workshops in two museums. The results suggest that the dialogic performance of museum educators, a positive art experience and positive perceptions of working with digital media are factors that strongly support student participation and reflection – although to various degrees. The findings also show that, in cases in which students are disinterested and see little value in participating during the workshop, this amotivation is likely to be lower when their art experiences and their perceptions of the media production process are positive.

  4. A technology-enhanced patient case workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vinita B; Kelley, Katherine A; Bellebaum, Katherine L

    2009-08-28

    To assess the impact of technology-based changes on student learning, skill development, and satisfaction in a patient-case workshop. A new workshop format for a course was adopted over a 3-year period. Students received and completed patient cases and obtained immediate performance feedback in class instead of preparing the case prior to class and waiting for instructors to grade and return their cases. The cases were designed and accessed via an online course management system. Student satisfaction was measured using end-of-course surveys. The impact of the technology-based changes on student learning, problem-solving, and critical-thinking skills was measured and compared between the 2 different course formats by assessing changes in examination responses. Three advantages to the new format were reported: real-life format in terms of time constraint for responses, a team learning environment, and expedient grading and feedback. Students overwhelmingly agreed that the new format should be continued. Students' examination scores improved significantly under the new format. The change in delivery of patient-case workshops to an online, real-time system was well accepted and resulted in enhanced learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

  5. Evaluating a poetry workshop in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T J; McLachlan, J C

    2006-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating how doing poetry could affect students' understanding of medical practice and at assessing the effectiveness of the evaluation method used. Qualitative research was carried out on the experiences of medical students participating in a poetry workshop, followed by some quantitative analysis. The study was conducted at Peninsula Medical School and St Ives, Cornwall, UK, with three medical students, a poet and a pathologist as participants. Data were collected by interviews, observation and web access. "Doing poetry" with a professional poet was found to assist communication between doctors and patients as it enhanced skills of observation, heightened awareness of the effect of language and fostered deep reflection. Poetry was also found to offer an outlet for medics and patients. The voluntary workshop attracted three participants; however, it might have had an effect on the wider student community because the poetry website received 493 hits in four months. Qualitative methods worked well as a tool for evaluation. "Doing poetry for poetry's sake" seemed to foster the development of skills related to empathy. The opportunity to do poetry should be made available to medical students as part of a wider arts and humanities programme.

  6. Evaluation of workshops on healing through multicultural counseling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of workshops on healing through multicultural counseling: Sport psychology implications. ... Healing through multicultural counselling workshops were conducted at universities in South Africa and ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. Evaluation of the Career Planning Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, L.W.

    1986-04-01

    People who apply to participate in this workshop appear to be genuinely interested in personal development. Participants reported that they were not very happy with several aspects of their jobs prior to the workshop. Predominant personality characteristics of the participants were shyness, communication anxiety, reserved style, cautiousness, moodiness, energetic, hard-working and analytical minded. Participants were favorably impressed with the workshop. One of the most potent ways that the workshop impacts participants is through improved self understanding and enhanced self-esteem. Many people did change jobs following the workshop. Of those who did not actually change jobs, almost half reported that they had modified their present job to achieve a better person-job fit. Participants did not report many changes in their routine behavior although they kept the supervisor more informed of their job activity. Current job satisfaction is good among the participants. Although the workshop is fairly expensive to provide, the long range benefits in terms of enhanced levels of performance far outweigh the costs.

  8. International Workshop on Evidence-Based Technology Enhanced Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Gennari, Rosella; Marenzi, Ivana; Prieta, Fernando; Rodríguez, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Research on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) investigates how information and communication technologies can be designed in order to support pedagogical activities. The workshop proceedings collects contributions concerning evidence based TEL systems, like their design following EBD principles as well as studies or best practices that educators, education stakeholders or psychologists used to diagnose or improve their students' learning skills, including students with specific difficulties. The international ebTEL’12 workshop wants to be a forum in which TEL researchers and practitioners alike can discuss ideas, projects, and lessons related to ebTEL. The workshop takes place in Salamanca, Spain, on March 28th-30th 2012.  

  9. Bibliometric-Enhanced Information Retrieval. Editorial for the workshop.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayr, Philipp; Schaer, Philipp; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Mutschke, Peter; de Rijke, Maarten; Kenter, Tom; de Vries, Arjen P.; Zhai, ChengXiang; de Jong, Franciska; Radinsky, Kira; Hofmann, Katja

    2014-01-01

    This first "Bibliometric-enhanced Information Retrieval" (BIR 2014) workshop aims to engage with the IR community about possible links to bibliometrics and scholarly communication. Bibliometric techniques are not yet widely used to enhance retrieval processes in digital libraries, although they

  10. An AHP-based evaluation method for teacher training workshop on information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rochelle Irene; Promentilla, Michael Angelo; Ubando, Aristotle; Tan, Raymond Girard; Aviso, Kathleen; Yu, Krista Danielle

    2017-08-01

    The emergence of information and communication technology (ICT) has created opportunities for enhancing the learning process at different educational levels. However, its potential benefits can only be fully realized if teachers are properly trained to utilize such tools. The rapid evolution of ICT also necessitates rigorous assessment of training programs by participants. Thus, this study proposes an evaluation framework based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to systematically evaluate such workshops designed for teachers. The evaluation model is decomposed hierarchically into four main criteria namely: (1) workshop design, (2) quality of content of the workshop, (3) quality of delivery of the content of the workshop, and the (4) relevance of the workshop. These criteria are further disaggregated into 24 sub-indicators to measure the effectiveness of the workshop as perceived by the participants based on their own expectations. This framework is applied to a case study of ICT workshops done in the Philippines. In this case, relevance of the workshop is found to be the most important main criterion identified by the participants, particularly on the new ICT knowledge that promotes teachers' professional growth and development. The workshop evaluation index (WEI) is also proposed as a metric to support decision-making by providing a mechanism for benchmarking performance, tracking improvement over time, and developing strategies for the design and improvement of training programs or workshops on ICT for teachers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of a Sexual Enhancement Workshop on Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Bill

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-four undergraduate volunteers participated in a sexual enhancement workshop, designed to explore the emotional aspects of sex through the use of small group discussion and sexually explicit films. Results indicated that participants experienced significant change toward acceptance of masturbation and a lessening of sex-related anxiety. (SJL)

  12. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data evaluation. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    A summary is given of the aims and contents of the Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluation, including the agenda, lists of participants and their presentations, general comments and recommendations. The 1-week workshop was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and held in Vienna, Austria, from 18 to 22 November 2002. Workshop material, including participants' presentations, computer codes, manuals and other materials for NSDD evaluators, are freely available on CD-ROM on request. (author)

  13. EVALUATION OF BASIC COURSE WORKSHOP CONDUCTED IN A MEDICAL COLLEGE

    OpenAIRE

    Manasee Panda; Krishna Kar; Kaushik Mishra

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Faculty development is perhaps one of the foremost issues among the factors influencing the quality of medical education. It was planned to evaluate Basic course workshop (BCW) on Medical education Technologies (MET) conducted in the institution with following objectives 1. To assess the effectiveness of the B CW in MET conducted in the Medical College. 2. To study the changes in teaching practices and assessment methods of faculties after the workshop. MATERIALS ...

  14. Fit for work? Evaluation of a workshop for rheumatology teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Khan, S; Marfell, N

    2016-06-01

    People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may rapidly cease work prematurely due to ill-health. A recent survey noted that a quarter of respondents with RA experienced job loss within a year of diagnosis and 50% stopped work within 6 years. To develop and pilot workshops to increase the knowledge, skills and confidence of rheumatology team members to support work-related issues in outpatient clinics. A 3-h interactive workshop, informed by rheumatology experts and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) National Education Programme (NEP) about work and health, was developed to address both knowledge and skills in the management of health and work consultations in an outpatient setting. Questionnaires were developed for use pre- and immediately post-workshop, with questions that focused on the confidence of delegates in managing these discussions and the importance they placed upon them. Ninety-nine participants attended five workshops throughout the UK between 2013 and 2104. Seventy-three per cent (72) completed the post-workshop questionnaire. Eighty-nine per cent found the workshop useful or very useful, 88% found it relevant or very relevant and 79% responded that it had an impact or a considerable impact on their practice. Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank tests were carried out that showed an overall increase in confidence after training. The results suggest that the workshop was both relevant and useful to participants and had an impact on their practice. This was true for all specialities. The workshops also highlighted participants' desire to understand how to use the 'fit note' to enhance their patient management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B. C.

    2004-10-01

    The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

  16. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization. The activities performed during the feasibility assessment phase include laboratory scale experiments; fuel performance code updates; and analytical assessment of economic, operational, safety, fuel cycle, and environmental impacts of the new concepts. The development and qualification stage will consist of fuel fabrication and large scale irradiation and safety basis testing, leading to qualification and ultimate NRC licensing of the new fuel. The commercialization phase initiates technology transfer to industry for implementation. Attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance include improved reaction kinetics with steam and slower hydrogen generation rate, while maintaining acceptable cladding thermo-mechanical properties; fuel thermo-mechanical properties; fuel-clad interactions; and fission-product behavior. These attributes provide a qualitative guidance for parameters that must be considered in the development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. However, quantitative metrics must be developed for these attributes. To initiate the quantitative metrics development, a Light Water Reactor Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held October 10-11, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the structure and outcome of the two-day workshop. Questions regarding the content can be directed to Lori Braase, 208-526-7763, lori.braase@inl.gov.

  17. Technology Evaluation Workshop Report for Tank Waste Chemical Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    A Tank Waste Chemical Characterization Technology Evaluation Workshop was held August 24--26, 1993. The workshop was intended to identify and evaluate technologies appropriate for the in situ and hot cell characterization of the chemical composition of Hanford waste tank materials. The participants were asked to identify technologies that show applicability to the needs and good prospects for deployment in the hot cell or tanks. They were also asked to identify the tasks required to pursue the development of specific technologies to deployment readiness. This report describes the findings of the workshop. Three focus areas were identified for detailed discussion: (1) elemental analysis, (2) molecular analysis, and (3) gas analysis. The technologies were restricted to those which do not require sample preparation. Attachment 1 contains the final workshop agenda and a complete list of attendees. An information package (Attachment 2) was provided to all participants in advance to provide information about the Hanford tank environment, needs, current characterization practices, potential deployment approaches, and the evaluation procedure. The participants also received a summary of potential technologies (Attachment 3). The workshop opened with a plenary session, describing the background and issues in more detail. Copies of these presentations are contained in Attachments 4, 5 and 6. This session was followed by breakout sessions in each of the three focus areas. The workshop closed with a plenary session where each focus group presented its findings. This report summarizes the findings of each of the focus groups. The evaluation criteria and information about specific technologies are tabulated at the end of each section in the report. The detailed notes from each focus group are contained in Attachments 7, 8 and 9

  18. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  19. Evaluating a Gender Diversity Workshop to Promote Positive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James; Lucassen, Mathijs F. G.; Hamilton, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on data from an Aotearoa/New Zealand study of more than 230 secondary students, this article evaluates the potential of a 60-min gender diversity workshop to address bullying and promote positive environments for learning. Students completed pre- and postworkshop questionnaires. The authors used descriptive statistics to summarize results…

  20. Bibliometric-enhanced Information Retrieval : 2nd International BIR Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayr, Philipp; Frommholz, Ingo; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Mutschke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This workshop brings together experts of communities which often have been perceived as different once: bibliometrics / scientometrics / informetrics on the one side and information retrieval on the other. Our motivation as organizers of the workshop started from the observation that main discourses

  1. Technology transfer - insider protection workshop (Safeguards Evaluation Method - Insider Threat)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, R.S.; Renis, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Safeguards Evaluation Method - Insider Threat, developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a field-applicable tool to evaluate facility safeguards against theft or diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) by nonviolent insiders. To ensure successful transfer of this technology from the laboratory to DOE field offices and contractors, LLNL developed a three-part package. The package includes a workbook, user-friendly microcomputer software, and a three-day training program. The workbook guides an evaluation team through the Safeguards Evaluation Method and provides forms for gathering data. The microcomputer software assists in the evaluation of safeguards effectiveness. The software is designed for safeguards analysts with no previous computer experience. It runs on an IBM Personal Computer or any compatible machine. The three-day training program is called the Insider Protection Workshop. The workshop students learn how to use the workbook and the computer software to assess insider vulnerabilities and to evaluate the benefits and costs of potential improvements. These activities increase the students' appreciation of the insider threat. The workshop format is informal and interactive, employing four different instruction modes: classroom presentations, small-group sessions, a practical exercise, and ''hands-on'' analysis using microcomputers. This approach to technology transfer has been successful: over 100 safeguards planners and analysts have been trained in the method, and it is being used at facilities through the DOE complex

  2. Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (RecSysTEL 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manouselis, Nikos; Drachsler, Hendrik; Verbert, Katrien; Santos, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Manouselis, N., Drachsler, H., Verbert, K., & Santos, O. C. (Eds.) (2012). Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (RecSysTEL 2012). Published by CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2012, Vol. 896.

  3. EVALUATION OF BASIC COURSE WORKSHOP CONDUCTED IN A MEDICAL COLLEGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasee Panda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Faculty development is perhaps one of the foremost issues among the factors influencing the quality of medical education. It was planned to evaluate Basic course workshop (BCW on Medical education Technologies (MET conducted in the institution with following objectives 1. To assess the effectiveness of the B CW in MET conducted in the Medical College. 2. To study the changes in teaching practices and assessment methods of faculties after the workshop. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present Evaluation study was conducted at the RTC (SCB Medical College, Odisha of MCI in MET from February 2012 to December 2012. Kirkpatrick’s model with four levels of program outcomes (reaction, learning, behaviour, and result was used to evaluate the effectiveness of workshop. Convenient sampling method was used. All the faculties in the first 4 batches of the workshop were the study participants. Data was collected from the record of the RTC from the filled in Feedback form, PrePst test forms, filled semi structured questionnaire from the participants, in-depth interview of facilitators and focus group discussion of students. Descriptive statistics like percentage, Proportions and Chi-square test used. RESULTS A total of 67 faculties responded to the questionnaire. There was gain in knowledge for majority of faculties in different teaching learning process and assessment methods due to the workshop. More than 90% of faculties had the attitude to practice interactive teaching, PBL and preparing MCQs and structured oral questions. Self-reported change in teaching behavior and assessment method was reported by more than 80% of the faculties. Reasons for non- implementation were given as the lack of support from the institution (64%, from other faculties (34%,lack of self-motivation(13%.Facilitators were satisfied with the quality of training. But FGD conducted for the students revealed that they failed to recognize noticeable change in the teaching and

  4. Transgender HIV prevention: implementation and evaluation of a workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockting, W O; Rosser, B R; Scheltema, K

    1999-04-01

    Virtually no HIV prevention education has specifically targeted the transgender community. To fill this void, a transgender HIV prevention workshop was developed, implemented and evaluated. A 4 h workshop, grounded in the Health Belief Model and the Eroticizing Safer Sex approach, combined lectures, videos, a panel, discussion, roleplay and exercises. Evaluation using a pre-, post- and follow-up test design showed an increase in knowledge and an initial increase in positive attitudes that diminished over time. Due to the small sample size (N = 59) and limited frequency of risk behavior, a significant decrease in unsafe sexual or needle practices could not be demonstrated. However, findings suggested an increase in safer sexual behaviors such as (mutual) masturbation. Peer support improved significantly. Future prevention education should make special efforts to target the more difficult-to-reach, high-risk subgroups of the transgender population.

  5. Workshop on using natural language processing applications for enhancing clinical decision making: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vinay M; Rodgers, Mary; Conroy, Richard; Luo, James; Zhou, Ruixia; Seto, Belinda

    2014-02-01

    In April 2012, the National Institutes of Health organized a two-day workshop entitled 'Natural Language Processing: State of the Art, Future Directions and Applications for Enhancing Clinical Decision-Making' (NLP-CDS). This report is a summary of the discussions during the second day of the workshop. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants emphasized the need for unstructured clinical notes to be included in the decision making workflow and the need for individualized longitudinal data tracking. The workshop also discussed the need to: (1) combine evidence-based literature and patient records with machine-learning and prediction models; (2) provide trusted and reproducible clinical advice; (3) prioritize evidence and test results; and (4) engage healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. The overall consensus of the NLP-CDS workshop was that there are promising opportunities for NLP and CDS to deliver cognitive support for healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients.

  6. Workshop on Realist Evaluation for Integrated Care

    OpenAIRE

    Busetto, Loraine; Vrijhoef, Bert

    2018-01-01

    Background: The medical and health sciences were described by Joan Eakin as “a land in which the randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered the apex of the methodological food chain”. However, integrated care (IC) interventions may in themselves call for the prioritisation of comprehensive, qualitative and multimethod research instead of traditional quantitative, single-method evaluations of program effectiveness. Therefore, rather than focusing only on whether certain IC interventions c...

  7. Enhancing clinical skills education: University of Virginia School of Medicine's Clerkship Clinical Skills Workshop Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Eugene C; Payne, Nancy J; Bradley, Elizabeth B; Maughan, Karen L; Heald, Evan B; Wang, Xin Qun

    2007-07-01

    In 1993, the University of Virginia School of Medicine began a clinical skills workshop program in an effort to improve the preparation of all clerkship students to participate in clinical care. This program involved the teaching of selected basic clinical skills by interested faculty to small groups of third-year medical students. Over the past 14 years, the number of workshops has increased from 11 to 31, and they now involve clerkship faculty from family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatrics. Workshops include a variety of common skills from the communication, physical examination, and clinical test and procedure domains such as pediatric phone triage, shoulder examination, ECG interpretation, and suturing. Workshop sessions allow students to practice skills on each other, with standardized patients, or with models, with the goal of improving competence and confidence in the performance of basic clinical skills. Students receive direct feedback from faculty on their skill performance. The style and content of these workshops are guided by an explicit set of educational criteria.A formal evaluation process ensures that faculty receive regular feedback from student evaluation comments so that adherence to workshop criteria is continuously reinforced. Student evaluations confirm that these workshops meet their skill-learning needs. Preliminary outcome measures suggest that workshop teaching can be linked to student assessment data and may improve students' skill performance. This program represents a work-in-progress toward the goal of providing a more comprehensive and developmental clinical skills curriculum in the school of medicine.

  8. Experimental evaluation of the Skylab orbital workshop ventilation system concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allums, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Ralston, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive testing was conducted to evaluate the Orbital Workshop ventilation concept. Component tests were utilized to determine the relationship between operating characteristics at 1 and 0.34 atm. System tests were conducted at 1 atm within the Orbital Workshop full-scale mockup to assess delivered volumetric flow rate and compartment air velocities. Component tests with the Anemostat circular diffusers (plenum- and duct-mounted) demonstrated that the diffuser produced essentially equivalent airflow patterns and velocities in 1- and 0.34-atm environments. The tests also showed that the pressure drop across the diffuser could be scaled from 1 to 0.34 atm using the atmosphere pressure ratio. Fan tests indicated that the performance of a multiple, parallel-mounted fan cluster could be predicted by summing the single-fan flow rates at a given delta P.

  9. A workshop on enhanced national capability for neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, Alan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rhyne, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Paul S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This two-day workshop will engage the international neutron scattering community to vet and improve the Lujan Center Strategic Plan 2007-2013 (SP07). Sponsored by the LANL SC Program Office and the University of California, the workshop will be hosted by LANSCE Professor Sunny Sinha (UCSD). Endorsement by the Spallation Neutron Source will be requested. The discussion will focus on the role that the Lujan Center will play in the national neutron scattering landscape assuming full utilization of beamlines, a refurbished LANSCE, and a 1.4-MW SNS. Because the Lujan Strategic Plan is intended to set the stage for the Signature Facility era at LANSCE, there will be some discussion of the long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos. Breakout groups will cover several new instrument concepts, upgrades to present instruments, expanded sample environment capabilities, and a look to the future. The workshop is in keeping with a request by BES to update the Lujan strategic plan in coordination with the SNS and the broader neutron community. Workshop invitees will be drawn from the LANSCE User Group and a broad cross section of the US, European, and Pacific Rim neutron scattering research communities.

  10. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AlFaris, E.; Naeem, N; Irfan, F.; Qureshi, R.; Saad, H.; Sadhan, R. Al; Abdulghani, H.M.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2015-01-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King

  11. Editorial for the Bibliometric-enhanced Information Retrieval Workshop at ECIR 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayr, Philipp; Schaer, Philipp; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Mutschke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This first "Bibliometric-enhanced Information Retrieval" (BIR 2014) workshop aims to engage with the IR community about possible links to bibliometrics and scholarly communication. Bibliometric techniques are not yet widely used to enhance retrieval processes in digital libraries, although they

  12. Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, Adam; Pammer, Viktoria; Pannese, Lucia; Prilla, Michael; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Ullman, Thomas; Voigt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Moore, A., Pammer, V., Pannese, L., Prilla, M., Rajagopal, K., Reinhardt, W., Ullman, Th. D., & Voigt, Ch. (Eds.) (2012). Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. In conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning: 21st

  13. OECD/CSNI Workshop on Best Estimate Methods and Uncertainty Evaluations - Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Best-Estimate Methods plus Uncertainty Evaluation are gaining increased interest in the licensing process. On the other hand, lessons learnt from the BEMUSE (NEA/CSNI/R(2011)3) and SM2A (NEA/CSNI/R(2011)3) benchmarks, progress of UAM benchmark, and answers to the WGAMA questionnaire on the Use of Best-Estimate Methodologies show that improvements of the present methods are necessary and new applications appear. The objective of this workshop is to provide a forum for a wide range of experts to exchange information in the area of best estimate analysis and uncertainty evaluation methods and address issues drawn-up from BEMUSE, UAM and SM2A activities. Both, improvement of existing methods and recent new developments are included. As a result of the workshop development, a set of recommendations, including lines for future activities were proposed. The organisation of the Workshop was divided into three parts: Opening session including key notes from OECD and IAEA representatives, Technical sessions, and a Wrap-up session. All sessions included a debate with participation from the audience constituted by 71 attendees. The workshop consisted of four technical sessions: a) Development achievements of BEPU methods and State of the Art: The objective of this session was to present the different approaches to deal with Best Estimate codes and uncertainties evaluations. A total of six papers were presented. One initial paper summarized the existing methods; the following open papers were focused on specific methods stressing their bases, peculiarities and advantages. As a result of the session a picture of the current State of the Art was obtained. b) International comparative activities: This session reviewed the set of international activities around the subject of BEPU methods benchmarking and development. From each of the activities a description of the objectives, development, main results, conclusions and recommendations (in case it is finalized) was presented. This

  14. Mobile health technology evaluation: the mHealth evidence workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Nilsen, Wendy J; Abernethy, Amy; Atienza, Audie; Patrick, Kevin; Pavel, Misha; Riley, William T; Shar, Albert; Spring, Bonnie; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Hedeker, Donald; Honavar, Vasant; Kravitz, Richard; Lefebvre, R Craig; Mohr, David C; Murphy, Susan A; Quinn, Charlene; Shusterman, Vladimir; Swendeman, Dallas

    2013-08-01

    Creative use of new mobile and wearable health information and sensing technologies (mHealth) has the potential to reduce the cost of health care and improve well-being in numerous ways. These applications are being developed in a variety of domains, but rigorous research is needed to examine the potential, as well as the challenges, of utilizing mobile technologies to improve health outcomes. Currently, evidence is sparse for the efficacy of mHealth. Although these technologies may be appealing and seemingly innocuous, research is needed to assess when, where, and for whom mHealth devices, apps, and systems are efficacious. In order to outline an approach to evidence generation in the field of mHealth that would ensure research is conducted on a rigorous empirical and theoretic foundation, on August 16, 2011, researchers gathered for the mHealth Evidence Workshop at NIH. The current paper presents the results of the workshop. Although the discussions at the meeting were cross-cutting, the areas covered can be categorized broadly into three areas: (1) evaluating assessments; (2) evaluating interventions; and (3) reshaping evidence generation using mHealth. This paper brings these concepts together to describe current evaluation standards, discuss future possibilities, and set a grand goal for the emerging field of mHealth research. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  15. Effective IEC approaches for Asia. IEC evaluation workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The UNFPA-supported project on development and distribution of information, education, and communication (IEC) materials in support of improving women's health and status was evaluated at a workshop held in Tokyo in December 13-15, 1995. The 1992-95 cycle of the project was analyzed by experts from Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, the Philippines, and Vietnam plus three experts from the UNFPA/Country Support Team. The workshop also made it possible for the experts to identify needs as well as effective utilization of existing IEC materials. It was suggested that a nongovernmental organization be established for the distribution and effective use of these materials. The workshop mostly reviewed the print and audiovisual materials. Videos were also evaluated. The materials were found useful for the targeted region. Among other subregional issues it was noted that youth needs were inadequately addressed as they related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), unwanted pregnancy, risk of maternal mortality and morbidity, low birth weight, and premature birth. Although the women of the region comprise one-third of the world's population, 70% of the global annual maternal mortality of 500,000 occurs in the subregion. IEC materials should also target adolescents and their support groups. Other needs were also outlined: the expansion of educational opportunities for women, the promotion of employment, the involvement of men, and the training of personnel. The strategies used in the cycle helped strengthen self-reliance through information and experience sharing. The focus on women should be continued with more attention paid to adolescents and young adults, including males. Women's health issues should be expanded to include menopause, reproductive tract infections, STDs, HIV/AIDS prevention, and legal rights including abortion. The production of IEC materials should be identified through research and analysis of existing materials, focus group

  16. 76 FR 49776 - The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ...] The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and... Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to identify and discuss the key issues related to the development and evaluation of next-generation smallpox vaccines. The...

  17. Applying the chronicle workshop as a method for evaluating participatory interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Signe; Ipsen, Christine; Gish, Liv

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing interest for process evaluation in participatory interventions, studies examining specific methods for process evaluation are lacking. In this paper, we propose a new method for process evaluation – the chronicle workshop. The chronicle workshop has not previously been used...... productivity and well-being. In all cases, we saw that the chronicle workshop gave valuable information about the intervention process and that it initiated a joint reflection among participants from different departments. The chronicle workshop makes it possible to better understand the results...

  18. Simulated surgical workshops enhance medical school students’ preparation for clinical rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Johnson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA major focus of the medical school curriculum is to ensure medical students are well prepared prior to entering clinical rotations, which includes the compulsory surgical rotation.AimsThe objective of this research was to design and formally evaluate a set of real-life surgical workshops aimed at better preparing medical students for their clinical rotation in surgery. These workshops would be incorporated into the pre-clinical medical school curriculum.MethodDedicated surgical workshops were introduced into the preclinical component of the Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS program at our University in 2009. These workshops encompassed training in the clinical skills needed in the perioperative and wider hospital setting. A survey comprising of eight to nine ranked questions (utilising a five-point Likert Scale as well as three short answer questions was administered to the medical students after they completed their compulsory surgical clinical rotation.ResultsThe overall response rate to the survey evaluating the surgical workshops was 79% (123/155. The mean of the ranked questions ranged from 4.05 to 4.89 which indicated that the students found the workshops useful. When evaluating the short answer questions (via topic coding, additional information was provided that supported and explained the survey findings and also included suggestions for improvements.ConclusionThe findings of the medical student survey demonstrated the value of incorporating dedicated preparatory surgical workshops in the medical school pre-clinical curriculum. However, further research is warranted to determine if this inclusion translated into improved student performance during the clinical surgical rotation.

  19. 76 FR 45268 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ...] Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop AGENCY... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop regarding the approach of the Center for Drug Evaluation and..., and to gain additional insight from, professional societies, patient advocates, industry, consumer...

  20. A methodology for enhancing implementation science proposals: comparison of face-to-face versus virtual workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Brigid R; Rodriguez, Allison L; Landes, Sara J; Lewis, Cara C; Comtois, Katherine A

    2016-05-06

    With the current funding climate and need for advancements in implementation science, there is a growing demand for grantsmanship workshops to increase the quality and rigor of proposals. A group-based implementation science-focused grantsmanship workshop, the Implementation Development Workshop (IDW), is one methodology to address this need. This manuscript provides an overview of the IDW structure, format, and findings regarding its utility. The IDW methodology allows researchers to vet projects in the proposal stage in a structured format with a facilitator and two types of expert participants: presenters and attendees. The presenter uses a one-page handout and verbal presentation to present their proposal and questions. The facilitator elicits feedback from attendees using a format designed to maximize the number of unique points made. After each IDW, participants completed an anonymous survey assessing perceptions of the IDW. Presenters completed a funding survey measuring grant submission and funding success. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a subset of participants who participated in both delivery formats. Mixed method analyses were performed to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of the IDW and compare the delivery formats. Of those who participated in an IDW (N = 72), 40 participated in face-to-face only, 16 in virtual only, and 16 in both formats. Thirty-eight (face-to-face n = 12, 35 % response rate; virtual n = 26, 66.7 % response rate) responded to the surveys and seven (15.3 % response rate), who had attended both formats, completed an interview. Of 36 total presenters, 17 (face-to-face n = 12, 42.9 % response rate; virtual n = 5, 62.9 % response rate) responded to the funding survey. Mixed method analyses indicated that the IDW was effective for collaboration and growth, effective for enhancing success in obtaining grants, and acceptable. A third (35.3 %) of presenters ultimately received funding for their proposal, and more than

  1. Research methodology workshops evaluation using the Kirkpatrick's model: translating theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Shaik, Shaffi Ahamed; Khamis, Nehal; Al-Drees, Abdulmajeed Abdulrahman; Irshad, Mohammad; Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Alhaqwi, Ali Ibrahim; Isnani, Arthur

    2014-04-01

    Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of academic programs can enhance the development, effectiveness, and dissemination of comparative quality reports as well as quality improvement efforts. To evaluate the five research methodology workshops through assessing participants' satisfaction, knowledge and skills gain and impact on practices by the Kirkpatrick's evaluation model. The four level Kirkpatrick's model was applied for the evaluation. Training feedback questionnaires, pre and post tests, learner development plan reports and behavioral surveys were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the workshop programs. Of the 116 participants, 28 (24.1%) liked with appreciation, 62 (53.4%) liked with suggestions and 26 (22.4%) disliked the programs. Pre and post MCQs tests mean scores showed significant improvement of relevant basic knowledge and cognitive skills by 17.67% (p ≤ 0.005). Pre-and-post tests scores on workshops sub-topics also significantly improved for the manuscripts (p ≤ 0.031) and proposal writing (p ≤ 0.834). As for the impact, 56.9% of participants started research, and 6.9% published their studies. The results from participants' performance revealed an overall positive feedback and 79% of participant reported transfer of training skills at their workplace. The course outcomes achievement and suggestions given for improvements offer insight into the program which were encouraging and very useful. Encouraging "research culture" and work-based learning are probably the most powerful determinants for research promotion. These findings therefore encourage faculty development unit to continue its training and development in the research methodology aspects.

  2. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper,S.E.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Occhogrosso, D.M.; Lockwood, D.; Carroll, C.J.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Fankhauser, J.

    2009-07-12

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards October 22 and 23, 2008. The workshop was sponsored by DOE/NA-243 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). Placing well-qualified Americans in sufficient number and in key safeguards positions within the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) Department of Safeguards is an important U.S. non-proliferation objective. The goal of the NGSI Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards was to improve U.S. efforts to recruit U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. BNL’s International Safeguards Project Office invited participants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the IAEA, U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who are either experts in international safeguards or who understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. A final report for the workshop will be finalized and distributed in early 2009. The main finding of the workshop was the need for an integrated recruitment plan to take into account pools of potential candidates, various government and private agency stakeholders, the needs of the IAEA, and the NGSI human capital development plan. There were numerous findings related to and recommendations for maximizing the placement of U.S. experts in IAEA Safeguards positions. The workshop participants offered many ideas for increasing the pool of candidates and increasing the placement rate. This paper will provide details on these findings and recommendations

  3. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, S.E.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Occhogrosso, D.M.; Lockwood, D.; Carroll, C.J.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Fankhauser, J.

    2009-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards October 22 and 23, 2008. The workshop was sponsored by DOE/NA-243 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). Placing well-qualified Americans in sufficient number and in key safeguards positions within the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) Department of Safeguards is an important U.S. non-proliferation objective. The goal of the NGSI Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards was to improve U.S. efforts to recruit U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. BNL's International Safeguards Project Office invited participants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the IAEA, U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who are either experts in international safeguards or who understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. A final report for the workshop will be finalized and distributed in early 2009. The main finding of the workshop was the need for an integrated recruitment plan to take into account pools of potential candidates, various government and private agency stakeholders, the needs of the IAEA, and the NGSI human capital development plan. There were numerous findings related to and recommendations for maximizing the placement of U.S. experts in IAEA Safeguards positions. The workshop participants offered many ideas for increasing the pool of candidates and increasing the placement rate. This paper will provide details on these findings and recommendations

  4. Technical Evaluation Report (Workshop on Visualising Network Information)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rasmussen, Lisbeth M

    2006-01-01

    The workshop brought together operational users, developers and researchers to explore the connection between visualisation technologies and network analysis for military and civil protection applications...

  5. Teachers' learning on the workshop of STS approach as a way of enhancing inventive thinking skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaewkoodrua, Nophakun; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    To improve science teachers to develop the STS lesson plans for enhancing the students' inventive thinking skills, the workshop of improving science teachers to develop the STS lesson plans for enhancing the Inventive thinking skills were organized. The paper aimed to clarify what teachers learn from the workshop. The goal of the activity of the workshop aimed to: 1) improve participants a better understanding of the relationship between the Inquiry based learning with STS approach, 2) understand the meaning and importance of the STS approach and identify the various stages of Yuenyong (2006) STS learning process, 3) discuss what they learned from the examples of Yuenyong (2006) lesson plan, 4) develop some activities for each stage of Yuenyong (2006) STS approach, and 5) ideas of providing STS approach activities for enhancing inventive thinking skills. Participants included 3 science teachers who work in Khon Kaen, Thailand. Methodology regarded interpretive paradigm. Teachers' learning about pedagogy of enhancing the students' inventive thinking skills will be interpreted through participant observation, teachers' tasks, and interview. The finding revealed that all participants could demonstrate their ideas how to generate the STS lesson plans as a way of enhancing inventive thinking skills. Teachers could mention some element of inventive thinking skills which could be generated on their STS learning activities.

  6. Ground Motion Saturation Evaluation (GMSE) Data Needs Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NA

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the data needs workshop is to identify potential near-term (12-18 month) studies that would reduce uncertainty in extremely low probability ( -5 /yr) earthquake ground motions at Yucca Mountain. Recommendations made at the workshop will be considered by BSC and DOE management in formulating plans for FY05 seismic-related investigations. Based on studies done earlier this year, a bound on peak ground velocities (PGVs), consisting of a uniform distribution from 150 cm/s to 500 cm/s, has been applied to the existing PGV hazard curve for the underground repository horizon, for use in the forthcoming License Application. The technical basis for this bounding distribution is being documented, along with the basis for a slightly less conservative bound in the form of a roughly triangular distribution from 153 cm/s to 451 cm/s. The objective of the GMSE studies is to provide a technical basis for reducing remaining excessive conservatism, if any, in the extremely low probability ground motions that are used in postclosure performance assessments. Potential studies that have already been suggested include: (1) Additional tests of failure-strains of repository rocks, at, above, and below the repository horizon; (2) Identification and evaluation of nuclear explosion data that may help establish strain limits in tuff; (3) Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation through repository rock column to test hypothesis that nonwelded tuffs below the repository horizon would fail in tension and prevent extreme strains from being transmitted to the repository; (4) Evaluation of seismic failure threshold of bladed, fragile-appearing lithophysal crystals; (5) Evaluation of whether a ground motion parameter other than PGV would correlate better with calculated drip-shield and waste-package damage states; (6) Qualification and use of finite seismic-source model to evaluate probabilities of extreme ground motions from extreme scenario earthquakes (e.g., magnitude 6

  7. The value of continuing professional development: A realistic evaluation of a multi-disciplinary workshop for health visitors dealing with children with complex needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Alison; Larkin, Valerie; Stewart, Jane; Bateman, Belinda

    2018-08-01

    Continuing Professional Development is important for maintaining and developing knowledge and skills. Evidence regarding direct impact on practice is limited. Existing literature often lacks sufficient detail regarding the initiative or its evaluation, making transferability problematic. To explore the impact and perceived value of multi-disciplinary Continuing Professional Development workshops for Health Visitors who support families with children with complex health needs. Realistic Evaluation principles guided the research. Workshop attendees were invited to participate (n.21), 81% (n.17) agreed. Data collection included a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and qualitative thematic analysis. One North of England Health Service Trust. Interrelated temporal themes emerged. Before the workshop expectations included, uncertainty regarding content and ambiguity regarding attendance. During workshops comments focused on networking opportunities, the detail, content and facilitation of the learning experience. 'Emotional safety' enabled interaction, sharing and absorption of information, and potentially increased trust, confidence and social capital. Participants viewed the workshop as informative, enhancing insight regarding roles, services and processes. Post-workshop participants reported examples of practice enhancements attributed to workshop attendance including: confidence building; improved team working; facilitation of early referral and accessing additional support for families. Findings suggest initiative developers aiming CPD at new or existing teams need to consider nurturing social capital and to pay attention to the context and mechanisms, which can prompt attendance, engagement and subsequent practice application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and Implementation of a Workshop to Enhance the Effectiveness of Mentors Working with Diverse Mentees in HIV Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Stoff, David M.; Narahari, Swathi; Blank, Michael; Fuchs, Jonathan; Evans, Clyde H.; Kahn, James S.; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of competent mentoring in academic research in the field of HIV, particularly for early stage investigators from diverse, underrepresented backgrounds. We describe the development and implementation of a 2-day intensive workshop to train mid-level and senior-level investigators conducting HIV-related clinical and translational research across multiple academic institutions on more effective mentoring, with an emphasis on techniques to foster mentees of diversity. The workshop was focused on training mentors in techniques designed to improve the effectiveness of the mentor–mentee relationship, and included didactic presentations, interactive discussions, and small-group problem-based learning activities. Mid-level or senior-level faculty involved or planning to be involved in significant mentorship activities related to HIV research were eligible. Surveys and formal actions plans allowed for workshop evaluation and laid the groundwork for subsequent workshops. Twenty-six faculty from 16 U.S.-based institutions participated, with good representation across discipline, gender, and race/ethnicity. The sessions were highly rated and discussions and evaluations revealed important barriers and facilitators to mentoring, challenges and solutions related to mentoring mentees from diverse backgrounds, and specific tools to enhance mentoring effectiveness. The Mentoring the Mentors training program for HIV researchers focusing on early career investigators of diversity was the first of its kind and was well attended, was rated highly, and provided guidance for improving the program in the future. This training program fills an important gap in the HIV researcher community and offers guidance for training mentors interested in diversity issues in settings outside of HIV. PMID:24735004

  9. Game-Coding Workshops in New Zealand Public Libraries: Evaluation of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolstad, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This report evaluates a game coding workshop offered to young people and adults in seven public libraries round New Zealand. Participants were taken step by step through the process of creating their own simple 2D videogame, learning the basics of coding, computational thinking, and digital game design. The workshops were free and drew 426 people…

  10. Enhancing student performance in introductory physics in topics related to electricity and magnetism through the use of voluntary workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, L. Ajith; Pullen, Adam; Hasbun, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    This article examines the effect of voluntary workshops on students’ performance in a university for algebra-based introductory physics on the topics of electricity, magnetism and related areas. A workshop is an optional one-hour-per-week session that promotes a small group’s peer instruction and co-operative learning, in order to enhance the conceptual understanding of physical principles and to improve problem-solving skills. During the workshops, a small group of students were encouraged to exchange ideas in a co-operative learning environment. Most students enrolled were poorly motivated, underprepared, and did not possess the prerequisite mathematics needed. For those who attended workshops, the result of scores on a standardized conceptual survey in electricity and magnetism showed a pre-test-post-test gain of 21% in the number of correct responses. This is to be contrasted with a 5% increase for those students who did not attend workshops. Further, we present a breakdown of the final letter grades obtained by students who attended workshops versus those who did not. Since the introduction of the workshops (out of 374 students), 95% of those who attended made a ‘C’ or better in the course. This compares to only 50% of the students who did not attend workshops and making a ‘C’ or better. The workshops have been offered since the Fall of 2010, but analyzed data includes fourteen years of student letter grades from 2001 to 2014 in order to study the effects on the workshops of the D, F, or W grades (DFW rate). We report a 7% reduction of the DFW rates, which we attribute to the incorporation of the workshops. The workshops are easy to implement and relatively inexpensive, yet appear to be an effective instructional method that enhances the success of underprepared students.

  11. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Alan L.; Dimitrious, P.; Kondev, F. G.; Ricard-McCutchan, E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators' abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  12. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  13. 2nd International Workshop on Evidence-Based Technology Enhanced Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Gennari, Rosella; Marenzi, Ivana; Mascio, Tania; Prieta, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Research on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) investigates how information and communication technologies can be designed in order to support pedagogical activities. The Evidence Based Design (EBD) of a system bases its decisions on empirical evidence and effectiveness. The evidence-based TEL workshop (ebTEL) brings together TEL and EBD.   The first edition of ebTEL collected contributions in the area of TEL from computer science, artificial intelligence, evidence-based medicine, educational psychology and pedagogy. Like the previous edition, this second edition, ebTEL’13, wants to be a forum in which TEL researchers and practitioners alike can discuss innovative evidence-based ideas, projects, and lessons related to TEL.   The workshop took place in Salamanca, Spain, on May 22nd-24th 2013.  

  14. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  15. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices

  16. Proceedings of the Second international Workshop on Nuclear Data Evaluation for Reactor applications (Wonder 2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The NEA (Nuclear Energy Agency) has collaborated with the CEA in the organization of the second international workshop on nuclear data evaluation for reactor applications: Wonder 2009. About 50 scientists have participated to the workshop and 38 presentations have been made, they have been organized around 4 sessions: 1) nuclear data measurements, 2) theory, modeling and evaluation of nuclear data, 3) uncertainties and covariance matrices, and 4) processing and validation of nuclear data

  17. Workshop on Radioanalytical Chemistry for Radioecology and Waste Management: Report, evaluation, abstracts and full papers of presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-03-15

    A NKS-B workshop on radioanalytical chemistry for radioecology and waste management was held at Risoe, Roskilde, Denmark in 16-20th November 2009. The workshop was organized as 3 days lectures and presentations and two days laboratory practice. 48 peoples participated the workshop, including 32 young participants from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Lithuania and Ireland. This report gives a brief description of the workshop and an evaluation of the workshop by statistic analysis of questionnaires feed back from the participants. The book of abstracts and proceedings presented in the workshop is enclosed. (author)

  18. Workshop on Radioanalytical Chemistry for Radioecology and Waste Management: Report, evaluation, abstracts and full papers of presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.

    2010-03-01

    A NKS-B workshop on radioanalytical chemistry for radioecology and waste management was held at Risoe, Roskilde, Denmark in 16-20th November 2009. The workshop was organized as 3 days lectures and presentations and two days laboratory practice. 48 peoples participated the workshop, including 32 young participants from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Lithuania and Ireland. This report gives a brief description of the workshop and an evaluation of the workshop by statistic analysis of questionnaires feed back from the participants. The book of abstracts and proceedings presented in the workshop is enclosed. (author)

  19. Cathedral outreach: student-led workshops for school curriculum enhancement in non-traditional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; Jantzen, Alexander; van Putten, Lieke D.; Ravagli, Andrea; Donko, Andrei L.; Soper, Nathan; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; John, Pearl V.

    2017-08-01

    Universities in the United Kingdom have been driven to work with a larger pool of potential students than just the more traditional student (middle-class white male), in order to tackle the widely-accepted skills-shortage in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), whilst honoring their commitment to fair access to higher education. Student-led outreach programs have contributed significantly to this drive. Two such programs run by postgraduate students at the University of Southampton are the Lightwave Roadshow and Southampton Accelerate!, which focus on photonics and particle physics, respectively. The program ambassadors have developed activities to enhance areas of the national curriculum through presenting fundamental physical sciences and their applications to optics and photonics research. The activities have benefitted significantly from investment from international organizations, such as SPIE, OSA and the IEEE Photonics Society, and UK research councils, in conjunction with university recruitment and outreach strategies. New partnerships have been formed to expand outreach programs to work in non-traditional environments to challenge stereotypes of scientists. This paper presents two case studies of collaboration with education learning centers at Salisbury Cathedral and Winchester Cathedral. The paper outlines workshops and shows developed for pupils aged 6-14 years (UK key stages 2-4) on the electromagnetic spectrum, particle physics, telecommunications and the human eye using a combination of readily obtainable items, hand-built kits and elements from the EYEST Photonics Explorer kit. The activities are interactive to stimulate learning through active participation, complement the UK national curriculum and link the themes of science with the non-traditional setting of a cathedral. We present methods to evaluate the impact of the activity and tools to obtain qualitative feedback for continual program improvement. We also

  20. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data: Theory and evaluation manual - Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; McLaughlin, P.K.; p.mclaughlin@iaea.org

    2004-11-01

    A two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Theory and Evaluation was organized and administrated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and hosted at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy from 17 to 28 November 2003. The aims and contents of this workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. Workshop materials are also included that are freely available on CD-ROM (all relevant PowerPoint presentations and manuals along with appropriate computer codes). (author)

  1. A court-mandated workshop for adolescent children of divorcing parents: a program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D M

    1980-01-01

    This article provides a description and an empirical evaluation of a predivorce workshop established by the Family Court of Allen County, Indiana, for adolescent children (N = 48) of divorcing parents. Highlighted are the concerns of the adolescents, the approaches taken by the workshop staff, and the impact of the program on the participants. Viewpoints on the clinical, ethical, and legal issues involved in "required" predivorce counseling for adolescents are presented. The preventive nature of the program, its means of transforming initial resentment toward the workshop experience into positive feelings, and the implications for future practice and research are also discussed.

  2. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data: Theory and evaluation manual - Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; McLaughlin, P.K.; p.mclaughlin@iaea.org

    2004-11-01

    A two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Theory and Evaluation was organized and administrated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and hosted at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy from 17 to 28 November 2003. The aims and contents of this workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. Workshop materials are also included that are freely available on CD-ROM (all relevant PowerPoint presentations and manuals along with appropriate computer codes). (author)

  3. Educating for diversity: an evaluation of a sexuality diversity workshop to address secondary school bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Mathijs F G; Burford, James

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the potential of a 60-minute sexuality diversity workshop to address bullying in secondary schools. Students completed pre- and post-workshop questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise results with pre- to immediate post-workshop changes compared using t-tests. Thematic analysis was used to analyse open-ended questionnaire responses. We had 229 students (mean age 13.7 years) attending 10 workshops participate in the study. Three-quarters of students thought the workshop would reduce bullying in schools, and over 95% of the participants thought that other secondary schools should offer the workshop. There was a significant increase in valuing (p bullying/mocking' of sexuality-diverse students; however, many individual students reported a desire to be supportive of their sexuality-diverse peers. Sexuality-based bullying is commonplace in secondary schools. This form of bullying is associated with depression and suicide attempts. Reducing sexuality-based bullying is very likely to have a positive impact on the mental health of young people. Brief workshops, as a part of a wider suite of interventions, have some potential to create safer school environments. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  4. Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications - NEMEA-6. Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    NEMEA-6 brought together nuclear scientists from the new member states that joined the European Union since 2000, scientists from the 'old' member states and colleagues from Russia and Israel. About 30 papers were presented. Topics addressed during the workshop involved nuclear data needs and impact, nuclear data validation and benchmarks, the ANDES - Accurate Nuclear Data for nuclear Energy Sustainability project, detectors and facilities, and measurements of nuclear data

  5. Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications (NEMEA-7) Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO). Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; Plompen, Arjan; ); Emmeric Dupont; )

    2014-01-01

    The 7. workshop on Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications (NEMEA) focused on international collaboration in nuclear data by hosting the kick-off meeting of the pilot project of the Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO). CIELO aims at fostering nuclear data advances by using the joint expertise of the nuclear data community under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The workshop aimed at status reviews of planned and completed contributions and related developments for the CIELO pilot isotopes. The workshop further sought to facilitate in-depth discussions on nuclear data issues which are being addressed in the framework of European Commission projects like ERINDA, EUFRAT, ANDES and CHANDA. The 7. workshop on Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications (NEMEA) provided an opportunity for the Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) to meet and advance its objectives to improve our understanding of neutron reactions on key isotopes that are especially important in nuclear applications, especially in the area of criticality safety and reactors. CIELO is focusing initially on six nuclides ( 1 H, 16 O, 56 Fe, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu). These nuclides are important in the aforementioned applications, and despite decades of work many open questions remain to be solved. In some cases, the existing evaluations need improvement because the underlying experimental measurements are either lacking or contradictory. In other cases, nuclear theory work is needed to better advance predictions. In yet other cases, information from cross-section measurements is proving difficult to reconcile with information from integral nuclear criticality experiments or neutron shielding experiments. The main challenges to be faced are as follows: For oxygen, new work is needed to better define the total and elastic cross-sections at lower energies and neutron scattering angular distributions. An outstanding

  6. The effect of workshop groups on achievement goals and performance in biology: An outcome evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Wendi Kay

    This two-year quasi-experiment evaluated the effect of peer-led workshop groups on performance of minority and majority undergraduate biology students in a three-course series and investigated motivational explanations for performance differences. The workshop intervention used was modeled after a program pioneered by Treisman (1992) at the University of California. Majority volunteers randomly assigned to workshops (n = 61) performed between 1/2 and 1 standard deviation better than those assigned to the control group (n = 60; p challenge interventions can be highly beneficial for both majority and minority participants and that institutions can promote excellence by incorporating workshop programs like the one described here. These interventions have been shown to be more effective and cost less than remedial interventions.

  7. An evaluation of a data linkage training workshop for research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kate M; Flack, Felicity S; Bear, Natasha L; Allen, Judy A

    2015-03-04

    In Australia research projects proposing the use of linked data require approval by a Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). A sound evaluation of the ethical issues involved requires understanding of the basic mechanics of data linkage, the associated benefits and risks, and the legal context in which it occurs. The rapidly increasing number of research projects utilising linked data in Australia has led to an urgent need for enhanced capacity of HRECs to review research applications involving this emerging research methodology. The training described in this article was designed to respond to an identified need among the data linkage units in the Australian Population Health Research Network (PHRN) and HREC members in Australia. Five one-day face to face workshops were delivered in the study period to a total of 98 participants. Participants in the workshops represented all six categories of HREC membership composition listed in the National Health and Medical Research Centres' (NHMRC) National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. Participants were assessed at three time points, prior to the training (T1), immediately after the training (T2) and 8 to 17 months after the training (T3). Ninety participants completed the pre and post questionnaires; 58 of them completed the deferred questionnaire. Participants reported significant improvements in levels of knowledge, understanding and skills in each of the eight areas evaluated. The training was beneficial for those with prior experience in the area of ethics and data linkage as well as those with no prior exposure. Our preliminary work in this area demonstrates that the provision of intensive face to face ethics training in data linkage is feasible and has a significant impact on participant's confidence in reviewing HREC applications.

  8. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper,S.; Rosenthal, M.; Fishbone, L.; Occhiogrosso, D.; Carroll, C.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Rankhauser, J.

    2008-10-22

    In 2007, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a yearlong review of the challenges facing the international safeguards system today and over the next 25 years. The study found that without new investment in international safeguards, the U.S. safeguards technology base, and our ability to support International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, will continue to erode and soon may be at risk. To reverse this trend, the then U.S. Secretary of Energy, Samuel Bodman, announced at the 2007 IAEA General Conference that the Department of Energy (DOE) would launch the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). He stated 'IAEA safeguards must be robust and capable of addressing proliferation threats. Full confidence in IAEA safeguards is essential for nuclear power to grow safely and securely. To this end, the U.S. Department of Energy will seek to ensure that modern technology, the best scientific expertise, and adequate resources are available to keep pace with expanding IAEA responsibilities.' To meet this goal, the NGSI objectives include the recruitment of international safeguards experts to work at the U.S. national laboratories and to serve at the IAEA's headquarters. Part of the latter effort will involve enhancing our existing efforts to place well-qualified Americans in a sufficient number of key safeguards positions within the IAEA's Department of Safeguards. Accordingly, the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards (ERIS) on October 22 and 23, 2008. The ISPO used a workshop format developed earlier with Sonalysts, Inc., that was followed at the U.S. Support Program's (USSP's) technology road-mapping sessions. ISPO invited participants from the U.S. DOE, the IAEA, the U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and

  9. Evaluation of Occupational Therapy Workshops to Prevent Work-Related Injuries or Illnesses among Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecours, Alexandra; Therriault, Pierre-Yves

    2018-01-01

    The few studies aiming to evaluate prevention interventions provided by occupational therapists in health at work were conducted in work settings. However, to intervene in primary prevention, developing occupational therapy interventions with students learning a trade is relevant. The objective is to evaluate workshops designed and set up by…

  10. The use of the Chronicle Workshop as a method for evaluating participatory interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Signe; Ipsen, Christine; Gish, Liv

    2014-01-01

    In the organizational intervention literature it has been stated that interventions needs to be evaluated both with respect to outcome and process. In an organizational intervention program we used the Chronicle Workshop in order to see if it was applicable as a process evaluation method. Surveys...

  11. "Think Tank" Workshop in Work Evaluation: March 19-21, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul R., Ed.

    A two-day workshop, conducted to study the different meanings of the concept of work evaluation, was participated in by representatives from rehabilitation facilities, work evaluation training programs, institutional organizations, and rehabilitation research and training centers. In addition, different types of patient populations were…

  12. Teaching Scenario-Based Planning for Sustainable Landscape Development: An Evaluation of Learning Effects in the Cagliari Studio Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the contributions of an intensive educational workshop to advance students’ understanding and skills for collaborative, scenario-based landscape planning. The research design involves a case study workshop with thirty international students and several regional experts as well as a multi-stage, in-process evaluation. The workshop resulted in six different alternative futures for the region of Cagliari, Italy, and a seventh combined version that was considered best by regional reviewers. The students’ learning evaluation showed substantial advances in their relevant understanding and skills. Key aspects of the workshop pedagogy and the evaluation are discussed, and recommendations for future applications presented.

  13. From Workshops to Walkshops: Evaluating Mobile Locastion-Based Applications in Realistic Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2010-01-01

    Many open questions on how to best observe the mobile user experience remain - at the stage of design time as well as use time. In this paper, we are focusing on the stage of design time and describe our experiences from evaluating a mobile application for citizen involvement in municipal land use...... planning. Due to the problems and issues identified after conducting several user workshops in our exemplary case process, we propose "walkshops" as a complement to traditional workshops and prototype field studies specifically to evaluate mobile location-based applications (and similar context......-aware systems). We report some problems with workshops and outline how a walkshop may be carried out. The first trials of the new method are promising and have generated valuable feedback, insights and discussions about using the mobile application within the intended contexts. Many open questions on how...

  14. Mental health workshops delivered by medical students in Cambridge secondary schools: an evaluation of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Chloe; Daunt, Anna; Taylor, Stephanie; Simmons, Meinou

    2013-09-01

    For a group of medical students to design and deliver a mental health workshop in Cambridge secondary schools. Subsequently, to evaluate any improvements in pupils' knowledge of mental health issues, including knowledge of common mental illnesses, stigma and where to access help with mental health problems. A group of three medical students undertook a five week Student Selected Component to develop a mental health workshop in Spring 2013. The workshop was designed to include interactive components, such as role play, models and video. It was delivered to eight classes of 12-13 year old pupils across two local secondary schools, a total of 230 students. Questionnaires were completed before and after each workshop to test knowledge acquisition of mental health issues, stigma and where pupils could get help with mental health problems. Comparisons between data from the pre- and post-workshop questionnaires were made to assess learning. The responses from the questionnaires showed a global improvement in knowledge of mental health. This is highlighted by the increase in awareness of the prevalence of mental health problems amongst young people from 47.0% before the workshops to 97.8% after the workshops. The ability to identify symptoms of anxiety rose from 21.7% to 44.8% and the ability to identify depression rose from 29.0% to 53.5% respectively. Whilst only 15.2% pupils disagreed with a stigmatising statement about mental illness before the workshops, 61.3% pupils disagreed afterwards. The students were also better informed about how to access help and identified areas that they found useful to learn about. Comparison of the pre- and post-workshop questionnaires indicate that medical student-led workshops are an effective method for improving knowledge of mental health topics amongst 12-13 year old school pupils, as well as encouraging positive attitudes towards mental health. The project highlights a demand for mental health education in schools and brings to

  15. Replacing Lecture with Peer-led Workshops Improves Student Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Preszler, Ralph W.

    2009-01-01

    Peer-facilitated workshops enhanced interactivity in our introductory biology course, which led to increased student engagement and learning. A majority of students preferred attending two lectures and a workshop each week over attending three weekly lectures. In the workshops, students worked in small cooperative groups as they solved challenging problems, evaluated case studies, and participated in activities designed to improve their general learning skills. Students in the workshop versio...

  16. Creativity and Self-Exploration in Projective Drawings of Abused Women: Evaluating the inside Me-outside Me Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; Kazmierczak, Elzbieta; Storkerson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a creative workshop where college students (N = 300) devised self-expressive products to explore their inner and outer worlds. Participants devised products with drawing and writing components to examine their relationships with negative life events, self-concepts, and worldviews. Participants then evaluated the workshop.…

  17. Presentations and recorded keynotes of the First European Workshop on Latent Semantic Analysis in Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Several

    2007-01-01

    Presentations and recorded keynotes at the 1st European Workshop on Latent Semantic Analysis in Technology-Enhanced Learning, March, 29-30, 2007. Heerlen, The Netherlands: The Open University of the Netherlands. Please see the conference website for more information:

  18. Evaluation of the 'healthy start to pregnancy' early antenatal health promotion workshop: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkinson Shelley A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy is an ideal time to encourage healthy lifestyles as most women access health services and are more receptive to health messages; however few effective interventions exist. The aim of this research was to deliver a low-intensity, dietitian-led behavior change workshop at a Maternity Hospital to influence behaviors with demonstrated health outcomes. Methods Workshop effectiveness was evaluated using an RCT; ‘usual care’ women (n = 182 received a nutrition resource at their first antenatal visit and 'intervention' women also attended a one-hour ‘Healthy Start to Pregnancy’ workshop (n = 178. Dietary intake, physical activity levels, gestational weight gain knowledge, smoking cessation, and intention to breastfeed were assessed at service-entry and 12 weeks later. Intention-to-treat (ITT and per-protocol (PP analyses examined change over time between groups. Results Approximately half (48.3% the intervention women attended the workshop and overall response rate at time 2 was 67.2%. Significantly more women in the intervention met pregnancy fruit guidelines at time 2 (+4.3%, p = 0.011 and had a clinically-relevant increase in physical activity (+27 minutes/week compared with women who only received the resource (ITT. Women who attended the workshop increased their consumption of serves of fruit (+0.4 serves/day, p = 0.004, vegetables (+0.4 serves/day, p = 0.006, met fruit guidelines (+11.9%, p , had a higher diet quality score (p = 0.027 and clinically-relevant increases in physical activity (+21.3 minutes/week compared with those who only received the resource (PP. Conclusions The Healthy Start to Pregnancy workshop attendance facilitates improvements in important health behaviors. Service changes and accessibility issues are required to assist women's workshop attendance to allow more women to benefit from the workshop’s effects. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN

  19. Evaluating environmental and economic consequences of alternative pest management strategies: results of modeling workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard L.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.L.; Ellison, Richard A.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.; McNamee, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs a comprehensive method to evaluate the human health and environmental effects of alternative agricultural pest management strategies. This project explored the utility of Adaptive Environmental Assessment (AEA) techniques for meeting this need. The project objectives were to produce models for environmental impact analysis, improve communications, identify research needs and data requirements, and demonstrate a process for resolving conflicts. The project was structured around the construction (in an initial 2 1/2-day workshop) and examination (in a second 2 1/2-day workshop) of a simulation model of a corn agroecosystem.

  20. Logic Models for Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation: Workshop Toolkit. REL 2015-057

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakman, Karen; Rodriguez, Sheila M.

    2015-01-01

    The Logic Model Workshop Toolkit is designed to help practitioners learn the purpose of logic models, the different elements of a logic model, and the appropriate steps for developing and using a logic model for program evaluation. Topics covered in the sessions include an overview of logic models, the elements of a logic model, an introduction to…

  1. The Team up for School Nutrition Success Workshop Evaluation Study: Three Month Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Rushing, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the "Team Up for School Nutrition Success" pilot initiative, conducted by the Institute of Child Nutrition (ICN), on meeting the objectives of the individual action plans created by school food authorities (SFAs) during the workshop. The action plans could address improving…

  2. The Team Up for School Nutrition Success workshop evaluation study: 3-month results

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Team Up for School Nutrition Success pilot initiative, conducted by the Institute of Child Nutrition (ICN), on meeting the objectives of the individual action plans created by school food authorities (SFAs) during the workshop. The action plans could add...

  3. Environmental radioactive monitoring, evaluation and protection in luminous workshops of a factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hanbin; Xiang Ming; Tan Jianzu

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent technique is often used to display instrumental indicator in the dark environment. Luminous workshops of a factory smear and depict the glassware by means of fluorescent power with adulterated radioactive matter. Because of adulterated radioactive matters such as 226 Ra, 40 K emit alpha-ray,beta-ray and gamma-ray, while they decay spontaneously, and high dose or cumulative radiation can damage human body in different degrees. Therefore, any radioactive damage to human body caused by over-safety dose should be prevented strictly during the working. To ensure health and safety of working staff in luminous workshop and the public, it is necessary to regularly have radioactive monitoring and evaluation to luminous workshop and its surrounding environment. Through the environment radioactive monitoring, the authors analyze its environmental radioactive level,and try to find out the possible problems so as to propose some protective measures for personal health. (authors)

  4. Workshop report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... health: report of first EQUIST training workshop in Nigeria .... The difference between the before and after measurements was ... After the administration of the pre-workshop questionnaire the ... represent Likert rating scale of 1-5 points, where 1point = grossly .... Procedures Manual for the "Evaluating.

  5. Evaluation of Recommender Systems for Technology-Enhanced Learning: Challenges and Possible Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandy, Heleau; Drachsler, Hendrik; Gillet, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Heleou, S., Drachsler, H., & Gillet, D. (2009). Evaluation of Recommender Systems for Technology-Enhanced Learning: Challenges and Possible Solutions. 1st workshop on Context-aware Recommender Systems for Learning at the Alpine Rendez-Vous. November, 30-December, 3, 2009, Garmisch-Patenkirchen,

  6. Evaluation of an educational programme with workshops for families of children with food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Porta, J; Ruiz-Baqués, A; Gabarron Hortal, E; Capel Torres, F; Ariño Pla, M N; Zorrozua Santisteban, A; Sáinz de la Maza, E

    2016-01-01

    When a child is diagnosed with a food allergy, prevention and patient education are the key interventions for maintaining the child's health and quality of life and that of his or her whole family. However, health education activities for the families of children with food allergies are very limited, and most of these activities have not been evaluated. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to develop an educational programme, to empower its participants through workshops, and to evaluate its results. Several types of educational materials were created specifically for the programme, called "Proyecto CESA" ("STOP-FAR Project: Stop Food-Induced Allergic Reactions"). The programme was carried out in seven Spanish cities and was attended by parents and caregivers. The workshops were led by physicians specialising in allergies and by expert patients. Afterwards, participant learning and satisfaction were evaluated based on questionnaires that were completed both before and after the workshops. A significant improvement was observed in 29 items out of 40 (McNemar's test). Participant satisfaction with the programme was also very high: 90% rated the course between 8 and 10 points out of a possible 10 (41% rated it as a 10). The face-to-face workshops, which included utilisation of educational materials, had positive results in terms of learning as well as in levels of satisfaction in participating families. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Proceedings of the enlargement workshop on Neutron Measurements and Evaluations for Applications - NEMEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plompen, A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The workshop on Neutron Measurements and Evaluation for Applications, NEMEA, was held 5-8 November 2003 in Budapest, Hungary. The objective of this workshop was to strengthen the contacts between laboratories working on nuclear data in member states of the European Union, Accession Countries joining the enlarged Union in 2004, and Candidate Countries which will join later. The workshop was organised by the Neutron Physics unit of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) together with the local organisers. The workshop included six sessions and three laboratory visits. The sessions were, in order of the agenda, Material Analysis; Data Evaluation; Safeguards, Illicit Trafficking and Demining; Biology, Medicine and Environment; Single Event Upsets; and Neutron Data for Energy Applications . In total there were thirty-seven presentations of excellent quality, illustrating the many different lines of research featuring neutron measurements and neutron data. Laboratory visits were made to the Atomki and the Institute for Experimental Physics on a one day trip from Budapest to Debrecen and to the KFKI research reactor in Budapest. Both at the Atomki and at the KFKI, laboratory visits were preceded by an excellent comprehensive overview of the facility, its history and its activities. At Debrecen, an overview was provided of the capabilities at the cyclotron laboratory in particular for neutron measurement, while at the Institute for Experimental Physics the neutron generator laboratory and the experimental setup for the demining experiments were shown. At KFKI, the participants were shown the laboratory for PGAA at the neutron beam guides of the reactor

  8. Practising what we preach: using cognitive load theory for workshop design and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naismith, Laura M; Haji, Faizal A; Sibbald, Matthew; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Tavares, Walter; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B

    2015-12-01

    Theory-based instructional design is a top priority in medical education. The goal of this Show and Tell article is to present our theory-driven approach to the design of instruction for clinical educators. We adopted cognitive load theory as a framework to design and evaluate a series of professional development workshops that were delivered at local, national and international academic conferences in 2014. We used two rating scales to measure participants' cognitive load. Participants also provided narrative comments as to how the workshops could be improved. Cognitive load ratings from 59 participants suggested that the workshop design optimized learning by managing complexity for different levels of learners (intrinsic load), stimulating cognitive processing for long-term memory storage (germane load), and minimizing irrelevant distracters (extraneous load). Narrative comments could also be classified as representing intrinsic, extraneous, or germane load, which provided specific directions for ongoing quality improvement. These results demonstrate that a cognitive load theory approach to workshop design and evaluation is feasible and useful in the context of medical education.

  9. Asian-American Communications: In-School Staff Workshops, 1991-92. Final Evaluation Report. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zenin

    The In-School Staff Workshops project run by Asian-American Communications was evaluated in its fourth year. The project provided various workshops for staff on Asian American and Asian cultures, intercultural communications, and strategies for helping Asian American students adjust to their new social and educational environments. The project…

  10. Faculty Development for Small-Group-Teaching with Simulated Patients (SP) - Design and Evaluation of a Competency-based Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Henrike; Freytag, Julia; Sonntag, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The introduction of innovative teaching formats and methods in medical education requires a specific didactic training for teachers to use complicated formats effectively. This paper describes preliminary considerations, design, implementation and evaluation of a skills-based workshop (7,5 hours long) for teaching with simulated patients. The aim is to describe the essential components for a lasting effect of the workshop so that the concept can be adapted to other contexts. Method: We present the theoretical framework, the objectives, the didactic methodology and the implementation of the workshop. The evaluation of the workshop was carried out using questionnaires. First the participants (teachers of the faculty of medicine, clinical and science subjects) were asked to estimate how well they felt prepared for small group teaching immediately after workshop. Later, after some teaching experience of their own, they gave feedback again as a part of the general evaluation of the semester. Results: In the course of three years 27 trainings were conducted and evaluated with a total of 275 participants. In the context of semester evaluation 452 questionnaires were evaluated on the quality of training. Conclusion: The evaluation shows that participants appreciate the concept of the workshop and also feel sufficiently well prepared. As a limitation it must be said that this is so far only the lecturers' self-assessment. Nevertheless, it can be stated that even a one-day workshop with a stringent teaching concept shows long term results regarding innovative teaching methods.

  11. Delivery of pilot workshop on preserving and enhancing the functionality of highways in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This report summarizes the delivery and results of a one-day pilot workshop conducted at the Texas : Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Waco District office in August 2010. This workshop was based on : material developed for research project 0-6208...

  12. "I'll never forget this": evaluating a pilot workshop in effective communication for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucander, Henriette; Knutsson, Kerstin; Salé, Hanna; Jonsson, Anders

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated a pilot workshop for teaching communication skills to dental students. The methodology is based on an experiential learning approach, the use of realistic clinical scenarios, simulated patients, and an integrated teaching team of both educational researchers and dentists. Furthermore, the methodology was adapted for short workshops, which is thought to offer better possibilities for frequent and effective training of communication skills throughout the curriculum. The work-shop was piloted with groups of six to ten students from the sixth and tenth semesters (n=94). Results show that the majority of students found the tasks meaningful and well aligned with how they perceived their future profession as dentists. Most students also thought that they learned from the task. An interesting finding is that students not only found it instructive to practice how to communicate in authentic situations, but that they generally found the workshop to be thought-provoking while at the same time providing structure and intellectual tools for the future. A possible explanation for this finding is the sharing of explicit criteria for high-quality communication.

  13. Evaluation of an interprofessional clinician-patient communication workshop utilizing standardized patient methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagan, Casey; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Waldo, Kim; Fox, Amy; Jo, Chanhee; Rahm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Communication and interpersonal skills (CIS) are one of the 6 general competencies required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The clinician-patient communication (CPC) workshop, developed by the Institute for Healthcare Communication, provides an interactive opportunity to practice and develop CIS. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the impact of a CPC workshop on orthopedic surgery residents' CIS (2) determine the impact of physician alone or incorporation of nursing participation in the workshop, and (3) incorporate standardized patients (SPs) in resident training and assessment of CIS. Stratified by training year, 18 residents of an Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program were randomized to a CPC workshop with only residents (group A, n = 9) or a CPC workshop with nurse participants (group B, n = 9). Data included residents' (1) CIS scores as evaluated by SPs and (2) self-reports from a 25-question survey on perception of CIS. Data were collected at baseline and 3 weeks following the workshop. Following the workshop, the combined group (group A and B) felt more strongly that the ACGME should require a communication training and evaluation curriculum (post mean = 52.7, post-pre difference = 15.94, p = 0.026). Group A residents felt more strongly that communication is a learned behavior (post mean = 82.7, post-pre difference = 17.67, p = 0.028), and the addition of SPs was a valuable experience (post mean = 59.3, post-pre difference = 16.44, p = 0.038). Group B residents reported less willingness to improve on their communication skills (post-mean = 79.7, post-pre difference = -7.44, p = 0.049) and less improvement in professional satisfaction in effective communication than group A (post mean group A = 81.9, group B = 83.6, post-pre difference group A = 7.11, group B = 1.89, p = 0.047). Few differences between groups regarding CIS scores were detected. While there was no demonstrable difference regarding CIS, our

  14. 2nd Workshop on Evaluating Child Robot Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaga, Cristina; Lohse, M.; Charisi, Vasiliki; Evers, Vanessa; Neerincx, Marc; Kanda, Takayuki; Leite, Iolanda

    Many researchers have started to explore natural interaction scenarios for children. No matter if these children are normally developing or have special needs, evaluating Child-Robot Interaction (CRI) is a challenge. To find methods that work well and provide reliable data is difficult, for example

  15. Development of Workshops on Biodiversity and Evaluation of the Educational Effect by Text Mining Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, R.; Iijima, A.

    2014-12-01

    Conservation of biodiversity is one of the key issues in the environmental studies. As means to solve this issue, education is becoming increasingly important. In the previous work, we have developed a course of workshops on the conservation of biodiversity. To disseminate the course as a tool for environmental education, determination of the educational effect is essential. A text mining enables analyses of frequency and co-occurrence of words in the freely described texts. This study is intended to evaluate the effect of workshop by using text mining technique. We hosted the originally developed workshop on the conservation of biodiversity for 22 college students. The aim of the workshop was to inform the definition of biodiversity. Generally, biodiversity refers to the diversity of ecosystem, diversity between species, and diversity within species. To facilitate discussion, supplementary materials were used. For instance, field guides of wildlife species were used to discuss about the diversity of ecosystem. Moreover, a hierarchical framework in an ecological pyramid was shown for understanding the role of diversity between species. Besides, we offered a document material on the historical affair of Potato Famine in Ireland to discuss about the diversity within species from the genetic viewpoint. Before and after the workshop, we asked students for free description on the definition of biodiversity, and analyzed by using Tiny Text Miner. This technique enables Japanese language morphological analysis. Frequently-used words were sorted into some categories. Moreover, a principle component analysis was carried out. After the workshop, frequency of the words tagged to diversity between species and diversity within species has significantly increased. From a principle component analysis, the 1st component consists of the words such as producer, consumer, decomposer, and food chain. This indicates that the students have comprehended the close relationship between

  16. Workshop proceedings: challenges and opportunities in evaluating protein allergenicity across biotechnology industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Nicola J; Ghantous, Hanan N; Ladics, Gregory S; House, Robert V; Gendel, Steven M; Hastings, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    A workshop entitled "Challenges and Opportunities in Evaluating Protein Allergenicity across Biotechnology Industries" was held at the 51st Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in San Francisco, California. The workshop was sponsored by the Biotechnology Specialty Section of SOT and was designed to present the science-based approaches used in biotechnology industries to evaluate and regulate protein allergenicity. A panel of experts from industry and government highlighted the allergenicity testing requirements and research in the agricultural, pharmaceutical/biopharma, and vaccine biotechnology industries and addressed challenges and opportunities for advancing the science of protein allergenicity. The main learning from the workshop was that immunoglobulin E-mediated allergenicity of biotechnology-derived products is difficult to assess without human data. The approaches currently being used to evaluate potential for allergenicity across biotechnology industries are very different and range from bioinformatics, in vitro serology, in vivo animal testing, in vitro and in vivo functional assays, and "biosimilar" assessments (ie, biotherapeutic equivalents to innovator products). The challenge remains with regard to the different or lack of regulatory requirements for allergenicity testing across industries, but the novel approaches being used with bioinformatics and biosimilars may lead to opportunities in the future to collaborate across biotechnology industries.

  17. Medical School Anatomy and Pathology Workshops for High School Students Enhance Learning and Provide Inspiration for Careers in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenderson, Bruce A.; Veloski, J. Jon; Livesey, Michael; Wojdon-Smith, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    “Anatomy and Pathology Workshop” is a cadaver-based outreach program that models medical education to large groups of high school students. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of this program on students’ knowledge of anatomy and interest in biomedical science. A total of 144 high school students participated in the workshop in 2015. Preworkshop and postworkshop assessments were administered to assess students’ learning. A postworkshop survey was conducted to solicit students’ reflections and feedback. It was found that student performance in the postworkshop examination (mean 78%) had significantly improved when compared to the performance in the preexamination (mean 54%), indicating that this program enhances learning. Students were also inspired to consider opportunities in medicine and allied health professions—97% indicated that they had a better understanding of medical education; 95% agreed that they had better understanding of the human body; 84% thought anatomy was interesting and exciting; and 62% of the students indicated that they looked forward to studying medicine or another health profession. Students rated the instructors highly—95% agreed that the instructors were professional and served as role models. Medical/graduate student instructors were also highly regarded by the high school students—96% thought it was valuable to have student instructors and 94% thought that student instructors were caring and enthusiastic about teaching. In summary, this study demonstrates that outreach programs provided by medical schools help young adults during their formative years by modeling professionalism, providing role models, enhancing learning, and encouraging many to consider opportunities in the health professions. PMID:28725784

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Hong Kong Community Social Service Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianling; Stewart, Sunita M; Wan, Alice; Leung, Charles Sai-Cheong; Lai, Agnes Y; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu-Chee

    2017-01-01

    Capacity building approaches are useful in large-scale community-based health promotion interventions. However, models to guide and evaluate capacity building among social service agency staff in community settings are rare in the literature. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a 1-day (7 h) train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop for the "Enhancing Family Well-Being Project". The workshop aimed at equipping staff from different community agencies with the knowledge and skills to design, implement, and evaluate positive psychology-based interventions for their clients in Sham Shui Po, an over-crowded and low-income district in Hong Kong. The current TTT extended and improved on our previous successful model by adding research and evaluation methods (including the Logic Model, process evaluation, and randomized controlled trial), which are important to plan and evaluate the community interventions. Evaluation of the TTT was guided by the Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness (IMTEE), with quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were collected from pretraining (T1), post-training (T2), and 6-month (T3) and 12-month (T4) follow-up surveys. Qualitative data were collected from four focus groups of agency staff after the intervention. Ninety-three staff from 30 community agencies attended the training, and 90 completed the baseline survey. Eighty-eight, 63, and 57 staff performed the evaluations at T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Agency staff were satisfied with the TTT. Immediate enhancement of knowledge, self-efficacy, and positive attitudes toward the training content was found at T2 (Cohen's d ranged from 0.24 to 1.22, all p  agency staff, and delivered to 1,586 participants. The agency staff indicated their intention to utilize the skills they had learned for other interventions (score ≥4 out of 6) and to share these skills with their colleagues. Qualitative feedbacks from 23 agency staff supported the

  19. Consumer and community involvement in health and medical research: evaluation by online survey of Australian training workshops for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Anne; Alpers, Kirsten; Heyworth, Jane; Phuong, Cindy; Hanley, Bec

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, since 2009, the Consumer and Community Involvement Program (formerly the Consumer and Community Participation Program) has developed and run workshops to help people working in health and medical research involve more consumers (patients) and community members (the public) in their research. In 2012, workshop attendees were invited to do an online survey to find out the effect, if any, that attending a workshop had on their awareness of and attitudes to consumer and community involvement. They were also asked about changes in their behaviour when it came to the involvement of consumers and the community in their work. The study found that, for people who answered the survey, more than double the number found consumer and community involvement very relevant after attending a workshop, compared with the number who thought that before attending one. Also, amongst those who answered the survey, 94 % thought that the workshop increased their understanding about involvement. Background There is limited evidence of the benefits of providing training workshops for researchers on how to involve consumers (patients) and the community (public) in health and medical research. Australian training workshops were evaluated to contribute to the evidence base. The key objective was to evaluate the impact of the workshops in increasing awareness of consumer and community involvement; changing attitudes to future implementation of involvement activities and influencing behaviour in the methods of involvement used. A secondary objective was to use a formal evaluation survey to build on the anecdotal feedback received from researchers about changes in awareness, attitudes and behaviours. Methods The study used a cross-sectional, online survey of researchers, students, clinicians, administrators and members of non-government organisations who attended Consumer and Community Involvement Program training workshops between 2009 and 2012 to ascertain changes to awareness

  20. Proceedings of the enlargement workshop on Neutron Measurements, Evaluations and Applications, NEMEA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plompen, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Enlargement workshop on Neutron Measurements, Evaluations and Applications, NEMEA-2 was held in Bucharest, Romania on October 20-23, 2004. The workshop was organised by the Neutron Physics Unit of IRMM, in close collaboration with the local organiser and his team from IFIN 'Horia Hulubei' in nearby Magurele. The organisers were assisted by a Program Advisory Committee. The purpose of the workshop was to stimulate exchange of knowledge on recent activities in the field of neutron measurements, evaluations and applications between researchers from new member states, candidate countries, and Western Balkan states with researchers from EU member states and elsewhere, notably Russia. The workshop was opened with an introduction about the status of research in Romania. Following this presentation, the Joint Research Centre and the role of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, situated in Geel, Belgium, was introduced. A further view on the research activities in Romania was offered in four presentations with a relation to the nuclear field. The research activities centered around the separation of tritium in heavy water from the CANDU reactors. An overview was presented of the nuclear power research and development program centered around the dual core 14 MW TRIGA reactor. Dr Rotaru of the Nuclear Electrica Company presented the status and prospects of the CERNAVODA nuclear power plant. The present 700 MWe from unit-1 will be doubled following completion and commissioning of unit-2, scheduled for March 2007. Prof. Zamfir, director of IFIN 'Horia Hulubei', presented the research activities of the insitute. This introduction was complemented by a laboratory visit including the tandem accelerator laboratory, the detector preparation laboratory that is involved in the CERN-based Large Hadron Collider project, the food irradiation facility and the radionuclides laboratory. With forty-three oral and invited contributions and nine posters a wide range of

  1. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  2. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Y Lai

    Full Text Available Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the "train-the-trainer" workshop (TTT for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled "Happy Family Kitchen Project" (HFK under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers' competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women. It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees' reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a

  3. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Agnes Y; Mui, Moses W; Wan, Alice; Stewart, Sunita M; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the "train-the-trainer" workshop (TTT) for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled "Happy Family Kitchen Project" (HFK) under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers' competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women). It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees' reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees) and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a practical example

  4. Profiling the Psychological Training and Support Needs of Oncology Staff, and Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Level 2 Psychological Support Training Program Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffan, Amanda J; Daniels, Jo; Osborn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The importance of training non-psychology healthcare professionals to offer psychological support to people with cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. This small-scale pilot project sought to identify the training and support needs of oncology staff and to evaluate the effectiveness of a Level 2 Psychological Support Training Program workshop. Semi-structured interviews with five members of multidisciplinary oncology staff identified that training needs were primarily around communication skills, recognizing and dealing with emotions, offering support and empathy, and self-care. Pre and post-training questionnaires developed with these themes in mind revealed that the Level 2 Training Program workshops run in this network of hospitals are effective in increasing participants' levels of perceived knowledge and confidence across each of these domains. Recommendations are made for further enhancing this effectiveness.

  5. Evaluation of a treatment manual and workshops for disseminating, parent-child interaction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschell, Amy D; McNeil, Cheryl B; Urquiza, Anthony J; McGrath, Jean M; Zebell, Nancy M; Timmer, Susan G; Porter, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    This study's main purposes were to: (a) evaluate a treatment manual as a dissemination strategy, (b) compare two workshop formats for evidence-based treatment (EBT) training, and (c) provide preliminary data on therapist characteristics potentially associated with successful EBT adoption. Forty-two community-based clinicians were assigned to one of two training groups (didactic or experiential). Behavior observation and self-report data were collected at four time points. Results suggest that reading a treatment manual is useful, but not sufficient. Experiential and didactic training were equally effective in increasing knowledge, skill, and satisfaction; however, after a 2-day training, few participants demonstrated mastery of skills.

  6. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system

  7. Workshop tools and methodologies for evaluation of energy chains and for technology perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appert, O. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Maillard, D. [Energy and Raw Materials, 75 - Paris (France); Pumphrey, D. [Energy Cooperation, US Dept. of Energy (United States); Sverdrup, G.; Valdez, B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Schindler, J. [LB-Systemtechnik (LBST), GmbH, Ottobrunn (Germany); His, St.; Rozakis, St. [Centre International de Recherche sur Environnement Developpement (CIRED), 94 - Nogent sur Marne (France); Sagisaka, M. [LCA Research Centre (Japan); Bjornstad, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Madre, J.L. [Institut National de Recherche sur les Transports et leur Securite, 94 - Arcueil (France); Hourcade, J.Ch. [Centre International de Recherche sur l' Environnement le Developpement (CIRED), 94 - Nogent sur Marne (France); Ricci, A.; Criqui, P.; Chateau, B.; Bunger, U.; Jeeninga, H. [EU/DG-R (Italy); Chan, A. [National Research Council (Canada); Gielen, D. [IEA-International Energy Associates Ltd., Fairfax, VA (United States); Tosato, G.C. [Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP), 75 - Paris (France); Akai, M. [Agency of Industrial Science and technology (Japan); Ziesing, H.J. [Deutsches Institut fur Wirtschaftsforschung, DIW Berlin (Germany); Leban, R. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The aims of this workshop is to better characterize the future in integrating all the dynamic interaction between the economy, the environment and the society. It offers presentations on the Hydrogen chains evaluation, the micro-economic modelling for evaluation of bio-fuel options, life cycle assessment evolution and potentialities, the consumer valuation of energy technologies attributes, the perspectives for evaluation of changing behavior, the incentive systems and barriers to social acceptability, the internalization of external costs, the endogenous technical change in long-tem energy models, ETSAP/technology dynamics in partial equilibrium energy models, very long-term energy environment modelling, ultra long-term energy technology perspectives, the socio-economic toolbox of the EU hydrogen road-map, the combined approach using technology oriented optimization and evaluation of impacts of individual policy measures and the application of a suite of basic research portfolio management tools. (A.L.B.)

  8. Approaches to Enhancing Cyber Resilience: Report of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Workshop IST-153

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    2017, at the University of Bundeswehr. Despite continual progress in managing risks in the cyber domain, anticipation and prevention of all possible...participants of the workshop saw as particularly important: 1) fundamental properties of cyber resilience, 2) approaches to measuring and modeling cyber...resilience. 15. SUBJECT TERMS cybersecurity, cyber resilience, risk management , cyber metrics, mission modeling, systems engineering, dynamic defense

  9. Maintainability effectiveness evaluations and enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    In the mid-seventies EPRI initiated a research project to review the human factors aspects of nuclear power plant control rooms. In the course of investigating operator-control room interfaces in five operational control rooms, it became evident that many plant outages had either been caused or prolonged by human factors problems associated with maintenance activities. Consequently, as one of several follow-on projects, EPRI sponsored a review of nine power plants (five nuclear and four fossil) to examine the human factors aspects of plant maintainability. This survey revealed a wide variety of generic human factors problems that could negatively impact the effectiveness of plant maintenance personnel. It was clear that plant maintainability features deserved no less attention to human factors concerns than the operational features of the control room. This paper describes subsequent EPRI-initiated efforts to assist the utilities in conducting self-reviews of maintainability effectiveness and effect needed enhancements

  10. International workshop on site investigation and evaluation based on the siting process in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Stroem, A.

    2001-06-01

    SKB's goal is to commence surface based site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purpose of the international workshop on site characterisation held at Aespoe April 2001 was to: present the SKB site investigation and evaluation programme to a group of international experts; discuss whether the available toolbox of investigation methods for surface based site investigations is appropriate and state-of-the-art in an international perspective; and by working group sessions discuss the level of ambition in the programme for site investigation for each discipline. This report summarises the conclusions of the workshop in general terms. Many of the detailed comments and ideas obtained at the workshop have already inspired and will also directly inspire the on-going planning work for site characterisation. The core activity at the workshop was the work performed by working groups. They addressed what should be considered for a site characterisation programme, based on the generic planning made so far by SKB. The working groups also outlined site specific characterisation programmes for the sites suggested by SKB. The tasks were strictly confined to technical and scientific modelling issues. The working group chairmen presented the working group results at the workshop and have also submitted short memos to SKB. The present document is a compilation of these memos. The SKB generic programme as presented in the existing top level documents, 'Requirements and Criteria and Overall Programme', received general endorsement and was appreciated for being comprehensive and systematic. For example, it contains comprehensive lists of parameters to be measured. However, there is need for prioritisation and sequencing. This is actually included in the current planning process at SKB where the generic programme later this year will be adapted to

  11. An Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Social Service Workers to Develop Community-Based Family Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Y. Lai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionEvaluation studies on train-the-trainer workshops (TTTs to develop family well-being interventions are limited in the literature. The Logic Model offers a framework to place some important concepts and tools of intervention science in the hands of frontline service providers. This paper reports on the evaluation of a TTT for a large community-based program to enhance family well-being in Hong Kong.MethodsThe 2-day TTT introduced positive psychology themes (relevant to the programs that the trainees would deliver and the Logic Model (which provides a framework to guide intervention development and evaluation for social service workers to guide their community-based family interventions. The effectiveness of the TTT was examined by self-administered questionnaires that assessed trainees’ changes in learning (perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, attitude, and intention, trainees’ reactions to training content, knowledge sharing, and benefits to their service organizations before and after the training and then 6 months and 1 year later. Missing data were replaced by baseline values in an intention-to-treat analysis. Focus group interviews were conducted approximately 6 months after training.ResultsFifty-six trainees (79% women joined the TTT. Forty-four and 31 trainees completed the 6-month and 1-year questionnaires, respectively. The trainees indicated that the workshop was informative and well organized. The TTT-enhanced trainees’ perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes toward the application of the Logic Model and positive psychology constructs in program design. These changes were present with small to large effect size that persisted to the 1 year follow-up. The skills learned were used to develop 31 family interventions that were delivered to about 1,000 families. Qualitative feedback supported the quantitative results.ConclusionThis TTT offers a practical example of academic-community partnerships that

  12. Teaching Note--Evaluation of an Avoiding Plagiarism Workshop for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Judy

    2016-01-01

    A 1-hour workshop on how to avoid plagiarizing when writing academic papers was developed and delivered at an orientation session for BSW and MSW students at a university in the northeast United States. Six social work instructors led the workshops at the university's main campus and two extension centers. Before and after the workshop, students…

  13. Joint IEA-OPEC workshop on CO2-enhanced oil recovery with CCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The IEA and OPEC jointly organised a workshop to discuss CO2-EOR and its role in supporting the early demonstration of CCS. The workshop was hosted by Kuwait Petroleum Corporation, and held in Kuwait City on 7-8 February 2012. It brought together OPEC Member country experts and international CO2-EOR experts to discuss commercial, economic, technical, regulatory and policy aspects associated with the technology. Issues discussed include factors that can promote CO2-EOR ahead of ''pure'' CCS, barriers preventing uptake of the technology,and the range of policy interventions that could be employed to promote its use in OPEC Member countriesand other parts of the world. This report presents a synthesis of the discussions that took place, and lays the foundation for future analysis.

  14. TRAVEL WRITING: AN APPLICATION OF WRITING WORKSHOP TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’S CREATIVE WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayudias Margawati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Writing is often assumed as uneasy skill to either learn or teach. For students, they find it difficult to develop ideas in writing. On the other hand, teachers, many of them, only ready with the materials but confuse with the appropriate ways to teach. This paper intends to describe and discuss a method of teaching writing namely writing workshop to improve students’ writing skill through travel writing. Writing workshop proposed by Calkins that consists of mini lesson, work time, peer conferring and/or response groups, share sessions, and publication celebration is applied in writing class for methodological purposes. In mini lesson, teacher offers something to the class that is meant to introduce a writing strategy done at the beginning of the workshop. During work time point, students start their new piece of writing. Teacher moves among students conferring with them while checking their works. Peer conferences or response groups provide a forum for students to talk about works in progress. When students work in group, one of them could arrange his/ her group needs during the work time. A share session may be varied, one possible way is each group shares their process of writing to other students. At the end of writing class, student writers come together to publish and/ or celebrate their final work. The publication could be in the form of portfolio, students’ diary, blog, or others. Travel writing genre is chosen as it could develop students’ creativity in describing/ narrating their own stories during, let say holiday or things they used to see on the way home weekly or monthly. Furthermore, travel writing as the product of creative writing teaches the readers of values, characteristics, and way of life. Last but not least, a professional writing teacher should set the writing workshop components in variety ways to achieve effective running-class.

  15. Proceedings of the national workshop on non destructive evaluation of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the care and best efforts to improve the quality of structures, problems do occur, raising alarm. This makes doubtful about the understanding. Distresses in the structures start immediately after construction and these are often concealed under the external finishes. A defect takes time to manifest itself. To add further, structures remain unattended for several years. As it is uneconomical to replace the assets before the intended service life by another capital investment, it is essential to periodically monitor the health of structures throughout its life. Success of both, the construction and restoration work depends on right diagnosis of the problem thorough proper testing techniques. Non destructive evaluation is one of the reliable methods for the scientific assessment of health and prediction of residual service life of structure. The workshop shall provide a platform to students, engineers and professionals for acquaintance with the current state of art technology of non-destructive evaluation techniques. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  16. Evaluating patient and public involvement in health research: from theoretical model to practical workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andy; Welsman, Jo; Britten, Nicky

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing literature on evaluating aspects of patient and public involvement (PPI). We have suggested that at the core of successful PPI is the dynamic interaction of different forms of knowledge, notably lay and professional. We have developed a four-dimensional theoretical framework for understanding these interactions. We explore the practical utility of the theoretical framework as a tool for mapping and evaluating the experience of PPI in health services research. We conducted three workshops with different PPI groups in which participants were invited to map their PPI experiences on wall charts representing the four dimensions of our framework. The language used to describe the four dimensions was modified to make it more accessible to lay audiences. Participants were given sticky notes to indicate their own positions on the different dimensions and to write explanatory comments if they wished. Participants' responses were then discussed and analysed as a group. The three groups were distinctive in their mapped responses suggesting different experiences in relation to having a strong or weak voice in their organization, having few or many ways of getting involved, addressing organizational or public concerns and believing that the organization was willing to change or not. The framework has practical utility for mapping and evaluating PPI interactions and is sensitive to differences in PPI experiences within and between different organizations. The workshops enabled participants to reflect collaboratively on their experiences with a view to improving PPI experiences and planning for the future. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Workshop meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veland, Oeystein

    2004-04-01

    1-2 September 2003 the Halden Project arranged a workshop on 'Innovative Human-System Interfaces and their Evaluation'. This topic is new in the HRP 2003-2005 programme, and it is important to get feedback from member organizations to the work that is being performed in Halden. It is also essential that relevant activities and experiences in this area from the member organizations are shared with the Halden staff and other HRP members. Altogether 25 persons attended the workshop. The workshop had a mixture of presentations and discussions, and was chaired by Dominique Pirus of EDF, France. Day one focused on the HRP/IFE activities on Human-System Interface design, including Function-oriented displays, Ecological Interface Design, Task-oriented displays, as well as work on innovative display solutions for the oil and gas domain. There were also presentations of relevant work in France, Japan and the Czech Republic. The main focus of day two was the verification and validation of human-system interfaces, with presentations of work at HRP on Human-Centered Validation, Criteria-Based System Validation, and Control Room Verification and Validation. The chairman concluded that it was a successful workshop, although one could have had more time for discussions. The Halden Project got valuable feedback and viewpoints on this new topic during the workshop, and will consider all recommendations related to the future work in this area. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of an Interactive Workshop Designed to Teach Practical Welfare Techniques to Beef Cattle Caretakers and Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, Reneé; Hanthorn, Christy; Danielson, Jared; Burzette, Rebecca; Coetzee, Johann; Griffin, D. Dee; Ramirez, Alejandro; Dewell, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to evaluate the use of an interactive workshop designed to teach novel practical welfare techniques to beef cattle caretakers and decision makers. Following training, respondents reported being more likely to use or recommend use of local anesthesia for dehorning and castration and were more inclined to use meloxicam…

  19. Assessment of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies in Oncology: Summary of the Oncology Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, James N.; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Vogel, Wendy H.; Griffith, Niesha; Wariabharaj, Darshan; Garg, Rekha; Zon, Robin; Stephens, Cyntha L.; Bialecki, Alison M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Allen, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    To address oncology community stakeholder concerns regarding implementation of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) program, ASCO sponsored a workshop to gather REMS experiences from representatives of professional societies, patient organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Stakeholder presentations and topical panel discussions addressed REMS program development, implementation processes, and practice experiences, as well as oncology drug safety processes. A draft REMS decision tool prepared by the ASCO REMS Steering Committee was presented for group discussion with facilitated, goal-oriented feedback. The workshop identified several unintended consequences resulting from current oncology REMS: (1) the release of personal health information to drug sponsors as a condition for gaining access to a needed drug; (2) risk information that is not tailored—and therefore not accessible—to all literacy levels; (3) exclusive focus on drug risk, thereby affecting patient-provider treatment discussion; (4) REMS elements that do not consider existing, widely practiced oncology safety standards, professional training, and experience; and (5) administrative burdens that divert the health care team from direct patient care activities and, in some cases, could limit patient access to important therapies. Increased provider and professional society participation should form the basis of ongoing and future REMS standardization discussions with the FDA to work toward overall improvement of risk communication. PMID:23814522

  20. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data: Theory and evaluation, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    2008-06-01

    A two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section was organised and held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy from 28 April to 9 May 2008. This workshop constituted a further development of previous Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Workshops held in 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2006. The aims and contents of the 2008 workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. All recent workshop material has been assembled in this INDC report, and is also freely available on CD-ROM (all relevant PowerPoint presentations and manuals along with appropriate computer codes). (author)

  1. Statement at TM/workshop on evaluation methodology for national nuclear infrastructure development, 10 December 2008, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In his statement at the Technical Meeting Workshop on Evaluation Methodology for National Nuclear Infrastructure Development Mr. Yuri Sokolov, IAEA Deputy Director General, Head of the Department of Nuclear Energy, thanked the co-sponsors of the workshop, namely Canada, China, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States for their continued support and the Nuclear Power Engineering Section for their dedication and hard work to implement this workshop. The evaluation methodology that is the main subject of this workshop is a component of building infrastructure for the implementation of cost-effective, safe and secure nuclear power programme. It aims to provide a tool for effective planning. The IAEA evaluation approach can be used either by a Member State wishing to review its own progress (self-assessment) or as a basis for an external review through which a Member State wishes to reassure others that its nuclear programme is effective. The IAEA can, upon a request from the Member State, provide Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions, INIR, conducted by international experts. These INIR missions provide a means for countries to work with the IAEA in an open and transparent way to ensure they are taking a comprehensive and integrated approach to nuclear power as promoted in the Milestones document. National self-assessments supported by INIR missions will help Member States to identify gaps and areas that need increased attention, and will help the Agency to focus the assistance on the Member States needs. Another theme of the workshop is the role of the Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO), in studying the nuclear power option and coordinating planning among various stakeholders. During the workshop publications in preparation will be presented including one on responsibilities and capabilities of owner-operator organizations and one on workforce planning. Presentations from the

  2. Acupuncture Research: Strategies for Clinical Evaluation: Workshop Report, York, July 5–8, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val Hopwood

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This report summarizes a ground-breaking workshop on the strategic direction of acupuncture research which was held in York in early July 2006. Three days were spent discussing the history, the philosophy and the practicalities of researching acupuncture. Attending the workshop were an international group of researchers with varied backgrounds, including acupuncturists, physicians, physiotherapists, sociologists and anthropologists. Supported by the Medical Research Council's Health Services Research Collaboration, Elsevier and others, this workshop was an opportunity to brainstorm the issues and to the concerns in the field and set out directions for research that would tackle some of the major challenges facing the acupuncture research community.

  3. Incorporating an Interactive Statistics Workshop into an Introductory Biology Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) Enhances Students' Statistical Reasoning and Quantitative Literacy Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T; Pevey, Ryan S; McCabe, Thomas M

    2018-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an avenue for student participation in authentic scientific opportunities. Within the context of such coursework, students are often expected to collect, analyze, and evaluate data obtained from their own investigations. Yet, limited research has been conducted that examines mechanisms for supporting students in these endeavors. In this article, we discuss the development and evaluation of an interactive statistics workshop that was expressly designed to provide students with an open platform for graduate teaching assistant (GTA)-mentored data processing, statistical testing, and synthesis of their own research findings. Mixed methods analyses of pre/post-intervention survey data indicated a statistically significant increase in students' reasoning and quantitative literacy abilities in the domain, as well as enhancement of student self-reported confidence in and knowledge of the application of various statistical metrics to real-world contexts. Collectively, these data reify an important role for scaffolded instruction in statistics in preparing emergent scientists to be data-savvy researchers in a globally expansive STEM workforce.

  4. Incorporating an Interactive Statistics Workshop into an Introductory Biology Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) Enhances Students’ Statistical Reasoning and Quantitative Literacy Skills †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; Pevey, Ryan S.; McCabe, Thomas M.

    2018-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an avenue for student participation in authentic scientific opportunities. Within the context of such coursework, students are often expected to collect, analyze, and evaluate data obtained from their own investigations. Yet, limited research has been conducted that examines mechanisms for supporting students in these endeavors. In this article, we discuss the development and evaluation of an interactive statistics workshop that was expressly designed to provide students with an open platform for graduate teaching assistant (GTA)-mentored data processing, statistical testing, and synthesis of their own research findings. Mixed methods analyses of pre/post-intervention survey data indicated a statistically significant increase in students’ reasoning and quantitative literacy abilities in the domain, as well as enhancement of student self-reported confidence in and knowledge of the application of various statistical metrics to real-world contexts. Collectively, these data reify an important role for scaffolded instruction in statistics in preparing emergent scientists to be data-savvy researchers in a globally expansive STEM workforce. PMID:29904549

  5. A qualitative evaluation of leadership development workshops for mental health workers from four Pacific Island Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Paul; Montague, Ros

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a qualitative evaluation of a series of leadership development workshops held at the New South Wales Institute of Psychiatry (NSWIOP) for mental health workers from Papua New Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Marshall Islands, and Palau. Fourteen mental health workers attended the week-long training focused on project management and partnership development skills. In-depth interviews were conducted with participants at the commencement and conclusion of the training, and questionnaires were completed. A focus group was conducted with the NSWIOP organisers. The data was analysed using qualitative techniques to identify emergent themes for both participants and NSWIOP project team. All Pacific Island participants responded positively to the training. All reported greater confidence in taking on formal or informal leadership roles in the workplace, developing project planning skills and interpersonal skills such as networking and partnerships. The NSWIOP organisers identified strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of this training. The strong partnerships developed between NSWIOP and the Ministry of Health in all four countries contributed to the success of the training. Leadership Development Programs are an important aspect of building capacity in the mental health services of Pacific Island Countries. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  6. Internal Quality Assurance--Enhancing Quality Culture. ENQA Workshop Report 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENQA (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (ENQA), in cooperation with the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA, UK), organised a seminar on theme "Internal Quality Assurance--Enhancing quality culture" which was held on 8-9 June, 2010 in London, United Kingdom. The seminar marked the fourth annual meeting of the ENQA…

  7. IAEA monitoring field trials workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.; Cooley, J.N.; Belew, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recent safeguards inspections in Iraq and elsewhere by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have led to the supposition that environmental monitoring can aid in verifying declared and in detecting undeclared nuclear activities or operations. This assumption was most recently examined by the IAEA's Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI), in their reports to the IAEA Board of Governors. In their reports, SAGSI suggested that further assessment and development of environmental monitoring would be needed to fully evaluate its potential application to enhanced IAEA safeguards. Such an inquiry became part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2'' assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards. In March, 1994, the International Safeguards Group at Oak Ridge hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for IAEA inspectors to train them in the techniques needed for effective environmental sampling. The workshop included both classroom lectures and actual field sampling exercises. The workshop was designed to emphasize the analytical infrastructure needed for an environmental program, practical sampling methods, and suggested procedures for properly planning a sampling campaign. Detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water associated sampling were covered. The overall approach to the workshop, and observed results, are described

  8. Effectiveness of faculty training to enhance clinical evaluation of student competence in ethical reasoning and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Carole; Bowen, Denise; Paarmann, Carlene

    2007-08-01

    This study evaluated the short- and long-term effectiveness of faculty training to enhance clinical evaluation of ethical reasoning and professionalism in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Ethics, values, and professionalism are best measured in contexts comparable to practice; therefore, authentic evaluation is desirable for assessing these areas of competence. Methods were the following: 1) a faculty development workshop implementing a core values-based clinical evaluation system for assessing students' professional judgment; 2) subsequent evaluation of the clinical faculty's use of core values for grading and providing written comments related to students' professional judgment during patient care for three academic years; and 3) evaluation of program outcomes assessments regarding clinical learning experiences related to ethics and professionalism domains. Results revealed the clinical faculty's evaluation of professional judgment during patient care was enhanced by training; written comments more frequently related to core values defined in the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) Code of Ethics; and faculty members reported more confidence and comfort evaluating professional judgment after implementation of this evaluation system and receiving training in its application. Students were more positive in outcomes assessments about their competency and learning experiences related to professionalism and ethics. This article shares one approach for enhancing clinical faculty's authentic evaluation of student competence in ethical reasoning and professionalism.

  9. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  10. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Replacing lecture with peer-led workshops improves student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preszler, Ralph W

    2009-01-01

    Peer-facilitated workshops enhanced interactivity in our introductory biology course, which led to increased student engagement and learning. A majority of students preferred attending two lectures and a workshop each week over attending three weekly lectures. In the workshops, students worked in small cooperative groups as they solved challenging problems, evaluated case studies, and participated in activities designed to improve their general learning skills. Students in the workshop version of the course scored higher on exam questions recycled from preworkshop semesters. Grades were higher over three workshop semesters in comparison with the seven preworkshop semesters. Although males and females benefited from workshops, there was a larger improvement of grades and increased retention by female students; although underrepresented minority (URM) and non-URM students benefited from workshops, there was a larger improvement of grades by URM students. As well as improving student performance and retention, the addition of interactive workshops also improved the quality of student learning: Student scores on exam questions that required higher-level thinking increased from preworkshop to workshop semesters.

  12. Planning for Student Assessment: Participant's Handbook. Bilingual Evaluation Technical Assistance, Workshop III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for the Study of Evaluation.

    This participant's handbook is designed to be used in conjunction with a workshop for planning bilingual student assessment. The following materials are included: (1) simulation materials, including descriptions of simulated programs, tests, test manuals, and printouts; (2) checklists, diagrams, and charts illustrating important points of the…

  13. Evaluating Interactive Fatigue Management Workshops for Occupational Health Professionals in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Ali

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Fatigue can lead to severe functional impairment with adverse workplace outcomes. One-day workshops can be effective in training OH professionals in how to diagnose and manage fatigue and CFS. Training may increase general knowledge of fatigue and confidence in fatigue management in an OH setting.

  14. An Initial Evaluation of Direct Care Staff Resilience Workshops in Intellectual Disabilities Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Barry; Riley, Jenny; Nevin, Helen; Evans, Gemma; Gair, Elodie

    2013-01-01

    The emotional responses to challenging behaviour of direct care staff who support people with intellectual disabilities is thought to be an important mediating factor within the stress experienced by staff and a potential maintaining factor in challenging behaviour. A brief workshop to improve direct care staff resilience was developed and…

  15. Proceedings of the OECD-NEA workshop on the evaluation of defects, repair criteria and methods of repair for concrete structures on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    enhanced by the involvement of regulators, operators and technical specialists in both the work of the committee and its technical workshops and by liaison and co-operation with complementary committees of other international organisations. The workshop format that has been adopted (based around presentation of pre-prepared papers or reports followed by open discussion and round-table development of recommendations) has proved to be an efficient mechanism for the identification of best practice, potential shortcomings of current methods and identification of future requirements. The objectives of the workshop were to examine the current practices and the state of the art with regard to the evaluation of defects, repair criteria and methods of repair for concrete structures on Nuclear Power Plants with a view to determining the best practices and identification of shortfalls in the current methods, which are presented in the form of conclusions and recommendations

  16. DoReMi workshop on multidisciplinary approaches to evaluating cancer risks associated with low-dose internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurier, D.; Guseva Canu, I.; Bertho, J.M.; Blanchardon, E.; Rage, E.; Baatout, S.; Bouffler, S.; Cardis, E.; Gomolka, M.; Kreuzer, M.; Hall, J.; Kesminiene, A.

    2012-01-01

    A workshop dedicated to cancer risks associated with low-dose internal contamination was organised in March 2011, in Paris, in the framework of the DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) European Network of Excellence. The aim was to identify the best epidemiological studies that provide an opportunity to develop a multidisciplinary approach to improve the evaluation of the cancer risk associated with internal contamination. This workshop provided an opportunity for in-depth discussions between researchers working in different fields including (but not limited to) epidemiology, dosimetry, biology and toxicology. Discussions confirmed the importance of research on the health effects of internal contamination. Several existing epidemiological studies provide a real possibility to improve the quantification of cancer risk associated with internal emitters. Areas for future multidisciplinary collaborations were identified, that should allow feasibility studies to be carried out in the near future. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place during this workshop. (authors)

  17. An evaluation of the 1997 JPL Summer Teacher Enhancement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovacek, Simeon P.; Doyle-Nichols, Adelaide R.

    1997-10-20

    There were two major components in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Summer Teacher Enhancement Project (STEP). First, the Summer Institute was structured as a four-week, 4-credit-unit University course for middle school science teachers, and consisted of workshops, lectures, labs, and tours as activities. The second component consists of follow-up activities related to the summer institute's contents, and again is structured as a University credit-bearing course for participants to reinforce their summer training. Considerable information from the comments and course ratings as given by the participants is included.

  18. Does one workshop on respecting cultural differences increase health professionals' confidence to improve the care of Australian Aboriginal patients with cancer? An evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durey, Angela; Halkett, Georgia; Berg, Melissa; Lester, Leanne; Kickett, Marion

    2017-09-15

    Aboriginal Australians have worse cancer survival rates than other Australians. Reasons include fear of a cancer diagnosis, reluctance to attend mainstream health services and discrimination from health professionals. Offering health professionals education in care focusing on Aboriginal patients' needs is important. The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether participating in a workshop improved the confidence of radiation oncology health professionals in their knowledge, communication and ability to offer culturally safe healthcare to Aboriginal Australians with cancer. Mixed methods using pre and post workshop online surveys, and one delivered 2 months later, were evaluated. Statistical analysis determined the relative proportion of participants who changed from not at all/a little confident at baseline to fairly/extremely confident immediately and 2 months after the workshop. Factor analysis identified underlying dimensions in the items and nonparametric tests recorded changes in mean dimension scores over and between times. Qualitative data was analysed for emerging themes. Fifty-nine participants attended the workshops, 39 (66% response rate) completed pre-workshop surveys, 32 (82% of study participants) completed post-workshop surveys and 25 (64% of study participants) completed surveys 2 months later. A significant increase in the proportion of attendees who reported fair/extreme confidence within 2 days of the workshop was found in nine of 14 items, which was sustained for all but one item 2 months later. Two additional items had a significant increase in the proportion of fair/extremely confident attendees 2 months post workshop compared to baseline. An exploratory factor analysis identified three dimensions: communication; relationships; and awareness. All dimensions' mean scores significantly improved within 2 days (p Aboriginal Australians that in some cases resulted in improved care. Single workshops co-delivered by an Aboriginal and non

  19. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  20. Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling and Simulation for Formulation Development and Bioequivalence Evaluation: Report of an FDA Public Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Duan, J; Kesisoglou, F; Novakovic, J; Amidon, G L; Jamei, M; Lukacova, V; Eissing, T; Tsakalozou, E; Zhao, L; Lionberger, R

    2017-08-01

    On May 19, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hosted a public workshop, entitled "Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling and Simulation for Formulation Development and Bioequivalence Evaluation." The topic of mechanistic oral absorption modeling, which is one of the major applications of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation, focuses on predicting oral absorption by mechanistically integrating gastrointestinal transit, dissolution, and permeation processes, incorporating systems, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and the drug product information, into a systemic mathematical whole-body framework. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. Student Feedback of Career Development Workshops for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, J. E.; Pressley, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A number of techniques are employed each year to evaluate the effectiveness of and to identify opportunities for improvement in the Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (LAR) REU program at Washington State University. For example, information gathered from pre-/post-surveys and pre-/post-interviews provides information regarding students' perceptions and levels of experience with the scientific process, career and academic goals, and motivation for joining the REU program. Poster session rubrics assess students' abilities to summarize their experiences in a professional setting. Alumni surveys gauge former participants' perceptions of the REU experience. One seemingly simple and highly useful, but often less documented, component of the evaluation process for program improvement is the use of workshop feedback forms. Weekly workshops are designed to provide students with enhanced knowledge and skills in the area of atmospheric chemistry as well as research design skills, academic and career guidance, and presentation skills. According to previous years' evaluation reports, workshops are largely beneficial to students for learning new skills. Yet, students suggest a number of recommendations that may benefit any REU program, such as: providing slides beforehand to provide a framework for the upcoming workshop, having instructors speak in more student-friendly language, covering higher-level topics, and including more hands-on, instructor-guided practice during the workshops. Thus, workshop feedback forms provide meaningful feedback to increase learning outcomes and enhance the REU student experience. This presentation will offer ideas gathered from over five years of workshop feedback forms that, while somewhat specific to workshops offered for the LAR REU, can offer faculty and PIs insight into the student experience, enhancing their ability to improve programming and achieve greater learning outcomes.

  2. Workshop Physics and Related Curricula: "A 25-Year History of Collaborative Learning Enhanced by Computer Tools for Observation and Analysis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the 25-year history of development of the activity-based Workshop Physics (WP) at Dickinson College, its adaptation for use at Gettysburg Area High School, and its synergistic influence on curricular materials developed at the University of Oregon and Tufts University and vice versa. WP and these related curricula: 1) are…

  3. Instructor Touch Enhanced College Students' Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2013-01-01

    Touch between people is associated with several outcomes, including reduced stress, more positive mood, enhanced feelings of closeness, and positive behavioral change. However, the potential utility of touch rarely has been examined in a college sample, with teachers touching their students. In the present study, we used instrumental touch…

  4. Enhancing reporting of behavior change intervention evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, C.; Johnson, B.T.; de Bruin, M.; Luszczynska, A.

    2014-01-01

    Many behavior change interventions for the prevention and treatment of HIV have been evaluated, but suboptimal reporting of evaluations hinders the accumulation of evidence and the replication of interventions. In this article, we address 4 practices contributing to this problem. First, detailed

  5. Evaluation of factors important to enhance productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Productivity as a measure for output is important to industry and academia. In this research, factors to enhance productivity have been identified from the literature by reviewing various international and national sources to explore this evergreen field of research that is “productivity,” which has always been an increasingly interesting area of research for researchers over decades or perhaps over centuries. In total, 15 number of factors have been identified to enhance productivity. Analytic hierarchy process approach has been appropriately chosen to rank these factors because of its simplicity and effectiveness. The tool has been used by taking perception of experts from the Indian manufacturing industry. Positive attitude and involvement of management, proactive employees, and good working conditions have been ranked as top three factors as per the experts’ opinion. The ranking of factors to enhance productivity, categorization of the factors into four perspectives, and hierarchy of perspective and action plan as a final outcome of the paper may help academia and operations managers toward effective management of “operations and production activities of firms/supply chains.”

  6. Consumer and community involvement in health and medical research: evaluation by online survey of Australian training workshops for researchers

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Anne; Alpers, Kirsten; Heyworth, Jane; Phuong, Cindy; Hanley, Bec

    2016-01-01

    Plain English Summary In Australia, since 2009, the Consumer and Community Involvement Program (formerly the Consumer and Community Participation Program) has developed and run workshops to help people working in health and medical research involve more consumers (patients) and community members (the public) in their research. In 2012, workshop attendees were invited to do an online survey to find out the effect, if any, that attending a workshop had on their awareness of and attitudes to con...

  7. INDICO Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Fabbrichesi, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The INtegrated DIgital COnferencing EU project has finished building a complete software solution to facilitate the MANAGEMENT OF CONFERENCES, workshops, schools or simple meetings from their announcement to their archival. Everybody involved in the organization of events is welcome to join this workshop, in order to understand the scope of the project and to see demonstrations of the various features.

  8. Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome: Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sczyrba, Alex

    2011-10-13

    DOE JGI's Alex Sczyrba on "Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome" and "Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  9. Report of a workshop on environment and health. Evaluating European air quality research and translating priorities into actions 19-20 January 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taalman, R.; Rushton, E.; Minsavage, G.

    2010-11-01

    Scientists, academics, regulators, and representatives of industry and non-governmental organizations from some 18 countries around the world convened at the Bedford Hotel and Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium on January 19-20, 2009 to participate in a Workshop on Environment and Health: Evaluating European Air Quality Research and Translating Priorities into Actions. The Workshop was organized by CONCAWE with contributions from the European Commission.s DG Research, Session Chairpersons and other distinguished presenters. The workshop provided scientific updates in a number of key areas including toxicology, epidemiology and exposure assessment of airborne pollutants. Invited platform presentations and submitted posters followed by facilitated discussions amongst participants resulted in a series of recommendations which are summarized in the present report.

  10. Computational methodology in crystallography: evaluation and extension. Report of a workshop at Asilomar June 19--22, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, D.; Johnson, C.

    1978-01-01

    The workshop tended to concentrate on joint activities where NRCC might facilitate cooperation among groups of people. This report gives lesser attention to the category of individual proposals for work to be assisted by NRCC. Recomendations are presented by the panels on systems, phasing, numerical refinement, graphics, and information retrieval. Abstracts of individual papers presented at the workshop are included in the report

  11. Computational methodology in crystallography: evaluation and extension. Report of a workshop at Asilomar June 19--22, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, D.; Johnson, C. (eds.)

    1978-01-01

    The workshop tended to concentrate on joint activities where NRCC might facilitate cooperation among groups of people. This report gives lesser attention to the category of individual proposals for work to be assisted by NRCC. Recomendations are presented by the panels on systems, phasing, numerical refinement, graphics, and information retrieval. Abstracts of individual papers presented at the workshop are included in the report. (DLC)

  12. Workshop Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , the main focus there is on spoken languages in their written and spoken forms. This series of workshops, however, offers a forum for researchers focussing on sign languages. For the third time, the workshop had sign language corpora as its main topic. This time, the focus was on the interaction between...... corpus and lexicon. More than half of the papers presented contribute to this topic. Once again, the papers at this workshop clearly identify the potentials of even closer cooperation between sign linguists and sign language engineers, and we think it is events like this that contribute a lot to a better...

  13. Workshop on the role of enhancement of utilization of primary and secondary hydro potential in the context of environmental protection. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the workshop on the role of enhancement of utilization of primary and secondary hydro potential in the context of environmental protection. The proceedings consist of the following chapters: (1) BOT schemes as financial model of hydro power projects; (2) Application of pumped storage plants in the control of the Slovak power system and the possibility of pumped storage plant Ipel exploitation towards the year 2010; (3) Use of hydro energetic potential of streams from the aspects of nature conservation on the example of north Slovakia; (4) Ecological aspects of the hydro power industry and possible means to improve ecological conditions of water reservoirs; (5) Preparation and realization of HPP Zilina; (6) Freudenau HPP. ecological measures and groundwater management; (7) Present state of hydro power development in Austria

  14. Workshop on the role of enhancement of utilization of primary and secondary hydro potential in the context of environmental protection. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the workshop on the role of enhancement of utilization of primary and secondary hydro potential in the context of environmental protection. The proceedings consist of the following chapters: (1) Use of a part and a secondary hydroenergetic potential of the Slovak Republic for electric energy production and its impact on the environment; (2) Economic problems of utilization of hydroenergetic potential of the Slovak Republic and possibilities for their solution; (3) Modernization of control systems of primary and secondary hydro energetic sources of electricity from the point of view of their fulfillment of important functions in operation of a power engineering system in the Slovak Republic; (4) The most important structures utilizing primary and secondary hydroenergetic potential for electric energy production; (5) Progressive technologies, modernization of hydro power projects aimed at rationalization in a use of hydroenergetic potential and environment protection; (6) Possibilities of further utilization of hydroenergetic potential of the Slovak Republic.

  15. Workshop on the role of enhancement of utilization of primary and secondary hydro potential in the context of environmental protection. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the workshop on the role of enhancement of utilization of primary and secondary hydro potential in the context of environmental protection. The proceedings consist of the following chapters: (1) Use of a part and a secondary hydroenergetic potential of the Slovak Republic for electric energy production and its impact on the environment; (2) Economic problems of utilization of hydroenergetic potential of the Slovak Republic and possibilities for their solution; (3) Modernization of control systems of primary and secondary hydro energetic sources of electricity from the point of view of their fulfillment of important functions in operation of a power engineering system in the Slovak Republic; (4) The most important structures utilizing primary and secondary hydroenergetic potential for electric energy production; (5) Progressive technologies, modernization of hydro power projects aimed at rationalization in a use of hydroenergetic potential and environment protection; (6) Possibilities of further utilization of hydroenergetic potential of the Slovak Republic

  16. Mind maps and network analysis to evaluate conceptualization of complex issues: A case example evaluating systems science workshops for childhood obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Young, Tiffany L; Dave, Gaurav; Stith, Doris; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen

    2018-06-01

    Across disciplines, it is common practice to bring together groups to solve complex problems. Facilitators are often asked to help groups organize information about and better understand the problem in order to develop and prioritize solutions. However, despite existence of several methods to elicit and characterize how individuals and groups think about and conceptualize an issue, many are difficult to implement in practice-based settings where resources such as technology and participant time are limited and research questions shift over time. This paper describes an easy-to-implement diagramming technique for eliciting conceptualization and a flexible network analysis method for characterizing changes in both individual and group conceptualization. We use a case example to illustrate how we used the methods to evaluate African American adolescent's conceptual understanding of obesity before and after participating in a series of four systems thinking workshops. The methods produced results that were sensitive to changes in conceptualization that were likely driven by the specific activities employed during the workshop sessions. The methods appear strong for capturing salient levels of conceptualization at both individual and collective levels. The paper concludes with a critical examination of strengths and weaknesses of the methods and implications for future practice and research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in evaluation of Bell palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.M.; Wesolowski, D.P.; Bojrab, D.I.; Ernstoff, R.M.; Farah, J.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with Bell palsy were evaluated with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist)-enhanced MR imaging in a 1.0-T Siemen's Magnetom unit. Axial pre-and postcontrast and coronal postcontrast T1-weighted MR images of facial nerves were studied. Significant unilateral enhancement of the facial nerve within the internal auditory canal, with or without involvement of the geniculate ganglia, was found in six patients. Three of these patients without satisfactory response to medical treatment underwent surgical decompression, with excellent recovery of facial nerve function. The authors believe that gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is valuable in the evaluation and management of Bell palsy

  18. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  19. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T

    2001-11-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  20. The Grad Cohort Workshop: Evaluating an Intervention to Retain Women Graduate Students in Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Jane G; Tamer, Burçin; Wright, Heather M; Clarke, Lori A; Dwarkadas, Sandhya; Howard, Ayanna M

    2016-01-01

    Women engaged in computing career tracks are vastly outnumbered by men and often must contend with negative stereotypes about their innate technical aptitude. Research suggests women's marginalized presence in computing may result in women psychologically disengaging, and ultimately dropping out, perpetuating women's underrepresentation in computing. To combat this vicious cycle, the Computing Research Association's Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W) runs a multi-day mentorship workshop for women graduate students called Grad Cohort, which consists of a speaker series and networking opportunities. We studied the long-term impact of Grad Cohort on women Ph.D. students' (a) dedication to becoming well-known in one's field, and giving back to the community ( professional goals ), (b) the degree to which one feels computing is an important element of "who they are" ( computing identity) , and (c) beliefs that computing skills are innate ( entity beliefs ). Of note, entity beliefs are known to be demoralizing and can lead to disengagement from academic endeavors. We compared a propensity score matched sample of women and men Ph.D. students in computing programs who had never participated in Grad Cohort to a sample of past Grad Cohort participants. Grad Cohort participants reported interest in becoming well-known in their field to a greater degree than women non-participants, and to an equivalent degree as men. Also, Grad Cohort participants reported stronger interest in giving back to the community than their peers. Further, whereas women non-participants identified with computing to a lesser degree than men and held stronger entity beliefs than men, Grad Cohort participants' computing identity and entity beliefs were equivalent to men. Importantly, stronger entity beliefs predicted a weaker computing identity among students, with the exception of Grad Cohort participants. This latter finding suggests Grad Cohort may shield students

  1. Algorithms evaluation for fundus images enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braem, V; Marcos, M; Bizai, G; Drozdowicz, B; Salvatelli, A

    2011-01-01

    Color images of the retina inherently involve noise and illumination artifacts. In order to improve the diagnostic quality of the images, it is desirable to homogenize the non-uniform illumination and increase contrast while preserving color characteristics. The visual result of different pre-processing techniques can be very dissimilar and it is necessary to make an objective assessment of the techniques in order to select the most suitable. In this article the performance of eight algorithms to correct the non-uniform illumination, contrast modification and color preservation was evaluated. In order to choose the most suitable a general score was proposed. The results got good impression from experts, although some differences suggest that not necessarily the best statistical quality of image is the one of best diagnostic quality to the trained doctor eye. This means that the best pre-processing algorithm for an automatic classification may be different to the most suitable one for visual diagnosis. However, both should result in the same final diagnosis.

  2. Stakeholder Engagement in Food Risk Management: Evaluation of an Iterated Workshop Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walls, J.; Rowe, G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    There are considerable uncertainties regarding how stakeholder engagement should be enacted. The lack of clear guidelines on good practice is arguably a consequence of an absence of evaluations on the effectiveness of past engagement exercises. Here we describe the evaluation of one engagement event

  3. Assessment of Interior General and Local Lighting in Carpet Weaving Workshops in Bijar City

    OpenAIRE

    Rostam Golmohamadi; Homeira Alizadeh; Motamedzade Majid; Soltanian Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives : The comfort lighting in the workplace provides employees visual health which can improve safety, visual comfort and enhance performance and product quality. The present study was conducted to evaluate general and local lighting in carpet weaving workshops in Bijar city . Methods : In this descriptive analytical study, 101 carpet weaving workshops were randomly selected. The illuminance were measured based on the models and formulas presented in Illuminating Engin...

  4. Improving the Pipeline of Women in STEM Fields: Addressing Challenges in Instruction, Engagement, and Evaluation of an Aerospace Workshop Series for Girl Scouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealfon, C. D.; Plummer, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The Women in Aerospace and Technology Project (WATP) is a collaborative effort between the Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania, the American Helicopter Museum, Boeing Rotorcraft, Sikorsky Global Helicopters, Drexel University, West Chester University, and Arcadia University. The program aims to increase the representation of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields; the evaluation team identified a secondary goal to assess growth in participants' understanding of scientific inquiry. Girls, grades 4-12, were invited to join Girl Scout troops formed at the American Helicopter Museum to participate in a series of eight workshops on the physics and engineering of flight. Five college women majoring in physics and engineering were recruited as mentors for the girls. Lessons were written by local aerospace industry partners (including Boeing and Sikorsky); the mentors then taught the lessons and activities during the workshops. To evaluate the impact of this project, we collected data to answer two research questions: 1) In what ways does the program impact participants' attitudes towards science and interest in pursuing science as a career? 2) In what ways does the program impact participants' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry? In this article we summarize results from two sources of data: before and after survey of attitudes about science and end-of-workshop informal questionnaires. Across the seven months of data collection, two challenges became apparent. First, our assessment goals, focusing on scientific interest and inquiry, seemed misaligned with the workshop curricula, which emphasized engineering and design. Secondly, there was little connection among activities within workshops and across the program.

  5. Second Greenhouse Gas Information System Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, S. W.; Duren, R. M.; Mitchiner, J.; Rotman, D.; Sheffner, E.; Ebinger, M. H.; Miller, C. E.; Butler, J. H.; Dimotakis, P.; Jonietz, K.

    2009-12-01

    The second Greenhouse Gas Information System (GHGIS) workshop was held May 20-22, 2009 at the Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The workshop brought together 74 representatives from 28 organizations including U.S. government agencies, national laboratories, and members of the academic community to address issues related to the understanding, operational monitoring, and tracking of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon offsets. The workshop was organized by an interagency collaboration between NASA centers, DOE laboratories, and NOAA. It was motivated by the perceived need for an integrated interagency, community-wide initiative to provide information about greenhouse gas sources and sinks at policy-relevant temporal and spatial scales in order to significantly enhance the ability of national and regional governments, industry, and private citizens to implement and evaluate effective climate change mitigation policies. This talk provides an overview of the second Greenhouse Gas Information System workshop, presents its key findings, and discusses current status and next steps in this interagency collaborative effort.

  6. Course Evaluation Systems for Open-ended Quality Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piihl, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jens Smed

    2013-01-01

    Quality in higher education is widely controlled through surveys asking students to evaluate teaching. However, control of quality does not necessarily lead to enhancement of quality. Drawing on accounting research and a case study, a measurement-based and open-ended quality control system...... emphasising quality enhancement is suggested. The case shows how interactive use of performance measurement can lead to more engaged and enabling dialogue amongst involved actors concerning quality enhancement, however institutionalised beliefs regarding course evaluation systems makes a change challenging....... The chapter suggests that open-ended measurement systems enabling stakeholders to take responsibility for quality enhancement is not so much a matter of technical design as a matter of an enabling style of use....

  7. An Evaluation of the Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Workshops: Results of a 1998 Customer Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. B. Gordon; N. Hall

    1999-04-01

    This report presents the results of a customer telephone survey of the participants of six workshops provided by the U. S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) during calendar years 1995 and 1996. The primary purpose for the survey was to provide the Team Leader for FEMP Technical Assistance and members of the team with detailed customer feedback pertaining to how well selected FEMP workshops are doing and to identify areas for improvement. The information presented enables managers to see both the strengths of their workshops, as well as workshop components that can be improved. In addition, the report identifies the questions included in the survey that were the most productive for obtaining customers experiences, opinions and recommendations. The experiences gained during this survey provide a platform from which to launch an annual FEMP customer survey.

  8. Engaging with economic evaluation methods: insights from small and medium enterprises in the UK medical devices industry after training workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craven Michael P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increased governmental interest in value assessment of technologies and where medical device manufacturers are finding it increasingly necessary to become more familiar with economic evaluation methods, the study sought to explore the levels of health economics knowledge within small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs and to scope strategies they employ to demonstrate the value of their products to purchasers. Methods A short questionnaire was completed by participants attending one of five workshops on product development in the medical device sector that took place in England between 2007 and 2011. From all responses obtained, a large proportion of participants were based in SMEs (N = 43, and these responses were used for the analysis. Statistical analysis using non-parametric tests was performed on questions with approximately interval scales. Qualitative data from participant responses were analysed to reveal emerging themes. Results The questionnaire results revealed that 60% of SME participants (mostly company directors or managers, including product or project managers rated themselves as having low or no knowledge of health economics prior to the workshops but the rest professed at least medium knowledge. Clinical trials and cost analyses or cost-effectiveness studies were the most highly cited means by which SMEs aim to demonstrate value of products to purchasers. Purchasers were perceived to place most importance on factors of safety, expert opinion, cost-effectiveness and price. However many companies did not utilise formal decision-making tools to prioritise these factors. There was no significant dependence of the use of decision-making tools in general with respect to professed knowledge of health economics methods. SMEs did not state a preference for any particular aspect of potential value when deciding whether to develop a product. A majority of SMEs stated they would use a health economics tool

  9. Engaging with economic evaluation methods: insights from small and medium enterprises in the UK medical devices industry after training workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Michael P; Allsop, Matthew J; Morgan, Stephen P; Martin, Jennifer L

    2012-09-03

    With increased governmental interest in value assessment of technologies and where medical device manufacturers are finding it increasingly necessary to become more familiar with economic evaluation methods, the study sought to explore the levels of health economics knowledge within small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and to scope strategies they employ to demonstrate the value of their products to purchasers. A short questionnaire was completed by participants attending one of five workshops on product development in the medical device sector that took place in England between 2007 and 2011. From all responses obtained, a large proportion of participants were based in SMEs (N = 43), and these responses were used for the analysis. Statistical analysis using non-parametric tests was performed on questions with approximately interval scales. Qualitative data from participant responses were analysed to reveal emerging themes. The questionnaire results revealed that 60% of SME participants (mostly company directors or managers, including product or project managers) rated themselves as having low or no knowledge of health economics prior to the workshops but the rest professed at least medium knowledge. Clinical trials and cost analyses or cost-effectiveness studies were the most highly cited means by which SMEs aim to demonstrate value of products to purchasers. Purchasers were perceived to place most importance on factors of safety, expert opinion, cost-effectiveness and price. However many companies did not utilise formal decision-making tools to prioritise these factors. There was no significant dependence of the use of decision-making tools in general with respect to professed knowledge of health economics methods. SMEs did not state a preference for any particular aspect of potential value when deciding whether to develop a product. A majority of SMEs stated they would use a health economics tool. Research and development teams or marketing and sales

  10. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

    2003-02-01

    This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in evaluation of cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, M.; Sugimura, K.; Ishida, T.; Fujino, A.; Miyakuni, Y.

    1990-01-01

    It was sometimes difficult to differentiate cholesteatoma from accompanied granuloma, cholesterol granuloma, or mastoiditis on high-resolution CT. This study was designed to assess the reliability with which cholesteatoma can be differentiated from those accompanied lesions by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Eight patients suspected to have cholesteatoma were evaluated with GD-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging with a 1.5-T MR imaging GE Signa unit. axial pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted (TR/TE, 600/20) and T2-weighted (TR/TE, 2,000/70) images were studied. MR imaging findings were compared with histologic findings (13 lesions), which included cholesteatoma (n = 6), granuloma (n = 4), cholesterol granuloma (n = 2), and mastoiditis (n = 1). Cholesteatoma had an intermediate to high signal intensity (SI) similar to that of granuloma on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Cholesterol granulomas showed high SI on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Mastoiditis demonstrated marked high SI on T2-weighted images. Cholesterol granuloma and mastoiditis can be distinguished from cholesteatoma or granuloma on both T1- and T2-weighted images. On Gd-DTPA-enhanced images, there was marked enhancement of all granulomas. However, no cholesteatoma enhancement was seen in all six lesions. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images were able to distinguish cholesteatoma from granuloma and to estimate the exact extent of cholesteatoma. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging is valuable in the evaluation and management of cholesteatoma

  12. A combined pulmonary-radiology workshop for visual evaluation of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barr, R Graham; Berkowitz, Eugene A; Bigazzi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were: to describe chest CT findings in normal non-smoking controls and cigarette smokers with and without COPD; to compare the prevalence of CT abnormalities with severity of COPD; and to evaluate concordance between visual and quantitative chest CT (QCT) scoring....

  13. An outcome study of gestalt-oriented growth workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Grace Suk Man; Leung, Timothy Yuk Ki; Ng, Monica Lai Tuen

    2013-01-01

    Compared to other intervention modalities, there are relatively few outcome studies of gestalt therapy. This study aimed to address this gap by evaluating the therapeutic effects of four gestalt-oriented group workshops designed to enhance well-being in professionals trained as social workers, counselors, and psychologists. The results of this preliminary, uncontrolled study indicated that the 55 participants had better emotional well-being and experienced a heightened sense of hope following the workshops. The factors leading to these positive outcomes are discussed.

  14. Effectiveness of an experiential workshop for enhancing helping professionals' self-competence in death work in Hong Kong: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wallace Chi Ho; Tin, Agnes Fong; Wong, Karen Lok Yi

    2017-05-01

    Helping professionals require self-competence in coping with the existential and emotional challenges of death work. Previous training often focused on knowledge and skills rather than on this competence. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a 3-day workshop in Hong Kong to enhance helping professionals' self-competence in death work. A randomised controlled trial was conducted to examine the effects of the training between January and May 2014. Targeted participants were helping professionals who had been doing death work for at least 6 months. The 112 participants were openly recruited from hospitals and NGOs and were assigned to an intervention group or a waitlist control group. Data were collected at pre-intervention and post-intervention. Primary outcome was self-competence in death work. All participants were grouped for analysing the changes in outcomes at pre-intervention, post-intervention and 3-month follow-up. Participants in the intervention group experienced a significant increase in the total score of the Self-competence in Death Work Scale (SC-DWS) and in scores of the Existential and Emotional subscales of SC-DWS. The positive effects of training on self-competence in death work were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. This study provides evidence of the effectiveness of training in enhancing helping professionals' self-competence in death work. Further research is required to examine the long-term effects of training. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluating the impact of an intensive education workshop on evidence-informed decision making knowledge, skills, and behaviours: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Jennifer; Ciliska, Donna; Dobbins, Maureen

    2014-01-17

    Health professionals require a unique set of knowledge and skills in order to meet increasing expectations to use research evidence to inform practice and policy decisions. They need to be able to find, access, interpret, and apply the best available research evidence, along with information about patient preferences, clinical expertise, and the clinical context and resources, to such decisions. This study determined preferences for continuing education following an intensive educational workshop and evaluated the impact of the workshop on evidence informed decision making (EIDM) knowledge, skills, and behaviours. An explanatory mixed methods, longitudinal study design was implemented among a convenience sample of various health care professionals attending the workshop. EIDM knowledge, skills, and behaviours were quantitatively measured at baseline and six month follow-up, with EIDM knowledge and skills measured additionally immediately following the educational workshop (post-test measurement). To determine participants preferences for continuing education, data were collected using quantitative survey (post-test measurement) and qualitative (individual telephone interviews after six-month follow-up) methods. EIDM knowledge and skills increased significantly from baseline to immediately following the intervention [5.6, 95% CI (3.7, 7.4), P skills and EIDM behaviours (r = 0.29, P 0.069 and r = 0.24, P 0.136, respectively). Over time there was a shift in preferences for timing and frequency of online continuing education strategies. Willingness to participate in continuing education, however, remained evident. An intensive educational workshop shows promise for increasing EIDM knowledge and skills. Increasing EIDM knowledge and skills may promote the capacity of health professionals to use research evidence when making practice and policy decisions and, in turn, lead to positive patient outcomes.

  16. Evaluation of carotid vessel wall enhancement with image subtraction after gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Aliprandi, Alberto; Flor, Nicola; Papini, Giacomo D.E.; Roccatagliata, Luca; Cotticelli, Biagio; Nano, Giovanni; Cornalba, Gianpaolo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study was aimed at testing the value of image subtraction for evaluating carotid vessel wall enhancement in contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. The scans of 81 consecutive patients who underwent carotid MRA with 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine were reviewed. Axial carotid 3D T1-weighted fast low-angle shot sequence before and 3 min after contrast injection were acquired and subtracted (enhanced minus unenhanced). Vessel wall enhancement was assigned a four-point score using native or subtracted images from 0 (no enhancement) to 3 (strong enhancement). Stenosis degree was graded according to NASCET. Results: With native images, vessel wall enhancement was detected in 20/81 patients (25%) and in 20/161 carotids (12%), and scored 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± standard deviation); with subtracted images, in 21/81 (26%) and 22/161 (14%), and scored 2.5 ± 0.6, respectively (P < 0.001, Sign test). The overall stenosis degree distribution was: mild, 41/161 (25%); moderate, 77/161 (48%); severe, 43/161 (27%). Carotids with moderate stenosis showed vessel wall enhancement with a frequency (17/77, 22%) significantly higher than that observed in carotids with mild stenosis (1/41, 2%) (P = 0.005, Fisher exact test) and higher, even though with borderline significance (P = 0.078, Fisher exact test), than that observed in carotids with severe stenosis (4/43, 9%). Conclusion: Roughly a quarter of patients undergoing carotid MRA showed vessel wall enhancement. Image subtraction improved vessel wall enhancement conspicuity. Vessel wall enhancement seems to be an event relatively independent from the degree of stenosis. Further studies are warranted to define the relation between vessel wall enhancement and histopathology, inflammatory status, and instability.

  17. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data....... These include student relations and interactions and epistemic and linguistic networks of words, concepts and actions. Network methodology has already found use in science education research. However, while networks hold the potential for new insights, they have not yet found wide use in the science education...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...

  18. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Summary: Enhancing Opportunities for Training and Retention of a Diverse Biomedical Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Lockett, Angelia; Villegas, Leah R; Almodovar, Sharilyn; Gomez, Jose L; Flores, Sonia C; Wilkes, David S; Tigno, Xenia T

    2016-04-01

    Committed to its mission of conducting and supporting research that addresses the health needs of all sectors of the nation's population, the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NHLBI/NIH) seeks to identify issues that impact the training and retention of underrepresented individuals in the biomedical research workforce. Early-stage investigators who received grant support through the NIH Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health Related Research Program were invited to a workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland in June, 2015, in order to (1) assess the effectiveness of the current NHLBI diversity program, (2) improve its strategies towards achieving its goal, and (3) provide guidance to assist the transition of diversity supplement recipients to independent NIH grant support. Workshop participants participated in five independent focus groups to discuss specific topics affecting underrepresented individuals in the biomedical sciences: (1) Socioeconomic barriers to success for diverse research scientists; (2) role of the academic research community in promoting diversity; (3) life beyond a research project grant: non-primary investigator career paths in research; (4) facilitating career development of diverse independent research scientists through NHLBI diversity programs; and (5) effectiveness of current NHLBI programs for promoting diversity of the biomedical workforce. Several key issues experienced by young, underrepresented biomedical scientists were identified, and solutions were proposed to improve on training and career development for diverse students, from the high school to postdoctoral trainee level, and address limitations of currently available diversity programs. Although some of the challenges mentioned, such as cost of living, limited parental leave, and insecure extramural funding, are also likely faced by nonminority scientists, these issues are magnified among diversity

  19. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  20. Developing and Evaluating Digital Interventions to Promote Behavior Change in Health and Health Care: Recommendations Resulting From an International Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Susan; Yardley, Lucy; West, Robert; Patrick, Kevin; Greaves, Felix

    2017-06-29

    Devices and programs using digital technology to foster or support behavior change (digital interventions) are increasingly ubiquitous, being adopted for use in patient diagnosis and treatment, self-management of chronic diseases, and in primary prevention. They have been heralded as potentially revolutionizing the ways in which individuals can monitor and improve their health behaviors and health care by improving outcomes, reducing costs, and improving the patient experience. However, we are still mainly in the age of promise rather than delivery. Developing and evaluating these digital interventions presents new challenges and new versions of old challenges that require use of improved and perhaps entirely new methods for research and evaluation. This article discusses these challenges and provides recommendations aimed at accelerating the rate of progress in digital behavior intervention research and practice. Areas addressed include intervention development in a rapidly changing technological landscape, promoting user engagement, advancing the underpinning science and theory, evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and addressing issues of regulatory, ethical, and information governance. This article is the result of a two-day international workshop on how to create, evaluate, and implement effective digital interventions in relation to health behaviors. It was held in London in September 2015 and was supported by the United Kingdom's Medical Research Council (MRC), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Methodology Research Programme (PI Susan Michie), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation of the United States (PI Kevin Patrick). Important recommendations to manage the rapid pace of change include considering using emerging techniques from data science, machine learning, and Bayesian approaches and learning from other disciplines including computer science and engineering. With regard to assessing and promoting engagement, a key

  1. Developing and Evaluating Digital Interventions to Promote Behavior Change in Health and Health Care: Recommendations Resulting From an International Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Lucy; West, Robert; Patrick, Kevin; Greaves, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Devices and programs using digital technology to foster or support behavior change (digital interventions) are increasingly ubiquitous, being adopted for use in patient diagnosis and treatment, self-management of chronic diseases, and in primary prevention. They have been heralded as potentially revolutionizing the ways in which individuals can monitor and improve their health behaviors and health care by improving outcomes, reducing costs, and improving the patient experience. However, we are still mainly in the age of promise rather than delivery. Developing and evaluating these digital interventions presents new challenges and new versions of old challenges that require use of improved and perhaps entirely new methods for research and evaluation. This article discusses these challenges and provides recommendations aimed at accelerating the rate of progress in digital behavior intervention research and practice. Areas addressed include intervention development in a rapidly changing technological landscape, promoting user engagement, advancing the underpinning science and theory, evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and addressing issues of regulatory, ethical, and information governance. This article is the result of a two-day international workshop on how to create, evaluate, and implement effective digital interventions in relation to health behaviors. It was held in London in September 2015 and was supported by the United Kingdom’s Medical Research Council (MRC), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Methodology Research Programme (PI Susan Michie), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation of the United States (PI Kevin Patrick). Important recommendations to manage the rapid pace of change include considering using emerging techniques from data science, machine learning, and Bayesian approaches and learning from other disciplines including computer science and engineering. With regard to assessing and promoting engagement, a key

  2. International Workshop on Hot Dry Rock. Creation and evaluation of geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-11-04

    At the above-named event which met on November 4 and 5, 1988, a number of essays were presented concerning the fracture system, exploration, evaluation, geophysical measurement application, etc., as developed in the U.S., France, Sweden, Italy, Japan, England, etc. Novel technologies are necessary for a breakthrough in HDR (hot dry rock) exploitation. In the designing of an HDR system, the orientation and dimensions of a fracture to be hydraulically produced have to be appropriately predicted, for which knowledge of rock physical properties and geological structures and the technology of simulating them will be useful. Drilling and geophysical probing of rock mass are some means for fracture observation. Seismometer-aided mapping by AE (acoustic emission) observation is performed while hydraulic fracturing is under way. Upon completion of an HDR circulation system, evaluation of the reservoir by experiment or theory becomes necessary. The heat exchanging area and deposition are estimated using the geochemical data, temperature fall, etc., of the liquid in circulation. If fracture impedance or water loss is out of the designed level, the fracture needs improvement. (NEDO)

  3. Proceedings: Power Plant Electric Auxiliary Systems Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The EPRI Power Plant Electric Auxiliary Systems Workshop, held April 24--25, 1991, in Princeton, New Jersey, brought together utilities, architect/engineers, and equipment suppliers to discuss common problems with power plant auxiliary systems. Workshop participants presented papers on monitoring, identifying, and solving problems with auxiliary systems. Panel discussions focused on improving systems and existing and future plants. The solutions presented to common auxiliary system problems focused on practical ideas that can enhance plant availability, reduce maintenance costs, and simplify the engineering process. The 13 papers in these proceedings include: Tutorials on auxiliary electrical systems and motors; descriptions of evaluations, software development, and new technologies used recently by electric utilities; an analysis of historical performance losses caused by power plant auxiliary systems; innovative design concepts for improving auxiliary system performance in future power plants

  4. Evaluation of the early enhancement of coronary atherosclerotic plaque by contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Tao [Department of Radiology, The General Hospital of Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Number 69, Yong Ding Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Number 28, Fu Xing Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Zhao Xihai [Department of Radiology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Number 28, Fu Xing Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Liu Xin [Paul C. Lauterbur Biomedical Imaging Center, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518067 (China); Gao Jianhua [Department of Radiology, The General Hospital of Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Number 69, Yong Ding Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Zhao Shaohong [Department of Radiology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Number 28, Fu Xing Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Li Xin; Zhou Weihua [Department of Radiology, The General Hospital of Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Number 69, Yong Ding Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Cai Zulong [Department of Radiology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Number 28, Fu Xing Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China); Zhang Weiguo [Cardiovascular and Neurological Consulting Institute, 6771 San Fernando, Irving, TX 75039 (United States); Yang Li, E-mail: Yangli301@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Number 28, Fu Xing Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the early enhancement of coronary atherosclerotic plaque using contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and investigate the association between unstable angina pectoris (UAP) and early enhancement of the plaque. Methods: Forty-one patients presenting with angina pectoris and demonstrating single-vessel disease with non-calcified plaque and significant coronary stenosis ({>=}50%) on CTA were consecutively recruited for coronary CE-MRA. Contrast-to-noise ratio of the culprit plaque guided by CTA was measured on a cross-sectional multi-planar reconstruction image of the plaque on both pre- and post-CE-MRA. A 50% increasing of CNR was defined as plaque enhancement. The association between early enhancement of the plaques and UAP was analyzed. Results: Thirty-seven non-calcified plaques with significant coronary stenosis were detected in the 37 patients on MRA. 4 subjects were excluded because coronary atherosclerotic plaques were inadequate for identification on MRA. Of the 37 patients, 18 patients had UAP and other 19 patients presented stable angina pectoris (SAP). Of the 37 plaques on CE-MRA, 13 and 24 plaques presented early enhancement and no enhancement, respectively. Of the 13 early-enhanced plaques, 11 (85%) and 2 (15%) were found in the patients with UAP and SAP, respectively (p < 0.01). Of the 37 patients, 11 (61%) with UAP and 2 (11%) with SAP had early-enhanced plaques, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion: CE-MRA allows detection of early enhancement of coronary atherosclerotic plaque. The early enhancement is common in unstable angina and could be a sign of vulnerability.

  5. Evaluation of Diclofenac Prodrugs for Enhancing Transdermal Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD), and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates, and bioconversion rates. ...

  6. Workshop introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Category I and II) sources in thousands of devices; and there are many more tens of thousands of smaller sources scattered among thousands of other NRC licensees. As a result of the ubiquitous nature and undeterminable number of current and legacy sources, even in developed countries they can be abandoned, disposed of in a haphazard manner, lost, stolen, and/or otherwise fallout of regulatory control. Supply and demand of sources, being market based, is more or less fluid. Normative security of radioactive sources exists, but varies in each country, and is loosely implemented through non-legally binding recommendations and standards provided by International Atomic Energy Agency technical documents and cooperation and through bilateral efforts such as this workshop where we share best-practices with one another. Much of the reason for the difficulty in securing sealed sources rests in the enormous need for their beneficial applications in the medical, industrial, and agricultural sectors. Alternative technologies to replace high-risk sources continue to be explored, but very few of these alternative solutions have reached the development stage for common usage and distribution. The beneficial uses of sources must be allowed to continue; however, to minimize the potential for their misuse, current controls and regulating mechanisms must be constantly evaluated to ensure the benefits gained outweigh potential risks. From a global perspective, an evaluation and modification of requirements over the entire life cycle of sources from their manufacture to their final disposition is required. The proper removal and disposal of vulnerable disused or orphan sources is essential to maintaining a safe operating environment. One of our goals in this workshop is to share our methodologies for recovering sources and learn how they differ or are similar to the challenges faced in recovering, storing, and disposing of sources in the Republic of Georgia . The suggestions we will make are

  7. Cancer genetics education in a low- to middle-income country: evaluation of an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hill

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic testing is becoming an integral part of medical care for inherited disorders. While genetic testing and counseling are readily available in high-income countries, in low- and middle-income countries like Kenya genetic testing is limited and genetic counseling is virtually non-existent. Genetic testing is likely to become widespread in Kenya within the next decade, yet there has not been a concomitant increase in genetic counseling resources. To address this gap, we designed an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya focused on the genetics of the childhood eye cancer retinoblastoma. The objectives were to increase retinoblastoma genetics knowledge, build genetic counseling skills and increase confidence in those skills.The workshop was conducted at the 2013 Kenyan National Retinoblastoma Strategy meeting. It included a retinoblastoma genetics presentation, small group discussion of case studies and genetic counseling role-play. Knowledge was assessed by standardized test, and genetic counseling skills and confidence by questionnaire.Knowledge increased significantly post-workshop, driven by increased knowledge of retinoblastoma causative genetics. One-year post-workshop, participant knowledge had returned to baseline, indicating that knowledge retention requires more frequent reinforcement. Participants reported feeling more confident discussing genetics with patients, and had integrated more genetic counseling into patient interactions.A comprehensive retinoblastoma genetics workshop can increase the knowledge and skills necessary for effective retinoblastoma genetic counseling.

  8. Cancer genetics education in a low- to middle-income country: evaluation of an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jessica A; Lee, Su Yeon; Njambi, Lucy; Corson, Timothy W; Dimaras, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing is becoming an integral part of medical care for inherited disorders. While genetic testing and counseling are readily available in high-income countries, in low- and middle-income countries like Kenya genetic testing is limited and genetic counseling is virtually non-existent. Genetic testing is likely to become widespread in Kenya within the next decade, yet there has not been a concomitant increase in genetic counseling resources. To address this gap, we designed an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya focused on the genetics of the childhood eye cancer retinoblastoma. The objectives were to increase retinoblastoma genetics knowledge, build genetic counseling skills and increase confidence in those skills. The workshop was conducted at the 2013 Kenyan National Retinoblastoma Strategy meeting. It included a retinoblastoma genetics presentation, small group discussion of case studies and genetic counseling role-play. Knowledge was assessed by standardized test, and genetic counseling skills and confidence by questionnaire. Knowledge increased significantly post-workshop, driven by increased knowledge of retinoblastoma causative genetics. One-year post-workshop, participant knowledge had returned to baseline, indicating that knowledge retention requires more frequent reinforcement. Participants reported feeling more confident discussing genetics with patients, and had integrated more genetic counseling into patient interactions. A comprehensive retinoblastoma genetics workshop can increase the knowledge and skills necessary for effective retinoblastoma genetic counseling.

  9. Systematic Review Workshop (August 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal for this workshop is to receive scientific input regarding approaches for different steps within a systematic review, such as evaluating individual studies, synthesizing evidence within a particular discipline, etc.

  10. Virtual Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann

    In relation to the Tutor course in the Mediterranean Virtual University (MVU) project, a virtual workshop “Getting experiences with different synchronous communication media, collaboration, and group work” was held with all partner institutions in January 2006. More than 25 key-tutors within MVU...

  11. Production Task Queue Optimization Based on Multi-Attribute Evaluation for Complex Product Assembly Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Hui; Mo, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The production task queue has a great significance for manufacturing resource allocation and scheduling decision. Man-made qualitative queue optimization method has a poor effect and makes the application difficult. A production task queue optimization method is proposed based on multi-attribute evaluation. According to the task attributes, the hierarchical multi-attribute model is established and the indicator quantization methods are given. To calculate the objective indicator weight, criteria importance through intercriteria correlation (CRITIC) is selected from three usual methods. To calculate the subjective indicator weight, BP neural network is used to determine the judge importance degree, and then the trapezoid fuzzy scale-rough AHP considering the judge importance degree is put forward. The balanced weight, which integrates the objective weight and the subjective weight, is calculated base on multi-weight contribution balance model. The technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) improved by replacing Euclidean distance with relative entropy distance is used to sequence the tasks and optimize the queue by the weighted indicator value. A case study is given to illustrate its correctness and feasibility.

  12. Production Task Queue Optimization Based on Multi-Attribute Evaluation for Complex Product Assembly Workshop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Hui Li

    Full Text Available The production task queue has a great significance for manufacturing resource allocation and scheduling decision. Man-made qualitative queue optimization method has a poor effect and makes the application difficult. A production task queue optimization method is proposed based on multi-attribute evaluation. According to the task attributes, the hierarchical multi-attribute model is established and the indicator quantization methods are given. To calculate the objective indicator weight, criteria importance through intercriteria correlation (CRITIC is selected from three usual methods. To calculate the subjective indicator weight, BP neural network is used to determine the judge importance degree, and then the trapezoid fuzzy scale-rough AHP considering the judge importance degree is put forward. The balanced weight, which integrates the objective weight and the subjective weight, is calculated base on multi-weight contribution balance model. The technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS improved by replacing Euclidean distance with relative entropy distance is used to sequence the tasks and optimize the queue by the weighted indicator value. A case study is given to illustrate its correctness and feasibility.

  13. Evaluation of airborne lead levels in storage battery workshops and some welding environments in Kumasi metropolis in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartey, E; Adimado, A A; Agyarko, K

    2010-05-01

    Airborne lead levels were assessed in nine workshops, three each from battery, electronic repair, and welding sources within the Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana. Samples were collected at 0, 2.5, and 5.0 m away from the emission source at the workshops during working hours and another at 5.0 m during break hours. Airborne lead particulates were collected and analyzed using the filter membrane technique and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. There were significant differences (p lead levels from the workshops. Workshop 3b produced the highest significant values of air lead concentrations of 2,820.31 +/- 53.89, 2,406.74 +/- 71.87, 754.55 +/- 72.52, and 549.01 +/- 67.30 microg/m(3) at distances of 0, 2.5, 5.0, and 5.0 m (break-time measurement), respectively, while workshop 1w significantly produced the lowest air lead concentration values of 261.06 +/- 21.60, 190.92 +/- 36.90, 86.43 +/- 16.26, and 61.05 +/- 3.88 microg/m(3) at distances of 0, 2.5, 5.0, and 5.0 m (break-time measurement), respectively. The air lead levels reduced with distance from emission source at the workshops. At all the distances of measurement at working hours, the airborne lead levels were higher than the World Health Organization standard of 50 microg/m(3) and exceeded the threshold limit values of 100 to 150 microg/m(3) recommended in most jurisdictions. Workers and people in the immediate environs were exposed to air lead levels that were too high by most international standards, thus posing a serious threat to their health.

  14. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  15. Providing a computing environment for a high energy physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    Although computing facilities have been provided at conferences and workshops remote from the hose institution for some years, the equipment provided has rarely been capable of providing for much more than simple editing and electronic mail over leased lines. This presentation describes the pioneering effort involved by the Computing Department/Division at Fermilab in providing a local computing facility with world-wide networking capability for the Physics at Fermilab in the 1990's workshop held in Breckenridge, Colorado, in August 1989, as well as the enhanced facilities provided for the 1990 Summer Study on High Energy Physics at Snowmass, Colorado, in June/July 1990. Issues discussed include type and sizing of the facilities, advance preparations, shipping, on-site support, as well as an evaluation of the value of the facility to the workshop participants

  16. Report on the value engineering workshop on APS beamline front ends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-01-01

    A formal value engineering evaluation process was developed to address the front end components of the beamlines for the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This process (described in Section 2) involved an information phase, a creative phase, a judgment phase, a development phase, and a recommendation phase. Technical experts from other national laboratories and industry were invited to a two-day Value Engineering Workshop on November 5-6, 1992. The results of this Workshop are described in Section 4. Following the Workshop, various actions by the APS staff led to the redesign of the front end components, which are presented in Sections 5 and 6. The cost benefit analysis is presented in Section 7. It is important of realize that an added benefit of the Workshop was to obtain numerous design evaluations and enhancements of the front end components by experts in the field. As the design work proceeds to Title II completion, the APS staff is including many of these suggestions

  17. Incorporating a Weight Management Skills Workshop in Pharmacy Curricula in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Irene S; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol; Gill, Timothy; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a competency-based weight management skills workshop for undergraduate pharmacy students in an Australian university. Design. A 3-hour workshop titled "Weight Management in Pharmacy" was implemented with a cohort of fourth-year undergraduate pharmacy students (n=180). Learning activities used included case-based learning, hands-on experience, role-play, and group discussion. Assessment. A 22-item attitudinal survey instrument and the validated Obesity Risk Knowledge (ORK-10) scale were administered at baseline and postworkshop to evaluate the impact of this educational workshop. There was significant improvement in the students' ORK scores and students' perceived level of self-confidence in performing weight management skills. Conclusion. An educational workshop designed to enhance professional competencies in weight management ensured graduates were "service-ready" and had the appropriate knowledge, skills, and attributes to deliver patient-centered pharmacy-based weight management services.

  18. Incorporating a Weight Management Skills Workshop in Pharmacy Curricula in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol; Gill, Timothy; Chaar, Betty B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a competency-based weight management skills workshop for undergraduate pharmacy students in an Australian university. Design. A 3-hour workshop titled “Weight Management in Pharmacy” was implemented with a cohort of fourth-year undergraduate pharmacy students (n=180). Learning activities used included case-based learning, hands-on experience, role-play, and group discussion. Assessment. A 22-item attitudinal survey instrument and the validated Obesity Risk Knowledge (ORK-10) scale were administered at baseline and postworkshop to evaluate the impact of this educational workshop. There was significant improvement in the students’ ORK scores and students’ perceived level of self-confidence in performing weight management skills. Conclusion. An educational workshop designed to enhance professional competencies in weight management ensured graduates were “service-ready” and had the appropriate knowledge, skills, and attributes to deliver patient-centered pharmacy-based weight management services. PMID:27293236

  19. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility

  20. Four Simple Questions: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Half-Day Community Workshops Designed to Increase Awareness of Coastal Cetacean Conservation Issues in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Gianna; Poh, Anna Norliza Zulkifli; Ngeian, Jenny; Peter, Cindy; Tuen, Andrew Alek

    2012-01-01

    Community workshops were held in coastal locations in Sarawak to raise awareness of cetacean conservation. Interviews were conducted up to 2 years later in four "workshop communities" as well as four villages where workshops were not conducted. Comparison of responses between respondents who had attended workshops (n = 127) versus those…

  1. Enhancing interdisciplinary climate change work through comprehensive evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Klink

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shares the details of an evaluation plan from an interdisciplinary climate change project that developed decision support tools (DSTs for agricultural advisors and farmers. It showcases how evaluation enhanced the project work by providing opportunities for the team to reflect on and use data to improve performance. The plan included both formative and summative approaches, team member interviews to assess team functioning, usability testing of DSTs, outreach and marketing campaign evaluation. Outreach evaluation included surveying those reached, monitoring project website traffic, and tracking and mapping outreach details. Marketing evaluation included pre-testing campaign materials, assessing open and click rates of email campaign, and monitoring associated traffic to website. The Useful to Usable (U2U team was generally high functioning, but team interviews allowed the evaluators and leaders to discern factors that were influencing intended outcomes, respond to needs, assign resources, and catalyze activities that were crucial in shaping the outcomes. Usability testing surfaced issues related to default values and search and help features that were addressed by the team and resulted in improved usability. Outreach evaluation found geographic and methodological gaps that were filled, resulting in more target audiences reached and more effective methods used (e.g., hands-on events. Marketing evaluation allowed for improving contact lists over time and improving campaign messaging before deployment. Evaluators and project leaders working on similar projects may adapt or utilize methods detailed in this paper, along with the recommendations, while designing and implementing improvement-oriented evaluation plans.

  2. Evaluation of Community Health Education Workshops among Chinese Older Adults in Chicago: A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinqi; Li, Yawen; Chen, Ruijia; Chang, E-Shien; Simon, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health education is one of the proven ways to improve knowledge and change health attitudes and behaviors. This study is intended to assess the effectiveness of five health workshops in a Chinese community, focusing on depression, elder abuse, nutrition, breast cancer and stroke. Methods: A community-based participatory research…

  3. Evaluating Peer-Led Team Learning: A Study of Long-Term Effects on Former Workshop Peer Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafney, Leo; Varma-Nelson, Pratibha

    2007-03-01

    Peer-led team learning (PLTL) is a program of small-group workshops, attached to a course, under the direction of trained peer leaders who have completed the course. Peer leaders ensure that team members engage with the materials and with each other, they help build commitment and confidence, and they encourage discussion. Studies of PLTL have found that grades and retention improve, and students value the workshops as important in their learning. With a ten-year history, it was possible to study the impact of PLTL on former leaders as they took subsequent steps into graduate work and careers. A survey was developed, piloted, revised, and placed online. Nearly 600 former leaders from nine institutions were contacted; 119 completed surveys were received. Respondents reported that leading the workshops reinforced the breadth and depth of their own learning, helped them develop personal qualities such as confidence and perseverance, and fostered a variety of presentation and team-related skills. The respondents offered rich insights into issues in implementing workshops. This study contributes to the literature on involvement theory in the academic development of college students.

  4. Changing residents' beliefs and concerns about treating chronic noncancer pain with opioids: evaluation of a pilot workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Craig S; Burgess, Diana J

    2008-10-01

    To determine if a pilot phase workshop influenced residents' beliefs and concerns about using opioids for chronic noncancer pain. Pre- and post-survey questionnaire. University residency program. Seventy-two Medicine and Medicine-Pediatrics residents. Participation in a 4-hour workshop based on adult learning theory. Residents' pre- and post-workshop concerns, feelings, and beliefs about the efficacy and safety of opioids for chronic noncancer pain (low back pain), and barriers to prescribing them (paired t-tests). On a scale of 1 = least to 10 = most, residents' concerns about addiction risk from opioids in patients with chronic noncancer pain dropped significantly (P changes were observed regarding concerns about abuse (5.61 to 3.92), side effects (4.88 to 2.88), limiting use of other treatments (5.41 to 3.60), sanctioning (State Board; 4.27 to 3.71; Legal 4.22 to 3.43), and drawing criticism from attending staff (4.50 to 2.77), with P beliefs about efficacy and safety of opioids for chronic noncancer pain increased (Pre 4.96 to Post 7.40), and they were more comfortable prescribing them (4.30 to 6.82), with P beliefs and concerns about using opioids for chronic noncancer pain changed after participating in a 4-hour interactive workshop.

  5. Evaluation of The Library and Archives of East Java’s Workshop as A Knowledge Sharing Form of Jawatimuran Local Wisdom Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragil Tri atmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Local wisdom possessed by the East Java is a form of culture that represents the identity of the Jawatimuran that does not shared by other regions, but the social dynamics and development of information technology make the knowledge of local wisdom faded and forgotten, so that the next generation remains to know, love and proud in the culture of their own country, then that knowledge must be preserved. The Library and Archives of East Java has organized several workshops. Those workshops are a form of knowledge sharing as an effort to preserve local wisdom of Jawatimuran through writing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the workshops conducted by The Library and Archives of East Java. The methodology used in this study is a qualitative descriptive method. The results of this study show that knowledge sharing can improve the productivity of the authors and creates integration between authors, publishers and The Library and Archives of East Java in an effort to preserve local wisdom in East Java. The conclusion is that The Library and Archives of East Java should be a bridge for the writers to continue to produce writings based on the local wisdom.

  6. Evaluation of The Library and Archives of East Java’s Workshop as A Knowledge Sharing Form of Jawatimuran Local Wisdom Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragil Tri Atmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Local wisdom possessed by the East Java is a form of culture that represents the identity of the Jawatimuran that does not shared by other regions, but the social dynamics and development of information technology make the knowledge of local wisdom faded and forgotten, so that the next generation remains to know, love and proud in the culture of their own country, then that knowledge must be preserved. The Library and Archives of East Java has organized several workshops. Those workshops are a form of knowledge sharing as an effort to preserve local wisdom of Jawatimuran through writing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the workshops conducted by The Library and Archives of East Java. The methodology used in this study is a qualitative descriptive method. The results of this study show that knowledge sharing can improve the productivity of the authors and creates integration between authors, publishers and The Library and Archives of East Java in an effort to preserve local wisdom in East Java. The conclusion is that The Library and Archives of East Java should be a bridge for the writers to continue to produce writings based on the local wisdom.

  7. Enhancement MRI evaluation of neuroblastoma staging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Wang Chunxiang; Zhao Bin; Liu Peifang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value and limitation of Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI for neuroblastoma staging in children. Methods: Twelve cases of neuroblastoma proved by operation or bone marrow aspiration were examined by gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The age ranged from seven months to five years, mean 3.7 years. Eight tumors originated from adrenal, and four from posterior mediastinum. Conventional sequences, double dose gadolinium-enhanced MRI, and 3D CEMRA were used in all patients. Six cases were examined by CT in same time. Imaging staging on surgic-histopathological-based International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) was performed. Results: Six patients were staged by CT, including stage I-II in 2 cases, stage III in 4 cases, and stage IV in none. Twelve patients were staged by conventional MRI, including stage I-II in 2 cases, stage III in 9 cases, and stage IV in 1 case. Twelve patients were staged by double dose gadolinium-enhanced MRI, including stage I-II in 1 case, stage III in 1 case, and stage IV in 10 cases. Conclusion: Gadolinium-enhanced MRI was a single best imaging modality for neuroblastoma, most useful for distal to diaphragm metastasis, dumbbell tumor intraspinal extension, and bone marrow metastasis that was not detected by aspirate examination. Enhancement MRI was important in evaluating the therapy and was also helpful in assessing the therapeutic efficacy and relapse. 3D CEMRA helps demonstrate large vascular encasement and tumor erosion into important organs, and it is useful in assessing the respectability. Long examination time and lack in showing the characteristic calcium were the limitations

  8. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  9. Evaluation of Underwater Image Enhancement Algorithms under Different Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Mangeruga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater images usually suffer from poor visibility, lack of contrast and colour casting, mainly due to light absorption and scattering. In literature, there are many algorithms aimed to enhance the quality of underwater images through different approaches. Our purpose was to identify an algorithm that performs well in different environmental conditions. We have selected some algorithms from the state of the art and we have employed them to enhance a dataset of images produced in various underwater sites, representing different environmental and illumination conditions. These enhanced images have been evaluated through some quantitative metrics. By analysing the results of these metrics, we tried to understand which of the selected algorithms performed better than the others. Another purpose of our research was to establish if a quantitative metric was enough to judge the behaviour of an underwater image enhancement algorithm. We aim to demonstrate that, even if the metrics can provide an indicative estimation of image quality, they could lead to inconsistent or erroneous evaluations.

  10. An interprofessional workshop for students to improve communication and collaboration skills in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jeanne M; Blackhall, Leslie; Brashers, Valentina; Varhegyi, Nikole

    2015-12-01

    Interprofessional care is critical for patients at the end of life (EOL), but programs to teach communication skills to medical and nursing students are rare. The aims of this study were to determine whether an interprofessional workshop improves (1) student attitudes toward teamwork and (2) self-efficacy for communicating in difficult situations. Nursing and medical students attended a workshop with collaborative role play of an EOL conversation. Before the workshop, students showed different attitudes toward teamwork and collaboration and varying levels of confidence about communication skills. After the workshop, both groups reported more positive attitudes toward teamwork but a mixed picture of confidence in communication. Experiential interprofessional education workshops enhance perceptions about the benefits of teamwork, but further teaching and evaluation methods are needed to maximize the effectiveness. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Use of computers to enhance nuclear power plant diagnosis and operator response. Report of a specialists meeting/workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable progress in expert system applications within the nuclear industry using by now already well established techniques and associated mature software products. In addition, other techniques such as neural networks, genetic algorithms and hybrid systems have matured to an extent that they can be seriously applied on an industrial scale. However, these more advanced applications put increasing demands on areas such as validation/verification and human factors. These issues were discussed at a specialists meeting held in Manchester, United Kingdom, on 15-19 July 1996, and the main deliberations are summarized in this publication. Applying intelligent methodologies to complex large systems will enhance: (a) plant reliability and safety, and (b) the quality of the services together with cost effectiveness. The disciplines which contribute to the development of the AI-based methods include neural network, pattern recognition, robotics, decision theory, genetic algorithms, advanced signal analysis, real-time learning, adaptive control and fuzzy systems. Fuzzy logic methods enable systems to deal with ambiguity and failures

  12. Use of computers to enhance nuclear power plant diagnosis and operator response. Report of a specialists meeting/workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable progress in expert system applications within the nuclear industry using by now already well established techniques and associated mature software products. In addition, other techniques such as neural networks, genetic algorithms and hybrid systems have matured to an extent that they can be seriously applied on an industrial scale. However, these more advanced applications put increasing demands on areas such as validation/verification and human factors. These issues were discussed at a specialists meeting held in Manchester, United Kingdom, on 15-19 July 1996, and the main deliberations are summarized in this publication. Applying intelligent methodologies to complex large systems will enhance: (a) plant reliability and safety, and (b) the quality of the services together with cost effectiveness. The disciplines which contribute to the development of the AI-based methods include neural network, pattern recognition, robotics, decision theory, genetic algorithms, advanced signal analysis, real-time learning, adaptive control and fuzzy systems. Fuzzy logic methods enable systems to deal with ambiguity and failures Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Workshop on Current Issues in Predictive Approaches to Intelligence and Security Analytics: Fostering the Creation of Decision Advantage through Model Integration and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2010-05-23

    The increasing asymmetric nature of threats to the security, health and sustainable growth of our society requires that anticipatory reasoning become an everyday activity. Currently, the use of anticipatory reasoning is hindered by the lack of systematic methods for combining knowledge- and evidence-based models, integrating modeling algorithms, and assessing model validity, accuracy and utility. The workshop addresses these gaps with the intent of fostering the creation of a community of interest on model integration and evaluation that may serve as an aggregation point for existing efforts and a launch pad for new approaches.

  14. Two related narratives: learning from an evaluation of a short coaching workshop and a pilot coaching project

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Jones

    2015-01-01

    Background and context: A key role of the district’s Nursing Midwifery Practice and Workforce Unit is to build capability in the nursing and midwifery workforce. In this paper I reflect on the experience of my team following attendance at a two-day Coaching for Performance workshop and the impact this had on developing coaching skills for nurse managers and nurse unit managers in South Eastern Sydney Local Health District. Aims: To highlight how engaging in critical reflection enabled the...

  15. Workshops som forskningsmetode

    OpenAIRE

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learnin...

  16. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Colbert, Rachel S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gupta, Vipin P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hibbs, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); West, Roger Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  17. Desnarrativas: workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivânia Marques

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a teacher workshop. It was an encounter among dialogues, pictures and possibilities of deconstruction in multiple directions. It enables studies inspiring debate in favor of images. Images are loaded with clichés and they risk breaking with the documentary/real character of photography. It leads us to think of the non-neutrality of an image and how the place is hegemonically imposed on us. It does away with blocking forces in a playful experimentation. The experimentation is extended into compositions with photographs, monotype printing, and different ways of perceiving space, dialogues, exchanges, poems and art.

  18. Workshop experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Holt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The setting for the workshop was a heady mix of history, multiculturalism and picturesque riverscapes. Within the group there was, as in many food studies, a preponderance of female scientists (or ethnographers, but the group interacted on lively, non-gendered terms - focusing instead on an appreciation of locals food and enthusiasm for research shared by all, and points of theoretical variance within that.The food provided by our hosts was of the very highest eating and local food qualities...

  19. Evaluation of radiological workstations and web-browser-based image distribution clients for a PACS project in hands-on workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Thomas; Handgraetinger, Oliver; Voellmy, Daniel R.; Marincek, Borut; Wildermuth, Simon; Link, Juergen; Ploner, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    The methodology and outcome of a hands-on workshop for the evaluation of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) software for a multihospital PACS project are described. The following radiological workstations and web-browser-based image distribution software clients were evaluated as part of a multistep evaluation of PACS vendors in March 2001: Impax DS 3000 V 4.1/Impax Web1000 (Agfa-Gevaert, Mortsel, Belgium); PathSpeed V 8.0/PathSpeed Web (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis., USA); ID Report/ID Web (Image Devices, Idstein, Germany); EasyVision DX/EasyWeb (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, Netherlands); and MagicView 1000 VB33a/MagicWeb (Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen, Germany). A set of anonymized DICOM test data was provided to enable direct image comparison. Radiologists (n=44) evaluated the radiological workstations and nonradiologists (n=53) evaluated the image distribution software clients using different questionnaires. One vendor was not able to import the provided DICOM data set. Another vendor had problems in displaying imported cross-sectional studies in the correct stack order. Three vendors (Agfa-Gevaert, GE, Philips) presented server-client solutions with web access. Two (Siemens, Image Devices) presented stand-alone solutions. The highest scores in the class of radiological workstations were achieved by ID Report from Image Devices (p<0.005). In the class of image distribution clients, the differences were statistically not significant. Questionnaire-based evaluation was shown to be useful for guaranteeing systematic assessment. The workshop was a great success in raising interest in the PACS project in a large group of future clinical users. The methodology used in the present study may be useful for other hospitals evaluating PACS. (orig.)

  20. Recent Workshops

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F. J.

    Since the previous edition of ATLAS e-news, the NIKHEF Institute in Amsterdam has hosted not just one but two workshops related to ATLAS TDAQ activities. The first in October was dedicated to the Detector Control System (DCS). Just three institutes, CERN, NIKHEF and St Petersburg, provide the effort for the central DCS services, but each ATLAS sub-detector provides effort for their own controls. Some 30 people attended, including representatives for all of the ATLAS sub-detectors, representatives of the institutes working on the central services and the project leader of JCOP, which brings together common aspects of detector controls across the LHC experiments. During the three-day workshop the common components were discussed, and each sub-detector described their experiences and plans for their future systems. Whilst many of the components to be used are standard commercial components, a key custom item for ATLAS is the ELMB (Embedded Local Monitor Board). Prototypes for this have now been extensively test...

  1. UVI Cyber-security Workshop Workshop Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuykendall, Tommie G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allsop, Jacob Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, Benjamin Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boumedine, Marc [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carter, Cedric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Galvin, Seanmichael Yurko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Oscar [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Wellington K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Han Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, Tyler Jake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nauer, Kevin S.; Potts, Beth A.; Ta, Kim Thanh; Trasti, Jennifer; White, David R.

    2015-07-08

    The cybersecurity consortium, which was established by DOE/NNSA’s Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program (MSIPP), allows students from any of the partner schools (13 HBCUs, two national laboratories, and a public school district) to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and to open doors to DOE sites and facilities to student members of the consortium. As a part of this year consortium activities, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Virgin Islands conducted a week long cyber workshop that consisted of three courses; Digital Forensics and Malware Analysis, Python Programming, and ThunderBird Cup. These courses are designed to enhance cyber defense skills and promote learning within STEM related fields.

  2. Sludge pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Enhanced sludge washing separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the work conducted in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Treatment Science Task. The main purpose of this task, is to provide the technical basis and scientific understanding to support TWRS baseline decisions and actions, such as the development of an enhanced sludge washing process to reduce the volume of waste that will require high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. One objective within the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask was to establish wash factors for various SST (single-shell tank) sludges. First, analytical data were compiled from existing tank waste characterization reports. These data were summarized on tank-specific worksheets that provided a uniform format for reviewing and comparing data, as well as the means to verify whether the data set for each tank was complete. Worksheets were completed for 27 SST wastes. The analytical water wash data provided tank-specific information about the fraction of each component that dissolves with water, i.e., an estimate of tank-specific wash factors for evaluating tank-by-tank processing. These wash data were then used collectively to evaluate some of the wash factors that are assumed for the overall SST waste inventory; specifically, wash factors for elements that would be found primarily in sludges. The final step in this study was to incorporate the characterization and wash factor data into a spreadsheet that provides insight into the effect of enhanced sludge washing on individual tank sludges as well as for groups of sludges that may be representative of different waste types. Spreadsheet results include the estimated mass and percentage of each element that would be removed with washing and leaching. Furthermore, estimated compositions are given of the final wash and leach streams and residual solids, in terms of both concentration and dry weight percent

  3. Evaluation of diclofenac prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2014-03-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD) and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates and bioconversion rates. In vitro fluxes across human epidermal membrane (HEM) in the Franz diffusion cell were determined on DA-, MD-, ED-, GD- and PD-saturated aqueous solutions. The formation of GD and ED led to the prodrugs with higher aqueous solubilities and lower partition coefficients than those of the parent drug. Prodrugs with improved aqueous solubility showed better fluxes across HEM in aqueous solution than that of the parent drug, with GD showing the highest aqueous solubility and also the highest flux. There is a linear relationship between the aqueous solubility and flux for DA, ED and PD, but GD and MD deviated from the linear line. Diclofenac prodrugs with improved hydrophilicity than the parent drug could be utilized for enhancing transdermal diclofenac delivery.

  4. Evaluation of Diclofenac Prodrugs for Enhancing Transdermal Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD), and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates, and bioconversion rates. In vitro fluxes across human epidermal membrane (HEM) in Franz diffusion cell were determined on DA, MD, ED, GD, and PD saturated aqueous solutions. The formation of GD and ED led to the prodrugs with higher aqueous solubilities and lower partition coefficients than those of the parent drug. Prodrugs with improved aqueous solubility showed better fluxes across HEM in aqueous solution than that of the parent drug, with GD showing the highest aqueous solubility and also the highest flux. There is a linear relationship between the aqueous solubility and flux for DA, ED and PD, but GD and MD deviated from the linear line. Overall, diclofenac prodrugs with improved hydrophilicity than the parent drug could be utilized for enhancing transdermal diclofenac delivery. PMID:24517636

  5. Overview of workshop on 'Evaluation of simulation techniques for radiation damage in the bulk of fusion first wall materials'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leffers, T.; Singh, B.N.; Green, W.V.; Victoria, M.

    1984-05-01

    The main points and the main conclusions of a workshop held June 27-30 1983 at Interlaken, Switzerland, are reported. There was general agreement among the participants that ideal simulation, providing unambiguous information about the behaviour of the first wall material, is at present out of reach. In this situation the route to follow is to use the existing simulation facilities in a concerted effort to understand the damage accumulation processes and thereby create the background for prediction or appropriate simulation of the behaviour of the first wall material. (Auth.)

  6. Overview of Workshop on Evaluation of Simulation Techniques for Radiation Damage in the Bulk of Fusion First Wall Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Singh, Bachu Narain; Green, W.V.

    1984-01-01

    of reach. In this situation the route to follow is to use the existing simulation facilities in a concerted effort to understand the damage accumulation processes and thereby create the background for prediction or appropriate simulation of the behaviour of the first wall material.......The main points and the main conclusions of a workshop held June 27–30 1983 at Interlaken, Switzerland, are reported. There was general agreement among the participants that ideal simulation, providing unambiguous information about the behaviour of the first wall material, is at present out...

  7. Mutual Workshops enhancing Curriculum Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard Jensen, Lotte; Markvorsen, Steen; Almegaard, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    . A course in material science was moved from the fourth to the first semester so that the project could be informed by material science. A new course in geometry was prepared and software that could facilitate an integrated design project was introduced (STAAD Pro). The ‘full package’ of the new third....... Every semester has a teaching team consisting of all the teachers for courses in that semester. Each semester also has its own theme and a multidisciplinary, joint project. So the most active members of the teaching team, of course, are those responsible for courses that address the theme and contribute...... to the joint project. The theme of the third semester is ‘structural design’. Structural design is defined as an integration of material science, statics and geometry in relation to an architectural project. Anticipating the implementation of CDIO and this theme, major changes were made to the curriculum...

  8. Clinical evaluation of contrast-enhanced digital mammography and contrast enhanced tomosynthesis--Comparison to contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chen-Pin; Lewin, John M; Chiang, Chia-Ling; Hung, Bao-Hui; Yang, Tsung-Lung; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Liao, Jia-Bin; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2015-12-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) and contrast-enhanced tomosynthesis (CET) to dynamic contrast enhanced breast MRI (DCE-MRI) using a multireader-multicase study. Institutional review board approval and informed consents were obtained. Total 185 patients (mean age 51.3) with BI-RADS 4 or 5 lesions were evaluated before biopsy with mammography, tomosynthesis, CEDM, CET and DCE-MRI. Mediolateral-oblique and cranio-caudal views of the target breast CEDM and CET were acquired at 2 and 4 min after contrast agent injection. A mediolateral-oblique view of the non-target breast was taken at 6 min. Each lesion was scored with forced BI-RADS categories by three readers. Each reader interpreted lesions in the following order: mammography, tomosynthesis, CEDM, CET, and DCE-MRI during a single reading session. Histology showed 81 cancers and 144 benign lesions in the study. Of the 81 malignant lesions, 44% (36/81) were invasive and 56% (45/81) were non-invasive. Areas under the ROC curve, averaged for the 3 readers, were as follows: 0.897 for DCE-MRI, 0.892 for CET, 0.878 for CEDM, 0.784 for tomosynthesis and 0.740 for mammography. Significant differences in AUC were found between the group of contrast enhanced modalities (CEDM, CET, DCE-MRI) and the unenhanced modalities (all p0.05). CET and CEDM may be considered as an alternative modality to MRI for following up women with abnormal mammography. All three contrast modalities were superior in accuracy to conventional digital mammography with or without tomosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MICCAI Workshops

    CERN Document Server

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Venkataraman, Archana; O'Donnell, Lauren; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings from two closely related workshops: Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’13) and Mathematical Methods from Brain Connectivity (MMBC’13), held under the auspices of the 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, which took place in Nagoya, Japan, September 2013. Inside, readers will find contributions ranging from mathematical foundations and novel methods for the validation of inferring large-scale connectivity from neuroimaging data to the statistical analysis of the data, accelerated methods for data acquisition, and the most recent developments on mathematical diffusion modeling. This volume offers a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational diffusion MRI and mathematical methods for brain connectivity as well as offers new perspectives and insights on current research challenges for those currently in the field. It will be of interest to researchers and practitioners in computer science, ...

  10. Retrieval practice enhances the ability to evaluate complex physiology information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, John; Linderholm, Tracy; Perez, Jose

    2018-05-01

    Many investigations have shown that retrieval practice enhances the recall of different types of information, including both medical and physiological, but the effects of the strategy on higher-order thinking, such as evaluation, are less clear. The primary aim of this study was to compare how effectively retrieval practice and repeated studying (i.e. reading) strategies facilitated the evaluation of two research articles that advocated dissimilar conclusions. A secondary aim was to determine if that comparison was affected by using those same strategies to first learn important contextual information about the articles. Participants were randomly assigned to learn three texts that provided background information about the research articles either by studying them four consecutive times (Text-S) or by studying and then retrieving them two consecutive times (Text-R). Half of both the Text-S and Text-R groups were then randomly assigned to learn two physiology research articles by studying them four consecutive times (Article-S) and the other half learned them by studying and then retrieving them two consecutive times (Article-R). Participants then completed two assessments: the first tested their ability to critique the research articles and the second tested their recall of the background texts. On the article critique assessment, the Article-R groups' mean scores of 33.7 ± 4.7% and 35.4 ± 4.5% (Text-R then Article-R group and Text-S then Article-R group, respectively) were both significantly (p Retrieval practice promoted superior critical evaluation of the research articles, and the results also indicated the strategy enhanced the recall of background information. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  11. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for clinically distressed health care workers: Waitlist-controlled evaluation of an ACT workshop in a routine practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Cerith S; Frude, Neil; Flaxman, Paul E; Boyd, Jane

    2018-03-01

    To examine the effects of a 1-day acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) workshop on the mental health of clinically distressed health care employees, and to explore ACT's processes of change in a routine practice setting. A quasi-controlled design, with participants block allocated to an ACT intervention or waiting list control group based on self-referral date. Participants were 35 health care workers who had self-referred for the ACT workshop via a clinical support service for staff. Measures were completed by ACT and control group participants at pre-intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Participants allocated to the waitlist condition went on to receive the ACT intervention and were also assessed 3 months later. At 3 months post-intervention, participants in the ACT group reported a significantly lower level of psychological distress compared to the control group (d = 1.41). Across the 3-month evaluation period, clinically significant change was exhibited by 50% of ACT participants, compared to 0% in the control group. When the control group received the same ACT intervention, 69% went on to exhibit clinically significant change. The ACT intervention also resulted in significant improvements in psychological flexibility, defusion, and mindfulness skills, but did not significantly reduce the frequency of negative cognitions. Bootstrapped mediation analyses indicated that the reduction in distress in the ACT condition was primarily associated with an increase in mindfulness skills, especially observing and non-reactivity. These findings provide preliminary support for providing brief ACT interventions as part of routine clinical support services for distressed workers. A 1-day ACT workshop delivered in the context of a routine staff support service was effective for reducing psychological distress among health care workers. The brief nature of this group intervention means it may be particularly suitable for staff support and primary care mental

  12. Development and evaluation of a medication counseling workshop for physicians: can we improve on ‘take two pills and call me in the morning’?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry A. Jacobson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Physicians often do not provide adequate medication counseling.To develop and evaluate an educational program to improve physicians’ assessment of adherence and their medication counseling skills, with attention to health literacy.We compared internal medicine residents’ confidence and counseling behaviors, measured by self-report at baseline and one month after participation in a two-hour interactive workshop.Fifty-four residents participated; 35 (65% completed the follow-up survey. One month after training, residents reported improved confidence in assessing and counseling patients (p<0.001, including those with low health literacy (p<0.001. Residents also reported more frequent use of desirable behaviors, such as assessing patients’ medication understanding and adherence barriers (p<0.05 for each, addressing costs when prescribing (p<0.01, suggesting adherence aids (p<0.01, and confirming patient understanding with teach-back (p<0.05.A medication counseling workshop significantly improved residents’ self-reported confidence and behaviors regarding medication counseling one month later.

  13. Competence Enhancement Program of Expressive Arts in End-of-Life Care for Health and Social Care Professionals: A Mixed-Method Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, J K M; Lau, Bobo Hi-Po; Szeto, M M L; Lam, K K F; Man, J C N; Chan, C L W

    2018-01-01

    In the recent decades, expressive arts (EXA) has been used in end-of-life care (EOLC) for facilitating the quality of life of the patients and the caregivers. However, it may not be practical for every EOLC service to dispense EXA activities solely by extensively trained art therapy specialists. There is currently a lack of brief training for nonart therapists, which may have stifled the application of the techniques in clinical settings. The current study therefore described and evaluated the effectiveness of a 2-day EXA training workshop in enhancing practice, knowledge, and self-competence among health and social care professionals working in EOLC using a mixed-method approach. The quantitative findings show significant improvement in perceived competence of providing services per holistic and person-centered EOLC objectives, nonpharmaceutical management of symptoms, and evidence-based psychosocial care as well as self-competence in death work (SCDW) after the workshop. The qualitative findings corroborated the quantitative results by suggesting that the improvement in competence could be associated with enhanced communication, meaning reconstruction, and therapeutic relationship with the clients as well as the improvement in mood, socialization, and self-esteem among the clients through the learned EXA activities. Our findings support the efficacy of a brief training of EXA activities for nonart therapists in enhancing multifaceted intervention competence. Further research on brief training will be needed to promote the use of EXA activities in the EOLC context.

  14. H2@Scale Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivovar, Bryan

    2017-03-31

    Final report from the H2@Scale Workshop held November 16-17, 2016, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory hosted a technology workshop to identify the current barriers and research needs of the H2@Scale concept. H2@Scale is a concept regarding the potential for wide-scale impact of hydrogen produced from diverse domestic resources to enhance U.S. energy security and enable growth of innovative technologies and domestic industries. Feedback received from a diverse set of stakeholders at the workshop will guide the development of an H2@Scale roadmap for research, development, and early stage demonstration activities that can enable hydrogen as an energy carrier at a national scale.

  15. Two related narratives: learning from an evaluation of a short coaching workshop and a pilot coaching project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Jones

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: A key role of the district’s Nursing Midwifery Practice and Workforce Unit is to build capability in the nursing and midwifery workforce. In this paper I reflect on the experience of my team following attendance at a two-day Coaching for Performance workshop and the impact this had on developing coaching skills for nurse managers and nurse unit managers in South Eastern Sydney Local Health District. Aims: To highlight how engaging in critical reflection enabled the unit team to identify gaps in the transfer of coaching skills learned from the two-day workshop to everyday management practices. The pilot project to embed coaching into management practices is the result of the team’s reflection. The method, findings and implications for coaching practices for nurse managers and nurse unit managers are described in detail. Findings: Using Gibbs’ model of reflection, the unit team reflected on its collective experiences following attendance at the workshop. This led to the development of a pilot coaching project called Embedding Coaching into Practice for nurse managers and nurse unit managers, which enabled the transfer of coaching skills learned to everyday management practices. The pilot project used a ‘coaching the coach’ approach, with structured follow-up at the managers’ places of work. This had a positive impact on the development of coaching skills and managers were able to use these skills with confidence to enable their staff to develop problem-solving skills. Conclusions: This paper highlights how using a validated tool for reflection can lead to positive change. ‘Coaching the coach’ can support transfer of coaching skills learned into everyday practices, which has a positive impact on work performance for nurse managers, nurse unit managers and their staff. It supports the practice development principle that lifelong learning can influence effective workplace cultures and have a positive impact on

  16. Impact of the Application of Redecision Methods in Executive Coaching Workshops on Psychological Wellbeing: a Quantitative Evaluation of Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Widdowson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has found that participants in redecision marathons experience increased personal growth and improvements in psychological well-being (McNeel, 1982; Noriega-Gayol, 1997; Widdowson & Rosseau, 2014. In this article, the authors conducted a quantitative analysis based on the use of the Ryff Scales of Psychological Wellbeing to determine whether participants (n=49 at an executive coaching redecision marathon would experience an increase in psychological well-being. The findings show statistically significant improvements in psychological well-being overall, and specifically within the sub-scales of autonomy, environmental mastery, personal growth and self-acceptance, suggesting that redecision-based workshops are effective for improving subjective psychological well-being.

  17. Workshop Report: concepts and methods in the economics of nutrition--gateways to better economic evaluation of nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Nuijten, M J C; Gutiérrez-Ibarluzea, I; Hutton, J; Poley, M J; Segal, L; Bresson, J L; van Ganse, E; Jones, P; Moreno, L; Salminen, S; Dubois, D

    2012-11-14

    Improving health through better nutrition of the population may contribute to enhanced efficiency and sustainability of healthcare systems. A recent expert meeting investigated in detail a number of methodological aspects related to the discipline of nutrition economics. The role of nutrition in health maintenance and in the prevention of non-communicable diseases is now generally recognised. However, the main scope of those seeking to contain healthcare expenditures tends to focus on the management of existing chronic diseases. Identifying additional relevant dimensions to measure and the context of use will become increasingly important in selecting and developing outcome measurements for nutrition interventions. The translation of nutrition-related research data into public health guidance raises the challenging issue of carrying out more pragmatic trials in many areas where these would generate the most useful evidence for health policy decision-making. Nutrition exemplifies all the types of interventions and policy which need evaluating across the health field. There is a need to start actively engaging key stakeholders in order to collect data and to widen health technology assessment approaches for achieving a policy shift from evidence-based medicine to evidence-based decision-making in the field of nutrition.

  18. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  19. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI for evaluation of peripheral nerve neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Katsuji; Yamada, Mitsuko; Kojima, Motohiro.

    1995-01-01

    We carried out enhanced MRI for the carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve palsy that is entrapment neuropathy. The affected nerve was enhanced in entrapment point. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 41 of 52 cases (79%). Cubital tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 4 of 5 cases (80%). Tarsal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 1 of 1 case. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 3 of 4 cases (75%). The affected nerve was strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA, indicating the blood-nerve barrier in the affected nerve to be broken and intraneural edema to be produced, e.i., the ability of Gd-DTPA to selectively contrast-enhance a pathologic focus within the peripheral nerve is perhaps its most important clinical applications. (author)

  20. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI for evaluation of peripheral nerve neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko [Aikoh Orthopaedic Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kobayashi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Katsuji; Yamada, Mitsuko; Kojima, Motohiro

    1995-11-01

    We carried out enhanced MRI for the carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve palsy that is entrapment neuropathy. The affected nerve was enhanced in entrapment point. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 41 of 52 cases (79%). Cubital tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 4 of 5 cases (80%). Tarsal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 1 of 1 case. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 3 of 4 cases (75%). The affected nerve was strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA, indicating the blood-nerve barrier in the affected nerve to be broken and intraneural edema to be produced, e.i., the ability of Gd-DTPA to selectively contrast-enhance a pathologic focus within the peripheral nerve is perhaps its most important clinical applications. (author).

  1. Evaluation of the intraspinal enhancement for medulloblastoma on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the enhancement pattern of the spinal cord for patients with medulloblastoma, and to correlate the enhancement pattern with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor seeding. We retrospectively reviewed 84 MR images, including the initial and follow-up studies after chemotherapy or radiation therapy, of 25 patients with medulloblastoma who were aged from 2 to 13 years. We analyzed the spinal leptomeningeal enhancement pattern on the MR images. The leptomeningeal enhancement patterns were categorized into three types: Type, I, fine or discontinuous linear enhancement, and type II, continuous linear or nodular enhancement, and type III, intradural mass formation. We correlated the enhancement pattern on MRI with the results of CSF cytology at the initial and follow-up examinations after treatment. Of total 25 patients, type I enhancement was observed for 14 patients. Twelve patients were negative on the initial CSF cytology and 2 patients were positive. On the follow-up MR studies, 14 patients showed no change or only a slight decrease of enhancement, and all were negative on the follow-up CSF cytology. Type II enhancement patterns were observed in seven patients, and all of them were positive on the initial CSF cytology. On follow-up MR study, one patient revealed an increased enhancement with the positive result on the follow-up CSF cytology, and six patients had decreased enhancement on the follow-up MR studies with negative conversion on the follow-up CSF cytology. Type III enhancement patterns were observed in four patients and all of them were positive on the initial CSF cytology. All four patients with tradural mass formations revealed progression of the lesions on follow-up MR studies, and all of them were positive on the follow-up CSF cytology. Type II and III enhancement patterns always represented CSF seeding and a type I enhancement pattern had a low probability of metastasis

  2. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Review of Dose Related Factors for the Evaluation of Exposures to Residual Radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, George D; Egbert, Stephen D; Al-Nabulsi, Isaf; Bailiff, Ian K; Beck, Harold L; Belukha, Irina G; Cockayne, John E; Cullings, Harry M; Eckerman, Keith F; Granovskaya, Evgeniya; Grant, Eric J; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kaul, Dean C; Kryuchkov, Victor; Mannis, Daniel; Ohtaki, Megu; Otani, Keiko; Shinkarev, Sergey; Simon, Steven L; Spriggs, Gregory D; Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Stricklin, Daniela; Weiss, Joseph F; Weitz, Ronald L; Woda, Clemens; Worthington, Patricia R; Yamamoto, Keiko; Young, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Groups of Japanese and American scientists, supported by international collaborators, have worked for many years to ensure the accuracy of the radiation dosimetry used in studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Reliable dosimetric models and systems are especially critical to epidemiologic studies of this population because of their importance in the development of worldwide radiation protection standards. While dosimetry systems, such as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) and Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), have improved, the research groups that developed them were unable to propose or confirm an additional contribution by residual radiation to the survivor's total body dose. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of residual radiation exposures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a half-day technical session was held for reports on newer studies at the 59 th Annual HPS Meeting in 2014 in Baltimore, MD. A day-and-a-half workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of the newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposure to atomic bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The process also involved a re-examination of very early surveys of radioisotope emissions from ground surfaces at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and early reports of health effects. New insights were reported on the potential contribution to residual radiation from neutron-activated radionuclides in the airburst's dust stem and pedestal and in unlofted soil, as well as from fission products and weapon debris from the nuclear cloud. However, disparate views remain concerning the actual residual radiation doses received by the atomic bomb survivors at different distances from the hypocenter. The workshop discussion indicated that measurements made using thermal luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence, like earlier measurements, especially in very thin layers of the samples, could be expanded to detect possible

  3. Evaluation of nicotinamide microemulsion on the skin penetration enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonme, Prapaporn; Boonthongchuay, Chalida; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Amnuaikit, Thanaporn

    2016-01-01

    This study purposed to evaluate a microemulsion containing nicotinamide for its characteristics, stability, and skin penetration and retention comparing with a solution of nicotinamide in 2:1 mixture of water and isopropyl alcohol (IPA). The microemulsion system was composed of 1:1 mixture of Span80 and Tween80 as a surfactant mixture, isopropyl palmitate (IPP) as an oil phase, and 2:1 mixture of water and IPA as an aqueous phase. Nicotinamide microemulsion was prepared by dissolving the active in the aqueous phase before simply mixing with the other components. It was determined for its characteristics and stability under various conditions. The skin penetration and retention studies of nicotinamide microemulsion and solution were performed by modified Franz diffusion cells, using newborn pig skin as the membrane. The results showed that nicotinamide microemulsion could be obtained as clear yellowish liquid, was water-in-oil (w/o) type, possessed Newtonian flow, and exhibited physicochemical stability when kept at 4 °C and room temperature (≈30 ± 2 °C) during 3 months. From the skin penetration data, the microemulsion could enhance the skin penetration of nicotinamide comparing with the solution. Additionally, nicotinamide microemulsion could provide much higher amount of skin retention than that of skin penetration, resulting in suitability for a cosmeceutical product.

  4. Evaluation of heat transfer enhancement in air-heating collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattox, D. L.

    1979-06-01

    The present research effort was initiated for the purpose of increasing the thermal efficiency of air heating solar collectors through identification and development of optimum design and operation criteria for solar absorber-to-air heat exchangers. Initially this effort took the form of a solar collector systems analysis to evaluate the impact of various techniques for enhancing the heat transfer between the absorber and air stream on overall thermal performance of the entire solar collector. This systems analysis resulted in the selection of solar collector designs providing ducted cooling air on the absorber shaded side as a base line. A transient heat transfer analysis of a complete solar air heating collector was used to demonstrate that an optimum absorber-to-air heat exchanger design could be provided with several interrupted fin configurations. Additional analyses were performed to establish that the maximum solar collector thermal performance to required pumping power was realized for a Reynolds number range of 1000 to 2000. This Reynolds number range was used to establish a theoretical design limit curve for maximum thermal performance versus required pumping power for all interrupted fin designs as published in the open literature. Heat and momentum transfer empirical relationships were defined for scaling the state-of-the-art high conductance fin designs identified from a compact configuration to the less compact designs needed for solar collectors.

  5. Welcome from the Workshop Chairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson Svensson, Richard; Daneva, Maia; Marczak, Sabrina; Ernst, Neil; Madhavji, N.

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to the fifth International Workshop on Empirical Requirements Engineering (EmpiRE 2015) at RE’15! In the past few years, some important developments in the Information Technology Services marketplace as well as in the software industry in particular fueled the debate on the evaluation of

  6. PERT and CPM: Workshop Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs Corp., Detroit, MI.

    This is a workbook containing problems in PERT (program evaluation review technique). It is intended to be used in a workshop or classroom to train management personnel in the basic methodology and capability of PERT. This material is not adequate in depth to create an expert in these techniques, but it is felt that the material is adequate to…

  7. Challenges and Enhancements to Defence-in-Depth (DiD) in Light of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident. Proceedings of a Joint CNRA/CSNI Workshop, Paris, France, 5 June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, Jean-Christophe; Autorite de surete nucleaire - ASN; ); Echavarri, Luis; ); Schneider, Thierry; ); Borchardt, Bill; Wanner, Hans; Park, Youn Won; Glenn, Tracy; Regaldo, Jacques; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Repussard, Jacques; Bolshov, Leonid; Chevet, Pierre Frank

    2014-01-01

    An international Workshop on Challenges and Enhancements to Defence in Depth (DiD) in Light of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident was jointly organised by the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the NEA Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations (CSNI), with input from the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH), on 5 June 2013 in Paris. About 100 participants from NEA member countries, India, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and Eurelectric held in-depth discussions on the defence-in-depth concept and its implementation in the post-Fukushima context. They also considered additional steps to be taken at the national and international levels to address the challenges identified and to make further enhancements to nuclear safety, along with future NEA activities in support of these processes. The concept of DiD - of multiple levels of protection - has been developed and refined by the nuclear safety community over many years. The concept is based on the experience and practice of high hazard industry in general as well as developments within the nuclear industry. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan on the 11 March 2011 demonstrated the importance of the concept of DiD, how these multiple levels of protection can operate and how some can be challenged. Just as with the nuclear accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl and accidents from other industries (e.g. chemical, aerospace, oil and gas), the NEA felt it important that lessons learned are used to further develop the concept and implementation of Defence-in-Depth to help ensure and enhance the safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world. The NEA has therefore looked at the concept and implementation of Defence-in-Depth and possible challenges and enhancements. It was noted that a great deal of interest has been shown in this area, particularly in the

  8. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  9. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on…

  10. The Future Workshop: Democratic problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Victor Valqui Vidal

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The origins, principles and practice of a very popular method known as The Future Workshop are presented. The fundamental theory and principles of this method are presented in an introductory way. In addition, practical guidelines to carry out such a workshop are outlined and several types of applications are shortly described. The crucial importance of both the facilitation process and the use of creative tools in team work are enhanced.

  11. A mixed-method evaluation of peer-education workshops for school-aged children to teach about antibiotics, microbes and hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Vicki L; Cole, Amy; Lecky, Donna M; Fettis, Dennis; Pritchard, Beth; Verlander, Neville Q; Eley, Charlotte V; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2017-07-01

    Delivering health topics in schools through peer education is known to be beneficial for all students involved. In this study, we have evaluated a peer-education workshop that aims to educate primary and secondary school students on hygiene, the spread of infection and antibiotics. Four schools in south-west England, in a range of localities, took part in peer-education workshops, with students completing before, after and knowledge-retention questionnaires. Mixed-effect logistic regression and mixed-effect linear regression were used to analyse the data. Data were analysed by topic, region and peer/non-peer-educator status. Qualitative interviews and focus groups with students and educators were conducted to assess changes in participants' skills, confidence and behaviour. Qualitative data indicated improvements in peer-educator skills and behaviour, including confidence, team-working and communication. There was a significant improvement in knowledge for all topics covered in the intervention, although this varied by region. In the antibiotics topic, peer-educators' knowledge increased in the retention questionnaire, whereas non-peer-educators' knowledge decreased. Knowledge declined in the retention questionnaires for the other topics, although this was mostly not significant. This study indicates that peer education is an effective way to educate young people on important topics around health and hygiene, and to concurrently improve communication skills. Its use should be encouraged across schools to help in the implementation of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance that recommends children are taught in an age-appropriate manner about hygiene and antibiotics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  12. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capuano, Louis, Jr. (Thermasource Inc.); Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert (Thermasource Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2008-12-01

    Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and

  13. Developing workshop module of realistic mathematics education: Follow-up workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palupi, E. L. W.; Khabibah, S.

    2018-01-01

    Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) is a learning approach which fits the aim of the curriculum. The success of RME in teaching mathematics concepts, triggering students’ interest in mathematics and teaching high order thinking skills to the students will make teachers start to learn RME. Hence, RME workshop is often offered and done. This study applied development model proposed by Plomp. Based on the study by RME team, there are three kinds of RME workshop: start-up workshop, follow-up workshop, and quality boost. However, there is no standardized or validated module which is used in that workshops. This study aims to develop a module of RME follow-up workshop which is valid and can be used. Plopm’s developmental model includes materials analysis, design, realization, implementation, and evaluation. Based on the validation, the developed module is valid. While field test shows that the module can be used effectively.

  14. ICP-MS Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eiden, Gregory C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  15. Triple-phase enhanced MSCT in evaluating solitary pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin'e; Zhao Zhenjun; Liang Changhong; He Hui; Zhang Jia; Ru Guangteng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of the triple-phase enhanced MSCT in the assessment of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN). Methods: Prospective study was made on 102 SPN using triple-phase enhanced MSCT, and the net elevation of the CT value of nodules as well as the neoplastic blood vessels were assessed. In total 102 patients were enrolled, including 63 males and 39 females, aged from 17 to 87 years (57.2 years in average). The nodules sized from 2.1 to 4.0 cm (3.3cm in average). Pulmonary carcinoma was proved in 71 cases and benign SPN in 31 cases(including 11 inflammatory pseudo tumors, 6 tuberculosis, 3 inflammatory granulomas, 3 lesions of acute nonspecific inflammation, 3 hamartomas, 3 mycosis and 2 abscesses). The spiral scan was performed on an 8-row detector spiral CT (GE/light speed Qx/I Extra) with 5mm/4 slices. The scan time was 1 second per circle. The 5mm sliced imaging was done for CT value measurement and 1.25mm sliced imaging was for MPR(multiplanar reconstruction) or VR(volume rendering), 20ml Ultravist(300 mg/I) was administered at first at a rate of 4ml/s via forearm superficial vein by a power injector. The peak CT values in pulmonary artery and aorta were to determine the delay time for the acquisition in pulmonary phase and aortal phase. Then Ultravist in a volume of lml/ body kilogram was injected, followed by 50 ml of sodium chloride. Delay phase was 3 minutes. Results: The differences of net increased CT value in three phases were statistically significant respectively between lung cancer and benign nodules (F=30.668, 4.495 and 56.141, respectively, P=0.000, 0.036 and 0. 000, respectively). When the net increased CT value≥20 HU was set as a diagnostic threshold, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predict value, negative predict value and veracity were 93%, 29%, 75%, 64.3% and 73.5%. When net increased CT value ≥20 HU in aortal phase while net increased CT value < 20 HU in pulmonary phase was set as a di- agnostic threshold, those values

  16. Workshop objectives and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim of the Workshop was to create a platform in order to better understand different approaches to managing uncertainty in post-closure safety cases and regulatory approaches in different national waste management programmes. The principal objectives of the Workshop were to: - To identify common elements in different approaches for managing uncertainty. - To facilitate information exchange and to promote discussion on different technical approaches to the management and characterisation of uncertainty and on the role of risk. - To explore the merits of alternative approaches to risk-informed decision making. - To identify the potential for further developments of methods or strategies to support the management of uncertainties. The workshop was organised into plenary sessions and working group discussions: The first plenary session focused on establishing a framework for understanding the management of uncertainties and the use of risk. It comprised oral presentations drawing on a range of experience from both active participants in the development and assessment of safety cases and keynotes presentations by external participants involved in risk management in other sectors. The working group discussions covered three technical themes: Risk management and decision making. Regulatory requirements and review of uncertainty and risk in safety cases. Practical approaches and tools for the management of uncertainties and the assignment of probabilities, the use of expert judgements, and the presentation of information on uncertainties and risk were examined. The aim of the working groups was to develop an understanding of the specific issues, and to identify any further activities that will support the development and/or evaluation of safety cases. The round up plenary session brought together information and conclusions from each of the working groups. Common elements in the different approaches to treating uncertainty and risk were identified, along with

  17. Human tumor cell proliferation evaluated using manganese-enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod D Braun

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation can depend on calcium entry across the cell membrane. As a first step toward the development of a non-invasive test of the extent of tumor cell proliferation in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that tumor cell uptake of a calcium surrogate, Mn(2+ [measured with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI], is linked to proliferation rate in vitro.Proliferation rates were determined in vitro in three different human tumor cell lines: C918 and OCM-1 human uveal melanomas and PC-3 prostate carcinoma. Cells growing at different average proliferation rates were exposed to 1 mM MnCl(2 for one hour and then thoroughly washed. MEMRI R(1 values (longitudinal relaxation rates, which have a positive linear relationship with Mn(2+ concentration, were then determined from cell pellets. Cell cycle distributions were determined using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. All three lines showed Mn(2+-induced increases in R(1 compared to cells not exposed to Mn(2+. C918 and PC-3 cells each showed a significant, positive correlation between MEMRI R(1 values and proliferation rate (p≤0.005, while OCM-1 cells showed no significant correlation. Preliminary, general modeling of these positive relationships suggested that pellet R(1 for the PC-3 cells, but not for the C918 cells, could be adequately described by simply accounting for changes in the distribution of the cell cycle-dependent subpopulations in the pellet.These data clearly demonstrate the tumor-cell dependent nature of the relationship between proliferation and calcium influx, and underscore the usefulness of MEMRI as a non-invasive method for investigating this link. MEMRI is applicable to study tumors in vivo, and the present results raise the possibility of evaluating proliferation parameters of some tumor types in vivo using MEMRI.

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  19. Workshop report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... Key words: Cardiovascular disease, double burden of disease, noncommunicable ... Post conference evaluation indicated that the course ... modification, the so called primary prevention, as well as secondary prevention.

  20. Workshop on spent fuel performance, radionuclide chemistry and geosphere transport parameters, Lidingoe 2008: Overview and evaluation of recent SKB procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, Guenther; Stenhouse, Mike; Brown, Paul; Ekberg, Christian; Jegou, Christophe; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-08-01

    The safety assessment for disposal of spent nuclear fuel canister in the Swedish bedrock should thoroughly address the time period after a containment failure. Such a failure could be expected as a result of corrosion damage or mechanical failure due to rock movement. This report mainly covers some issues connected to parameters used for radionuclide transport calculations in the areas of spent fuel performance (for fuel in contact with groundwater), radionuclide chemistry, and sorption and geosphere transport parameters. Some examples of topics that are elaborated in some detail include statistical treatment of measurement data (for sorption measurements), handling of uncertainties in speciation calculations, use of triangular distributions in safety assessment and physical processes in connection with spent fuel aging. The results emerged from discussions among international experts at a workshop in May 2008. The purpose of this work is providing an overview of ongoing work within the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), to provide ideas and suggestions for methodology development and to develop review capability within the SSM. The authors conclude that SKB's treatment of uncertainty in speciation calculations has improved, but that additional efforts in the area of error propagation are recommended. In efforts to condense the scope of utilised thermodynamic databases, the authors recommend that exclusion criteria should be explicitly stated. In the area of sorption, there is a need for more thorough analysis of errors in order to establish uncertainty ranges. The most essential improvements concern dose-limiting nuclides (e.g. Ra-226). Triangular distributions are often featured in SKB safety assessment, but it is not clear that the use of such distributions is based on a firm understanding of its properties. Regarding fuel performance, while safety assessment parameters are supported by measurement data there is still a need for better

  1. Workshop on spent fuel performance, radionuclide chemistry and geosphere transport parameters, Lidingoe 2008: Overview and evaluation of recent SKB procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinrath, Guenther; Stenhouse, Mike; Brown, Paul; Ekberg, Christian; Jegou, Christophe; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-08-15

    The safety assessment for disposal of spent nuclear fuel canister in the Swedish bedrock should thoroughly address the time period after a containment failure. Such a failure could be expected as a result of corrosion damage or mechanical failure due to rock movement. This report mainly covers some issues connected to parameters used for radionuclide transport calculations in the areas of spent fuel performance (for fuel in contact with groundwater), radionuclide chemistry, and sorption and geosphere transport parameters. Some examples of topics that are elaborated in some detail include statistical treatment of measurement data (for sorption measurements), handling of uncertainties in speciation calculations, use of triangular distributions in safety assessment and physical processes in connection with spent fuel aging. The results emerged from discussions among international experts at a workshop in May 2008. The purpose of this work is providing an overview of ongoing work within the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), to provide ideas and suggestions for methodology development and to develop review capability within the SSM. The authors conclude that SKB's treatment of uncertainty in speciation calculations has improved, but that additional efforts in the area of error propagation are recommended. In efforts to condense the scope of utilised thermodynamic databases, the authors recommend that exclusion criteria should be explicitly stated. In the area of sorption, there is a need for more thorough analysis of errors in order to establish uncertainty ranges. The most essential improvements concern dose-limiting nuclides (e.g. Ra-226). Triangular distributions are often featured in SKB safety assessment, but it is not clear that the use of such distributions is based on a firm understanding of its properties. Regarding fuel performance, while safety assessment parameters are supported by measurement data there is still a need for better

  2. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2004-12-01

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  3. Applied antineutrino physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river

  4. Workshop report: "Using Social Media and Smartphone Applications in Practical Lessons to Enhance Student Learning" in Búzios, Brazil (August 6-8, 2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellis-Santos, Camilo; Halpin, Patricia A

    2018-06-01

    Cost-effective student engagement poses a challenge for instructors, especially those who may not be familiar with new technologies and mobile devices. In this workshop, participants, experienced and discussed two ways of using smartphones in physiology classes: to engage in an online learning environment for discussions, and to make physiological measurements. Participants signed up for individual Twitter accounts and learned how to tweet, retweet, message, use a URL shortener, and use hashtags. They then went on to locate articles on an assigned topic from the Twitter accounts of credible science sources ( American Journal of Physiology, The Scientist, CDC.gov, WHO.int) and applied their Twitter skills to discuss the science topic of current interest. Additionally, participants shared their knowledge about the use of smartphones as a tool for teaching; they discussed the foundations of smartphone-assisted learning and the concept of mobile-learning laboratories, which we refer to as MobLeLabs. Participants also performed an experiment that used an Axé dance video and smartphone applications to measure changes in heart rate and reaction time. Our report describes this international hands-on teaching workshop and highlights its outcomes.

  5. R and D Evaluation Workshop report, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, September 7--8, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, G.

    1995-10-30

    The objective of the workshop was to promote discussions between experts and research managers on developing approaches for assessing the impact of DOE`s basic energy research upon the energy mission, applied research, technology transfer, the economy, and society. The purpose of this impact assessment is to demonstrate results and improve ER research programs in this era when basic research is expected to meet changing national economic and social goals. The questions addressed were: (1) By what criteria and metrics does Energy Research measure performance and evaluate its impact on the DOE mission and society while maintaining an environment that fosters basic research? (2) What combination of evaluation methods best applies to assessing the performance and impact of OBES basic research? The focus will be upon the following methods: Case studies, User surveys, Citation analysis, TRACES approach, Return on DOE investment (ROI)/Econometrics, and Expert panels. (3) What combination of methods and specific rules of thumb can be applied to capture impacts along the spectrum from basic research to products and societal impacts?

  6. Evaluation of meningeal enhancement with Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.; Ryals, T.J.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Kambho, S.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-three consecutive patients (16 with tumor, 11 with inflammation, 16 postoperative) with abnormal meningeal enhancement were studied. Positive pathology was obtained in 75% of tumors and 100% of inflammatory conditions. Pial enhancement was demonstrated in seven of 11 patients with inflammation, four of 16 with tumor, and two of 16 postoperative patients. Diffuse meningeal enhancement was most commonly present with neoplastic and inflammatory etiologies. Localized enhancement predominated in the postoperative population, unless complicated by a subdural hematoma. A nodular appearance was present in two patients with tumor. In conclusion, Gd-DTPA MR imaging is sensitive to but not specific of meningeal pathology. MR imaging is better in inflammatory than in neoplastic conditions

  7. Evaluation of sacroiliitis: contrast-enhanced MRI with subtraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algin, Oktay; Gokalp, Gokhan; Baran, Bulent; Ocakoglu, Gokhan; Yazici, Zeynep [Uludag University, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRI using the subtraction technique in the detection of active sacroiliitis. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 8 asymptomatic volunteers and 50 patients with clinically suspected active sacroiliitis. On precontrast MR images, T1-weighted spin-echo images with and without fat saturation (T1WFS and T1W), STIR and 3D-FLASH images with fat saturation were obtained in the semicoronal plane using a 1.5 Tesla imager. Postcontrast MRI was performed using the same T1WFS sequence as before contrast injection for all volunteers and patients. Postcontrast images were subtracted from fat-suppressed precontrast images. Enhancement within the joint space and bone marrow was considered to demonstrate active sacroiliitis. In 50 patients (100 sacroiliac joints [SIJs]), 40 (76 SIJs) were considered to have active sacroiliitis based on MR images. Bone marrow edema was present in 33 patients (62 SIJs) on STIR images. Routine MRI allowed identification of contrast enhancement in SIJs on postcontrast T1WFS images in 31 patients (49 SIJs). Contrast enhancement was observed in 40 patients (76 SIJs) who were examined by MRI using the subtraction technique. Contrast enhancement was significantly more conspicuous on subtraction images than on non-subtracted postcontrast T1WFS images (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.001). Contrast-enhanced MRI with subtraction technique may be useful for early detection of active sacroiliitis. (orig.)

  8. IN SITU STEAM ENHANCED RECOVERY PROCESS - HUGHES ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, INC. - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Innovative Technology Evaluation report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the in situ Steam Enhanced Recovery Process (SERP) operated by Hughes Environmental Systems, Inc. at the Rainbow Disposal facility in Huntington Beach, California. he technology demonstration...

  9. Workshop Report: concepts and methods in the economics of nutrition ? gateways to better economic evaluation of nutrition interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I.; Nuijten, M. J. C.; Guti?rrez-Ibarluzea, I.; Hutton, J.; Poley, M. J.; Segal, L.; Bresson, J. L.; van Ganse, E.; Jones, P.; Moreno, L.; Salminen, S.; Dubois, D.

    2012-01-01

    textabstractImproving health through better nutrition of the population may contribute to enhanced efficiency and sustainability of healthcare systems. A recent expert meeting investigated in detail a number of methodological aspects related to the discipline of nutrition economics. The role of nutrition in health maintenance and in the prevention of non-communicable diseases is now generally recognised. However, the main scope of those seeking to contain healthcare expenditures tends to focu...

  10. Taller "la persona del terapeuta": una experiencia de formación que promueve el aprendizaje Workshop: "the therapist as a person": A formative experience that enhances learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarita Maida Sosic

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El artículo describe las actividades realizadas en un taller centrado en la persona del terapeuta con el fin de desarrollar habilidades de relación interpersonal que surgen y afectan el trabajo terapéutico. Este se lleva a cabo como parte de un programa de entrenamiento de alumnos de Psicología y becados de Psiquiatría en un hospital pediátrico. Metodología: Se trabaja con los postulados teóricos del construccionismo social, enfoque que integra las ideas del pensamiento post moderno a las ciencias sociales y a la práctica clínica. En este artículo se expone brevemente algunas de sus principales premisas, las cuales son objeto de estudio en una instancia paralela. En el taller se utiliza una metodología experiencial e interactiva para revisar aspectos personales, rol profesional y desarrollar habilidades de diálogo y acogida terapéutica, a través de actividades que facilitan la integración entre el contenido teórico y la propia experiencia. Resultados: Al término del trabajo de taller, los alumnos expresan su valoración por esta forma de aprendizaje, reportando haber adquirido destrezas en el campo terapéutico y, al mismo tiempo, experimentado transformaciones en su vida personal.Introduction: The article describes the activities of a workshop that addresses the therapist as a person, by way of developing interpersonal skills in therapeutic work. This activity takes place during training of Psychological and Psychiatric trainees conducted in a Pediatric Hospital. Methodology: The work is accomplished through the theoretical postulates of social constructionism, which integrates the ideas of post modern thought to social sciences and therapeutic practice. This article deals briefly with its main premises, which are studied in a parallel activity. The workshop utilizes experiential and interactive techniques to review personal issues, professional role and the development of dialogic and therapeutical skills. This

  11. SEE - Sight Effectiveness Enhancement. Results of the automotive evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V.; Hansen, K.D.; Cathala, T.

    2006-01-01

    In the SEE project two parallel evaluations have been conducted, an experimental trial of the automotive and another of the aeronautical application. The evaluations have measured the efficiency and HMI (human-machine interaction) characteristics of theSEE prototype. This report covers the automo......In the SEE project two parallel evaluations have been conducted, an experimental trial of the automotive and another of the aeronautical application. The evaluations have measured the efficiency and HMI (human-machine interaction) characteristics of theSEE prototype. This report covers...... the automotive part of the evaluation. The evaluation of the automotive application was carried out in computer simulated environments and followed the general objectives of the evaluation described in ‘Definition of theEvaluation Plan’ . The field experiment discussed, however, was given up due to lack...

  12. Proceedings of the TOUGH workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K. [ed.

    1990-09-01

    A workshop on applications and enhancements of the TOUGH/MULKOM family of multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation programs was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on September 13--14, 1990. The workshop was attended by 62 scientists from seven countries with interests in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste isolation, unsaturated zone hydrology, environmental problems, and laboratory and field experimentation. The meeting featured 21 technical presentations, extended abstracts of which are reproduced in the present volume in unedited form. Simulator applications included processes on a broad range of space scales, from centimeters to kilometers, with transient times from seconds to geologic time scales. A number of code enhancements were reported that increased execution speeds for large 3-D problems by factors of order 20, reduced memory requirements, and improved user-friendliness. The workshop closed with an open discussion session that focussed on future needs and means for interaction in the TOUGH user community. Input from participants was gathered by means of a questionnaire that is reproduced in the appendix. 171 refs., 91 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Proceedings of the TOUGH workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.

    1990-09-01

    A workshop on applications and enhancements of the TOUGH/MULKOM family of multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation programs was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on September 13--14, 1990. The workshop was attended by 62 scientists from seven countries with interests in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste isolation, unsaturated zone hydrology, environmental problems, and laboratory and field experimentation. The meeting featured 21 technical presentations, extended abstracts of which are reproduced in the present volume in unedited form. Simulator applications included processes on a broad range of space scales, from centimeters to kilometers, with transient times from seconds to geologic time scales. A number of code enhancements were reported that increased execution speeds for large 3-D problems by factors of order 20, reduced memory requirements, and improved user-friendliness. The workshop closed with an open discussion session that focussed on future needs and means for interaction in the TOUGH user community. Input from participants was gathered by means of a questionnaire that is reproduced in the appendix. 171 refs., 91 figs., 16 tabs

  14. Do Simulations Enhance Student Learning? An Empirical Evaluation of an IR Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellman, Stephen M.; Turan, Kursad

    2006-01-01

    There is a nascent literature on the question of whether active learning methods, and in particular simulation methods, enhance student learning. In this article, the authors evaluate the utility of an international relations simulation in enhancing learning objectives. Student evaluations provide evidence that the simulation process enhances…

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography depicts small tumor vessels for the evaluation of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yuko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takaki, Akinobu; Ishida, Etsuji; Ogawa, Tsuneyoshi; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist was performed on 62 consecutive patients (53 with pancreatic cancer, 4 with islet cell tumor, 3 with inflammatory pancreatic tumor, and 2 with metastatic tumor). The vascular and perfusion image phases of the tumors were evaluated and compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Results: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed tumor vessels around and/or in the tumor at the vascular image phase in 79% of pancreatic cancer patients (42/53). At the perfusion image phase, 96% of pancreatic cancers (51/53) were classified as hypo-enhancement type. However, tiny spotty or irregular heterogeneous enhanced lesions were found in 84% of hypo-enhanced pancreatic cancer patients (43/51). The presence of small vessels at the vascular image phase was closely correlated with the presence of these intratumor regional enhanced lesions at the perfusion image phase (κ coefficient = 0.42). The sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (100%) for pancreatic cancer was superior to that of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (91%), but no significant difference was observed between the two (McNemar test: p = 0.063). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist successfully visualizes fine vessels and enhancement in pancreatic tumors, and is useful for evaluating pancreatic tumors

  16. Evaluating Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning: A Quantitative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdt, Mojisola; Fernandez, Alejandro; Rensing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of publications on recommender systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) evidence a growing interest in their development and deployment. In order to support learning, recommender systems for TEL need to consider specific requirements, which differ from the requirements for recommender systems in other domains like…

  17. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Well Construction Technology Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Capuano, Louis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Finger, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huh, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knudsen, Steve [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chip, A.J. Mansure [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Raymond, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swanson, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: 1. Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. 2. Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics.

  18. DOE/CEC [Department of Energy/Commission of the European Communities] workshop on critical evaluation of radiobiological data to biophysical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Radiation Protection Program support the majority of Research in the Field of Radiobiological Modeling. This field of science develops models based on scientifically sound principles to predict biological response (at the cellular, molecular, and animal level) to exposure to low level ionizing radiation. Biophysical models are an important tool for estimating response of ionizing radiation at low doses and dose rates. Generally speaking, the biophysical models can be classified into two groups: (1) mechanistic models and (2) phenomenological models. Mechanistic models are based on some assumptions about the physical, chemical, or biological mechanisms of action in association with radiobiological data whereas the phenomenological models are based solely on available experimental data on radiobiological effects with less emphasis on mechanisms of action. There are a number of these models which are being developed. Since model builders rely on radiobiological data available in the literature either to develop mechanistic or phenomenological models, it is essential that a critical evaluation of existing radiobiological data be made and data that is generally considered good and most appropriate for biophysical modeling be identified. A Workshop jointly sponsored by the DOE and the CEC was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee from June 23--25, 1988, to review the data available from physical and chemical, cellular and molecular and animal studies with ionizing radiation

  19. 2014 MICCAI Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Rathi, Yogesh; Reisert, Marco; Schneider, Torben

    2014-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the 2014 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI, CDMRI’14. Detailing new computational methods applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data, it offers readers a snapshot of the current state of the art and covers a wide range of topics from fundamental theoretical work on mathematical modeling to the development and evaluation of robust algorithms and applications in neuroscientific studies and clinical practice.   Inside, readers will find information on brain network analysis, mathematical modeling for clinical applications, tissue microstructure imaging, super-resolution methods, signal reconstruction, visualization, and more. Contributions include both careful mathematical derivations and a large number of rich full-color visualizations.   Computational techniques are key to the continued success and development of diffusion MRI and to its widespread transfer into the clinic. This volume will offer a valuable starting point for anyone interested i...

  20. Physics Analysis Tools Workshop 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    Elizabeth Gallas,

    The ATLAS PAT (Physics Analysis Tools) group evaluates, develops and tests software tools for the analysis of physics data, consistent with the ATLAS analysis and event data models. Following on from earlier PAT workshops in London (2004), Tucson (2005) and Tokyo (2006), this year's workshop was hosted by the University of Bergen in Norway on April 23-28 with more than 60 participants. The workshop brought together PAT developers and users to discuss the available tools with an emphasis on preparing for data taking. At the start of the week, workshop participants, laptops and power converters in-hand, jumped headfirst into tutorials, learning how to become trigger-aware and how to use grid computing resources via the distributed analysis tools Panda and Ganga. The well organised tutorials were well attended and soon the network was humming, providing rapid results to the users and ample feedback to the developers. A mid-week break was provided by a relaxing and enjoyable cruise through the majestic Norwegia...

  1. Systems Engineering Workshops | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workshops Systems Engineering Workshops The Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop is a biennial topics relevant to systems engineering and the wind industry. The presentations and agendas are available for all of the Systems Engineering Workshops: The 1st NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

  2. Putting the MeaT into TeaM Training: Development, Delivery, and Evaluation of a Surgical Team-Training Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Neal E; Paige, John T; Arora, Sonal; Fernandez, Gladys L; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Tsuda, Shawn T; Powers, Kinga A; Langlois, Gerard; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Despite importance to patient care, team training is infrequently used in surgical education. To address this, a workshop was developed by the Association for Surgical Education Simulation Committee to teach team training using high-fidelity patient simulators and the American College of Surgeons-Association of Program Directors in Surgery team-training curriculum. Workshops were conducted at 3 national meetings. Participants completed preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires to define experience, confidence in using simulation, intention to implement, as well as workshop content quality. The course consisted of (A) a didactic review of Preparation, Implementation, and Debriefing and (B) facilitated small group simulation sessions followed by debriefings. Of 78 participants, 51 completed the workshops. Overall, 65% indicated that residents at their institutions used patient simulation, but only 33% used the American College of Surgeons-the Association of Program Directors in Surgery team-training modules. The workshop increased confidence to implement simulation team training (3.4 ± 1.3 vs 4.5 ± 0.9). Quality and importance were rated highly (5.4 ± 00.6, highest score = 6). Preparation for simulation-based team training is possible in this workshop setting, although the effect on actual implementation remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronological evaluation of liver enhancement in patients with chronic liver disease at Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3-T MR imaging. Does liver function correlate with enhancement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo; Nakaura, Takeshi; Morita, Kosuke

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chronological relationship between scan delay and liver enhancement for the hepatobiliary phase on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and evaluate the effects of liver function on liver enhancement. Hepatobiliary-phase images were retrospectively evaluated in 125 patients with chronic liver disease. Hepatobiliary phase images were obtained at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after injection. We calculated relative liver enhancement (RLE) at t min after injection by dividing the signal intensity (SI) of the liver at t min by precontrast SI. We compared RLE values at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min and evaluated the detectability of focal hepatic lesions. We analyzed the effect of liver function on RLE with the generalized linear model. There was not significant difference in RLE and lesion detectability at 15 and 20 min. RLE in the Child-Pugh C group was significantly lower than in the Child-Pugh A and B groups. The serum albumin level and prothrombin time were significantly correlated with the liver enhancement. A delay time of 15 min for the hepatobiliary phase was thought to be adequate in patients with mild liver dysfunction. The serum albumin level and prothrombin time would be predictive of liver enhancement in the hepatobiliary phase. (author)

  4. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... presentations, including the privacy compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance... Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Privacy Compliance Workshop.'' DATES: The...

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on new material development. Nano-technology and hydrogen energy society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaru; Asano, Masaharu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Ohgaki, Junpei

    2005-03-01

    We have newly held the Workshop on New Material Development in order to enhance the research activities on new material development using radiation. Theme of this workshop was 'nano-technology and hydrogen', both of which are considered to have great influence on our social life and have shown rapid progress in the related researches, recently. Researchers from domestic universities, research institutes, and private companies have attended at the workshop and had the opportunity to exchange information and make discussions about the latest trend in the leading edge researches, and have contributed to the material development in future. The technology for manufacturing and evaluation of very fine materials, which is essential for the nano-technology, and the development of new functional materials, which will support the hydrogen energy society in future, have increasingly become important and have been intensively investigated by many research groups. In such investigation, the ionizing radiation is indispensable as the tool for probing and modifying materials. For this reason, this workshop was held at JAERI, Takasaki, a center of excellence for radiation application in Japan. This workshop was held by JAERI, Takasaki, on November 19, 2004 under the joint auspices of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Chemical Society of Japan, the Polymer Science Society of Japan and the Japanese Society of Radiation Chemistry. The workshop was attended by 97 participates. We believe that this workshop supported by many academic societies will largely contribute to the research on new material development in the field of nano-technology and hydrogen. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop

  7. Innovative confinement concepts workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop occurred in California during the week preceding the Second Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. An informal report was made to the Second Symposium. A summary of the Workshop concluded that some very promising ideas were presented, that innovative concept development is a central element of the restructured US DOE. Fusion Energy Sciences program, and that the Workshop should promote real scientific progress in fusion

  8. Emergency response workers workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapeev, S.A.; Glukhikh, E.N.; Tyurin, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A training workshop entitled Current issues and potential improvements in Rosatom Corporation emergency prevention and response system was held in May-June, 2012. The workshop combined theoretical training with full-scale practical exercise that demonstrated the existing innovative capabilities for radiation reconnaissance, diving equipment and robotics, aircraft, emergency response and rescue hardware and machinery. This paper describes the activities carried out during the workshop [ru

  9. Proceedings: 2001 ASME/EPRI Radwaste Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear utilities continually evaluate methods to improve operations and reduce costs associated with radioactive waste management. The continuing deregulation process has increased the emphasis on this activity. The Annual ASME/EPRI Workshop facilitates this effort by communicating technology and management improvements throughout the industry. This workshop, restricted to utility radwaste professionals, also serves to communicate practical in-plant improvements with the opportunity to discuss them in detail

  10. Proceedings: 2000 ASME/EPRI Radwaste Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and reduce costs associated with radioactive waste management. The continuing deregulation process has added increased emphasis to this activity. The Annual ASME/EPRI Workshop facilitates this effort by communicating technological and managerial improvements throughout the industry. This workshop, restricted to utility radwaste professionals, also serves to communicate practical in-plant improvements with the opportunity to discuss them in detail

  11. Recurrent postoperative sciatica: Evaluation with MR imaging and enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duoauferrier, R.; Frocrain, L.; Husson, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors prospectively compared surface coil MR (SCMR) imaging and CT with iodinate contrast enhancement in 50 patients with recurrent postoperative sciatica. Of the 50 patients enrolled in the study, surgical treatment was elected in 27 patients after independent examination of SCMR imaging and enhanced CT. All predictions made with the 27 SCMR images were surgically confirmed. The surgical findings were 20 recurrent disk herniations, five recurrent disk herniations with scar tissue, one disk herniation above the level of diskectomy, and one disk herniation below the level of diskectomy. The surgical findings of the 12 patients who had scar tissue on CT were seven recurrent disk herniations, four recurrent disk herniations with scar tissue, and one disk herniation below the operated level. SCMR imaging was more sensitive and more specific than CT to differentiate scar tissue from recurrent disk herniation

  12. THE EFFORT TO IMPROVE TEACHERS’PERFORMANCE OF SMA TMI ROUDLATUL QUR’AN IN COMPOSING LESSON PLAN AND EVALUATION INSTRUMENT OF CHARACTER EDUCATION THROUGH WORKSHOP ACADEMIC YEAR 2015/2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Raharjo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Difficulties found in Senior High School (SMA TMI Roudlatul Qur’an, teachers were not able to integrate character value into their lesson plan and to identify which behaviour must be success indicators of character education. Out of 18 Character value existed, the measurement of students’success as the better change of their behaviour, some only covering observation and lack of triangulation consideration to more accountable result. Worskhop potentially becomes one of the ways to up grade teachers’performance in determining the instrument of character value education, at the same time, train them the way composing lesson plan which integrates character education. This school action research was aimed to carry out workshop at SMA TMI Roudlatul Qur’an of Metro Municipal City, to improve teachers’performance in composing evaluation instrumen of value character education, to improve teachers’performance in composing integrated character value education.The research took place at SMA TMI Roudlatul Qur’an, located at Mulyojati, Metro Barat, Metro Municipal City. It was done in odd semester, continually to one month. Started in early Academic Year 2015/2016, July to August.The researcher concluded that teachers of SMA TMI Roudlatul Qur’an improved their performance well in composing evaluation instrument of value character education and integrated value character lesson plan through workshop. Facts: Workshop process was considered fair 11 teachers, good by 16 teachers, and very good by 12 teachers. At cycle II, the performance of composing evaluation instrument of character education showed 11 teachers were less sufficient performance, 16 teachers were good performance, and 12 teachers were very good. And the performance of composing integrated character value at cycle II showed 8 moderate teachers, 19 good teachers, and 12 excellent teachers. Key words: Workshop, Lesson Plan, Character Education Evaluation

  13. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached

  14. MOOC Design Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Mor, Yishay; Warburton, Steven

    2016-01-01

    For the last two years we have been running a series of successful MOOC design workshops. These workshops build on previous work in learning design and MOOC design patterns. The aim of these workshops is to aid practitioners in defining and conceptualising educational innovations (predominantly......, but not exclusively MOOCs) which are based on an empathic user-centered view of the target learners and teachers. In this paper, we share the main principles, patterns and resources of our workshops and present some initial results for their effectiveness...

  15. On correct evaluation techniques of brightness enhancement effect measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukačka, Leoš; Dupuis, Pascal; Motomura, Hideki; Rozkovec, Jiří; Kolář, Milan; Zissis, Georges; Jinno, Masafumi

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to establish confidence intervals of the quantification of brightness enhancement effects resulting from the use of pulsing bright light. It is found that the methods used so far may yield significant bias in the published results, overestimating or underestimating the enhancement effect. The authors propose to use a linear algebra method called the total least squares. Upon an example dataset, it is shown that this method does not yield biased results. The statistical significance of the results is also computed. It is concluded over an observation set that the currently used linear algebra methods present many patterns of noise sensitivity. Changing algorithm details leads to inconsistent results. It is thus recommended to use the method with the lowest noise sensitivity. Moreover, it is shown that this method also permits one to obtain an estimate of the confidence interval. This paper neither aims to publish results about a particular experiment nor to draw any particular conclusion about existence or nonexistence of the brightness enhancement effect.

  16. Evaluation of a Mathematical Model for Digital Image Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geha, Hassem; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Noujeim, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the detected number of holes on a stepwedge on images resulting from the application of the 5th degree polynomial model compared to the images resulting from the application of linear enhancement. Material and Methods : A 10-step aluminum step wedge with holes randomly drilled on each step was exposed with three different kVp and five exposure times per kVp on a Schick33(®) sensor. The images were enhanced by brightness/contrast adjustment, histogram equalization and with the 5th degree polynomial model and compared to the original non-enhanced images by six observers in two separate readings. Results : There was no significant difference between the readers and between the first and second reading. There was a significant three-factor interaction among Method, Exposure time, and kVp in detecting holes. The overall pattern was: "Poly" results in the highest counts, "Original" in the lowest counts, with "B/C" and "Equalized" intermediate. Conclusion : The 5th degree polynomial model showed more holes when compared to the other modalities.

  17. Improving Undergraduates' Critical Thinking Skills through Peer-learning Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Critical thinking skills are among the primary learning outcomes of undergraduate education, but they are rarely explicitly taught. Here I present a two-fold study aimed at analyzing undergraduate students' critical thinking and information literacy skills, and explicitly teaching these skills, in an introductory Planetary Science course. The purpose of the research was to examine the students' information-filtering skills and to develop a short series of peer-learning workshops that would enhance these skills in both the students' coursework and their everyday lives. The 4 workshops are designed to be easily adaptable to any college course, with little impact on the instructor's workload. They make use of material related to the course's content, enabling the instructor to complement a pre-existing syllabus while explicitly teaching students skills essential to their academic and non-academic lives. In order to gain an understanding of undergraduates' existing information-filtering skills, I examined the material that they consider to be appropriate sources for a college paper. I analyzed the Essay 1 bibliographies of a writing-based introductory Planetary Science course for non-majors. The 22 essays cited 135 (non-unique) references, only half of which were deemed suitable by their instructors. I divided the sources into several categories and classified them as recommended, recommended with caution, and unsuitable for this course. The unsuitable sources ranged from peer-reviewed journal articles, which these novice students were not equipped to properly interpret, to websites that cannot be relied upon for scientific information (e.g., factoidz.com, answersingenesis.org). The workshops aim to improve the students' information-filtering skills by sequentially teaching them to evaluate search engine results, identify claims made on websites and in news articles, evaluate the evidence presented, and identify specific correlation/causation fallacies in news articles

  18. Developmental evaluation applying complexity concepts to enhance innovation and use

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2011-01-01

    Developmental evaluation (DE) offers a powerful approach to monitoring and supporting social innovations by working in partnership with program decision makers. In this book, eminent authority Michael Quinn Patton shows how to conduct evaluations within a DE framework. Patton draws on insights about complex dynamic systems, uncertainty, nonlinearity, and emergence. He illustrates how DE can be used for a range of purposes: ongoing program development, adapting effective principles of practice to local contexts, generating innovations and taking them to scale, and facilitating rapid response in crisis situations. Students and practicing evaluators will appreciate the book's extensive case examples and stories, cartoons, clear writing style, "closer look" sidebars, and summary tables. Provided is essential guidance for making evaluations useful, practical, and credible in support of social change.

  19. Workshop summary of 'nuclear knowledge management: Present status and perspective'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Minoru

    2007-03-01

    The workshop on 'Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM): Present Status and Perspective' was held at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (supported by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency), Tokyo, Japan on the 14th and 15th of December 2006. The purpose of the workshop is to introduce NKM activities inside and outside Japan so that concerned parties/professionals could share related information and enhance awareness of the issues on NKM. Participants from various sectors, such as authorities, industry, universities/research institutes, etc, made presentations. Issues on NKM are recognized and discussed. The workshop consisted of 18 oral lectures and a panel discussion. The 55 participants attended the workshop. Under permission of the Tokyo Institute of Technology which is the sponsor of the workshop, this report compiles these lecture's presentation materials which got permission of a lecturer and synopses which were submitted after the workshop. (author)

  20. Computational evaluation of amplitude modulation for enhanced magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Frederik; Dupré, Luc; Ivkov, Robert; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can interact with alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) to deposit localized energy for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. Hyperthermia is useful in the context of multimodality treatments with radiation or chemotherapy to enhance disease control without increased toxicity. The unique attributes of heat deposition and transfer with MNPs have generated considerable attention and have been the focus of extensive investigations to elucidate mechanisms and optimize performance. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations are often conducted with the finite element method (FEM) using the Pennes' bioheat equation. In the current study, the Pennes' equation was modified to include a thermal damage-dependent perfusion profile to improve model predictions with respect to known physiological responses to tissue heating. A normal distribution of MNPs in a model liver tumor was combined with empirical nanoparticle heating data to calculate tumor temperature distributions and resulting survival fraction of cancer cells. In addition, calculated spatiotemporal temperature changes were compared among magnetic field amplitude modulations of a base 150-kHz sinusoidal waveform, specifically, no modulation, sinusoidal, rectangular, and triangular modulation. Complex relationships were observed between nanoparticle heating and cancer tissue damage when amplitude modulation and damage-related perfusion profiles were varied. These results are tantalizing and motivate further exploration of amplitude modulation as a means to enhance efficiency of and overcome technical challenges associated with magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH).

  1. Workshop of medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This event was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentine Republic from 14 th. through 18 th. November, 1988. A great part of the physicians in the area of medical physics participated in this workshop. This volume includes the papers presented at this Workshop of Medical Physics [es

  2. Workshops on Writing Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-30

    Sep 30, 2017 ... hands-on practice, feedback, mentoring and highly interactive sessions. The focus will be on work done as individuals and in teams. Maximum number of participants for the workshop is limited. The workshop is compulso- rily residential. Boarding and lodging free for selected candidates. Re-imbursement ...

  3. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  4. SPLASH'13 workshops summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, S.; Schultz, U. P.

    2013-01-01

    Following its long-standing tradition, SPLASH 2013 will host 19 high-quality workshops, allowing their participants to meet and discuss research questions with peers, to mature new and exciting ideas, and to build up communities and start new collaborations. SPLASH workshops complement the main t...

  5. Recurrent postoperative sciatica: Evaluation with MR imaging and enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauferrier, R.; Frocain, L.; Husson, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors prospectively compared MR imaging performed with a surface coil and CT performed with iodinated contrast agent enhancement in 50 patients with recurrent postoperative sciatica. Surgical decision was an objective measure of accuracy. Surgical treatment was selected for 27 patients. All 27 underwent MR imaging. The 15 patients who underwent CT/surgical treatment were included in the 27 indications of SCMR. All predictions based on MR imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. There were 25 recurrent disk herniations, including five with scar tissue, and two disk herniations above or below the level of the diskectomy. In the 12 patients with scar tissue detected on CT there were seven recurrent disk hernitions, four recurrent disk herniations with scar tissue, and one disk herniation below the level of the diskectomy

  6. Evaluation and technologic improvement of an enhanced imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, D.

    1990-08-01

    Feature-based systems that combine imaging and signal analysis capabilities may be useful for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of plant components. This report describes the metallurgical evaluation conducted to verify the performance of a feature-based system to discriminate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) from benign geometrical reflectors. The ultrasonic examination results were also evaluated by examination personnel trained in intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) detection techniques. The welds were examined prior to their removal from the recirculation and Residual-Heat-Removal (RHR) piping systems of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Plant, as described in the Phase 2 Interim Report issued in June 1989. In this phase of the program, a metallurgical evaluation was performed on piping system welds that were examined ultrasonically using a feature-based system for analysis. The feature-based system correctly identified crack, but incorrectly identified other features, e.g., root geometry and metallurgical interfaces, as cracks. While the results of the analysis by the feature-based system were not identical to the results of analysis by trained personnel, the overall performance of the feature-based system was comparable to that of the trained personnel. Based on the results of this program, the feature-based system may be useful as a supplementary method of identifying IGSCC indications. When used in conjunction with existing methods and techniques, it could improve the accuracy of IGSCC identification

  7. Sexual Enhancement Groups for Dysfunctional Women: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiblum, Sandra R.; Ersner-Hershfield, Robin

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of women with sexual dysfunction were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment. Two groups did not involve partner participation, while the third group included partners on two occasions. Results for all groups were similar. The question of whether orgasm through coitus alone is a reasonable goal is raised and challenged. (Author)

  8. Evaluating and Enhancing Outcomes Assessment Quality in Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kenneth; Goodwin, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Accreditation is a mark of distinction indicating that an institution has met high standards set by the profession, and an increasingly important feature of the accreditation process in higher education is "outcomes assessment." This article presents two rubrics for evaluating the quality of an institution's outcomes assessment system. One rubric…

  9. Increasing the health literacy of learning disability and mental health nurses in physical care skills: a pre and post-test evaluation of a workshop on diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Trotter, Fiona; Clifton, Andrew; Holdich, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pre- and post-test results of the outcomes of a workshop designed to increase learning disability and mental health nurses' knowledge and skill to undertake interventions for service users at risk of, or with a diagnosis of, type 2 diabetes. Health literacy is also discussed as a way of explaining why such nurses may lack expertise in physical health care. Findings from the workshop show that learning disability and mental health nurses have the motivation to increase their health literacy (skills and knowledge) in diabetes care. The potential of such workshops, and how organisations looking forward to the future can build health literacy, is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancing Insights into Pulmonary Vascular Disease through a Precision Medicine Approach. A Joint NHLBI-Cardiovascular Medical Research and Education Fund Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John H; Rich, Stuart; Abman, Steven H; Alexander, John H; Barnard, John; Beck, Gerald J; Benza, Raymond L; Bull, Todd M; Chan, Stephen Y; Chun, Hyung J; Doogan, Declan; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Erzurum, Serpil C; Frantz, Robert P; Geraci, Mark; Gillies, Hunter; Gladwin, Mark; Gray, Michael P; Hemnes, Anna R; Herbst, Roy S; Hernandez, Adrian F; Hill, Nicholas S; Horn, Evelyn M; Hunter, Kendall; Jing, Zhi-Cheng; Johns, Roger; Kaul, Sanjay; Kawut, Steven M; Lahm, Tim; Leopold, Jane A; Lewis, Greg D; Mathai, Stephen C; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Michelakis, Evangelos D; Nathan, Steven D; Nichols, William; Page, Grier; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Rich, Jonathan; Rischard, Franz; Rounds, Sharon; Shah, Sanjiv J; Tapson, Victor F; Lowy, Naomi; Stockbridge, Norman; Weinmann, Gail; Xiao, Lei

    2017-06-15

    The Division of Lung Diseases of the NHLBI and the Cardiovascular Medical Education and Research Fund held a workshop to discuss how to leverage the anticipated scientific output from the recently launched "Redefining Pulmonary Hypertension through Pulmonary Vascular Disease Phenomics" (PVDOMICS) program to develop newer approaches to pulmonary vascular disease. PVDOMICS is a collaborative, protocol-driven network to analyze all patient populations with pulmonary hypertension to define novel pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) phenotypes. Stakeholders, including basic, translational, and clinical investigators; clinicians; patient advocacy organizations; regulatory agencies; and pharmaceutical industry experts, joined to discuss the application of precision medicine to PVD clinical trials. Recommendations were generated for discussion of research priorities in line with NHLBI Strategic Vision Goals that include: (1) A national effort, involving all the stakeholders, should seek to coordinate biosamples and biodata from all funded programs to a web-based repository so that information can be shared and correlated with other research projects. Example programs sponsored by NHLBI include PVDOMICS, Pulmonary Hypertension Breakthrough Initiative, the National Biological Sample and Data Repository for PAH, and the National Precision Medicine Initiative. (2) A task force to develop a master clinical trials protocol for PVD to apply precision medicine principles to future clinical trials. Specific features include: (a) adoption of smaller clinical trials that incorporate biomarker-guided enrichment strategies, using adaptive and innovative statistical designs; and (b) development of newer endpoints that reflect well-defined and clinically meaningful changes. (3) Development of updated and systematic variables in imaging, hemodynamic, cellular, genomic, and metabolic tests that will help precisely identify individual and shared features of PVD and serve as the basis of novel

  11. Enhancing the contribution and role of practitioner knowledge in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Working Group (WG II process: Insights from UK workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Howarth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective critically assesses how the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC could facilitate a closer alignment of its activities and include lessons drawn from the policy and decision-making communities working on the ground at the regional/local levels. The objective is to facilitate practitioner input into the detailed choice of topics and priorities for IPCC review and in the conclusions drawn (we define practitioners as those engaged in the development and application of practical responses to climate change on the ground. By means of a series of workshops with academics, policy officials and decision-makers in the United Kingdom, the research reported here illuminates how the IPCC’s Working Group II (WGII has been used in the past to inform decision-making and how practitioner responses to climate change could better inform the IPCC process in the future. In particular, we recommend three key actions. Firstly that IPCC WGII should incorporate more practitioners as authors to improve the awareness and understanding amongst the writing teams of the nature and detail of decisions being made in response to climate change; secondly a practitioner-led IPCC Special Report should be commissioned on good-practice responses to climate change; and thirdly a new body should be created, attached to the IPCC, to synthesise and report on good practice on climate response strategies in a timely manner. By adopting these recommendations, the IPCC could become more directly useful to decision-makers working on adaptation at the national, regional and local levels and enable more actionable decision-making.

  12. VLLEEM-2 technical workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In order to overcome the limits of the energy-environment models, and to benefit at the same time of their past experiences, the VLEEM project proposes a genuine approach and innovative modelling tools to assess the energy-environment systems over the very long term, which are based on the strengths of existing long term energy models, but focussed on two major objectives: to describe normative futures which fit with a set of overall constraints, like the stabilisation of the concentration of green-house gases in the atmosphere, or the stabilisation of the overall inventory of plutonium and minor actinides, etc...; to describe and formalize the association of causalities necessary to bring the system from the present situation to the targeted future, through a '' back-casting '' approach. This first technical workshop presents the state of the art of the different Work Programmes. WP1:Enhancement of the Conceptual framework. WP2: Data base on conventional demand/supply technologies. WP3: Complement and up-date technology monographs. WP4: Formalization and computing of final VLEEM submodels. WP5: Case study 2030, 2050, 2100. (A.L.B.)

  13. Proceedings: 2001 Nuclear Asset Management Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The fourth annual EPRI Nuclear Asset Management Workshop helped decision makers at all levels of nuclear enterprises to keep informed about developing nuclear asset management (NAM) processes, methods, and tools. The goal is to operate nuclear plants with enhanced profitability, while maintaining safety

  14. Workshop on radioisotope safety issues in medical and academic institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to present current trends and recent initiatives of AECB staff members on issues relating to the regulation of radiation safety at hospitals and universities, and to invite the views of licencees on these matters. This report provides a record of presentations and discussions at this workshop. Presentation overheads are included as well as the results of workshop evaluations and a list of participants

  15. Workshop on radioisotope safety issues in medical and academic institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to present current trends and recent initiatives of AECB staff members on issues relating to the regulation of radiation safety at hospitals and universities, and to invite the views of licencees on these matters. This report provides a record of presentations and discussions at this workshop. Presentation overheads are included as well as the results of workshop evaluations and a list of participants.

  16. Evaluating drywells for stormwater management and enhanced aquifer recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Salini; Bradford, Scott A.; Šimůnek, Jiří; DeJong, Bill; Kraemer, Stephen R.

    2018-06-01

    Drywells are increasingly used for stormwater management and enhanced aquifer recharge, but only limited research has quantitatively determined the performance of drywells. Numerical and field scale experiments were, therefore, conducted to improve our understanding and ability to characterize the drywell behavior. In particular, HYDRUS (2D/3D) was modified to simulate transient head boundary conditions for the complex geometry of the Maxwell Type IV drywell; i.e., a sediment chamber, an overflow pipe, and the variable geometry and storage of the drywell system with depth. Falling-head infiltration experiments were conducted on drywells located at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California (CA) and a commercial complex in Torrance, CA to determine in situ soil hydraulic properties (the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, and the retention curve shape parameter, α) for an equivalent uniform soil profile by inverse parameter optimization. A good agreement between the observed and simulated water heights in wells was obtained for both sites as indicated by the coefficient of determination 0.95-0.99-%, unique parameter fits, and small standard errors. Fort Irwin and Torrance drywells had very distinctive soil hydraulic characteristics. The fitted value of Ks=1.01 × 10-3 m min-1 at the Torrance drywell was consistent with the sandy soil texture at this site and the default value for sand in the HYDRUS soil catalog. The drywell with this Ks= 1.01 × 10-3 m min-1 could easily infiltrate predicted surface runoff from a design rain event (∼51.3 m3) within 5760 min (4 d). In contrast, the fitted value of Ks=2.25 × 10-6 m min-1 at Fort Irwin was very low compared to the Torrance drywell and more than an order of magnitude smaller than the default value reported in the HYDRUS soil catalog for sandy clay loam at this site, likely due to clogging. These experiments and simulations provide useful information to characterize effective soil hydraulic properties

  17. Assessment of change in knowledge about research methods among delegates attending research methodology workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Shrivastava

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: There was increase in knowledge of the delegates after attending research methodology workshops. Participatory research methodology workshops are good methods of imparting knowledge, also the long term effects needs to be evaluated.

  18. Evaluating and Enhancing Driving Ability among Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    spectrum disorder (ASD). Autism also has a significant effect on military families . Autism Speaks, a science and advocacy organization, estimates that...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0610 TITLE: Evaluating and Enhancing Driving Ability among Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Evaluating and Enhancing Driving Ability among Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0610 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  19. Measuring Emotional Intelligence Enhances the Psychological Evaluation of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Eva M; Walsh, Rosemary; Andrews, Leanne; McPherson, Susan

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of emotional factors, in addition to other psychosocial factors, has been recommended as a means of identifying individuals with chronic pain who may not respond to certain pain treatments. Systematic reviews of the evidence regarding the prediction of responsiveness to a treatment called the spinal cord stimulator (SCS) have yielded inconclusive results. Emotional intelligence is a term which refers to the ability to identify and manage emotions in oneself and others and has been shown to be inversely associated with emotional distress and acute pain. This study aims to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence, chronic pain, and the more established psychosocial factors usually used for SCS evaluations by clinical psychologists in medical settings. A sample of 112 patients with chronic pain on an acute hospital waiting list for SCS procedures in a pain medicine service were recruited. Psychological measures were completed including: a novel measure of emotional intelligence; usual measures of emotional distress and catastrophizing; and a numerical rating scale designed to assess pain intensity, pain-related distress, and interference. As predicted, findings revealed significant associations between most of the measures analyzed and current pain intensity. When entered into a simultaneous regression analysis, emotional intelligence scores remained the only significant predictor of current pain intensity. There are potential clinical, ethical, and organizational implications of emotional intelligence processes partially predicting pain in patients on a waiting list for a medical procedure. These results may offer new insight, understanding, and evaluation targets for clinical psychologists in the field of pain management.

  20. Workshop report: US-China workshop on smart structures and smart systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2006-03-01

    A Joint U.S.-China workshop on the topic of Integrated Sensing Systems, Mechatronics and Smart Structures Technologies was held in Jinan, China in October 2005 to evaluate the current status of research and education in the topic areas in the United States and China, to identify critical and strategic research and educational issues of mutual interest, and to identify joint research projects and potential research teams for collaborative research activities. The workshop included a series of presentations by leading researchers and educators from the United States and China and group discussions on the workshop objectives.

  1. Evaluación de un taller práctico sobre higiene de manos impartido por estudiantes entrenados Evaluation of a workshop on hand hygiene taught by instructed students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernández-Prada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La enseñanza y el aprendizaje de la higiene de manos en el contexto sanitario es una tarea compleja. La intervención del estudiante como líder de su propia formación está muy poco analizada en la bibliografía. El objetivo principal del trabajo es la evaluación de un taller sobre higiene de manos gestionado, dirigido e impartido, bajo tutela experta, por estudiantes al propio colectivo estudiantil. Sujetos y métodos. Evaluación pre-post de la técnica, los conocimientos y las actitudes de los participantes hacia la higiene de manos. Asistieron 40 estudiantes de ciencias de la salud de la Universidad de Granada. Se realizaron dos evaluaciones del taller: mediante un cuestionario diseñado ad hoc con 12 ítems sobre conocimientos y actitudes, y mediante la observación directa de la técnica de higiene de manos y la calidad del proceso utilizando una lámpara de luz ultravioleta y una solución reactiva. Resultados. Tras la realización del taller se aprecia que disminuye de forma significativa el número de zonas contaminadas de las manos (t = 9,278; p Introduction. The teaching and learning of hand hygiene in the context of health is a complex task. There is little discussion in the literature regarding the student involvement as the leader of his own background. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of a workshop on hand hygiene managed, directed and delivered, under expert supervision, by students at the same student group. Subjects and methods. An evaluation pre-post about technique, knowledge and attitudes of participants towards hygiene. Attended by 40 students of Health Sciences at the University of Granada. We conducted two evaluations of the workshop by: a questionnaire designed ad hoc with 12 items on knowledge and attitudes, and the direct observation of hand hygiene technique and quality of the processing with an ultraviolet lamp and a reactive solution for it. Results. After the workshop, it shows

  2. A reflexive evaluation of technology-enhanced learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Young

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the lived experiences of two academics in a UK Higher Education Institution who have embedded digital learning approaches within their curriculum delivery. Achieving student excellence can be impeded by a lack of engagement and sense of identity on large courses. Digital learning strategies can offer opportunities to overcome these challenges by empowering students to engage self-confidently. Through an evaluation of the authors’ own experiences of using social media, polling and web-conferencing software, the article shows how interacting with students via a range of learning technologies can create more inclusive and engaging learning environments. Including feedback from students within this article provides evidence that diversification of communication within teaching and learning practice gives students more choice and opportunity to interact with both their peers and teaching staff. The article concludes with recommendations for embedding technology, whilst acknowledging the well-established value of face-to-face interaction.

  3. Promoting Cultural Awareness: A Faculty Development Workshop on Cultural Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Razack, Saleem; Steinert, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    An interdisciplinary faculty development workshop on cultural competency (CC) was implemented and evaluated for the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. It consisted of a 4-hour workshop and 2 follow-up sessions. A reflective practice framework was used. The project was evaluated using the Multicultural Assessment Questionnaire (MAQ), evaluation forms completed by participants, and detailed field notes taken during the sessions. The workshop was attended by 49 faculty members with diverse professional backgrounds. Statistically significant improvements were measured using the MAQ. On a scale of 1 to 5 (5 = very useful) on the evaluation form, the majority of participants (76.1%) gave the workshop a score of 4 or 5 for overall usefulness. A thematic analysis of field-note data highlighted participant responses to specific activities in the workshop. Participants expressed a need for faculty development initiatives on CC such as this one. Copyright© by Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

  4. Evaluating biological variation in non-transgenic crops: executive summary from the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute workshop, November 16-17, 2009, Paris, France

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerrer, Nancy; Ladics, Gregory; McClain, Scott

    2010-01-01

    .e., genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) highlighted the workshop, and summaries of these presentations are published separately in this supplemental issue. This paper summarizes key messages, as well as the consensus points reached, in a roundtable discussion on eight specific questions posed during...

  5. Natural Flood Management in context: evaluating and enhancing the impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Peter; Beven, Keith; Hankin, Barry; Lamb, Rob

    2016-04-01

    areas of the catchment that will naturally retain storm run-off and quantified the effects of removing this storage on the run-off. It is suggested that enhancing the storage capacity of these areas may be a low impact approach in keeping with the ethos of NFM that has a significant, and quantifiable impact, on storm flows.

  6. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  7. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  8. Space and Earth Science Data Compression Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The workshop explored opportunities for data compression to enhance the collection and analysis of space and Earth science data. The focus was on scientists' data requirements, as well as constraints imposed by the data collection, transmission, distribution, and archival systems. The workshop consisted of several invited papers; two described information systems for space and Earth science data, four depicted analysis scenarios for extracting information of scientific interest from data collected by Earth orbiting and deep space platforms, and a final one was a general tutorial on image data compression.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of enhancement patterns in focal solid liver lesions with Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haimerl

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objective was to investigate the dynamic enhancement patterns in focal solid liver lesions after the administration of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA by means of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI including hepatobiliary phase (HP images 20 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Non-enhanced T1/T2-weighted as well as dynamic magnetic resonance (MR images during the arterial phase (AP, the portal venous phase (PVP, the late phase (LP, and the HP (20 min were obtained from 83 patients (54 male, 29 female, mean age 62.01 years with focal solid liver lesions. MRI was conducted by means of a 1.5-T system for 63 patients with malignant liver lesions (HCCs: n = 34, metastases: n = 29 and for 20 patients with benign liver lesions (FNH lesions: n = 14, hemangiomas: n = 3, adenomas: n = 3. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise ratios (SNR, contrast enhancement ratios (CER, lesion-to-liver contrast ratios (LLC, and signal intensity (SI ratios were measured. RESULTS: The SNR of liver parenchyma significantly increased in each dynamic phase after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration compared to the SNR of non-enhanced images (p<0.001. The CER of HCCs and metastases significantly decreased between LP and HP images (p = 0.0011, p<0.0001. However, FNH lesions did not show any significant difference, whereas an increased CER was found in hemangiomas. The mean LLCs of FNH lesions were significantly higher than those of HCCs and metastases. The LLC values of hemangiomas remained negative during the entire time course, whereas the LLC of adenomas indicated hyperintensity from the AP to the LP. Furthermore, adenomas showed hypointensity in HP images. CONCLUSION: Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI may help diagnose focal solid liver lesions by evaluating their enhancement patterns.

  10. PV radiometrics workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents presentations and discussions held at the Photovoltaics Radiometeric Measurements Workshop conducted at Vail, Colorado, on July 24 and 25, 1995. The workshop was sponsored and financed by the Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project managed by Richard DeBlasio, Principal Investigator. That project is a component of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic Research and Development Program, conducted by NREL for the US Department of Energy, through the NREL Photovoltaic Engineering and Applications Branch, managed by Roland Hulstrom. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this workshop.

  11. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Lunar Workshops for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Hsu, B. C.; Hessen, K.; Bleacher, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWEs) are a series of weeklong professional development workshops, accompanied by quarterly follow-up sessions, designed to educate and inspire grade 6-12 science teachers, sponsored by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Participants learn about lunar science and exploration, gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the Moon, find out about the latest research results from LRO scientists, work with data from LRO and other lunar missions, and learn how to bring these data to their students using hands-on activities aligned with grade 6-12 National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks and through authentic research experiences. LWEs are held around the country, primarily in locations underserved with respect to NASA workshops. Where possible, workshops also include tours of science facilities or field trips intended to help participants better understand mission operations or geologic processes relevant to the Moon. Scientist and engineer involvement is a central tenant of the LWEs. LRO scientists and engineers, as well as scientists working on other lunar missions, present their research or activities to the workshop participants and answer questions about lunar science and exploration. This interaction with the scientists and engineers is consistently ranked by the LWE participants as one of the most interesting and inspiring components of the workshops. Evaluation results from the 2010 and 2011 workshops, as well as preliminary analysis of survey responses from 2012 participants, demonstrated an improved understanding of lunar science concepts among LWE participants in post-workshop assessments (as compared to identical pre-assessments) and a greater understanding of how to access and effectively share LRO data with students. Teachers reported increased confidence in helping students conduct research using lunar data, and learned about programs that would allow their students to make authentic

  12. Enhancement of wind stress evaluation method under storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingjian; Yu, Xiping

    2016-12-01

    Wind stress is an important driving force for many meteorological and oceanographical processes. However, most of the existing methods for evaluation of the wind stress, including various bulk formulas in terms of the wind speed at a given height and formulas relating the roughness height of the sea surface with wind conditions, predict an ever-increasing tendency of the wind stress coefficient as the wind speed increases, which is inconsistent with the field observations under storm conditions. The wave boundary layer model, which is based on the momentum and energy conservation, has the advantage to take into account the physical details of the air-sea interaction process, but is still invalid under storm conditions without a modification. By including the energy dissipation due to the presence of sea spray, which is speculated to be an important aspect of the air-sea interaction under storm conditions, the wave boundary layer model is improved in this study. The improved model is employed to estimate the wind stress caused by an idealized tropical cyclone motion. The computational results show that the wind stress coefficient reaches its maximal value at a wind speed of about 40 m/s and decreases as the wind speed further increases. This is in fairly good agreement with the field data.

  13. Development of panel loudspeaker system: design, evaluation and enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, M R; Huang, T

    2001-06-01

    Panel speakers are investigated in terms of structural vibration and acoustic radiation. A panel speaker primarily consists of a panel and an inertia exciter. Contrary to conventional speakers, flexural resonance is encouraged such that the panel vibrates as randomly as possible. Simulation tools are developed to facilitate system integration of panel speakers. In particular, electro-mechanical analogy, finite element analysis, and fast Fourier transform are employed to predict panel vibration and the acoustic radiation. Design procedures are also summarized. In order to compare the panel speakers with the conventional speakers, experimental investigations were undertaken to evaluate frequency response, directional response, sensitivity, efficiency, and harmonic distortion of both speakers. The results revealed that the panel speakers suffered from a problem of sensitivity and efficiency. To alleviate the problem, a woofer using electronic compensation based on H2 model matching principle is utilized to supplement the bass response. As indicated in the result, significant improvement over the panel speaker alone was achieved by using the combined panel-woofer system.

  14. Evaluering af Animationsbaseret Sketching Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter; Hautopp, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    Formålet med workshoppen var at styrke forskere fra Ild-Lab i at anvende animationsbaseret sketching og prototyping i deres undervisning således, at undervisningen understøtter designbaserede tilgange, der er mere produkt- og teknologiorienteret. På denne led kan vi styrke materialiseringen af hu...

  15. Building Strong Geoscience Departments Through the Visiting Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Bralower, T. J.; Clemens-Knott, D.; Doser, D. I.; Feiss, P. G.; Rhodes, D. D.; Richardson, R. M.; Savina, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project focuses on helping geoscience departments adapt and prosper in a changing and challenging environment. From 2005-2009, the project offered workshop programs on topics such as student recruitment, program assessment, preparing students for the workforce, and strengthening geoscience programs. Participants shared their departments' challenges and successes. Building on best practices and most promising strategies from these workshops and on workshop leaders' experiences, from 2009-2011 the project ran a visiting workshop program, bringing workshops to 18 individual departments. Two major strengths of the visiting workshop format are that it engages the entire department in the program, fostering a sense of shared ownership and vision, and that it focuses on each department's unique situation. Departments applied to have a visiting workshop, and the process was highly competitive. Selected departments chose from a list of topics developed through the prior workshops: curriculum and program design, program elements beyond the curriculum, recruiting students, preparing students for the workforce, and program assessment. Two of our workshop leaders worked with each department to customize and deliver the 1-2 day programs on campus. Each workshop incorporated exercises to facilitate active departmental discussions, presentations incorporating concrete examples drawn from the leaders' experience and from the collective experiences of the geoscience community, and action planning to scaffold implementation. All workshops also incorporated information on building departmental consensus and assessing departmental efforts. The Building Strong Geoscience Departments website complements the workshops with extensive examples from the geoscience community. Of the 201 participants in the visiting workshop program, 140 completed an end of workshop evaluation survey with an overall satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of a possible 10

  16. Development and evaluation of a training workshop for lay health promoters to implement a community-based intervention program in a public low rent housing estate: The Learning Families Project in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Agnes Y; Stewart, Sunita M; Wan, Alice; Fok, Helen; Lai, Hebe Y W; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of the train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop for lay resident leaders to be lay health promoters. The TTT workshop aimed to prepare the trainees to implement and/or assist in conducting a series of community-based family well-being activities for the residents in a public low rent housing estate, entitled "Learning Families Project", under the FAMILY project. The four-hour TTT workshop was conducted for 32 trainees (72% women, 43% aged ≥ 60, 41% ≤ elementary school education). The workshop aimed to promote trainees' knowledge, self-efficacy, attitude and practice of incorporating the positive psychology themes into their community activities and engaging the residents to join these activities and learn with their family members. Post-training support was provided. The effectiveness of the TTT was examined by self-administered questionnaires about trainees' reactions to training content, changes in learning and practice at three time points (baseline, and immediately and one year after training), and the difference in residents' survey results before and after participating in the community activities delivered by the trainees. The trainees' learning about the general concepts of family well-being, learning family, leadership skills and planning skills increased significantly with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen's d: 0.5-1.4) immediately after the training. The effects of perceived knowledge and attitude towards practice were sustained to one year (Cohen's d: 0.4-0.6). The application of planning skills to implement community activities was higher at one year (Cohen's d: 0.4), compared with baseline. At one year, the residents' survey results showed significant increases in the practice of positive communication behaviours and better neighbour cohesions after joining the family well-being activities of LFP. Qualitative feedback supported the quantitative results. Our TTT workshop could serve as a practical

  17. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  18. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  19. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-01-15

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991.

  20. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strålberg, Elisabeth; Klemola, Seppo; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical...

  1. YEREVAN: Acceleration workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Sponsored by the Yerevan Physics Institute in Armenia, a Workshop on New Methods of Charged Particle Acceleration in October near the Nor Amberd Cosmic Ray Station attracted participants from most major accelerator centres in the USSR and further afield

  2. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  3. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification

  4. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  5. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  6. Second ICFA workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the topics discussed at the second ICFA Workshop on 'Possibilities and Limitations of Accelerators and Detectors'. High energy accelerators are discussed, particularly electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders. (W.D.L.).

  7. Workshop on environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.C.

    1982-07-01

    Objectives of the workshop were: to review and evaluate the state-of-the-art of environmental impact assessments as applied to the regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems; to identify areas where existing technology allows establishing acceptable methods or standard practices that will meet the requirements of the NRC regulations, standards and guides for both normal operations and off-standard conditions including accident considerations; to illuminate topics where existing models or analytical methods are deficient because of unverified assumptions, a paucity of empirical data, conflicting results reported in the literature or a need for observation of operation systems; to compile, analyze and synthesize a prioritized set of research needs to advance the state-of-the-art to the level which will meet all of the requirements of the Commission's regulations, standards and guides; and to develop bases for maintaining the core of regulatory guidance at the optimum level balancing technical capabilities with practical considerations of cost and value to the regulatory process. The discussion held in small group sessions on aquatic, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways are presented. The following research needs were identified as common to all three groups: validation of models; characterization of source terms; development of screening techniques; basis for de minimis levels of contamination; and updating of objectives for environmental monitoring programs

  8. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  9. TPC workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept is now nearly ten years old and, as is evident in this workshop, is still evolving in many directions. From the liquid xenon TPC for double beta decay studies to the impressively large second generation TPC for the LEP experiment ALEPH, the surprising diversity of current applications is apparent. This workshop, the first to concentrate solely on the TPC has provided a most congenial and rewarding occasion for all TPC enthusiasts to share experience, results, and ideas

  10. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  11. Geometric Methods in Physics : XXXIII Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Bieliavsky, Pierre; Odzijewicz, Anatol; Schlichenmaier, Martin; Voronov, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a selection of papers based on the XXXIII Białowieża Workshop on Geometric Methods in Physics, 2014. The Białowieża Workshops are among the most important meetings in the field and attract researchers from both mathematics and physics. The articles gathered here are mathematically rigorous and have important physical implications, addressing the application of geometry in classical and quantum physics. Despite their long tradition, the workshops remain at the cutting edge of ongoing research. For the last several years, each Białowieża Workshop has been followed by a School on Geometry and Physics, where advanced lectures for graduate students and young researchers are presented; some of the lectures are reproduced here. The unique atmosphere of the workshop and school is enhanced by its venue, framed by the natural beauty of the Białowieża forest in eastern Poland. The volume will be of interest to researchers and graduate students in mathematical physics, theoretical physics and m...

  12. Lost circulation technology workshop, October 9-10, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C. (ed.)

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of a workshop on lost circulation technology. The workshop identified and defined lost circulation problem areas in field operations, materials, mud effects, and standards. Problem solution needs were also categorized as requiring analytical evaluation and procedure, instrument, and material development.

  13. Workshop as a Pedagogical Strategy for Printmaking: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In May 2009, the sixth printmaking workshop was held at the Department of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. This paper is a review of this creative workshop. Critically evaluating the demonstration of drypoint and collagraphy techniques in the exercise, effort is made to highlight the effectiveness of ...

  14. Strengthening the Paediatricians Project 2: The effectiveness of a workshop to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders of adolescence in low-health related human resource countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Paul SS

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paediatricians can be empowered to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders at primary care level. To evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative workshop in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge among paediatricians. Methods A 3-day, 27-hours workshop was held for paediatricians from different regions of India under the auspices of the National Adolescent Paediatric Task Force of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics. A 5-item pretest-posttest questionnaire was developed and administered at the beginning and end of the workshop to evaluate the participants' knowledge acquisition in adolescent psychiatry. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed on an intention-to-participate basis. Results Forty-eight paediatricians completed the questionnaire. There was significant enhancement of the knowledge in understanding the phenomenology, identifying the psychopathology, diagnosing common mental disorder and selecting the psychotropic medication in the bivariate analysis. When the possible confounders of level of training in paediatrics and number of years spent as paediatrician were controlled, in addition to the above areas of adolescent psychiatry, the diagnostic ability involving multiple psychological concepts also gained significance. However, both in the bivariate and multivariate analyses, the ability to refer to appropriate psychotherapy remained unchanged after the workshop. Conclusions This workshop was effective in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge of paediatricians. Such workshops could strengthen paediatricians in addressing the priority mental health disorders at the primary-care level in countries with low-human resource for health as advocated by the World Health Organization. However, it remains to be seen if this acquisition of adolescent psychiatry knowledge results in enhancing their adolescent psychiatry practice.

  15. Contrast-enhanced flair imaging in the evaluation of infectious leptomeningeal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Hemant; Sitoh, Y.-Y.; Anand, Pooja; Chua, Violet; Hui, Francis

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to compare contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images with contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for infectious leptomeningitis. Materials and methods: We studied twenty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of infectious meningitis with unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced T1 weighted and contrast-enhanced FLAIR MR sequences. Twelve patients had cytologic and biochemical diagnosis of meningitis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination obtained 48 h before or after the MR study. Sequences were considered positive if abnormal signal was seen in the subarachnoid space (cistern or sulci) or along pial surface. Results: Twenty-seven examinations in 24 patients were performed. Of the 12 patients (thirteen studies) in whom cytology was positive, unenhanced FLAIR images were positive in six cases (sensitivity 46%), contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were positive in 11 (sensitivity 85%), and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were positive in 11 patients (sensitivity 85%). Of the 12 patients (14 studies) in whom cerebrospinal fluid study was negative, unenhanced FLAIR images were negative in 13, contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were negative in 11, and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were negative in eight. Thus, the specificity of unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images was 93, 79 and 57%, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that post-contrast FLAIR images have similar sensitivity but a higher specificity compared to contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for detection of leptomeningeal enhancement. It can be a useful adjunct to post-contrast T1 weighted images in evaluation of infectious leptomeningitis

  16. Contrast-enhanced flair imaging in the evaluation of infectious leptomeningeal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore) and Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)]. E-mail: parurad@hotmail.com; Sitoh, Y.-Y. [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore); Anand, Pooja [Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Chua, Violet [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore); Hui, Francis [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore)

    2006-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to compare contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images with contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for infectious leptomeningitis. Materials and methods: We studied twenty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of infectious meningitis with unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced T1 weighted and contrast-enhanced FLAIR MR sequences. Twelve patients had cytologic and biochemical diagnosis of meningitis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination obtained 48 h before or after the MR study. Sequences were considered positive if abnormal signal was seen in the subarachnoid space (cistern or sulci) or along pial surface. Results: Twenty-seven examinations in 24 patients were performed. Of the 12 patients (thirteen studies) in whom cytology was positive, unenhanced FLAIR images were positive in six cases (sensitivity 46%), contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were positive in 11 (sensitivity 85%), and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were positive in 11 patients (sensitivity 85%). Of the 12 patients (14 studies) in whom cerebrospinal fluid study was negative, unenhanced FLAIR images were negative in 13, contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were negative in 11, and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were negative in eight. Thus, the specificity of unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images was 93, 79 and 57%, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that post-contrast FLAIR images have similar sensitivity but a higher specificity compared to contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for detection of leptomeningeal enhancement. It can be a useful adjunct to post-contrast T1 weighted images in evaluation of infectious leptomeningitis.

  17. Application of the Concept of Intrusion Tolerant System for Evaluating Cyber Security Enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chanyoung; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems is that nuclear industry is in very early stage in dealing with cyber security issues. It is because that cyber security has received less attention compared to other safety problems. In addition, late adoption of digital I and C systems has resulted in lower level of cyber security advancements in nuclear industry than ones in other industries. For the cyber security of NPP I and C systems, many regulatory documents, guides and standards were already published. These documents include cyber security plans, methods for cyber security assessments and comprehensive set of security controls. However, methods which can help assess how much security is improved if a specific security control is applied are not included in these documents. Hence, NPP I and C system designers may encounter difficulties when trying to apply security controls with limited structure and cost. In order to provide useful information about cyber security issues including cyber security enhancements, this paper suggests a framework to evaluate how much cyber security is improved when a specific cyber security enhancement is applied in NPPs. In order to provide useful information about cyber security issues including cyber security enhancements, this paper suggests a framework to evaluate how much cyber security is improved when a specific cyber security enhancement is applied in NPPs. The extent of cyber security improvement caused by security enhancement was defined as reduction ratio of the failure probability to secure the system from cyber-attack as Eq.1. The concept of 'intrusion tolerant system' was applied to not only prevent cyber-attacks but also limit the extent of damage in this study. For applying the concept of intrusion tolerant system to NPP, the event tree was constructed with some assumptions. Cyber security improvement caused by cyber security enhancement can be estimated as Eq.3. By comparing current system to the enhanced system, it is possible to

  18. Application of the Concept of Intrusion Tolerant System for Evaluating Cyber Security Enhancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chanyoung; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    One of the major problems is that nuclear industry is in very early stage in dealing with cyber security issues. It is because that cyber security has received less attention compared to other safety problems. In addition, late adoption of digital I and C systems has resulted in lower level of cyber security advancements in nuclear industry than ones in other industries. For the cyber security of NPP I and C systems, many regulatory documents, guides and standards were already published. These documents include cyber security plans, methods for cyber security assessments and comprehensive set of security controls. However, methods which can help assess how much security is improved if a specific security control is applied are not included in these documents. Hence, NPP I and C system designers may encounter difficulties when trying to apply security controls with limited structure and cost. In order to provide useful information about cyber security issues including cyber security enhancements, this paper suggests a framework to evaluate how much cyber security is improved when a specific cyber security enhancement is applied in NPPs. In order to provide useful information about cyber security issues including cyber security enhancements, this paper suggests a framework to evaluate how much cyber security is improved when a specific cyber security enhancement is applied in NPPs. The extent of cyber security improvement caused by security enhancement was defined as reduction ratio of the failure probability to secure the system from cyber-attack as Eq.1. The concept of 'intrusion tolerant system' was applied to not only prevent cyber-attacks but also limit the extent of damage in this study. For applying the concept of intrusion tolerant system to NPP, the event tree was constructed with some assumptions. Cyber security improvement caused by cyber security enhancement can be estimated as Eq.3. By comparing current system to the enhanced system, it is

  19. Optimizing signal intensity correction during evaluation of hepatic parenchymal enhancement on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI: Comparison of three methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, Minori; Hyodo, Tomoko; Murakami, Takamichi; Okada, Masahiro; Uto, Tatsuro; Hori, Masatoshi; Miyati, Tosiaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Signal intensity is often used to evaluate hepatic enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA in the hepatobiliary phase. •Comparison of uncorrected signal intensity with T 1 value revealed signal intensity instability. •Measurement of uncorrected liver SI or SNR often yields erroneous results on late-phase gadoxetate MRI due to shimming and other optimization techniques. •Signal intensity corrected by scale and rescale slope from DICOM data gave comparable results. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare signal intensity (SI) correction using scale and rescale slopes with SI correction using SIs of spleen and muscle for quantifying multiphase hepatic contrast enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA by assessing their correlation with T 1 values generated from Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequence data (ER-T 1 ). Materials and methods: Thirty patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this prospective clinical study. For each patient, breath-hold T 1 -weighted fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequences (e-THRIVE) were acquired before and 2 (first phase), 10 (second phase), and 20 min (third phase) after intravenous Gd-EOB-DTPA. Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequences were acquired before and 1.5 (first phase), 8 (second phase), and 18 min (third phase) postcontrast. The liver parenchyma enhancement ratios (ER) of each phase were calculated using the SI from e-THRIVE sequences (ER-SI) and the T 1 values generated from LL-TFE sequence data (ER-T 1 ) respectively. ER-SIs were calculated in three ways: (1) comparing with splenic SI (ER-SI-s), (2) comparing with muscle SI (ER-SI-m), (3) using scale and rescale slopes obtained from DICOM headers (ER-SI-c), to eliminate the effects of receiver gain and scaling. For each of the first, second and third phases, correlation and agreement were assessed between each ER-SI and ER-T 1 . Results: In the first phase, all ER-SIs correlated weakly with ER-T 1 . In the second

  20. Special Characteristics of the Rust Workshop and Their Influence on My Facilitation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Maria Villas-Boas

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates the Carl Rogers Peace Project workshop held in Austria in 1985. Defines ways in which the workshop was unique. Elaborates on staff participation and the author's personal reactions. Concludes by discussing the distinctive role facilitators had in this workshop. (BR)

  1. Helping International Students Succeed Academically through Research Process and Plagiarism Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Workshops on the research process and plagiarism were designed to meet the needs of international students at the University at Albany. The research process workshop covered formulating research questions, as well as locating and evaluating sources. The plagiarism workshop focused on acknowledging sources, quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing…

  2. 75 FR 69078 - Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9224-7] Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Workshop... (NAAQS) for Lead (Pb), EPA is announcing that a workshop to evaluate initial draft materials for the Pb...

  3. Investigating Climate Science Misconceptions Using a Teacher Professional Development Workshop Registration Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynds, S. E.; Gold, A. U.; McNeal, K.; Libarkin, J. C.; Buhr Sullivan, S. M.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Ellins, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs Climate project, an NSF-Discovery Research K12 program, has developed a suite of three online classroom-ready modules: Climate and the Cryosphere; Climate and the Carbon Cycle; and Climate and the Biosphere. The EarthLabs Climate project included week-long professional development workshops during June of 2012 and 2013 in Texas and Mississippi. Evaluation of the 2012 and 2013 workshops included participant self-reported learning levels in many areas of climate science. Teachers' answers indicated they had increased their understanding of the topics addressed in the workshops. However, the project team was interested in refining the evaluation process to determine exactly those areas of climate science in which participants increased content knowledge and ameliorated misconceptions. Therefore, to enhance the investigation into what teachers got out of the workshop, a pre-test/post-test design was implemented for 2013. In particular, the evaluation team was interested in discovering the degree to which participants held misconceptions and whether those beliefs were modified by attendance at the workshops. For the 2013 workshops, a registration survey was implemented that included the Climate Concept Inventory (a climate content knowledge quiz developed by the education research team for the project). The multiple-choice questions are also part of the pre/post student quiz used in classrooms in which the EarthLabs Climate curriculum was implemented. Many of the questions in this instrument assess common misconceptions by using them as distractors in the multiple choice options. The registration survey also asked respondents to indicate their confidence in their answer to each question, because, in addition to knowledge limitations, lack of confidence also can be a barrier to effective teaching. Data from the registration survey informed workshop managers of the topic content knowledge of participants, allowing fine-tuning of the professional development

  4. Assessment of Interior General and Local Lighting in Carpet Weaving Workshops in Bijar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostam Golmohamadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : The comfort lighting in the workplace provides employees visual health which can improve safety, visual comfort and enhance performance and product quality. The present study was conducted to evaluate general and local lighting in carpet weaving workshops in Bijar city . Methods : In this descriptive analytical study, 101 carpet weaving workshops were randomly selected. The illuminance were measured based on the models and formulas presented in Illuminating Engineering Society (IES using luxmeter model Hagner EC1 in height 76 cm from the ground surface. The local illuminances were measured in horizontal and vertical weaving level. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 16. Results : Research findings revealed the average of total and artificial illuminance level were 484.5±458.9 and 80.0±49.9 Lx respectively. Mean total, natural and artificial illuminance 39.6, 57.4 and 100 percent were lower the recommended 300 Lx levels. The average of minimum of local illuminance was less than 500 Lx in all workshops. Conclusion : About 60% of workrooms had the acceptable general illuminance levels in middle day. However, due to the insufficient lighting sources in workshops, the artificial illuminance levels are unsuitable. Therefore, it is necessary to improve general illuminance levels by reform and repair artificial lighting systems or redesign them in carpet weaving workrooms.

  5. The Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk: State of Workshop Education

    OpenAIRE

    Pisani, Anthony R.; Cross, Wendi F.; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic search of popular and scholarly databases identified workshops that addressed general clinical competence in the assessment or management of suicide risk, targeted mental health professionals, and had at least one peerreviewed publication. We surveyed workshop developers and examined empirical articles associated with each workshop. The state of workshop education is characterized by presenting the learning objectives, educational formats, instructor factors, and evaluation studi...

  6. Promoting evidence informed policy making for maternal and child health in Nigeria: lessons from a knowledge translation workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigozie Jesse Uneke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge translation (KT is a process that ensures that research evidence gets translated into policy and practice. In Nigeria, reports indicate that research evidence rarely gets into policy making process. A major factor responsible for this is lack of KT capacity enhancement mechanisms. The objective of this study was to improve KT competence of an implementation research team (IRT, policymakers and stakeholders in maternal and child health to enhance evidence-informed policy making. Methods: This study employed a "before and after" design, modified as an intervention study. The study was conducted in Bauchi, north-eastern Nigeria. A three-day KT training workshop was organized and 15 modules were covered including integrated and end-of-grant KT; KT models,measures, tools and strategies; priority setting; managing political interference; advocacy and consensus building/negotiations; inter-sectoral collaboration; policy analysis, contextualization and legislation. A 4-point Likert scale pre-/post-workshop questionnaires were administered to evaluate the impact of the training, it was designed in terms of extent of adequacy; with "grossly inadequate" representing 1 point, and "very adequate" representing 4 points.Results: A total of 45 participants attended the workshop. There was a noteworthy improvement in the participants’ understanding of KT processes and strategies. The range of the praiseworthiness of participants knowledge of modules taught was from 2.04-2.94, the range for the post workshop mean was from 3.10–3.70 on the 4-point Likert scale. The range of percentage increase in mean for participants’ knowledge at the end of the workshop was from 13.3%–55.2%.Conclusion: The outcome of this study suggests that using a KT capacity building programme e.g., workshop, health researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders can acquire capacity and skill that will facilitate evidence-to-policy link.

  7. The QED Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  8. t4 Workshop Report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  9. Let's get technical: Enhancing program evaluation through the use and integration of internet and mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Frank T; Miller, Elizabeth A; Runion, Megan C; Chesnut, Ryan P; Irvin, Jamie B; Richardson, Cameron B; Perkins, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    Program evaluation has become increasingly important, and information on program performance often drives funding decisions. Technology use and integration can help ease the burdens associated with program evaluation by reducing the resources needed (e.g., time, money, staff) and increasing evaluation efficiency. This paper reviews how program evaluators, across disciplines, can apply internet and mobile technologies to key aspects of program evaluation, which consist of participant registration, participant tracking and retention, process evaluation (e.g., fidelity, assignment completion), and outcome evaluation (e.g., behavior change, knowledge gain). In addition, the paper focuses on the ease of use, relative cost, and fit with populations. An examination on how these tools can be integrated to enhance data collection and program evaluation is discussed. Important limitations of and considerations for technology integration, including the level of technical skill, cost needed to integrate various technologies, data management strategies, and ethical considerations, are highlighted. Lastly, a case study of technology use in an evaluation conducted by the Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness at Penn State is presented and illustrates how technology integration can enhance program evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [A workshop to improve written communication skills of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitran, Marcela; Zúñiga, Denisse; Flotts, Paulina; Padilla, Oslando; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2009-05-01

    Despite being among the best academically prepared of the country, many medical students have difficulties to communicate in writing. In 2005, the School of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile introduced a writing workshop in the undergraduate curriculum, to enhance the students' writing skills. To describe the workshop and its impact on the writing skills of 3 cohorts of students. This 30-h workshop used a participative methodology with emphasis on deliberate practice and feedback. Students worked in small groups with a faculty member specially trained in writing. The qualities of the essays written before and after the workshop were compared. Essays were rated by a professional team that used an analytic rubric to measure formal aspects of text writing as well as more complex thinking processes. There was a significant improvement in the quality of the texts written after the workshop; the main changes occurred in argumentation, and in paragraph and text structure. This improvement was inversely proportional to the initial level of performance, and independent of gender. A writing workshop based on deliberate practice and personalized feedback is effective to enhance the writing proficiency of medical students. Due to its design, this workshop could be useful for students of other careers and universities.

  11. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  12. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  13. 36th Brazilian Workshop on Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brandão de Oliveira, José Roberto; Barbosa Shorto, Julian Marco; Higa, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Workshop on Nuclear Physics (RTFNB, acronym in Portuguese) is organized annually by the Brazilian Physics Society since 1978, in order to: promote Nuclear Physics research in the country; stimulate and reinforce collaborations among nuclear physicists from around the country; disseminate advances in nuclear physics research and its applications; disseminate, disclose and evaluate the scientific production in this field.

  14. WALLTURB International Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This book brings together selected contributions from the WALLTURB workshop on ”Understanding and modelling of wall turbulence” held in Lille, France, on April 21st to 23rd 2009. This workshop was organized by the WALLTURB consortium, in order to present to the relevant scientific community the main results of the project and to stimulate scientific discussions around the subject of wall turbulence. The workshop reviewed the recent progress in theoretical, experimental and numerical approaches to wall turbulence. The problems of zero pressure gradient, adverse pressure gradient and separating turbulent boundary layers were addressed in detail with the three approaches, using the most advanced tools. This book is a milestone in the research field, thanks to the high level of the invited speakers and the involvement of the contributors and a testimony of the achievement of the WALLTURB project.

  15. Vulcano Workshop 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Mannocchi, G.; Morselli, A.; Trinchero, G.

    2016-01-01

    We announce the XVI Vulcano Workshop, which will be held from May 22nd to May 28th, 2016 in the Vulcano Island (Sicily, Italy). As in the past editions, the workshop will aim to gather people from High Energy Astrophysics and Particle Physics to discuss the most recent highlights in these fields. The workshop will cover the following topics: Astrophysics/Cosmology, Astrophysics/Gravity, Dark Matter, Particle Physics, Cosmic Rays, Gamma/Neutrino Astronomy, Neutrinos and Future Prospects. The scientific program will include several 30-minute review talks, to introduce the current problems, and 20-minute talks, giving new experimental and theoretical results. The participation is by invitation and limited to 80 people.

  16. The 2008 ICOH Workshop on Skin Notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sartorelli, P; Ahlers, H W; Cherrie, J W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On 29 March 2008 the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Scientific Committee on Occupational and Environmental Dermatoses organized a Skin Notation Workshop hosted by the 11th International Percutaneous Penetration Perspectives Conference (La Grande Motte, France...... assignment criteria and the attempts to improve the S system made by various international and governmental agencies. A position paper was subsequently published. OBJECTIVES: The workshop in France was a continuation of this activity with the aim of evaluating how the different strategies can improve S....... METHODS AND DISCUSSION: The Workshop was divided into two sessions. The first was dedicated to lectures focused on different aspects of S. In the second session participants discussed key issues with the aim of exploring the actions needed to improve international S. systems....

  17. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Insolves LLC, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  18. Measurement Control Workshop Instructional Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-01-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  19. Radiofrequency ablation of liver cancer: early evaluation of therapeutic response with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Gil; Lim, Hyo K.; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Ju; Kim, Seung Kwon; Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2004-01-01

    The early assessment of the therapeutic response after percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation is important, in order to correctly decide whether further treatment is necessary. The residual unablated tumor is usually depicted on contrast-enhanced multiphase helical computed tomography (CT) as a focal enhancing structure during the arterial and portal venous phases. Contrast-enhanced color Doppler and power Doppler ultrasonography (US) have also been used to detect residual tumors. Contrast-enhanced gray-scale US, using a harmonic technology which has recently been introduced, allows for the detection of residual tumors after ablation, without any of the blooming or motion artifacts usually seen on contrast-enhanced color or power Doppler US. Based on our experience and reports in the literature, we consider that contrast-enhanced gray-scale harmonic US constitutes a reliable alternative to contrast-enhanced multiphase CT for the early evaluation of the therapeutic response to RF ablation for liver cancer. This technique was also useful in targeting any residual unablated tumors encountered during additional ablation

  20. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Midwifery education and technology enhanced learning: Evaluating online story telling in preregistration midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    A major issue regarding the implementation of blended learning for preregistration health programmes is the analysis of students' perceptions and attitudes towards their learning. It is the extent of the embedding of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) into the higher education curriculum that makes this analysis so vital. This paper reports on the quantitative results of a UK based study that was set up to respond to the apparent disconnect between technology enhanced education provision and reliable student evaluation of this mode of learning. Employing a mixed methods research design, the research described here was carried to develop a reliable and valid evaluation tool to measure acceptability of and satisfaction with a blended learning approach, specifically designed for a preregistration midwifery module offered at level 4. Feasibility testing of 46 completed blended learning evaluation questionnaires - Student Midwife Evaluation of Online Learning Effectiveness (SMEOLE) - using descriptive statistics, reliability and internal consistency tests. Standard deviations and mean scores all followed predicted pattern. Results from the reliability and internal consistency testing confirm the feasibility of SMEOLE as an effective tool for measuring student satisfaction with a blended learning approach to preregistration learning. The analysis presented in this paper suggests that we have been successful in our aim to produce an evaluation tool capable of assessing the quality of technology enhanced, University level learning in Midwifery. This work can provide future benchmarking against which midwifery, and other health, blended learning curriculum planning could be structured and evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. HEAT TRANSFER EVALUATION OF HFC-236EA WITH HIGH PERFORMANCE ENHANCED TUBES IN CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the heat transfer performance of pure hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea for high performance enhanced tubes which had not been previously used in Navy shipboard chillers. Shell-side heat transfer coefficient data are presented for condensa...

  3. Is staff well-being and communication enhanced by multidisciplinary work shift evaluations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, Judith K.; Bos, Albert P.; Tol, Dirk; Calff, Mart; Krijnen, Margot; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the implementation of multidisciplinary structured work shift evaluations at a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) to enhance team communication. Desogn and setting: Prospective, repeated measurements design, comparison of pre/post measurements and process measures in a Dutch

  4. Health Systems Research Training Enhances Workplace Research Skills: A Qualitative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jolene; Schaffer, Angela; Lewin, Simon; Zwarenstein, Merrick; van der Walt, Hester

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: In-service education is a widely used means of enhancing the skills of health service providers, for example, in undertaking research. However, the transfer of skills acquired during an education course to the workplace is seldom evaluated. The objectives of this study were to assess learner, teacher, and health service manager…

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of an Aviation Safety Thesaurus' Utility for Enhancing Automated Processing of Incident Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Francesca; Castle, Joseph; McIntosh, Dawn; Srivastava, Ashok

    2007-01-01

    This document presents a preliminary evaluation the utility of the FAA Safety Analytics Thesaurus (SAT) utility in enhancing automated document processing applications under development at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Current development efforts at ARC are described, including overviews of the statistical machine learning techniques that have been investigated. An analysis of opportunities for applying thesaurus knowledge to improving algorithm performance is then presented.

  6. An analytical framework for evaluating the value of enhanced customisation: an integrated operations-marketing perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Hartanto; Eyers, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a formal approach to evaluate the value of enhanced customisation. The suggested approach is based on a new perspective addressing the important alignment between the operations and marketing functions, under which we are able to obtain a more holistic understanding...

  7. 77 FR 32712 - Technical Report: Evaluation of the Enhancing Vehicle-to-Vehicle Crash Compatibility Agreement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ...-0070] Technical Report: Evaluation of the Enhancing Vehicle-to-Vehicle Crash Compatibility Agreement... comments on technical report. SUMMARY: This notice announces NHTSA's publication of a Technical Report... be received no later than October 1, 2012. ADDRESSES: Report: The technical report is available on...

  8. Ex-vivo evaluation of crab shell chitosan as absorption enhancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at evaluating crab shell chitosan as absorption enhancer in ciprofloxacin tablet formulation using the ex-vivo model. Six batches of ciprofloxacin tablets containing varying concentrations of crab shell-derived chitosan ranging from 0 to 5% w/w at 1% w/w intervals were produced. Batch CTS-0 ...

  9. Preliminary evaluation of data mining on non-masslike enhancement of breast lesions on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongna; Li Ruimin; Wang Peihua; Tang Feng; Mao Jian; Shen Xigang; Qian Min; Gu Yajia; Su Yi; Chen Ying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic values of the breast imaging reporting and data system-MRI (BI-RADS-MRI)description about non-masslike enhancement by data mining. Methods: Fifty- five patients with non-masslike enhancement lesions showed on breast contrast-enhanced MRI were evaluated using two data mining algorithms (Logistic regression and decision tree) and 10-fold cross-validation methods. Results: There were 28 malignant and 27 benign lesions. The most frequent findings of the malignant lesions were clustered ring enhancement and clumped enhancement [12 and 4 lesions, respectively; 84.2% (16/19) in decision trees, partial regression coefficients in Logistic model were 2.128 and 1.723, respectively], whereas homogenous, stippled, reticular internal and linear ductal enhancement were the most frequent findings in benign lesions [4,9,1 and 7 lesions, respectively; 72.4% (21/29) in decision tree, partial regression coefficients in Logistic model were 0.357 (homogenous), 1.861 (stippled) and 18.870(reticular), respectively]. 10-fold cross-validation indicated that decision tree (C5.0) achieved an accuracy of 69.3% with a sensitivity of 66.7% and a specificity of 71.7% in comparison to the Logistic regression model with an accuracy of 57.0%, a sensitivity of 43.3% and a specificity of 71.7%. Conclusions: The diagnosis efficacy of non-masslike enhancement interpretation according to BI-RADS-MRI is not high. It is very important to find more potential features of non-masslike enhancement to improve the diagnosis accuracy. (authors)

  10. Diagnostic Imaging Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Fisica Medica

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) and the Argentina Society of Medical Physics (SAFIM) was organized the Diagnostic Imaging Workshop 2012, in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. This workshop was an oriented training and scientific exchange between professionals and technicians who work in medical physics, especially in the areas of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, with special emphasis on the use of multimodal imaging for radiation treatment, planning as well of quality assurance associates.

  11. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keckler, C.R.; Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report

  12. DESY: QCD workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelman, Gunnar

    1994-01-01

    The traditional annual DESY Theory Workshop highlights a topical theory sector. The most recent was under the motto 'Quantum Chromo-Dynamics' - QCD, the field theory of quarks and gluons. The organizers had arranged a programme covering most aspects of current QCD research. This time the workshop was followed by a topical meeting on 'QCD at HERA' to look at the electron-proton scattering experiments now in operation at DESY's new HERA collider

  13. Evaluation of residual hepatocellular carcinoma after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: Comparison between contrast-enhanced helical CT and contrast-enhanced power doppler ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Won Jae

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced helical CT and contrast-enhanced power doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) in assessing the therapeutic effect of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). The follow-up contrast-enhanced helical CT and contrast-enhanced PDUS were performed for twenty-nine nodular HCCs from twelve patients previously treated with TACE. We defined the residual HCCs as intratumoral enhancing area on contrast-enhanced helical CT and color signal on contrast-enhanced PDUS. The interval between two examinations was less than 2 weeks (mean, 9 days). Two radiologists evaluated two examinations by consensus, and the results of these two examination were compared with the findings of other examinations including CT, angiography, and/or pathology to calculate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of two examinations. Of the 29 HCCs, 20 had residual HCCs whereas no residual HCCs in 9 HCCs on pathologic examination and/or follow-up radiologic study. The sensitivity, sensitivity and accuracy of contrast-enhanced helical CT were 65 (13/20), 89 (8/9), and 72% (21/29) while those of contrast-enhanced PDUS were 100 (20/20), 89 (8/9) and 97% (28/29), respectively. A microbubble contrast-enhanced PDUS was more effective in the detection of residual tumor in HCCs following TACE than contrast-enhanced helical CT.

  14. Semiconductor measurement technology: reliability technology for cardiac pacemakers 2: a workshop report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafft, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries are presented of 12 invited talks on the following topics: the procurement and assurance of high reliability electronic parts, leak rate and moisture measurements, pacemaker batteries, and pacemaker leads. The workshop, second in a series, was held in response to strong interest expressed by the pacemaker community to address technical questions relevant to the enhancement and assurance of cardiac pacemaker reliability. Discussed at the workshop were a process validation wafer concept for assuring process uniformity in device chips; screen tests for assuring reliable electronic parts; reliability prediction; reliability comparison of semiconductor technologies; mechanisms of short-circuiting dendritic growths; details of helium and radioisotope leak test methods; a study to correlate package leak rates, as measured with test gasses, and actual moisture infusion; battery life prediction; microcalorimetric measurements to nondestructively evaluate batteries for pacemakers; and an engineer's and a physician's view of the present status of pacemaker leads. References are included with most of the reports

  15. Evaluation of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography in pediatric body vascular lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori; Katayama, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Narabayashi, Isamu

    1998-01-01

    Evaluation of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography in the pediatric body vascular lesions. This study examined the usefulness of three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (3D-enhanced MRA) for pediatric body vascular lesions. Fifteen 3D-enhanced MRAs were performed on fourteen pediatric patients aged from one month to fifteen years, using a 3D fast SPGR sequence. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images were obtained from the imaging data in all cases, and eleven MIP images were obtained after subtraction of precontrast-enhanced imaging data from postcontrast-enhanced imaging data. In six cases, MIP and MPR images were correlated with cine or digital subtraction angiographies, and the eleven subtracted MIP images were compared with those before subtraction. Clinical usefulness was demonstrated in fourteen (93%) of the fifteen cases, and in seven (64%) of the eleven cases in which subtraction was performed, image quality was improved. In comparison with cine or digital subtraction angiographies, however, only one (17%) MRA was superior. It was considered that 3D-enhanced MRA was useful for pediatric body vascular lesions because of advantages such as lower invasiveness compared with that of conventional angiography, absence of radiation exposure, safety of contrast media, easy availability of MPR images, and short scanning time. In conclusion, if a pediatric body vascular lesion is suspected, 3D-enhanced MRA should be performed before conventional angiography. It also seems that 3D-enhanced MRA may be useful for follow-up. (author)

  16. Optimizing signal intensity correction during evaluation of hepatic parenchymal enhancement on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI: Comparison of three methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Minori, E-mail: onoda@radt.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kinki University Hospital, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Hyodo, Tomoko, E-mail: neneth@m.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Murakami, Takamichi, E-mail: murakami@med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro, E-mail: okada777@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Uto, Tatsuro, E-mail: chuho@med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kinki University Hospital, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Hori, Masatoshi, E-mail: mhori@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki, E-mail: ramiyati@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Signal intensity is often used to evaluate hepatic enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA in the hepatobiliary phase. •Comparison of uncorrected signal intensity with T{sub 1} value revealed signal intensity instability. •Measurement of uncorrected liver SI or SNR often yields erroneous results on late-phase gadoxetate MRI due to shimming and other optimization techniques. •Signal intensity corrected by scale and rescale slope from DICOM data gave comparable results. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare signal intensity (SI) correction using scale and rescale slopes with SI correction using SIs of spleen and muscle for quantifying multiphase hepatic contrast enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA by assessing their correlation with T{sub 1} values generated from Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequence data (ER-T{sub 1}). Materials and methods: Thirty patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this prospective clinical study. For each patient, breath-hold T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequences (e-THRIVE) were acquired before and 2 (first phase), 10 (second phase), and 20 min (third phase) after intravenous Gd-EOB-DTPA. Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequences were acquired before and 1.5 (first phase), 8 (second phase), and 18 min (third phase) postcontrast. The liver parenchyma enhancement ratios (ER) of each phase were calculated using the SI from e-THRIVE sequences (ER-SI) and the T{sub 1} values generated from LL-TFE sequence data (ER-T{sub 1}) respectively. ER-SIs were calculated in three ways: (1) comparing with splenic SI (ER-SI-s), (2) comparing with muscle SI (ER-SI-m), (3) using scale and rescale slopes obtained from DICOM headers (ER-SI-c), to eliminate the effects of receiver gain and scaling. For each of the first, second and third phases, correlation and agreement were assessed between each ER-SI and ER-T{sub 1}. Results: In the first phase, all ER-SIs correlated

  17. Current concepts in lung dosimetry. Proceedings of a special workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1983-02-01

    The proceedings of the first special workshop on Lung Dosimetry include the presentation of many new concepts and the reassessment of traditional ideas in lung dosimetry and risk evaluation. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 21 papers in the proceedings

  18. Lung cancer in hilar region: the resectability evaluation with dual phase enhanced EBCT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Guosheng; Zhou Xuhui; Li Xiangmin; Fan Miao; Meng Quanfei; Peng Qian; Tan Zhiyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of duralphase enhanced electronic beam computed tomography (EBCT) scans in resectability evaluation of lung cancer located in hilar region. Methods: Dual phase enhanced EBCT scans were available for 40 cases that were initially diagnosed as 'carcinoma of lung' in hilar region. The relations between masses and trachea, bronchi, hilar and mediastinal great vessels were analyzed and compared with operation. Results: 38 cases in our series confirmed by operation and pathological examination were divided two groups: respectable (28 cases) and non-resectable (10 cases) groups. 25 cases in the former group were consistent with operation, accounting for 89.3%, and 8 cases, in the latter group, accounting for 80%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of dural-phase enhanced EBCT scan evaluating the relations between masses and hilar and mediastinal structure were as follows: 92.6%, 72.7% and 86.8%. Conclusion: Dural-phase enhanced EBCT scans can provide precise and feasible pre-operative evaluation of lung cancer in hilar region. (authors)

  19. Summary of cosmology workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in quality, quantity, and the scope of cosmological observations. While the ob- ... In this article, I summarize both the oral and poster presentations made at the workshop. ... the angular spectrum of CMB anisotropy with recent measurements of the power spectrum of ..... A thermodynamical treatment within the framework of.

  20. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  1. Dynamic defense workshop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  2. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  3. WORKSHOP: Scintillating fibre detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Scintillating fibre detector development and technology for the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider, SSC, was the subject of a recent workshop at Fermilab, with participation from the high energy physics community and from industry. Sessions covered the current status of fibre technology and fibre detectors, new detector applications, fluorescent materials and scintillation compositions, radiation damage effects, amplification and imaging structures, and scintillation fibre fabrication techniques

  4. WORKSHOP: Nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheepard, Jim; Van Dyck, Olin

    1985-06-15

    A workshop 'Dirac Approaches t o Nuclear Physics' was held at Los Alamos from 31 January to 2 February, the first meeting ever on relativistic models of nuclear phenomena. The objective was to cover historical background as well as the most recent developments in the field, and communication between theorists and experimentalists was given a high priority.

  5. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  6. General conclusions on workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustand, H.

    2006-01-01

    The author proposes a general conclusion on the second workshop on the indemnification of damage in the event of a nuclear accident, organized in Bratislava, the 18-20 May 2005. He pointed out the most important discussions and the results revealed during these two days. (A.L.B.)

  7. WORKSHOP: Scintillating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-12-15

    Scintillating crystals are one of the big spinoff success stories of particle physics, and from 22-26 September an international workshop in Chamonix in the French Alps looked at the increasing role of these materials in pure and applied science and in industry.

  8. ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Capeans, M.

    Starting on 17th May, the ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop was organised by Ken MacFarlane and his team at Hampton University, Virginia, USA. During a welcome break in the very dense workshop programme, the group enjoyed a half-day long boat trip along the waterways, offering a first-hand look at the history and heritage of this part of America. The attendance during the six-day workshop was about 50 people representing most of the collaborating institutes, although many Russian colleagues had stayed in their institutes to pursue the start-up of end-cap wheel production at PNPI and DUBNA. The meeting clearly showed that, during the year 2002, the TRT community is focusing on final design issues and module/wheel construction, while moving at the same time towards acceptance testing and integration, including the front-end electronics. The two main topics treated at the workshop were the preparation for beginning full production of the FE electronics, and the wire-joint problem that the US barrel colleagues have been fa...

  9. WORKSHOP: Scintillating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Scintillating crystals are one of the big spinoff success stories of particle physics, and from 22-26 September an international workshop in Chamonix in the French Alps looked at the increasing role of these materials in pure and applied science and in industry

  10. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  11. Conferences, workshops, trainings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goals Recycling Green Purchasing Pollution Prevention Reusing Water Resources Environmental Management . Mar 1 Wed 8:00 AM Cosmic Rays, Pulsar Nebulae and Dark Matter La Fonda Hotel, Santa Fe, NM The purpose Quantum Matter La Fonda Hotel - 100 East San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, NM The purpose of this workshop

  12. YOUR house - workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Exhibition shows the result of a three-week workshop for 3.year students from the Architecture school in which I wanted to test the idea that good architecture is a balanced work between the non-reflective life experience of space and materiality (all the things you know and feel subconsciously a...

  13. OpenShift Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rodriguez Peon, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Workshop to introduce developers to the OpenShift platform available at CERN. Several use cases will be shown, including deploying an existing application into OpenShift. We expect attendees to realize about OpenShift features and general architecture of the service.

  14. DNA Microarray Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauro, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    .... Funding for the workshop was provided by the US Department of Defense (USAMRAA). The aim of the meeting was to discuss how to best use the data derived from the Malaria Genome Sequencing Project for the functional analysis of the genome...

  15. FINPIE/97. Workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This publication contains the proceedings of 1997 Finnish Workshop on Power and Industrial Electronics, held in Espoo, Finland, on 26 August, 1997. The programme consisted of technical sessions on Advanced AC Motor Control, Electric Machines and Drives, Advanced Control and Measurement, Power Electronics Systems, Modelling and Simulation, and Power Converters

  16. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  17. 8. stellarator workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The technical reports in this collection of papers were presented at the 8th International Workshop on Stellarators, and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting. They include presentations on transport, magnetic configurations, fluctuations, equilibrium, stability, edge plasma and wall aspects, heating, diagnostics, new concepts and reactor studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Evaluation of bone marrow by opposed phase T1-weighted images and enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Horiuchi, Junichi; Nomura, Takeo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1994-01-01

    We investigated bone marrow in a control group, cases of aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients by examining T1-weighted (T1W1), short T1 inversion recovery (STIR), opposed phase T1W1 (op-T1W1) and Gd-DTPA enhanced op-T1W1 images obtained by 0.5 T MRI. Bone marrow was classified into four types based on MR findings. Normal marrow showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and STIR images without enhancement (I). Fatty marrow, which showed high intensity on T1W1 and op-T1W1 images was observed in aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients (II). Hematopoietic marrow (III) showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and enhanced, while active hematopoietic marrow (IV) revealed high intensity on both STIR and op-T1W1 images and was enhanced following Gd-DTPA infusion. Aplastic anemia of moderate grade included types II, III and IV. Enhanced MR was needed to differentiate between types I and III since both types showed low intensity on op-T1W1 images. Furthermore, type IV was considered as hyperplastic compared with type III. Enhanced MR and op-T1W1 images were useful in evaluating hematopoiesis of bone marrow. (author)

  19. Evaluation of bone marrow by opposed phase T1-weighted images and enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Horiuchi, Junichi; Nomura, Takeo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    We investigated bone marrow in a control group, cases of aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients by examining T1-weighted (T1W1), short T1 inversion recovery (STIR), opposed phase T1W1 (op-T1W1) and Gd-DTPA enhanced op-T1W1 images obtained by 0.5 T MRI. Bone marrow was classified into four types based on MR findings. Normal marrow showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and STIR images without enhancement (I). Fatty marrow, which showed high intensity on T1W1 and op-T1W1 images was observed in aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients (II). Hematopoietic marrow (III) showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and enhanced, while active hematopoietic marrow (IV) revealed high intensity on both STIR and op-T1W1 images and was enhanced following Gd-DTPA infusion. Aplastic anemia of moderate grade included types II, III and IV. Enhanced MR was needed to differentiate between types I and III since both types showed low intensity on op-T1W1 images. Furthermore, type IV was considered as hyperplastic compared with type III. Enhanced MR and op-T1W1 images were useful in evaluating hematopoiesis of bone marrow. (author).

  20. Evaluation of Fused Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Display Concepts for Low-Visibility Approach and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Wilz, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA is developing revolutionary crew-vehicle interface technologies that strive to proactively overcome aircraft safety barriers that would otherwise constrain the full realization of the next generation air transportation system. A piloted simulation experiment was conducted to evaluate the complementary use of Synthetic and Enhanced Vision technologies. Specific focus was placed on new techniques for integration and/or fusion of Enhanced and Synthetic Vision and its impact within a two-crew flight deck during low-visibility approach and landing operations. Overall, the experimental data showed that significant improvements in situation awareness, without concomitant increases in workload and display clutter, could be provided by the integration and/or fusion of synthetic and enhanced vision technologies for the pilot-flying and the pilot-not-flying. Improvements in lateral path control performance were realized when the Head-Up Display concepts included a tunnel, independent of the imagery (enhanced vision or fusion of enhanced and synthetic vision) presented with it. During non-normal operations, the ability of the crew to handle substantial navigational errors and runway incursions were neither improved nor adversely impacted by the display concepts. The addition of Enhanced Vision may not, of itself, provide an improvement in runway incursion detection without being specifically tailored for this application.

  1. Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshops: 20 Years of Workshops and 2000 Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert

    Most college and university new faculty members start their teaching careers with almost no formal training in pedagogy. To address this issue, the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society have been offering since 1996 workshops for physics and astronomy new faculty members (and in recent years for experienced faculty members as well). The workshops introduce faculty members to a variety of interactive engagement teaching (IET) methods and the evidence for their effectiveness, embedded in a framework of general professional development. Currently the workshops engage about 50% of the new tenure-track hires in physics and astronomy. The workshops are quite successful in making the participants aware of IET methods and motivating them to implement them in their classes. However, about 1/3 of the participants stop using IET methods within a year or two. The faculty members cite (a) lack of time and energy to change, (b) content coverage concerns, and (c) difficulty getting students engaged as reasons for their discontinuance. To help overcome these barriers, we have introduced faculty online learning communities (FOLCs). The FOLCs provide peer support and advice through webinars and coaching from more experienced faculty members. Recommendations based on the workshops and the experiences of the participants can enhance the teaching effectiveness of future physics and astronomy faculty members. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant 1431638.

  2. Quantitative evaluation in enhancement of pancreas and adjacent vessels during spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Seuk; Shin, Kue Hee; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Kyoo Byung

    1997-01-01

    To determine by quantitative evaluation of pancreatic and adjacent vascular enhancement during spiral CT, the ideal scan delay for examination of the pancreas. Dual(n=3D90) and triple(n=3D90) phase spiral CT scans of patients whose pancreas showed no pathologic condition were retrospectively evaluated. Dual-phase scans were performed at 43 seconds(early), and 5-6 minutes(delayed) after the injection of 120ml of contrast material at an injection rate of 3ml/sec;triple-phase scans were performed at 25 seconds(arterial),60-65 seconds (portal) and 5-6 minutes (delayed) after the injection of 120-140ml of contrast material at an injection rate of 2-4ml/sec, and ten patients also underwent precontrast scanning. CT attenuation values(HU) were measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas, aorta, and main portal vein during each phase of all scans. Triple-phase protocol was used to measure the effect of different total volumes and injection rates on enhancement of the pancreas and adjacent vessels. There was no significant difference in the degree of enhancement of the pancreas head, body and tail during each phase(p>0.05). The pancreas was maximally enhanced on 43 second delayed scan(132±20HU)(p 0.05). The main portal vein showed maximum enhancement on 43-second delayed scan(207±44HU)(p<0.05). Different total volume of contrast material did not change the enhancement of the pancreas and adjacent vessels. At an injection rate of 2ml/sec, peak enhancement of the pancreas, aorta and portal vein was obtained on 60-65 second delayed scan, and at 4ml/sec, peak enhancement was obtained on 25 second delayed scan(p<0.05). Observing the usual protocols for abdominal spiral CT scanning, the pancreas was most effectively evaluated using a 43-second delayed scan. An increased injection rate resulted in earlier enhancement of the pancreas, aorta and portal vein

  3. Proceedings of a workshop on the development and evaluation of habitat suitability criteria: A compilation of papers and discussions presented at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, December 8-12, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovee, Ken; Zuboy, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The development of reliable habitat suitability criteria is critical to the successful implementation of the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM), or any other habitat based evaluation technology. It is also a fascinating topic of research, for several reasons. First, the “science” of habitat quantification is relatively young. Descriptions of habitat use and partitioning can be traced back to Darwin, if not further. Attempts to actually quantify habitat use can be found predominantly during the last two decades, with most of the activity occurring in about the last five years. Second, this work is challenging because we are usually working with fish or some other organism that lives out of sight in an environment that is foreign to humans. Most of the data collection techniques that have been developed for standard fisheries work are unsuited, without modification, for criteria development. These factors make anyone involved in this type of research a pioneer, of sorts. Pioneers often make new and wonderful discoveries, but they also sometimes get lost. In our opinion, however, there is an even more rewarding aspect to criteria development research. It seems that the field of biology has tended to become increasingly clinical over the years. Criteria development demands the unobtrusive observation of organisms in their natural environment, a fact that allows the biological to be a naturalist and still get paid for it. The relative youth and importance of habitat quantification have resulted in rapid advancements in the state of the art. The expansion of methods is vividly demonstrated simply by comparing the two Instream Flow Information Papers written on the subject in 1978 and in 1986. One of the missions of the Aquatic Systems Branch (formerly the Instream Flow Group) is to serve as a clearinghouse for new techniques and methods. In keeping with this role, a workshop was conducted during December 1986 to discuss current and newly evolving methods

  4. Effectiveness of a Clinical Skills Workshop for drug-dosage calculation in a nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugnetti, Anna Maria; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Rosa, Francesca; Sasso, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical and calculation skills are widely acknowledged as being key nursing competences if patients are to receive care that is both effective and safe. Indeed, weaknesses in mathematical competence may lead to the administration of miscalculated drug doses, which in turn may harm or endanger patients' lives. However, little attention has been given to identifying appropriate teaching and learning strategies that will effectively facilitate the development of these skills in nurses. One such approach may be simulation. To evaluate the effectiveness of a Clinical Skills Workshop on drug administration that focused on improving the drug-dosage calculation skills of second-year nursing students, with a view to promoting safety in drugs administration. A descriptive pre-post test design. Educational. Simulation center. The sample population included 77 nursing students from a Northern Italian University who attended a 30-hour Clinical Skills Workshop over a period of two weeks. The workshop covered integrated teaching strategies and innovative drug-calculation methodologies which have been described to improve psychomotor skills and build cognitive abilities through a greater understanding of mathematics linked to clinical practice. Study results showed a significant improvement between the pre- and the post-test phases, after the intervention. Pre-test scores ranged between 0 and 25 out of a maximum of 30 points, with a mean score of 15.96 (SD 4.85), and a median score of 17. Post-test scores ranged between 15 and 30 out of 30, with a mean score of 25.2 (SD 3.63) and a median score of 26 (pstudy shows that Clinical Skills Workshops may be tailored to include teaching techniques that encourage the development of drug-dosage calculation skills, and that training strategies implemented during a Clinical skills Workshop can enhance students' comprehension of mathematical calculations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using a systems orientation and foundational theory to enhance theory-driven human service program evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Deborah L

    2010-05-01

    This paper offers a framework for using a systems orientation and "foundational theory" to enhance theory-driven evaluations and logic models. The framework guides the process of identifying and explaining operative relationships and perspectives within human service program systems. Self-Determination Theory exemplifies how a foundational theory can be used to support the framework in a wide range of program evaluations. Two examples illustrate how applications of the framework have improved the evaluators' abilities to observe and explain program effect. In both exemplars improvements involved addressing and organizing into a single logic model heretofore seemingly disparate evaluation issues regarding valuing (by whose values); the role of organizational and program context; and evaluation anxiety and utilization. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lighting Assessment in Knitting Workshop in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Barkhordari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sense of sight is one of the most vital human senses and help the environment gets most of its information. Whatever one's job is more subtle, more work will be given brightness. Good lighting, increase work efficiency and general physiological effects on people's moods. The relationship between low and high frequency illumination accidents there Methods: This study was conducted in 10 workshops in Yazd home knitting. Due to maximize natural lighting measurements in June and November this year took place in cloudy days. Thus, in both seasons overall lighting, natural and artificial, were evaluated. That, in order to measure all the natural light, artificial light sources (lamps and the measurements were off by clarifying re-lamp, the overall lighting (natural and artificial were measured. In order to measure the general lighting provided by the Illuminating Engineering society and stop the pattern surfaces were used. The workshops with less than standard lighting conditions were identified and interventions to improve the brightness of the workshops were measured again. Results: Average, minimum and maximum overall brightness of spring workshops 4 and 6 respectively, with values of 67/278 and 53/452 is a luxury. Workshops values 5 and 2 47/184 and 43/218 minimum and maximum luxury in order to be daylight in spring. Conclusions: The majority of the studied weaving Workshops lighting was good, with measures such as proper installation and periodic cleaning and dust lamps, replacement lamps burned by use of fluorescent ambient lighting conditions can be improved.

  7. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    , and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learning through video conferencing. Through analysis and discussion of these studies’ findings, we argue......This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice...... that workshops provide a platform that can aid researchers in identifying and exploring relevant factors in a given domain by providing means for understanding complex work and knowledge processes that are supported by technology (for example, e-learning). The approach supports identifying factors...

  8. Contrast-enhanced multislice pneumo-CT-cystography in the evaluation of urinary bladder neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scardapane, Arnaldo [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy)], E-mail: scardapane@aruba.it; Pagliarulo, Vincenzo [Institute of Urology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy); Ianora, Amato A. Stabile [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy); Pagliarulo, Arcangelo [Institute of Urology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy); Angelelli, Giuseppe [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced multislice CT (MSCT) in the study of urothelial tumors after distension of the bladder with air. Materials and methods: We evaluated 43 consecutive patients with endoscopically proven bladder lesions. After air distension of the bladder, unenhanced pelvic and enhanced abdomino-pelvic scans were obtained with the following protocol: thickness 2.5 mm x 4 mm, increment 1 mm, scan delay 40'' and 7-10 min. For each patient we considered the number, size, aspect (papillary or sessile) and contrast enhancement of lesions. Ureteral involvement and the presence of synchronous lesions in the excretory scan were also evaluated. MPR and virtual endoscopy images were reviewed in all cases. Results: Bladder lesions were visualized in 39/43 cases. Compared to conventional cystoscopy, MSCT recognized single lesions in 31/33 patients, two lesions in 4/6, three in 2/2 and more than five foci in 2/2 patients. A papillary aspect was described in 44 cases while 11 lesions were sessile. Conventional Cystoscopy recognized six more lesions as compared with MSCT (four flat and two small papillary lesions). The detection rate for protruding lesions was 100% (52/52) for lesions > 5 mm and 60% (3/5%) for lesions < 5 mm. In four patients hydronephrosis was present, while in one case a synchronous lesion was evident in the renal pelvis. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MSCT with air distension of the urinary bladder is a safe and complete investigation to evaluate the local stage of bladder cancer and to evaluate the ureteral extension of the tumor, as well as the presence of synchronous lesions.

  9. Second International Workshop on Teaching Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vatrapu, Ravi; Reimann, Peter; Halb, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Teaching Analytics is conceived as a subfield of learning analytics that focuses on the design, development, evaluation, and education of visual analytics methods and tools for teachers in primary, secondary, and tertiary educational settings. The Second International Workshop on Teaching Analytics...... (IWTA) 2013 seeks to bring together researchers and practitioners in the fields of education, learning sciences, learning analytics, and visual analytics to investigate the design, development, use, evaluation, and impact of visual analytical methods and tools for teachers’ dynamic diagnostic decision...

  10. Evaluation criteria for enhanced solar–coal hybrid power plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yawen; Hong, Hui; Jin, Hongguang

    2014-01-01

    Attention has been directed toward hybridizing solar energy with fossil power plants since the 1990s to improve reliability and efficiency. Appropriate evaluation criteria were important in the design and optimization of solar–fossil hybrid systems. Two new criteria to evaluate the improved thermodynamic performances in a solar hybrid power plant were developed in this study. Correlations determined the main factors influencing the improved thermodynamic performances. The proposed criteria can be used to effectively integrate solar–coal hybridization systems. Typical 100 MW–1000 MW coal-fired power plants hybridized with solar heat at approximately 300 °C, which was used to preheat the feed water before entering the boiler, were evaluated using the criteria. The integration principle of solar–coal hybrid systems was also determined. The proposed evaluation criteria may be simple and reasonable for solar–coal hybrid systems with multi-energy input, thus directing system performance enhancement. - Highlights: • New criteria to evaluate the solar hybrid power plant were developed. • Typical solar–coal hybrid power plants were evaluated using the criteria. • The integration principle of solar–coal hybrid systems was determined. • The benefits of the solar–coal hybrid system are enhanced at lower solar radiation

  11. Enhanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin I. Bayala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land Surface Temperature (LST is a key parameter in the energy balance model. However, the spatial resolution of the retrieved LST from sensors with high temporal resolution is not accurate enough to be used in local-scale studies. To explore the LST–Normalised Difference Vegetation Index relationship potential and obtain thermal images with high spatial resolution, six enhanced image sharpening techniques were assessed: the disaggregation procedure for radiometric surface temperatures (TsHARP, the Dry Edge Quadratic Function, the Difference of Edges (Ts∗DL and three models supported by the relationship of surface temperature and water stress of vegetation (Normalised Difference Water Index, Normalised Difference Infrared Index and Soil wetness index. Energy Balance Station data and in situ measurements were used to validate the enhanced LST images over a mixed agricultural landscape in the sub-humid Pampean Region of Argentina (PRA, during 2006–2010. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (EOS-MODIS thermal datasets were assessed for different spatial resolutions (e.g., 960, 720 and 240 m and the performances were compared with global and local TsHARP procedures. Results suggest that the Ts∗DL technique is the most adequate for simulating LST to high spatial resolution over the heterogeneous landscape of a sub-humid region, showing an average root mean square error of less than 1 K.

  12. Report of the European Society of Cardiology Cardiovascular Round Table regulatory workshop update of the evaluation of new agents for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bueno, Héctor; de Graeff, Pieter; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    syndrome (ACS) to achieve consistency with current knowledge in the field. This manuscript summarizes the key output from a collaborative workshop, organized by the Cardiovascular Round Table and the European Affairs Committee of the European Society of Cardiology, involving clinicians, academic...... researchers, trialists, European and US regulators, and pharmaceutical industry researchers. Specific questions in four key areas were selected as priorities for changes in regulatory guidance: patient selection, endpoints, methodologic issues and issues related to the research for novel agents. Patients......Regulatory authorities interpret the results of randomized controlled trials according to published principles. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is planning a revision of the 2000 and 2003 guidance documents on clinical investigation of new medicinal products for the treatment of acute coronary...

  13. A holistic model for evaluating the impact of individual technology-enhanced learning resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Joynes, Viktoria C T

    2016-12-01

    The use of technology within education has now crossed the Rubicon; student expectations, the increasing availability of both hardware and software and the push to fully blended learning environments mean that educational institutions cannot afford to turn their backs on technology-enhanced learning (TEL). The ability to meaningfully evaluate the impact of TEL resources nevertheless remains problematic. This paper aims to establish a robust means of evaluating individual resources and meaningfully measure their impact upon learning within the context of the program in which they are used. Based upon the experience of developing and evaluating a range of mobile and desktop based TEL resources, this paper outlines a new four-stage evaluation process, taking into account learner satisfaction, learner gain, and the impact of a resource on both the individual and the institution in which it has been adapted. A new multi-level model of TEL resource evaluation is proposed, which includes a preliminary evaluation of need, learner satisfaction and gain, learner impact and institutional impact. Each of these levels are discussed in detail, and in relation to existing TEL evaluation frameworks. This paper details a holistic, meaningful evaluation model for individual TEL resources within the specific context in which they are used. It is proposed that this model is adopted to ensure that TEL resources are evaluated in a more meaningful and robust manner than is currently undertaken.

  14. Benign pulmonary nodule. Morphological features and contrast enhancement evaluated with contiguous thin-section CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Hisayasu; Murata, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masashi; Morita, Rikushi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    The morphological changes in 54 benign lung nodules, including 8 histologically proven nodules of tuberculoma, 10 of focal organizing pneumonia (FOP), 1 of lung abscess and 35 other benign nodules, were evaluated with contiguous thin-section (3 mm) CT. In addition, incremental dynamic studies were carried out in 25 of these nodules. The three-dimensional shapes of the nodules were found to be quite varied and were classified into four types: round mass (n=18), polygonal mass with concave or straight margins (n=20), oval or band-like mass extending along the bronchovascular bundle (n=7), and oval mass attached to the pleura with broad contact (n=9). Forty-two (78%) of the 54 nodules were located along the bronchovascular bundle. The maximum increments in CT values over 20 HU were observed after contrast enhancement in 18 (72%) of the 25 benign nodules, among which all tuberculomas showed little or no contrast enhancement. The number of small vessels quantified microscopically in the center of the nodules were minimal in tuberculomas with little enhancement and plentiful in lesions of FOP and abscess which showed marked enhancement. Our results suggest that the differentiation between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules is not possible simply on the basis of the degree of contrast enhancement. Therefore, morphological features and the anatomical relation to the bronchovascular bundles should also be taken into consideration in the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules. (author)

  15. Benign pulmonary nodule. Morphological features and contrast enhancement evaluated with contiguous thin-section CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hisayasu; Murata, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masashi; Morita, Rikushi

    1998-01-01

    The morphological changes in 54 benign lung nodules, including 8 histologically proven nodules of tuberculoma, 10 of focal organizing pneumonia (FOP), 1 of lung abscess and 35 other benign nodules, were evaluated with contiguous thin-section (3 mm) CT. In addition, incremental dynamic studies were carried out in 25 of these nodules. The three-dimensional shapes of the nodules were found to be quite varied and were classified into four types: round mass (n=18), polygonal mass with concave or straight margins (n=20), oval or band-like mass extending along the bronchovascular bundle (n=7), and oval mass attached to the pleura with broad contact (n=9). Forty-two (78%) of the 54 nodules were located along the bronchovascular bundle. The maximum increments in CT values over 20 HU were observed after contrast enhancement in 18 (72%) of the 25 benign nodules, among which all tuberculomas showed little or no contrast enhancement. The number of small vessels quantified microscopically in the center of the nodules were minimal in tuberculomas with little enhancement and plentiful in lesions of FOP and abscess which showed marked enhancement. Our results suggest that the differentiation between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules is not possible simply on the basis of the degree of contrast enhancement. Therefore, morphological features and the anatomical relation to the bronchovascular bundles should also be taken into consideration in the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules. (author)

  16. Design and Evaluation of Photo-Induced Biofeedback Fabric for the Enhancement in Sleeping Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Hsin-Ju; Chiu, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Based on overcoming the sleeping obstacle for people, the purpose of this study is to design a photo-induced biofeedback fabric which is a kind of optical fiber fabric with the function of enhancing sleeping sense and to evaluate its effect. The fabrics with two layers including background layer and pattern layer were designed firstly. The pattern layers with 3 kinds of wavelengths of sine waves and the light controller with 3 kinds of flashing frequencies were then prepared. Guiding the ligh...

  17. Motivational interviewing workshop in a virtual world: learning as avatars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shershneva, Marianna; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kear, Cynthia; Heyden, Robin; Heyden, Neil; Lee, Jay; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Limited research has been done to understand outcomes of continuing medical education offered in three-dimensional, immersive virtual worlds. We studied a case of a virtual world workshop on motivational interviewing (MI) applied to smoking cessation counseling and its educational impact. To facilitate content development and evaluation, we specified desired MI competencies. The workshop consisted of three sessions, which included lectures, practice with standardized patients, and chat interactions. Data were collected from 13 primary care physicians and residents through workshop observation, and pre- and 3-month post-workshop telephone/Skype interviews and interactions with standardized patients. Interactions with standardized patients were assessed by an expert using a validated MI tool and by standardized patients using a tool developed for this study. For 11 participants who attended two or three sessions, we conducted paired-samples t tests comparing mean differences between the competency scores before and after the workshop. Expert assessment showed significant improvement on six of seven MI competencies. All participants reported learning new knowledge and skills, and nine described incorporating new learning into their clinical practice. Practicing MI with standardized patients and/or observing others' practice appeared to be the most helpful workshop component. The evaluated workshop had positive impact on participants' competencies and practice as related to MI applied to smoking cessation counseling. Our findings support further exploration of three-dimensional virtual worlds as learning environments for continuing medical education.

  18. 1994 DOE Technical Standards Program Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The DOE Technical Standards Program has been structured to provide guidance and assistance for the development, adoption, and use of voluntary standards within the Department. OMB Circular A-119, ''Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Standards'' establishes the policy to be followed in working with voluntary standards bodies, and in adopting and using voluntary standards whenever feasible. The DOE Technical Standards Program is consistent with this policy and is dedicated to the task of promoting its implementation. The theme of this year's workshop is ''Standards Initiatives in Environmental Management fostering the development and use of industry standards for safe, environmentally responsible operations.'' The objective of the workshop is to increase the participant's awareness of the standardization activities taking place nationally and internationally and the impact of these activities on their efforts, and to facilitate the exchange of experiences, processes, and tools for implementing the program. Workshop sessions will include presentations by industry and Government notables in the environment, safety, and health arena with ample opportunity for everyone to ask questions and share experiences. There will be a breakout session which will concentrate on resolution of issues arising from the implementation of the DOE Technical Standards Program and a plenary session to discuss the plans developed by the breakout groups. Many organizations provide services and products which support the development, processing, distribution, and retrieval of standards. Those organizations listed at the end of the agenda will have exhibits available for your perusal throughout the workshop. Last year's workshop was very successful in stimulating an understanding of an interest in the standards program. This year, we hope to build on that success and provide an environment for the synergism of ideas to enhance the program and advance its implementation

  19. Report on July 2015 Additional Protocol Coordinators Best Practices Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitau, Ernest T.N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burbank, Roberta L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Finch, Valerie A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-31

    After 10 years of implementation experience, the Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC) within the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) conducted the Additional Protocol (AP) Coordinators Best Practices Workshop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 29-30, 2015. The goal of this workshop was to identify implementation best practices, lessons learned, and compliance challenges from the various Additional Protocol Coordinators (APCs) at each laboratory in the DOE/NNSA complex and associated sites. The workshop provided the opportunity for participants to share their insights and establish networks that APCs can utilize to continue to discuss challenges (new and old), identify best practices, and enhance communication and coordination for reporting multi-lab research projects during review activities. Workshop participants included DOE/NNSA HQ, laboratory and site APCs, seasoned experts, members of the original implementation outreach team, and Field Element and site security representatives.

  20. Evaluation of breast lesions by contrast enhanced ultrasound: Qualitative and quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Caifeng; Du Jing; Fang Hua; Li Fenghua; Wang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the diagnostic performance of qualitative, quantitative and combined analysis for characterization of breast lesions in contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), with histological results used as the reference standard. Methods: Ninety-one patients with 91 breast lesions BI-RADS 3–5 at US or mammography underwent CEUS. All lesions underwent qualitative and quantitative enhancement evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of different analytical method for discrimination between benign and malignant breast lesions. Results: Histopathologic analysis of the 91 lesions revealed 44 benign and 47 malignant. For qualitative analysis, benign and malignant lesions differ significantly in enhancement patterns (p z1 ), 0.768 (A z2 ) and 0.926(A z3 ) respectively. The values of A z1 and A z3 were significantly higher than that for A z2 (p = 0.024 and p = 0.008, respectively). But there was no significant difference between the values of A z1 and A z3 (p = 0.625). Conclusions: The diagnostic performance of qualitative and combined analysis was significantly higher than that for quantitative analysis. Although quantitative analysis has the potential to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, it has not yet improved the final diagnostic accuracy.

  1. Human Reliability Program Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

    2014-05-18

    A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

  2. Off-site evaluation of liver lesion detection by Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehl, H.B.; Bourne, M.; Grazioli, L.; Moeller, A.; Lodemann, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MRI in liver lesion detection in comparison with unenhanced MRI and dynamic CT. The image sets of 148 of 151 patients enrolled in a multicenter German phase-III trial were evaluated by two independent radiologists unaffiliated with the investigating centers. Patients underwent a routine MRI protocol comprising T2- and T1-weighted spin-echo and T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences pre and 1 h post 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-BOPTA (Bracco-Byk Gulden, Konstanz, Germany). Additionally, a serial T1-weighted GE scan was performed after administration of the first half of the dose. All patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced CT. The evaluation was performed with regard to the number and size of lesions detected per patient by each modality or sequence. Furthermore, all pre CM and pre + post CM image sets were analyzed for number of lesions per patient. Both readers detected significantly more lesions in the contrast-enhanced image set compared with the unenhanced image set (32 and 39 %, respectively; p < 0.0001). While contrast-enhanced CT detected a similar number of lesions to unenhanced MRI, it was clearly inferior to contrast-enhanced MRI (reader 1: p = 0.0117; reader 2: p = 0.0225). Of the T1-weighted scans performed, the dynamic and late T1-weighted GE exams contributed most to the increased lesion detection rate (reader 1: p = 0.0007; reader 2: p = 0.0037). The size of the smallest lesion detected by means of MRI was significantly larger in the pre-CM image sets than in the pre + post CM image sets (reader 1: p = 0.001; reader 2: p < 0.0001). Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MRI detected significantly smaller lesions than contrast-enhanced CT (reader 1: p = 0.0117; reader 2: p = 0.0925). Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MR imaging improves liver lesion detection significantly over unenhanced MRI and dynamic CT. (orig.)

  3. Off-site evaluation of liver lesion detection by Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehl, H.B. [Inst. of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Bourne, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Grazioli, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Brescia (Italy); Moeller, A. [MEDIDATA GmbH, Konstanz (Germany); Lodemann, K.P. [BRACCO-BYK GULDEN GmbH, Konstanz (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MRI in liver lesion detection in comparison with unenhanced MRI and dynamic CT. The image sets of 148 of 151 patients enrolled in a multicenter German phase-III trial were evaluated by two independent radiologists unaffiliated with the investigating centers. Patients underwent a routine MRI protocol comprising T2- and T1-weighted spin-echo and T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences pre and 1 h post 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-BOPTA (Bracco-Byk Gulden, Konstanz, Germany). Additionally, a serial T1-weighted GE scan was performed after administration of the first half of the dose. All patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced CT. The evaluation was performed with regard to the number and size of lesions detected per patient by each modality or sequence. Furthermore, all pre CM and pre + post CM image sets were analyzed for number of lesions per patient. Both readers detected significantly more lesions in the contrast-enhanced image set compared with the unenhanced image set (32 and 39 %, respectively; p < 0.0001). While contrast-enhanced CT detected a similar number of lesions to unenhanced MRI, it was clearly inferior to contrast-enhanced MRI (reader 1: p = 0.0117; reader 2: p = 0.0225). Of the T1-weighted scans performed, the dynamic and late T1-weighted GE exams contributed most to the increased lesion detection rate (reader 1: p = 0.0007; reader 2: p = 0.0037). The size of the smallest lesion detected by means of MRI was significantly larger in the pre-CM image sets than in the pre + post CM image sets (reader 1: p = 0.001; reader 2: p < 0.0001). Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MRI detected significantly smaller lesions than contrast-enhanced CT (reader 1: p = 0.0117; reader 2: p = 0.0925). Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MR imaging improves liver lesion detection significantly over unenhanced MRI and dynamic CT. (orig.)

  4. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Straelberg, E.; Klemola, S.; Nielsen, Sven P.; Palsson, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day's meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risoe-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical sessions. The practical sessions included demonstrations of tools for e.g. corrections and calculations of the above meantioned topics. (Author)

  5. Spiral 2 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop.

  6. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  7. Accelerator reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, L; Duru, Ph; Koch, J M; Revol, J L; Van Vaerenbergh, P; Volpe, A M; Clugnet, K; Dely, A; Goodhew, D

    2002-07-01

    About 80 experts attended this workshop, which brought together all accelerator communities: accelerator driven systems, X-ray sources, medical and industrial accelerators, spallation sources projects (American and European), nuclear physics, etc. With newly proposed accelerator applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, replacement of nuclear power plants and others. Reliability has now become a number one priority for accelerator designers. Every part of an accelerator facility from cryogenic systems to data storage via RF systems are concerned by reliability. This aspect is now taken into account in the design/budget phase, especially for projects whose goal is to reach no more than 10 interruptions per year. This document gathers the slides but not the proceedings of the workshop.

  8. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  9. Accelerator reliability workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.; Duru, Ph.; Koch, J.M.; Revol, J.L.; Van Vaerenbergh, P.; Volpe, A.M.; Clugnet, K.; Dely, A.; Goodhew, D.

    2002-01-01

    About 80 experts attended this workshop, which brought together all accelerator communities: accelerator driven systems, X-ray sources, medical and industrial accelerators, spallation sources projects (American and European), nuclear physics, etc. With newly proposed accelerator applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, replacement of nuclear power plants and others. Reliability has now become a number one priority for accelerator designers. Every part of an accelerator facility from cryogenic systems to data storage via RF systems are concerned by reliability. This aspect is now taken into account in the design/budget phase, especially for projects whose goal is to reach no more than 10 interruptions per year. This document gathers the slides but not the proceedings of the workshop

  10. Spiral 2 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop

  11. ARCSACC '99: Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahir, M.; Biggar, K.

    1999-01-01

    The assessment and remediation of contaminated sites in cold and Arctic environments is an area of increasing concern, primarily because of the unique problems associated with northern regions. Not only the obvious effects of the cold temperatures on the operation of many systems, but also remedial effectiveness of measures under extreme cold conditions are of interest. Accordingly, this workshop was organized to provide a means of exchange of information among people responsible for cleaning-up contaminated sites in cold and Arctic environments, researchers, and providers of remediation services with experience in dealing with such conditions. Speakers at the workshop addressed problems concerning risk assessment and site characterization, contaminant migration in permafrost, contamination caused by mining and associated clean-up problems, assessed bioremediation as a means of contaminant control, reviewed various remediation technologies and techniques, and presented a number of bioremediation case studies. refs., tabs., figs

  12. MATHEON Workshop 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Calderbank, Robert; Kutyniok, Gitta; Vybíral, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Since publication of the initial papers in 2006, compressed sensing has captured the imagination of the international signal processing community, and the mathematical foundations are nowadays quite well understood. Parallel to the progress in mathematics, the potential applications of compressed sensing have been explored by many international groups of, in particular, engineers and applied mathematicians, achieving very promising advances in various areas such as communication theory, imaging sciences, optics, radar technology, sensor networks, or tomography. Since many applications have reached a mature state, the research center MATHEON in Berlin focusing on "Mathematics for Key Technologies", invited leading researchers on applications of compressed sensing from mathematics, computer science, and engineering to the "MATHEON Workshop 2013: Compressed Sensing and its Applications” in December 2013. It was the first workshop specifically focusing on the applications of compressed sensing. This book featur...

  13. Workshop on decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.

    2005-12-01

    A Nordic workshop on decommissioning of nuclear facilities was held at Risoe in Denmark September 13-15, 2005. The workshop was arranged by NKS in cooperation with the company Danish Decommissioning, DD, responsible for decommissioning of nuclear facilities at Risoe. Oral presentations were made within the following areas: International and national recommendations and requirements concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities Authority experiences of decommissioning cases Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Denmark Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Sweden Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Norway Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Finland Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in German and the UK Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the former Soviet Union Results from research and development A list with proposals for future work within NKS has been prepared based on results from group-work and discussions. The list contains strategic, economical and political issues, technical issues and issues regarding competence and communication. (au)

  14. Solar workshops financial incentives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Ten one-day workshops were held across the United States. Information in this workbook is compiled in conjunction with those workshops. The following discussions are included: solar as a fuel (history); why alternative fuels are being sought today; the need for conservation; advantages of solar energy; the potential of solar energy; why solar energy is not more widely used; a definition of solar; how solar can help meet energy demands; Federal policies and programs; what solar technologies exist today that can be effectively utilized (thermal applications, fuels from biomass, solar electric). Additional information is presented in three attachments: Energy-Conserving Methods; Domestic Policy Review of Solar Energy; and DOE Secretary's Annual Report to Congress-Solar Section. (MCW)

  15. Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Software Engineering Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The workshop provided a forum for software practitioners from around the world to exchange information on the measurement, use, and evaluation of software methods, models, and tools. This year, approximately 450 people attended the workshop, which consisted of six sessions on the following topics: the Software Engineering Laboratory, measurement, technology assessment, advanced concepts, process, and software engineering issues in NASA. Three presentations were given in each of the topic areas. The content of those presentations and the research papers detailing the work reported are included in these proceedings. The workshop concluded with a tutorial session on how to start an Experience Factory.

  16. RADIOFREQUENCY SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency is already playing an important role in the beam acceleration system for the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and new such systems are being prepared for other major machines. Thus the fourth Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity, organized by KEK under the chairmanship of local specialist Yuzo Kojima and held just before the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators, had much progress to review and even more to look forward to

  17. Workshop UNK-600 (proceedings)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, A.M.; Bitykov, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    Proceedings are presented of the workshop devoted to the accelerating storage complex of IHEP (UNK-600). In the first section is given the information on the present status of the UNK-600 and particle channels design and on the adopted experiment NEPTUN-A. In the papers of the second section are discussed hadron physics investigations at 600 GeV. Experiments in the neutrino and muon beams are analyzed. A possible program of studying the charged kaon rare decays is described

  18. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    At the experimental halls workshop, discussions were held on: (1) open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) the needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) the hall for the lepton detector; and (4) the hall for the hadron spectrometer. The value of different possibilities for the future experimental program was explored. A number of suggestions emerged which will be used as the design of the experimental halls progresses

  19. WORKSHOP: Let's twist again..

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalobos Baillie, Orlando

    1988-12-15

    In the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) candidate theory of interquark forces, calculations involve summing the effects from many different possible quark/gluon interactions. In addition to the 'leading term' frequently used as the basis for QCD calculations, additional contributions — so-called 'higher twists' — are modulated by powers of kinematical factors. An illuminating international workshop to discuss higher twist QCD was held at the College de France, Paris, from 21-23 September.

  20. DESY Theory Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Held during the 'Festwoche' which marked the 25th anniversary of the German DESY Laboratory last year, the traditional DESY Theory Workshop concentrated on weak interactions of heavy quarks and on non-standard models for weak interactions, together with a progress report on lattice gauge theories with fermions. The organizing committee had invited eleven lecturers to present experiments and theoretical ideas in these fields. Also many short communications contributed interesting material

  1. Imaging sciences workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. International Social Pharmacy Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Cordina, Maria; Journal of the Malta College of Pharmacy Practice Editorial Board

    2003-01-01

    The Malta College of Pharmacy Practice, will be hosting the 13th International Social Pharmacy Workshop next summer. The concept of social pharmacy is very clearly explained in the article by Professor Ellen West Sørensen and colleagues, who are considered to be pioneers in this field. Malta has successfully hosted a number of pharmacy conferences, however this one is somewhat different and rather special.

  3. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-10-15

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators.

  4. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators

  5. Combined experimental and numerical evaluation of a prototype nano-PCM enhanced wallboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Lu, Jue; Soroushian, Parviz; Shrestha, Som

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Field-testing of a nano-PCM wallboard under varying weather conditions. • Numerical model validation and annual simulations of PCM wallboard performance. • Reduced cooling electricity consumption results from PCM wallboard. • PCM wallboard reduces peak cooling loads with implications on power plant capacity. • PCM performance was sensitive to building temperature set point for cooling. - Abstract: In the United States, forty-eight (48) percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change materials (PCMs) in building envelopes can enhance the energy efficiency of buildings and reduce energy consumption. Experimental testing and numerical modeling of PCM-enhanced envelope components are two important aspects of the evaluation of their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM supported by expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which are highly conductive and allow enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution. The nano-PCM is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. A wall with cellulose cavity insulation and a prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboard was built and tested in a natural exposure test (NET) facility in a hot-humid climate location. The test wall contained the PCM wallboard and a regular gypsum wallboard, for a side-by-side annual comparison study. Further, numerical modeling of the wall containing the nano-PCM wallboard was performed to determine its actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The model was first validated using experimental data, and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis evaluating the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced wallboard

  6. Auroral Tomography Workshop, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, Aa.

    1993-08-01

    In ionospheric and atmospheric physics the importance of multi-station imaging has grown as a consequence of the availability of scientific grade CCD cameras with digital output and affordable massive computing power. Tomographic inversion techniques are used in many different areas, e.g. medicine, plasma research and space physics. The tomography workshop was announced to gather a limited group of people interested in auroral tomography or tomographic inversion methods in general. ALIS (Auroral Large Imaging System) is a multi-station ground-based system developed primarily for three-dimensional auroral imaging, however other non-auroral objects can be studied with ALIS, e.g. stratospheric clouds. Several of the contributions in the workshop dealt with problems related to geometries similar to the ALIS-configuration. The Proceedings contain written contributions received either in abstract form or as full papers. The Proceedings also contain contributions intended for the Workshop but not presented due to the absence of the speaker. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 of the 17 papers

  7. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2005-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses, classes for undergraduate majors, and High Schools. Here we briefly describe a few of the more popular tools. The Life of the Sun (New!): The history of the Sun is animated as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve in time. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbital motions of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country of impact (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by a NASA EPO grant.

  8. Grid and Entrepreneurship Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CERN openlab is organising a special workshop about Grid opportunities for entrepreneurship. This one-day event will provide an overview of what is involved in spin-off technology, with a special reference to the context of computing and data Grids. Lectures by experienced entrepreneurs will introduce the key concepts of entrepreneurship and review, in particular, the industrial potential of EGEE (the EU co-funded Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project, led by CERN). Case studies will be given by CEOs of European start-ups already active in the Grid and computing cluster area, and regional experts will provide an overview of efforts in several European regions to stimulate entrepreneurship. This workshop is designed to encourage students and researchers involved or interested in Grid technology to consider the entrepreneurial opportunities that this technology may create in the coming years. This workshop is organized as part of the CERN openlab student programme, which is co-sponsored by CERN, HP, ...

  9. Summary of the Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    The summary session of the LHC Performance Workshop in Chamonix, 6-10 February 2012, synthesized one week of presentations and intense discussions on the near-, medium- and long-term strategy for the LHC and LHC upgrades. In particular, Chamonix’12 discussed the lessons from 2011, the strategy, beam energy and beam parameters for 2012, the planning for the Long Shutdown no. 1 (LS1), the measures and schemes for improving or maintaining the machine availability at higher beam energy, the injector performance and injector upgrade schedule, the HL-LHC project as well as possible additional or future LHC upgrades like LHeC and HELHC. Key workshop themes included the risk associated with 4 TeV beam energy in 2012, the beam energy after LS1, the turnaround time, the physics goal and optimized running schedule for 2012, the achievements and plans for Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions, beam-beam effects, electron-cloud phenomena and UFOs. We report the proposals for decisions which have emerged at the Chamonix’12 workshop. (author)

  10. Summary of the Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S; Zimmermann, F [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The summary session of the LHC Performance Workshop in Chamonix, 6-10 February 2012, synthesized one week of presentations and intense discussions on the near-, medium- and long-term strategy for the LHC and LHC upgrades. In particular, Chamonix’12 discussed the lessons from 2011, the strategy, beam energy and beam parameters for 2012, the planning for the Long Shutdown no. 1 (LS1), the measures and schemes for improving or maintaining the machine availability at higher beam energy, the injector performance and injector upgrade schedule, the HL-LHC project as well as possible additional or future LHC upgrades like LHeC and HELHC. Key workshop themes included the risk associated with 4 TeV beam energy in 2012, the beam energy after LS1, the turnaround time, the physics goal and optimized running schedule for 2012, the achievements and plans for Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions, beam-beam effects, electron-cloud phenomena and UFOs. We report the proposals for decisions which have emerged at the Chamonix’12 workshop. (author)

  11. The ROS Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Francis, D.

    The first week of February saw the taking place of the ReadOut Subsystem (ROS) workshop. The ROS is the subsystem of the Trigger, DAQ & DCS project which receives and buffers data from the detector ReadOut Drivers (RODs). On request it then provides a subset of this buffered data, the so-called Regions of Interest (RoI), to the Level 2 trigger. Using the subsequent Level 2 trigger decision, the ROS either removes the buffered event data from its buffers or sends the full event data to the Event Filter for further processing. The workshop took place over a four-day period at a location in the Jura. The average daily attendance was twenty people, which mainly represented the five main ATLAS institutes currently engaged in this Trigger, DAQ & DCS activity. The aim of the workshop was to bring to an end the current prototyping activities in this area and launch the next, final, phase of prototyping. This new phase of prototyping will build on the successful activities of the previous phase and will focus...

  12. Spent fuel workshop'2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers the transparencies of the presentations given at the 2002 spent fuel workshop: Session 1 - Research Projects: Overview on the IN CAN PROCESSES European project (M. Cowper), Overview on the SPENT FUEL STABILITY European project (C. Poinssot), Overview on the French R and D project on spent fuel long term evolution, PRECCI (C. Poinssot); Session 2 - Spent Fuel Oxidation: Oxidation of uranium dioxide single crystals (F. Garrido), Experimental results on SF oxidation and new modeling approach (L. Desgranges), LWR spent fuel oxidation - effects of burn-up and humidity (B. Hanson), An approach to modeling CANDU fuel oxidation under dry storage conditions (P. Taylor); Session 3 - Spent Fuel Dissolution Experiments: Overview on high burnup spent fuel dissolution studies at FZK/INE (A. Loida), Results on the influence of hydrogen on spent fuel leaching (K. Spahiu), Leaching of spent UO 2 fuel under inert and reducing conditions (Y. Albinsson), Fuel corrosion investigation by electrochemical techniques (D. Wegen), A reanalysis of LWR spent fuel flow through dissolution tests (B. Hanson), U-bearing secondary phases formed during fuel corrosion (R. Finch), The near-field chemical conditions and spent fuel leaching (D. Cui), The release of radionuclides from spent fuel in bentonite block (S.S. Kim), Trace actinide behavior in altered spent fuel (E. Buck, B. Hanson); Session 4 - Radiolysis Issues: The effect of radiolysis on UO 2 dissolution determined from electrochemical experiments with 238 Pu doped UO 2 M. Stroess-Gascoyne (F. King, J.S. Betteridge, F. Garisto), doped UO 2 studies (V. Rondinella), Preliminary results of static and dynamic dissolution tests with α doped UO 2 in Boom clay conditions (K. Lemmens), Studies of the behavior of UO 2 / water interfaces under He 2+ beam (C. Corbel), Alpha and gamma radiolysis effects on UO 2 alteration in water (C. Jegou), Behavior of Pu-doped pellets in brines (M. Kelm), On the potential catalytic behavior of

  13. Science for Society Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Bjornstad, David J [ORNL; Lenhardt, W Christopher [ORNL; Shumpert, Barry L [ORNL; Wang, Stephanie [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    Science for Society, a workshop held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 27, 20111, explored ways to move Laboratory science toward use. It sought actionable recommendations. Thus the workshop focused on: (1) current practices that promote and inhibit the translation of science into use, (2) principles that could lead to improving ORNL's translational knowledge and technology transfer efforts, and (3) specific recommendations for making these principles operational. This highly interactive workshop struck a positive chord with participants, a group of 26 ORNL staff members from diverse arenas of science and technology (S and T), technology transfer, and external laboratory relations, who represented all levels of science, technology, and management. Recognizing that the transformation of fundamental principles into operational practices often follows a jagged path, the workshop sought to identify key choices that could lead to a smoother journey along this path, as well as choices that created roadblocks and bottlenecks. The workshop emphasized a portion of this pathway, largely excluding the marketplace. Participants noted that research translation includes linkages between fundamental and applied research and development (R and D), and is not restricted to uptake by manufacturers, consumers, or end users. Three crosscutting ideas encapsulate workshop participants observations: (1) ORNL should take more action to usher the translation of its S and T products toward use, so as to make a positive national and global impact and to enhance its own competitiveness in the future; (2) ORNL (and external entities such as DOE and Congress) conveys inconsistent messages with regard to the importance of research translation and application, which (a) creates confusion, (b) poses disincentives to pursue research translation, (c) imposes barriers that inhibit cross-fertilization and collaboration, and (d) diminishes the effectiveness of both the

  14. Evaluation of edge enhancement effect of phase contrast imaging using newly-developed photostimulable phosphor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Satoru; Morishita, Junji; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether the use of a newly developed columnar-crystal-type photostimulable-phosphor plate (CP1M200, referred to as system C) helps to provide improved edge-enhanced effect in phase contrast imaging. Physical characteristics of 2 conventional particulate-crystal-type photostimulable-phosphor plates (RP-5PM, referred to as system A and RP-6M, referred to as system B) and system C were measured. Then, an acrylic plate phantom and RMI152 phantom were imaged using 3 types of plates, and the edge-enhancement effects were evaluated based on the profile curve of the acrylic plate phantom. Visual evaluation of the RMI152 phantom images was conducted. The results showed that the modulation transfer function (MTF) of system C was superior to those of the other systems. The WS of system C was superior to those of the other systems in the low frequency band region, and inferior to those of the other systems in the high frequency band region. The presence of an edge-enhanced image was not detectable in the profile curve of the acrylic plate in system A, although that was shown in systems B and C due to their excellent sharpness. In the visual image evaluation of the RMI152 phantom, image quality of system C was superior to those of the other systems. Phase contrast imaging with a digital detector of a columnar-crystal-type photostimulable-phosphor plate is considered to provide improved edge-enhancement over that of conventional plates. (author)

  15. 2014 Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The 3rd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop took place in early June 2014 and was combined with the 3rd Penn State Frontiers in Metallobiochemistry Symposium. The workshop was even larger than the 2nd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop we offered in 2012. It had even more participants (162 rather than 123 in 2012). Like the 2012 workshop, the 2014 workshop had three parts. The first part consisted of 16 90-minute lectures presented by faculty experts on the topic of their expertise (see below). Based on the suggestions from the 2012 workshop, we have recorded all 16 lectures professionally and make them available to the entire bioinorganic community via online streaming. In addition, hard copies of the recordings are available as backup.

  16. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  17. Evaluation of the mechanism of skin enhancing surfactants on the biomembrane of shed snake skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonglertnirant, Nanthida; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Kumpugdee-Vollrath, Mont

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of different surfactants at various concentrations as a skin penetration enhancer through the biomembrane of the shed skin of Naja kaouthia. Additionally, the enhancer mechanism(s) of each class of surfactants were evaluated using physical characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS). Our results showed that skin permeability increased with increasing concentrations of surfactants and the degree of increase was higher for the model hydrophilic permeant, deuterium dioxide (D(2)O), than the lipophilic permeant, ketoprofen (KP). Ionic surfactants, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), demonstrated higher enhancement ability than the polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan mono-oleate (Tween 80) non-ionic surfactant, which was consistent with the results from physical characterization studies. Increasing amounts of permeated drug resulted in an increase in membrane interactions. From our observations, it can be assumed that SLS and CTAB can be localized inside the biomembrane and thereby enhance drug permeation mainly through interactions with intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum (SC) and the creation of a perturbed microenvironment among lipid alkyl chains and polar head groups.

  18. Simulation-based evaluation of an in-vehicle smart situation awareness enhancement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoriades, Andreas; Sutcliffe, Alistair

    2018-07-01

    Situation awareness (SA) constitutes a critical factor in road safety, strongly related to accidents. This paper describes the evaluation of a proposed SA enhancement system (SAES) that exploits augmented reality through a head-up display (HUD). Two SAES designs were evaluation (information rich vs. minimal information) using a custom-made simulator and the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique with performance and EEG measures. The paper describes the process of assessing the SA of drivers using the SAES, through a series of experiments with participants in a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment. The effectiveness of the SAES was tested in a within-group research design. The results showed that the information rich (radar-style display) was superior to the minimal (arrow hazard indicator) design and that both SAES improved drivers' SA and performance compared to the control (no HUD) design. Practitioner Summary: Even though driver situation awareness is considered as one of the leading causes of road accidents, little has been done to enhance it. The current study demonstrates the positive effect of a proposed situation awareness enhancement system on driver situation awareness, through an experiment using virtual prototyping in a simulator.

  19. Design and Evaluation of Photo-Induced Biofeedback Fabric for the Enhancement in Sleeping Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Cheng Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on overcoming the sleeping obstacle for people, the purpose of this study is to design a photo-induced biofeedback fabric which is a kind of optical fiber fabric with the function of enhancing sleeping sense and to evaluate its effect. The fabrics with two layers including background layer and pattern layer were designed firstly. The pattern layers with 3 kinds of wavelengths of sine waves and the light controller with 3 kinds of flashing frequencies were then prepared. Guiding the light into the optical fiber, it will emit out of the optical fiber and stimulate our visual system to change the form of brain wave. Finally, EEG and sleeping scale were applied to evaluate the effect of enhancing sleeping sense. The results were shown that human’s brain wave can be changed from sober status to shallow-sleeping status and the effect of enhancing sleeping sense can be achieved for all pattern layers in frequencies of 0, 5 and 10 Hz. Furthermore, female is more significant than male and participants age from 30 to 49 are the most significant. Besides, the stronger the participant’s stress is, the more significant the sleeping sense is.

  20. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms.

  1. 76 FR 53689 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... for Autism Spectrum Disorder Research and to inform other activities of the committee. The workshop... Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) Services Subcommittee. The purpose of the IACC Services Workshop: ``Enhancing Supports for People with Autism and Their Families: Community Integration and the Changing...

  2. The BDA Dental Academic Staff Group Student Elective Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A D; White, D A; Hobson, R; Ensor, S

    2007-08-25

    In the current climate in dental education, many schools are re-evaluating the role of the student elective in the curriculum, with two schools no longer running elective programmes. In order to discuss the future of student electives in the dental curriculum, the Dental Academic Staff Group (DASG) of the British Dental Association organised a Student Elective Workshop, which attracted 42 delegates including nine student representatives. The following article is an account of the Workshop and its conclusions.

  3. Results from the Savannah River Laboratory model validation workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate existing and newly developed air pollution models used in DOE-funded laboratories, the Savannah River Laboratory sponsored a model validation workshop. The workshop used Kr-85 measurements and meteorology data obtained at SRL during 1975 to 1977. Individual laboratories used models to calculate daily, weekly, monthly or annual test periods. Cumulative integrated air concentrations were reported at each grid point and at each of the eight sampler locations

  4. Proceedings of the 1991 Windsor workshop on alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A workshop was held to exchange information among engine and vehicle manufacturers, fuel suppliers, research organizations, and academic and regulatory bodies on various aspects of alternative transportation fuels development. Papers were presented on alternative fuels policies and programs, zero-emission vehicles, emission control technologies, field evaluations of alternative fuel systems, and heavy duty alternate-fuel engines. Separate abstracts have been prepared for nine papers from this workshop

  5. Guidelines for the preclinical in vivo evaluation of pharmacological active drugs for ALS/MND: report on the 142nd ENMC international workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Albert C; Bendotti, Caterina; Blaugrund, Eran; Hengerer, Bastian; Löffler, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Joanne; Meininger, Vincent; Meyer, Thomas; Moussaoui, Saliha; Robberecht, Wim; Scott, Sean; Silani, Vincenzo; Van Den Berg, Leonard H

    2007-08-01

    A transgenic animal model for anterior horn cell loss was established in 1994. This model is based on the insertion of a high copy number of disease-causing human Cu/Zn SOD mutations into the intact mouse genome. It serves to establish hypotheses for the pathogenesis of anterior horn cell death, but also to test potential pharmacological approaches to therapy in human ALS. Today, more than 100 -- published and unpublished -- compounds have been tested in this animal model, a large part of them being reported as successful. However, it proved to be difficult to translate these therapeutic successes in the animal model into human trials. Also, a number of disease-modifying strategies were difficult to reproduce, even by the same group. On the other hand, the step from mice to men means a huge investment for the sponsors of clinical trials and the scientific community. Therefore, establishment of standard methods for drug testing in ALS models is mandatory. In this workshop, clinical and preclinical researchers established in the field of ALS/MND met in Holland in March 2006 in order to establish guidelines for the community for drug testing in mouse models.

  6. Report of the Orientation Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunez, Heilyn Camacho; Buus, Lillian; Ogange, Betty

    2014-01-01

    This Orientation Workshops is part of MAAGART project. The workshop is divided in three parts: 1) pre-Orientation Workshop stage, 2) Face-to-Face stage and 3) post-Orientation stage. Pre and post stages will be developed online. All the activities will take place in a virtual learning environment...... created for this purpose. Participants will receive all the information about how to access the virtual learning environment (Moodle) prior to the pre-orientation workshop. In this report we cover only the two first stages. Jørgen Bang, as a part of the Community of Practice activity, will be facilitating...

  7. Buildings energy management program workshop design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    This document describes activities undertaken by Honeywell's Energy Resources Center for design and development of the format, content, and materials that were used in conducting 129 one-day energy management workshops for specific commercial business audiences. The Building Energy Management Workshop Program was part of a National Workshop Program that was intended to increase awareness of energy-related issues and to encourage energy-conservation actions on the part of commercial and industrial sectors. The total effort included executive conferences for chief executive officers and other senior management personnel; industrial energy-conservation workshops directed at plant management and engineering personnel; vanpooling workshops designed to inform and encourage business in implementing a vanpooling program for employees; and the building energy-management workshops specifically developed for managers, owners, and operators of office and retail facilities, restaurants, and supermarkets. The total program spanned nearly two years and reached approximately 2,500 participants from all parts of the U.S. A detailed followup evaluation is still being conducted to determine the impact of this program in terms of conservation action undertaken by workshop participants.

  8. Flight Simulator Evaluation of Enhanced Propulsion Control Modes for Emergency Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan, S; Sowers, T.; Owen, A., Karl; Fulton, Christopher, E.; Chicatelli, Amy, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes piloted evaluation of enhanced propulsion control modes for emergency operation of aircraft. Fast Response and Overthrust modes were implemented to assess their ability to help avoid or mitigate potentially catastrophic situations, both on the ground and in flight. Tests were conducted to determine the reduction in takeoff distance achievable using the Overthrust mode. Also, improvements in Dutch roll damping, enabled by using yaw rate feedback to the engines to replace the function of a stuck rudder, were investigated. Finally, pilot workload and ability to handle the impaired aircraft on approach and landing were studied. The results showed that improvement in all aspects is possible with these enhanced propulsion control modes, but the way in which they are initiated and incorporated is important for pilot comfort and perceived benefit.

  9. Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Roland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Implant constructs supporting angiogenesis are favorable for treating critically-sized bone defects, as ingrowth of capillaries towards the center of large defects is often insufficient. Consequently, the insufficient nutritional supply of these regions leads to impaired bone healing. Implants with specially designed angiogenic supporting geometry and functionalized with proangiogenic cytokines can enhance angiogenesis. In this study, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 were used for incorporation into poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL-coated porous titanium implants. Bioactivity of released factors and influence on angiogenesis of functionalized implants were evaluated using a migration assay and angiogenesis assays. Both implants released angiogenic factors, inducing migration of endothelial cells. Also, VEGF-functionalized PCL-coated titanium implants enhanced angiogenesis in vitro. Both factors were rapidly released in high doses from the implant coating during the first 72 h.

  10. CT findings of pancreatic carcinoma. Evaluation with the combined method of early enhancement CT and high dose enhancement CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Endo, Tokiko; Isomura, Takayuki; Ishigaki, Takeo; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Senda, Kouhei.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were studied with the combined method of early enhancement CT and high dose enhancement CT in 72 carcinomas. Common Findings were change in pancreatic contour, abnormal attenuation in a tumor and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. The incidence of abnormal attenuation and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct and bile duct was constant regardless of tumor size. The finding of hypoattenuation at early enhancement CT was most useful for demonstrating a carcinoma. However, this finding was negative in ten cases, five of which showed inhomogenous hyperattenuation at high dose enhancement CT. The detection of change in pancreatic contour and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct was most frequent at high dose enhancement CT. The finding of change in pancreatic contour and/or abnormal attenuation in a tumor could be detected in 47 cases at plain CT, 66 at early enhancement CT and 65 at high dose enhancement CT. Since the four cases in which neither finding was detected by any CT method showed dilatated main pancreatic duct, there was no case without abnormal CT findings. This combined CT method will be a reliable diagnostic technique in the imaging of pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  11. Fourth International Workshop on Spoken Dialog Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rosset, Sophie; Garnier-Rizet, Martine; Devillers, Laurence; Natural Interaction with Robots, Knowbots and Smartphones : Putting Spoken Dialog Systems into Practice

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings presents the state-of-the-art in spoken dialog systems with applications in robotics, knowledge access and communication. It addresses specifically: 1. Dialog for interacting with smartphones; 2. Dialog for Open Domain knowledge access; 3. Dialog for robot interaction; 4. Mediated dialog (including crosslingual dialog involving Speech Translation); and, 5. Dialog quality evaluation. These articles were presented at the IWSDS 2012 workshop.

  12. Neutron radiobiology. Summary of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report is a summary of a workshop held in June 1977 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the progress of research in the field of neutron radiobiology. The participants reviewed the results of current research and identified unresolved questions and areas of uncertainty. They then defined areas in which additional research should be undertaken, and, finally, they reviewed ways in which results from current and projected research could be applied to inform and influence regulatory decisions

  13. North Region ROW tool implementation workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    Welcome to the North Region ROW Tool Workshop. This workshop is funded under an implementation project sponsored by TxDOTs Research & Technology Implementation Office (RTI). This is the second of four regional workshops being planned for this summ...

  14. Three-dimensional evaluation of lumbar disc hernia and prediction of absorption by enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaji, Youichi; Uchiyama, Seiji; Yagi, Eiichi

    2001-01-01

    Both the spontaneous shrinkage and the disappearance of disc hernia have been confirmed through the use of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There is, however, no practical method to predict the likely absorption of the herniated mass. The objective of this study was to predict the spontaneous absorption of disc hernia by MRI, and to select the optimum treatment. The study involved 65 patients with lumbar disc hernias. Conservative treatment was carried out in 21 patients, while 44 patients underwent herniotomy. In the nonoperated patients, an MRI was taken both during the painful period, and shortly after pain remission. Hernial shrinkage was evaluated according to the decrease in the calculated volume, in addition to the decrease in hernial area, calculated by MRI. In the operated group, preoperative MRI enhancement, type of hernia, and invasion of granulation tissue in the histological specimens were studied. In the 21 nonoperated patients, the volume (mean ±SD) was 0.488±208 cm 3 (range, 0.197-0.931 cm 3 ) in the painful period and 0.214±0.181 cm 3 (range, 0.0-0.744 cm 3 ) in the remission period. This decrease in volume was statistically significant. There was also a greater decrease in hernias exhibiting positive enhancement by MRI. In the operated patients, hernias that penetrated the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) had high rates of preoperative enhancement, and these hernias showed invasion of granulation tissue with marked neovascularization. Positive enhancement by MRI confirms an ongoing absorption process. Enhanced MRI can be a good method for the prediction of spontaneous absorption of lumbar disc hernias. (author)

  15. Three-dimensional evaluation of lumbar disc hernia and prediction of absorption by enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Youichi; Uchiyama, Seiji [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Yagi, Eiichi

    2001-07-01

    Both the spontaneous shrinkage and the disappearance of disc hernia have been confirmed through the use of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There is, however, no practical method to predict the likely absorption of the herniated mass. The objective of this study was to predict the spontaneous absorption of disc hernia by MRI, and to select the optimum treatment. The study involved 65 patients with lumbar disc hernias. Conservative treatment was carried out in 21 patients, while 44 patients underwent herniotomy. In the nonoperated patients, an MRI was taken both during the painful period, and shortly after pain remission. Hernial shrinkage was evaluated according to the decrease in the calculated volume, in addition to the decrease in hernial area, calculated by MRI. In the operated group, preoperative MRI enhancement, type of hernia, and invasion of granulation tissue in the histological specimens were studied. In the 21 nonoperated patients, the volume (mean {+-}SD) was 0.488{+-}208 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.197-0.931 cm{sup 3}) in the painful period and 0.214{+-}0.181 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.0-0.744 cm{sup 3}) in the remission period. This decrease in volume was statistically significant. There was also a greater decrease in hernias exhibiting positive enhancement by MRI. In the operated patients, hernias that penetrated the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) had high rates of preoperative enhancement, and these hernias showed invasion of granulation tissue with marked neovascularization. Positive enhancement by MRI confirms an ongoing absorption process. Enhanced MRI can be a good method for the prediction of spontaneous absorption of lumbar disc hernias. (author)

  16. Comparative evaluation of three heat transfer enhancement strategies in a grooved channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, C.; Kang, E. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Results of a comparative evaluation of three heat transfer enhancement strategies for forced convection cooling of a parallel plate channel populated with heated blocks, representing electronic components mounted on printed circuit boards, are reported. Heat transfer in the reference geometry, the asymmetrically heated parallel plate channel, is compared with that for the basic grooved channel, and the same geometry enhanced by cylinders and vanes placed above the downstream edge of each heated block. In addition to conventional heat transfer and pressure drop measurements, holographic interferometry combined with high-speed cinematography was used to visualize the unsteady temperature fields in the self-sustained oscillatory flow. The locations of increased heat transfer within one channel periodicity depend on the enhancement technique applied, and were identified by analyzing the unsteady temperature distributions visualized by holographic interferometry. This approach allowed gaining insight into the mechanisms responsible for heat transfer enhancement. Experiments were conducted at moderate flow velocities in the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes. Reynolds numbers were varied in the range Re = 200-6500, corresponding to flow velocities from 0.076 to 2.36 m/s. Flow oscillations were first observed between Re = 1050 and 1320 for the basic grooved channel, and around Re = 350 and 450 for the grooved channels equipped with cylinders and vanes, respectively. At Reynolds numbers above the onset of oscillations and in the transitional flow regime, heat transfer rates in the investigated grooved channels exceeded the performance of the reference geometry, the asymmetrically heated parallel plate channel. Heat transfer in the grooved channels enhanced with cylinders and vanes showed an increase by a factor of 1.2-1.8 and 1.5-3.5, respectively, when compared to data obtained for the basic grooved channel; however, the accompanying pressure drop penalties

  17. 2003 RIA R AND D WORKSHOP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OZAKI, S.ET AL.

    2003-08-26

    The 2003 RIA R&D Workshop was held on August 26-28, 2003 at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland. This Workshop was chaired by Satoshi Ozaki of BNL and sponsored by the Nuclear Physics Division of DOE, with the help of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). The purpose of this workshop was to understand the present status of R&D efforts for RIA, to evaluate the needs for further R&D, and to identify opportunities for international collaborations. The workshop examined and documented the current pre-conceptual design for RIA, identifying areas where decisions on technical options remain. The status of the current RIA R&D program was documented, recognizing areas where efforts were needed in light of what had been learned. The ongoing and planned R&D activities for operating and planned rare-isotope facilities were presented, enabling the workshop to be a venue to develop coordinated R&D efforts of mutual benefit to U.S. and international efforts. The scientific program for the first day (August 26, 2003) consisted mostly of invited talks presented by major research groups involved in RIA and other RI beam facilities. The talks included those covering: Science of RIA and the RIA Facility Performance Requirements; The Reference RIA Facility Pre-CDR design that was used for the NSAC cost exercise (M. Harrison Sub-Panel) in January 2001; New or latest perspectives on the RIA design at ANL & MSU; and RI Beam facility plans and overview of the R&D activities at overseas laboratories. The second day (August 27, 2003) was devoted to contributed talks on continuing R&D, including that which had been supported by DOE RIA R&D funds. The third day (August 28, 2003) began with open panel discussions in the morning, including further input from participants. The panel members discussed the present status of the RIA planning and R&D needs in a closed session for the rest of the day, and then worked on report planning and writing. This Workshop

  18. 2003 RIA R AND D WORKSHOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OZAKI, S.

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 RIA R and D Workshop was held on August 26-28, 2003 at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland. This Workshop was chaired by Satoshi Ozaki of BNL and sponsored by the Nuclear Physics Division of DOE, with the help of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). The purpose of this workshop was to understand the present status of R and D efforts for RIA, to evaluate the needs for further R and D, and to identify opportunities for international collaborations. The workshop examined and documented the current pre-conceptual design for RIA, identifying areas where decisions on technical options remain. The status of the current RIA R and D program was documented, recognizing areas where efforts were needed in light of what had been learned. The ongoing and planned R and D activities for operating and planned rare-isotope facilities were presented, enabling the workshop to be a venue to develop coordinated R and D efforts of mutual benefit to U.S. and international efforts. The scientific program for the first day (August 26, 2003) consisted mostly of invited talks presented by major research groups involved in RIA and other RI beam facilities. The talks included those covering: Science of RIA and the RIA Facility Performance Requirements; The Reference RIA Facility Pre-CDR design that was used for the NSAC cost exercise (M. Harrison Sub-Panel) in January 2001; New or latest perspectives on the RIA design at ANL and MSU; and RI Beam facility plans and overview of the R and D activities at overseas laboratories. The second day (August 27, 2003) was devoted to contributed talks on continuing R and D, including that which had been supported by DOE RIA R and D funds. The third day (August 28, 2003) began with open panel discussions in the morning, including further input from participants. The panel members discussed the present status of the RIA planning and R and D needs in a closed session for the rest of the day, and then worked on report

  19. Compulsory Project-Level Involvement and the Use of Program-Level Evaluations: Evaluating the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelli; Weiss, Iris R.

    2011-01-01

    In 1995, the National Science Foundation (NSF) contracted with principal investigator Iris Weiss and an evaluation team at Horizon Research, Inc. (HRI) to conduct a national evaluation of the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement program (LSC). HRI conducted the core evaluation under a $6.25 million contract with NSF. This program…

  20. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... District Office (DALDO), in collaboration with Oklahoma State University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food...