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Sample records for enhanced monocyte response

  1. Levamisole enhances immune response by affecting the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-Y; Lin, Y-L; Chiang, B-L

    2008-01-01

    Levamisole is a synthetic phenylimidazolthiazole that was first introduced in 1966 as an anti-helmintic agent. Current studies have been focused upon its effect on immune response and on cancer treatment. We examined the molecular mechanisms of levamisole in the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) and human T cells. Treatment of DC with levamisole increased the presentation of CD80, CD86, CD83 and human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR) molecules on the cell membrane, as well as the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and IL-10. Levamisole-treated human DC also enhanced T cell activation towards type 1 T helper immune response by inducing interferon-γ secretion. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 inhibited levamisole-induced production of IL-12 p40 and IL-10, suggesting a vital role for TLR-2 in signalling DC upon incubation with levamisole. The inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 or c-Jun N-terminal kinases pathways also prevented the effects of levamisole on DC in producing IL-12 p40 or IL-10. Taken together, levamisole could enhance immune response towards T helper 1 development through the activation of dendritic cells or T cell aspects. PMID:18005262

  2. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-10-21

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host.

  3. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

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    Shankar J Evani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  4. Vitamin d-directed rheostatic regulation of monocyte antibacterial responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, John S; Ren, Songyang; Liu, Philip T

    2009-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) enhances innate immunity by inducing the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP). In monocytes/macrophages, this occurs primarily in response to activation of TLR, that induce expression of the vitamin D receptor and localized...

  5. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2- and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Køllgaard, Tania; Enevold, Christian; Bendtzen, Klaus; Hansen, Peter R.; Givskov, Michael; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol deposits and pro-inflammatory cytokines play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a predominant cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological evidence has linked periodontal disease (PD) with atherosclerotic CVD. Accordingly, viable periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, have been found in atherosclerotic plaques in humans and mice. We aimed to determine whether cholesterol crystals (CHCs) and oral bacteria synergize in the stimulation of human monocytes. Incubation of human monocytes with CHCs induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-8. Moreover, CHCs markedly enhanced secretion of IL-1β by monocytes stimulated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 agonist Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the TLR2 agonist Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. Notably, CHCs also enhanced IL-1β secretion induced by P. gingivalis LPS and IL-1β secretion induced by whole P. gingivalis bacteria. This enhancement was abrogated by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors Z-YVAD-FMK and glibenclamide. CHCs had no effect on cytokine production induced by P. gingivalis gingipains. Taken together, our findings support that CHCs, via stimulation of NLRP3 inflammasomes, act in synergy with the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis to promote monocyte secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines. PMID:28235036

  6. Peripheral blood monocyte responses in periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, S J

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from the interaction of bacteria on the tooth surfaces and the host immune response. Although periodontal pathogens are essential for the initiation and progression of the disease, the tissue damage in periodontitis is primarily mediated by the host immune response. Differences in the susceptibility to the disease and in the clinal outcome of the therapy seem to be less dependent on genetics but more on lifestyle factors, like smoking, overweight, stress and nutrition. It has been shown that these lifestyle factors may modulate the immune response and therefore influence the initiation and progression of the disease. To study the host immune response, whole blood cell cultures (WBCC) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been widely used and they specifically reflect the behaviour of monocytes. It has been shown that peripheral blood monocytes in LPS-stimulated WBCC from non-smoking periodontitis patients display a T-helper 2 (Th2)-promoting phenotype in comparison with controls. After periodontal therapy, this phenotype reversed and was comparable with controls. However, in smoking but treated patients, the Th2-promoting phenotype of monocytes still remained. Therefore, the aberrant phenotype of monocytes in the peripheral blood from periodontitis patients is likely to be a systemic response to exogenous and endogenous danger molecules released or induced by the periodontal infection or by smoking. It can be concluded that periodontal therapy in non-smoking periodontitis patients has beneficial health effects and that smoking cessation should be an integral part of the therapy as well for general health reasons as for the clinical outcome. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Sialoadhesin expressed on IFN-induced monocytes binds HIV-1 and enhances infectivity.

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    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14(+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1, a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14(+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14(+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells.

  8. Enhanced bacterial phagocytosis by peripheral blood monocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steven, M M; Lennie, S E; Sturrock, R D; Gemmell, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the functional state of peripheral blood monocytes in rheumatoid arthritis, we have measured phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis in 48 patients and 28 controls. Using radiolabelled bacteria preopsonised in normal human serum we have demonstrated significantly enhanced uptake of both organisms by patients' monocytes: (Median % uptake Staph. aureus: patients = 35.8; controls = 19.3; p less than 0.001. Median % uptake P. mirabilis: patients = 32.3; controls = 19...

  9. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  10. Enhancement of fibrinogen-triggered pro-coagulant activation of monocytes in vitro by matrix metalloproteinase-9

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    Feistritzer Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of fibrinogen with specific leukocyte integrins of monocytes may link coagulation and inflammation, however, the precise mechanism of fibrinogen leading to the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory response on monocytes is yet unknown. Results Fibrinogen and its digestion fragment D induced pro-coagulant activation of monocytes as assessed in a cellular coagulation assay by reductions in clotting times. Pro-coagulant activation was reversed by blocking antibodies against Mac-1 or LFA-1. Pre-exposure of monocytes to the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190 and the MEK1.2 inhibitor U0126 led to significant increasees in coagulation times whereas blocking JNKII with its inhibitor had no such effect. Blocking NFκB with MG-132 also inhibited pro-coagulant activation of monocytes by fibrinogen. A selective inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased times to clot formation whereas other matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors did not significantly interfere with fibrinogen-augmented clot formation in this assay. Treatment of monocytes with fibrinogen increased concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 immunoreactivity in their supernatants. Conclusions Fibrinogen induces monocyte pro-coagulant activation in an integrin-, nuclear factor κB-, p38 MAPK-, and MEK1.2-dependent manner. Activation of monocytes by fibrinogen increases metalloproteinase-9 secretion, metalloproteinase-9 itself enhances monocyte coagulation by an autocrine mechanism. Results provide further evidence that mediators of hemostasis have a profound impact on cells of the immune system and are closely related to inflammatory pathways.

  11. Tolerance of monocytes and macrophages in response to bacterial endotoxin.

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    Wiśnik, Ewelina; Pikus, Ewa; Duchnowicz, Piotr; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2017-03-07

    Monocytes belong to myeloid effector cells, which constitute the first line of defense against pathogens, also called the nonspecific immune system and play an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. In response to stimulation, monocytes differentiate into macrophages capable of microorganism phagocytosis and secrete factors that play a key role in the regulation of immune responses. However excessive exposure of monocytes/macrophages to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram negative bacteria leads to the acquisition of immune tolerance by these cells. Such state results from disruption of different biological processes, for example intracellular signaling pathways and is accompanied by a number of disease states (immune, inflammatory or neoplastic conditions). Regulation of monocytes/macrophages activity is controlled by miRNAs, which are involved in the modulation of immune tolerance acquired by these cells. Moreover, the tolerance to endotoxin is conditioned by the posttranscriptional processes and posttranslational epigenetic modifications leading to the impairment of normal immune response for example by alterations in the expression of many genes encoding immune signaling mediators. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview existing knowledge on the modulation of activity of monocytes/macrophages in response to bacterial endotoxin and impaired immune responses.

  12. Tolerance of monocytes and macrophages in response to bacterial endotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Wiśnik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes belong to myeloid effector cells, which constitute the first line of defense against pathogens, also called the nonspecific immune system and play an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. In response to stimulation, monocytes differentiate into macrophages capable of microorganism phagocytosis and secrete factors that play a key role in the regulation of immune responses. However excessive exposure of monocytes/macrophages to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram negative bacteria leads to the acquisition of immune tolerance by these cells. Such state results from disruption of different biological processes, for example intracellular signaling pathways and is accompanied by a number of disease states (immune, inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. Regulation of monocytes/macrophages activity is controlled by miRNAs, which are involved in the modulation of immune tolerance acquired by these cells. Moreover, the tolerance to endotoxin is conditioned by the posttranscriptional processes and posttranslational epigenetic modifications leading to the impairment of normal immune response for example by alterations in the expression of many genes encoding immune signaling mediators. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview existing knowledge on the modulation of activity of monocytes/macrophages in response to bacterial endotoxin and impaired immune responses.

  13. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

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    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  14. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2-and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køllgaard, Tania Maria Simonsen; Enevold, Christian; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol deposits and pro-inflammatory cytokines play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a predominant cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological evidence has linked periodontal disease (PD) with atherosclerotic CVD. Accordingly, viable periodontal pathogens...... findings support that CHCs, via stimulation of NLRP3 inflammasomes, act in synergy with the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis to promote monocyte secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines....

  15. BUPRENORPHINE DECREASES THE CCL2-MEDIATED CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSE OF MONOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo; Williams, Dionna W.; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M.; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite successful cART, approximately 60% of HIV infected people exhibit HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9, were identified and had not been shown previously be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  16. A System Dynamics Model to Predict the Human Monocyte Response to Endotoxins

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    Enrique Álvarez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available System dynamics is a powerful tool that allows modeling of complex and highly networked systems such as those found in the human immune system. We have developed a model that reproduces how the exposure of human monocytes to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs induces an inflammatory state characterized by high production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, which is rapidly modulated to enter into a tolerant state, known as endotoxin tolerance (ET. The model contains two subsystems with a total of six states, seven flows, two auxiliary variables, and 14 parameters that interact through six differential and nine algebraic equations. The parameters were estimated and optimized to obtain a model that fits the experimental data obtained from human monocytes treated with various LPS doses. In contrast to publications on other animal models, stimulation of human monocytes with super-low-dose LPSs did not alter the response to a second LPSs challenge, neither inducing ET, nor enhancing the inflammatory response. Moreover, the model confirms the low production of TNFα and increased levels of C–C motif ligand 2 when monocytes exhibit a tolerant state similar to that of patients with sepsis. At present, the model can help us better understand the ET response and might offer new insights on sepsis diagnostics and prognosis by examining the monocyte response to endotoxins in patients with sepsis.

  17. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  19. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  20. Monocyte-Derived Signals Activate Human Natural Killer Cells in Response to Leishmania Parasites

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    Helena Messlinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated natural killer (NK cells release interferon (IFN-γ, which is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania. In contrast to experimental murine leishmaniasis, the human NK cell response to Leishmania is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the interaction of human blood NK cells with promastigotes of different Leishmania species (Leishmania major, Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania donovani. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified NK cells and monocytes (all derived from healthy blood donors from Germany without a history of leishmaniasis were exposed to promastigotes, NK cells showed increased surface expression of the activation marker CD69. The extent of this effect varied depending on the Leishmania species; differences between dermotropic and viscerotropic L. infantum strains were not observed. Upregulation of CD69 required direct contact between monocytes and Leishmania and was partly inhibitable by anti-interleukin (IL-18. Unexpectedly, IL-18 was undetectable in most of the supernatants (SNs of monocyte/parasite cocultures. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of non-permeabilized cells revealed that Leishmania-infected monocytes trans-presented IL-18 to NK cells. Native, but not heat-treated SNs of monocyte/Leishmania cocultures also induced CD69 on NK cells, indicating the involvement of a soluble heat-labile factor other than IL-18. A role for the NK cell-activating cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-21, and IFN-α/β was excluded. The increase of CD69 was not paralleled by NK cell IFN-γ production or enhanced cytotoxicity. However, prior exposure of NK cells to Leishmania parasites synergistically increased their IFN-γ release in response to IL-12, which was dependent on endogenous IL-18. CD1c+ dendritic cells were identified as possible source of Leishmania-induced IL-12. Finally, we observed that direct contact between Leishmania and NK cells

  1. Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response.

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    Hua, Kai; Ålander, Eva; Lindström, Tom; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria; Ferraz, Natalia

    2015-09-14

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications.

  2. Susceptibility and response of human blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus infection.

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    Kok Loon Wong

    Full Text Available Human blood monocytes play a central role in dengue infections and form the majority of virus infected cells in the blood. Human blood monocytes are heterogeneous and divided into CD16(- and CD16(+ subsets. Monocyte subsets play distinct roles during disease, but it is not currently known if monocyte subsets differentially contribute to dengue protection and pathogenesis. Here, we compared the susceptibility and response of the human CD16(- and CD16(+ blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus in vitro. We found that both monocyte subsets were equally susceptible to dengue virus (DENV2 NGC, and capable of supporting the initial production of new infective virus particles. Both monocyte subsets produced anti-viral factors, including IFN-α, CXCL10 and TRAIL. However, CD16(+ monocytes were the major producers of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to dengue virus, including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, 3 and 4. The susceptibility of both monocyte subsets to infection was increased after IL-4 treatment, but this increase was more profound for the CD16(+ monocyte subset, particularly at early time points after virus exposure. These findings reveal the differential role that monocyte subsets might play during dengue disease.

  3. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

  4. Dietary supplementation with fish oil modifies the ability of human monocytes to induce an inflammatory response.

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    Luu, Nguyet-Thin; Madden, Jackie; Calder, Philip C; Grimble, Robert F; Shearman, Cliff P; Chan, Tim; Dastur, Neville; Howell, William M; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2007-12-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are key orchestrators of inflammation and are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis. (n-3) Fatty acids, found in fish oil, have been shown to have protective effects in such disorders. To investigate possible modes of action, we used a monocyte:endothelial cell (EC) coculture model to investigate the pro-inflammatory potential of monocytes. Monocytes were isolated from the blood of donors with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or control donors, before and after a 12-wk supplementation of their diet with fish oil. The monocytes were cultured with human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) for 24 h, after which the ability of the HUVEC to recruit flowing neutrophils was tested. Monocytes from either group of donors stimulated the EC to support the adhesion and migration of neutrophils. Fish oil supplementation reduced the potency of monocytes from normal subjects, but not those from patients with PAD, to induce recruitment. Concurrent medication may have acted as a complicating factor. On subgroup analysis, only those free of medication showed a significant effect of fish oil. Responses before or after supplementation were not closely linked to patterns of secretion of cytokines by cultured monocytes, tested in parallel monocultures. These results suggest that fish oil can modulate the ability of monocytes to stimulate EC and that this might contribute to their protective effects against chronic inflammatory disorders. Benefits, however, may depend on existing medical status and on other treatments being received.

  5. Reduced TNF-α response in preterm neonates is associated with impaired nonclassic monocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisgrill, Lukas; Groschopf, Alina; Herndl, Elisabeth; Sadeghi, Kambis; Spittler, Andreas; Berger, Angelika; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Premature infants are highly susceptible to severe bacterial infections. The impaired infection control related to the functional immaturity of the neonatal innate immune system is an important cause of infection. Different monocyte subpopulations have been described and functionally characterized. However, data from preterm infants are scarce. We analyzed constitutive monocyte TLR2, TLR4, CD163, and HLA-DR expression in preterm cord blood. We further investigated activation of the signaling proteins ERK1/2 and NF-κB in monocyte subpopulations after ex vivo stimulation with the bacterial TLR agonists LPS and lipoteichoic acid. The functional outcome of the stimulation was determined by the intracellular production of TNF. Furthermore, the phagocytic activity was measured via flow cytometry. TLR4 and HLA-DR showed a gestational age-dependent increase. However, activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB was impaired in neonatal monocyte subpopulations after stimulation with TLR agonists. Accordingly, intracellular TNF was diminished in preterm monocytes, especially in nonclassic monocytes. Premature monocytes showed high phagocytic activity, with significantly lower acidification of the phagosome. The reduced functional response of nonclassic monocytes of preterm neonates appears to be part of the diminished early immune response to bacterial cell wall components and is likely to contribute to their susceptibility to bacterial infection. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  6. Human Airway Epithelial Cells Direct Significant Rhinovirus Replication in Monocytic Cells by Enhancing ICAM1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lizarraga, Rosa; Chen, Yin

    2017-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the major cause of common cold, and it also plays a significant role in asthma and asthma exacerbation. The airway epithelium is the primary site of RV infection and production. In contrast, monocytic cells (e.g., monocytes and macrophages) are believed to be nonpermissive for RV replication. Instead, RV has been shown to modulate inflammatory gene expressions in these cells via a replication-independent mechanism. In the study presented here, replication of RV16 (a major-group RV) was found to be significantly enhanced in monocytes when it was cocultivated with airway epithelial cells. This effect appeared to be mediated by secretory components from epithelial cells, which stimulated RV16 replication and significantly elevated the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines. The lack of such an effect on RV1A, a minor-group RV that enters the cell by a different receptor, suggests that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), the receptor for major-group RVs, may be involved. Indeed, conditioned media from epithelial cells significantly increased ICAM1 expression in monocytes. Consistently, ICAM1 overexpression and ICAM1 knockdown enhanced and blocked RV production, respectively, confirming the role of ICAM1 in this process. Thus, this is the first report demonstrating that airway epithelial cells direct significant RV16 replication in monocytic cells via an ICAM1-dependent mechanism. This finding will open a new avenue for the study of RV infection in airway disease and its exacerbation.

  7. Anti-inflammatory and corticosteroid-enhancing actions of vitamin D in monocytes of patients with steroid-resistant and those with steroid-sensitive asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Leung, Donald Y M; Goleva, Elena

    2014-06-01

    Vitamin D is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. Vitamin D regulation of responses in patients with steroid-resistant (SR) versus steroid-sensitive (SS) asthma has not been studied. Peripheral blood cells from 11 patients with SR asthma and 8 patients with SS asthma were preincubated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D [VitD]), followed by dexamethasone (DEX) treatment and LPS stimulation. LPS-induced phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38) in monocytes was examined by means of flow cytometry. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) mRNA expression, which inhibits p-p38, was analyzed by means of real-time PCR. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding and histone H4 acetylation in the glucocorticoid response element of the MKP-1 promoter in monocytes were analyzed by means of chromatin immunoprecipitation. DEX significantly inhibited LPS-induced p-p38 in monocytes from patients with SS asthma but not those from patients with SR asthma (P asthma (P asthma and patients with SR asthma. VitD/DEX-induced MKP-1 mRNA levels remained significantly lower in monocytes from patients with SR asthma (P asthma compared with those from patients with SS asthma. VitD pretreatment enhanced DEX-induced GR binding and histone acetylation in monocytes from both patient groups. However, GR binding and histone H4 acetylation remained significantly lower in monocytes from patients with SR asthma. VitD demonstrated anti-inflammatory and corticosteroid-enhancing effects in monocytes of patients with SR asthma and patients with SS asthma. However, the responses to corticosteroids in patients with SR asthma remained significantly lower than those in patients with SS asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. T-cell cytokines differentially control human monocyte antimicrobial responses by regulating vitamin D metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edfeldt, Kristina; Liu, Philip T; Chun, Rene; Fabri, Mario; Schenk, Mirjam; Wheelwright, Matthew; Keegan, Caroline; Krutzik, Stephan R; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin; Modlin, Robert L

    2010-12-28

    We investigated the mechanisms by which T-cell cytokines are able to influence the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced, vitamin D-dependent antimicrobial pathway in human monocytes. T-cell cytokines differentially influenced TLR2/1-induced expression of the antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and DEFB4, being up-regulated by IFN-γ, down-regulated by IL-4, and unaffected by IL-17. The Th1 cytokine IFN-γ up-regulated TLR2/1 induction of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase (i.e., CYP27B1), leading to enhanced bioconversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25D(3)) to its active metabolite 1,25D(3). In contrast, the Th2 cytokine IL-4, by itself and in combination with the TLR2/1 ligand, induced catabolism of 25D(3) to the inactive metabolite 24,25D(3), and was dependent on expression of vitamin D-24-hydroxylase (i.e., CYP24A1). Therefore, the ability of T-cell cytokines to differentially control monocyte vitamin D metabolism represents a mechanism by which cell-mediated immune responses can regulate innate immune mechanisms to defend against microbial pathogens.

  9. Induction of Chemokine Secretion and Monocyte Migration by Human Choroidal Melanocytes in Response to Proinflammatory Cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehs, Tina; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine to which extent inflammatory cytokines affect chemokine secretion by primary human choroidal melanocytes (HCMs), their capacity to attract monocytes, and whether HCMs are able to influence the proliferation of activated T cells. Methods: Primary cultures of HCMs were...... and secretion of CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL2, CCL5 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte migration inhibitory factor were constitutively expressed without changes in response to proinflammatory cytokines. Supernatants derived from unstimulated cultures...... of 10 HCM donors induced a high initial level of monocyte migration, which decreased upon stimulation with either TCM or IFN-γ and TNF-α. The supernatants from three HCM donors initially showed a low level of monocyte attraction, which increased after exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. Direct...

  10. Inflammatory Monocytes Facilitate Adaptive CD4 T Cell Responses during Respiratory Fungal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Tobias M.; Rivera, Amariliz; Lipuma, Lauren; Gallegos, Alena; Shi, Chao; Mack, Mathias; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, causes invasive disease in immunocompromised humans. Although monocytes and antigen-specific CD4 T cells contribute to defense against inhaled fungal spores, how these cells interact during infection remains undefined. Investigating the role of inflammatory monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during fungal infection, we find that A. fumigatus infection induces an influx of chemokine receptor CCR2- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes into lungs and draining lymph nodes. Depletion of CCR2+ cells reduced A. fumigatus conidial transport from lungs to draining lymph nodes, abolished CD4 T cell priming following respiratory challenge, and impaired pulmonary fungal clearance. In contrast, depletion of CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes during systemic fungal infection did not prevent CD4 T cell priming in the spleen. Our findings demonstrate that pulmonary CD4 T cell responses to inhaled spores require CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes and their derivatives, revealing a compartmentally restricted function for these cells in adaptive respiratory immune responses. PMID:19917501

  11. Interferon-beta induces distinct gene expression response patterns in human monocytes versus T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Henig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocytes, which are key players in innate immunity, are outnumbered by neutrophils and lymphocytes among peripheral white blood cells. The cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β is widely used as an immunomodulatory drug for multiple sclerosis and its functional pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have been previously described. The aim of the present study was to identify novel, cell-specific IFN-β functions and pathways in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-activated monocytes that may have been missed in studies using PBMCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles of human monocytes and T cells were compared following in vitro priming to TNF-α and overnight exposure to IFN-β. Statistical analyses of the gene expression data revealed a cell-type-specific change of 699 transcripts, 667 monocyte-specific transcripts, 21 T cell-specific transcripts and 11 transcripts with either a difference in the response direction or a difference in the magnitude of response. RT-PCR revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs, exhibiting responses to IFN-β that are modulated by TNF-α in monocytes, such as RIPK2 and CD83, but not in T cells or PBMCs. Known IFN-β promoter response elements, such as ISRE, were enriched in T cell DEGs but not in monocyte DEGs. The overall directionality of the gene expression regulation by IFN-β was different in T cells and monocytes, with up-regulation more prevalent in T cells, and a similar extent of up and down-regulation recorded in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By focusing on the response of distinct cell types and by evaluating the combined effects of two cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activities, we were able to present two new findings First, new IFN-β response pathways and genes, some of which were monocytes specific; second, a cell-specific modulation of the IFN-β response transcriptome by TNF-α.

  12. Differential monocyte responses to TLR ligands in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enstrom, Amanda M; Onore, Charity E; Van de Water, Judy A; Ashwood, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairment in social interactions, communication deficits, and restricted repetitive interests and behaviors. Recent evidence has suggested that impairments of innate immunity may play an important role in ASD. To test this hypothesis, we isolated peripheral blood monocytes from 17 children with ASD and 16 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls and stimulated these cell cultures in vitro with distinct toll-like receptors (TLR) ligands: TLR 2 (lipoteichoic acid; LTA), TLR 3 (poly I:C), TLR 4 (lipopolysaccharide; LPS), TLR 5 (flagellin), and TLR 9 (CpG-B). Supernatants were harvested from the cell cultures and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses for IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha, MCP-1, and GM-CSF were determined by multiplex Luminex analysis. After in vitro challenge with TLR ligands, differential cytokine responses were observed in monocyte cultures from children with ASD compared with TD control children. In particular, there was a marked increase in pro-inflammatory IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNFalpha responses following TLR 2, and IL-1beta response following TLR 4 stimulation in monocyte cultures from children with ASD (p<0.04). Conversely, following TLR 9 stimulation there was a decrease in IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNFalpha responses in monocyte cell cultures from children with ASD compared with controls (p<0.05). These data indicate that, monocyte cultures from children with ASD are more responsive to signaling via select TLRs. As monocytes are key regulators of the immune response, dysfunction in the response of these cells could result in long-term immune alterations in children with ASD that may lead to the development of adverse neuroimmune interactions and could play a role in the pathophysiology observed in ASD.

  13. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Schleich, Eva; Hertzenberg, Deetje; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Kümpfel, Tania; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Berthele, Achim; Hemmer, Bernhard; Weber, Martin S

    2011-10-26

    Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg) and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC) were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM). We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and effectiveness may further advance by selectively targeting pathogenic B

  14. CD16+ monocyte subset was enriched and functionally exacerbated in driving T-cell activation and B-cell response in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqun Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The roles that CD16+ monocyte subset plays in T-cell activation and B-cell response have not been well studied in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the distribution of CD16+ monocyte subsets in SLE and explore their possible roles in T-cell activation and B-cell differentiation. Methods: The frequencies of monocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of healthy controls (HCs and patients with SLE were determined by flow cytometry. Monocyte subsets were sorted and co-cultured with CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. Then, T and B cells were collected for different subset detection, while the supernatants were collected for immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgA, and IgM or interferon (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-17A detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Our results showed that CD16+ monocytes exhibited a pro-inflammatory phenotype with elevated CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and CX3CR1 expression on the cell surface. It’s further demonstrated that CD16+ monocytes from patients and HCs shared different cell-surface marker profiles. The CD16+ subset was enriched in SLE and had an exacerbated capacity to promote CD4+ T cell polarization into a Th17 phenotype. Also, CD16+ monocytes had enhanced impacts on CD19+ B cells to differentiate into plasma B cells and regulatory B cells with more Ig production. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that CD16+ monocytes, characterized by different cell-surface marker profiles, were enriched and played a critical role in driving the pathogenic T- and B-cell responses in patients with SLE.

  15. Oxidized Phospholipids on Lipoprotein(a) Elicit Arterial Wall Inflammation and an Inflammatory Monocyte Response in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, Fleur M; Bekkering, Siroon; Kroon, Jeffrey; Yeang, Calvin; Van den Bossche, Jan; van Buul, Jaap D; Ravandi, Amir; Nederveen, Aart J; Verberne, Hein J; Scipione, Corey; Nieuwdorp, Max; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G; Koschinsky, Marlys L; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Riksen, Niels P; Stroes, Erik S G

    2016-08-23

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a prevalent, independent cardiovascular risk factor, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity are poorly defined. Because Lp(a) is the prominent carrier of proinflammatory oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), part of its atherothrombosis might be mediated through this pathway. In vivo imaging techniques including magnetic resonance imaging, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake positron emission tomography/computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography were used to measure subsequently atherosclerotic burden, arterial wall inflammation, and monocyte trafficking to the arterial wall. Ex vivo analysis of monocytes was performed with fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, inflammatory stimulation assays, and transendothelial migration assays. In vitro studies of the pathophysiology of Lp(a) on monocytes were performed with an in vitro model for trained immunity. We show that subjects with elevated Lp(a) (108 mg/dL [50-195 mg/dL]; n=30) have increased arterial inflammation and enhanced peripheral blood mononuclear cells trafficking to the arterial wall compared with subjects with normal Lp(a) (7 mg/dL [2-28 mg/dL]; n=30). In addition, monocytes isolated from subjects with elevated Lp(a) remain in a long-lasting primed state, as evidenced by an increased capacity to transmigrate and produce proinflammatory cytokines on stimulation (n=15). In vitro studies show that Lp(a) contains OxPL and augments the proinflammatory response in monocytes derived from healthy control subjects (n=6). This effect was markedly attenuated by inactivating OxPL on Lp(a) or removing OxPL on apolipoprotein(a). These findings demonstrate that Lp(a) induces monocyte trafficking to the arterial wall and mediates proinflammatory responses through its OxPL content. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which Lp(a) mediates cardiovascular disease. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR

  16. Establishing a Proteomics-Based Monocyte Assay To Assess Differential Innate Immune Activation Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Nataliya K; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Lundberg, Karin; Zhang, Xing-Mei; Harris, Robert A; Zubarev, Roman A

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune cells are complex systems that can be simultaneously activated in a variety of ways. Common methods currently used to estimate the response of innate immune cells to stimuli are usually biased toward a single mode of activation. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of designing an assay based on unbiased proteome analysis that would be capable of predicting the complex response of the innate immune system to various challenges. Monocytes were used as representative cells of the innate immune system. The underlying hypothesis was that their proteome response to different activating molecules would reflect the immunogenicity of these molecules. To identify the main modes of response, we treated the human monocytic THP-1 cell line with nine different stimuli. Differentiation and activation were determined to be the two major modes of monocyte response, with PMA causing the strongest differentiation and Pam3CSK4 causing the strongest proinflammatory activation. The established assay was applied to characterize the monocyte response to epidermal growth factor peptide containing isoaspartate, which induced differentiation but not proinflammatory activation. Because of its versatility, robustness, and specificity, this new assay is likely to find a niche among the more established immunological methods.

  17. Evaluation of trained immunity by β-1, 3 (d)-glucan on murine monocytes in vitro and duration of response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Guzman-Genuino, Ruth Marian; Williams, David L; Hayball, John D; Diener, Kerrilyn R

    2017-08-01

    The β-1, 3 (d)-glucan (β-glucan) present in the cell wall of Candida albicans induces epigenetic changes in human monocytes resulting in primed macrophages exhibiting increased cytokine responsiveness to reinfection. This phenomenon is referred to as trained immunity or innate immune memory. However, whether β-glucan can reprogramme murine monocytes in vitro or induce lasting effects in vivo has yet to be elucidated. Thus, purified murine spleen-derived monocytes were primed with β-glucan in vitro and assessed for markers of differentiation and survival. Important macrophage cell markers during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation were downregulated and survival enhanced due to partial inhibition of apoptosis. Increased survival and not the β-glucan training effect explained the elevated production of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced by subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. In vivo, 4 days after systemic administration of β-glucan, mice were more responsive to LPS challenge as shown by the increased serum levels of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10, an effect shown to be short lived as enhanced cytokine production was lost by day 20. Here, we have characterised murine macrophages derived from β-glucan-primed monocytes based on their surface marker expression and for the first time provide evidence that the training effect of β-glucan in vivo declines within a 3-week period.

  18. Chemotherapy of colorectal liver metastases induces a rapid rise in intermediate blood monocytes which predicts treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Dominic; Starlinger, Patrick; Alidzanovic, Lejla; Zajc, Philipp; Maier, Thomas; Feldman, Alexandra; Padickakudy, Robin; Buchberger, Elisabeth; Elleder, Vanessa; Spittler, Andreas; Stift, Judith; Pop, Lorand; Gruenberger, Birgit; Gruenberger, Thomas; Brostjan, Christine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported that intermediate monocytes (CD14++/CD16+) were increased in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, while the subset of pro-angiogenic TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) was not significantly elevated. This study was designed to evaluate changes in frequency and function of intermediate monocytes and TEMs during chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic cancer treatment and their relation to treatment response. Monocyte populations were determined by flow cytometry in 60 metastasized CRC (mCRC) patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. Blood samples were taken before treatment, after two therapy cycles, at the end of neoadjuvant therapy and immediately before surgical resection of liver metastases. Neoadjuvant treatment resulted in a significant increase in circulating intermediate monocytes which was most pronounced after two cycles and positively predicted tumor response (AUC = 0.875, p = 0.005). With a cut-off value set to 1% intermediate monocytes of leukocytes, this parameter showed a predictive sensitivity and specificity of 75% and 88%. Anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab had no impact on monocyte populations including TEMs. In 15 patients and six healthy controls, the gene expression profile and the migratory behavior of monocyte subsets was evaluated. The profile of intermediate monocytes suggested functions in antigen presentation, inflammatory cytokine production, chemotaxis and was remarkably stable during chemotherapy. Intermediate monocytes showed a preferential migratory response to tumor-derived signals in vitro and correlated with the level of CD14+/CD16+ monocytic infiltrates in the resected tumor tissue. In conclusion, the rapid rise of intermediate monocytes during chemotherapy may offer a simple marker for response prediction and a timely change in regimen. PMID:27471631

  19. Maggot secretions suppress pro-inflammatory responses of human monocytes through elevation of cyclic AMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, M.P.E.; Baldry, M.; Dissel, van J.T.; Jukema, G.N.; Nibbering, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As monocytes may contribute to the excessive inflammatory responses in such wounds, this study focussed on the effects of maggot secretions on the pro-inflammatory activities of these cells.

  20. Crosstalk between monocytes and myometrial smooth muscle in culture generates synergistic pro-inflammatory cytokine production and enhances myocyte contraction, with effects opposed by progesterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S.P.; Hutchinson, J.L.; Dorward, D.A.; Rossi, A.G.; Norman, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Both term and preterm parturition are characterized by an influx of macrophages and neutrophils into the myometrium and cervix, with co-incident increased peripheral blood monocyte activation. Infection and inflammation are strongly implicated in the pathology of preterm labour (PTL), with progesterone considered a promising candidate for its prevention or treatment. In this study, we investigated the effect of monocytes on myometrial smooth muscle cell inflammatory cytokine production both alone and in response to LPS, a TLR4 agonist used to trigger PTL in vivo. We also investigated the effect of monocytes on myocyte contraction. Monocytes, isolated from peripheral blood samples from term pregnant women, were cultured alone, or co-cultured with PHM1-41 myometrial smooth muscle cells, for 24 h. In a third set of experiments, PHM1-41 myocytes were cultured for 24 h in isolation. Cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA or multiplex assays. Co-culture of monocytes and myocytes led to synergistic secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1, with the secretion being further enhanced by LPS (100 ng/ml). The synergistic secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 from co-cultures was mediated in part by direct cell–cell contact, and by TNF. Conditioned media from co-cultures stimulated contraction of PHM1-41 myocytes, and the effect was inhibited by progesterone. Both progesterone and IL-10 inhibited LPS-stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion from co-cultures, while progesterone also inhibited chemokine secretion. These data suggest that monocytes infiltrating the myometrium at labour participate in crosstalk that potentiates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, an effect that is enhanced by LPS, and can augment myocyte contraction. These effects are all partially inhibited by progesterone. PMID:26002969

  1. Activated platelets enhance IL-10 secretion and reduce TNF-α secretion by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Hasselbalch, Hans C; Nielsen, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    ), Escherichia coli LPS, or intact Porphyromonas gingivalis. Addition of platelets activated by thrombin-receptor-activating peptide enhanced IL-10 production induced by LPS (p ....05), and P. gingivalis (p IL-10 and TNF-α production were observed on addition of platelet supernatant to mononuclear cells, whereas addition of recombinant soluble CD40L mimicked the effects on IL-10...... production. Moreover, Ab-mediated blockade of CD40L counteracted the effect of platelets and platelet supernatants on TNF-α production. Monocytes separated into two populations with respect to IL-10 production induced by TG; the high-secreting fraction increased from 0.8 to 2.1% (p

  2. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Methods Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM. Results We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. Conclusions These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and

  3. Cognitive Consequences of a Sustained Monocyte Type 1 IFN Response in HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pulliam, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    With successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1-infected subjects can achieve undetectable peripheral viral loads and immune homeostasis. However, in a subset of individuals on therapy, peripheral monocytes have a gene expression profile characteristic of a type 1 interferon α (IFN) response. This type 1 IFN response correlates with a number of pathogenic conditions including neural cell injury and in combination with HCV infection, cognitive impairment. Lessons from the non-human primate model...

  4. Phagocytosis of haemozoin (malarial pigment enhances metalloproteinase-9 activity in human adherent monocytes: Role of IL-1beta and 15-HETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giribaldi Giuliana

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown previously that human monocytes fed with haemozoin (HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs displayed increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 enzyme activity and protein/mRNA expression and increased TNF production, and showed higher matrix invasion ability. The present study utilized the same experimental model to analyse the effect of phagocytosis of: HZ, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ and trophozoites on production of IL-1beta and MMP-9 activity and expression. The second aim was to find out which component of HZ was responsible for the effects. Methods Native HZ freshly isolated from Plasmodium falciparum (Palo Alto strain, Mycoplasma-free, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ, trophozoites and control meals such as opsonized non-parasitized RBCs and inert latex particles, were fed to human monocytes. The production of IL-1beta by differently fed monocytes, in presence or absence of specific MMP-9 inhibitor or anti-hIL-1beta antibodies, was quantified in supernatants by ELISA. Expression of IL-1beta was analysed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. MMP-9 activity and protein expression were quantified by gelatin zymography and Western blotting. Results Monocytes fed with HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs generated increased amounts of IL-1beta and enhanced enzyme activity (in cell supernatants and protein/mRNA expression (in cell lysates of monocyte MMP-9. The latter appears to be causally related to enhanced IL-1beta production, as enhancement of both expression and enzyme activity were abrogated by anti-hIL-1beta Abs. Upregulation of IL-1beta and MMP-9 were absent in monocytes fed with beta-haematin or delipidized HZ, indicating a role for HZ-attached or HZ-generated lipid components. 15-HETE (15(S,R-hydroxy-6,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid a potent lipoperoxidation derivative generated by HZ from arachidonic acid via haem-catalysis was identified as one mediator

  5. Redox Stimulation of Human THP-1 Monocytes in Response to Cold Physical Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In plasma medicine, cold physical plasma delivers a delicate mixture of reactive components to cells and tissues. Recent studies suggested a beneficial role of cold plasma in wound healing. Yet, the biological processes related to the redox modulation via plasma are not fully understood. We here used the monocytic cell line THP-1 as a model to test their response to cold plasma in vitro. Intriguingly, short term plasma treatment stimulated cell growth. Longer exposure only modestly compromised cell viability but apparently supported the growth of cells that were enlarged in size and that showed enhanced metabolic activity. A significantly increased mitochondrial content in plasma treated cells supported this notion. On THP-1 cell proteome level, we identified an increase of protein translation with key regulatory proteins being involved in redox regulation (hypoxia inducible factor 2α, differentiation (retinoic acid signaling and interferon inducible factors, and cell growth (Yin Yang 1. Regulation of inflammation is a key element in many chronic diseases, and we found a significantly increased expression of the anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 and of the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8. Together, these results foster the view that cold physical plasma modulates the redox balance and inflammatory processes in wound related cells.

  6. Brugia malayi Microfilariae Induce a Regulatory Monocyte/Macrophage Phenotype That Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Gopinath; Rao, Gopala B.; Lucius, Richard; Srikantam, Aparna; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages contribute to the dysfunction of immune responses in human filariasis. During patent infection monocytes encounter microfilariae in the blood, an event that occurs in asymptomatically infected filariasis patients that are immunologically hyporeactive. Aim To determine whether blood microfilariae directly act on blood monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages to induce a regulatory phenotype that interferes with innate and adaptive responses. Methodology and principal findings Monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages from filaria non-endemic normal donors were stimulated in vitro with Brugia malayi microfilarial (Mf) lysate. We could show that monocytes stimulated with Mf lysate develop a defined regulatory phenotype, characterised by expression of the immunoregulatory markers IL-10 and PD-L1. Significantly, this regulatory phenotype was recapitulated in monocytes from Wuchereria bancrofti asymptomatically infected patients but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. Monocytes from non-endemic donors stimulated with Mf lysate directly inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10). IFN-γ responses were restored by neutralising IL-10 or PD-1. Furthermore, macrophages stimulated with Mf lysate expressed high levels of IL-10 and had suppressed phagocytic abilities. Finally Mf lysate applied during the differentiation of macrophages in vitro interfered with macrophage abilities to respond to subsequent LPS stimulation in a selective manner. Conclusions and significance Conclusively, our study demonstrates that Mf lysate stimulation of monocytes from healthy donors in vitro induces a regulatory phenotype, characterized by expression of PD-L1 and IL-10. This phenotype is directly reflected in monocytes from filarial patients with asymptomatic infection but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. We suggest that suppression of T cell functions typically seen in lymphatic

  7. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. (Univ. of California-Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  8. Sulforaphane Epigenetically Regulates Innate Immune Responses of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Induced with Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xueqi; Pröll, Maren; Neuhoff, Christiane; Zhang, Rui; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Hossain, Md. Munir; Tesfaye, Dawit; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Hölker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2015-01-01

    Histone acetylation, regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling gene expressions. Although dendritic cells (DCs) are playing pivotal roles in host immune responses, the effect of epigenetic modulation of DCs immune responses remains unknown. Sulforaphane (SFN) as a HDAC inhibitor has anti-inflammatory properties, which is used to investigate the epigenetic regulation of LPS-induced immune gene and HDAC family gene expressions in porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). SFN was found to inhibit the lipopolysaccharide LPS induced HDAC6, HDAC10 and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3a) gene expression, whereas up-regulated the expression of DNMT1 gene. Additionally, SFN was observed to inhibit the global HDAC activity, and suppressed moDCs differentiation from immature to mature DCs through down-regulating the CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and led further to enhanced phagocytosis of moDCs. The SFN pre-treated of moDCs directly altered the LPS-induced TLR4 and MD2 gene expression and dynamically regulated the TLR4-induced activity of transcription factor NF-κB and TBP. SFN showed a protective role in LPS induced cell apoptosis through suppressing the IRF6 and TGF-ß1 production. SFN impaired the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1ß secretion into the cell culture supernatants that were induced in moDCs by LPS stimulation, whereas SFN increased the cellular-resident TNF-α accumulation. This study demonstrates that through the epigenetic mechanism the HDAC inhibitor SFN could modulate the LPS induced innate immune responses of porcine moDCs. PMID:25793534

  9. PPARγ Ligand-Induced Unfolded Protein Responses in Monocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High levels of oxLDL lead to cell dysfunction and apoptosis, a phenomenon known as lipotoxicity. Disturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function results in ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), which tends to restore ER homeostasis but switches to apoptosis when ER stress is prolonged. In the present study the ...

  10. Infliximab therapy increases the frequency of circulating CD16+ monocytes and modifies macrophage cytokine response to bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, N; Magro, F; Silva, J; Duro, M; Gracio, D; Coelho, R; Appelberg, R; Macedo, G; Sarmento, A

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has been correlated with altered macrophage response to microorganisms. Considering the efficacy of infliximab treatment on CD remission, we investigated infliximab effects on circulating monocyte subsets and on macrophage cytokine response to bacteria. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were obtained from CD patients, treated or not with infliximab. Macrophages were infected with Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) or M. avium subsp avium, and cytokine levels [tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10] were evaluated at different time-points. To evaluate infliximab-dependent effects on monocyte subsets, we studied CD14 and CD16 expression by peripheral blood monocytes before and after different infliximab administrations. We also investigated TNF secretion by macrophages obtained from CD16+ and CD16− monocytes and the frequency of TNF+ cells among CD16+ and CD16− monocyte-derived macrophages from CD patients. Infliximab treatment resulted in elevated TNF and IL-10 macrophage response to bacteria. An infliximab-dependent increase in the frequency of circulating CD16+ monocytes (particularly the CD14++CD16+ subset) was also observed (before infliximab: 4·65 ± 0·58%; after three administrations: 10·68 ± 2·23%). In response to MAP infection, macrophages obtained from CD16+ monocytes were higher TNF producers and CD16+ macrophages from infliximab-treated CD patients showed increased frequency of TNF+ cells. In conclusion, infliximab treatment increased the TNF production of CD macrophages in response to bacteria, which seemed to depend upon enrichment of CD16+ circulating monocytes, particularly of the CD14++CD16+ subset. Infliximab treatment of CD patients also resulted in increased macrophage IL-10 production in response to bacteria, suggesting an infliximab-induced shift to M2 macrophages. PMID:24816497

  11. Low Glucose Concentrations Induce a Similar Inflammatory Response in Monocytes from Type 2 Diabetic Patients and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Piarulli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the proinflammatory interleukin 1β (IL-1β and anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by monocytes from 38 patients with type 2 diabetes and 31 controls in different glucose concentrations. Monocytes were incubated in low (2.5 mmol/L-, normal (5.0 mmol/L-, and high (20 mmol/L-glucose conditions in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Monocytes from both patients and controls only produced a significant increase in IL-1β in low-glucose conditions (p<0.01, and this phenomenon was amplified in the presence of LPS, while it was not seen in normal- or high-glucose conditions, not even in the presence of LPS stimulation. There was no increase in IL-10 production by monocytes from either diabetic patients or controls using whatever glucose concentrations, except when treated with LPS in normal-glucose conditions. These findings seem to suggest that low-glucose conditions induce an inflammatory response in monocytes in all individuals, as an intrinsic capacity of this cell line. On the other hand, monocytes only retain their anti-inflammatory ability in response to known inflammatory stimuli such as LPS, under normal-glucose concentrations. In conclusion, human monocytes express an inflammatory pattern in low-glucose conditions in vitro. This response could contribute to explaining the higher cardiovascular risk induced by hypoglycemia in diabetic patients.

  12. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Are Essential for CD8(+) T Cell Activation and Antitumor Responses After Local Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Sabine; Yang, Jianping; Ronchese, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Tumors harbor several populations of dendritic cells (DCs) with the ability to prime tumor-specific T cells. However, these T cells mostly fail to differentiate into armed effectors and are unable to control tumor growth. We have previously shown that treatment with immunostimulatory agents at the tumor site can activate antitumor immune responses and is associated with the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) in the tumor and tumor-draining lymph node (dLN). Here, we use depletion of DCs or monocytes and monocyte transfer to show that these moDCs are critical to the activation of antitumor immune responses. Treatment with the immunostimulatory agents monosodium urate crystals and Mycobacterium smegmatis induced the accumulation of monocytes in the dLN, their upregulation of CD11c and MHCII, and expression of iNOS, TNFα, and IL12p40. Blocking monocyte entry into the lymph node and tumor through neutralization of the chemokine CCL2 or inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling prevented the generation of moDCs, the infiltration of tumor-specific T cells into the tumor, and antitumor responses. In a reciprocal fashion, monocytes transferred into mice depleted of CD11c(+) cells were sufficient to rescue CD8(+) T cell priming in lymph node and delay tumor growth. Thus, monocytes exposed to the appropriate conditions become powerful activators of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells and antitumor immunity.

  13. Candesartan reduces the innate immune response to lipopolysaccharide in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrayoz, Ignacio M.; Pang, Tao; Benicky, Julius; Pavel, Jaroslav; Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Inhibition of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) reduces chronic inflammation associated with hypertension. We asked whether AT1 receptor inhibition would reduce the innate inflammatory response induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods We used unstimulated human circulating monocytes obtained from healthy donors by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Monocytes were studied in vitro after incubation with LPS (50 ng/ml) with and without 1 μmol/l candesartan, an AT1 receptor blocker. Angiotensin II receptor mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcriptase-PCR and receptor binding by autoradiography; inflammatory factor mRNA expression was studied by reverse transcriptase-PCR and cytokine release by ELISA. Results Human monocytes did not express detectable AT1 receptors, and angiotensin II did not induce inflammatory factor mRNA expression or cytokine release. However, candesartan substantially reduced the LPS-induced expression of the mRNAs for the LPS recognition protein cluster of differentiation 14, the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 and the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor. In addition, candesartan reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway, the tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 secretion, and the ROS formation induced by LPS, without affecting the secretion of interleukin-10. Conclusion We hypothesize that the anti-inflammatory effects of candesartan in these cells are likely mediated by mechanisms unrelated to AT1 receptor blockade. Our results demonstrate that candesartan significantly reduces the innate immune response to LPS in human circulating monocytes. The anti-inflammatory effects of candesartan may be of importance not only in hypertension but also in other inflammatory disorders. PMID:19730394

  14. Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas granulocytes and monocytes display variable responses to in vitro pressure exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Thompson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While it is widely known that marine mammals possess adaptations which allow them to make repetitive and extended dives to great depths without suffering ill effects seen in humans, the response of marine mammal immune cells to diving is unknown. Renewed interest in marine mammal dive physiology has arisen due to reports of decompression sickness-like symptoms and embolic damage in stranded and by-caught animals, and there is concern over whether anthropogenic activities can impact marine mammal health by disrupting adaptive dive responses and behavior. This work addresses the need for information concerning marine mammal immune function during diving by evaluating granulocyte and monocyte phagocytosis, and granulocyte activation in belugas (n=4 in comparison with humans (n=4, with and without in vitro pressure exposures. In addition, the potential for additional stressors to impact immune function was investigated by comparing the response of beluga cells to pressure between baseline and stressor conditions. Granulocyte and monocyte phagocytosis, as well as granulocyte activation, were compared between pressure exposed and non-exposed cells for each condition, between different pressure profiles and between conditions using mixed generalized linear models (α=0.05. The effects of pressure varied between species as well by depth, compression/decompression rates, and length of exposures, and condition for belugas. Pressure induced changes in granulocyte and monocyte function in belugas could serve a protective function against dive-related pathologies and differences in the response between humans and belugas could reflect degrees of dive adaptation. The alteration of these responses during physiologically challenging conditions may increase the potential for dive-related in jury and disease in marine mammals.

  15. Monocyte / macrophage inflammatory response pathways to combat Francisella infection: possible therapeutic targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devyn D Gillette

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis can bypass and suppress host immune responses, even to the point of manipulating immune cell phenotypes and intercellular inflammatory networks. Strengthening these responses such that immune cells more readily identify and destroy the bacteria is likely to become a viable (and perhaps necessary strategy for combating infections with Francisella, especially given the likelihood of antibiotic resistance in the foreseeable future. Monocytes and macrophages offer a niche wherein Francisella can invade and replicate, resulting in substantially higher bacterial load that can overcome the host. As such, understanding their responses to Francisella may uncover potential avenues of therapy that could promote a lowering of bacterial burden and clearance of infection. These response pathways include Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, the caspase-1 inflammasome, Interferons, NADPH oxidase, Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the Ras pathway. In this review we summarize the literature pertaining to the roles of these pathways during Francisella infection, with an emphasis on monocyte / macrophage responses. The therapeutic targeting of one or more such pathways may ultimately become a valuable tool for the treatment of tularemia, and several possibilities are discussed.

  16. Leishmania exosomes modulate innate and adaptive immune responses through effects on monocytes and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Judith Maxwell; Clos, Joachim; Horakova, Eva; Wang, Adele Y; Wiesgigl, Martina; Kelly, Isabelle; Lynn, Miriam A; McMaster, W Robert; Foster, Leonard J; Levings, Megan K; Reiner, Neil E

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the properties of leishmania exosomes with respect to influencing innate and adaptive immune responses. Exosomes from Leishmania donovani modulated human monocyte cytokine responses to IFN-γ in a bimodal fashion by promoting IL-10 production and inhibiting that of TNF-α. Moreover, these vesicles were inhibitory with respect to cytokine responses (IL-12p70, TNF-α, and IL-10) by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Exosomes from wild-type (WT) L. donovani failed to prime monocyte-derived dendritic cells to drive the differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. In contrast, vesicles from heat shock protein (HSP)100(-/-) L. donovani showed a gain-of-function and proinflammatory phenotype and promoted the differentiation of naive CD4 lymphocytes into Th1 cells. Proteomic analysis showed that exosomes from WT and HSP100(-/-) leishmania had distinct protein cargo, suggesting that packaging of proteins into exosomes is dependent in part on HSP100. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with WT L. donovani exosomes prior to challenge with WT organisms exacerbated infection and promoted IL-10 production in the spleen. In contrast, HSP100(-/-) exosomes promoted spleen cell production of IFN-γ and did not adversely affect hepatic parasite burdens. Furthermore, the proparasitic properties of WT exosomes were not species specific because BALB/c mice exposed to Leishmania major exosomes showed increased Th2 polarization and exacerbation of disease in response to infection with L. major. These findings demonstrate that leishmania exosomes are predominantly immunosuppressive. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first evidence to suggest that changes in the protein cargo of exosomes may influence the impact of these vesicles on myeloid cell function.

  17. Regulation of Monocyte Adhesion and Migration by Nox4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Fung Lee

    Full Text Available We showed that metabolic disorders promote thiol oxidative stress in monocytes, priming monocytes for accelerated chemokine-induced recruitment, and accumulation at sites of vascular injury and the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify both the source of reactive oxygen species (ROS responsible for thiol oxidation in primed and dysfunctional monocytes and the molecular mechanisms through which ROS accelerate the migration and recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages. We found that Nox4, a recently identified NADPH oxidase in monocytes and macrophages, localized to focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton, and associated with phospho-FAK, paxillin, and actin, implicating Nox4 in the regulation of monocyte adhesion and migration. We also identified Nox4 as a new, metabolic stress-inducible source of ROS that controls actin S-glutathionylation and turnover in monocytes and macrophages, providing a novel mechanistic link between Nox4-derived H2O2 and monocyte adhesion and migration. Actin associated with Nox4 was S-glutathionylated, and Nox4 association with actin was enhanced in metabolically-stressed monocytes. Metabolic stress induced Nox4 and accelerated monocyte adhesion and chemotaxis in a Nox4-dependent mechanism. In conclusion, our data suggest that monocytic Nox4 is a central regulator of actin dynamics, and induction of Nox4 is the rate-limiting step in metabolic stress-induced monocyte priming and dysfunction associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and the progression of atherosclerotic plaques.

  18. Training modifies innate immune responses in blood monocytes and in pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frellstedt, Linda; Waldschmidt, Ingrid; Gosset, Philippe; Desmet, Christophe; Pirottin, Dimitri; Bureau, Fabrice; Farnir, Frédéric; Franck, Thierry; Dupuis-Tricaud, Marie-Capucine; Lekeux, Pierre; Art, Tatiana

    2014-07-01

    In humans, strenuous exercise causes increased susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and costimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules. Lower airway diseases are also a common problem in sport and racing horses. Because innate immunity plays an essential role in lung defense mechanisms, we assessed the effect of acute exercise and training on innate immune responses in two different compartments. Blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were collected from horses in untrained, moderately trained, intensively trained, and deconditioned states before and after a strenuous exercise test. The cells were analyzed for TLR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression by real-time PCR in vitro, and cytokine production after in vitro stimulation with TLR ligands was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that training, but not acute exercise, modified the innate immune responses in both compartments. The mRNA expression of TLR3 was down-regulated by training in both cell types, whereas the expression of TLR4 was up-regulated in monocytes. Monocytes treated with LPS and a synthetic diacylated lipoprotein showed increased cytokine secretion in trained and deconditioned subjects, indicating the activation of cells at the systemic level. The production of TNF-α and IFN-β in nonstimulated and stimulated PAMs was decreased in trained and deconditioned horses and might therefore explain the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. Our study reports a dissociation between the systemic and the lung response to training that is probably implicated in the systemic inflammation and in the pulmonary susceptibility to infection.

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen enhances neutrophil apoptosis and their clearance by monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almzaiel, Anwar J; Billington, Richard; Smerdon, Gary; Moody, A John

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis and clearance by macrophages are essential for wound healing. Evidence suggests that hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) exposure may enhance neutrophil apoptosis, but HBO effects leading to neutrophil clearance by macrophages are still unclear. In the current study, bovine neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMΦ) were co-cultured under HBO (97.9% O2, 2.1% CO2 at 2.4 atm absolute (ATA)) (1 atm = 101.325 kPa), hyperbaric normoxia (8.8% O2 at 2.4 ATA), normobaric hyperoxia (95% O2, 5% CO2), normoxia (air), and normobaric hypoxia (5% O2, 5% CO2). Phagocytosis of fresh and 22 h aged neutrophils by MDMΦ was increased after HBO pre-treatment, assessed using flow cytometry and light microscopy. Enhanced clearance of neutrophils was accompanied by an increase in H2O2 levels following HBO pre-treatment with upregulation of IL-10 (anti-inflammatory cytokine) mRNA expression in LPS-stimulated MDMΦ that had ingested aged neutrophils. TNF-α (pro-inflammatory cytokine) gene expression did not change in LPS-stimulated MDMΦ that had ingested fresh or aged neutrophils after HBO, pressure, and hyperoxia. These findings suggest that HBO-activated MDMΦ participate in the clearance of apoptotic cells. Uptake of neutrophils by MDMΦ exposed to HBO may contribute to resolution of inflammation, because HBO induced up-regulation of IL-10 mRNA expression.

  20. IκBζ Regulates Human Monocyte Pro-Inflammatory Responses Induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Kruthika; Rahman, Mohd. Akhlakur; Mitra, Srabani; Knoell, Daren L.; Woodiga, Shireen A.; King, Samantha J.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal lung infections represent a major cause of death worldwide. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NFKBIZ gene, encoding the transcription factor IκBζ, are associated with increased susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease. We hence analyzed how IκBζ might regulate inflammatory responses to pneumococcal infection. We first demonstrate that IκBζ is expressed in human blood monocytes but not in bronchial epithelial cells, in response to wild type pneumococcal strain D39. D39 transiently induced IκBζ in a dose dependent manner, with subsequent induction of downstream molecules involved in host defense. Of these molecules, IκBζ knockdown reduced the expression of IL-6 and GMCSF. Furthermore, IκBζ overexpression increased the activity of IL-6 and GMCSF promoters, supporting the knockdown findings. Pneumococci lacking either pneumolysin or capsule still induced IκBζ. While inhibition of TLR1/TLR2 blocked D39 induced IκBζ expression, TLR4 inhibition did not. Blockade of p38 MAP kinase and NFκB suppressed D39 induced IκBζ. Overall, our data demonstrates that IκBζ regulates monocyte inflammatory responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae by promoting the production of IL-6 and GMCSF. PMID:27597997

  1. Differential interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-23 production by human blood monocytes and dendritic cells in response to commensal enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuzak, Jennifer; Dillon, Stephanie; Wilson, Cara

    2012-08-01

    Human peripheral blood contains antigen-presenting cells (APC), including dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, that may encounter microbes that have translocated from the intestine to the periphery in disease states like HIV-1 infection and inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated the response of DC and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to a panel of representative commensal enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Bacteroides fragilis. All three bacteria induced significant upregulation of the maturation and activation markers CD40 and CD83 on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). However, only mDC produced cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p40/70, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in response to bacterial stimulation. Cytokine profiles in whole PBMC differed depending on the stimulating bacterial species: B. fragilis induced production of IL-23, IL-12p70, and IL-10, whereas E. coli and Enterococcus induced an IL-10-predominant response. mDC and monocyte depletion experiments indicated that these cell types differentially produced IL-10 and IL-23 in response to E. coli and B. fragilis. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron did not induce levels of IL-23 similar to those of B. fragilis, suggesting that B. fragilis may have unique proinflammatory properties among Bacteroides species. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to PBMC cultures stimulated with commensal bacteria abrogated the IL-23 response, whereas blocking IL-10 significantly enhanced IL-23 production, suggesting that IL-10 controls the levels of IL-23 produced. These results indicate that blood mDC and monocytes respond differentially to innate stimulation with whole commensal bacteria and that IL-10 may play a role in controlling the proinflammatory response to translocated microbes.

  2. Identification of genes responsive to solar simulated UV radiation in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortensia de la Fuente

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1, inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL, galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA, IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC-mediated immune responses.

  3. Cognitive consequences of a sustained monocyte type 1 IFN response in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    With successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1-infected subjects can achieve undetectable peripheral viral loads and immune homeostasis. However, in a subset of individuals on therapy, peripheral monocytes have a gene expression profile characteristic of a type 1 interferon α (IFN) response. This type 1 IFN response correlates with a number of pathogenic conditions including neural cell injury and in combination with HCV infection, cognitive impairment. Lessons from the non-human primate models of pathogenic and nonpathogenic SIV suggest that returning the initial IFN spike in acute SIV infection to normal allows the immune system to control infection and return to homeostasis. An IFN "alarm" signature, defined as monocyte activation with overexpression of the type1 IFN genes IFI27 and CD169, would be useful for identifying a subset of subjects with HIV-1 infection that could progress to a number of pathologies associated with immune activation including cognitive dysfunction. This strategy is being actively pursued for autoimmune diseases that are characterized by an IFN signature. Therapies to block the IFN signature are under investigation as a means to reset the immune system and in a subset of HIV-1-infected subjects may be an adjuvant to standard antiviral therapy to return cognitive function.

  4. Activation of human monocytes by live Borrelia burgdorferi generates TLR2-dependent and -independent responses which include induction of IFN-beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Salazar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that innate immune responses to Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb are primarily triggered by the spirochete's outer membrane lipoproteins signaling through cell surface TLR1/2. We recently challenged this notion by demonstrating that phagocytosis of live Bb by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs elicited greater production of proinflammatory cytokines than did equivalent bacterial lysates. Using whole genome microarrays, we show herein that, compared to lysates, live spirochetes elicited a more intense and much broader transcriptional response involving genes associated with diverse cellular processes; among these were IFN-beta and a number of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs, which are not known to result from TLR2 signaling. Using isolated monocytes, we demonstrated that cell activation signals elicited by live Bb result from cell surface interactions and uptake and degradation of organisms within phagosomes. As with PBCMs, live Bb induced markedly greater transcription and secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1beta in monocytes than did lysates. Secreted IL-18, which, like IL-1beta, also requires cleavage by activated caspase-1, was generated only in response to live Bb. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production by TLR2-deficient murine macrophages was only moderately diminished in response to live Bb but was drastically impaired against lysates; TLR2 deficiency had no significant effect on uptake and degradation of spirochetes. As with PBMCs, live Bb was a much more potent inducer of IFN-beta and ISGs in isolated monocytes than were lysates or a synthetic TLR2 agonist. Collectively, our results indicate that the enhanced innate immune responses of monocytes following phagocytosis of live Bb have both TLR2-dependent and -independent components and that the latter induce transcription of type I IFNs and ISGs.

  5. Blood monocyte oxidative burst activity in acute P. falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Theander, T G

    1989-01-01

    The release of superoxide anion from blood monocytes was studied in eight patients with acute primary attack P. falciparum malaria. Before treatment a significant enhancement of the oxidative burst prevailed, which contrasts with previous findings of a depressed monocyte chemotactic responsiveness...

  6. N-Acetylcysteine enhances the action of anti-inflammatory drugs as suppressors of prostaglandin production in monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hoffer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for the synthesis of prostaglandins. Since oxygen free radicals can act as second cellular messengers, especially to modulate the metabolism of arachidonic acid and the prostaglandin tract, it seems plausible that antioxidants might affect the production of prostaglandin by activated cells. This research is focused on the effect of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC on the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 formation in activated monocytes by specific and non-specific COX inhibitors. We found that lipopolysaccharide-induced prostaglandin E2 formation was significantly reduced by rofecoxib and by diclofenac, two NSAIDs. Addition of NAC to each of these drugs enhanced the effect of the NSAIDs. These results suggest that one might expect either a potentiation of the anti-inflammatory effect of COX inhibitors by their simultaneous administration with NAC, or obtaining the same anti-inflammatory at lower drug levels.

  7. The Soluble Form of the Cellular Prion Protein Enhances Phagocytic Activity and Cytokine Production by Human Monocytes Via Activation of ERK and NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Won; Park, Bum-Chan; Jung, Joon-Goo; Jang, Young-Soon; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    The PrPC is expressed in many types of immune cells including monocytes and macrophages, however, its function in immune regulation remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined a role for PrPC in regulation of monocyte function. Specifically, the effect of a soluble form of PrPC was studied in human monocytes. A recombinant fusion protein of soluble human PrPC fused with the Fc portion of human IgG1 (designated as soluble PrPC-Fc) bound to the cell surface of monocytes, induced differentiation to macrophage-like cells, and enhanced adherence and phagocytic activity. In addition, soluble PrPC-Fc stimulated monocytes to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Both ERK and NF-κB signaling pathways were activated in soluble PrPC-treated monocytes, and inhibitors of either pathway abrogated monocyte adherence and cytokine production. Taken together, we conclude that soluble PrPC-Fc enhanced adherence, phagocytosis, and cytokine production of monocytes via activation of the ERK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24009542

  8. Osteopontin inhibition of miR-129-3p enhances IL-17 expression and monocyte migration in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Hao; Liu, Shan-Chi; Wang, Yu-Han; Su, Chen-Ming; Huang, Chien-Chung; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-02-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is an important proinflammatory cytokine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Levels of OPN have been shown to be significantly correlated with interleukin-17 (IL-17) production and expression of Th17 cells in the synovial fluid of RA patients. Here, we investigated the role of OPN in monocyte migration, IL-17 production and osteoblasts. OPN and IL-17 expression profiles in osteoarthritis (OA) and RA synovial fluid were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of the microRNA, miR-129-3p, in osteoblasts was analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Immunoreactive proteins were spotted by Western blotting. We used the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model to investigate the role of OPN in monocyte migration during RA. OPN and IL-17 expression were higher in RA synovial fluid as compared to OA samples. We also found that OPN promotes IL-17 expression in osteoblasts and thereby enhances monocyte migration via the Syk/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. miR-129-3p expression was found to be negatively regulated by OPN via the Syk/PI3K/Akt signal cascade. In contrast, lentiviral vectors expressing short hairpin RNA inhibited OPN expression and ameliorated articular swelling, cartilage erosion and monocyte infiltration in the ankle joints of CIA mice. To our knowledge, our study is the first to describe how OPN promotes monocyte migration by upregulating IL-17 expression in osteoblasts in RA disease. These findings indicate that OPN could serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of RA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is a Regulator of Monocyte and Electroencephalographic Responses to Sleep Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Clegern, William C.; Schmidt, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep loss triggers changes in inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain and periphery. The mechanisms that underlie these changes are ill-defined. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activates inflammatory signaling cascades in response to endogenous and pathogen-associated ligands known to be elevated in association with sleep loss. TLR4 is therefore a possible mediator of some of the inflammation-related effects of sleep loss. Here we describe the baseline electroencephalographic sleep phenotype and the biochemical and electroencephalographic responses to sleep loss in TLR4-deficient mice. Design, Measurements and Results: TLR4-deficient mice and wild type controls were subjected to electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings during spontaneous sleep/wake cycles and during and after sleep restriction sessions of 3, 6, and 24-h duration, during which sleep was disrupted by an automated sleep restriction system. Relative to wild type control mice, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited an increase in the duration of the primary daily waking bout occurring at dark onset in a light/dark cycle. The amount of time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep by TLR4-deficient mice was reduced in proportion to increased wakefulness in the hours immediately after dark onset. Subsequent to sleep restriction, EEG measures of increased sleep drive were attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. TLR4 was enriched 10-fold in brain cells positive for the cell surface marker CD11b (cells of the monocyte lineage) relative to CD11b-negative cells in wild type mouse brains. To assess whether this population was affected selectively by TLR4 knockout, flow cytometry was used to count F4/80- and CD45-positive cells in the brains of sleep deprived and time of day control mice. While wild-type mice exhibited a significant reduction in the number of CD11b-positive cells in the brain after 24-h sleep restriction, TLR4-deficient mice did not. Conclusion

  10. Endotoxin induced peritonitis elicits monocyte immigration into the lung: implications on alveolar space inflammatory responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welte Tobias

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute peritonitis developing in response to gram-negative bacterial infection is known to act as a trigger for the development of acute lung injury which is often complicated by the development of nosocomial pneumonia. We hypothesized that endotoxin-induced peritonitis provokes recruitment of monocytes into the lungs, which amplifies lung inflammatory responses to a second hit intra-alveolar challenge with endotoxin. Methods Serum and lavage cytokines as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells were analyzed at different time points after intraperitoneal or intratracheal application of LPS. Results We observed that mice challenged with intraperitoneal endotoxin developed rapidly increasing serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cytokine and chemokine levels (TNFα, MIP-2, CCL2 and a nearly two-fold expansion of the alveolar macrophage population by 96 h, but this was not associated with the development of neutrophilic alveolitis. In contrast, expansion of the alveolar macrophage pool was not observed in CCR2-deficient mice and in wild-type mice systemically pretreated with the anti-CD18 antibody GAME-46. An intentional two-fold expansion of alveolar macrophage numbers by intratracheal CCL2 following intraperitoneal endotoxin did not exacerbate the development of acute lung inflammation in response to intratracheal endotoxin compared to mice challenged only with intratracheal endotoxin. Conclusion These data, taken together, show that intraperitoneal endotoxin triggers a CCR2-dependent de novo recruitment of monocytes into the lungs of mice but this does not result in an accentuation of neutrophilic lung inflammation. This finding represents a previously unrecognized novel inflammatory component of lung inflammation that results from endotoxin-induced peritonitis.

  11. Monocyte-derived interleukin-10 depresses the Bordetella pertussis- specific gamma interferon response in vaccinated infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirix, V; Verscheure, V; Goetghebuer, T; Hainaut, M; Debrie, A S; Locht, C; Mascart, F

    2009-12-01

    Antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) has been demonstrated to participate in protection against Bordetella pertussis infection. Circulating mononuclear cells from B. pertussis-infected and from pertussis-vaccinated infants secrete high amounts of IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation by B. pertussis antigens, but with a large variation in the secreted IFN-gamma levels between individuals. We show here that the inhibition of the specific IFN-gamma response can be at least partially attributed to IL-10 secretion by monocytes. This IL-10 secretion was not associated with polymorphisms at positions -1082, -819, and -592 of the IL-10 gene promoter, suggesting that other genetic or environmental factors affect IL-10 expression and secretion.

  12. Enhanced Apoptosis of Monocytes from Complication-Free Juvenile-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 May Be Ameliorated by TNF-α Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Myśliwska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with an enhanced apoptosis of different cells and tissues, accelerating occurrence of diabetic microvascular complications. The aim of our study was to determine spontaneous apoptotic potential of the monocyte subsets in juvenile-onset complication-free diabetes mellitus type 1 and to compare them with the corresponding values of the healthy. Moreover, we wanted to assess effects of TNF-R1 blocking agents and those of general TNF-α blocker (Infliximab on spontaneous apoptosis of monocytes. Sixty randomly selected DM1 patients (14.5 ± 3.2 years and 30 healthy (13.5 ± 2.8 years volunteers were enrolled in the study. Our results indicate that three monocyte subsets are distinguishable in the groups of young diabetic patients and the healthy, similarly to in the blood of adults. DM1 patients were characterized by higher values of apoptotic monocytes than the healthy. The manipulation with drugs inhibiting TNF-R1 expression diminished the pool of CD16+ apoptotic monocytes. Infliximab reduced the apoptotic CD16− cells. In conclusion, diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with greater apoptosis of three monocyte subsets which may contribute to the development of microvascular complications. TNF-α modifiers appear to ameliorate monocyte apoptosis. They may be useful for controlling excessive monocyte apoptosis in diabetic patients.

  13. In vitro studies of human monocyte migration across endothelium in response to leukotriene B4 and f-Met-Leu-Phe.

    OpenAIRE

    Migliorisi, G.; Folkes, E.; Pawlowski, N.; Cramer, E. B.

    1987-01-01

    Relatively little is known about monocyte emigration from the vasculature or about the factors that regulate this process. In this study, a human in vitro model of a blood vessel wall was used for examination of monocyte transendothelial migration. Umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluency on amnion connective tissue, and human monocytes were stimulated to cross the monolayer in response to the chemoattractants leukotriene B4 or f-Met-Leu-Phe. The pattern and time course of mo...

  14. Identification of generic and pathogen-specific cord blood monocyte transcriptomes reveals a largely conserved response in preterm and term newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Emma; Hancock, David G; Hibbert, Julie; Wells, Christine; Richmond, Peter; Simmer, Karen; Burgner, David; Strunk, Tobias; Currie, Andrew J

    2017-11-13

    Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis are predominant causes of neonatal sepsis, particularly affecting preterm infants. Susceptibility to infection has been attributed to "immature" innate monocyte defences, but no studies have assessed global transcriptional responses of neonatal monocytes to these pathogens. Here, we aimed to identify and characterise the neonatal monocyte transcriptional responses to E. coli and S. epidermidis and the role of common modifiers such as gestational age (GA) and exposure to chorioamnionitis (a common complication of preterm birth) to better understand early life innate immune responses. RNA-sequencing was performed on purified cord blood monocytes from very preterm (neonatal monocyte response to infection, largely mediated by TLR/NF-κB/TREM-1 signalling. In addition, we observed an activated interferon-centred immune response specific to stimulation with E. coli in both preterm and term infants. These data provide novel insights into the functionality of neonatal monocytes at birth and highlight potential pathways that could be targeted to reduce the harmful effects of bacterial-induced inflammation in sepsis. E. coli and S. epidermidis elicit common transcriptional changes in cord monocytes. The common transcriptional response is mediated by TLR/NF-κB/TREM-1 signalling. IFN genes are differentially regulated by E. coli and S. epidermidis in monocytes. These responses are largely unaffected by GA or exposure to chorioamnionitis. E. coli and S. epidermidis elicit common transcriptional changes in cord monocytes. The common transcriptional response is mediated by TLR/NF-κB/TREM-1 signalling. IFN-genes are differentially regulated by E. coli and S. epidermidis in monocytes. These responses are largely unaffected by GA or exposure to chorioamnionitis.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus lytic infection promotes activation of Toll-like receptor 8 innate immune response in systemic sclerosis monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Antonella; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Lacconi, Valentina; Lenna, Stefania; Quarta, Silvia; Rosato, Edoardo; Vestri, Anna Rita; York, Michael; Dreyfus, David H; Faggioni, Alberto; Morrone, Stefania; Trojanowska, Maria; Farina, G Alessandra

    2017-02-28

    Monocytes/macrophages are activated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc), with increased expression of interferon (IFN)-regulatory genes and inflammatory cytokines, suggesting dysregulation of the innate immune response in autoimmunity. In this study, we investigated whether the lytic form of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (infectious EBV) is present in scleroderma monocytes and contributes to their activation in SSc. Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) depleted of the CD19+ cell fraction, using CD14/CD16 negative-depletion. Circulating monocytes from SSc and healthy donors (HDs) were infected with EBV. Gene expression of innate immune mediators were evaluated in EBV-infected monocytes from SSc and HDs. Involvement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)8 in viral-mediated TLR8 response was investigated by comparing the TLR8 expression induced by infectious EBV to the expression stimulated by CL075/TLR8/agonist-ligand in the presence of TLR8 inhibitor in THP-1 cells. Infectious EBV strongly induced TLR8 expression in infected SSc and HD monocytes in vitro. Markers of activated monocytes, such as IFN-regulated genes and chemokines, were upregulated in SSc- and HD-EBV-infected monocytes. Inhibiting TLR8 expression reduced virally induced TLR8 in THP-1 infected cells, demonstrating that innate immune activation by infectious EBV is partially dependent on TLR8. Viral mRNA and proteins were detected in freshly isolated SSc monocytes. Microarray analysis substantiated the evidence of an increased IFN signature and altered level of TLR8 expression in SSc monocytes carrying infectious EBV compared to HD monocytes. This study provides the first evidence of infectious EBV in monocytes from patients with SSc and links EBV to the activation of TLR8 and IFN innate immune response in freshly isolated SSc monocytes. This study provides the first evidence of EBV replication activating the TLR8 molecular pathway

  16. Proteomic and systems biology analysis of the monocyte response to Coxiella burnetii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Shipman

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of Q fever. Chronic Q fever can produce debilitating fatigue and C. burnetii is considered a significant bioterror threat. C. burnetii occupies the monocyte phagolysosome and although prior work has explained features of the host-pathogen interaction, many aspects are still poorly understood. We have conducted a proteomic investigation of human Monomac I cells infected with the Nine Mile Phase II strain of C. burnetii and used the results as a framework for a systems biology model of the host response. Our principal methodology was multiplex differential 2D gel electrophoresis using ZDyes, a new generation of covalently linked fluorescent protein detection dyes under development at Montana State University. The 2D gel analysis facilitated the detection of changes in posttranslational modifications on intact proteins in response to infection. The systems model created from our data a framework for the design of experiments to seek a deeper understanding of the host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 is a regulator of monocyte and electroencephalographic responses to sleep loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P; Clegern, William C; Schmidt, Michelle A

    2011-10-01

    Sleep loss triggers changes in inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain and periphery. The mechanisms that underlie these changes are ill-defined. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activates inflammatory signaling cascades in response to endogenous and pathogen-associated ligands known to be elevated in association with sleep loss. TLR4 is therefore a possible mediator of some of the inflammation-related effects of sleep loss. Here we describe the baseline electroencephalographic sleep phenotype and the biochemical and electroencephalographic responses to sleep loss in TLR4-deficient mice. TLR4-deficient mice and wild type controls were subjected to electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings during spontaneous sleep/wake cycles and during and after sleep restriction sessions of 3, 6, and 24-h duration, during which sleep was disrupted by an automated sleep restriction system. Relative to wild type control mice, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited an increase in the duration of the primary daily waking bout occurring at dark onset in a light/dark cycle. The amount of time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep by TLR4-deficient mice was reduced in proportion to increased wakefulness in the hours immediately after dark onset. Subsequent to sleep restriction, EEG measures of increased sleep drive were attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. TLR4 was enriched 10-fold in brain cells positive for the cell surface marker CD11b (cells of the monocyte lineage) relative to CD11b-negative cells in wild type mouse brains. To assess whether this population was affected selectively by TLR4 knockout, flow cytometry was used to count F4/80- and CD45-positive cells in the brains of sleep deprived and time of day control mice. While wild-type mice exhibited a significant reduction in the number of CD11b-positive cells in the brain after 24-h sleep restriction, TLR4-deficient mice did not. These data demonstrate that innate immune signaling pathways

  18. Inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils are licensed to kill during memory responses in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Narni-Mancinelli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunological memory is a hallmark of B and T lymphocytes that have undergone a previous encounter with a given antigen. It is assumed that memory cells mediate better protection of the host upon re-infection because of improved effector functions such as antibody production, cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion. In contrast to cells of the adaptive immune system, innate immune cells are believed to exhibit a comparable functional effector response each time the same pathogen is encountered. Here, using mice infected by the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we show that during a recall bacterial infection, the chemokine CCL3 secreted by memory CD8+ T cells drives drastic modifications of the functional properties of several populations of phagocytes. We found that inflammatory ly6C+ monocytes and neutrophils largely mediated memory CD8+ T cell bacteriocidal activity by producing increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, augmenting the pH of their phagosomes and inducing antimicrobial autophagy. These events allowed an extremely rapid control of bacterial growth in vivo and accounted for protective immunity. Therefore, our results provide evidence that cytotoxic memory CD8+ T cells can license distinct antimicrobial effector mechanisms of innate cells to efficiently clear pathogens.

  19. Sex differences in monocyte activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    Full Text Available TLR7/8 and TLR9 signaling pathways have been extensively studied in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE as possible mediators of disease. Monocytes are a major source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and are understudied in SLE. In the current project, we investigated sex differences in monocyte activation and its implications in SLE disease pathogenesis.Human blood samples from 27 healthy male controls, 32 healthy female controls, and 25 female patients with SLE matched for age and race were studied. Monocyte activation was tested by flow cytometry and ELISA, including subset proportions, CD14, CD80 and CD86 expression, the percentage of IL-6-producing monocytes, plasma levels of sCD14 and IL-6, and urine levels of creatinine.Monocytes were significantly more activated in women compared to men and in patients with SLE compared to controls in vivo. We observed increased proportions of non-classic monocytes, decreased proportions of classic monocytes, elevated levels of plasma sCD14 as well as reduced surface expression of CD14 on monocytes comparing women to men and lupus patients to controls. Plasma levels of IL-6 were positively related to sCD14 and serum creatinine.Monocyte activation and TLR4 responsiveness are altered in women compared to men and in patients with SLE compared to controls. These sex differences may allow persistent systemic inflammation and resultant enhanced SLE susceptibility.

  20. Ability of Interleukin-33- and Immune Complex-Triggered Activation of Human Mast Cells to Down-Regulate Monocyte-Mediated Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivellese, Felice; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; Townsend, Michael J; de Paulis, Amato; Marone, Gianni; Huizinga, Tom W J; Pitzalis, Costantino; Toes, René E M

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, their activation by interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been linked to the development of arthritis in animal models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional responses of human mast cells to IL-33 in the context of RA. Human mast cells were stimulated with IL-33 combined with plate-bound IgG or IgG anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and their effects on monocyte activation were evaluated. Cellular interactions of mast cells in RA synovium were assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for mast cell-specific genes was evaluated in synovial biopsy tissue from patients with early RA who were naive to treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. IL-33 induced the up-regulation of Fcγ receptor type IIa and enhanced the activation of mast cells by IgG, including IgG ACPAs, as indicated by the production of CXCL8/IL-8. Intriguingly, mast cell activation triggered with IL-33 and IgG led to the release of mediators such as histamine and IL-10, which inhibited monocyte activation. Synovial mast cells were found in contact with CD14+ monocyte/macrophages. Finally, mRNA levels of mast cell-specific genes were inversely associated with disease severity, and IL-33 mRNA levels showed an inverse correlation with the levels of proinflammatory markers. When human mast cells are activated by IL-33, an immunomodulatory phenotype develops, with human mast cells gaining the ability to suppress monocyte activation via the release of IL-10 and histamine. These findings, together with the presence of synovial mast cell-monocyte interactions and the inverse association between the expression of mast cell genes at the synovial level and disease activity, suggest that these newly described mast cell-mediated inhibitory pathways might have a functional relevance in the pathogenesis of RA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1–Dependent Leukocytic Infiltrates Are Responsible for Autoimmune Disease in Mrl-Faslpr Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tesch, Gregory H.; Maifert, Stefanie; Schwarting, Andreas; Rollins, Barrett J.; Kelley, Vicki Rubin

    1999-01-01

    Infiltrating leukocytes may be responsible for autoimmune disease. We hypothesized that the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 recruits macrophages and T cells into tissues that, in turn, are required for autoimmune disease. Using the MRL-Faslpr strain with spontaneous, fatal autoimmune disease, we constructed MCP-1–deficient MRL-Faslpr mice. In MCP-1–intact MRL-Faslpr mice, macrophages and T cells accumulate at sites (kidney tubules, glomeruli, pulmonary bronchioli, lymph nod...

  2. Intermediate monocytes in ANCA vasculitis: increased surface expression of ANCA autoantigens and IL-1β secretion in response to anti-MPO antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Eóin C

    2015-01-01

    ANCA vasculitis encompasses several autoimmune conditions characterised by destruction of small vessels, inflammation of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis. Most patients harbour autoantibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3). Clinical and experimental data suggest that pathogenesis is driven by ANCA-mediated activation of neutrophils and monocytes. We investigated a potential role for distinct monocyte subsets. We found that the relative proportion of intermediate monocytes is increased in patients versus control individuals, and both MPO and PR3 are preferentially expressed on these cells. We demonstrate that MPO and PR3 are expressed independently of each other on monocytes and that PR3 is not associated with CD177. MPO expression correlates with that of Fc receptor CD16 on intermediate monocytes. Monocyte subsets respond differently to antibodies directed against MPO and PR3, with anti-MPO but not anti-PR3 leading to increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production. In concordance with the observed higher surface expression of MPO on intermediate monocytes, this subset produces the highest quantity of IL-1β in response to anti-MPO stimulation. These data suggest that monocytes, specifically, the intermediate subset, may play a role in ANCA vasculitis, and also indicate that substantial differences exist between the effect of anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies on these cells.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation downregulates the increase of monocytes expressing toll-like receptor 4 in response to 6-day intensive training in kendo athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akama, Takao; Kon, Michihiro; Tanimura, Yuko; Kimura, Fuminori; Hanaoka, Yukichi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Kono, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    This study examined changes in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-expressing monocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in response to continuous intensive exercise training in athletes, as well as the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10...

  4. Source and Purity of Dengue-Viral Preparations Impact Requirement for Enhancing Antibody to Induce Elevated IL-1β Secretion: A Primary Human Monocyte Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Justin B; Smith, Scott A; Widman, Douglas G; McKinnon, Karen P; Scholle, Frank; Sempowski, Gregory D; Dittmer, Dirk P; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus is a major global health threat and can lead to life-threatening hemorrhagic complications due to immune activation and cytokine production. Cross-reactive antibodies to an earlier dengue virus infection are a recognized risk factor for severe disease. These antibodies bind heterologous dengue serotypes and enhance infection into Fc-receptor-bearing cells, a process known as antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. One crucial cytokine seen elevated in severe dengue patients is IL-1β, a potent inflammatory cytokine matured by the inflammasome. We used a highly-physiologic system by studying antibody-dependent enhancement of IL-1β in primary human monocytes with anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies isolated from patients. Antibody-enhancement increased viral replication in primary human monocytes inoculated with supernatant harvested from Vero cells infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) 16681. Surprisingly, IL-1β secretion induced by infectious supernatant harvested from two independent Vero cell lines was not enhanced by antibody. Secretion of multiple other inflammatory cytokines was also independent of antibody signaling. However, IL-1β secretion did require NLRP3 and caspase-1 activity. Immunodepletion of dengue virions from the infectious supernatant confirmed that virus was not the main IL-1β-inducing agent, suggesting that a supernatant component(s) not associated with the virion induced IL-1β production. We excluded RNA, DNA, contaminating LPS, viral NS1 protein, complement, and cytokines. In contrast, purified Vero-derived DENV-2 16681 exhibited antibody-enhancement of both infection and IL-1β induction. Furthermore, C6/36 mosquito cells did not produce such an inflammatory component, as crude supernatant harvested from insect cells infected with DENV-2 16681 induced antibody-dependent IL-1β secretion. This study indicates that Vero cells infected with DENV-2 16681 may produce inflammatory components during dengue virus

  5. Source and Purity of Dengue-Viral Preparations Impact Requirement for Enhancing Antibody to Induce Elevated IL-1β Secretion: A Primary Human Monocyte Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin B Callaway

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is a major global health threat and can lead to life-threatening hemorrhagic complications due to immune activation and cytokine production. Cross-reactive antibodies to an earlier dengue virus infection are a recognized risk factor for severe disease. These antibodies bind heterologous dengue serotypes and enhance infection into Fc-receptor-bearing cells, a process known as antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. One crucial cytokine seen elevated in severe dengue patients is IL-1β, a potent inflammatory cytokine matured by the inflammasome. We used a highly-physiologic system by studying antibody-dependent enhancement of IL-1β in primary human monocytes with anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies isolated from patients. Antibody-enhancement increased viral replication in primary human monocytes inoculated with supernatant harvested from Vero cells infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2 16681. Surprisingly, IL-1β secretion induced by infectious supernatant harvested from two independent Vero cell lines was not enhanced by antibody. Secretion of multiple other inflammatory cytokines was also independent of antibody signaling. However, IL-1β secretion did require NLRP3 and caspase-1 activity. Immunodepletion of dengue virions from the infectious supernatant confirmed that virus was not the main IL-1β-inducing agent, suggesting that a supernatant component(s not associated with the virion induced IL-1β production. We excluded RNA, DNA, contaminating LPS, viral NS1 protein, complement, and cytokines. In contrast, purified Vero-derived DENV-2 16681 exhibited antibody-enhancement of both infection and IL-1β induction. Furthermore, C6/36 mosquito cells did not produce such an inflammatory component, as crude supernatant harvested from insect cells infected with DENV-2 16681 induced antibody-dependent IL-1β secretion. This study indicates that Vero cells infected with DENV-2 16681 may produce inflammatory components

  6. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells are essential for CD8+ T cell activation and anti-tumor responses after local immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eKuhn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumors harbor several populations of dendritic cells with the ability to prime tumor-specific T cells. However, these T cells mostly fail to differentiate into armed effectors and are unable to control tumor growth. We have previously shown that treatment with immunostimulatory agents at the tumor site can activate anti-tumor immune responses, and is associated with the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the tumor and tumor-draining lymph node. Here we use dendritic cell or monocyte depletion and monocyte transfer to show that these monocyte-derived dendritic cells are critical to the activation of anti-tumor immune responses. Treatment with the immunostimulatory agents Monosodium Urate crystals and Mycobacterium smegmatis induced the accumulation of monocytes in the draining lymph node, their upregulation of CD11c and MHCII, and expression of iNOS, TNFα and IL12p40. Blocking monocyte entry into the lymph node and tumor through neutralization of the chemokine CCL2 or inhibition of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 receptor signaling prevented the generation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the infiltration of tumor-specific T cells into the tumor, and anti-tumor responses. In a reciprocal fashion, monocytes transferred into mice depleted of CD11c+ cells were sufficient to rescue CD8+ T cell priming in lymph node and delay tumor growth. Thus monocytes exposed to the appropriate conditions become powerful activators of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and anti-tumor immunity.

  7. Human bladder uroepithelial cells synergize with monocytes to promote IL-10 synthesis and other cytokine responses to uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L Duell

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10 in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Human Bladder Uroepithelial Cells Synergize with Monocytes to Promote IL-10 Synthesis and Other Cytokine Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duell, Benjamin L.; Carey, Alison J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Schembri, Mark A.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24155979

  9. Neutrophil and monocyte responses to downhill running: Intracellular contents of MPO, IL-6, IL-10, pstat3, and SOCS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vyver, M; Engelbrecht, L; Smith, C; Myburgh, K H

    2016-06-01

    High-intensity exercise results in immune activation. This study determined whether (a) there is concordance between serum MPO and neutrophil and/or monocyte intracellular MPO content; (b) peripheral blood mononuclear cells respond to inflammatory interleukins (ILs) by increasing intracellular signaling. Healthy male (n = 12) volunteers participated in high-intensity running (12 × 5 min, 10% decline, 15 km/h). Blood sample (pre, post, 4 h) analyses included serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and creatine kinase (CK). Intracellular IL-6, IL-10, MPO and STAT3/SOCS3 signaling were assessed in mononuclear cells. CK (1573 ± 756 u/L), MMP-9 (101 ± 27 ng/mL), neutrophil (9.89 ± 0.76 × 10(9) cells/L) and monocyte counts (1 ± 0.08 × 10(9) cells/L) increased at 4 h. At 4 h serum (7.1 ± 1.3 ng/mL) and monocyte MPO (1.7-fold) increased, whereas neutrophil MPO decreased (0.8-fold). Intracellular monocyte IL-10 and IL-6 decreased by 15% and 20-30%, respectively, coinciding with elevations in serum IL-10 of 14.5 ± 4.7 pg/mL and IL-6 of 5.4 ± 2.9 pg/mL, suggesting immune cell cytokine release in response to exercise. Intracellular PBMC p-STAT3 to total STAT3 ratio increased from pre to 4 h. Circulating monocytes are responsive to increased serum IL-6 suggesting a negative feedback loop via STAT3 signaling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Killing of Escherichia coli by Crohn's Disease Monocyte-derived Macrophages and Its Enhancement by Hydroxychloroquine and Vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Paul K; Chiewchengchol, Direkrit; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Alswied, Abdullah; Satsangi, Jack; Subramanian, Sreedhar; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Campbell, Barry J

    2015-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with defective innate immunity, including impaired neutrophil chemotaxis, and mucosal invasion by bacteria, particularly adherent and invasive Escherichia coli that replicate inside macrophage phagolysosomes. We compared CD and healthy control (HC) macrophages for their abilities to kill E. coli and generate neutrophil chemoattractants and also assessed the effects of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and vitamin D on killing of phagocytosed E. coli. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages from CD and HC were compared for bacterial killing and generation of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to CD-derived E. coli. Escherichia coli replication was also assessed in the presence and absence of HCQ, alone and with antibiotics, and vitamin D. Monocyte-derived macrophages from patients with CD were similar to HC in allowing replication of phagocytosed CD-derived E. coli: HM605 {CD: N = 10, mean fold replication in 3 hr = 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.78); HC: N = 9, 1.50 (95% CI, 1.02-1.97); P = 0.15} and also in generation of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to E. coli (mean fold chemotaxis relative to control: CD = 2.55 [95% CI, 2.31-2.80]; HC = 2.65 [95% CI, 2.46-2.85], P = 0.42). HCQ and 1,25 OH2-vitamin D3 both caused dose-dependent inhibition of intramacrophage E. coli replication 3-hour postinfection; HCQ: 73.9% inhibition (P vitamin D3: 80.7% inhibition (P coli and generating neutrophil chemoattractants. Replication of phagocytosed E. coli was substantially decreased by HCQ and vitamin D. These warrant further therapeutic trials in CD in combination with relevant antibiotics.

  11. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  12. Neutrophil and Monocyte Bactericidal Responses to 10 Weeks of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval or Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in Sedentary Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Sam O.; Wilson, Oliver J.; Adlan, Ahmed M.; Wagenmakers, Anton J. M.; Shaw, Christopher S.; Lord, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes are key components of the innate immune system that undergo age-associated declines in function. This study compared the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on immune function in sedentary adults. Twenty-seven (43 ± 11 years) healthy sedentary adults were randomized into ten weeks of either a HIIT (>90% maximum heart rate) or MICT (70% maximum heart rate) group training program. Aerobic capacity (VO2peak), neutrophil and monocyte bacterial phagocytosis and oxidative burst, cell surface receptor expression, and systemic inflammation were measured before and after the training. Total exercise time commitment was 57% less for HIIT compared to that for MICT while both significantly improved VO2peak similarly. Neutrophil phagocytosis and oxidative burst and monocyte phagocytosis and percentage of monocytes producing an oxidative burst were improved by training similarly in both groups. Expression of monocyte but not neutrophil CD16, TLR2, and TLR4 was reduced by training similarly in both groups. No differences in systemic inflammation were observed for training; however, leptin was reduced in the MICT group only. With similar immune-enhancing effects for HIIT compared to those for MICT at 50% of the time commitment, our results support HIIT as a time efficient exercise option to improve neutrophil and monocyte function. PMID:28656073

  13. Neutrophil and Monocyte Bactericidal Responses to 10 Weeks of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval or Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in Sedentary Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Bartlett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils and monocytes are key components of the innate immune system that undergo age-associated declines in function. This study compared the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT on immune function in sedentary adults. Twenty-seven (43 ± 11 years healthy sedentary adults were randomized into ten weeks of either a HIIT (>90% maximum heart rate or MICT (70% maximum heart rate group training program. Aerobic capacity (VO2peak, neutrophil and monocyte bacterial phagocytosis and oxidative burst, cell surface receptor expression, and systemic inflammation were measured before and after the training. Total exercise time commitment was 57% less for HIIT compared to that for MICT while both significantly improved VO2peak similarly. Neutrophil phagocytosis and oxidative burst and monocyte phagocytosis and percentage of monocytes producing an oxidative burst were improved by training similarly in both groups. Expression of monocyte but not neutrophil CD16, TLR2, and TLR4 was reduced by training similarly in both groups. No differences in systemic inflammation were observed for training; however, leptin was reduced in the MICT group only. With similar immune-enhancing effects for HIIT compared to those for MICT at 50% of the time commitment, our results support HIIT as a time efficient exercise option to improve neutrophil and monocyte function.

  14. Neutrophil and Monocyte Bactericidal Responses to 10 Weeks of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval or Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in Sedentary Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, David B; Shepherd, Sam O; Wilson, Oliver J; Adlan, Ahmed M; Wagenmakers, Anton J M; Shaw, Christopher S; Lord, Janet M

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes are key components of the innate immune system that undergo age-associated declines in function. This study compared the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on immune function in sedentary adults. Twenty-seven (43 ± 11 years) healthy sedentary adults were randomized into ten weeks of either a HIIT (>90% maximum heart rate) or MICT (70% maximum heart rate) group training program. Aerobic capacity (VO2peak), neutrophil and monocyte bacterial phagocytosis and oxidative burst, cell surface receptor expression, and systemic inflammation were measured before and after the training. Total exercise time commitment was 57% less for HIIT compared to that for MICT while both significantly improved VO2peak similarly. Neutrophil phagocytosis and oxidative burst and monocyte phagocytosis and percentage of monocytes producing an oxidative burst were improved by training similarly in both groups. Expression of monocyte but not neutrophil CD16, TLR2, and TLR4 was reduced by training similarly in both groups. No differences in systemic inflammation were observed for training; however, leptin was reduced in the MICT group only. With similar immune-enhancing effects for HIIT compared to those for MICT at 50% of the time commitment, our results support HIIT as a time efficient exercise option to improve neutrophil and monocyte function.

  15. Acute myocardial infarction activates distinct inflammation and proliferation pathways in circulating monocytes, prior to recruitment, and identified through conserved transcriptional responses in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Godec, Jernej; Lee, Regent; Chai, Joshua T.; Dall'Armellina, Erica; McAndrew, Debra; Digby, Janet E.; Forfar, J. Colin; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Kharbanda, Rajesh K.; Banning, Adrian P.; Neubauer, Stefan; Lygate, Craig A.; Channon, Keith M.; Haining, Nicholas W.; Choudhury, Robin P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play critical roles in tissue injury and repair following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Specifically targeting inflammatory monocytes in experimental models leads to reduced infarct size and improved healing. However, data from humans are sparse, and it remains unclear whether monocytes play an equally important role in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the monocyte response following AMI is conserved between humans and mice and interrogate patterns of gene expression to identify regulated functions. Methods and results Thirty patients (AMI) and 24 control patients (stable coronary atherosclerosis) were enrolled. Female C57BL/6J mice (n = 6/group) underwent AMI by surgical coronary ligation. Myocardial injury was quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (human) and echocardiography (mice). Peripheral monocytes were isolated at presentation and at 48 h. RNA from separated monocytes was hybridized to Illumina beadchips. Acute myocardial infarction resulted in a significant peripheral monocytosis in both species that positively correlated with the extent of myocardial injury. Analysis of the monocyte transcriptome following AMI demonstrated significant conservation and identified inflammation and mitosis as central processes to this response. These findings were validated in both species. Conclusions Our findings show that the monocyte transcriptome is conserved between mice and humans following AMI. Patterns of gene expression associated with inflammation and proliferation appear to be switched on prior to their infiltration of injured myocardium suggesting that the specific targeting of inflammatory and proliferative processes in these immune cells in humans are possible therapeutic strategies. Importantly, they could be effective in the hours after AMI. PMID:25982896

  16. FcγRIIIa expression on monocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: role in immune-complex stimulated TNF production and non-response to methotrexate therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn L Cooper

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The expression of FcγRIIIa/CD16 may render monocytes targets for activation by IgG-containing immune complexes (IC. We investigated whether FcγRIIIa/CD16 was upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, associated with TNF production in response to IC-stimulation, and if this predicted response to methotrexate therapy. METHODS: FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14(low and CD14++ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry in healthy controls and RA patients (early and long-standing disease. Intracellular TNF-staining was carried out after in vitro LPS or heat-aggregated immunoglobulin (HAG activation. FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression pre- and post-steroid/methotrexate treatment was examined. RESULTS: Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in long-standing RA patients compared to controls was demonstrated (p = 0.002 with intermediate levels in early-RA patients. HAG-induced TNF-production in RA patients was correlated with the percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 (p<0.001. The percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 at baseline in early DMARD-naïve RA patients was negatively correlated with DAS28-ESR improvement 14-weeks post-methotrexate therapy (p = 0.003 and was significantly increased in EULAR non-responders compared to moderate (p = 0.01 or good responders (p = 0.003. FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression was not correlated with age, presence of systemic inflammation or autoantibody titers. CONCLUSION: Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in RA may result in a cell that has increased responsiveness to IC-stimulation. This monocyte subset may contribute to non-response to methotrexate therapy.

  17. FcγRIIIa Expression on Monocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Role in Immune-Complex Stimulated TNF Production and Non-Response to Methotrexate Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Dawn L.; Martin, Stephen G.; Robinson, James I.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Charles, Christopher J.; Nam, Jackie; Consortium, YEAR; Isaacs, John D.; Emery, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The expression of FcγRIIIa/CD16 may render monocytes targets for activation by IgG-containing immune complexes (IC). We investigated whether FcγRIIIa/CD16 was upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), associated with TNF production in response to IC-stimulation, and if this predicted response to methotrexate therapy. Methods FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14low and CD14++ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry in healthy controls and RA patients (early and long-standing disease). Intracellular TNF-staining was carried out after in vitro LPS or heat-aggregated immunoglobulin (HAG) activation. FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression pre- and post-steroid/methotrexate treatment was examined. Results Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in long-standing RA patients compared to controls was demonstrated (p = 0.002) with intermediate levels in early-RA patients. HAG-induced TNF-production in RA patients was correlated with the percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 (p<0.001). The percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 at baseline in early DMARD-naïve RA patients was negatively correlated with DAS28-ESR improvement 14-weeks post-methotrexate therapy (p = 0.003) and was significantly increased in EULAR non-responders compared to moderate (p = 0.01) or good responders (p = 0.003). FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression was not correlated with age, presence of systemic inflammation or autoantibody titers. Conclusion Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in RA may result in a cell that has increased responsiveness to IC-stimulation. This monocyte subset may contribute to non-response to methotrexate therapy. PMID:22235253

  18. Aβ and inflammatory stimulus activate diverse signaling pathways in monocytic cells: implications in retaining phagocytosis in Aβ-laden environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Savchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ is one of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The enhancement of Aβ clearance may provide therapeutic means to restrict AD pathology. The cellular responses to different forms of Aβ in monocytic cells are poorly known. We aimed to study whether different forms of Aβ induce inflammatory responses in monocytic phagocytes and how Aβ may affect monocytic cell survival and function to retain phagocytosis in Aβ-laden environment. Methods Monocytic cells were differentiated from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells in the presence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor. Monocytic cells were stimulated with synthetic Aβ42 and intracellular calcium responses were recorded with calcium imaging. The formation of reactive oxygen species, secretion of cytokines and cell viability were also assessed. Finally, monocytic cells were introduced to native Aβ deposits ex vivo and the cellular responses in terms of cell viability, pro-inflammatory activation and phagocytosis were determined. The ability of monocytic cells to phagocytose Aβ plaques was determined after intrahippocampal transplantation in vivo.Results Freshly solubilized Aβ induced calcium oscillations, which persisted after removal of the stimulus. After few hours of aggregation, Aβ was not able to induce oscillations in monocytic cells. Instead, lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced calcium responses divergent from Aβ-induced response. Furthermore, while LPS induced massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neither synthetic Aβ species nor native Aβ deposits were able to induce pro-inflammatory activation of monocytic cells, contrary to primary microglia. Finally, monocytic cells retained their viability in the presence of Aβ and exhibited phagocytic activity towards native fibrillar Aβ deposits and congophilic Aβ plaques.Conclusions Monocytic cells carry diverse cellular responses to Aβ and inflammatory stimulus LPS. Even

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin increases resistin messenger ribonucleic acid through the pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase-activating transcription factor 4-CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α homologous protein pathway in THP-1 human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Junpei; Onuma, Hiroshi; Ochi, Fumihiro; Hirai, Hiroki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyoshi, Akiko; Matsushita, Manami; Kadota, Yuko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Nishida, Wataru; Hashida, Seiichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Osawa, Haruhiko

    2016-05-01

    Resistin, secreted from adipocytes, causes insulin resistance in mice. In humans, the resistin gene is mainly expressed in monocytes and macrophages. Tunicamycin is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduce resistin gene expression in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether ER stress affects resistin gene expression in human monocytes. The relationship between resistin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and ER stress markers mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in isolated monocytes of 30 healthy volunteers. The effect of endotoxin/lipopolysaccharides or tunicamycin on resistin gene expression was analyzed in THP-1 human monocytes. Signaling pathways leading to resistin mRNA were assessed by the knockdown using small interfering RNA or overexpression of key molecules involved in unfolded protein response. Resistin mRNA was positively associated with immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) or CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA in human isolated monocytes. In THP-1 cells, lipopolysaccharides increased mRNA of BiP, pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase (PERK) and CHOP, as well as resistin. Tunicamycin also increased resistin mRNA. This induction appeared to be dose- and time-dependent. Tunicamycin-induced resistin mRNA was inhibited by chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid. The knockdown of either PERK, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or CHOP reduced tunicamycin-induced resistin mRNA. Conversely, overexpression of ATF4 or CHOP increased resistin mRNA. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin increased resistin mRNA through the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway in THP-1 human monocytes. ER stress could lead to insulin resistance through enhanced resistin gene expression in human monocytes.

  20. Characterization of the opsonic and monocyte adherence functions of the specific fibronectin fragment that enhances phagocytosis of particulate activators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czop, JK; Kadish, JL; Zepf, DM; Austen, KF

    1985-01-01

    .... opsonic fibronectin fragment (180K-opFnf) that selectively augments human monocyte phagocytosis of particulate activators of the alternative complement pathway were analyzed with Fab fragments of monoclonal anti-fibronectin antibodies BC7...

  1. Aspirin-induced histone acetylation in endothelial cells enhances synthesis of the secreted isoform of netrin-1 thus inhibiting monocyte vascular infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passacquale, Gabriella; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Warboys, Christina; Cooper, Margaret; Lavin, Begona; Alfieri, Alessio; Andia, Marcelo E; Botnar, Rene M; Ferro, Albert

    2015-07-01

    There are conflicting data regarding whether netrin-1 retards or accelerates atherosclerosis progression, as it can lead either to monocyte repulsion from or retention within plaques depending on its cellular source. We investigated the effect of aspirin, which is widely used in cardiovascular prophylaxis, on the synthesis of different isoforms of netrin-1 by endothelial cells under pro-inflammatory conditions, and defined the net effect of aspirin-dependent systemic modulation of netrin-1 on atherosclerosis progression. Netrin-1 synthesis was studied in vitro using human endothelial cells stimulated with TNF-α, with or without aspirin treatment. In vivo experiments were conducted in ApoE(-/-) mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD), receiving either aspirin or clopidogrel. TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation up-regulated the nuclear isoform of netrin-1, while simultaneously reducing secreted netrin-1. Down-regulation of the secreted isoform compromised the chemorepellent action of the endothelium against monocyte chemotaxis. Aspirin counteracted TNF-α-mediated effects on netrin-1 synthesis by endothelial cells through COX-dependent inhibition of NF-κB and concomitant histone hyperacetylation. Administration of aspirin to ApoE(-/-) mice on HFD increased blood and arterial wall levels of netrin-1 independently of its effects on platelets, accompanied by reduced plaque size and content of monocytes/macrophages, compared with untreated or clopidogrel-treated mice. In vivo blockade of netrin-1 enhanced monocyte plaque infiltration in aspirin-treated ApoE(-/-) mice. Aspirin counteracts down-regulation of secreted netrin-1 induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli in endothelial cells. The aspirin-dependent increase of netrin-1 in ApoE(-/-) mice exerts anti-atherogenic effects by preventing arterial accumulation of monocytes. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Fusion of ubiquitin to HIV gag impairs human monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and reduces ability to induce gag T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Herath

    Full Text Available The efficient induction of CD8 T cell immunity is dependent on the processing and presentation of antigen on MHC class I molecules by professional antigen presenting cells (APC. To develop an improved T cell vaccine for HIV we investigated whether fusing the ubiquitin gene to the N terminus of the HIV gag gene enhanced targeting to the proteasome resulting in better CD8 T cell responses. Human monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDC, transduced with adenovirus vectors carrying either ubiquitinated or non-ubiquitinated gag transgene constructs, were co-cultured with autologous naïve T cells and T cell responses were measured after several weekly cycles of stimulation. Despite targeting of the ubiquitin gag transgene protein to the proteasome, ubiquitination did not increase CD8 T cell immune responses and in some cases diminished responses to gag peptides. There were no marked differences in cytokines produced from ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated gag stimulated cultures or in the expression of inhibitory molecules on expanded T cells. However, the ability of moDC transduced with ubiquitinated gag gene to upregulate co-stimulatory molecules was reduced, whilst no difference in moDC maturation was observed with a control ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated MART gene. Furthermore moDC transduced with ubiquitinated gag produced more IL-10 than transduction with unmodified gag. Thus failure of gag ubiquitination to enhance CD8 responses may be caused by suppression of moDC maturation. These results indicate that when designing a successful vaccine strategy to target a particular cell population, attention must also be given to the effect of the vaccine on APCs.

  3. Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Enhances Viral Replication in CD172a+ Monocytic Cells upon Adhesion to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Poelaert, Katrien C K; Van Cleemput, Jolien; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a main cause of respiratory disease, abortion, and encephalomyelopathy in horses. Monocytic cells (CD172a(+)) are the main carrier cells of EHV-1 during primary infection and are proposed to serve as a "Trojan horse" to facilitate the dissemination of EHV-1 to target organs. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 is transferred from CD172a(+) cells to endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate EHV-1 transmission between these two cell types. We hypothesized that EHV-1 employs specific strategies to promote the adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC to facilitate EHV-1 spread. Here, we demonstrated that EHV-1 infection of CD172a(+) cells resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increase in adhesion to EC. Antibody blocking experiments indicated that α4β1, αLβ2, and αVβ3 integrins mediated adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC. We showed that integrin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were involved in EHV-1-induced CD172a(+) cell adhesion at early times of infection. EHV-1 replication was enhanced in adherent CD172a(+) cells, which correlates with the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In the presence of neutralizing antibodies, approximately 20% of infected CD172a(+) cells transferred cytoplasmic material to uninfected EC and 0.01% of infected CD172a(+) cells transmitted infectious virus to neighboring cells. Our results demonstrated that EHV-1 infection induces adhesion of CD172a(+) cells to EC, which enhances viral replication, but that transfer of viral material from CD172a(+) cells to EC is a very specific and rare event. These findings give new insights into the complex pathogenesis of EHV-1. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen worldwide, causing frequent outbreaks of abortion and myeloencephalopathy, even in vaccinated horses. After primary replication in the respiratory tract, EHV-1 disseminates

  4. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes induce an inflammatory response in human primary monocytes through oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Shefang, E-mail: yeshefang@xmu.edu.cn; Zhang Honggang; Wang Yifang; Jiao Fei; Lin Cuilin; Zhang Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@xmu.edu.cn [Xiamen University, Department of Biomaterials, Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, College of Materials (China)

    2011-09-15

    A mechanistic understanding of interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and living systems has become imperative owing to the growing nanomedicine applications and the mounting societal concerns on nanosafety. The addition of different chemical groups leads to a significant change in the properties of CNTs, and the resulting functionalized CNTs are generating great interest in many biological applications, such as biosensors and transporters. This study aimed to assess the toxicity exhibited by carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) (with a diameter of 1-2 nm and mean length of 500 nm) and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of carboxylated SWCNTs in human primary monocytes. The results demonstrated that carboxylated SWCNTs were cytotoxic, triggering apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M phase arrest in human primary monocytes. Flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis indicated that internalized carboxylated SWCNTs were mainly accumulated in the cytoplasm. Exposure of human primary monocytes to carboxylated SWCNTs led to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in human primary monocytes. Pretreatment of human primary monocytes with antioxidants or NF-{kappa}B-specific inhibitor before exposure to carboxylated SWCNTs significantly abolished carboxylated SWCNTs-induced IL-8 and IL-6 expression. These results provide novel insights into the carboxylated SWCNTs-mediated chemokine induction and inflammatory responses in vitro.

  5. Formyl-peptide Receptor Agonists and Amorphous SiO2-NPs Synergistically and Selectively Increase the Inflammatory Responses of Human Monocytes and PMNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Tavano

    2016-02-01

    ligands, but not toward FPR2-specific ones. Conversely, the chemotaxis of monocytes toward FPR2-specific peptides was inhibited by SiO2-NPs. NADPH-oxidase activation triggered by FPR1- and FPR2-specific ligands in both cell types was not altered by SiO2-NPs. Microbial and tissue danger signals sensed by FPRs selectively amplified the functional responses of monocytes and PMNS to SiO2-NPs, and should be carefully considered in the assessment of the risk associated with nanoparticle exposure.

  6. In vitro suppression of immune responses using monocyte-derived tolerogenic dendritic cells from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Volchenkov, Roman; Brun, Johan Gorgas; Jonsson, Roland; Appel, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Therapeutic vaccination with antigen-specific tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC) might become a future option of individualized therapy for patients with autoimmune diseases. In this study, we tested the possibility of generating monocyte-derived tolDC from patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS). We analyzed phenotype, cytokine production and ability to suppress Ro/La-specific immune responses.Methods: Monocyte-derived tolDC from patients with pSS were ge...

  7. Cryopreservation of monocytes or differentiated immature DCs leads to an altered cytokine response to TLR agonists and microbial stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Ulluwishewa, D.; Anderson, R.C.; Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Literature on the effects of cryopreservation and thawing of monocytes or monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (iDCs) on the subsequent functional capacities of the DCs is limited to a few specific maturation stimuli and is focused on applications in clinical immunotherapy. Given the cardinal

  8. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria de Turris

    Full Text Available Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B.

  9. Endothelial cells suppress monocyte activation through secretion of extracellular vesicles containing antiinflammatory microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Cheng, Henry S; Dang, Lan T; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Lau, Andrew C; Boudreau, Emilie; Roufaiel, Mark; Cybulsky, Myron I; Schober, Andreas; Fish, Jason E

    2015-05-14

    The blood contains high concentrations of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs), and their levels and contents are altered in several disease states, including cardiovascular disease. However, the function of circulating EVs, especially the microRNAs (miRNAs) that they contain, are poorly understood. We sought to determine the effect of secreted vesicles produced by quiescent endothelial cells (ECs) on monocyte inflammatory responses and to assess whether transfer of microRNAs occurs between these cells. We observed that monocytic cells cocultured (but not in contact) with ECs were refractory to inflammatory activation. Further characterization revealed that endothelium-derived EVs (EC-EVs) suppressed monocyte activation by enhancing immunomodulatory responses and diminishing proinflammatory responses. EVs isolated from mouse plasma also suppressed monocyte activation. Importantly, injection of EC-EVs in vivo repressed monocyte/macrophage activation, confirming our in vitro findings. We found that several antiinflammatory microRNAs were elevated in EC-EV-treated monocytes. In particular, miR-10a was transferred to monocytic cells from EC-EVs and could repress inflammatory signaling through the targeting of several components of the NF-κB pathway, including IRAK4. Our findings reveal that ECs secrete EVs that can modulate monocyte activation and suggest that altered EV secretion and/or microRNA content may affect vascular inflammation in the setting of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Monocyte Subsets Coregulate Inflammatory Responses by Integrated Signaling through TNF and IL-6 at the Endothelial Cell Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimen, Myriam; Yates, Clara M; McGettrick, Helen M; Ward, Lewis S C; Harrison, Matthew J; Apta, Bonita; Dib, Lea H; Imhof, Beat A; Harrison, Paul; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2017-04-01

    Two major monocyte subsets, CD14+CD16- (classical) and CD14+/dimCD16+ (nonclassical/intermediate), have been described. Each has different functions ascribed in its interactions with vascular endothelial cells (EC), including migration and promoting inflammation. Although monocyte subpopulations have been studied in isolated systems, their influence on EC and on the course of inflammation has been ignored. In this study, using unstimulated or cytokine-activated EC, we observed significant differences in the recruitment, migration, and reverse migration of human monocyte subsets. Associated with this, and based on their patterns of cytokine secretion, there was a difference in their capacity to activate EC and support the secondary recruitment of flowing neutrophils. High levels of TNF were detected in cocultures with nonclassical/intermediate monocytes, the blockade of which significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment. In contrast, classical monocytes secreted high levels of IL-6, the blockade of which resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment. When cocultures contained both monocyte subsets, or when conditioned supernatant from classical monocytes cocultures (IL-6hi) was added to nonclassical/intermediate monocyte cocultures (TNFhi), the activating effects of TNF were dramatically reduced, implying that when present, the anti-inflammatory activities of IL-6 were dominant over the proinflammatory activities of TNF. These changes in neutrophil recruitment could be explained by regulation of E-selectin on the cocultured EC. This study suggests that recruited human monocyte subsets trigger a regulatory pathway of cytokine-mediated signaling at the EC interface, and we propose that this is a mechanism for limiting the phlogistic activity of newly recruited monocytes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Formyl-Peptide Receptor Agonists and Amorphous SiO-NPs Synergistically and Selectively Increase the Inflammatory Responses of Human Monocytes and PMNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Tavano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We tested whether amorphous SiO 2 -NPs and formylpeptide receptor (FPRs agonists synergistically activate human monocytes and neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs. Peptide ligands specifically binding to FPR1 (f-MLP and to FPR2 (MMK-1, WKYMVM and WKYMVm human isoforms did not modify the association of SiO 2 -NPs to both cell types or their cytotoxic effects. Similarly, the extent of CD80, CD86, CD83, ICAM-1 and MHCII expression in monocytes treated with SiO 2 -NPs was not significantly altered by any FPRs agonist. However, FPR1 stimulation with f-MLP strongly increased the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 by human monocytes, and of IL-8 by PMNs in the presence of SiO 2 -NPs, due to the synergic stimulation of gene transcription. FPR2 agonists also up-modulated the production of IL-1β induced by monocytes treated with SiO 2 -NPs. In turn, SiO 2 -NPs increased the chemotaxis of PMNs toward FPR1-specific ligands, but not toward FPR2-specific ones. Conversely, the chemotaxis of monocytes toward FPR2-specific peptides was inhibited by SiO 2 -NPs. NADPH-oxidase activation triggered by FPR1- and FPR2-specific ligands in both cell types was not altered by SiO 2 -NPs. Microbial and tissue danger signals sensed by FPRs selectively amplified the functional responses of monocytes and PMN S to SiO 2 -NPs, and should be carefully considered in the assessment of the risk associated with nanoparticle exposure.

  12. Cross-talk between iNKT cells and monocytes triggers an atheroprotective immune response in SLE patients with asymptomatic plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward; Croca, Sara; Waddington, Kirsty E; Sofat, Reecha; Griffin, Maura; Nicolaides, Andrew; Isenberg, David A; Torra, Ines Pineda; Rahman, Anisur; Jury, Elizabeth C

    2016-12-02

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is a complication of the autoimmune rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We questioned the role played by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in this process because they not only are defective in autoimmunity but also promote atherosclerosis in response to CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation. iNKT cells from SLE patients with asymptomatic plaque (SLE-P) had increased proliferation and interleukin-4 production compared with those from SLE patients with no plaque. The anti-inflammatory iNKT cell phenotype was associated with dyslipidemia and was driven by altered monocyte phospholipid expression and CD1d-mediated cross-talk between iNKT cells and monocytes but not B cells. Healthy iNKT cells differentiated in the presence of healthy monocytes and SLE-P serum polarized macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. Conversely, patients with clinical cardiovascular disease had unresponsive iNKT cells and increased proinflammatory monocytes. iNKT cell function could link immune responses, lipids, and cardiovascular disease in SLE patients and, together with serum lipid taxonomy, help predict preclinical atherosclerosis in SLE patients. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Enhanced immunological response by dendritic cells in male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Juan J; Almeida, María; Cordero, Mar; Martín-Martín, Lourdes; Méndez, Cristina; Miralles, José M; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    The effect of male hypogonadism on the immune response is poorly understood, even though testosterone has both immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects in men. In this study, we compared the distribution and functional status of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) [CD16(+) (monocytoid), CD33(+) (myeloid) and CD33(-) (plasmacytoid)] and CD4(+) CD25(+)CD127(-/lo) regulatory T cells from hypogonadic men and control subjects. Immunophenotypic studies were performed both on resting and in vitro-stimulated cells. Overall, no significant differences were detected on the number of monocytes, DCs and CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(-/lo) regulatory T cells between both groups of subjects. However, hypogonadic men showed slightly higher numbers of circulating CD16(+) cells expressing the CD107b activation/degranulation-associated marker than controls, such differences reaching statistical significance after in vitro stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Interestingly, antigen-stimulated expression of CD107b on CD16(+) cells inversely correlated with the serum concentrations of total testosterone (r(2)=-0.45; P=0.01), free testosterone (r(2)=-0.48; P=0.005), calculated free testosterone (r(2)=-0.44; P=0.01) and bioavailable testosterone (r(2)=-0.46; P=0.008) among all cases studied, as well as with both the LH (r(2)=-0.53, P=0.04) and FSH (r(2)=-0.54, P=0.04) serum levels among hypogonadic men. These findings show an enhanced immunological response of circulating (activated) CD16(+) DCs to antigen stimulation, which was inversely related to testosterone and gonadotropin serum levels. Such findings suggest a modulation by the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis of the immune response and may have clinical implications for hypogonadic men, as regards susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and increased responses to antigenic stimuli. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2012 Stichting European Society for Clinical

  14. The cis-acting phorbol ester "12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate"-responsive element is involved in shear stress-induced monocyte chemotactic protein 1 gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Shyy, J Y; Lin, M C; Han, J; Lu, Y; Petrime, M; Chien, S

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells, serving as a barrier between vessel and blood, are exposed to shear stress in the body. Although endothelial responses to shear stress are important in physiological adaption to the hemodynamic environments, they can also contribute to pathological conditions--e.g., in atherosclerosis and reperfusion injury. We have previously shown that shear stress mediates a biphasic response of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) gene expression in vascular endothelial cells...

  15. Evaluating the Use of Monocytes with a Degradable Polyurethane for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Kyle Giovanni

    Monocytes are one of the first cell types present following the implantation of a biomaterial or tissue engineered construct. Depending on the monocyte activation state supported by the biomaterial, monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDMs) can act as positive contributors to tissue regeneration and wound healing, or conversely promote a chronic inflammatory response that leads to fibrous encapsulation and implant rejection. A degradable polar hydrophobic iconic polyurethane (D-PHI) has been shown to reduce pro-inflammatory monocyte/macrophage response compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), a substrate routinely used for in vitro culture of cells, as well as poly(lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA), a standard synthetic biodegradable biomaterial in the tissue engineering field. D-PHI has also shown properties suitable for use in a vascular tissue engineering context. In order to understand the mechanism through which D-PHI attenuates pro-inflammatory monocyte response, this thesis investigated the ability of D-PHI to modulate interactions with adsorbed serum proteins and the properties of D-PHI that were important for this activity. D-PHI was shown to regulate protein adsorption in a manner that produced divergent monocyte responses compared to TCPS and PLGA when coated with the serum proteins alpha2-macroglobulin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). In the case of IgG, D-PHI was shown to reduce pro-inflammatory binding site exposure as a function of the material's polar, hydrophobic, and ionic character. Due to the favourable monocyte activation state supported by D-PHI, and the importance of monocytes/macrophages in regulating the response of tissue-specific cell types in vivo, the ability of a D-PHI-stimulated monocyte/macrophage activation state to contribute to modulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in a vascular tissue engineering context was investigated. D-PHI- stimulated monocytes promoted VSMC growth and migration through biomolecule

  16. Activated Platelets Induce an Anti-Inflammatory Response of Monocytes/Macrophages through Cross-Regulation of PGE2 and Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bona Linke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are well known for their role in hemostasis and are also increasingly recognized for their roles in the innate immune system during inflammation and their regulation of macrophage activation. Here, we aimed to study the influence of platelets on the production of inflammatory mediators by monocytes and macrophages. Analyzing cocultures of platelets and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages or human monocytes, we found that collagen-activated platelets release high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 that leads to an increased interleukin- (IL- 10 release and a decreased tumor necrosis factor (TNF α secretion out of the monocytes or macrophages. Platelet PGE2 mediated the upregulation of IL-10 in both cell types via the PGE2 receptor EP2. Notably, PGE2-mediated IL-10 synthesis was also mediated by EP4 in murine macrophages. Inhibition of TNFα synthesis via EP2 and EP4, but not EP1, was mediated by IL-10, since blockade of the IL-10 receptor abolished the inhibitory effect of both receptors on TNFα release. This platelet-mediated cross-regulation between PGE2 and cytokines reveals one mechanism how monocytes and macrophages can attenuate excessive inflammatory responses induced by activated platelets in order to limit inflammatory processes.

  17. Intestinal Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Control Commensal-Specific Th17 Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra Panea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Generation of different CD4 T cell responses to commensal and pathogenic bacteria is crucial for maintaining a healthy gut environment, but the associated cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mfs integrate microbial signals and direct adaptive immunity. Although the role of DCs in initiating T cell responses is well appreciated, how Mfs contribute to the generation of CD4 T cell responses to intestinal microbes is unclear. Th17 cells are critical for mucosal immune protection and at steady state are induced by commensal bacteria, such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB. Here, we examined the roles of mucosal DCs and Mfs in Th17 induction by SFB in vivo. We show that Mfs, and not conventional CD103+ DCs, are essential for the generation of SFB-specific Th17 responses. Thus, Mfs drive mucosal T cell responses to certain commensal bacteria.

  18. Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Exposed to Microorganisms Involved in Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Induce a Th1-Polarized Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallandre, Jean-René; Borg, Christophe; Loeffert, Sophie; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Millon, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immunoallergic disease characterized by a prominent interstitial infiltrate composed predominantly of lymphocytes secreting inflammatory cytokines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to play a pivotal role in the lymphocytic response. However, their cross talk with microorganisms that cause HP has yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the initial interactions between human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and four microorganisms that are different in nature (Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula [actinomycetes], Mycobacterium immunogenum [mycobacteria], and Wallemia sebi and Eurotium amstelodami [filamentous fungi]) and are involved in HP. Our objectives were to determine the cross talk between MoDCs and HP-causative agents and to determine whether the resulting immune response varied according to the microbial extract tested. The phenotypic activation of MoDCs was measured by the increased expression of costimulatory molecules and levels of cytokines in supernatants. The functional activation of MoDCs was measured by the ability of MoDCs to induce lymphocytic proliferation and differentiation in a mixed lymphocytic reaction (MLR). E. amstelodami-exposed (EA) MoDCs expressed higher percentages of costimulatory molecules than did W. sebi-exposed (WS), S. rectivirgula-exposed (SR), or M. immunogenum-exposed (MI) MoDCs (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). EA-MoDCs, WS-MoDCs, SR-MoDCs, and MI-MoDCs induced CD4+ T cell proliferation and a Th1-polarized immune response. The present study provides evidence that, although differences were initially observed between MoDCs exposed to filamentous fungi and MoDCs exposed to bacteria, a Th1 response was ultimately promoted by DCs regardless of the microbial extract tested. PMID:23720369

  19. Dyslipidemic Diet-Induced Monocyte “Priming” and Dysfunction in Non-Human Primates Is Triggered by Elevated Plasma Cholesterol and Accompanied by Altered Histone Acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Short

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and the recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages into sites of inflammation play a key role in atherogenesis and other chronic inflammatory diseases linked to cardiometabolic syndrome and obesity. Previous studies from our group have shown that metabolic stress promotes monocyte priming, i.e., enhanced adhesion and accelerated chemotaxis of monocytes in response to chemokines, both in vitro and in dyslipidemic LDLR−/− mice. We also showed that metabolic stress-induced monocyte dysfunction is, at least to a large extent caused by the S-glutathionylation, inactivation, and subsequent degradation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1. Here, we analyzed the effects of a Western-style, dyslipidemic diet (DD, which was composed of high levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and simple sugars, on monocyte (dysfunction in non-human primates (NHPs. We found that similar to mice, a DD enhances monocyte chemotaxis in NHP within 4 weeks, occurring concordantly with the onset of hypercholesterolemia but prior to changes in triglycerides, blood glucose, monocytosis, or changes in monocyte subset composition. In addition, we identified transitory decreases in the acetylation of histone H3 at the lysine residues 18 and 23 in metabolically primed monocytes, and we found that monocyte priming was correlated with the acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 after an 8-week DD regimen. Our data show that metabolic stress promotes monocyte priming and hyper-chemotactic responses in NHP. The histone modifications accompanying monocyte priming in primates suggest a reprogramming of the epigenetic landscape, which may lead to dysregulated responses and functionalities in macrophages derived from primed monocytes that are recruited to sites of inflammation.

  20. Dendritic cell, monocyte and T cell activation and response to glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Hesse, D; Limborg, S

    2012-01-01

    patients, the latter followed prospectively for one year. Gd-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were conducted in all patients. Disease activity was assessed as relapses. Results: The median percentage of DCs expressing CD40 was 10% in untreated MS patients and 5.9% in GA-treated patients...... associated with regulatory, naïve or central memory T cell populations, but CD4+ T cell activation was not related with relapse risk. Conclusions: MS patients treated with GA show prominent changes in circulating antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T cells. Expression of CD40 on DCs is significantly lower...

  1. Intestinal Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Control Commensal-Specific Th17 Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panea, C.; Farkas, A.M.; Goto, Y.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Lee, C.; Koscso, B.; Gowda, K.; Hohl, T.M.; Bogunovic, M.; Ivanov, II

    2015-01-01

    Generation of different CD4 T cell responses to commensal and pathogenic bacteria is crucial for maintaining a healthy gut environment, but the associated cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (Mfs) integrate microbial signals and direct adaptive immunity.

  2. ALV-J strain SCAU-HN06 induces innate immune responses in chicken primary monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min; Dai, Manman; Cao, Weisheng; Tan, Yan; Li, Zhenhui; Shi, Meiqing; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause lifelong infection and can escape from the host immune defenses in chickens. Since macrophages act as the important defense line against invading pathogens in host innate immunity, we investigated the function and innate immune responses of chicken primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after ALV-J infection in this study. Our results indicated that ALV-J was stably maintained in MDM cells but that the viral growth rate was significantly lower than that in DF-1 cells. We also found that ALV-J infection significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) production, but had no effect on MDM phagocytic capacity. Interestingly, infection with ALV-J rapidly promoted the expression levels of Myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx) (3 h, 6 h), ISG12 (6 h), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (3 h, 12 h) at an early infection stage, whereas it sharply decreased the expression of Mx (24 h, 36 h), ISG12 (36 h), and made little change on IL-1β (24 h, 36 h) production at a late infection stage in MDM cells. Moreover, the protein levels of interferon-β (IFN-β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) had sharply increased in infected MDM cells from 3 to 36 h post infection (hpi) of ALV-J. And, the protein level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was dramatically decreased at 36 hpi in MDM cells infected with ALV-J. These results demonstrate that ALV-J can induce host innate immune responses and we hypothesize that macrophages play an important role in host innate immune attack and ALV-J immune escape. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus promotes human monocyte survival and maturation through a paracrine induction of IFN-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Lyons, Stephen A; Arrand, John R

    2004-07-01

    The role of monocytes and macrophages during EBV infection is not clear. The interaction of EBV with human monocytes was investigated in terms of cell survival and morphological and phenotypic changes to gain a better understanding of the role of these cells during EBV infection. We show that EBV infection of PBMCs rescues monocytes from undergoing spontaneous apoptosis and dramatically enhances their survival. Results obtained with heat-inactivated virus, neutralizing anti-EBV mAb 72A1 and recombinant gp350, suggest that enhancement of viability by EBV requires both infectious virus and interaction between gp350 and its receptor. IFN-alpha either secreted within 24 h from PBMCs upon infection with EBV or exogenously added to unstimulated monocytes inhibited spontaneous apoptosis, indicating that induction of IFN-alpha is an early important survival signal responsible for the delay in the apoptosis of monocytes. EBV infection also induced acute maturation of monocytes to macrophages with morphological and phenotypic characteristics of potent APCs. Monocytes exposed to EBV became larger in size with increased granularity and expressed considerably higher levels of membrane HLA classes I and II, ICAM-1, CD80, CD86, and CD40 compared with uninfected cultures. These observations provide the first immunoregulatory links among EBV, IFN-alpha, and monocyte survival and maturation and importantly raise the possibility that these cells may serve as a vehicle for the dissemination of the virus as well as being active participants in eliciting anti-EBV T cell responses during acute infection.

  4. Sesquiterpene lactones induce distinct forms of cell death that modulate human monocyte-derived macrophage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Antón, Nancy; Hermann, Corinna; Murillo, Renato; Merfort, Irmgard; Wanner, Gerhard; Vollmar, Angelika M; Dirsch, Verena M

    2007-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SQTLs) are shown to possess anti-inflammatory as well as cytotoxic activity. No study, however, links both activities. We, therefore, hypothesized that SQTL-treated, dying cells might induce an anti-inflammatory response in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that SQTLs bearing either an alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclopentenone or an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone induce different forms of cell death. Whereas the cyclopentenone SQTL induced typical apoptosis, the alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs-induced cell death lacked partly classical signs of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation. All SQTLs, however, activated caspases and the nuclear morphology of cell death was dependent on caspase activation. Most interestingly, alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs induced a more pronounced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure than the cyclopentenone SQTL. Especially, 7-hydroxycostunolide (HC), with an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone substituted with a hydroxyl group, showed a striking fast and pronounced PS translocation. This result was in agreement with a strong activation of phagocytosis in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, HC-treated Jurkat cells led to an early (3.5 h) but transient increase in TNF-alpha levels in macrophage coculture. Release of TGF-beta remained unaffected after 18 h. We propose that this type of SQTL may influence local inflammation by transiently activating the immune system and help to clear cells by inducing a form of cell death that promotes phagocytosis.

  5. Metabolism-associated danger signal-induced immune response and reverse immune checkpoint-activated CD40(+) monocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Fang, Pu; Saredy, Jason; Xi, Hang; Ramon, Cueto; Yang, William; Choi, Eric T; Ji, Yong; Mao, Wei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2017-07-24

    Adaptive immunity is critical for disease progression and modulates T cell (TC) and antigen-presenting cell (APC) functions. Three signals were initially proposed for adaptive immune activation: signal 1 antigen recognition, signal 2 co-stimulation or co-inhibition, and signal 3 cytokine stimulation. In this article, we propose to term signal 2 as an immune checkpoint, which describes interactions of paired molecules leading to stimulation (stimulatory immune checkpoint) or inhibition (inhibitory immune checkpoint) of an immune response. We classify immune checkpoint into two categories: one-way immune checkpoint for forward signaling towards TC only, and two-way immune checkpoint for both forward and reverse signaling towards TC and APC, respectively. Recently, we and others provided evidence suggesting that metabolic risk factors (RF) activate innate and adaptive immunity, involving the induction of immune checkpoint molecules. We summarize these findings and suggest a novel theory, metabolism-associated danger signal (MADS) recognition, by which metabolic RF activate innate and adaptive immunity. We emphasize that MADS activates the reverse immune checkpoint which leads to APC inflammation in innate and adaptive immunity. Our recent evidence is shown that metabolic RF, such as uremic toxin or hyperhomocysteinemia, induced immune checkpoint molecule CD40 expression in monocytes (MC) and elevated serum soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) resulting in CD40(+) MC differentiation. We propose that CD40(+) MC is a novel pro-inflammatory MC subset and a reliable biomarker for chronic kidney disease severity. We summarize that CD40:CD40L immune checkpoint can induce TC and APC activation via forward stimulatory, reverse stimulatory, and TC contact-independent immune checkpoints. Finally, we modeled metabolic RF-induced two-way stimulatory immune checkpoint amplification and discussed potential signaling pathways including AP-1, NF-κB, NFAT, STAT, and DNA methylation and their

  6. Enhancement of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-induced differentiation of human leukaemia HL-60 cells into monocytes by parthenolide via inhibition of NF-κB activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S N; Kim, S H; Chung, S W; Lee, M H; Kim, H J; Kim, T S

    2002-01-01

    Transcription factors such as NF-κB provide powerful targets for drugs to use in the treatment of cancer. In this report parthenolide (PT), a sesquiterpene lactone of herbal remedies such as feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) with NF-κB inhibitory activity, markedly increased the degree of human leukaemia HL-60 cell differentiation when simultaneously combined with 5 nM 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3). PT by itself did not induce HL-60 cell differentiation. Cytofluorometric analysis indicated that PT stimulated 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells predominantly into monocytes. Pretreatment of HL-60 cells with PT before the 1,25-(OH)2D3 addition also potentiated the 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced HL-60 cell differentiation in both a dose- and a time-dependent manner, in which the enhanced levels of cell differentiation closely correlated with the inhibitory levels of NF-κB binding activity by PT. In contrast, santonin, a sesquiterpene lactone without an inhibitory activity of NF-κB binding to the κB sites, did not enhance the 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced HL-60 cell differentiation. In transfection experiments, PT enhanced 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced VDRE-dependent promoter activity. Furthermore, PT restored 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced VDRE-dependent promoter activity inhibited by TNF-α, an activator of NF-κB signalling pathway. These results indicate that PT strongly potentiates the 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced HL-60 cell differentiation into monocytes via the inhibition of NF-κB activity and provide evidence that inhibition of NF-κB activation can be a pre-requisite to the efficient entry of promyelocytic leukaemia cells into a differentiation pathway. PMID:11877332

  7. The immune response during the luteal phase of the ovarian cycle : increasing sensitivity of human monocytes to endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Annechien; Moes, H; Heineman, MJ; de Leij, LFMH; Faas, MM

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that during the luteal phase of the human ovarian cycle, as compared with the follicular phase, the percentage of cytokines producing peripheral monocytes after in vitro stimulation with endotoxin is increased. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Academic research

  8. Thrombin-Derived Host-Defense Peptides Modulate Monocyte/Macrophage Inflammatory Responses to Gram-Negative Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finja C; Strömdahl, Ann-Charlotte; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    , the effect of GKY25 on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with Gram-negative bacteria was explored. Electron microscopy analysis showed that fibrin slough from non-healing wounds, colonized with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, contains C-terminal thrombin epitopes associated...

  9. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  10. Epigallocatechin gallate induces apoptosis of monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kazushige; Tsuno, Nelson H; Kitayama, Joji; Okaji, Yurai; Yazawa, Kentaro; Asakage, Masahiro; Sasaki, Shin; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Koki; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2005-01-01

    Monocytes are the main effector cells of the immune system, and the regulation of their survival and apoptosis is essential for monocyte-involved immune responses. Green tea polyphenol catechin has been reported to have antiallergic and anti-inflammatory activities, but its effect on monocytes has not yet been explored. To elucidate the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effect of catechin, we studied the effect of catechin, especially epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on the apoptosis of monocytes. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were incubated without or with catechin, and apoptosis was evaluated by annexin V and propidium iodide double-staining or terminal deoxynucleotidyl assay. The activation of caspases 3, 8, and 9 was also evaluated by flow cytometry. The influence of GM-CSF or LPS, the known monocyte survival factors, on the EGCG-induced apoptosis of monocytes was investigated. Among the 4 catechin derivatives tested, EGCG and epicatechin gallate induced apoptosis of monocytes. Caspases 3, 8, and 9, which play a central role in the apoptotic cascade, were dose-dependently activated by EGCG treatment. The EGCG-induced apoptosis of monocytes was not affected by GM-CSF or LPS. Catechin, especially EGCG, by promoting monocytic apoptosis, may be a new promising anti-inflammatory agent, and should be tested in clinical trials.

  11. Ly6Chigh Monocytes Oscillate in the Heart During Homeostasis and After Myocardial Infarction-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Maximilian J; Hilby, Michael; Nitz, Katrin; Guillamat Prats, Raquel; Ferraro, Bartolo; Leoni, Giovanna; Soehnlein, Oliver; Kessler, Thorsten; He, Wenyan; Luckow, Bruno; Horckmans, Michael; Weber, Christian; Duchene, Johan; Steffens, Sabine

    2017-09-01

    Circadian regulation of neutrophil homeostasis affects myocardial infarction (MI) healing. It is unknown whether diurnal variations of monocyte counts exist in the heart and whether this affects their cardiac infiltration in response to MI. Murine blood and organs were harvested at distinct times of day and analyzed by flow cytometry. Ly6Chigh monocyte surface expression levels of chemokine receptors (CCR) were ≈2-fold higher at the beginning of the active phase, Zeitgeber Time (ZT) 13 compared with ZT5. This was because of enhanced receptor surface expression at ZT13, whereas no significant changes in total cellular protein levels were found. Most blood Ly6Chigh monocytes were CCR2high, whereas only a minority was CCR1high and CCR5high. We also found diurnal changes of classical monocyte blood counts in humans, being higher in the evening, while exhibiting enhanced CCR2 surface expression in the morning. In support of monocyte oscillations between blood and tissue, murine cardiac Ly6Chigh monocyte counts were highest at ZT13, accompanied by an upregulation of cardiac CC chemokine ligand 2 mRNA. Mice subjected to MI at ZT13 had an even higher upregulation of CCR2 surface expression on circulating monocytes compared with noninfarcted mice and more elevated cardiac CC chemokine ligand 2 protein expression and more pronounced Ly6Chigh monocyte infiltration compared with ZT5-infarcted mice. Concomitantly, CCR2 antagonism only inhibited the excessive cardiac Ly6Chigh monocyte infiltration after ZT13 MI but not ZT5 MI. CCR2 surface expression on Ly6Chigh monocytes changes in a time-of-day-dependent manner, which crucially affects cardiac monocyte recruitment after an acute ischemic event. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Pregnancy and Preeclampsia Affect Monocyte Subsets in Humans and Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, Barbro N.; Spaans, Floor; Borghuis, Theo; Klok, Pieter A.; Groen, Bart; Bolt, Annemarie; de Vos, P.; van Pampus, Maria; Wong, Tsz Y.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, Winston W.; Faas, Marijke M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Both nonclassical and intermediate monocytes have been implicated in different inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that these monocytes would increase during pregnancy, a condition associated with generalized activation of inflammatory responses and that they would increase even

  13. Heterogeneity of Bovine Peripheral Blood Monocytes

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    Jamal Hussen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood monocytes of several species can be divided into different subpopulations with distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Herein, we aim at reviewing published work regarding the heterogeneity of the recently characterized bovine monocyte subsets. As the heterogeneity of human blood monocytes was widely studied and reviewed, this work focuses on comparing bovine monocyte subsets with their human counterparts regarding their phenotype, adhesion and migration properties, inflammatory and antimicrobial functions, and their ability to interact with neutrophilic granulocytes. In addition, the differentiation of monocyte subsets into functionally polarized macrophages is discussed. Regarding phenotype and distribution in blood, bovine monocyte subsets share similarities with their human counterparts. However, many functional differences exist between monocyte subsets from the two species. In contrast to their pro-inflammatory functions in human, bovine non-classical monocytes show the lowest phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species generation capacity, an absent ability to produce the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β after inflammasome activation, and do not have a role in the early recruitment of neutrophils into inflamed tissues. Classical and intermediate monocytes of both species also differ in their response toward major monocyte-attracting chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5 and neutrophil degranulation products (DGP in vitro. Such differences between homologous monocyte subsets also extend to the development of monocyte-derived macrophages under the influence of chemokines like CCL5 and neutrophil DGP. Whereas the latter induce the differentiation of M1-polarized macrophages in human, bovine monocyte-derived macrophages develop a mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotype. Although only a few bovine clinical trials analyzed the correlation between changes in monocyte composition and disease, they suggest that functional differences between

  14. Non-myeloid Cells are Major Contributors to Innate Immune Responses via Production of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein- 1(MCP-1/CCL2

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    Teizo eYoshimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 is a chemokine regulating the recruitment of monocytes into sites of inflammation and cancer. MCP-1 can be produced by a variety of cell types, such as macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. Notably, macrophages produce high levels of MCP-1 in response to proinflammatory stimuli in vitro, leading to the hypothesis that macrophages are the major source of MCP-1 during inflammatory responses in vivo. In stark contrast to the hypothesis, however, there was no significant reduction in MCP-1 protein or the number of infiltrating macrophages in the peritoneal inflammatory exudates of myeloid cell-specific MCP-1-deficient mice in response to i.p injection of thioglycollate or zymosan A. Furthermore, injection of LPS into skin air pouch also had no effect on local MCP-1 production in myeloid-specific MCP-1-deficient mice. Finally, myeloid-specific MCP-1-deficiency did not reduce MCP-1 mRNA expression or macrophage infiltration in LPS-induced lung injury. These results indicate that non-myeloid cells, in response to a variety of stimulants, play a previously unappreciated role in innate immune responses as the primary source of MCP-1.

  15. Preexercise energy drink consumption does not improve endurance cycling performance but increases lactate, monocyte, and interleukin-6 response.

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    Phillips, Melody D; Rola, Kelyn S; Christensen, Kenneth V; Ross, Jacob W; Mitchell, Joel B

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an energy drink (ED) on cycling performance and immune-related variables. Eleven trained male cyclists (33.4 ± 8.9 years; 81 ± 7.6 kg; maximal VO2, 52 ± 3.4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) consumed 500 ml of (a) ED (2.0 g taurine, 1.2 g glucuronolactone, 160 mg caffeine, 56 g carbohydrate [CHO], and B vitamins), (b) cola matched for caffeine and CHO (CC), or (c) flavored placebo (PL: sparking water and flavoring) 50 minutes before racing in a randomized, crossover design. Performance was measured as time to complete (TTC) a 25-mile simulated road race. Blood was collected at baseline, 30 minutes after drink consumption, during exercise at miles 5 (M5), 15 (M15), and immediately (POEX) and 30 minutes (30minPO) after exercise. TTC was not different (p > 0.05) among trials (ED, 68.6 ± 2.7; CC, 68.9 ± 3.8; PL, 69.6 ± 3.8 minutes). Consumption of CC and ED elicited a mild hypoglycemia elicited a mild hypoglycemia during cycling. POEX interleukin-6 (IL-6) was greatest after ED, whereas CC IL-6 was greater than PL (10.2 ± 1.6, 6.7 ± 0.6, and 4.8 ± 0.7 pg·ml(-1), respectively; p Energy drink induced an earlier recruitment of monocytes to the blood stream than CC. Mean fat oxidation was greater in PL compared with CC (0.43 ± 0.06 and 0.28 ± 0.04 g·min(-1); p = 0.033) but did not differ between ED (0.32 ± 0.06) and PL. Lactate was higher in ED compared with CC and PL at M5 and M15 (p = 0.003), but there was no significant influence of either ED or CC on performance. Carbohydrate and caffeine consumption before endurance cycling significantly increased the IL-6 release and leukocytosis, and the additional ingredients in ED seem to have further augmented these responses.

  16. In vitro suppression of immune responses using monocyte-derived tolerogenic dendritic cells from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenkov, Roman; Brun, Johan G; Jonsson, Roland; Appel, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination with antigen-specific tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC) might become a future option of individualized therapy for patients with autoimmune diseases. In this study, we tested the possibility of generating monocyte-derived tolDC from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). We analyzed phenotype, cytokine production and ability to suppress Ro/La-specific immune responses. Monocyte-derived tolDC from patients with pSS were generated in the presence of dexamethasone, vitamin D3 and lipopolysaccharide (DexVD3 DC). The phenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry and the cytokine profile was investigated using a 25-plex Luminex assay and ELISA. The capacity to both stimulate Ro/La-specific T cells and suppress this response was evaluated by autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). DC generated from patients with pSS had a similar phenotype and cytokine profile to those from healthy controls. DexVD3 DC from pSS patients induced little antigen-specific T cell proliferation, but DexVD3 DC-primed lymphocytes successfully suppressed Ro/La-specific T cell responses. DexVD3 DC presenting Ro/La antigens might be a promising new therapeutic option for patients with pSS.

  17. NADPH Oxidase/ROS-Dependent VCAM-1 Induction on TNF-α-Challenged Human Cardiac Fibroblasts Enhances Monocyte Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chien-Chung; Wang, Chen-Yu; Tseng, Hui-Ching; Pan, Chih-Shuo; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The inflammation-dependent adhesion molecule expressions are characterized in cardiovascular diseases and myocardial tissue infiltrations. Several pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in the acute myocardial injury and infarction. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is raised in the injury tissues and inflammatory regions and involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac injury, inflammation, and apoptosis. In fibroblasts, TNF-α-triggered expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 aggravated the heart inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying TNF-α-mediated VCAM-1 expression in cardiac fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, the primary cultured human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) were used to investigate the effects of TNF-α on VCAM-1 expression. The molecular evidence, including protein, mRNA, and promoter analyses, indicated that TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 gene expression is mediated through the TNFR-dependent manner. Activation of TNF-α/TNFR system triggered PKCα-dependent NADPH oxidase (Nox)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal linking to MAPK cascades, and then led to activation of the transcription factor, AP-1. Moreover, the results of mRNA and promoter assay demonstrated that c-Jun/AP-1 phosphorylated by TNF-α turns on VCAM-1 gene expression. Subsequently, up-regulated VCAM-1 on the cell surface of TNF-α-challenged HCFs increased the number of monocytes adhering to these cells. These results indicated that in HCFs, activation of AP-1 by PKCα-dependent Nox/ROS/MAPKs cascades is required for TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. To clarify the mechanisms of TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression in HCFs may provide therapeutic strategies for heart injury and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26858641

  18. Multisensory integration produces an initial response enhancement

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    Benjamin A Rowland

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The brain has evolved the ability to integrate information across the senses in order to improve the detection and disambiguation of biologically significant events. This multisensory synthesis of information leads to faster (and more accurate behavioral responses, yet the underlying neural mechanisms by which these responses are speeded are as yet unclear. The aim of these experiments was to evaluate the temporal properties of multisensory enhancement in the physiological responses of neuron in the superior colliculus (SC. Of specific interest was the temporal evolution of their responses to individual modality-specific stimuli as well as to cross-modal combinations of these stimuli. The results demonstrate that cross-modal stimuli typically elicit faster, more robust, and more reliable physiological responses than do their modality-specific component stimuli. Response measures sensitive to the time domain showed that these multisensory responses were enhanced from their very onset, and that the acceleration of the enhancement was greatest within the first 40 ms (or 50% of the response. The latter half of the multisensory response was typically only as robust and informative as predicted by a linear combination of the unisensory component responses. These results may reveal some of the key physiological changes underlying many of the SC-mediated behavioral benefits of multisensory integration.

  19. Conjugation of nitrated acetaminophen to Der p1 amplifies peripheral blood monocyte response to Der p1.

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    Ryan G Thomas

    Full Text Available An association of acetaminophen use and asthma was observed in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study. However there are no clear mechanisms to explain an association between acetaminophen use and immunologic pathology. In acidic conditions like those in the stomach and inflamed airway, tyrosine residues are nitrated by nitrous and peroxynitrous acids. The resulting nitrotyrosine is structurally similar to 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, known haptens that enhance immune responses by covalently binding proteins. Nitrated acetaminophen shares similar molecular structure.We hypothesized the acetaminophen phenol ring undergoes nitration under acidic conditions, producing 3-nitro-acetaminophen which augments allergic responses by acting as a hapten for environmental allergens.3-nitro-acetaminophen was formed from acetaminophen in the presence of acidified nitrite, purified by high performance liquid chromatography, and assayed by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry. Purified 3-nitro-acetaminophen was reacted with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1 and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify the modification site. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation response was measured in response to 3-nitro-acetaminophen and to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1.Acetaminophen was modified by nitrous acid forming 3-nitro-acetaminophen over a range of different acidic conditions consistent with airway inflammation and stomach acidity. The Der p1 protein-hapten adduct creation was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry proteomics modifying cysteine 132. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1 had increased proliferation and cytokine production compared to acetaminophen and Der p1 alone (n = 7; p < 0.05.These data suggests 3-nitro-acetaminophen formation and reaction with Der p1 provides a mechanism by which stomach acid or infection

  20. Proteomic and systems biology analysis of monocytes exposed to securinine, a GABA(A receptor antagonist and immune adjuvant.

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    Matt Shipman

    Full Text Available Securinine, a GABA(A receptor antagonist, has been reported to enhance monocyte cell killing of Coxiella burnetii without obvious adverse effects in vivo. We employed multiplex 2D gel electrophoresis using Zdyes, a new generation of covalently linked fluorescent differential protein detection dyes to analyze changes in the monocyte proteome in response to Securinine. Securinine antagonism of GABA(A receptors triggers the activation of p38. We used the differential protein expression results to guide a search of the literature and network analysis software to construct a systems biology model of the effect of Securinine on monocytes. The model suggests that various metabolic modulators (fatty acid binding protein 5, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, and thioredoxin are at least partially reshaping the metabolic landscape within the monocytes. The actin bundling protein L-plastin, and the Ca(2+ binding protein S100A4 also appear to have important roles in the immune response stimulated by Securinine. Fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5 may be involved in effecting lipid raft composition, inflammation, and hormonal regulation of monocytes, and the model suggests that FABP5 may be a central regulator of metabolism in activated monocytes. The model also suggests that the heat shock proteins have a significant impact on the monocyte immune response. The model provides a framework to guide future investigations into the mechanisms of Securinine action and with elaboration may help guide development of new types of immune adjuvants.

  1. Continuous treatment with recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis CFP-10-ESAT-6 protein activated human monocyte while deactivated LPS-stimulated macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yonghong; Yang, Xin; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yaoting; Su, Bo; Ding, Yuansheng; Qin, Lianhua; Yang, Hua; Zheng, Ruijuan; Hu, Zhongyi

    2008-01-18

    Influence of the recombinant culture filtered protein 10 (CFP-10) and early-secreted antigenic target 6kDa protein (ESAT-6) (r-CFP-10-ESAT-6, rCE) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) on human monocyte and macrophage activation was investigated using human monocyte, monocyte like THP-1 cell line and monocyte derived macrophage (MDM). rCE solely enhanced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes and THP-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. rCE enhanced expression of CD80 and CD40, it also synergized with IFN-gamma in induction of TNF-alpha production and HLA-DR expression. Pharmacological agents that selectively inhibit mitogen activated protein kinase activation markedly suppressed rCE-induced TNF- alpha release. However, continuous presence of rCE (>72h) during monocyte to macrophage differentiation inhibited macrophage response to LPS stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that rCE might have differential influence on monocyte and macrophage activation, which might be correlated with Mtb immune evasion.

  2. Porcine neonatal blood dendritic cells, but not monocytes, are more responsive to TLRs stimulation than their adult counterparts.

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    Gael Auray

    Full Text Available The neonatal immune system is often considered as immature or impaired compared to the adult immune system. This higher susceptibility to infections is partly due to the skewing of the neonatal immune response towards a Th2 response. Activation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in shaping the immune response, therefore, DCs are a target of choice for the development of efficient and protective vaccine formulations able to redirect the neonatal immune response to a protective Th1 response. As pigs are becoming more important for vaccine development studies due to their similarity to the human immune system, we decided to compare the activation and maturation of a subpopulation of porcine DCs in adult and neonatal pigs following stimulation with different TLR ligands, which are promising candidates for adjuvants in vaccine formulations. Porcine blood derived DCs (BDCs were directly isolated from blood and consisted of a mix of conventional and plasmacytoid DCs. Following CpG ODN (TLR9 ligand and imiquimod (TLR7 ligand stimulation, neonatal BDCs showed higher levels of expression of costimulatory molecules and similar (CpG ODN or higher (imiquimod levels of IL-12 compared to adult BDCs. Another interesting feature was that only neonatal BDCs produced IFN-α after TLR7 or TLR9 ligand stimulation. Stimulation with CpG ODN and imiquimod also induced enhanced expression of several chemokines. Moreover, in a mixed leukocyte reaction assay, neonatal BDCs displayed a greater ability to induce lymphoproliferation. These findings suggest that when stimulated via TLR7 or TLR9 porcine DCs display similar if not better response than adult porcine DCs.

  3. Aldose Reductase Mediates NLRP3 Inflammasome-Initiated Innate Immune Response in Hyperglycemia-Induced Thp1 Monocytes and Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Pabitra B; Sonowal, Himangshu; Shukla, Kirtikar; Srivastava, Satish K; Ramana, Kota V

    2017-10-01

    Despite recent studies that show oxidative stress-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome-mediated innate immune response in various diabetic complications, the mechanism by which ROS activate innate immune response is not well understood. We have shown previously that aldose reductase (AR), besides reducing glucose, reduces lipid aldehydes and their glutathione conjugates and participates in various oxidative stress-induced inflammatory pathways. To understand the role of AR in ROS-induced innate immune response, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which AR activates hyperglycemia-induced NLRP3 inflammsome-initiated innate immune response in Thp1 monocytes and in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. In Thp1 monocytes, inhibition or ablation of AR prevented high-glucose-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and caspase-1 and release of the innate immune cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. AR inhibition in Thp1 cells also prevented the high-glucose-induced generation of ROS, influx of Ca2+, efflux of K+, and activation of Lyn, Syk, and PI3K. Furthermore, the AR inhibitor fidarestat prevented the expression of NLRP inflammasome components in STZ-induced diabetic mouse heart and aorta, and also prevented the release of various cytokines in the serum. Collectively, our data suggest that AR regulates hyperglycemia-induced NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated innate immune response by altering the ROS/Lyn/Syk/PI3K/Ca2+/K+ signals. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  4. Evidence of changes in the immunophenotype and metabolic characteristics (intracellular reactive oxygen radicals) of fetal, but not maternal, monocytes and granulocytes in the fetal inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Kwon; Romero, Roberto; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Mittal, Pooja; Erez, Offer; Vaisbuch, Edi; Gotsch, Francesca; Pacora, Percy; Yeo, Lami; Gervasi, Maria Teresa; Lamont, Ronald F; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Hassan, Sonia S

    2009-01-01

    The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) is present in a fraction of fetuses exposed to intra-amniotic infection and is associated with the impending onset of labor and multisystem organ involvement. Neonates born with funisitis, the histologic counterpart of fetal systemic inflammation, are at increased risk for cerebral palsy and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to determine whether fetal and maternal granulocytes and monocytes have the phenotypic and metabolic characteristics of activation in cases with FIRS. A case-control study was conducted with umbilical cord and maternal blood samples obtained from patients who delivered preterm with (n=30) and without funisitis (n=15). The phenotypic characteristics of granulocytes and monocytes were examined using flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies including CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD18, CD49d, CD62L, CD64, CD66b, and HLA-DR. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) were measured at the basal state and after stimulation (oxidative burst). A Pmetabolic changes consistent with activation in fetal immune cells but not in maternal blood.

  5. Atomic layer deposition coating of carbon nanotubes with zinc oxide causes acute phase immune responses in human monocytes in vitro and in mice after pulmonary exposure.

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    Dandley, Erinn C; Taylor, Alexia J; Duke, Katherine S; Ihrie, Mark D; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C

    2016-06-08

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a method for applying conformal nanoscale coatings on three-dimensional structures. We hypothesized that surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polycrystalline ZnO by ALD would alter pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by human monocytes in vitro and modulate the lung and systemic immune response following oropharyngeal aspiration in mice. Pristine (U-MWCNTs) were coated with alternating doses of diethyl zinc and water over increasing ALD cycles (10 to 100 ALD cycles) to yield conformal ZnO-coated MWCNTs (Z-MWCNTs). Human THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to U-MWCNTs or Z-MWCNTs in vitro and cytokine mRNAs measured by Taqman real-time RT-PCR. Male C57BL6 mice were exposed to U- or Z-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) and lung inflammation evaluated at one day post-exposure by histopathology, cytokine expression and differential counting of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells. Lung fibrosis was evaluated at 28 days. Cytokine mRNAs (IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL10, TNF-α) in lung, heart, spleen, and liver were quantified at one and 28 days. DNA synthesis in lung tissue was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. ALD resulted in a conformal coating of MWCNTs with ZnO that increased proportionally to the number of coating cycles. Z-MWCNTs released Zn(+2) ions in media and increased IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL10, and TNF-α mRNAs in THP-1 cells in vitro. Mice exposed to Z-MWCNTs by OPA had exaggerated lung inflammation and a 3-fold increase in monocytes and neutrophils in BALF compared to U-MWCNTs. Z-MWCNTs, but not U-MWCNTs, induced IL-6 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein in the lungs of mice and increased IL-6 mRNA in heart and liver. U-MWCNTs but not Z-MWCNTs stimulated airway epithelial DNA synthesis in vivo. Lung fibrosis at 28 days was not significantly different between mice treated with U-MWCNT or Z-MWCNT. Pulmonary exposure to ZnO-coated MWCNTs produces a systemic acute phase response that

  6. Study of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in paracoccidioidomycosis: cytopathology and alveolar macrophage function in response to gamma interferon; comparison with blood monocytes.

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    Calvi, Sueli A; Soares, Angela M V C; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha S; Franco, Marcelo; Ruiz, Raul L; Marcondes-Machado, Jussara; Fecchio, Denise; Mattos, Maria C I; Mendes, Rinaldo P

    2003-12-01

    Patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) present marked involvement of the lungs during the course of the mycosis. The purpose of this work was to obtain bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from these patients to study the cytopathology, TNF levels and the oxidative and fungicidal response of alveolar macrophages (AMs) to in vitro incubation with recombinant IFN-gamma. To compare the lung and blood compartments, these determinations were also made in plasma and blood monocytes (BMs) obtained from the same patients. The cytopathology of BAL fluid revealed a predominance of macrophages, but with the presence of neutrophil exudation, and rare lymphocytes and epithelioid and giant cells. Comparison of the oxidative status and fungicidal activity of AMs and circulating BMs demonstrated that both cell types are highly activated for these two functions when compared to control cells. However, TNF levels were higher in BAL fluid than in plasma. The possible mechanisms involved in the hyperresponsiveness of cells from PCM patients are discussed.

  7. Proteome of monocyte priming by lipopolysaccharide, including changes in interleukin-1beta and leukocyte elastase inhibitor

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    Beranova-Giorgianni Sarka

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes can be primed in vitro by lipopolysaccharide (LPS for release of cytokines, for enhanced killing of cancer cells, and for enhanced release of microbicidal oxygen radicals like superoxide and peroxide. We investigated the proteins involved in regulating priming, using 2D gel proteomics. Results Monocytes from 4 normal donors were cultured for 16 h in chemically defined medium in Teflon bags ± LPS and ± 4-(2-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF, a serine protease inhibitor. LPS-primed monocytes released inflammatory cytokines, and produced increased amounts of superoxide. AEBSF blocked priming for enhanced superoxide, but did not affect cytokine release, showing that AEBSF was not toxic. After staining large-format 2D gels with Sypro ruby, we compared the monocyte proteome under the four conditions for each donor. We found 30 protein spots that differed significantly in response to LPS or AEBSF, and these proteins were identified by ion trap mass spectrometry. Conclusion We identified 19 separate proteins that changed in response to LPS or AEBSF, including ATP synthase, coagulation factor XIII, ferritin, coronin, HN ribonuclear proteins, integrin alpha IIb, pyruvate kinase, ras suppressor protein, superoxide dismutase, transketolase, tropomyosin, vimentin, and others. Interestingly, in response to LPS, precursor proteins for interleukin-1β appeared; and in response to AEBSF, there was an increase in elastase inhibitor. The increase in elastase inhibitor provides support for our hypothesis that priming requires an endogenous serine protease.

  8. LSD enhances the emotional response to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelen, M; Barrett, F S; Roseman, L; Lorenz, R; Family, N; Bolstridge, M; Curran, H V; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2015-10-01

    There is renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). LSD was used extensively in the 1950s and 1960s as an adjunct in psychotherapy, reportedly enhancing emotionality. Music is an effective tool to evoke and study emotion and is considered an important element in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy; however, the hypothesis that psychedelics enhance the emotional response to music has yet to be investigated in a modern placebo-controlled study. The present study sought to test the hypothesis that music-evoked emotions are enhanced under LSD. Ten healthy volunteers listened to five different tracks of instrumental music during each of two study days, a placebo day followed by an LSD day, separated by 5-7 days. Subjective ratings were completed after each music track and included a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the nine-item Geneva Emotional Music Scale (GEMS-9). Results demonstrated that the emotional response to music is enhanced by LSD, especially the emotions "wonder", "transcendence", "power" and "tenderness". These findings reinforce the long-held assumption that psychedelics enhance music-evoked emotion, and provide tentative and indirect support for the notion that this effect can be harnessed in the context of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. Further research is required to test this link directly.

  9. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme in myelomonocytic cells enhances the immune response [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    Kenneth E. Bernstein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and thereby plays an important role in blood pressure control. However, ACE is relatively non-specific in its substrate specificity and cleaves many other peptides. Recent analysis of mice overexpressing ACE in monocytes, macrophages, and other myelomonocytic cells shows that these animals have a marked increase in resistance to experimental melanoma and to infection by Listeria monocytogenes or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Several other measures of immune responsiveness, including antibody production, are enhanced in these animals. These studies complement a variety of studies indicating an important role of ACE in the immune response.

  10. Carvedilol, a nonselective beta-blocker, suppresses the production of tumor necrosis factor and tissue factor by inhibiting early growth response factor-1 expression in human monocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuochi, Yuichiro; Okajima, Kenji; Harada, Naoaki; Molor-Erdene, Perenlei; Uchiba, Mitsuhiro; Komura, Hidefumi; Tsuda, Takako; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2007-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and tissue factor (TF) produced by monocytes and macrophages have been shown to be among the aggravating factors for chronic heart failure (CHF), because they induce cardiac dysfunction and thrombotic complications, respectively. Carvedilol, a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist with alpha(1)- adrenoceptor blockade action, has been demonstrated to improve the outcome of patients with severe CHF, suggesting that carvedilol might inhibit the production of TNF and TF. In this study, this possibility is examined using isolated human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. Carvedilol (10 muM) significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of TNF and TF by monocytes, whereas prazosin (a selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist), bisoprolol (a selective beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist), ICI-118,551 (a selective beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist), and arotinolol (a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist with alpha(1)-adrenoceptor blockade action) did not. Carvedilol inhibited both expression of early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, but it did not inhibit activation of either nuclear factor-kappaB or activator protein-1 in monocytes stimulated with LPS. These results suggest that carvedilol inhibits LPS-induced production of TNF and TF by inhibiting activation of the ERK1/2-Egr-1 pathway independent of its adrenoceptor inhibitory activities in monocytes.

  11. Glutamine May Repress the Weak LPS and Enhance the Strong Heat Shock Induction of Monocyte and Lymphocyte HSP72 Proteins but May Not Modulate the HSP72 mRNA in Patients with Sepsis or Trauma

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    Efrossini Briassouli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We assessed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS or heat shock (HS induction of heat shock protein-72 (HSP72 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of patients with severe sepsis (SS or trauma-related systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, compared to healthy individuals (H; we also investigated any pre- or posttreatment modulating glutamine (Gln effect. Methods. SS (11, SIRS (10, and H (19 PBMCs were incubated with 1 μg/mL LPS or 43°HS. Gln 10 mM was either added 1 h before or 1 h after induction or was not added at all. We measured monocyte (m, lymphocyte (l, mRNA HSP72, HSP72 polymorphisms, interleukins (ILs, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and cortisol levels. Results. Baseline lHSP72 was higher in SS p<0.03, and mHSP72 in SIRS p<0.02, compared to H. Only HS induced l/mHSP72/mRNA HSP72; LPS induced IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1. Induced mRNA was related to l/mHSP72, and was related negatively to cytokines. Intracellular l/mHSP72/HSP72 mRNA was related to serum ILs, not being influenced by cortisol, illness severity, and HSP72 polymorphisms. Gln did not induce mRNA in any group but modified l/mHSP72 after LPS/HS induction unpredictably. Conclusions. HSP72 mRNA and l/mHSP72 are higher among critically ill patients, further induced by HS, not by LPS. HSP72 proteins and HSP72 mRNA are related to serum ILs and are negatively related to supernatant cytokines, not being influenced by HSP72 polymorphisms, cortisol, or illness severity. Gln may depress l/mHSP72 after LPS exposure and enhance them after HS induction, but it may not affect early induced HSP72 mRNA.

  12. Enhanced Inhibitory Effect of Ultra-Fine Granules of Red Ginseng on LPS-induced Cytokine Expression in the Monocyte-Derived Macrophage THP-1 Cells

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    Hong-Yeoul Kim

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Red ginseng is one of the most popular traditional medicines in Korea because its soluble hot-water extract is known to be very effective on enhancing immunity as well as inhibiting inflammation. Recently, we developed a new technique, called the HACgearshift system, which can pulverize red ginseng into the ultra-fine granules ranging from 0.2 to 7.0 μm in size. In this study, the soluble hot-water extract of those ultra-fine granules of red ginseng (URG was investigated and compared to that of the normal-sized granules of red ginseng (RG. The high pressure liquid chromatographic analyses of the soluble hot-water extracts of both URG and RG revealed that URG had about 2-fold higher amounts of the ginsenosides, the biologically active components in red ginseng, than RG did. Using quantitative RT-PCR, cytokine profiling against the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the monocyte-derived macrophage THP-1 cells demonstrated that the URG-treated cells showed a significant reduction in cytokine expression than the RG-treated ones. Transcription expression of the LPS-induced cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TGF-β was significantly inhibited by URG compared to RG. These results suggest that some biologically active and soluble components in red ginseng can be more effectively extracted from URG than RG by standard hot-water extraction.

  13. Asian Zika virus strains target CD14+ blood monocytes and induce M2-skewed immunosuppression during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Suan-Sin; Chen, Weiqiang; Chan, Yen; Bowman, James W; Chang, Lin-Chun; Choi, Younho; Yoo, Ji Seung; Ge, Jianning; Cheng, Genhong; Bonnin, Alexandre; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Brasil, Patrícia; Jung, Jae U

    2017-11-01

    Blood CD14+ monocytes are frontline immunomodulators categorized into classical, intermediate or non-classical subsets, and subsequently differentiated into M1 pro- or M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages on stimulation. Although the Zika virus (ZIKV) rapidly establishes viraemia, the target cells and immune responses, particularly during pregnancy, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown whether African- and Asian-lineage ZIKV have different phenotypic impacts on host immune responses. Using human blood infection, we identified CD14+ monocytes as the primary target for African- or Asian-lineage ZIKV infection. When immunoprofiles of human blood infected with ZIKV were compared, a classical/intermediate monocyte-mediated M1-skewed inflammation by the African-lineage ZIKV infection was observed, in contrast to a non-classical monocyte-mediated M2-skewed immunosuppression by the Asian-lineage ZIKV infection. Importantly, infection of the blood of pregnant women revealed an enhanced susceptibility to ZIKV infection. Specifically, Asian-lineage ZIKV infection of pregnant women's blood led to an exacerbated M2-skewed immunosuppression of non-classical monocytes in conjunction with a global suppression of type I interferon-signalling pathway and an aberrant expression of host genes associated with pregnancy complications. Also, 30 ZIKV+ sera from symptomatic pregnant patients showed elevated levels of M2-skewed immunosuppressive cytokines and pregnancy-complication-associated fibronectin-1. This study demonstrates the differential immunomodulatory responses of blood monocytes, particularly during pregnancy, on infection with different lineages of ZIKV.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation downregulates the increase of monocytes expressing toll-like receptor 4 in response to 6-day intensive training in kendo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Kon, Michihiro; Tanimura, Yuko; Hanaoka, Yukichi; Kimura, Fuminori; Akama, Takao; Kono, Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    This study examined changes in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-expressing monocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in response to continuous intensive exercise training in athletes, as well as the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on these changes. Eighteen male elite kendo athletes in Japan were randomly assigned to a CoQ10-supplementation group (n = 9) or a placebo-supplementation group (n = 9) using a double-blind method. Subjects in the CoQ10 group took 300 mg CoQ10 per day for 20 days. Subjects in the placebo group took the same dosage of placebo. All subjects practiced kendo 5.5 h per day for 6 consecutive days during the study period. Blood samples were collected 2 weeks before training, on the first day (day 1), third day (day 3), and fifth day of training (day 5), and 1 week after the training period (post-training) to ascertain TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) monocyte and lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD28(+)/CD4(+), CD28(+)/CD8(+), and CD56(+)/CD3(-) cells) using flow cytometry analysis. The group × time interaction for TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) cells did not reach significance (p = 0.08). Within the CoQ10 group, the absolute number of TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) cells was significantly higher only at day 5. The placebo group showed a significant increase in the absolute number of TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) cells at day 3, day 5, and post-training (p athletes.

  15. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

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    Andrew S Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC, which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  16. C5a enhances dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenic responses to malaria in vitro: potential implications for placental malaria.

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    Andrea Conroy

    Full Text Available Placental malaria (PM is a leading cause of maternal and infant mortality. Although the accumulation of parasitized erythrocytes (PEs and monocytes within the placenta is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of PM, the molecular mechanisms underlying PM remain unclear. Based on the hypothesis that excessive complement activation may contribute to PM, in particular generation of the potent inflammatory peptide C5a, we investigated the role of C5a in the pathogenesis of PM in vitro and in vivo.Using primary human monocytes, the interaction between C5a and malaria in vitro was assessed. CSA- and CD36-binding PEs induced activation of C5 in the presence of human serum. Plasmodium falciparum GPI (pfGPI enhanced C5a receptor expression (CD88 on monocytes, and the co-incubation of monocytes with C5a and pfGPI resulted in the synergistic induction of cytokines (IL-6, TNF, IL-1beta, and IL-10, chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1, MIP1alpha, MIP1beta and the anti-angiogenic factor sFlt-1 in a time and dose-dependent manner. This dysregulated response was abrogated by C5a receptor blockade. To assess the potential role of C5a in PM, C5a plasma levels were measured in malaria-exposed primigravid women in western Kenya. Compared to pregnant women without malaria, C5a levels were significantly elevated in women with PM.These results suggest that C5a may contribute to the pathogenesis of PM by inducing dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenic responses that impair placental function.

  17. Interleukin 10 Increases CCR5 Expression and HIV Infection in Human Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzani, Silvano; Ghezzi, Silvia; Iannolo, Gioacchino; Luini, Walter; Borsatti, Alessandro; Polentarutti, Nadia; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo; Mackay, Charles; Wells, Timothy N.C.; Biswas, Priscilla; Vicenzi, Elisa; Poli, Guido; Mantovani, Alberto

    1998-01-01

    The immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10 selectively upregulates the expression of the CC chemokine receptors CCR5, 2, and 1 in human monocytes by prolonging their mRNA half-life. IL-10–stimulated monocytes display an increased number of cell surface receptors for, and better chemotactic responsiveness to, relevant agonists than do control cells. In addition, IL-10–stimulated monocytes are more efficiently infected by HIV BaL. This effect was associated to the enhancement of viral entry through CCR5. These data add support to an emerging paradigm in which pro- and antiinflammatory molecules exert reciprocal and opposing influence on chemokine agonist production and receptor expression. PMID:9449724

  18. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  19. Network response synchronization enhanced by synaptic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobov, S.; Simonov, A.; Kastalskiy, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Synchronization of neural network response on spatially localized periodic stimulation was studied. The network consisted of synaptically coupled spiking neurons with spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP). Network connectivity was defined by time evolving matrix of synaptic weights. We found that the steady-state spatial pattern of the weights could be rearranged due to locally applied external periodic stimulation. A method for visualization of synaptic weights as vector field was introduced to monitor the evolving connectivity matrix. We demonstrated that changes in the vector field and associated weight rearrangements underlay an enhancement of synchronization range.

  20. High-fat diet enhances and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 deficiency reduces bone loss in mice with pulmonary metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone is adversely affected by metastasis and metastasis-associated complications. Obesity is a risk factor for both bone and cancer. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that produces pro-inflammatory adipokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), that contribute to obesity and obesit...

  1. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 in Plasma from Soluble Leishmania Antigen-Stimulated Whole Blood as a Potential Biomarker of the Cellular Immune Response to Leishmania infantum

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    Ana V. Ibarra-Meneses

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New biomarkers are needed to identify asymptomatic Leishmania infection as well as immunity following vaccination or treatment. With the aim of finding a robust biomarker to assess an effective cellular immune response, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 was examined in plasma from soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA-stimulated whole blood collected from subjects living in a Leishmania infantum-endemic area. MCP-1, expressed 110 times more strongly than IL-2, identified 87.5% of asymptomatic subjects and verified some asymptomatic subjects close to the cutoff. MCP-1 was also significantly elevated in all patients cured of visceral leishmaniasis (VL, unlike IL-2, indicating the specific memory response generated against Leishmania. These results show MCP-1 to be a robust candidate biomarker of immunity that could be used as a marker of cure and to both select and follow the population in vaccine phase I–III human clinical trials with developed rapid, easy-to-use field tools.

  2. Enhanced embodied response following ambiguous emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffara, Brice; Ouellet, Marc; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Basu, Anamitra; Morisseau, Tiffany; Mermillod, Martial

    2012-08-01

    It has generally been assumed that high-level cognitive and emotional processes are based on amodal conceptual information. In contrast, however, "embodied simulation" theory states that the perception of an emotional signal can trigger a simulation of the related state in the motor, somatosensory, and affective systems. To study the effect of social context on the mimicry effect predicted by the "embodied simulation" theory, we recorded the electromyographic (EMG) activity of participants when looking at emotional facial expressions. We observed an increase in embodied responses when the participants were exposed to a context involving social valence before seeing the emotional facial expressions. An examination of the dynamic EMG activity induced by two socially relevant emotional expressions (namely joy and anger) revealed enhanced EMG responses of the facial muscles associated with the related social prime (either positive or negative). These results are discussed within the general framework of embodiment theory.

  3. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma...

  4. The cis-acting phorbol ester "12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate"-responsive element is involved in shear stress-induced monocyte chemotactic protein 1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, J Y; Lin, M C; Han, J; Lu, Y; Petrime, M; Chien, S

    1995-08-15

    Vascular endothelial cells, serving as a barrier between vessel and blood, are exposed to shear stress in the body. Although endothelial responses to shear stress are important in physiological adaption to the hemodynamic environments, they can also contribute to pathological conditions--e.g., in atherosclerosis and reperfusion injury. We have previously shown that shear stress mediates a biphasic response of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) gene expression in vascular endothelial cells and that the regulation is at the transcriptional level. These observations led us to functionally analyze the 550-bp promoter region of the MCP-1-encoding gene to define the cis element responding to shear stress. The shear stress/luciferase assay on the deletion constructs revealed that a 38-bp segment (-53 to -90 bp relative to the transcription initiation site) containing two divergent phorbol ester "12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate" (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) is critical for shear inducibility. Site-specific mutations on these two sites further demonstrated that the proximal one (TGACTCC) but not the distal one (TCACTCA) was shear-responsive. Shear inducibility was lost after the mutation or deletion of the proximal site. This molecular mechanism of shear inducibility of the MCP-1 gene was functional in both the epithelial-like HeLa cells and bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In a construct with four copies of the TRE consensus sequences TGACTACA followed by the rat prolactin minimal promoter and luciferase gene, shear stress induced the reporter activities by 35-fold and 7-fold in HeLa cells and BAEC, respectively. The application of shear stress on BAEC also induced a rapid and transient phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. Pretreatment of BAEC with TPA attenuated the shear-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, suggesting that shear stress and TPA share a similar signal transduction pathway in activating cells. The

  5. Pan-genomic analysis of bovine monocyte-derived macrophage gene expression in response to in vitro infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, an intestinal disease of ruminants with major economic consequences. Infectious bacilli are phagocytosed by host macrophages upon exposure where they persist, resulting in lengthy subclinical phases of infection that can lead to immunopathology and disease dissemination. Consequently, analysis of the macrophage transcriptome in response to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection can provide valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Johne’s disease. Here, we investigate pan-genomic gene expression in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) purified from seven age-matched females, in response to in vitro infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (multiplicity of infection 2:1) at intervals of 2 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours post-infection (hpi). Differentially expressed genes were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of the infected MDM to the non-infected control MDM at each time point (adjusted P-value threshold ≤ 0.10). 1050 differentially expressed unique genes were identified 2 hpi, with 974 and 78 differentially expressed unique genes detected 6 and 24 hpi, respectively. Furthermore, in the infected MDM the number of upregulated genes exceeded the number of downregulated genes at each time point, with the fold-change in expression for the upregulated genes markedly higher than that for the downregulated genes. Inspection and systems biology analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed an enrichment of genes involved in the inflammatory response, cell signalling pathways and apoptosis. The transcriptional changes associated with cellular signalling and the inflammatory response may reflect different immuno-modulatory mechanisms that underlie host-pathogen interactions during infection. PMID:22455317

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 suppresses TLR8 expression and TLR8-mediated inflammatory responses in monocytes in vitro and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo.

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    Bo Li

    Full Text Available 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3 suppresses autoimmunity and inflammation; however, the mechanism of its action has not been fully understood. We sought in this study to determine whether the anti-immune/anti-inflammatory action of 1,25(OH2D3 is in part mediated through an interplay between 1,25(OH2D3 and toll-like receptor (TLR7/8 signaling. 1,25(OH2D3 treatment prior to and/or following experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induction effectively reduced inflammatory cytokine expression in the spinal cord and ameliorated EAE. These effects were accompanied with a reduction in expression of several TLRs with the most profound effect observed for TLR8. The expression of TLR8 adaptor protein MyD88 was also significantly reduced by 1,25(OH2D3. To determine the molecular mechanism by which 1,25(OH2D3 suppresses EAE induction of TLR8 and inflammatory cytokine expression, we evaluated whether 1,25(OH2D3 can directly inhibit TLR8 signaling and the resulting inflammatory responses in human THP-1 monocytes. 1,25(OH2D3 treatment not only significantly reduced TLR8 expression but also the expression or activity of MyD88, IRF-4, IRF-7 and NF-kB in monocytes challenged with TLR8 ligands. TLR8 promoter-luciferase reporter assays indicated that 1,25(OH2D3 decreases TLR8 mRNA level in part via inhibiting TLR8 gene transcription activity. As a result of inhibition on TLR8 signaling cascade at various stages, 1,25(OH2D3 significantly diminished the TLR8 target gene expression (TNF-α and IL-1β. In summary, our novel findings suggest that TLR8 is a new target of 1,25(OH2D3 and may mediate the anti-inflammatory action of 1,25(OH2D3. Our findings also point to a destructive role of TLR8 in EAE and shed lights on pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  7. Low CCR7-mediated migration of human monocyte derived dendritic cells in response to human respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus.

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    Cyril Le Nouën

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV and, to a lesser extent, human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, can re-infect symptomatically throughout life without significant antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete or short-lived immunity. In contrast, re-infection by influenza A virus (IAV largely depends on antigenic change, suggestive of more complete immunity. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DC is critical in initiating the adaptive immune response. Antigen uptake by DC induces maturational changes that include decreased expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 that maintain DC residence in peripheral tissues, and increased expression of CCR7 that mediates the migration of antigen-bearing DC to lymphatic tissue. We stimulated human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC with virus and found that, in contrast to HPIV3 and IAV, HMPV and HRSV did not efficiently decrease CCR1, 2, and 5 expression, and did not efficiently increase CCR7 expression. Consistent with the differences in CCR7 mRNA and protein expression, MDDC stimulated with HRSV or HMPV migrated less efficiently to the CCR7 ligand CCL19 than did IAV-stimulated MDDC. Using GFP-expressing recombinant virus, we showed that the subpopulation of MDDC that was robustly infected with HRSV was particularly inefficient in chemokine receptor modulation. HMPV- or HRSV-stimulated MDDC responded to secondary stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide or with a cocktail of proinflammatory cytokines by increasing CCR7 and decreasing CCR1, 2 and 5 expression, and by more efficient migration to CCL19, suggesting that HMPV and HRSV suboptimally stimulate rather than irreversibly inhibit MDDC migration. This also suggests that the low concentration of proinflammatory cytokines released from HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated MDDC is partly responsible for the low CCR7-mediated migration. We propose that inefficient migration of HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated DC to

  8. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A Induce a Distinctive Profile on Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through Transcriptional Modulation of Genes Associated With Essential Processes of the Immune Response

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    Paulina A. García-González

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the use of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDCs as a potential target for immunotherapy. However, the molecular bases that drive the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs toward a tolerogenic state are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the transcriptional profile of moDCs from healthy subjects, modulated with dexamethasone (Dex and activated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA, referred to as Dex-modulated and MPLA-activated DCs (DM-DCs, as an approach to identify molecular regulators and pathways associated with the induction of tolerogenic properties in tolDCs. We found that DM-DCs exhibit a distinctive transcriptional profile compared to untreated (DCs and MPLA-matured DCs. Differentially expressed genes downregulated by DM included MMP12, CD1c, IL-1B, and FCER1A involved in DC maturation/inflammation and genes upregulated by DM included JAG1, MERTK, IL-10, and IDO1 involved in tolerance. Genes related to chemotactic responses, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, fatty acid oxidation, metal homeostasis, and free radical scavenging were strongly enriched, predicting the activation of alternative metabolic processes than those driven by counterpart DCs. Furthermore, we identified a set of genes that were regulated exclusively by the combined action of Dex and MPLA, which are mainly involved in the control of zinc homeostasis and reactive oxygen species production. These data further support the important role of metabolic processes on the control of the DC-driven regulatory immune response. Thus, Dex and MPLA treatments modify gene expression in moDCs by inducing a particular transcriptional profile characterized by the activation of tolerance-associated genes and suppression of the expression of inflammatory genes, conferring the potential to exert regulatory functions and immune response modulation.

  9. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A Induce a Distinctive Profile on Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through Transcriptional Modulation of Genes Associated With Essential Processes of the Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Paulina A; Schinnerling, Katina; Sepúlveda-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Maggi, Jaxaira; Mehdi, Ahmed M; Nel, Hendrik J; Pesce, Bárbara; Larrondo, Milton L; Aravena, Octavio; Molina, María C; Catalán, Diego; Thomas, Ranjeny; Verdugo, Ricardo A; Aguillón, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDCs) as a potential target for immunotherapy. However, the molecular bases that drive the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) toward a tolerogenic state are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the transcriptional profile of moDCs from healthy subjects, modulated with dexamethasone (Dex) and activated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), referred to as Dex-modulated and MPLA-activated DCs (DM-DCs), as an approach to identify molecular regulators and pathways associated with the induction of tolerogenic properties in tolDCs. We found that DM-DCs exhibit a distinctive transcriptional profile compared to untreated (DCs) and MPLA-matured DCs. Differentially expressed genes downregulated by DM included MMP12, CD1c, IL-1B, and FCER1A involved in DC maturation/inflammation and genes upregulated by DM included JAG1, MERTK, IL-10, and IDO1 involved in tolerance. Genes related to chemotactic responses, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, fatty acid oxidation, metal homeostasis, and free radical scavenging were strongly enriched, predicting the activation of alternative metabolic processes than those driven by counterpart DCs. Furthermore, we identified a set of genes that were regulated exclusively by the combined action of Dex and MPLA, which are mainly involved in the control of zinc homeostasis and reactive oxygen species production. These data further support the important role of metabolic processes on the control of the DC-driven regulatory immune response. Thus, Dex and MPLA treatments modify gene expression in moDCs by inducing a particular transcriptional profile characterized by the activation of tolerance-associated genes and suppression of the expression of inflammatory genes, conferring the potential to exert regulatory functions and immune response modulation.

  10. Fast response cavity enhanced ozone monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Gomez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an important atmospheric gas due to its role in air quality and radiative forcing. A new method for sensitive, rapid monitoring of ambient ozone has been developed using a compact platform and relatively inexpensive components. Based on incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBB-CEAS, the device utilizes an optical cavity of just 14.5 cm and 99.3% reflective mirrors. Performance of the instrument has been validated against direct absorption measurements in a single-pass measurement cell. Currently, the IBB-CEAS ozone instrument can achieve ∼1 ppb sensitivities at 0.1 s integration time with a dynamic range over four orders of magnitude, accessing relevant ozone concentrations in both the stratosphere and troposphere. This new device offers improved sensitivity and time response for mapping ozone aboard airborne platforms.

  11. Oxidized Phospholipids on Lipoprotein(a) Elicit Arterial Wall Inflammation and an Inflammatory Monocyte Response in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, F.M. van der; Bekkering, S.; Kroon, J.; Yeang, C.; Bossche, J. Van den; Buul, J.D. van; Ravandi, A.; Nederveen, A.J.; Verberne, H.J.; Scipione, C.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Koschinsky, M.L.; Witztum, J.L.; Tsimikas, S.; Riksen, N.P.; Stroes, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a prevalent, independent cardiovascular risk factor, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity are poorly defined. Because Lp(a) is the prominent carrier of proinflammatory oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), part of its

  12. Oxidized Phospholipids on Lipoprotein(a) Elicit Arterial Wall Inflammation and an Inflammatory Monocyte Response in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Fleur M.; Bekkering, Siroon; Kroon, Jeffrey; Yeang, Calvin; van den Bossche, Jan; van Buul, Jaap D.; Ravandi, Amir; Nederveen, Aart J.; Verberne, Hein J.; Scipione, Corey; Nieuwdorp, Max; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Riksen, Niels P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a prevalent, independent cardiovascular risk factor, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity are poorly defined. Because Lp(a) is the prominent carrier of proinflammatory oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), part of its atherothrombosis might be

  13. Human metapneumovirus M2-2 protein inhibits innate immune response in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

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    Junping Ren

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a leading cause of lower respiratory infection in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. Repeated hMPV infections occur throughout life. However, immune evasion mechanisms of hMPV infection are largely unknown. Recently, our group has demonstrated that hMPV M2-2 protein, an important virulence factor, contributes to immune evasion in airway epithelial cells by targeting the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS. Whether M2-2 regulates the innate immunity in human dendritic cells (DC, an important family of immune cells controlling antigen presenting, is currently unknown. We found that human DC infected with a virus lacking M2-2 protein expression (rhMPV-ΔM2-2 produced higher levels of cytokines, chemokines and IFNs, compared to cells infected with wild-type virus (rhMPV-WT, suggesting that M2-2 protein inhibits innate immunity in human DC. In parallel, we found that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88, an essential adaptor for Toll-like receptors (TLRs, plays a critical role in inducing immune response of human DC, as downregulation of MyD88 by siRNA blocked the induction of immune regulatory molecules by hMPV. Since M2-2 is a cytoplasmic protein, we investigated whether M2-2 interferes with MyD88-mediated antiviral signaling. We found that indeed M2-2 protein associated with MyD88 and inhibited MyD88-dependent gene transcription. In this study, we also identified the domains of M2-2 responsible for its immune inhibitory function in human DC. In summary, our results demonstrate that M2-2 contributes to hMPV immune evasion by inhibiting MyD88-dependent cellular responses in human DC.

  14. Histamine Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton in Human Toll-like Receptor 4-activated Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Tuning CD4+ T Lymphocyte Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Manuelli, Cinzia; Nosi, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Ballerini, Clara

    2016-07-08

    Histamine, a major mediator in allergic diseases, differentially regulates the polarizing ability of dendritic cells after Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation, by not completely explained mechanisms. In this study we investigated the effects of histamine on innate immune reaction during the response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs) to different TLR stimuli: LPS, specific for TLR4, and Pam3Cys, specific for heterodimer molecule TLR1/TLR2. We investigated actin remodeling induced by histamine together with mDCs phenotype, cytokine production, and the stimulatory and polarizing ability of Th0. By confocal microscopy and RT-PCR expression of Rac1/CdC42 Rho GTPases, responsible for actin remodeling, we show that histamine selectively modifies actin cytoskeleton organization induced by TLR4, but not TLR2 and this correlates with increased IL4 production and decreased IFNγ by primed T cells. We also demonstrate that histamine-induced cytoskeleton organization is at least in part mediated by down-regulation of small Rho GTPase CdC42 and the protein target PAK1, but not by down-regulation of Rac1. The presence and relative expression of histamine receptors HR1-4 and TLRs were determined as well. Independently of actin remodeling, histamine down-regulates IL12p70 and CXCL10 production in mDCs after TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation. We also observed a trend of IL10 up-regulation that, despite previous reports, did not reach statistical significance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Histamine Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton in Human Toll-like Receptor 4-activated Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Tuning CD4+ T Lymphocyte Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonechi, Elena; Manuelli, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Histamine, a major mediator in allergic diseases, differentially regulates the polarizing ability of dendritic cells after Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation, by not completely explained mechanisms. In this study we investigated the effects of histamine on innate immune reaction during the response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs) to different TLR stimuli: LPS, specific for TLR4, and Pam3Cys, specific for heterodimer molecule TLR1/TLR2. We investigated actin remodeling induced by histamine together with mDCs phenotype, cytokine production, and the stimulatory and polarizing ability of Th0. By confocal microscopy and RT-PCR expression of Rac1/CdC42 Rho GTPases, responsible for actin remodeling, we show that histamine selectively modifies actin cytoskeleton organization induced by TLR4, but not TLR2 and this correlates with increased IL4 production and decreased IFNγ by primed T cells. We also demonstrate that histamine-induced cytoskeleton organization is at least in part mediated by down-regulation of small Rho GTPase CdC42 and the protein target PAK1, but not by down-regulation of Rac1. The presence and relative expression of histamine receptors HR1–4 and TLRs were determined as well. Independently of actin remodeling, histamine down-regulates IL12p70 and CXCL10 production in mDCs after TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation. We also observed a trend of IL10 up-regulation that, despite previous reports, did not reach statistical significance. PMID:27226579

  16. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  17. Diverging pathways for lipopolysaccharide and CD14 in human monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antal-Szalmas, P; Poppelier, MJJG; Broekhuizen, R; Verhoef, J; van Strijp, JAG; van Kessel, KPM

    2000-01-01

    Background: CD14 is considered to be the major endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) binding molecule on human monocytes. It initiates cellular response, but its role in the clearance of LPS is not well understood. Under conditions that ensure totally CD14-dependent LPS binding on human monocytes,

  18. Toll-like receptors, chemokine receptors and death receptor ligands responses in SARS coronavirus infected human monocyte derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Helen KW

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SARS outbreak in 2003 provides a unique opportunity for the study of human responses to a novel virus. We have previously reported that dendritic cells (DCs might be involved in the immune escape mechanisms for SARS-CoV. In this study, we focussed on the gene expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs, chemokine receptors (CCRs and death receptor ligands in SARS-CoV infected DCs. We also compared adult and cord blood (CB DCs to find a possible explanation for the age-dependent severity of SARS. Results Our results demonstrates that SARS-CoV did not modulate TLR-1 to TLR-10 gene expression but significantly induced the expression of CCR-1, CCR-3, and CCR-5. There was also strong induction of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, but not Fas ligand gene expression in SARS-CoV infected DCs. Interestingly, the expressions of most genes studied were higher in CB DCs than adult DCs. Conclusion The upregulation of chemokines and CCRs may facilitate DC migration from the infection site to the lymph nodes, whereas the increase of TRAIL may induce lymphocyte apoptosis. These findings may explain the increased lung infiltrations and lymphoid depletion in SARS patients. Further explorations of the biological significance of these findings are warranted.

  19. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Magda Paula Pereira do; Bannwart, Camila Ferreira; Nakaira-Takahagi, Erika; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão

    2011-09-01

    Multinucleated giant cells (MGC) are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg). The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI) and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18). The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  20. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  1. Candida albicans Infection Affords Protection against Reinfection via Functional Reprogramming of Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Joost H.A.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.; Ifrim, Daniela C.; Logie, Colin; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Jansen, Trees; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Immunological memory in vertebrates is often exclusively attributed to T and B cell function. Recently it was proposed that the enhanced and sustained innate immune responses following initial infectious exposure may also afford protection against reinfection. Testing this concept of “trained immunity,” we show that mice lacking functional T and B lymphocytes are protected against reinfection with Candida albicans in a monocyte-dependent manner. C. albicans and fungal cell wall β-glucans induced functional reprogramming of monocytes, leading to enhanced cytokine production in vivo and in vitro. The training required the β-glucan receptor dectin-1 and the noncanonical Raf-1 pathway. Monocyte training by β-glucans was associated with stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4, which suggests the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in this phenomenon. The functional reprogramming of monocytes, reminiscent of similar NK cell properties, supports the concept of “trained immunity” and may be employed for the design of improved vaccination strategies. PMID:22901542

  2. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A. F.; Bartlett, J. A.; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6...

  3. Pregnancy and preeclampsia affect monocyte subsets in humans and rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbro N Melgert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Both nonclassical and intermediate monocytes have been implicated in different inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that these monocytes would increase during pregnancy, a condition associated with generalized activation of inflammatory responses and that they would increase even more during preeclampsia, in which inflammatory responses are further stimulated. In the present study we investigated changes in monocyte subsets during healthy pregnancy and preeclampsia in humans and rats. METHODS: Blood monocyte subsets of nonpregnant, preeclamptic and healthy pregnant women were identified with CD14 and CD16. In nonpregnant and pregnant rats, blood monocytes were identified with CD172a and CD43, as well as in rats infused with adenosine triphosphate (ATP, a pro-inflammatory stimulus known to induce preeclampsia-like symptoms. Total and CD206-positive macrophages were quantified in placentas of these animals. RESULTS: Lower percentages of classical monocytes were found in pregnant women (91%-[83-98%] compared to nonpregnant women (94%-[90-98%] and even less in preeclamptic patients (90%-[61-92%]. In contrast, the percentage of combined nonclassical/intermediate monocytes was higher in pregnant women (8.5%-[2.3-16.6%] vs. 5.6%-[1.9-9.5%] and even higher in preeclamptic patients (9.9%-[7.8-38.7%], which was caused by a selective increase of intermediate monocytes. In rats, we also found lower percentages of classical monocytes and higher percentages of nonclassical monocytes in pregnant versus nonpregnant rats. ATP infusion increased the percentage of nonclassical monocytes in pregnant rats even further but not in nonpregnant rats. These nonclassical monocytes showed a more activated phenotype in pregnant ATP-infused rats only. Mesometrial triangles of ATP-infused rats had less CD206-positive macrophages as compared to those of saline-infused rats. CONCLUSION: The higher percentage of nonclassical/intermediate monocytes found in

  4. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from...... for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed....

  5. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Suppresses TLR8 Expression and TLR8-Mediated Inflammatory Responses in Monocytes In Vitro and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    paralysis; 4, hind and forelimb paralysis; 5, death . Paralyzed mice were given easy access to food and water. Cell Culture Human monocytic THP-1 cells...Mata-Greenwood (Center for Perinatal Biology, Loma Linda University) for assistance with luciferase measurement. Author Contributions Conceived and

  6. Monocyte-to-Macrophage Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mary Y.; Chan, Christina K.; Braun, Kathleen R.; Green, Pattie S.; O'Brien, Kevin D.; Chait, Alan; Day, Anthony J.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Although monocyte- and macrophage-derived molecules are known to promote extracellular matrix (ECM) disruption and destabilization, it is less appreciated that they also synthesize molecules contributing to ECM formation, stabilization, and function. We have identified and characterized the synthesis of proteoglycans and related proteins, some not previously known to be associated with macrophages. Proteoglycan extracts of [35S]sulfate- and 35S-trans amino acid-radiolabeled culture media from THP-1 monocytes induced to differentiate by treatment with phorbol myristate acetate revealed three major proteins of ∼25, 90, and 100 kDa following chondroitin ABC lyase digestion. The 25-kDa protein was predominant for monocytes, whereas the 90- and 100-kDa proteins were predominant for macrophages. Tandem mass spectrometry identified (i) the 25-kDa core protein as serglycin, (ii) the 90-kDa core protein as inter-α-inhibitor heavy chain 2 (IαIHC2), and (iii) the 100-kDa core as amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2). Differentiation was also associated with (i) a >500-fold increase in mRNA for TNF-stimulated gene-6, an essential cofactor for heavy chain-mediated matrix stabilization; (ii) a >800-fold increase in mRNA for HAS2, which is responsible for hyaluronan synthesis; and (iii) a 3-fold increase in mRNA for versican, which interacts with hyaluronan. Biochemical evidence is also presented for an IαIHC2-APLP2 complex, and immunohistochemical staining of human atherosclerotic lesions demonstrates similar staining patterns for APLP2 and IαIHC2 with macrophages, whereas serglycin localizes to the underlying glycosaminoglycan-rich region. These findings indicate that macrophages synthesize many of the molecules participating in ECM formation and function, suggesting a novel role for these molecules in the differentiation of macrophages in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22351750

  7. Epigallocatechin gallate reduces human monocyte mobility and adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Esther; Medina, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Urdiales, José Luis

    2009-12-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an important population of immune inflammatory cells that have diverse effector functions in which their mobility and adhesion play a very relevant role. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, has been reported to have anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities, but its effects on monocytes remain to be determined. Here we investigated the effects of EGCG on the migration and adhesion of monocytes. We used a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) to analyse the effects of treatment with EGCG under non-cytotoxic conditions on the expression levels of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and of the MCP-1 receptor (CCR2) and on the activation of beta1 integrin. A functional validation was carried out by evaluating the inhibitory effect of EGCG on monocyte adhesiveness and migration in vitro. Treatment of THP-1 cells with EGCG decreased MCP-1 and CCR2 gene expression, together with MCP-1 secretion and CCR2 expression at the cell surface. EGCG also inhibited beta1 integrin activation. The effects on these molecular targets were in agreement with the EGCG-induced inhibition of THP-1 migration in response to MCP-1 and adhesion to fibronectin. Under our experimental conditions, EGCG treatment inhibited the migration and adhesion of monocytes. These inhibitory effects of EGCG on monocyte function should be considered as a promising new anti-inflammatory response with a potential therapeutic role in the treatment of inflammation-dependent diseases.

  8. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-10-13

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis , permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218's effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  9. CD14(hi)CD16+ monocytes phagocytose antibody-opsonised Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes more efficiently than other monocyte subsets, and require CD16 and complement to do so.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingling; Feng, Gaoqian; Beeson, James; Hogarth, P Mark; Rogerson, Stephen J; Yan, Yan; Jaworowski, Anthony

    2015-07-07

    With more than 600,000 deaths from malaria, mainly of children under five years old and caused by infection with Plasmodium falciparum, comes an urgent need for an effective anti-malaria vaccine. Limited details on the mechanisms of protective immunity are a barrier to vaccine development. Antibodies play an important role in immunity to malaria and monocytes are key effectors in antibody-mediated protection by phagocytosing antibody-opsonised infected erythrocytes (IE). Eliciting antibodies that enhance phagocytosis of IE is therefore an important potential component of an effective vaccine, requiring robust assays to determine the ability of elicited antibodies to stimulate this in vivo. The mechanisms by which monocytes ingest IE and the nature of the monocytes which do so are unknown. Purified trophozoite-stage P. falciparum IE were stained with ethidium bromide, opsonised with anti-erythrocyte antibodies and incubated with fresh whole blood. Phagocytosis of IE and TNF production by individual monocyte subsets was measured by flow cytometry. Ingestion of IE was confirmed by imaging flow cytometry. CD14(hi)CD16+ monocytes phagocytosed antibody-opsonised IE and produced TNF more efficiently than CD14(hi)CD16- and CD14(lo)CD16+ monocytes. Blocking experiments showed that Fcγ receptor IIIa (CD16) but not Fcγ receptor IIa (CD32a) or Fcγ receptor I (CD64) was necessary for phagocytosis. CD14(hi)CD16+ monocytes ingested antibody-opsonised IE when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were reconstituted with autologous serum but not heat-inactivated autologous serum. Antibody-opsonised IE were rapidly opsonised with complement component C3 in serum (t1/2 = 2-3 minutes) and phagocytosis of antibody-opsonised IE was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by an inhibitor of C3 activation, compstatin. Compared to other monocyte subsets, CD14(hi)CD16+ monocytes expressed the highest levels of complement receptor 4 (CD11c) and activated complement receptor 3 (CD11b) subunits

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-Elicited TSLPR Expression Enriches a Functionally Discrete Subset of Human CD14+ CD1c+ Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Vastolo, Viviana; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Visconte, Feliciano; Raia, Maddalena; Scalia, Giulia; Loffredo, Stefania; Varricchi, Gilda; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Granata, Francescopaolo; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-05-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine produced mainly by epithelial cells in response to inflammatory or microbial stimuli and binds to the TSLP receptor (TSLPR) complex, a heterodimer composed of TSLPR and IL-7 receptor α (CD127). TSLP activates multiple immune cell subsets expressing the TSLPR complex and plays a role in several models of disease. Although human monocytes express TSLPR and CD127 mRNAs in response to the TLR4 agonist LPS, their responsiveness to TSLP is poorly defined. We demonstrate that TSLP enhances human CD14+ monocyte CCL17 production in response to LPS and IL-4. Surprisingly, only a subset of CD14+ CD16- monocytes, TSLPR+ monocytes (TSLPR+ mono), expresses TSLPR complex upon LPS stimulation in an NF-κB- and p38-dependent manner. Phenotypic, functional, and transcriptomic analysis revealed specific features of TSLPR+ mono, including higher CCL17 and IL-10 production and increased expression of genes with important immune functions (i.e., GAS6, ALOX15B, FCGR2B, LAIR1). Strikingly, TSLPR+ mono express higher levels of the dendritic cell marker CD1c. This evidence led us to identify a subset of peripheral blood CD14+ CD1c+ cells that expresses the highest levels of TSLPR upon LPS stimulation. The translational relevance of these findings is highlighted by the higher expression of TSLPR and CD127 mRNAs in monocytes isolated from patients with Gram-negative sepsis compared with healthy control subjects. Our results emphasize a phenotypic and functional heterogeneity in an apparently homogeneous population of human CD14+ CD16- monocytes and prompt further ontogenetic and functional analysis of CD14+ CD1c+ and LPS-activated CD14+ CD1c+ TSLPR+ mono. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Monocyte-platelet interaction induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes.

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    Gabriella Passacquale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activated platelets exert a pro-inflammatory action that can be largely ascribed to their ability to interact with leukocytes and modulate their activity. We hypothesized that platelet activation and consequent formation of monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPA induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD62P(+ platelets and MPA were measured, and monocytes characterized, by whole blood flow cytometry in healthy subjects, before and two days after receiving influenza immunization. Three monocytic subsets were identified: CD14(+CD16(-, CD14(highCD16(+and CD14(lowCD16(+. The increase in high sensitivity C-reactive protein post-immunization was accompanied by increased platelet activation and MPA formation (25.02±12.57 vs 41.48±16.81; p = 0.01, along with enhancement of circulating CD14(highCD16(+ cells (4.7±3.6 vs 10.4±4.8; p = 0.003, their percentage being linearly related to levels of CD62P(+-platelets (r(2 = 0.4347; p = 0.0008. In separate in vitro experiments, co-incubation of CD14(+CD16(- cells, isolated from healthy donor subjects, with autologous platelets gave rise to up-regulation of CD16 on monocytes as compared with those maintained in medium alone (% change in CD14(+CD16(+ cells following 48 h co-incubation of monocytes with platelets was +106±51% vs monocytes in medium alone; p<0.001. This effect correlated directly with degree of MPA formation (r(2 = 0.7731; p<0.0001 and was associated with increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 blocking antibody, which abrogates MPA formation, abolished these effects, as did the cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitor NS-398, aspirin and the EP1/EP2-selective antagonist AH6809. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MPA formation, as occurs in the blood under pro-inflammatory conditions, expands the pool of circulating CD14(highCD16(+ monocytes in a

  12. Monocyte Subsets in Schistosomiasis Patients with Periportal Fibrosis

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    Jamille Souza Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major issue with Schistosoma mansoni infection is the development of periportal fibrosis, which is predominantly caused by the host immune response to egg antigens. Experimental studies have pointed to the participation of monocytes in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to characterize the subsets of monocytes in individuals with different degrees of periportal fibrosis secondary to schistosomiasis. Monocytes were classified into classical (CD14++CD16−, intermediate (CD14++CD16+, and nonclassical (CD14+CD16++. The expressions of monocyte markers and cytokines were assessed using flow cytometry. The frequency of classical monocytes was higher than the other subsets. The expression of HLA-DR, IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β was higher in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis as compared to other groups. Although no differences were observed in receptors expression (IL-4R and IL-10R between groups of patients, the expression of IL-12 was lower in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis, suggesting a protective role of this cytokine in the development of fibrosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the three different monocyte populations participate in the immunopathogenesis of periportal fibrosis, since they express high levels of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines and low levels of regulatory markers.

  13. RUNX3 regulates intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3 expression during macrophage differentiation and monocyte extravasation.

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    Ana Estecha

    Full Text Available The adhesion molecule ICAM-3 belongs to the immunoglobulin gene superfamily and functions as a ligand for the β2 integrins LFA-1, Mac-1 and α(dβ(2. The expression of ICAM-3 is restricted to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. We present evidences that the ICAM-3 gene promoter exhibits a leukocyte-specific activity, as its activity is significantly higher in ICAM-3+ hematopoietic cell lines. The activity of the ICAM-3 gene promoter is dependent on the occupancy of RUNX cognate sequences both in vitro and in vivo, and whose integrity is required for RUNX responsiveness and for the cooperative actions of RUNX with transcription factors of the Ets and C/EBP families. Protein analysis revealed that ICAM-3 levels diminish upon monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation, monocyte transendothelial migration and dendritic cell maturation, changes that correlate with an increase in RUNX3. Importantly, disruption of RUNX-binding sites led to enhanced promoter activity, and small interfering RNA-mediated reduction of RUNX3 expression resulted in increased ICAM-3 mRNA levels. Altogether these results indicate that the ICAM-3 gene promoter is negatively regulated by RUNX transcription factors, which contribute to the leukocyte-restricted and the regulated expression of ICAM-3 during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and monocyte extravasation.

  14. Neutrophil and Monocyte Bactericidal Responses to 10 Weeks of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval or Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in Sedentary Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, David B; Shepherd, Sam O.; Wilson, Oliver J.; Adlan, Ahmed M.; Anton J. M. Wagenmakers; Shaw, Christopher S.; Lord, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes are key components of the innate immune system that undergo age-associated declines in function. This study compared the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on immune function in sedentary adults. Twenty-seven (43???11 years) healthy sedentary adults were randomized into ten weeks of either a HIIT (>90% maximum heart rate) or MICT (70% maximum heart rate) group training program. Aerobic capacity (VO2peak...

  15. Monocytes and the 38kDa-antigen of mycobacterium tuberculosis modulate natural killer cell activity and their cytolysis directed against ovarian cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottschalk Nina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite strong efforts to improve clinical outcome of ovarian cancer patients by conventional and targeted immuno-based therapies, the prognosis of advanced ovarian cancer is still poor. Natural killer (NK cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC, release immunostimulatory cytokines and thus function as potent anti-tumour effector cells. However, tumour cells developed mechanisms to escape from an effective immune response. So highly immunogenic substances, like the 38 kDa-preparation of M. tuberculosis, PstS-1, are explored for their potential to enhance cancer-targeted immune responses. In this study we examined the modulation of different NK cell functions by accessory monocytes and PstS-1. We focussed on NK cell activation as well as natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity directed against epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR-positive ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods Activation, cytokine release and cytotoxicity of NK cells stimulated by monocytes and PstS-1 were determined by FACS-analysis, ELISA, Bioplex assay and quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (qPCR. Transwell assays were used to discriminate cell-cell contact-dependent from contact-independent mechanisms. Five ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, IGROV-1, OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4 and SKOV-3 with different EGFR-expression were used as target cells for natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity assays. Cetuximab (anti-EGFR-antibody was used for ADCC studies. Results Our data show that monocytes effectively enhance activation as well natural and antibody-dependent cytolytic activity of NK cells. PstS-1 directly stimulated monocytes and further activated monocyte-NK-co-cultures. However, PstS-1 did not directly influence purified NK cells and did also not affect natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity directed against EGFR-positive ovarian cancer cells, even in presence of monocytes. Direct cell-cell contact between

  16. Bluetongue virus infection of bovine monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetter, L E; Maclachlan, N J; Gebhard, D H; Heidner, H W; Moore, P F

    1989-07-01

    contrast, virus was consistently isolated from erythrocyte-enriched preparations throughout viraemia in titres comparable to those in whole blood. These results indicate that although bovine monocytes are readily infected in vitro with this strain of BTV serotype 10, infection of blood monocytes is unlikely to be responsible for the prolonged viraemia that consistently occurs in BTV-infected cattle.

  17. Persistent STAT5 phosphorylation and epigenetic dysregulation of GM-CSF and PGS2/COX2 expression in Type 1 diabetic human monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Garrigan

    Full Text Available STAT5 proteins are adaptor proteins for histone acetylation enzymes. Histone acetylation at promoter and enhancer chromosomal regions opens the chromatin and allows access of transcription enzymes to specific genes in rapid response cell signals, such as in inflammation. Histone acetylation-mediated gene regulation is involved in expression of 2 key inflammatory response genes: CSF2, encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and PTGS2, encoding prostaglandin synthase 2/cyclooxygenase 2 (PGS2/COX2. Prolonged CSF2 expression, high GM-CSF production, and GM-CSF activation of PTGS2 gene expression all are seen in type 1 diabetes (T1D monocytes. Persistent phosphorylation activation of monocyte STAT5 (STAT5Ptyr is also found in individuals with or at-risk for T1D. To examine whether elevated T1D monocyte STAT5Ptyr may be associated with aberrant inflammatory gene expression in T1D, blood monocytes from non-autoimmune controls and T1D patients were analyzed by flow cytometry for STAT5Ptyr activation, and by chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP analyses for STAT5Ptyr's ability to bind at CSF2 and PTGS2 regulatory sites in association with histone acetylation. In unstimulated monocytes, STAT5Ptyr was elevated in 59.65% of T1D, but only 2.44% of control subjects (p<0.0001. Increased STAT5Ptyr correlated with T1D disease duration (p = 0.0030, r(2 = 0.0784. Unstimulated (p = 0.140 and GM-CSF-stimulated (p = 0.0485 T1D monocytes, had greater STAT5Ptyr binding to epigenetic regulatory sites upstream of CSF2 than control monocytes. Increased STAT5Ptyr binding in T1D monocytes was concurrent with binding at these sites of STAT6Ptyr (p = 0.0283, CBP/P300 histone acetylase, acetylated histones H3, SMRT/NCoR histone deacetylase (p = 0.0040, and RNA Polymerase II (p = 0.0040. Our study indicates that in T1D monocytes, STAT5Ptyr activation is significantly higher and that STAT5Ptyr is found bound to CSF2 promoter and PTGS2 enhancer regions

  18. 'Clustering' SIRPα into the plasma membrane lipid microdomains is required for activated monocytes and macrophages to mediate effective cell surface interactions with CD47.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Ha

    Full Text Available SIRPα, an ITIMs-containing signaling receptor, negatively regulates leukocyte responses through extracellular interactions with CD47. However, the dynamics of SIRPα-CD47 interactions on the cell surface and the governing mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that while the purified SIRPα binds to CD47 and that SIRPα is expressed on monocytes and monocytic THP-1 or U937, these SIRPα are ineffective to mediate cell binding to immobilized CD47. However, cell binding to CD47 is significantly enhanced when monocytes transmigrating across endothelia, or being differentiated into macrophages. Cell surface labeling reveals SIRPα to be diffused on naïve monocytes but highly clustered on transmigrated monocytes and macrophages. Protein crosslink and equilibrium centrifugation confirm that SIRPα in the latter cells forms oligomerized complexes resulting in increased avidity for CD47 binding. Furthermore, formation of SIRPα complexes/clusters requires the plasma membrane 'lipid rafts' and the activity of Src family kinase during macrophage differentiation. These results together suggest that 'clustering' SIRPα into plasma membrane microdomains is essential for activated monocytes and macrophages to effectively interact with CD47 and initiate intracellular signaling.

  19. Responsive Copolymers for Enhanced Petroleum Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

    2001-02-27

    The objectives of this work was to: synthesize responsive copolymer systems; characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; measure rheological properties of aqueous fluids in fixed geometry flow profiles; and to tailor final polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated conditions. This report focuses on the synthesis and characterization of novel stimuli responsive copolymers, the investigation of dilute polymer solutions in extensional flow and the design of a rheometer capable of measuring very dilute aqueous polymer solutions at low torque.

  20. Dietary strawberries increase the proliferative response of CD3/CD28-activated CD8⁺ T cells and the production of TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocytes from obese human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Susan J; Storms, David H; Freytag, Tammy L; Mackey, Bruce E; Zhao, Ling; Gouffon, Julia S; Hwang, Daniel H

    2013-12-14

    Obesity increases the risk of developing bacterial and viral infections compared with normal weight. In a 7-week double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial, twenty obese volunteers (BMI between 30 and 40 kg/m²) were fed freeze-dried strawberry powder or strawberry-flavoured placebo preparations to determine the effects of dietary strawberries on immune function. Blood was collected at six time points during the study and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at each time point and activated with CD3 plus CD28 antibodies (T-lymphocyte activation) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, monocyte activation). Interferon-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10 were measured in supernatants from the activated T cells. Supernatants from the activated monocytes were analysed for the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. PBMC were pre-stained with PKH (Paul Karl Horan) dye and activated with CD3 plus CD28 antibodies to determine the proliferative responses of CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-lymphocytes by flow cytometry. To detect global changes in gene expression, microarray analysis was performed on LPS- and vehicle-treated PBMC from two subjects before and after the strawberry intervention. No difference was observed for the production of T-cell cytokines between the intervention groups. The production of TNF-α was increased in the supernatants from LPS-activated PBMC in the group consuming strawberries compared with the placebo. A modest increase in the proliferation of the CD8⁺ T-lymphocyte population was observed at 24 h post-activation. These data suggest that dietary strawberries may increase the immunological response of T-lymphocytes and monocytes in obese people who are at greater risk for developing infections.

  1. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  2. Discovery of stimulation-responsive immune enhancers with CRISPR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Boontanrart, Mandy; Roth, Theodore L.; Gagnon, John D.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Lee, Youjin; Bray, Nicolas L.; Chan, Alice Y.; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Nguyen, Michelle L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Subramaniam, Meena; Li, Zhongmei; Woo, Jonathan M.; Mitros, Therese; Ray, Graham J.; Curie, Gemma L.; Naddaf, Nicki; Chu, Julia S.; Ma, Hong; Boyer, Eric; Van Gool, Frederic; Huang, Hailiang; Liu, Ruize; Tobin, Victoria R.; Schumann, Kathrin; Daly, Mark J.; Farh, Kyle K; Ansel, K. Mark; Ye, Chun J.; Greenleaf, William J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Corn, Jacob E.; Marson, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The majority of genetic variants associated with common human diseases map to enhancers, non-coding elements that shape cell-type-specific transcriptional programs and responses to extracellular cues1–3. Systematic mapping of functional enhancers and their biological contexts is required to understand the mechanisms by which variation in non-coding genetic sequences contributes to disease. Functional enhancers can be mapped by genomic sequence disruption4–6, but this approach is limited to the subset of enhancers that are necessary in the particular cellular context being studied. We hypothesized that recruitment of a strong transcriptional activator to an enhancer would be sufficient to drive target gene expression, even if that enhancer was not currently active in the assayed cells. Here we describe a discovery platform that can identify stimulus-responsive enhancers for a target gene independent of stimulus exposure. We used tiled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa)7 to synthetically recruit a transcriptional activator to sites across large genomic regions (more than 100 kilobases) surrounding two key autoimmunity risk loci, CD69 and IL2RA. We identified several CRISPRa-responsive elements with chromatin features of stimulus-responsive enhancers, including an IL2RA enhancer that harbours an autoimmunity risk variant. Using engineered mouse models, we found that sequence perturbation of the disease-associated Il2ra enhancer did not entirely block Il2ra expression, but rather delayed the timing of gene activation in response to specific extracellular signals. Enhancer deletion skewed polarization of naive T cells towards a pro-inflammatory T helper (TH17) cell state and away from a regulatory T cell state. This integrated approach identifies functional enhancers and reveals how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs. PMID:28854172

  3. Discovery of stimulation-responsive immune enhancers with CRISPR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Boontanrart, Mandy; Roth, Theodore L.; Gagnon, John D.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Lee, Youjin; Bray, Nicolas L.; Chan, Alice Y.; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Nguyen, Michelle L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Subramaniam, Meena; Li, Zhongmei; Woo, Jonathan M.; Mitros, Therese; Ray, Graham J.; Curie, Gemma L.; Naddaf, Nicki; Chu, Julia S.; Ma, Hong; Boyer, Eric; van Gool, Frederic; Huang, Hailiang; Liu, Ruize; Tobin, Victoria R.; Schumann, Kathrin; Daly, Mark J.; Farh, Kyle K.; Ansel, K. Mark; Ye, Chun J.; Greenleaf, William J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Corn, Jacob E.; Marson, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The majority of genetic variants associated with common human diseases map to enhancers, non-coding elements that shape cell-type-specific transcriptional programs and responses to extracellular cues. Systematic mapping of functional enhancers and their biological contexts is required to understand the mechanisms by which variation in non-coding genetic sequences contributes to disease. Functional enhancers can be mapped by genomic sequence disruption, but this approach is limited to the subset of enhancers that are necessary in the particular cellular context being studied. We hypothesized that recruitment of a strong transcriptional activator to an enhancer would be sufficient to drive target gene expression, even if that enhancer was not currently active in the assayed cells. Here we describe a discovery platform that can identify stimulus-responsive enhancers for a target gene independent of stimulus exposure. We used tiled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) to synthetically recruit a transcriptional activator to sites across large genomic regions (more than 100 kilobases) surrounding two key autoimmunity risk loci, CD69 and IL2RA. We identified several CRISPRa-responsive elements with chromatin features of stimulus-responsive enhancers, including an IL2RA enhancer that harbours an autoimmunity risk variant. Using engineered mouse models, we found that sequence perturbation of the disease-associated Il2ra enhancer did not entirely block Il2ra expression, but rather delayed the timing of gene activation in response to specific extracellular signals. Enhancer deletion skewed polarization of naive T cells towards a pro-inflammatory T helper (TH17) cell state and away from a regulatory T cell state. This integrated approach identifies functional enhancers and reveals how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs.

  4. Effect of Native and Minimally Modified Low-density Lipoprotein on the Activation of Monocyte Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Espinosa-Luna, José Esteban; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis

    2017-07-01

    In atherosclerosis, monocytes are essential and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Human CD14++CD16-, CD14++CD16+ and CD14+CD16++ monocytes produce different cytokines. The objective of this research was to determine the number of monocyte subsets positives to cytokines in response to native (nLDL) and minimally modified LDL (mmLDL). Human monocytes from healthy individuals were purified by negative selection and were stimulated with nLDL, mmLDL or LPS. Subsequently, human total monocytes were incubated with monoclonal antibodies specific for CD14 or both CD14 and CD16 to characterize total monocytes and monocyte subsets and with antibodies specific to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, anti-interleukin (IL)-6 and anti-IL-10. The number of cells positive for cytokines was determined and cells cultured with nLDL, mmLDL and LPS were compared with cells cultured only with culture medium. We found that nLDL does not induce in the total monocyte population or in the three monocyte subsets positives to cytokines. MmLDL induced in total monocytes positives to TNF-α and IL-6 as well as in both CD14++CD16+ and CD14+CD16++ and in CD14++CD16+ monocytes, respectively. Moreover, total monocytes and the three monocyte subsets expressed few amounts of cells positives to IL-10 in response to mmLDL. Our study demonstrated that nLDL did not induce cells positives to cytokines and that the CD14++CD16+ and CD14+CD16++ monocyte subsets could be the main sources of TNF-α and IL-6, respectively, in response to mmLDL, which promotes the development and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aversive Life Events Enhance Human Freezing Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, M.A.; Stins, J.F.; Roelofs, K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of prior aversive life events on freezing-like responses. Fifty healthy females were presented neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant images from the International Affective Picture System while standing on a stabilometric platform and wearing a polar band

  6. Aversive life events enhance human freezing responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, M.A.; Stins, J.F.; Roelofs, K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of prior aversive life events on freezing-like responses. Fifty healthy females were presented neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant images from the International Affective Picture System while standing on a stabilometric platform and wearing a polar band

  7. Expression of Versican V3 by Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Alters Tumor Growth Factor β (TGFβ)-, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)-, and Nuclear Factor κB (NFκB)-dependent Signaling Pathways, Creating a Microenvironment That Resists Monocyte Adhesion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Inkyung; Yoon, Dong Won; Braun, Kathleen R.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage accumulation plays a critical role during progression of cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Our previous studies demonstrated that retrovirally mediated expression of the versican V3 splice variant (V3) by arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) decreases monocyte adhesion in vitro and macrophage accumulation in a model of lipid-induced neointimal formation in vivo. We now demonstrate that V3-expressing ASMCs resist monocyte adhesion by altering the composition of the microenvironment surrounding the cells by affecting multiple signaling pathways. Reduction of monocyte adhesion to V3-expressing ASMCs is due to the generation of an extracellular matrix enriched in elastic fibers and depleted in hyaluronan, and reduction of the proinflammatory cell surface vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1). Blocking these changes reverses the protective effect of V3 on monocyte adhesion. The enhanced elastogenesis induced by V3 expression is mediated by TGFβ signaling, whereas the reduction in hyaluronan cable formation induced by V3 expression is mediated by the blockade of epidermal growth factor receptor and NFκB activation pathways. In addition, expression of V3 by ASMCs induced a marked decrease in NFκB-responsive proinflammatory cell surface molecules that mediate monocyte adhesion, such as VCAM1. Overall, these results indicate that V3 expression by ASMCs creates a microenvironment resistant to monocyte adhesion via differentially regulating multiple signaling pathways. PMID:24719328

  8. Identification of Monocyte Chemotactic Activity Produced by Malignant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, D. T.; Jiang, Y. L.; Williamson, M. J.; Valente, A. J.

    1989-09-01

    Human malignant cells secrete low molecular size proteins that attract peripheral blood monocytes and may be responsible for the accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages observed in vivo. Similar chemotactic proteins are secreted by cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. The predominant monocyte chemoattractants produced by tumor cells of differing origin were demonstrated to be related to smooth muscle cell-derived chemotactic factor. Thus, a single class of chemotactic proteins is produced by different cell types, which suggests a common mechanism for the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages. These results are significant in view of the potential of macrophages to affect tumor growth.

  9. Pyriproxyfen enhances the immunoglobulin G immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Tanjina; Satho, Tomomitsu; Irie, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mineo; Hosokawa, Masato; Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Talukder, Parimal; Okuno, Takahiro; Tsuruda, Shodai; Uyeda, Saori; Fukmits, Yuki; Tamura, Yukie; Nakashima, Yukihiko; Imoto, Masumi; Toda, Akihisa; Kashige, Nobuhiro; Miake, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Pyriproxyfen is a juvenile hormone mimic of vital importance for insect development with little risk to humans. This study was performed to investigate whether large doses of pyriproxyfen affect the immune response in mammals. Mice were immunized thrice with ovalbumin in 5% ethanol, with or without pyriproxyfen or alum. Large doses of pyriproxyfen (9 or 15 mM) significantly enhanced specific total IgG immune response. This enhancement was no longer present 24 hr after treatment with pyriproxyfen. These results suggest that pyriproxyfen is a safe chemical. Moreover, pyriproxyfen induced higher titers of IgG2a and enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and gamma-interferon responses whereas alum induced IgG1 with enhanced interleukin-4 and -10. These observations indicate that the mechanism of immune enhancement by pyriproxyfen may differ from that of alum. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. HIV-1 infection and first line ART induced differential responses in mitochondria from blood lymphocytes and monocytes: the ANRS EP45 "Aging" study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Perrin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ANRS EP45 "Aging" study investigates the cellular mechanisms involved in the accelerated aging of HIV-1 infected and treated patients. The data reported focus on mitochondria, organelles known to be involved in cell senescence. METHODS: 49 HIV-1 infected patients untreated with antiretroviral therapy, together with 49 seronegative age- and sex-matched control subjects and 81 HIV-1 infected and treated patients, were recruited by 3 AIDS centres (Marseille, Montpellier, Nice; France; http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01038999. In more than 88% of treated patients, the viral load was 500/mm(3. ROS (reactive oxygen species production and ΔΨm (inner membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry in blood lymphocytes and monocytes (functional parameters. Three mitochondrial network quantitative morphological parameters were computed using confocal microscopy and image analysis. Three PBMC mitochondrial proteins (porin and subunits 2 and 4 of cytochrome C oxidase encoded by mtDNA or nuclear DNA, respectively were analysed by western blotting. RESULTS: Quantitative changes in PBMC mitochondrial proteins were not induced by either HIV-1 infection or ART. Discriminant analysis integrating functional (ROS production and ΔΨm or morphological (network volume density, fragmentation and branching parameters revealed HIV-1 infection and ART differential effects according to cell type. First line ART tended to rescue lymphocyte mitochondrial parameters altered by viral infection, but induced slight changes in monocytes. No statistical difference was found between the effects of three ART regimens on mitochondrial parameters. Correlations between functional parameters and viral load confirmed the damaging effects of HIV-1 in lymphocyte mitochondria. CONCLUSIONS: In patients considered to be clinically stable, mitochondria exhibited functional and morphological modifications in PBMCs resulting from either direct or indirect effects of HIV-1

  11. HIV-1 Infection and First Line ART Induced Differential Responses in Mitochondria from Blood Lymphocytes and Monocytes: The ANRS EP45 “Aging” Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Sophie; Cremer, Jonathan; Roll, Patrice; Faucher, Olivia; Ménard, Amélie; Reynes, Jacques; Dellamonica, Pierre; Naqvi, Alissa; Micallef, Joëlle; Jouve, Elisabeth; Tamalet, Catherine; Solas, Caroline; Pissier, Christel; Arnoux, Isabelle; Nicolino-Brunet, Corine; Espinosa, Léon; Lévy, Nicolas; Kaspi, Elise; Robaglia-Schlupp, Andrée; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Cau, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background The ANRS EP45 “Aging” study investigates the cellular mechanisms involved in the accelerated aging of HIV-1 infected and treated patients. The data reported focus on mitochondria, organelles known to be involved in cell senescence. Methods 49 HIV-1 infected patients untreated with antiretroviral therapy, together with 49 seronegative age- and sex-matched control subjects and 81 HIV-1 infected and treated patients, were recruited by 3 AIDS centres (Marseille, Montpellier, Nice; France; http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01038999). In more than 88% of treated patients, the viral load was 500/mm3. ROS (reactive oxygen species) production and ΔΨm (inner membrane potential) were measured by flow cytometry in blood lymphocytes and monocytes (functional parameters). Three mitochondrial network quantitative morphological parameters were computed using confocal microscopy and image analysis. Three PBMC mitochondrial proteins (porin and subunits 2 and 4 of cytochrome C oxidase encoded by mtDNA or nuclear DNA, respectively) were analysed by western blotting. Results Quantitative changes in PBMC mitochondrial proteins were not induced by either HIV-1 infection or ART. Discriminant analysis integrating functional (ROS production and ΔΨm) or morphological (network volume density, fragmentation and branching) parameters revealed HIV-1 infection and ART differential effects according to cell type. First line ART tended to rescue lymphocyte mitochondrial parameters altered by viral infection, but induced slight changes in monocytes. No statistical difference was found between the effects of three ART regimens on mitochondrial parameters. Correlations between functional parameters and viral load confirmed the damaging effects of HIV-1 in lymphocyte mitochondria. Conclusions In patients considered to be clinically stable, mitochondria exhibited functional and morphological modifications in PBMCs resulting from either direct or indirect effects of HIV-1 infection

  12. HIV-1 infection and first line ART induced differential responses in mitochondria from blood lymphocytes and monocytes: the ANRS EP45 "Aging" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Sophie; Cremer, Jonathan; Roll, Patrice; Faucher, Olivia; Ménard, Amélie; Reynes, Jacques; Dellamonica, Pierre; Naqvi, Alissa; Micallef, Joëlle; Jouve, Elisabeth; Tamalet, Catherine; Solas, Caroline; Pissier, Christel; Arnoux, Isabelle; Nicolino-Brunet, Corine; Espinosa, Léon; Lévy, Nicolas; Kaspi, Elise; Robaglia-Schlupp, Andrée; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Cau, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The ANRS EP45 "Aging" study investigates the cellular mechanisms involved in the accelerated aging of HIV-1 infected and treated patients. The data reported focus on mitochondria, organelles known to be involved in cell senescence. 49 HIV-1 infected patients untreated with antiretroviral therapy, together with 49 seronegative age- and sex-matched control subjects and 81 HIV-1 infected and treated patients, were recruited by 3 AIDS centres (Marseille, Montpellier, Nice; France; http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01038999). In more than 88% of treated patients, the viral load was 500/mm(3). ROS (reactive oxygen species) production and ΔΨm (inner membrane potential) were measured by flow cytometry in blood lymphocytes and monocytes (functional parameters). Three mitochondrial network quantitative morphological parameters were computed using confocal microscopy and image analysis. Three PBMC mitochondrial proteins (porin and subunits 2 and 4 of cytochrome C oxidase encoded by mtDNA or nuclear DNA, respectively) were analysed by western blotting. Quantitative changes in PBMC mitochondrial proteins were not induced by either HIV-1 infection or ART. Discriminant analysis integrating functional (ROS production and ΔΨm) or morphological (network volume density, fragmentation and branching) parameters revealed HIV-1 infection and ART differential effects according to cell type. First line ART tended to rescue lymphocyte mitochondrial parameters altered by viral infection, but induced slight changes in monocytes. No statistical difference was found between the effects of three ART regimens on mitochondrial parameters. Correlations between functional parameters and viral load confirmed the damaging effects of HIV-1 in lymphocyte mitochondria. In patients considered to be clinically stable, mitochondria exhibited functional and morphological modifications in PBMCs resulting from either direct or indirect effects of HIV-1 infection (lymphocytes), or from first line ART

  13. Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Charles; Hester, Roger

    2000-06-13

    The objectives of this work were to: synthesize responsive, amphiphilic systems; characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; measure rheological properties of the aqueous fluids including behavior in fixed geometry flow profiles and beds; and to tailor final polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated reservoir conditions. This report focuses on the first phase of the research emphasizing synthesis and the development of photophysical techniques and rheological means of following segmental organization at the structural level.

  14. Maternal monocytes in pregnancy and preeclampsia in humans and in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, M M; de Vos, P

    2017-02-01

    Monocytes are short-lived cells, arising from the bone marrow and maturing in the circulation. They play an important role in immune responses and are thought to be important for healthy pregnancy. In humans, 3 subpopulations of monocytes have been identified: classical, intermediate and non-classical monocytes. These subpopulations have different functions and phenotypical characteristics. Healthy pregnancy is characterized by a pro-inflammatory condition, with increased numbers of monocytes and monocyte activation as well as with increased numbers of intermediate monocytes and decreased numbers of classical monocytes. This may suggest monocyte maturation. Preeclampsia is an important pregnancy complication characterized by hypertension and proteinuria developing in the second half of pregnancy. The pathophysiology of preeclampsia is associated with further activation of the inflammatory response, further activation of monocytes and further monocyte maturation. In the present review we focus on the role of monocyte activation and maturation in healthy and preeclamptic pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Four-component Staphylococcus aureus vaccine 4C-staph enhances Fcγ receptor expression in neutrophils and monocytes and mitigates S. aureus infection in neutropenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Antonina; Bacconi, Marta; Sammicheli, Chiara; Galletti, Bruno; Laera, Donatello; Fontana, Maria Rita; Grandi, Guido; De Gregorio, Ennio; Bagnoli, Fabio; Nuti, Sandra; Bertholet, Sylvie; Bensi, Giuliano

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human bacterial pathogen causing a variety of diseases. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus underlines the need for a vaccine. Defining immune correlates of protection may support the design of an effective vaccine. We used a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model, in which bacteria were inoculated in an air pouch generated on the back of the animal. Analysis of the air-pouch content in mice immunized or not with an adjuvanted multiantigen vaccine formulation, four-component S. aureus vaccine (4C-Staph), prior to infection allowed us to measure bacteria, cytokines, and 4C-Staph-specific antibodies and to analyze host immune cells recruited to the infection site. Immunization with 4C-Staph resulted in accumulation of antigen-specific antibodies in the pouch and mitigated the infection. Neutrophils were the most abundant cells in the pouch, and they showed the upregulation of Fcγ receptor (FcγR) following immunization with 4C-Staph. Reduction of the infection was also obtained in mice immunized with 4C-Staph and depleted of neutrophils; these mice showed an increase in monocytes and macrophages. Upregulation of the FcγR and the presence of antigen-specific antibodies induced by immunization with 4C-Staph may contribute to increase bacterial opsonophagocytosis. Protection in neutropenic mice indicated that an effective vaccine could activate alternative protection mechanisms compensating for neutropenia, a condition often occurring in S. aureus-infected patients. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Identifying the functional part of heparin-binding protein (HBP) as a monocyte stimulator and the novel role of monocytes as HBP producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Djurup, René; Norris, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    a crucial role when HBP binds to monocytes. We synthesized a 20-44 HBP peptide, cyclicized by a sulphur bridge, which encompasses this amino acid and functions as full-length HBP. Using a human monocyte cell line, we have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-triggered secretion of IL-6 is enhanced up to 10...

  17. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling of human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zeng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human monocyte is an important cell type which is involved in various complex human diseases. To better understand the biology of human monocytes and facilitate further studies, we developed the first comprehensive proteome knowledge base specifically for human monocytes by integrating both in vivo and in vitro datasets. The top 2000 expressed genes from in vitro datasets and 779 genes from in vivo experiments were integrated into this study. Altogether, a total of 2237 unique monocyte-expressed genes were cataloged. Biological functions of these monocyte-expressed genes were annotated and classified via Gene Ontology (GO analysis. Furthermore, by extracting the overlapped genes from in vivo and in vitro datasets, a core gene list including 541 unique genes was generated. Based on the core gene list, further gene-disease associations, pathway and network analyses were performed. Data analyses based on multiple bioinformatics tools produced a large body of biologically meaningful information, and revealed a number of genes such as SAMHD1, G6PD, GPD2 and ENO1, which have been reported to be related to immune response, blood biology, bone remodeling, and cancer respectively. As a unique resource, this study can serve as a reference map for future in-depth research on monocytes biology and monocyte-involved human diseases.

  18. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yong; Deng, Fei-Yan; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Lan; He, Hao; Xu, Chao; Tian, Qing; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Zhang, Li-Shu; Hu, Hong-Gang; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Human monocyte is an important cell type which is involved in various complex human diseases. To better understand the biology of human monocytes and facilitate further studies, we developed the first comprehensive proteome knowledge base specifically for human monocytes by integrating both in vivo and in vitro datasets. The top 2000 expressed genes from in vitro datasets and 779 genes from in vivo experiments were integrated into this study. Altogether, a total of 2237 unique monocyte-expressed genes were cataloged. Biological functions of these monocyte-expressed genes were annotated and classified via Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Furthermore, by extracting the overlapped genes from in vivo and in vitro datasets, a core gene list including 541 unique genes was generated. Based on the core gene list, further gene-disease associations, pathway and network analyses were performed. Data analyses based on multiple bioinformatics tools produced a large body of biologically meaningful information, and revealed a number of genes such as SAMHD1, G6PD, GPD2 and ENO1, which have been reported to be related to immune response, blood biology, bone remodeling, and cancer respectively. As a unique resource, this study can serve as a reference map for future in-depth research on monocytes biology and monocyte-involved human diseases.

  19. Comparison of the effects of ketoprofen and flunixin meglumine on the in vitro response of equine peripheral blood monocytes to bacterial endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, B R; Moore, J N; Barton, M H; Morris, D D

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of flunixin meglumine, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, and ketoprofen, a reported cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitor, on the synthesis of cyclo-oxygenase end-products thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2, lipoxygenase derived 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, tumor necrosis factor and tissue factor. Six adult horses were each randomly administered flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg) or ketoprofen (2.2 mg/kg) intravenously every 12 hours with the drug treatments separated by two weeks. Blood samples were obtained prior to initiating treatment, the last day of treatment and for two consecutive days after the termination of treatment for measurement of serum concentrations of thromboxane B2 as well as isolation of peripheral blood monocytes. Quantitation of unstimulated, endotoxin- and calcium ionophore-induced synthesis of thromboxane B2, prostaglandin E2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, tumor necrosis factor and tissue factor by peripheral blood monocytes was performed in vitro. Both flunixin meglumine and ketoprofen significantly decreased serum concentrations of thromboxane B2 demonstrating in vivo cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. There were no significant differences between drug treatment groups in the in vitro production of thromboxane B2, prostaglandin E2, 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, tumor necrosis factor or tissue factor. This study does not identify significant differences between the effects of flunixin meglumine and ketoprofen. PMID:8004539

  20. Human CD68 promoter GFP transgenic mice allow analysis of monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif J; McNeill, Eileen; Kapellos, Theodore S; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Norman, Sophie; Burd, Sarah; Smart, Nicola; Machemer, Daniel E W; Stylianou, Elena; McShane, Helen; Channon, Keith M; Chawla, Ajay; Greaves, David R

    2014-10-09

    The recruitment of monocytes and their differentiation into macrophages at sites of inflammation are key events in determining the outcome of the inflammatory response and initiating the return to tissue homeostasis. To study monocyte trafficking and macrophage differentiation in vivo, we have generated a novel transgenic reporter mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the human CD68 promoter. CD68-GFP mice express high levels of GFP in both monocyte and embryo-derived tissue resident macrophages in adult animals. The human CD68 promoter drives GFP expression in all CD115(+) monocytes of adult blood, spleen, and bone marrow; we took advantage of this to directly compare the trafficking of bone marrow-derived CD68-GFP monocytes to that of CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes in vivo using a sterile zymosan peritonitis model. Unlike CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes, which downregulate GFP expression on differentiation into macrophages in this model, CD68-GFP monocytes retain high-level GFP expression for 72 hours after differentiation into macrophages, allowing continued cell tracking during resolution of inflammation. In summary, this novel CD68-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource for analyzing monocyte mobilization and monocyte trafficking as well as studying the fate of recruited monocytes in models of acute and chronic inflammation. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  2. Maggot secretions skew monocyte-macrophage differentiation away from a pro-inflammatory to a pro-angiogenic type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariena J A van der Plas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. Earlier we reported maggot secretions to inhibit pro-inflammatory responses of human monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maggot secretions on the differentiation of monocytes into pro-inflammatory (MØ-1 and anti-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic macrophages (MØ-2 as these cells play a central role in wound healing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Freshly isolated monocytes were incubated with secretions and GM-CSF or M-CSF for 6 days and then stimulated with LPS or LTA for 18 h. The expression of cell surface molecules and the levels of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in supernatants were measured. Our results showed secretions to affect monocyte-macrophage differentiation leading to MØ-1 with a partial MØ-2-like morphology but lacking CD163, which is characteristic for MØ-2. In response to LPS or LTA, secretions-differentiated MØ-1 produced less pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-12p40 and MIF than control cells. Similar results were observed for MØ-2 when stimulated with low concentrations of LPS. Furthermore, secretions dose-dependently led to MØ-1 and MØ-2 characterized by an altered chemokine production. Secretions led to MØ-2, but not MØ-1, producing enhanced levels of the growth factors bFGF and VEGF, as compared to control cells. The expression of cell-surface receptors involved in LPS/LTA was enhanced by secretions, that of CD86 and HLA-DR down-regulated, while receptors involved in phagocytosis remained largely unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: Maggot secretions skew the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages away from a pro-inflammatory to a pro-angiogenic type.

  3. IN VITRO INTERACTION OF INFLUENZA VIRUS A(H1N1pdm09 WITH MONOCYTIC MACROPHAGES: INDIVIDUAL RESPONSES OF TLR7 AND RIG1 RECEPTOR GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sokolova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro differentiation of donor blood monocytes to macrophages (Mph following GM-CSF treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in the levels of gene transcription signaling receptors TLR7 or RIG1. The levels of intracellular viral RNA (M1 gene in Mph remained high upon infection by influenza virus A H1N1pdm (Moscow 2009 for 24-96 hours. The innate immunity reactions caused by influenza virus show individual features: they are decreased in Mph from donor 1 which had initially high level of endosomal TLR7 gene activity, and it increased by influenza virus in MPh from donor 2 who had a very low level of TLR7 gene expression. The influenza H1N1pdm virus weakly stimulated expression of gene RIG1 and production of inflammatory cytokines in Mf in donor 1. The differences may be connected with individual sensitivity of the donors to influenza infection.

  4. Interleukin-2 dose, blood monocyte and CD25+ lymphocyte counts as predictors of clinical response to interleukin-2 therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Geertsen, P F; von der Maase, H

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine immunological parameters in the peripheral blood that correlate with the clinical effect of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer. A group of 26 patients with metastatic renal cell cancer underwent IL-2 treatment using a 36-day...... schedule with continuous intravenous IL-2 infusion (3 x 10(6) units m-2 day-1) administered from days 1 to 5 and days 12 to 16. The white blood cell count and the absolute and relative number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and monocytes were recorded six times in peripheral blood during...... the treatment. Also the blood counts of T cell and NK cell subsets and cells expressing the T cell activation markers IL-2R alpha and VLA-1 were measured. The lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell cytotoxicity was measured either with or without additional in vitro stimulation by IL-2. Multivariate statistical...

  5. Statins attenuate polymethylmethacrylate-mediated monocyte activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, Alan J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic osteolysis precipitates aseptic loosening of components, increases the risk of periprosthetic fracture and, through massive bone loss, complicates revision surgery and ultimately is the primary cause for failure of joint arthroplasty. The anti-inflammatory properties of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors belonging to the statin family are well recognized. We investigated a possible role for status in initiating the first stage of the osteolytic cycle, namely monocytic activation. METHODS: We used an in vitro model of the human monocyte\\/macrophage inflammatory response to poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles after pretreat-ing cells with cerivastatin, a potent member of the statin family. Cell activation based upon production of TNF-alpha and MCP-1 cytokines was analyzed and the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK signal transduction pathway was evaluated using western blot analysis, to identify its role in cell activation and in any cerivastatin effects observed. RESULTS: We found that pretreatment with cerivastatin significantly abrogates the production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and MCP-1 by human monocytes in response to polymethylmethacrylate particle activation. This inflammatory activation and attenuation appear to be mediated through the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. INTERPRETATION: We propose that by intervening at the upstream activation stage, subsequent osteoclast activation and osteolysis can be suppressed. We believe that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may potentially play a prophylactic role in the setting of aseptic loosening, and in so doing increase implant longevity.

  6. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from late gestation cows have an impaired ability to mature in response to E. coli stimulation in a receptor and cytokine-mediated fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Brianna; Sipka, Anja; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte

    2015-09-15

    During late gestation the bovine immune system is less capable of eliciting inflammatory responses and eliminating invading pathogens. The maternal immune system is directed toward tolerance in order to prevent fetal rejection due to recognition of paternal antigens. In humans and mice, dendritic cell (DC) populations maintain a tolerogenic phenotype essential in the generation and preservation of maternal immune tolerance throughout pregnancy. However, the primary mechanisms which facilitate maternal immune tolerance involved in bovine gestation remain poorly understood. In order to determine if DC phenotype and function were regulated toward tolerance during bovine gestation, we compared in vitro generated monocyte-derived DC (mo-DC) from monocytes isolated from cows in late gestation (LG) to those from non-pregnant (NP) cows in their ability to mature following stimulation with UV irradiated Escherichia coli. Our results show mo-DC from LG cows have an impaired ability to mature in response to E. coli stimulation in a receptor and cytokine-mediated fashion in comparison to those from NP cows. Specifically, mo-DC from LG cows were unable to upregulate MHC II and maintained high expression of CD14, both indicative of an immature phenotype following E. coli-stimulation. Only mo-DC from LG showed significant increase in IL-10 production and had a significantly lower ratio of production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12 to regulatory cytokine IL-10 following E. coli stimulation compared to mo-DC from NP cows. Our findings demonstrate mo-DC from LG cows have a stifled capacity to develop a mature phenotype and drive pro-inflammatory Th1-type responses to E. coli stimulation. Results from this study provide insight into DC immune modulation in bovine pregnancy and elucidate host factors which may contribute to the heightened susceptibility to infection in late gestation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of monocyte-HIV interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Huyen

    2010-06-01

    /macrophage dysfunction is involved may only now be emerging or remain yet to be discovered, in particular in view of the limited number of studies focussing on the monocyte response to ART 32. In order to generate novel hypotheses rather than test pre-existing ones in the context of monocyte-HIV interactions, we performed a transcriptome analysis on monocyte samples from patients in different stages of HIV infection and/or combination ART treatment, using a parallel approach of genome-wide microarray analysis and focused gene expression profiling to identify broad areas of monocyte dysfunction and to pinpoint genes which are potentially involved in one or several of these dysfunctions. In particular the factors which are exploited by the monocyte/macrophage to communicate with and/or modulate other immune cells were of interest, as they represent a particularly relevant population 3334 which is a primary target for intervention.

  8. Monocyte-lymphocyte fusion induced by the HIV-1 envelope generates functional heterokaryons with an activated monocyte-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Méndez, David; Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Ortega, Enrique; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Huerta, Leonor, E-mail: leonorhh@biomedicas.unam.mx

    2017-03-01

    Enveloped viruses induce cell-cell fusion when infected cells expressing viral envelope proteins interact with target cells, or through the contact of cell-free viral particles with adjoining target cells. CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and cells from the monocyte-macrophage lineage express receptors for HIV envelope protein. We have previously reported that lymphoid Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) can fuse with THP-1 monocytic cells, forming heterokaryons with a predominantly myeloid phenotype. This study shows that the expression of monocytic markers in heterokaryons is stable, whereas the expression of lymphoid markers is mostly lost. Like THP-1 cells, heterokaryons exhibited FcγR-dependent phagocytic activity and showed an enhanced expression of the activation marker ICAM-1 upon stimulation with PMA. In addition, heterokaryons showed morphological changes compatible with maturation, and high expression of the differentiation marker CD11b in the absence of differentiation-inducing agents. No morphological change nor increase in CD11b expression were observed when an HIV-fusion inhibitor blocked fusion, or when THP-1 cells were cocultured with Jurkat cells expressing a non-fusogenic Env protein, showing that differentiation was not induced merely by cell-cell interaction but required cell-cell fusion. Inhibition of TLR2/TLR4 signaling by a TIRAP inhibitor greatly reduced the expression of CD11b in heterokaryons. Thus, lymphocyte-monocyte heterokaryons induced by HIV-1 Env are stable and functional, and fusion prompts a phenotype characteristic of activated monocytes via intracellular TLR2/TLR4 signaling. - Highlights: • Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope fuse with THP-1 monocytes. • Heterokaryons display a dominant myeloid phenotype and monocyte function. • Heterokaryons exhibit activation features in the absence of activation agents. • Activation is not due to cell-cell interaction but requires cell-cell fusion. • The

  9. Palmitate-stimulated monocytes induce adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells via IL-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikama, Yosuke; Aki, Nanako; Hata, Akiko; Nishimura, Miho; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Funaki, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Increased intake of saturated fatty acids (SFAs), such as palmitate (Pal), is linked to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although recent studies have investigated the direct effects of SFAs on inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells, it remains unknown whether SFAs also induce these responses mediated by circulating cells. In this study, especially focused on adhesion molecules and monocytes, we investigated the indirect effects of Pal on expression and release of ICAM-1 and E-selectin in vascular endothelial cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-treated THP-1 (pTHP-1) cells and human monocytes were stimulated with various free fatty acids (FFAs). SFAs, but not unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), increased interleukin (IL)-1β secretion and decreased IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) secretion, resulting in an increase in the IL-1β/IL-1Ra secretion ratio. UFAs dose-dependently inhibited the increase in IL-1β secretion and decrease in IL-1Ra secretion induced by Pal. Moreover, in human aortic and vein endothelial cells, expression and release of ICAM-1 and E-selectin were induced by treatment with conditioned medium collected from Pal-stimulated pTHP-1 cells and human monocytes, but not by Pal itself. The up-regulated expression and release of adhesion molecules by the conditioned medium were mostly abolished by recombinant human IL-1Ra supplementation. These results suggest that the Pal-induced increase in the ratio of IL-1β/IL-1Ra secretion in monocytes up-regulates endothelial adhesion molecules, which could enhance leukocyte adhesion to endothelium. This study provides further evidence that IL-1β neutralization through receptor antagonism may be useful for preventing the onset and development of cardiovascular disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. Ciprofloxacin inhibits advanced glycation end products-induced adhesion molecule expression on human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, S; Takahashi, H K; Liu, K; Wake, H; Zhang, J; Liu, R; Yoshino, T; Nishibori, M

    2010-09-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) subtypes, proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to sugars, can induce complications in diabetes. Among the various AGE subtypes, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) are involved in inflammation in diabetic patients; monocytes are activated by these AGEs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluorinated 4-quinolone, is often used clinically to treat infections associated with diabetis due to its antibacterial properties. It also modulates immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) therefore we investigated the involvement of AGEs in these effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 was examined by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interferon (IFN)-gamma, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and cAMP were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by [(3)H]-thymidine uptake. KEY RESULTS CIP induced PGE(2) production in monocytes, irrespective of the presence of AGE-2 and AGE-3, by enhancing COX-2 expression; this led to an elevation of intracellular cAMP in monocytes. Non-selective and selective COX-2 inhibitors, indomethacin and NS398, inhibited CIP-induced PGE(2) and cAMP production. In addition, CIP inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 in monocytes, the production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and lymphocyte proliferation in PBMC. Indomethacin, NS398 and a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, inhibited the actions of CIP. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CIP exerts immunomodulatory activity via PGE(2), implying therapeutic potential of CIP for the treatment of AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced inflammatory responses.

  11. Eplerenone promotes alternative activation in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Liber, Sebastian; Bułdak, Łukasz; Machnik, Grzegorz; Liber, Justyna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the response of human monocyte-derived macrophages to mineralocorticoid axis modulators. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with aldosterone alone, eplerenone alone, and the combination of aldosterone and eplerenone. The analyzed variables were nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production, and the gene and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, arginase I, and mannose receptor. We showed that aldosterone promotes a classic inflammatory response in macrophages, whereas its antagonist, eplerenone, attenuates aldosterone-induced activity. Eplerenone did not quantitatively weaken the response of macrophages to aldosterone but instead qualitatively changed their behavior.

  12. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Milena; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  13. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Milena, E-mail: milena.de.nicola@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy); Mirabile Gattia, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it [UTTMAT, ENEA-C.R. Casaccia (Italy); Traversa, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Traversa@kaust.edu.sa [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Division of Physical Science and Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Ghibelli, Lina, E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 {mu}m) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  14. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    De Nicola, Milena D.

    2013-05-17

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  15. Will Biomedical Enhancements Undermine Solidarity, Responsibility, Equality and Autonomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Ori

    2009-01-01

    Prominent thinkers such as Jurgen Habermas and Michael Sandel are warning that biomedical enhancements will undermine fundamental political values. Yet, whether biomedical enhancements will undermine such values depends on how biomedical enhancements will function, how they will be administered and to whom. Since only few enhancements are obtainable, it is difficult to tell whether their predictions are sound. Nevertheless, such warnings are extremely valuable. As a society we must, at the very least, be aware of developments that could have harmful consequences. Indeed, if important values would be jeopardized, we should take appropriate measures to protect them. This paper focuses on four central values: solidarity, personal responsibility, equality and autonomy. It delineates the conditions under which biomedical enhancements would undermine these values. It also details the circumstances under which these values would be unaffected by enhancements as well as those under which they would be promoted. Specifying these conditions is valuable; it would enable society to prepare appropriate ethical guidelines and policy responses in advance. PMID:20002073

  16. Primary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 response of the interleukin 8 gene cluster in human monocyte- and macrophage-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Ryynänen

    Full Text Available Genome-wide analysis of vitamin D receptor (VDR binding sites in THP-1 human monocyte-like cells highlighted the interleukin 8 gene, also known as chemokine CXC motif ligand 8 (CXCL8. CXCL8 is a chemotactic cytokine with important functions during acute inflammation as well as in the context of various cancers. The nine genes of the CXCL cluster and the strong VDR binding site close to the CXCL8 gene are insulated from neighboring genes by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites. Only CXCL8, CXCL6 and CXCL1 are expressed in THP-1 cells, but all three are up-regulated primary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3 target genes. Formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements sequencing analysis of the whole CXCL cluster demonstrated 1,25(OH2D3-dependent chromatin opening exclusively for the VDR binding site. In differentiated THP-1 cells the CXCL8 gene showed a 33-fold higher basal expression, but is together with CXCL6 and CXCL1 still a primary 1,25(OH2D3 target under the control of the same genomic VDR binding site. In summary, both in undifferentiated and differentiated THP-1 cells the genes CXCL8, CXCL6 and CXCL1 are under the primary control of 1,25(OH2D3 and its receptor VDR. Our observation provides further evidence for the immune-related functions of vitamin D.

  17. Immunomodulator-based enhancement of anti smallpox immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Osmarie; Miranda, Eric; Ramírez, Maite; Santos, Saritza; Rivera, Carlos; Vázquez, Luis; Sánchez, Tomás; Tremblay, Raymond L; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Otero, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists), and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein. We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation. The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections. These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform.

  18. Cytokine regulation of the intracellular growth of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in bovine monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbrick, B G; Follett, D M; Czuprynski, C J

    1988-01-01

    In this study we examined the influence of various crude and recombinant cytokines on the ingestion and intracellular survival of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis within bovine monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Cytokine pretreatment had little effect on the ingestion of M. paratuberculosis by bovine monocytes and macrophages. Monocytes that were continuously incubated with virus-induced crude bovine interferon (100 U) or recombinant bovine alpha interferon (100 U) significantly restricted the subsequent intracellular growth of M. paratuberculosis, as determined by microscopic counts of acid-fast bacilli and by recovery of CFU from lysed monocyte monolayers. In contrast to their effects on freshly adherent monocytes, these cytokines had little effect on the growth of M. paratuberculosis within monocyte-derived macrophages. In two separate experiments, we also observed inhibition of bacillary growth in monocytes treated with unpurified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Conversely, intracellular growth of M. paratuberculosis was enhanced in monocytes that were pretreated with culture supernatants from M. paratuberculosis-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from an immunized calf. The growth-enhancing activity of these supernatants was labile at pH 2.0, suggesting a role for gamma interferon; however, subsequent experiments indicated that recombinant gamma interferon alone neither enhanced nor restricted intracellular bacillary growth. To determine the possible contributions of monocyte oxidative activity to cytokine-induced bacteriostasis, we compared the release of superoxide anion from cytokine-treated and control monocytes. No obvious relationship was observed between the release of superoxide anion and the subsequent intracellular fate of the bacilli. PMID:2838423

  19. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elene Sapharikas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Critical limb ischemia (CLI induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic beads from peripheral blood of healthy donors were treated with fucoidan. Fucoidan induced a 1.5-fold increase in monocyte adhesion to gelatin (p < 0.05 and a five-fold increase in chemotaxis in Boyden chambers (p < 0.05. Fucoidan also enhanced migration 2.5-fold in a transmigration assay (p < 0.05. MMP9 activity in monocyte supernatants was significantly enhanced by fucoidan (p < 0.05. Finally, Western blot analysis of fucoidan-treated monocytes showed upregulation of ERK/p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK/p38 phosphorylation abrogated fucoidan enhancement of migration (p < 0.01. Fucoidan displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte adhesion and migration. These effects involve the ERK and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. Fucoidan could improve critical limb ischemia by promoting monocyte recruitment.

  20. Lactobacilli Modulate Natural Killer Cell Responses In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    . The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain increased the proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production, both to levels comparable to PHA stimulation. The proliferative response was further enhanced with autologous...... monocytes present, probably because cytokines, secreted by monocytes having engulfed bacteria, stimulated the NK cells. In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various strains of lactobacilli have...

  1. Interactions of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in monocyte adherence and TNFalpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, M R; Arbabi, S; Garcia, I; Maier, R V

    2000-03-01

    The circulating monocyte possesses a markedly different functional phenotype relative to the macrophage (Mphi). The adhesive interactions encountered by the monocyte, en route to the inflammatory focus, generate signals that culminate in the expression of a pro-inflammatory Mphi phenotype, marked by enhanced cytokine production. Previously, we demonstrated that calcium and calmodulin are essential for maximal Mphi activation and, in particular, TNFalpha production. These effects are likely to be mediated through signal transduction kinases that require the calcium/calmodulin complex. Here, we investigated the effect of adherence on calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and IV activation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 cascade and on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production by human monocytes. Adherence activated ERK 1/2 and led to an 8-fold potentiation in LPS-induced TNFalpha production over similarly stimulated non-adherent cells. Inhibition of CaMK II prior to adherence prevented ERK 1/2 activation and attenuated by up to 40%, the TNFalpha response to subsequent LPS stimulation. CaMK II inhibition after adherence, however, failed to modify cytokine release. Inhibition of CaMK IV, both after adherence and in non-adherent monocytes, significantly inhibited LPS-induced ERK 1/2 activation and abrogated TNFalpha production by up to 75%. These data suggest that the function of CaMK II in TNFalpha production by adherent monocytes occurs during adhesion, is mediated in part by activation of ERK 1/2, and appears to "prime" the monocyte for enhanced cytokine production. CaMK IV, through activation of ERK 1/2, appears to have a direct role in the LPS signal transduction for TNFalpha production.

  2. Ly6C- Monocytes Regulate Parasite-Induced Liver Inflammation by Inducing the Differentiation of Pathogenic Ly6C+ Monocytes into Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Morias

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes consist of two well-defined subsets, the Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes. Both CD11b+ myeloid cells populations have been proposed to infiltrate tissues during inflammation. While infiltration of Ly6C+ monocytes is an established pathogenic factor during hepatic inflammation, the role of Ly6C- monocytes remains elusive. Mice suffering experimental African trypanosome infection die from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that is initiated by phagocytosis of parasites by liver myeloid cells and culminates in apoptosis/necrosis of liver myeloid and parenchymal cells that reduces host survival. C57BL/6 mice are considered as trypanotolerant to Trypanosoma congolense infection. We have reported that in these animals, IL-10, produced among others by myeloid cells, limits the liver damage caused by pathogenic TNF-producing Ly6C+ monocytes, ensuring prolonged survival. Here, the heterogeneity and dynamics of liver myeloid cells in T. congolense-infected C57/BL6 mice was further dissected. Moreover, the contribution of Ly6C- monocytes to trypanotolerance was investigated. By using FACS analysis and adoptive transfer experiments, we found that the accumulation of Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages in the liver of infected mice coincided with a drop in the pool of Ly6C+ monocytes. Pathogenic TNF mainly originated from Ly6C+ monocytes while Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages were major and equipotent sources of IL-10 within myeloid cells. Moreover, Nr4a1 (Nur77 transcription factor-dependent Ly6C- monocytes exhibited IL-10-dependent and cell contact-dependent regulatory properties contributing to trypanotolerance by suppressing the production of TNF by Ly6C+ monocytes and by promoting the differentiation of the latter cells into macrophages. Thus, Ly6C- monocytes can dampen liver damage caused by an extensive Ly6C+ monocyte-associated inflammatory immune response in T. congolense trypanotolerant animals. In a more general context, Ly6C- or Ly6C

  3. The glial scar-monocyte interplay: a pivotal resolution phase in spinal cord repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Shechter

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response in the injured spinal cord, an immune privileged site, has been mainly associated with the poor prognosis. However, recent data demonstrated that, in fact, some leukocytes, namely monocytes, are pivotal for repair due to their alternative anti-inflammatory phenotype. Given the pro-inflammatory milieu within the traumatized spinal cord, known to skew monocytes towards a classical phenotype, a pertinent question is how parenchymal-invading monocytes acquire resolving properties essential for healing, under such unfavorable conditions. In light of the spatial association between resolving (interleukin (IL-10 producing monocytes and the glial scar matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG, in this study we examined the mutual relationship between these two components. By inhibiting the de novo production of CSPG following spinal cord injury, we demonstrated that this extracellular matrix, mainly known for its ability to inhibit axonal growth, serves as a critical template skewing the entering monocytes towards the resolving phenotype. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated that this matrix alone is sufficient to induce such monocyte polarization. Reciprocal conditional ablation of the monocyte-derived macrophages concentrated at the lesion margins, using diphtheria toxin, revealed that these cells have scar matrix-resolving properties. Replenishment of monocytic cell populations to the ablated mice demonstrated that this extracellular remodeling ability of the infiltrating monocytes requires their expression of the matrix-degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, a property that was found here to be crucial for functional recovery. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the glial scar-matrix, a known obstacle to regeneration, is a critical component skewing the encountering monocytes towards a resolving phenotype. In an apparent feedback loop, monocytes were found to regulate scar resolution. This

  4. Cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea are enhanced in hypertensive rats due to enhanced chemoreceptor responsivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M M Angheben

    Full Text Available Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY. Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (p<0.05, n = 14/13. The respiratory effort increased by 53±6 mmHg in SHR and by 34±5 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell by 209±19 bpm in SHR and by 155±16 bpm in WKY. The carotid chemoreceptors were then inactivated by the ligation of the carotid body artery, and apneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea.

  5. Bacille Calmette-Guerin induces NOD2-dependent nonspecific protection from reinfection via epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Quintin, Jessica; Preijers, Frank; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Ifrim, Daniela C.; Saeed, Sadia; Jacobs, Cor; van Loenhout, Joke; De Jong, Dirk,; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Xavier, Ramnik J; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive features of innate immunity, recently described as “trained immunity,” have been documented in plants, invertebrate animals, and mice, but not yet in humans. Here we show that bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in healthy volunteers led not only to a four- to sevenfold increase in the production of IFN-γ, but also to a twofold enhanced release of monocyte-derived cytokines, such as TNF and IL-1β, in response to unrelated bacterial and fungal pathogens. The enhanced function of...

  6. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanine on human T and B lymphocytes and human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, A J; Pryjma, J; Tarnok, Z; Ernst, M; Flad, H D

    1990-01-01

    Pyocyanine, a pigment produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has dual dose-dependent stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on immune responses in vitro as measured by DNA synthesis of human T and B lymphocytes, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by human T lymphocytes, immunoglobulin production by human B lymphocytes, and monokine production by human monocytes. In general, stimulatory activity was found at low concentrations of pyocyanine, whereas high concentrations of the pigment resulted in an inhibition of responses. At a pyocyanine concentration of 0.1 micrograms/ml or less the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes was enhanced, but at 0.5 micrograms/ml it was suppressed. IL-2 production by T lymphocytes was enhanced at concentrations up to 0.5 micrograms/ml but totally inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The differentiation of B lymphocytes to become immunoglobulin-producing cells was also enhanced in the presence of low doses of pyocyanine, whereas secretion of immunoglobulin by B lymphocytes was suppressed at all concentrations of pyocyanine. In contrast to the dual effects of pyocyanine on lymphocyte response, lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor release by monocytes was markedly enhanced by low as well as high concentrations of pyocyanine. From these results we conclude that this property of pyocyanine may lead to suppression of specific defense mechanisms and enhance harmful inflammatory reactions of the host during infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:2106495

  7. The pathological effects of CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes are amplified by an IFNAR1-triggered chemokine feedback loop in highly pathogenic influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sue-Jane; Lo, Ming; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Shih, Shin-Ru; Ojcius, David M; Lu, Jean; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Hui-Chen; Lin, Meei Yun; Leu, Chuen-Miin; Lin, Chia-Ni; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2014-11-18

    Highly pathogenic influenza viruses cause high levels of morbidity, including excessive infiltration of leukocytes into the lungs, high viral loads and a cytokine storm. However, the details of how these pathological features unfold in severe influenza infections remain unclear. Accumulation of Gr1 + CD11b + myeloid cells has been observed in highly pathogenic influenza infections but it is not clear how and why they accumulate in the severely inflamed lung. In this study, we selected this cell population as a target to investigate the extreme inflammatory response during severe influenza infection. We established H1N1 IAV-infected mouse models using three viruses of varying pathogenicity and noted the accumulation of a defined Gr1 + CD11b + myeloid population correlating with the pathogenicity. Herein, we reported that CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes are the major cell compartments in this population. Of note, impaired clearance of the high pathogenicity virus prolonged IFN expression, leading to CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes amplifying their own recruitment via an interferon-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1)-triggered chemokine loop. Blockage of IFNAR1-triggered signaling or inhibition of viral replication by Oseltamivir significantly suppresses the expression of CCR2 ligands and reduced the influx of CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes. Furthermore, trafficking of CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes from the bone marrow to the lung was evidenced by a CCR2-dependent chemotaxis. Importantly, leukocyte infiltration, cytokine storm and expression of iNOS were significantly reduced in CCR2-/- mice lacking infiltrating CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes, enhancing the survival of the infected mice. Our results indicated that uncontrolled viral replication leads to excessive production of inflammatory innate immune responses by accumulating CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes, which contribute to the fatal outcomes of high pathogenicity virus infections.

  8. Suppression of blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis in acute human malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Kharazmi, A; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    tested monocyte chemotactic responsiveness in 19 patients with acute primary attack malaria. In addition, the neutrophil chemotaxis was measured in 12 patients. Before the initiation of antimalarial treatment a significant depression of monocyte chemotaxis was observed in approximately half...... suppressed. The monocyte chemotaxis was followed in 14 of the patients, during treatment and after complete recovery. After 3 days of treatment the response had improved in most of the patients, and after 7 days all patients had a normal monocyte chemotaxis, which remained normal after one month....... No significant differences between P. falciparum and P. vivax/ovale malaria was observed with respect to blood monocyte chemotactic responsiveness. Neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with P. falciparum infections was similarly suppressed before treatment (54% of controls), was still defective after 3 days...

  9. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-α concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-α signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-κB/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  10. Systemic T Cells Immunosuppression of Glioma Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Is Mediated by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenis, Rossana; Cesselli, Daniela; Toffoletto, Barbara; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Caponnetto, Federica; Manini, Ivana; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Di Loreto, Carla

    2017-01-01

    A major contributing factor to glioma development and progression is its ability to evade the immune system. Nano-meter sized vesicles, exosomes, secreted by glioma-stem cells (GSC) can act as mediators of intercellular communication to promote tumor immune escape. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of GCS-derived exosomes on different peripheral immune cell populations. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2, were treated with GSC-derived exosomes. Phenotypic characterization, cell proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion and intracellular cytokine production were analysed by distinguishing among effector T cells, regulatory T cells and monocytes. In unfractionated PBMCs, GSC-derived exosomes inhibited T cell activation (CD25 and CD69 expression), proliferation and Th1 cytokine production, and did not affect cell viability or regulatory T-cell suppression ability. Furthermore, exosomes were able to enhance proliferation of purified CD4+ T cells. In PBMCs culture, glioma-derived exosomes directly promoted IL-10 and arginase-1 production and downregulation of HLA-DR by unstimulated CD14+ monocytic cells, that displayed an immunophenotype resembling that of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs). Importantly, the removal of CD14+ monocytic cell fraction from PBMCs restored T-cell proliferation. The same results were observed with exosomes purified from plasma of glioblastoma patients. Our results indicate that glioma-derived exosomes suppress T-cell immune response by acting on monocyte maturation rather than on direct interaction with T cells. Selective targeting of Mo-MDSC to treat glioma should be considered with regard to how immune cells allow the acquirement of effector functions and therefore counteracting tumor progression. PMID:28107450

  11. Systemic T Cells Immunosuppression of Glioma Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Is Mediated by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenis, Rossana; Cesselli, Daniela; Toffoletto, Barbara; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Caponnetto, Federica; Manini, Ivana; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Di Loreto, Carla; Gri, Giorgia

    2017-01-01

    A major contributing factor to glioma development and progression is its ability to evade the immune system. Nano-meter sized vesicles, exosomes, secreted by glioma-stem cells (GSC) can act as mediators of intercellular communication to promote tumor immune escape. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of GCS-derived exosomes on different peripheral immune cell populations. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2, were treated with GSC-derived exosomes. Phenotypic characterization, cell proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion and intracellular cytokine production were analysed by distinguishing among effector T cells, regulatory T cells and monocytes. In unfractionated PBMCs, GSC-derived exosomes inhibited T cell activation (CD25 and CD69 expression), proliferation and Th1 cytokine production, and did not affect cell viability or regulatory T-cell suppression ability. Furthermore, exosomes were able to enhance proliferation of purified CD4+ T cells. In PBMCs culture, glioma-derived exosomes directly promoted IL-10 and arginase-1 production and downregulation of HLA-DR by unstimulated CD14+ monocytic cells, that displayed an immunophenotype resembling that of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs). Importantly, the removal of CD14+ monocytic cell fraction from PBMCs restored T-cell proliferation. The same results were observed with exosomes purified from plasma of glioblastoma patients. Our results indicate that glioma-derived exosomes suppress T-cell immune response by acting on monocyte maturation rather than on direct interaction with T cells. Selective targeting of Mo-MDSC to treat glioma should be considered with regard to how immune cells allow the acquirement of effector functions and therefore counteracting tumor progression.

  12. Immunomodulator-based enhancement of anti smallpox immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmarie Martínez

    Full Text Available The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists, and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein.We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation.The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections.These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform.

  13. Cigarette smoking enhances T cell activation and a Th2 immune response; an aspect of the pathophysiology in periodontal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres de Heens, G.L.; van der Velden, U.; Loos, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Smoking is a strong risk factor for periodontitis. Treated patients who smoke show increased risk for further periodontal breakdown, despite receiving maintenance care. Previous work indicated that such patients have a monocytic cytokine response favoring Th2 activity. The purpose of this study was

  14. Enhancing the Benefits of Written Emotional Disclosure through Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R.; Vrana, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n = 113) or a neutral writing condition (n = 133). Participants in each condition wrote for 20 minutes on three occasions and received response training (n = 79), stimulus training (n = 84) or no training (n = 83). Heart rate and skin conductance were recorded throughout a 10-minute baseline, 20-minute writing, and a 10-minute recovery period. Self-reported emotion was assessed in each session. One month after completing the sessions, participants completed follow-up assessments of psychological and physical health outcomes. Emotional disclosure elicited greater physiological reactivity and self-reported emotion than neutral writing. Response training amplified physiological reactivity to emotional disclosure. Greater heart rate during emotional disclosure was associated with the greatest reductions in event-related distress, depression, and physical illness symptoms at follow-up, especially among response trained participants. Results support an exposure explanation of emotional disclosure effects and are the first to demonstrate that response training facilitates emotional processing and may be a beneficial adjunct to written emotional disclosure. PMID:24680230

  15. Enhancing the benefits of written emotional disclosure through response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R; Vrana, Scott R

    2014-05-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n=113) or a neutral writing condition (n=133). Participants in each condition wrote for 20 minutes on 3 occasions and received response training (n=79), stimulus training (n=84) or no training (n=83). Heart rate and skin conductance were recorded throughout a 10-minute baseline, 20-minute writing, and a 10-minute recovery period. Self-reported emotion was assessed in each session. One month after completing the sessions, participants completed follow-up assessments of psychological and physical health outcomes. Emotional disclosure elicited greater physiological reactivity and self-reported emotion than neutral writing. Response training amplified physiological reactivity to emotional disclosure. Greater heart rate during emotional disclosure was associated with the greatest reductions in event-related distress, depression, and physical illness symptoms at follow-up, especially among response trained participants. Results support an exposure explanation of emotional disclosure effects and are the first to demonstrate that response training facilitates emotional processing and may be a beneficial adjunct to written emotional disclosure. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The complexity of arterial classical monocyte recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Maik; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of classical monocytes is imperative for the progression of atherosclerosis. Hence, therapeutic interference with mechanisms of lesional monocyte recruitment, the primary mechanism controlling macrophage accumulation, may allow for targeting atheroprogression and its clinical

  17. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C; Butterfield, D Allan; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Castegna, Alessandra

    2017-03-10

    Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351-363.

  18. Targeting the tumor microenvironment to enhance antitumor immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Jeught, Kevin; Bialkowski, Lukasz; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Broos, Katrijn; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Renmans, Dries; Van Lint, Sandra; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-specific antigens and the immune responses directed against them has instigated the development of therapies to enhance antitumor immune responses. Most of these cancer immunotherapies are administered systemically rather than directly to tumors. Nonetheless, numerous studies have demonstrated that intratumoral therapy is an attractive approach, both for immunization and immunomodulation purposes. Injection, recruitment and/or activation of antigen-presenting cells in the tumor nest have been extensively studied as strategies to cross-prime immune responses. Moreover, delivery of stimulatory cytokines, blockade of inhibitory cytokines and immune checkpoint blockade have been explored to restore immunological fitness at the tumor site. These tumor-targeted therapies have the potential to induce systemic immunity without the toxicity that is often associated with systemic treatments. We review the most promising intratumoral immunotherapies, how these affect systemic antitumor immunity such that disseminated tumor cells are eliminated, and which approaches have been proven successful in animal models and patients. PMID:25682197

  19. Responsivity Enhanced NMOSFET Photodetector Fabricated by Standard CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuwei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the responsivity is one of the important issues for a photodetector. In this paper, we demonstrate an improved NMOSFET photodetector by using deep-n-well (DNW structure which can improve the responsivity of the photodetector significantly. The experimental results show that the responsivity can be enhanced greatly by the DNW structure and is much larger than the previous work when DNW is biased with 0.5 V, while the dark current exhibits almost no increase. Further characterization indicates that the diode formed by the bulk and DNW can efficiently absorb photons and has a large gain factor of the photocurrent especially under low light condition, which gives a more promising application for the detector to detect the weak light.

  20. Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides inhibit TLR3-mediated responses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and in vivo in cynomolgus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sköld, A.; Hasan, M.; Vargas, L.; Saidi, H.; Bosquet, N.; Grand, R. le; Smith, C.I.; Spetz, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    TLR3 is a key receptor for recognition of double-stranded RNA and initiation of immune responses against viral infections. However, hyperactive responses can have adverse effects, such as virus-induced asthma. Strategies to prevent TLR3-mediated pathology are therefore desired. We investigated the

  1. Inflammatory monocytes mediate early and organ-specific innate defense during systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Lisa Y; Kasahara, Shinji; Kumasaka, Debra K; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Jhingran, Anupam; Hohl, Tobias M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that can cause systemic disease in patients with breaches in mucosal integrity, indwelling catheters, and defects in phagocyte function. Although circulating human and murine monocytes bind C. albicans and promote inflammation, it remains unclear whether C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes exert a protective or a deleterious function during systemic infection. During murine systemic candidiasis, interruption of CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocyte trafficking into infected kidneys impaired fungal clearance and decreased murine survival. Depletion of CCR2-expressing cells led to uncontrolled fungal growth in the kidneys and brain and demonstrated an essential antifungal role for inflammatory monocytes and their tissue-resident derivatives in the first 48 hours postinfection. Adoptive transfer of purified inflammatory monocytes in depleted hosts reversed the defect in fungal clearance to a substantial extent, indicating a compartmentally and temporally restricted protective function that can be transferred to enhance systemic innate antifungal immunity.

  2. HDR Image Quality Enhancement Based on Spatially Variant Retinal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horiuchi Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for being able to display high dynamic range (HDR images on low dynamic range (LDR devices. Tone mapping is a process for enhancing HDR image quality on an LDR device by converting the tonal values of the original image from HDR to LDR. This paper proposes a new tone mapping algorithm for enhancing image quality by deriving a spatially-variant operator for imitating S-potential response in human retina, which efficiently improves local contrasts while conserving good global appearance. The proposed tone mapping operator is studied from a system construction point of view. It is found that the operator is regarded as a natural extension of the Retinex algorithm by adding a global adaptation process to the local adaptation. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is examined in detail on experiments using standard HDR images and real HDR scene images, comparing with conventional tone mapping algorithms.

  3. Mitigation of monocyte inflammation by inhibition of sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of sodium phosphate co-transporter (Pit-1) on the regulation of monocyte inflammation in diabetic nephropathy uremia (DNU) patients and the underlying principles of inflammatory immune response during DNU pathogenesis. Methods: The levels of CD14+ CD16+ and Pit-1 on peripheral ...

  4. Monocytes and macrophages in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M.; Spaans, Floor; De Vos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is an important complication in pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy. Generalized activation of the inflammatory response is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. Monocytes may play a central role in this

  5. Dexamethasone Enhances ATP-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The purinergic nucleotide ATP is released from stressed cells and is implicated in vascular inflammation. Glucocorticoids are essential to stress responses and are used therapeutically, yet little information is available that describes the effects of glucocorticoids on ATP-induced inflammation. In a human microvascular endothelial cell line, extracellular ATP-induced interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. When cells were pretreated with dexamethasone, a prototypic glucocorticoid, ATP-induced IL-6 production was enhanced in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, blocked these effects. ATP-induced IL-6 release was significantly inhibited by a phospholipase C inhibitor [1-[6-[((17β)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)] (63.2 ± 3%, p dexamethasone induced mRNA expression of the purinergic P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) 1.8- ± 0.1-fold and, when stimulated with ATP, enhanced Ca2+ release and augmented IL-6 mRNA expression. Silencing of the P2Y2R by its small interfering RNA decreased ATP-induced IL-6 production by 81 ± 1% (p Dexamethasone enhanced the transcription rate of P2Y2R mRNA and induced a dose-related increase in the activity of the P2Y2R promoter. Furthermore, dexamethasone-enhanced ATP induction of adhesion molecule transcription and augmented the release of IL-8. Dexamethasone leads to an unanticipated enhancement of endothelial inflammatory mediator production by extracellular ATP via a P2Y2R-dependent mechanism. These data define a novel positive feedback loop of glucocorticoids and ATP-induced endothelial inflammation. PMID:20826566

  6. Enhancing the thermal response of latent heat storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugaje, I.M. [Ahmadu Bello Univ., Zaria (Nigeria)

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports experiments carried out to investigate methods of enhancing the thermal response of paraffin wax heat storage tubes by incorporation of aluminium thermal conductivity promoters of various designs into the body of the wax. Heating and cooling runs were carried out and phase change times determined. It was found that the phase change time reduced significantly by orders of up to 2.2 in energy storage (heating) and 4.2 in energy recovery (cooling). Internal fins performed much better than the star matrices and expanded aluminium performed better than promoters made from aluminium sheet metal in both storage and recovery of heat. (author)

  7. Helium-neon and nitrogen laser irradiation accelerates the phagocytic activity of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemvani, Nanda; Chitnis, Dhananjay Sadashiv; Bhagwanani, Nijram Satramdas

    2005-12-01

    Intracellular survival of mycobacteria within monocytes is a crucial stage in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. The aim was to check intracellular survival of Mycobacterium fortuitum within the human monocytes exposed to He-Ne and nitrogen laser irradiation. Tuberculosis remains one of the most important infectious diseases for developing countries. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been tried to treat tubercular cavitory lung disease with encouraging results. The in vitro photobiological effect of low level laser radiation on the intracellular mycobacteria needs to be evaluated before we could go for large clinical trials. The aliquots of human monocytes from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and tuberculosis cases were exposed to He-Ne or nitrogen laser beam. The non-irradiated monocytes from the same source served as controls. The monocytes were then challenged with M. fortuitum, and surviving mycobacteria within monocytes were subjected to viable counts. Enhanced killing of mycobacterial cells was seen among monocytes exposed to He-Ne and nitrogen laser irradiation. He-Ne and nitrogen laser irradiation activates the monocytes to increase intracellular killing of mycobacteria.

  8. Antibacterial responses by peritoneal macrophages are enhanced following vitamin D supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Bacchetta

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, who usually display low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D, are at high risk of infection, notably those undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD. We hypothesized that peritoneal macrophages from PD patients are an important target for vitamin D-induced antibacterial activity. Dialysate effluent fluid was obtained from 27 non-infected PD patients. Flow cytometry indicated that PD cells were mainly monocytic (37.9±17.7% cells CD14+/CD45+. Ex vivo analyses showed that PD cells treated with 25D (100 nM, 6 hrs or 1,25D (5 nM, 6 hrs induced mRNA for antibacterial cathelicidin (CAMP but conversely suppressed mRNA for hepcidin (HAMP. PD cells from patients with peritonitis (n = 3 showed higher baseline expression of CAMP (18-fold±9, p<0.05 and HAMP (64-fold±7 relative to cells from non-infected patients. In 12 non-infected PD patients, oral supplementation with a single dose of vitamin D2 (100,000 IU increased serum levels of 25D from 18±8 to 41±15 ng/ml (p = 0.002. This had no significant effect on PD cell CD14/CD45 expression, but mRNA for HAMP was suppressed significantly (0.5-fold, p = 0.04. Adjustment for PD cell CD14/CD45 expression using a mixed linear statistical model also revealed increased expression of CAMP (mRNA in PD cells and protein in effluent in vitamin D-supplemented patients. These data show for the first time that vitamin D supplementation in vitro and in vivo promotes innate immune responses that may enhance macrophage antibacterial responses in patients undergoing PD. This highlights a potentially important function for vitamin D in preventing infection-related complications in CKD.

  9. Human Macrophage–derived Chemokine (MDC), a Novel Chemoattractant for Monocytes, Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells, and Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godiska, Ronald; Chantry, David; Raport, Carol J.; Sozzani, Silvano; Allavena, Paola; Leviten, Dina; Mantovani, Alberto; Gray, Patrick W.

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a novel human chemokine was isolated by random sequencing of cDNA clones from human monocyte-derived macrophages. This protein has been termed macrophagederived chemokine (MDC) because it appears to be synthesized specifically by cells of the macrophage lineage. MDC has the four-cysteine motif and other highly conserved residues characteristic of CC chemokines, but it shares <35% identity with any of the known chemokines. Recombinant MDC was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified by heparin– Sepharose chromatography. NH2-terminal sequencing and mass spectrophotometry were used to verify the NH2 terminus and molecular mass of recombinant MDC (8,081 dalton). In microchamber migration assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and IL-2–activated natural killer cells migrated to MDC in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal chemotactic response at 1 ng/ml. Freshly isolated monocytes also migrated toward MDC, but with a peak response at 100 ng/ml MDC. Northern analyses indicated MDC is highly expressed in macrophages and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not in monocytes, natural killer cells, or several cell lines of epithelial, endothelial, or fibroblast origin. High expression was also detected in normal thymus and less expression in lung and spleen. Unlike most other CC chemokines, MDC is encoded on human chromosome 16. MDC is thus a unique member of the CC chemokine family that may play a fundamental role in the function of dendritic cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes. PMID:9151897

  10. Human macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), a novel chemoattractant for monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godiska, R; Chantry, D; Raport, C J; Sozzani, S; Allavena, P; Leviten, D; Mantovani, A; Gray, P W

    1997-05-05

    A cDNA encoding a novel human chemokine was isolated by random sequencing of cDNA clones from human monocyte-derived macrophages. This protein has been termed macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) because it appears to be synthesized specifically by cells of the macrophage lineage. MDC has the four-cysteine motif and other highly conserved residues characteristic of CC chemokines, but it shares <35% identity with any of the known chemokines. Recombinant MDC was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. NH2-terminal sequencing and mass spectrophotometry were used to verify the NH2 terminus and molecular mass of recombinant MDC (8,081 dalton). In microchamber migration assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and IL-2-activated natural killer cells migrated to MDC in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal chemotactic response at 1 ng/ml. Freshly isolated monocytes also migrated toward MDC, but with a peak response at 100 ng/ml MDC. Northern analyses indicated MDC is highly expressed in macrophages and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not in monocytes, natural killer cells, or several cell lines of epithelial, endothelial, or fibroblast origin. High expression was also detected in normal thymus and less expression in lung and spleen. Unlike most other CC chemokines, MDC is encoded on human chromosome 16. MDC is thus a unique member of the CC chemokine family that may play a fundamental role in the function of dendritic cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes.

  11. Epinephrine Enhances the Response of Macrophages under LPS Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyun Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma associated with infection may directly trigger a neuroendocrine reaction in vivo while the hormone epinephrine is known to mediate immune responses to inflammation after injury. However, the role of epinephrine during the earliest stage of trauma still remains unclear. We therefore explored the role of epinephrine on activated macrophages under LPS stimulation in vitro as well as the mechanisms underlying its effect. Dose- and time-dependent effects of epinephrine on macrophage immune function were assessed after LPS activation. We also employed CD14 siRNA interference to investigate whether CD14 played a role in the mechanism underlying the effect of epinephrine on LPS-induced macrophage responses. Our results showed that epinephrine pretreatment (10 ng/mL significantly promoted immune responses from LPS stimulated macrophages, including phagocytic rate, phagocytic index, TNFα/IL-1β/IL-10 secretion, and CD14 expression (P < 0.05. Moreover, TNFα/IL-1β/IL-10 levels attained their peak value 1 hour after incubation with 10 ng/mL epinephrine (P < 0.05, and CD14 siRNA transfection dramatically decreased phagocytosis and cytokine secretion by LPS-activated macrophages (P < 0.05. We therefore conclude that 10 ng/mL epinephrine enhances immune responses from macrophages under LPS stimulation and that the underlying mechanism may relate to CD14 upregulation on the surface of macrophages.

  12. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juli Broggi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects. However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers.

  13. Response variability to glucose facilitation of cognitive enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Lauren; Scholey, Andrew; Finnegan, Yvonne; Sünram-Lea, Sandra I

    2013-11-01

    Glucose facilitation of cognitive function has been widely reported in previous studies (including our own). However, several studies have also failed to detect glucose facilitation. There is sparsity of research examining the factors that modify the effect of glucose on cognition. The aims of the present study were to (1) demonstrate the previously observed enhancement of cognition through glucose administration and (2) investigate some of the factors that may exert moderating roles on the behavioural response to glucose, including glucose regulation, body composition (BC) and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response. A total of twenty-four participants took part in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, repeated-measures study, which examined the effect of 25 and 60 g glucose compared with placebo on cognitive function. At 1 week before the study commencement, all participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Glucose facilitated performance on tasks of numeric and spatial working memory, verbal declarative memory and speed of recognition. Moderating variables were examined using several indices of glucoregulation and BC. Poorer glucoregulation predicted improved immediate word recall accuracy following the administration of 25 g glucose compared with placebo. Those with better glucoregulation showed performance decrements on word recall accuracy following the administration of 25 g glucose compared with placebo. These findings are in line with accumulating evidence that glucose load may preferentially enhance cognition in those with poorer glucoregulation. Furthermore, the finding that individuals with better glucoregulation may suffer impaired performance following a glucose load is novel and requires further substantiation.

  14. Cytotoxicity of activated monocytes on endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, G; Chiaffarino, F; Bernasconi, S; Padura, I M; Mantovani, A

    1990-02-15

    Unstimulated human monocytes did not express appreciable levels of cytotoxicity on normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) in a 24-48 hr TdR release assay. On activation with IFN-gamma and LPS, monocytes had appreciable cytotoxicity on EC. Monocyte cytotoxicity on EC was not dependent on the presence of contaminating lymphoid cells. Recombinant TNF, IL-1, and IL-6 as well as monocyte supernatants did not exert a cytotoxic effect on EC. Moreover, anti-TNF, anti-IL-1, and anti-IL-6 antibodies, as well as scavengers of reactive oxygen intermediates, did not affect the cytotoxicity of activated monocytes on EC. Antibodies against the beta-chain (CD18) of leukocyte integrins inhibited the adhesion and cytotoxicity of activated monocytes on EC. Pretreatment of EC with IL-1 augmented the adhesion of monocytes on EC. Normal monocytes were not cytotoxic on IL-1-pretreated EC and IL-1 treatment did not increase the susceptibility of EC to activated monocytes. Thus adhesion is necessary but not sufficient for monocyte killing of EC. Anti-alpha L (LFA-1) antibodies markedly reduced monocyte cytotoxicity on EC, although anti-alpha X (p150) antibodies had only a modest effect. Anti-alpha M (Mac-1/CR3) antibodies were intermediate inhibitors of EC killing by activated monocytes. Thus, alpha L, beta 2 (LFA-1), and, to a lesser extent, alpha M, beta 2 (Mac-1/CR3) and alpha X, beta 2 (p 150, 95) integrins are the main adhesive structures involved in the cytotoxic interaction of activated monocytes with EC. Monocyte-mediated damage of EC could play a role as a mechanism of tissue injury under conditions of local or systemic activation of mononuclear phagocytes.

  15. The Thrombin-Derived Host Defense Peptide GKY25 Inhibits Endotoxin-Induced Responses through Interactions with Lipopolysaccharide and Macrophages/Monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finja C; Kalle-Brune, Martina; van der Plas, Mariena J A

    2015-01-01

    Host defense peptides have recently gained much interest as novel anti-infectives owing to their ability to kill bacteria and simultaneously modulate host cell responses. The cationic host defense peptide GKY25 (GKYGFYTHVFRLKKWIQKVIDQFGE), derived from the C terminus of human thrombin, inhibits p...

  16. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  17. Psychedelic N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine modulate innate and adaptive inflammatory responses through the sigma-1 receptor of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Frecska, Ede; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1) is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT), its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and the synthetic high affinity sigmar-1 agonist PRE-084 hydrochloride on human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDCs) activation provoked by LPS, polyI:C or pathogen-derived stimuli to induce inflammatory responses. Co-treatment of moDC with these activators and sigma-1 receptor ligands inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and the chemokine IL-8, while increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The T-cell activating capacity of moDCs was also inhibited, and dimethyltryptamines used in combination with E. coli or influenza virus as stimulators decreased the differentiation of moDC-induced Th1 and Th17 inflammatory effector T-cells in a sigmar-1 specific manner as confirmed by gene silencing. Here we demonstrate for the first time the immunomodulatory potential of NN-DMT and 5-MeO-DMT on human moDC functions via sigmar-1 that could be harnessed for the pharmacological treatment of autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory conditions of the CNS or peripheral tissues. Our findings also point out a new biological role for dimethyltryptamines, which may act as systemic endogenous regulators of inflammation and immune homeostasis through the sigma-1 receptor.

  18. Psychedelic N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine modulate innate and adaptive inflammatory responses through the sigma-1 receptor of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szabo

    Full Text Available The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1 is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT, its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT and the synthetic high affinity sigmar-1 agonist PRE-084 hydrochloride on human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDCs activation provoked by LPS, polyI:C or pathogen-derived stimuli to induce inflammatory responses. Co-treatment of moDC with these activators and sigma-1 receptor ligands inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and the chemokine IL-8, while increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The T-cell activating capacity of moDCs was also inhibited, and dimethyltryptamines used in combination with E. coli or influenza virus as stimulators decreased the differentiation of moDC-induced Th1 and Th17 inflammatory effector T-cells in a sigmar-1 specific manner as confirmed by gene silencing. Here we demonstrate for the first time the immunomodulatory potential of NN-DMT and 5-MeO-DMT on human moDC functions via sigmar-1 that could be harnessed for the pharmacological treatment of autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory conditions of the CNS or peripheral tissues. Our findings also point out a new biological role for dimethyltryptamines, which may act as systemic endogenous regulators of inflammation and immune homeostasis through the sigma-1 receptor.

  19. Monocyte subset dynamics in human atherosclerosis can be profiled with magnetic nano-sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Wildgruber

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes are circulating macrophage and dendritic cell precursors that populate healthy and diseased tissue. In humans, monocytes consist of at least two subsets whose proportions in the blood fluctuate in response to coronary artery disease, sepsis, and viral infection. Animal studies have shown that specific shifts in the monocyte subset repertoire either exacerbate or attenuate disease, suggesting a role for monocyte subsets as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Assays are therefore needed that can selectively and rapidly enumerate monocytes and their subsets. This study shows that two major human monocyte subsets express similar levels of the receptor for macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSFR but differ in their phagocytic capacity. We exploit these properties and custom-engineer magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo sensing of monocytes and their subsets. We present a two-dimensional enumerative mathematical model that simultaneously reports number and proportion of monocyte subsets in a small volume of human blood. Using a recently described diagnostic magnetic resonance (DMR chip with 1 microl sample size and high throughput capabilities, we then show that application of the model accurately quantifies subset fluctuations that occur in patients with atherosclerosis.

  20. Methylomics of gene expression in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongmei; Ding, Jingzhong; Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Lohman, Kurt; Register, Thomas C.; De La Fuente, Alberto; Howard, Timothy D.; Hawkins, Greg A.; Cui, Wei; Morris, Jessica; Smith, Shelly G.; Barr, R. Graham; Kaufman, Joel D.; Burke, Gregory L.; Post, Wendy; Shea, Steven; Mccall, Charles E.; Siscovick, David; Jacobs, David R.; Tracy, Russell P.; Herrington, David M.; Hoeschele, Ina

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of several epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of gene expression; however, the extent to which methylation of CpG dinucleotides correlates with gene expression at the genome-wide level is still largely unknown. Using purified primary monocytes from subjects in a large community-based cohort (n = 1264), we characterized methylation (>485 000 CpG sites) and mRNA expression (>48K transcripts) and carried out genome-wide association analyses of 8370 expression phenotypes. We identified 11 203 potential cis-acting CpG loci whose degree of methylation was associated with gene expression (eMS) at a false discovery rate threshold of 0.001. Most of the associations were consistent in effect size and direction of effect across sex and three ethnicities. Contrary to expectation, these eMS were not predominately enriched in promoter regions, or CpG islands, but rather in the 3′ UTR, gene bodies, CpG shores or ‘offshore’ sites, and both positive and negative correlations between methylation and expression were observed across all locations. eMS were enriched for regions predicted to be regulatory by ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) data in multiple cell types, particularly enhancers. One of the strongest association signals detected (P < 2.2 × 10−308) was a methylation probe (cg17005068) in the promoter/enhancer region of the glutathione S-transferase theta 1 gene (GSTT1, encoding the detoxification enzyme) with GSTT1 mRNA expression. Our study provides a detailed description of the epigenetic architecture in human monocytes and its relationship to gene expression. These data may help prioritize interrogation of biologically relevant methylation loci and provide new insights into the epigenetic basis of human health and diseases. PMID:23900078

  1. Azithromycin distinctively modulates classical activation of human monocytes in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrančić, M; Banjanac, M; Nujić, K; Bosnar, M; Murati, T; Munić, V; Stupin Polančec, D; Belamarić, D; Parnham, MJ; Eraković Haber, V

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Azithromycin has been reported to modify activation of macrophages towards the M2 phenotype. Here, we have sought to identify the mechanisms underlying this modulatory effect of azithromycin on human monocytes, classically activated in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human blood monocytes were primed with IFN-γ for 24 h and activated with LPS for 24 h. Azithromycin, anti-inflammatory and lysosome-affecting agents were added 2 h before IFN-γ. Cytokine and chemokine expression was determined by quantitative PCR and protein release by ELISA. Signalling molecules were determined by Western blotting and transcription factor activation quantified with a DNA-binding ELISA kit. KEY RESULTS Azithromycin (1.5–50 µM) dose-dependently inhibited gene expression and/or release of M1 macrophage markers (CCR7, CXCL 11 and IL-12p70), but enhanced CCL2, without altering TNF-α or IL-6. Azithromycin also enhanced the gene expression and/or release of M2 macrophage markers (IL-10 and CCL18), and the pan-monocyte marker CD163, but inhibited that of CCL22. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling pathway was modulated, down-regulating NF-κB and STAT1 transcription factors. The inhibitory profile of azithromycin differed from that of dexamethasone, the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast and the p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 but was similar to that of the lysosomotropic drug chloroquine. Effects of concanamycin and NH4Cl, which also act on lysosomes, differed significantly. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Azithromycin modulated classical activation of human monocytes by inhibition of TLR4-mediated signalling and possible effects on lysosomal function, and generated a mediator expression profile that differs from that of monocyte/macrophage phenotypes so far described. PMID:21726210

  2. Chronic intrathecal cannulation enhances nociceptive responses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida F.R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a chronically implanted spinal cannula on the nociceptive response induced by mechanical, chemical or thermal stimuli was evaluated. The hyperalgesia in response to mechanical stimulation induced by carrageenin or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 was significantly increased in cannulated (Cn rats, compared with naive (Nv or sham-operated (Sh rats. Only Cn animals presented an enhanced nociceptive response in the first phase of the formalin test when low doses were used (0.3 and 1%. The withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation of a paw inflamed by carrageenin was significantly reduced in Cn rats but not in Nv or Sh rats. In contrast to Nv and Sh rats, injection in Cn animals of a standard non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin, either intraperitoneally or into the spinal cord via an implanted cannula or by direct puncture of the intrathecal space significantly blocked the intensity of the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2. Cannulated animals treated with indomethacin also showed a significant inhibition of second phase formalin-induced paw flinches. Histopathological analysis of the spinal cord showed an increased frequency of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the Cn groups. Thus, the presence of a chronically implanted cannula seems to cause nociceptive spinal sensitization to mechanical, chemical and thermal stimulation, which can be blocked by indomethacin, thus suggesting that it may result from the spinal release of prostaglandins due to an ongoing mild inflammation.

  3. Temporal profiles of response enhancement in multisensory integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Rowland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals have evolved multiple senses that transduce different forms of energy as a way of increasing their sensitivity to environmental events. Each sense provides a unique and independent perspective on the world, and very often a single event stimulates several of them. In order to make best use of the available information, the brain has also evolved the capacity to integrate information across the senses (“multisensory integration”. This facilitates the detection, localization, and identification of a given event, and has obvious survival value for the individual and the species. Multisensory responses in the superior colliculus (SC evidence shorter latencies and are more robust at their onset. This is the phenomenon of initial response enhancement in multisensory integration, which is believed to a real time fusion of information across the senses. The present paper reviews two recent reports describing how the timing and robustness of sensory responses changes as a consequence of multisensory integration in the model system of the SC.

  4. Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

    1994-08-01

    A coordinated research program involving synthesis, characterization, and rheology has been undertaken to develop advanced polymer system which should be significantly more efficient than polymers presently used for mobility control and conformance. Unlike the relatively inefficient, traditional EOR polymers, these advanced polymer systems possess microstructural features responsive to temperature, electrolyte concentration, and shear conditions. Contents of this report include the following chapters. (1) First annual report responsive copolymers for enhanced oil recovery. (2) Copolymers of acrylamide and sodium 3-acrylamido-3-methylbutanoate. (3) Terpolymers of NaAMB, Am, and n-decylacrylamide. (4) Synthesis and characterization of electrolyte responsive terpolymers of acrylamide, N-(4-butyl)phenylacrylamide, and sodium acrylate, sodium-2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulphonate or sodium-3-acrylamido-3-methylbutanoate. (5) Synthesis and solution properties of associative acrylamido copolymers with pyrensulfonamide fluorescence labels. (6) Photophysical studies of the solution behavior of associative pyrenesulfonamide-labeled polyacrylamides. (7) Ampholytic copolymers of sodium 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonate with [2-(acrylamido)-2-methypropyl]trimethylammonium chloride. (8) Ampholytic terpolymers of acrylamide with sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulphoante and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanetrimethyl-ammonium chloride and (9) Polymer solution extensional behavior in porous media.

  5. Inhibition of human monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on human monocyte function was examined. Mononuclear cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy individuals were incubated with various concentrations of elastase, and the chemotactic activity and chemiluminescence response of these ...

  6. Plasma L-cystine/L-glutamate imbalance increases tumor necrosis factor-alpha from CD14+ circulating monocytes in patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kakazu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The innate immune cells can not normally respond to the pathogen in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Previous studies reported that antigen-presenting cells take up L-Cystine (L-Cys and secrete substantial amounts of L-Glutamate (L-Glu via the transport system Xc- (4F2hc+xCT, and that this exchange influences the immune responses. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the plasma L-Cys/L-Glu imbalance observed in patients with advanced cirrhosis on the function of circulating monocytes. METHODS: We used a serum-free culture medium consistent with the average concentrations of plasma amino acids from patients with advanced cirrhosis (ACM, and examined the function of CD14+ monocytes or THP-1 under ACM that contained 0-300 nmol/mL L-Cys with LPS. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, we actually determined the TNF-alpha and xCT mRNA of monocytes, and evaluated the correlation between the plasma L-Cys/L-Glu ratio and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: The addition of L-Cys significantly increased the production of TNF alpha from monocytes under ACM. Monocytes with LPS and THP-1 expressed xCT and a high level of extracellular L-Cys enhanced L-Cys/L-Glu antiport, and the intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio was decreased. The L-Cys transport was inhibited by excess L-Glu. In patients with advanced cirrhosis (n = 19, the TNF-alpha and xCT mRNA of monocytes were increased according to the Child-Pugh grade. The TNF-alpha mRNA of monocytes was significantly higher in the high L-Cys/L-Glu ratio group than in the low ratio group, and the plasma TNF-alpha was significantly correlated with the L-Cys/L-Glu ratio. CONCLUSIONS: A plasma L-Cys/L-Glu imbalance, which appears in patients with advanced cirrhosis, increased the TNF-alpha from circulating monocytes via increasing the intracellular oxidative stress. These results may reflect the immune abnormality that appears in patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

  7. Effect and possible mechanism of monocyte-derived VEGF on monocyte-endothelial cellular adhesion after electrical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qiongfang; Zhao, Chaoli; Ye, Ziqing; Ruan, Jingjing; Xie, Qionghui; Xie, Weiguo

    2015-06-01

    One of the major obstacles in the treatment of severe electrical burns is properly handling the resulting uncontrolled inflammation. Such inflammation often causes secondary injury and necrosis, thus complicating patient outcomes. Vascular endothelial grow factor (VEGF) has emerged as an important mediator for the recruitment of monocytes to the site inflammation. This study was designed to explore the effects and possible mechanism of VEGF on monocyte-endothelial cellular adhesion. To do so, we used a cultured human monocytic cell line (THP-1) that was stimulated with serum derived from rats that had received electrical burns. Serum was obtained from rats that had received electrical burns. Both the VEGF and soluble flt-1 (sflt-1) concentrations of the serum were determined by double-antibody sandwich ELISA. The concentrations of VEGF, sflt-1, and TNF-α obtained from the cell-free cultured supernatant of THP-1 cells that had been exposed to the serum were then determined by double-antibody sandwich ELISA. Serum-stimulated THP-1 cells were added to wells with a monolayer of endothelial cells to detect the level of monocyte-endothelial cells adhesion. Finally, the state of phosphorylation of AKT was determined by Western blotting. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that compared to controls, the levels of VEGF were significantly increased after electrical burns. This increased was accompanied by a reduction of sflt-1 levels. Furthermore, the serum of rats that had received electrical burns was able to both activate monocytes to secrete TNF-α and enhance monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Treatment with the serum also resulted in an up-regulation of the phosphorylation of AKT, but had no effect on the total levels of AKT. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) inhibition decreased the number of THP-1 cells that were adhered to endothelial cells. Finally, sequestering VEGF with sflt-1 was able to reduce the effect on monocyte-endothelial cells adhesion by

  8. Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Response of Zn-Dotted Hematite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemical response of thin films of α-Fe2O3, Zn doped α-Fe2O3, and Zn dots deposited on doped α-Fe2O3 prepared by spray pyrolysis has been studied. Samples of Zn dots were prepared using thermal evaporation method by evaporating Zn through a mesh having pore diameter of 0.7 mm. The presence of Zn-dotted islands on doped α-Fe2O3 surface exhibited significantly large photocurrent density as compared to other samples. An optimum thickness of Zn dots ∼230 Å is found to give enhanced photoresponse. The observed results are analyzed with the help of estimated values of resistivity, band gap, flatband potential, and donor density.

  9. Enhanced Wireless Power Transmission Using Strong Paramagnetic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Dukju; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-03-01

    A method of quasi-static magnetic resonant coupling has been presented for improving the power transmission efficiency (PTE) in near-field wireless power transmission, which improves upon the state of the art. The traditional source resonator on the transmitter side is equipped with an additional resonator with a resonance frequency that is tuned substantially higher than the magnetic field excitation frequency. This additional resonator enhances the magnetic dipole moment and the effective permeability of the power transmitter, owing to a phenomenon known as the strong paramagnetic response. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results show increased PTE due to amplification of the effective permeability. In measurements, the PTE was improved from 57.8% to 64.2% at the nominal distance of 15 cm when the effective permeability was 2.6. The power delivered to load was also improved significantly, with the same 10 V excitation voltage, from 0.38 to 5.26 W.

  10. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity. PMID:28138327

  11. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  12. Inhibitors of the interferon response enhance virus replication in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Stewart

    Full Text Available Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1 significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints or (ii mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV, Influenza Virus, traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV. In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications

  13. Interleukin-8, CXCL1, and MicroRNA miR-146a Responses to Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Enteropathogenic E. coli in Human Intestinal Epithelial T84 and Monocytic THP-1 Cells after Apical or Basolateral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Harshana; Cichon, Christoph; Ölschläger, Tobias A; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Bacterium-host interactions in the gut proceed via directly contacted epithelial cells, the host's immune system, and a plethora of bacterial factors. Here we characterized and compared exemplary cytokine and microRNA (miRNA) responses of human epithelial and THP-1 cells toward the prototype enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strain E2348/69 (O127:H6) and the probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) (O6:K5:H1). Human T84 and THP-1 cells were used as cell culture-based model systems for epithelial and monocytic cells. Polarized T84 monolayers were infected apically or basolaterally. Bacterial challenges from the basolateral side resulted in more pronounced cytokine and miRNA responses than those observed for apical side infections. Interestingly, the probiotic EcN also caused a pronounced transcriptional increase of proinflammatory CXCL1 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels when human T84 epithelial cells were infected from the basolateral side. miR-146a, which is known to regulate adaptor molecules in Toll-like receptor (TLR)/NF-κB signaling, was found to be differentially regulated in THP-1 cells between probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. To assess the roles of flagella and flagellin, we employed several flagellin mutants of EcN. EcN flagellin mutants induced reduced IL-8 as well as CXCL1 responses in T84 cells, suggesting that flagellin is an inducer of this cytokine response. Following infection with an EPEC type 3 secretion system (T3SS) mutant, we observed increased IL-8 and CXCL1 transcription in T84 and THP-1 cells compared to that in wild-type EPEC. This study emphasizes the differential induction of miR-146a by pathogenic and probiotic E. coli strains in epithelial and immune cells as well as a loss of probiotic properties in EcN interacting with cells from the basolateral side. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Elastic Properties and Enhanced Piezoelectric Response at Morphotropic Phase Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The search for improved piezoelectric materials is based on the morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB) between ferroelectric phases with different crystal symmetry and available directions for the spontaneous polarization. Such regions of the composition x−T phase diagrams provide the conditions for minimal anisotropy with respect to the direction of the polarization, so that the polarization can easily rotate maintaining a substantial magnitude, while the near verticality of the TMPBx boundary extends the temperature range of the resulting enhanced piezoelectricity. Another consequence of the quasi-isotropy of the free energy is a reduction of the domain walls energies, with consequent formation of domain structures down to nanoscale. Disentangling the extrinsic and intrinsic contributions to the piezoelectricity in such conditions requires a high level of sophistication from the techniques and analyses for studying the structural, ferroelectric and dielectric properties. The elastic characterization is extremely useful in clarifying the phenomenology and mechanisms related to ferroelectric MPBs. The relationship between dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric responses is introduced in terms of relaxation of defects with electric dipole and elastic quadrupole, and extended to the response near phase transitions in the framework of the Landau theory. An account is provided of the anelastic experiments, from torsional pendulum to Brillouin scattering, that provided new important information on ferroelectric MPBs, including PZT, PMN-PT, NBT-BT, BCTZ, and KNN-based systems. PMID:28793707

  15. Elastic Properties and Enhanced Piezoelectric Response at Morphotropic Phase Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cordero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The search for improved piezoelectric materials is based on the morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB between ferroelectric phases with different crystal symmetry and available directions for the spontaneous polarization. Such regions of the composition x − T phase diagrams provide the conditions for minimal anisotropy with respect to the direction of the polarization, so that the polarization can easily rotate maintaining a substantial magnitude, while the near verticality of the TMPB(x boundary extends the temperature range of the resulting enhanced piezoelectricity. Another consequence of the quasi-isotropy of the free energy is a reduction of the domain walls energies, with consequent formation of domain structures down to nanoscale. Disentangling the extrinsic and intrinsic contributions to the piezoelectricity in such conditions requires a high level of sophistication from the techniques and analyses for studying the structural, ferroelectric and dielectric properties. The elastic characterization is extremely useful in clarifying the phenomenology and mechanisms related to ferroelectric MPBs. The relationship between dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric responses is introduced in terms of relaxation of defects with electric dipole and elastic quadrupole, and extended to the response near phase transitions in the framework of the Landau theory. An account is provided of the anelastic experiments, from torsional pendulum to Brillouin scattering, that provided new important information on ferroelectric MPBs, including PZT, PMN-PT, NBT-BT, BCTZ, and KNN-based systems.

  16. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  17. Monocyte subset distribution is associated with mortality in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Lenz, Max; Koller, Lorenz; Honeder, Maria C; Wutzlhofer, Lisa; Zhang, Chao; Chi, Lijian; Maurer, Gerald; Niessner, Alexander; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Speidl, Walter S

    2016-10-28

    Although patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) suffer from various pathologies, many develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). As key regulators of innate immunity, monocytes may be crucially involved in SIRS development. Monocytes can be distinguished into three subsets: Classical monocytes (CD14++CD16-; CM), non-classical monocytes (CD14+CD16++CCR2-; NCM) and intermediate monocytes (CD14++CD16+CCR2+; IM). The aim of this prospective, observational study was to analyse whether monocyte subset distribution is associated with 30-day survival in critically ill patients. A total of 195 consecutive patients admitted to a cardiac ICU at a tertiary-care centre were enrolled, blood was taken at admission and after 72 hours and monocyte subset distribution was analysed. Mean APACHE II score was 19.5 ± 8.1 and 30-day mortality was 25.4 %. At admission, NCM were significantly lower in non-survivors as compared to survivors [2.7 (0.4-5.5) vs 4.2 (1.6-7.5)%; p=0.012] whereas CM and IM did not differ according to 30-day survival. In contrast, 72 hours after admission, monocyte subset distribution shifted towards an increased proportion of IM [8.2 (3.9-13.2) vs 4.2 (2.3-7.9)%; p=0.003] with a concomitant decrease of CM [86.9 (78.6-89.2) vs 89.6 (84.9-93.1)%; p=0.02] in non-survivors vs survivors, respectively. NCM at day 3 were not associated with death at 30 days. These results were independent from age, gender, CRP, APACHE II score and primary diagnosis. In conclusion, circulating monocyte subsets are associated with 30-day mortality in critically ill patients. The innate immune system as reflected by monocyte subset distribution may play a major role in ICU outcome despite varying admittance pathologies.

  18. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  19. Monocyte Conversion During Inflammation and Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratofil, Rachel M; Kubes, Paul; Deniset, Justin F

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes are circulating leukocytes important in both innate and adaptive immunity, primarily functioning in immune defense, inflammation, and tissue remodeling. There are 2 subsets of monocytes in mice (3 subsets in humans) that are mobilized from the bone marrow and recruited to sites of inflammation, where they carry out their respective functions in promoting inflammation or facilitating tissue repair. Our understanding of the fate of these monocyte subsets at the site of inflammation is constantly evolving. This brief review highlights the plasticity of monocyte subsets and their conversion during inflammation and injury. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Human cytomegalovirus induces TLR4 signaling components in monocytes altering TIRAP, TRAM and downstream interferon-beta and TNF-alpha expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Hooi Yew

    Full Text Available Using TLR pathways, primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV induces innate responses including the production of inflammatory cytokines. Mounting evidence suggests that LPS recognition by TLR4/MD2/CD14 results in differential utilization of TIRAP-TRAF6 and TRAM-TRIF signaling, thereby leading to transcriptional activation of various cytokine genes. However, relative roles of the TLR4/MD2/CD14 complex and its adaptor proteins TIRAP and TRAM involved in regulating monocyte responses to HCMV are incomplete. Here, we provided evidence supporting the notion that the TLR4/MD2/CD14 complex contributes notably to HCMV-induced signaling and subsequent cytokine production in monocytes. In particular, induction of both IL-6 and IL-8 is associated with elevated TIRAP and reduced TRAM mRNA expression. The latter may serve in a compensatory pathway that yields a robust IFN response when TIRAP signaling is blocked in monocytes incubated with Toledo strain HCMV. Inhibitory studies using antisense oligonucleotides or neutralizing antibodies indicate that IL-6 induction by TLR4/MD2 complex is important for the activation of endogenous CD14 which later acts in concert or synergy with TLR4/MD2 as a factor resulting in IL-8 gene expression. We further show that exogenous recombinant CD14 can potentiate innate immune response via TLR4-dependent and possibly via TLR9-dependent pathways to promote enhanced expression/production of IL-8 and IFN-β, respectively.

  1. Endothelial cell ephrinB2-dependent activation of monocytes in arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jennifer; Hoffmann, Sabrina C; Feldner, Anja; Ludwig, Thomas; Henning, Rob; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    The expression of ephrinB2 in endothelial cells delineates their arterial phenotype and is a prerequisite for the development of the embryonic vasculature. Whereas the role of ephrinB2 in the microcirculation has been studied extensively, its expression and function in adult arteries is hardly understood. Our analyses showed that in mouse arteries, ephrinB2 is located on the luminal surface of endothelial cells and may physically interact with monocyte EphB receptors. Moreover, transdifferentiation of human monocytes into macrophages was associated with an increase in EphB2 expression, and exposing monocytes to immobilized ephrinB2 resulted in phosphorylation of the receptor followed by an increased expression of proinflammatory chemokines such as interleukin-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1/CCL2. Relating to the (patho)physiological relevance of these findings, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that ephrinB2 is most abundantly expressed in endothelial cells at arteriosclerosis predilection sites of the mouse aorta. Subsequent analyses indicated that monocyte adhesion to aortic segments abundantly expressing ephrinB2 is strongly enhanced and that endothelial cell ephrinB2 forward signaling is sufficient to upregulate cytokine expression in monocytes. These observations suggest a hitherto unknown link between vascular ephrinB2 expression and the proinflammatory activation of monocytes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis.

  2. In vitro responses of chicken macrophage-like monocytes following exposure to pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli ghosts loaded with a rational design of conserved genetic materials of influenza and Newcastle disease viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagzian, Milad; Bassami, Mohammad Reza; Dehghani, Hesam

    2016-08-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two important viral diseases in the poultry industry. Therefore, new disease-fighting strategies, especially effective genetic vaccination, are in high demand. Bacterial Ghost (BG) is a promising platform for delivering genetic materials to macrophages, cells that are among the first to encounter these viruses. However, there is no investigation on the immune response of these macrophage-targeted treatments. Here, we investigated the effect of genetic materials of AIV and NDV on the gene expression profile of important pro-inflammatory cytokines, a chemokine, a transcription factor, major histocompatibility complexes, and the viability of the chicken macrophage-like monocyte cells (CMM). Our genetic construct contained the external domain of matrix protein 2 and nucleoprotein gene of AIV, and immunodominant epitopes of fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins of NDV (hereinafter referred to as pAIV-Vax), delivered via the pathogenic and non-pathogenic BGs (Escherichia coli O78K80 and E. coli TOP10 respectively). The results demonstrated that both types of BGs were able to efficiently deliver the construct to the CMM, although the pathogenic strain derived BG was a significantly better stimulant and delivery vehicle. Both BGs were safe regarding LPS toxicity and did not induce any cell death. Furthermore, the loaded BGs were more powerful in modulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines' responses and antigen presentation systems in comparison to the unloaded BGs. Nitric oxide production of the BG-stimulated cells was also comparable to those challenged by the live bacteria. According to the results, the combination of pAIV-Vax construct and E. coli O78K80 BG is promising in inducing a considerable innate and adaptive immune response against AIV-NDV and perhaps the pathogenic E. coli, provided that the current combination be a potential candidate for in vivo testing regarding the development of an

  3. Augmented TLR2 expression on monocytes in both human Kawasaki disease and a mouse model of coronary arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Chun; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Lin, Ying-Jui; Wang, Feng-Shen; Wang, Lin; Huang, Shun-Chen; Chien, Shao-Ju; Huang, Chien-Fu; Wang, Chih-Lu; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Rong-Fu; Yang, Kuender D

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) of unknown immunopathogenesis is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and the leading cause of acquired heart diseases in childhood. To search for a better strategy for the prevention and treatment of KD, this study compared and validated human KD immunopathogenesis in a mouse model of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced coronary arteritis. Recruited subjects fulfilled the criteria of KD and were admitted for intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG) treatment at the Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from 2001 to 2009. Blood samples from KD patients were collected before and after IVIG treatment, and cardiovascular abnormalities were examined by transthoracic echocardiography. Wild-type male BALB/c mice (4-week-old) were intraperitoneally injected with LCWE (1 mg/mL) to induce coronary arteritis. The induced immune response in mice was examined on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 post injections, and histopathology studies were performed on days 7 and 14. Both human KD patients and LCWE-treated mice developed coronary arteritis, myocarditis, valvulitis, and pericarditis, as well as elevated plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in acute phase. Most of these proinflammatory cytokines declined to normal levels in mice, whereas normal levels were achieved in patients only after IVIG treatment, with a few exceptions. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, but not TLR4 surface enhancement on circulating CD14+ monocytes, was augmented in KD patients before IVIG treatment and in LCWE-treated mice, which declined in patients after IVIG treatment. This result suggests that that not only TLR2 augmentation on CD14+ monocytes might be an inflammatory marker for both human KD patients and LCWE-induced CAL mouse model but also this model is feasible for studying therapeutic strategies of coronary arteritis in human KD by modulating TLR2-mediated immune activation on CD14

  4. Augmented TLR2 expression on monocytes in both human Kawasaki disease and a mouse model of coronary arteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chun Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD of unknown immunopathogenesis is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and the leading cause of acquired heart diseases in childhood. To search for a better strategy for the prevention and treatment of KD, this study compared and validated human KD immunopathogenesis in a mouse model of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE-induced coronary arteritis. METHODS: Recruited subjects fulfilled the criteria of KD and were admitted for intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG treatment at the Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from 2001 to 2009. Blood samples from KD patients were collected before and after IVIG treatment, and cardiovascular abnormalities were examined by transthoracic echocardiography. Wild-type male BALB/c mice (4-week-old were intraperitoneally injected with LCWE (1 mg/mL to induce coronary arteritis. The induced immune response in mice was examined on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 post injections, and histopathology studies were performed on days 7 and 14. RESULTS: Both human KD patients and LCWE-treated mice developed coronary arteritis, myocarditis, valvulitis, and pericarditis, as well as elevated plasma levels of interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in acute phase. Most of these proinflammatory cytokines declined to normal levels in mice, whereas normal levels were achieved in patients only after IVIG treatment, with a few exceptions. Toll-like receptor (TLR-2, but not TLR4 surface enhancement on circulating CD14+ monocytes, was augmented in KD patients before IVIG treatment and in LCWE-treated mice, which declined in patients after IVIG treatment. CONCLUSION: This result suggests that that not only TLR2 augmentation on CD14+ monocytes might be an inflammatory marker for both human KD patients and LCWE-induced CAL mouse model but also this model is feasible for studying therapeutic strategies of coronary arteritis in human KD by

  5. Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: Can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, J.E.; Ring, C.; Drayson, M.; Bosch, J.; Campbell, J.P.; Bhabra, J.; Browne, D.; Dawson, J.; Harding, S.; Lau, J.; Burns, V.E.

    2012-01-01

    High intensity acute exercise at the time of vaccination has been shown to enhance the subsequent antibody response. This study examines whether an acute moderate intensity aerobic intervention prior to vaccination can enhance antibody response to pneumonia and half dose influenza vaccination. Sixty

  6. Blockage of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulates Japanese encephalitis via enhancement of type I/II IFN innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Bum; Choi, Jin Young; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Hur, Jin; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-04-18

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), a leading cause of viral encephalitis, is characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been identified as an enzyme associated with immunoregulatory function. Although the regulatory role of IDO in viral replication has been postulated, the in vivo role of IDO activity has not been fully addressed in neurotropic virus-caused encephalitis. Mice in which IDO activity was inhibited by genetic ablation or using a specific inhibitor were examined for mortality and clinical signs after infection. Neuroinflammation was evaluated by central nervous system (CNS) infiltration of leukocytes and cytokine expression. IDO expression, viral burden, JEV-specific T-cell, and type I/II interferon (IFN-I/II) innate responses were also analyzed. Elevated expression of IDO activity in myeloid and neuron cells of the lymphoid and CNS tissues was closely associated with clinical signs of JE. Furthermore, inhibition of IDO activity enhanced resistance to JE, reduced the viral burden in lymphoid and CNS tissues, and resulted in early and increased CNS infiltration by Ly-6C(hi) monocytes, NK, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T-cells. JE amelioration in IDO-ablated mice was also associated with enhanced NK and JEV-specific T-cell responses. More interestingly, IDO ablation induced rapid enhancement of type I IFN (IFN-I) innate responses in CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs), including conventional and plasmacytoid DCs, following JEV infection. This enhanced IFN-I innate response in IDO-ablated CD11c(+) DCs was coupled with strong induction of PRRs (RIG-I, MDA5), transcription factors (IRF7, STAT1), and antiviral ISG genes (Mx1, Mx2, ISG49, ISG54, ISG56). IDO ablation also enhanced the IFN-I innate response in neuron cells, which may delay the spread of virus in the CNS. Finally, we identified that IDO ablation in myeloid cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) dominantly

  7. Cortical responses to Mozart's sonata enhance spatial-reasoning ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Miyuki; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Obata, Akiko; Koizumi, Hideaki; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-11-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Mozart's music on spatial-reasoning ability by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The subjects comprised five males and five females (aged 25-35 years). They were administered the seven original core subtests of the Japanese version of the Tanaka B-type intelligence test, which includes a spatial-reasoning subtest. We used three different music conditions: Mozart's sonata (K. 448), Beethoven and a silent control condition. Moreover, we used optical topography to assess the effects of music on brain function with a spatial-reasoning subtest. We found that exposure to Mozart's sonata enhanced cognitive performance in intelligence tests when compared with results obtained upon exposure to Beethoven or silence. In addition to the expected temporal cortex activation, we report dramatic results revealing differences in activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the occipital cortex, both of which are expected to be important for spatial-temporal reasoning. We suggest the possibility of a direct priming effect being responsible for preferential activation, and open the door to understanding the potential effects of Mozart's music.

  8. Enhancement of the mydriatic response to tropicamide by bioadhesive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Vanrell, R; Fernandez-Carballido, A; Frutos, G; Cadórniga, R

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how the addition of mucoadhesive polymers to aqueous solutions affects the ocular response of tropicamide (0.2%; w/v). The polymer solutions tested were carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt (CMC-Na; 1%; w/v), hyaluronic acid sodium salt (HA-Na; 0.1%; w/v) and polyacrylic acid (PAA; 0.2%; w/v). Polymeric solutions were compared to a nonviscous formulation (AS). In vitro mucoadhesion measurements were expressed as a percentage of the adhesion force mucin-mucin, considering this one as 100% mucoadhesion. The values ofmucoadhesion obtained were 172%, 127%, 103% and 87.6% for formulations with CMC, PAA, HA and AS, respectively. The mydriatic response of tropicamide was determined in adult male New Zealand rabbits, weighing 1.7-2 Kg, by pupil diameter measurements at different times after instillation. The area under the mydriatic response-time curve (AUC 0-6 hr) was interpreted as an indication of the bioavailability of tropicamide in each vehicle. The AUC 0-6 hr was related to the in vitro mucoadhesion for each formulation. Tropicamide solutions with CMC-Na and PAA resulted in mucoadhesion and AUC 0-6 hr values approximately 1.9 and 1.4 times higher than AS. Although the solution with HA-Na was less mucoadhesive than PAA, the hyaluronic acid solution resulted in a higher AUC mydriasis/time value. Formulations with HA-Na and PAA presented values of surface tension close to that observed in the lacrimal fluid, with the Imax (maximum pupil diameter) being higher than for CMC-Na and AS. Greater than 90% of the mydriatic effect disappeared 4.5 hr after instillation for PAA and AS. Nevertheless, the mydriatic effect remained up to 5.5 hr for HA-Na and CMC-Na. HA-Na solution enhanced the bioavailability oftropicamide, presenting a value of mucoadhesion similar to the reference mucin-mucin.

  9. Overexpression of SK2 channels enhances efferent suppression of cochlear responses without enhancing noise resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maison, Stéphane F; Parker, Lisan L; Young, Lucy; Adelman, John P; Zuo, Jian; Liberman, M Charles

    2007-04-01

    Cochlear hair cells express SK2, a small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel thought to act in concert with Ca(2+)-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) alpha9 and alpha10 in mediating suppressive effects of the olivocochlear efferent innervation. To probe the in vivo role of SK2 channels in hearing, we examined gene expression, cochlear function, efferent suppression, and noise vulnerability in mice overexpressing SK2 channels. Cochlear thresholds, as measured by auditory brain stem responses and otoacoustic emissions, were normal in overexpressers as was overall cochlear morphology and the size, number, and distribution of efferent terminals on outer hair cells. Cochlear expression levels of SK2 channels were elevated eightfold without striking changes in other SK channels or in the alpha9/alpha10 nAChRs. Shock-evoked efferent suppression of cochlear responses was significantly enhanced in overexpresser mice as seen previously in alpha9 overexpresser mice; however, in contrast to alpha9 overexpressers, SK2 overexpressers were not protected from acoustic injury. Results suggest that efferent-mediated cochlear protection is mediated by other downstream effects of ACh-mediated Ca(2+) entry different from those involving SK2-mediated hyperpolarization and the associated reduction in outer hair cell electromotility.

  10. PPARgamma activation primes human monocytes into alternative M2 macrophages with anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, M Amine; Derudas, Bruno; Rigamonti, Elena; Dièvart, Rébecca; Brozek, John; Haulon, Stéphan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Torpier, Gérard; Marx, Nikolaus; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2007-08-01

    Th1 cytokines promote monocyte differentiation into proatherogenic M1 macrophages, while Th2 cytokines lead to an "alternative" anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Here we show that in human atherosclerotic lesions, the expression of M2 markers and PPARgamma, a nuclear receptor controlling macrophage inflammation, correlate positively. Moreover, PPARgamma activation primes primary human monocytes into M2 differentiation, resulting in a more pronounced anti-inflammatory activity in M1 macrophages. However, PPARgamma activation does not influence M2 marker expression in resting or M1 macrophages, nor does PPARgamma agonist treatment influence the expression of M2 markers in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating that only native monocytes can be primed by PPARgamma activation to an enhanced M2 phenotype. Furthermore, PPARgamma activation significantly increases expression of the M2 marker MR in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data demonstrate that PPARgamma activation skews human monocytes toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype.

  11. Fungal Chitin Induces Trained Immunity in Human Monocytes during Cross-talk of the Host with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rizzetto, L; Ifrim, D.C; Moretti, S; Tocci, N; Cheng, S.C; Quintin, J; Renga, G; Oikonomou, V; Filippo, C. De; Weil, T; Blok, B.A; Lenucci, M.S; Santos, M.A; Romani, L; Netea, M.G; Cavalieri, D

    2016-01-01

    .... cerevisiaecells induce trained immunity in monocytes in a strain-dependent manner through enhanced TNFalpha and IL-6 production upon secondary stimulation with TLR ligands, as well as bacterial and fungal commensals...

  12. Inhibition of the differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by human gingival fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Séguier

    Full Text Available We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05 inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism.

  13. Inhibition of the differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguier, Sylvie; Tartour, Eric; Guérin, Coralie; Couty, Ludovic; Lemitre, Mathilde; Lallement, Laetitia; Folliguet, Marysette; El Naderi, Samah; Terme, Magali; Badoual, Cécile; Lafont, Antoine; Coulomb, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs) can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM) from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism.

  14. Exposure of Monocytes to Lipoarabinomannan Promotes Their Differentiation into Functionally and Phenotypically Immature Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoarabinomannan (LAM is a lipid virulence factor secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. LAM can be measured in the urine or serum of tuberculosis patients (TB-patients. Circulating monocytes are the precursor cells of alveolar macrophages and might be exposed to LAM in patients with active TB. We speculated that exposing monocytes to LAM could produce phenotypically and functionally immature macrophages. To test our hypothesis, human monocytes were stimulated with LAM (24–120 hours and various readouts were measured. The study showed that when monocytes were exposed to LAM, the frequency of CD68+, CD33+, and CD86+ macrophages decreased, suggesting that monocyte differentiation into mature macrophages was affected. Regarding functionality markers, TLR2+ and TLR4+ macrophages also decreased, but the percentage of MMR+ expression did not change. LAM-exposed monocytes generated macrophages that were less efficient in producing proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ; however, their phagocytic capacity was not modified. Taken together, these data indicate that LAM exposure influenced monocyte differentiation and produced poorly functional macrophages with a different phenotype. These results may help us understand how mycobacteria can limit the quality of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  15. Aged mice have increased inflammatory monocyte concentration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Strohacker K, Breslin WL, Carpenter KC and McFarlin BK 2012 Aged mice have increased inflammatory monocyte concentration and altered expression of ... 2007). Conversely, when little to no inflammation is present, classic monocytes ..... Strohacker) received from the Texas Obesity Research Center. (Houston, Texas).

  16. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  17. Age-dependent alterations of monocyte subsets and monocyte-related chemokine pathways in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trautwein Christian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental approaches have unraveled essential migratory and functional differences of monocyte subpopulations in mice. In order to possibly translate these findings into human physiology and pathophysiology, human monocyte subsets need to be carefully revisited in health and disease. In analogy to murine studies, we hypothesized that human monocyte subsets dynamically change during ageing, potentially influencing their functionality and contributing to immunosenescence. Results Circulating monocyte subsets, surface marker and chemokine receptor expression were analyzed in 181 healthy volunteers (median age 42, range 18-88. Unlike the unaffected total leukocyte or total monocyte counts, non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocytes significantly increased with age, but displayed reduced HLA-DR and CX3CR1 surface expression in the elderly. Classical CD14++CD16- monocyte counts did not vary dependent on age. Serum MCP-1 (CCL2, but not MIP1α (CCL3, MIP1β (CCL4 or fractalkine (CX3CL1 concentrations increased with age. Monocyte-derived macrophages from old or young individuals did not differ with respect to cytokine release in vitro at steady state or upon LPS stimulation. Conclusions Our study demonstrates dynamic changes of circulating monocytes during ageing in humans. The expansion of the non-classical CD14+CD16+ subtype, alterations of surface protein and chemokine receptor expression as well as circulating monocyte-related chemokines possibly contribute to the preserved functionality of the monocyte pool throughout adulthood.

  18. Muramyl dipeptide and mononuclear cell supernatant induce Langhans-type cells from human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, K; Okamoto, H; Horio, T

    2001-09-01

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in bacterial cell walls reportedly evokes epithelioid cell granulomas. We examined its effects on multinucleated-giant-cell (MGC) formation from monocytes. Supernatant of concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (conditioned medium) generated MGCs from monocytes. MDP significantly increased the fusion index of Langhans-type MGCs (LGCs) but did not affect total MGCs. N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-L-isoglutamine, an MDP analogue, had no effect on MGC formation. MGCs were produced by conditioned medium from CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes. MDP enhanced the LGC fusion index from CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes. MGCs were not produced from CD14(+)/CD16(+) monocytes or immature dendritic cells induced by granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL) 4 and only weakly produced from macrophage (M)-CSF- or GM-CSF-induced macrophages. Added MDP did not generate MGCs from CD14(+)/CD16(+) monocytes or dendritic cells but enhanced LGC formation from macrophages. Because IFN-gamma, IL-3, and GM-CSF reportedly are important in LGC induction, we added anti-IFN-gamma, anti-IL-3, or anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibody (mAb) concomitantly to the monocyte culture treated with conditioned medium alone or plus MDP. Anti-IFN-gamma mAb completely abrogated MGC generation, whereas anti-GM-CSF and anti-IL-3 mAbs significantly inhibited LGCs. These findings suggest that CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes are fused to form LGCs by MDP derived from granulomatous-disease-causing pathogens with inflammatory mediators such as IFN-gamma, IL-3, and GM-CSF.

  19. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mantena, P. R; Al-Ostaz, Ahmed; Cheng, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    ...) molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticle-enhanced composites and fly- ash based foams that are being considered for the future generation naval structures or retrofitting of existing ones...

  20. Phenotypic and functional changes in blood monocytes following adherence to endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Tso

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Blood monocytes are known to express endothelial-like genes during co-culture with endothelium. In this study, the time-dependent change in the phenotype pattern of primary blood monocytes after adhering to endothelium is reported using a novel HLA-A2 mistyped co-culture model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Freshly isolated human PBMCs were co-cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells or human coronary arterial endothelial cells of converse human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA-A2 status. This allows the tracking of the PBMC-derived cells by HLA-A2 expression and assessment of their phenotype pattern over time. PBMCs that adhered to the endothelium at the start of the co-culture were predominantly CD11b+ blood monocytes. After 24 to 72 hours in co-culture, the endothelium-adherent monocytes acquired endothelial-like properties including the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, CD105, CD144 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. The expression of monocyte/macrophage lineage antigens CD14, CD11b and CD36 were down regulated concomitantly. The adherent monocytes did not express CD115 after 1 day of co-culture. By day 6, the monocyte-derived cells expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 in response to tumour necrosis factor alpha. Up to 10% of the PBMCs adhered to the endothelium. These monocyte-derived cells contributed up to 30% of the co-cultured cell layer and this was dose-dependent on the PBMC seeding density. CONCLUSIONS: Human blood monocytes undergo rapid phenotype change to resemble endothelial cells after adhering to endothelium.

  1. Plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human peripheral monocytes acting via a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovets, T; Tippler, B; Rieks, M; Simmet, T

    1997-06-15

    We have previously reported that the serine protease plasmin generated during contact activation of human plasma triggers biosynthesis of leukotrienes (LTs) in human peripheral monocytes (PMs), but not in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We now show that purified plasmin acts as a potent chemoattractant on human monocytes, but not on PMNs. Human plasmin or plasminogen activated with urokinase, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, elicited monocyte migration across polycarbonate membranes. Similarly, stimulation of monocytes with plasmin, but not with active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, induced actin polymerization. As assessed by checkerboard analysis, the plasmin-mediated monocyte locomotion was a true chemotaxis. The plasmin-induced chemotactic response was inhibited by the lysine analog trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (t-AMCA), which prevents binding of plasmin/ogen to the appropriate membrane binding sites. In addition, active site-blocked plasmin inhibited monocyte migration triggered by active plasmin. Further, plasmin-induced monocyte chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (HMG) and chelerythrine, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC). Plasmin, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, triggered formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in monocytes. LY83583, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, inhibited both plasmin-induced cGMP formation and the chemotactic response. The latter effect could be antagonized by 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, KT5823 and (Rp)-8-(p-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate [(Rp)-8-pCPT-cGMPs], two structurally unrelated inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase, inhibited plasmin-mediated monocyte chemotaxis. Thus, beyond being a stimulus for lipid mediator release, plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human monocytes acting via a c

  2. Trained immunity or tolerance: opposing functional programs induced in human monocytes after engagement of various pattern recognition receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifrim, Daniela C; Quintin, Jessica; Joosten, Leo A B; Jacobs, Cor; Jansen, Trees; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Gow, Neil A R; Williams, David L; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G

    2014-04-01

    Upon priming with Candida albicans or with the fungal cell wall component β-glucan, monocytes respond with an increased cytokine production upon restimulation, a phenomenon termed "trained immunity." In contrast, the prestimulation of monocytes with lipopolysaccharide has long been known to induce tolerance. Because the vast majority of commensal microorganisms belong to bacterial or viral phyla, we sought to systematically investigate the functional reprogramming of monocytes induced by the stimulation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) with various bacterial or viral ligands. Monocytes were functionally programmed for either enhanced (training) or decreased (tolerance) cytokine production, depending on the type and concentration of ligand they encountered. The functional reprogramming of monocytes was also associated with cell shape, granulocity, and cell surface marker modifications. The training effect required p38- and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK)-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, with specific signaling patterns directing the functional fate of the cell. The long-term effects on the function of monocytes were mediated by epigenetic events, with both histone methylation and acetylation inhibitors blocking the training effects. In conclusion, our experiments identify the ability of monocytes to acquire adaptive characteristics after prior activation with a wide variety of ligands. Trained immunity and tolerance are two distinct and opposing functional programs induced by the specific microbial ligands engaging the monocytes.

  3. Transcript and protein analysis reveals better survival skills of monocyte-derived dendritic cells compared to monocytes during oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Van Brussel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs, professional antigen-presenting cells with the unique ability to initiate primary T-cell responses, are present in atherosclerotic lesions where they are exposed to oxidative stress that generates cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. A large body of evidence indicates that cell death is a major modulating factor of atherogenesis. We examined antioxidant defence systems of human monocyte-derived (moDCs and monocytes in response to oxidative stress. METHODS: Oxidative stress was induced by addition of tertiary-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BHP, 30 min. Cellular responses were evaluated using flow cytometry and confocal live cell imaging (both using 5-(and-6-chloromethyl-2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, CM-H(2DCFDA. Viability was assessed by the neutral red assay. Total RNA was extracted for a PCR profiler array. Five genes were selected for confirmation by Taqman gene expression assays, and by immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry for protein levels. RESULTS: Tert-BHP increased CM-H(2DCFDA fluorescence and caused cell death. Interestingly, all processes occurred more slowly in moDCs than in monocytes. The mRNA profiler array showed more than 2-fold differential expression of 32 oxidative stress-related genes in unstimulated moDCs, including peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2, an enzyme reducing hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides. PRDX2 upregulation was confirmed by Taqman assays, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Silencing PRDX2 in moDCs by means of siRNA significantly increased CM-DCF fluorescence and cell death upon tert-BHP-stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that moDCs exhibit higher intracellular antioxidant capacities, making them better equipped to resist oxidative stress than monocytes. Upregulation of PRDX2 is involved in the neutralization of ROS in moDCs. Taken together, this points to better survival skills of DCs in oxidative stress environments, such as atherosclerotic plaques.

  4. PLGA nano/micro particles encapsulated with pertussis toxoid (PTd) enhances Th1/Th17 immune response in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Liu, Fang; Khaing, Kyi Kyi; Kmiec, Dorota; Wei, Xiaoqing; Song, Bing; Xing, Dorothy; Kong, Deling

    2016-11-20

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) based nano/micro particles were investigated as a potential vaccine platform for pertussis antigen. Presentation of pertussis toxoid as nano/micro particles (NP/MP) gave similar antigen-specific IgG responses in mice compared to soluble antigen. Notably, in cell line based assays, it was found that PLGA based nano/micro particles enhanced the phagocytosis of fluorescent antigen-nano/micro particles by J774.2 murine monocyte/macrophage cells compared to soluble antigen. More importantly, when mice were immunised with the antigen-nano/micro particles they significantly increased antigen-specific Th1 cytokines INF-γ and IL-17 secretion in splenocytes after in vitro re-stimulation with heat killed Bordetalla pertussis, indicating the induction of a Th1/Th17 response. Also, presentation of pertussis antigen in a NP/MP formulation is able to provide protection against respiratory infection in a murine model. Thus, the NP/MP formulation may provide an alternative to conventional acellular vaccines to achieve a more balanced Th1/Th2 immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Persistent systemic monocyte and neutrophil activation in neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, F M; Watson, R W G; O'Neill, A; Blanco, A; Donoghue, V; Molloy, E J

    2016-01-01

    Circulating immune cell activation is associated with worse outcome in adult and animal models of brain injury. Our aim was to profile the systemic inflammatory response over the first week of life in infants at risk of neonatal encephalopathy and correlate early neutrophil and monocyte endotoxin and activation responses with outcome. Prospective observational study in a tertiary referral university hospital including 22 infants requiring resuscitation at birth who had serial (five time points) neutrophil and monocyte CD11b (marker of cell adhesion) (intracellular Reactive oxygen intermediates) ROI (cell activation), and Toll-like receptor (endotoxin recognition) before and after endotoxin stimulation ex vivo compared to neonatal controls. All neonates requiring resuscitation at delivery (n = 122 samples) had higher neutrophil and monocyte CD11b and TLR-4 expressions compared with adults and neonatal controls. Neonates with abnormal neuroimaging and/or severe neonatal encephalopathy had increased CD11b, ROI and TLR-4. Increased PMN TLR-4 expression was associated with increased mortality in infants with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Innate immune dysregulation in the first week of life is associated with severity of outcome in neonatal brain injury in this cohort and may be amenable to immunomodulation.

  6. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  7. Diesel exhaust particle exposure in vitro alters monocyte differentiation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Chaudhuri

    Full Text Available Air pollution by diesel exhaust particles is associated with elevated mortality and increased hospital admissions in individuals with respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. During active inflammation monocytes are recruited to the airways and can replace resident alveolar macrophages. We therefore investigated whether chronic fourteen day exposure to low concentrations of diesel exhaust particles can alter the phenotype and function of monocytes from healthy individuals and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocytes were purified from the blood of healthy individuals and people with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in the presence or absence of diesel exhaust particles and their phenotypes studied through investigation of their lifespan, cytokine generation in response to Toll like receptor agonists and heat killed bacteria, and expression of surface markers. Chronic fourteen day exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to concentrations of diesel exhaust particles >10 µg/ml caused mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction, and a gradual loss of cells over time both in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease individuals. Chronic exposure to lower concentrations of diesel exhaust particles impaired CXCL8 cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide and heat killed E. coli, and this phenotype was associated with a reduction in CD14 and CD11b expression. Chronic diesel exhaust particle exposure may therefore alter both numbers and function of lung macrophages differentiating from locally recruited monocytes in the lungs of healthy people and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  8. Enhancing Students' Responsibility towards Society through Civic Involvement Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetindamar, Dilek; Hopkins, Tara

    2008-01-01

    The recent literature on corporate social responsibility is searching for new ways of education in relation to citizenship and social responsibility. This paper reviews some of the educational issues discussed within the corporate social responsibility literature. It also includes examples of some of the methods and tools used at universities…

  9. Strenuous physical exercise adversely affects monocyte chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czepluch, Frauke S; Barres, Romain; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is important for proper cardiovascular function and disease prevention, but it may influence the immune system. We evaluated the effect of strenuous exercise on monocyte chemotaxis. Monocytes were isolated from blood of 13 young, healthy, sedentary individuals participating...... in a three-week training program which consisted of repeated exercise bouts. Monocyte chemotaxis and serological biomarkers were investigated at baseline, after three weeks training and after four weeks recovery. Chemotaxis towards vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and transforming growth factor...

  10. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  11. Cis association of galectin-9 with Tim-3 differentially regulates IL-12/IL-23 expressions in monocytes via TLR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng J Ma

    Full Text Available Human monocytes/macrophages (M/M(Ф of the innate immunity sense and respond to microbial products via specific receptor coupling with stimulatory (such as TLR and inhibitory (such as Tim-3 receptors. Current models imply that Tim-3 expression on M/M(Ø can deliver negative signaling to TLR-mediated IL-12 expression through trans association with its ligand Galectin-9 (Gal-9 presented by other cells. However, Gal-9 is also expressed within M/M(Ø, and the effect of intracellular Gal-9 on Tim-3 activities and inflammatory responses in the same M/M(Ø remains unknown. In this study, our data suggest that Tim-3 and IL-12/IL-23 gene transcriptions are regulated by enhanced or silenced Gal-9 expression within monocytes through synergizing with TLR signaling. Additionally, TLR activation facilitates Gal-9/Tim-3 cis association within the same M/M(Ø to differentially regulate IL-12/IL-23 expressions through STAT-3 phosphorylation. These results reveal a ligand (Gal-9 compartment-dependent regulatory effect on receptor (Tim-3 activities and inflammatory responses via TLR pathways--a novel mechanism underlying cellular responses to external or internal cues.

  12. Moderate Increase of Indoxyl Sulfate Promotes Monocyte Transition into Profibrotic Macrophages.

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    Chiara Barisione

    Full Text Available The uremic toxin Indoxyl-3-sulphate (IS, a ligand of Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR, raises in blood during early renal dysfunction as a consequence of tubular damage, which may be present even when eGFR is normal or only moderately reduced, and promotes cardiovascular damage and monocyte-macrophage activation. We previously found that patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs have higher CD14+CD16+ monocyte frequency and prevalence of moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD than age-matched control subjects. Here we aimed to evaluate the IS levels in plasma from AAA patients and to investigate in vitro the effects of IS concentrations corresponding to mild-to-moderate CKD on monocyte polarization and macrophage differentiation.Free IS plasma levels, monocyte subsets and laboratory parameters were evaluated on blood from AAA patients and eGFR-matched controls. THP-1 monocytes, treated with IS 1, 10, 20 μM were evaluated for CD163 expression, AhR signaling and then induced to differentiate into macrophages by PMA. Their phenotype was evaluated both at the stage of semi-differentiated and fully differentiated macrophages. AAA and control sera were similarly used to treat THP-1 monocytes and the resulting macrophage phenotype was analyzed.IS plasma concentration correlated positively with CD14+CD16+ monocytes and was increased in AAA patients. In THP-1 cells, IS promoted CD163 expression and transition to macrophages with hallmarks of classical (IL-6, CCL2, COX2 and alternative phenotype (IL-10, PPARγ, TGF-β, TIMP-1, via AhR/Nrf2 activation. Analogously, AAA sera induced differentiation of macrophages with enhanced IL-6, MCP1, TGF-β, PPARγ and TIMP-1 expression.IS skews monocyte differentiation toward low-inflammatory, profibrotic macrophages and may contribute to sustain chronic inflammation and maladaptive vascular remodeling.

  13. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... to CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  14. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

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    Rogier M Thurlings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  15. Bacille Calmette-Guerin induces NOD2-dependent nonspecific protection from reinfection via epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Quintin, Jessica; Preijers, Frank; Joosten, Leo A B; Ifrim, Daniela C; Saeed, Sadia; Jacobs, Cor; van Loenhout, Joke; de Jong, Dirk; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Xavier, Ramnik J; van der Meer, Jos W M; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G

    2012-10-23

    Adaptive features of innate immunity, recently described as "trained immunity," have been documented in plants, invertebrate animals, and mice, but not yet in humans. Here we show that bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in healthy volunteers led not only to a four- to sevenfold increase in the production of IFN-γ, but also to a twofold enhanced release of monocyte-derived cytokines, such as TNF and IL-1β, in response to unrelated bacterial and fungal pathogens. The enhanced function of circulating monocytes persisted for at least 3 mo after vaccination and was accompanied by increased expression of activation markers such as CD11b and Toll-like receptor 4. These training effects were induced through the NOD2 receptor and mediated by increased histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation. In experimental studies, BCG vaccination induced T- and B-lymphocyte-independent protection of severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice from disseminated candidiasis (100% survival in BCG-vaccinated mice vs. 30% in control mice). In conclusion, BCG induces trained immunity and nonspecific protection from infections through epigenetic reprogramming of innate immune cells.

  16. Bacille Calmette-Guérin induces NOD2-dependent nonspecific protection from reinfection via epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Quintin, Jessica; Preijers, Frank; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Ifrim, Daniela C.; Saeed, Sadia; Jacobs, Cor; van Loenhout, Joke; de Jong, Dirk; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive features of innate immunity, recently described as “trained immunity,” have been documented in plants, invertebrate animals, and mice, but not yet in humans. Here we show that bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in healthy volunteers led not only to a four- to sevenfold increase in the production of IFN-γ, but also to a twofold enhanced release of monocyte-derived cytokines, such as TNF and IL-1β, in response to unrelated bacterial and fungal pathogens. The enhanced function of circulating monocytes persisted for at least 3 mo after vaccination and was accompanied by increased expression of activation markers such as CD11b and Toll-like receptor 4. These training effects were induced through the NOD2 receptor and mediated by increased histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation. In experimental studies, BCG vaccination induced T- and B-lymphocyte–independent protection of severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice from disseminated candidiasis (100% survival in BCG-vaccinated mice vs. 30% in control mice). In conclusion, BCG induces trained immunity and nonspecific protection from infections through epigenetic reprogramming of innate immune cells. PMID:22988082

  17. Protective role of klotho protein on epithelial cells upon co-culture with activated or senescent monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mytych, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifermytych@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Centre of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wos, Izabela; Solek, Przemyslaw; Koziorowski, Marek [Institute of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Centre of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2017-01-15

    Monocytes ensure proper functioning and maintenance of epithelial cells, while good condition of monocytes is a key factor of these interactions. Although, it was shown that in some circumstances, a population of altered monocytes may appear, there is no data regarding their effect on epithelial cells. In this study, using direct co-culture model with LPS-activated and Dox-induced senescent THP-1 monocytes, we reported for the first time ROS-induced DNA damage, reduced metabolic activity, proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest followed by p16-, p21- and p27-mediated DNA damage response pathways activation, premature senescence and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells. Also, we show that klotho protein possessing anti-aging and anti-inflammatory characteristics reduced cytotoxic and genotoxic events by inhibition of insulin/IGF-IR and downregulation of TRF1 and TRF2 proteins. Therefore, klotho protein could be considered as a protective factor against changes caused by altered monocytes in epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Activated and senescent THP-1 monocytes induced cyto- and genotoxicity in HeLa cells. • Altered monocytes provoked oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced DNA damage. • DNA damage activated DDR pathways and lead to premature senescence and apoptosis. • Klotho reduced ROS/RNS-mediated toxicity through insulin/IGF-IR pathway inhibition. • Klotho protects HeLa cells from cyto- and genotoxicity induced by altered monocytes.

  18. The CD14+CD16+ inflammatory monocyte subset displays increased mitochondrial activity and effector function during acute Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis R V Antonelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Plasmodium vivax results in strong activation of monocytes, which are important components of both the systemic inflammatory response and parasite control. The overall goal of this study was to define the role of monocytes during P. vivax malaria. Here, we demonstrate that P. vivax-infected patients display significant increase in circulating monocytes, which were defined as CD14(+CD16- (classical, CD14(+CD16(+ (inflammatory, and CD14loCD16(+ (patrolling cells. While the classical and inflammatory monocytes were found to be the primary source of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the CD16(+ cells, in particular the CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes, expressed the highest levels of activation markers, which included chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules. Morphologically, CD14(+ were distinguished from CD14lo monocytes by displaying larger and more active mitochondria. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes were more efficient in phagocytizing P. vivax-infected reticulocytes, which induced them to produce high levels of intracellular TNF-α and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, antibodies specific for ICAM-1, PECAM-1 or LFA-1 efficiently blocked the phagocytosis of infected reticulocytes by monocytes. Hence, our results provide key information on the mechanism by which CD14(+CD16(+ cells control parasite burden, supporting the hypothesis that they play a role in resistance to P. vivax infection.

  19. A Combination of Ex vivo Diffusion MRI and Multiphoton to Study Microglia/Monocytes Alterations after Spinal Cord Injury

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    Harun N. Noristani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS injury has been observed to lead to microglia activation and monocytes infiltration at the lesion site. Ex vivo diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (diffusion MRI or DWI allows detailed examination of CNS tissues, and recent advances in clearing procedures allow detailed imaging of fluorescent-labeled cells at high resolution. No study has yet combined ex vivo diffusion MRI and clearing procedures to establish a possible link between microglia/monocytes response and diffusion coefficient in the context of spinal cord injury (SCI. We carried out ex vivo MRI of the spinal cord at different time-points after spinal cord transection followed by tetrahydrofuran based clearing and examined the density and morphology of microglia/monocytes using two-photon microscopy. Quantitative analysis revealed an early marked increase in microglial/monocytes density that is associated with an increase in the extension of the lesion measured using diffusion MRI. Morphological examination of microglia/monocytes somata at the lesion site revealed a significant increase in their surface area and volume as early as 72 hours post-injury. Time-course analysis showed differential microglial/monocytes response rostral and caudal to the lesion site. Microglia/monocytes showed a decrease in reactivity over time caudal to the lesion site, but an increase was observed rostrally. Direct comparison of microglia/monocytes morphology, obtained through multiphoton, and the longitudinal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, measured with diffusion MRI, highlighted that axonal integrity does not correlate with the density of microglia/monocytes or their somata morphology. We emphasize that differential microglial/monocytes reactivity rostral and caudal to the lesion site may thus coincide, at least partially, with reported temporal differences in debris clearance. Our study demonstrates that the combination of ex vivo diffusion MRI and two

  20. Body enhancement : body images, vulnerability and moral responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dikken, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244750939

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this explorative study is to show that it is highly relevant to integrate cultural and personal body images into the ethical debate on human enhancement. The current debate has little attention for the motivations to make use of technology to alter the human body, such as cultural

  1. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  2. Zinc oxide nanoparticles and monocytes: Impact of size, charge and solubility on activation status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prach, Morag [Edinburgh Napier University, School of Life, Sport and Social Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Stone, Vicki [Heriot-Watt University, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Proudfoot, Lorna, E-mail: l.proudfoot@napier.ac.uk [Edinburgh Napier University, School of Life, Sport and Social Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) particle induced cytotoxicity was dependent on size, charge and solubility, factors which at sublethal concentrations may influence the activation of the human monocytic cell line THP1. ZnO nanoparticles (NP; average diameter 70 nm) were more toxic than the bulk form (< 44 μm mesh) and a positive charge enhanced cytotoxicity of the NP despite their relatively high dissolution. A positive charge of the particles has been shown in other studies to have an influence on cell viability. Centrifugal filtration using a cut off of 5 kDa and Zn element analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy confirmed that exposure of the ZnO particles and NP to 10% foetal bovine serum resulted in a strong association of the Zn{sup 2+} ion with protein. This association with protein may influence interaction of the ZnO particles and NP with THP1 cells. After 24 h exposure to the ZnO particles and NP at sublethal concentrations there was little effect on immunological markers of inflammation such as HLA DR and CD14, although they may induce a modest increase in the adhesion molecule CD11b. The cytokine TNFα is normally associated with proinflammatory immune responses but was not induced by the ZnO particles and NP. There was also no effect on LPS stimulated TNFα production. These results suggest that ZnO particles and NP do not have a classical proinflammatory effect on THP1 cells. -- Highlights: ► ZnO is cytotoxic to THP-1 monocytes. ► ZnO nanoparticles are more toxic than the bulk form. ► Positive charge enhances ZnO nanoparticle cytotoxicity. ► Sublethal doses of ZnO particles do not induce classical proinflammatory markers.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: Inhibition of infection of human monocytes by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Freitas, Rafael; Lonien, Sandra Cristina Heim; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bordignon, Juliano; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2017-11-01

    Cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential for progression of the parasite life cycle and development of Chagas disease. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and other eicosanoids potently modulate host response and contribute to Chagas disease progression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (ASA), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor on the T. cruzi invasion and its influence on nitric oxide and cytokine production in human monocytes. The pretreatment of monocytes with ASA or SQ 22536 (adenylate-cyclase inhibitor) induced a marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection. On the other hand, the treatment of monocytes with SQ 22536 after ASA restored the invasiveness of T. cruzi. This reestablishment was associated with a decrease in nitric oxide and PGE 2 production, and also an increase of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 by cells pre-treated with ASA. Altogether, these results reinforce the idea that the cyclooxygenase pathway plays a fundamental role in the process of parasite invasion in an in vitro model of T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of monocytes in ischemic stroke pathobiology: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman eElAli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke accounts for the majority of stroke cases and constitutes a major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. Inflammation has been reported to constitute a major component of ischemic stroke pathobiology. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are activated, followed by several infiltration waves of different circulating immune cells into the brain. Among these circulating immune cells, monocytes have been shown to play a particularly important role. Following their infiltration, monocytes differentiate into potent phagocytic cells, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs in the ischemic brain. Initially, the presence of these cells was considered as marker of an exacerbated inflammatory response that contributes to brain damage. However, the recent reports are suggesting a more complex and multiphasic roles of these cells in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Monocytes constitute a heterogeneous group of cells, which comprises two major subsets in rodent and three major subsets in human. In both species, two equivalent subsets exist, the pro-inflammatory subset and the anti-inflammatory subset. Recent data have demonstrated that ischemic stroke differentially regulate monocyte subsets, which directly affect ischemic stroke pathobiology and may have direct implications in ischemic stroke therapies. Here we review the recent findings that addressed the role of different monocyte subsets in ischemic stroke pathobiology, and the implications on therapies.

  5. Fulvic acid attenuates homocysteine-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shao-Ju; Chen, Te-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Chang, Shun-Fu

    2015-03-13

    Homocysteine and pro-inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) have been linked to vascular dysfunction and risks of cardiovascular diseases. Fulvic acid (FA), a class of compounds of humic substances, possesses various pharmacological properties. However, the effect of FA on inflammatory responses of the monocytes remains unclear. We investigated the regulatory effect of FA on homocysteine-induced COX-2 expression in human monocytes. Peripheral blood monocytes and U937 cells were used for all experiments. Real-time PCR and ELISA assay were used to analyze the COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE2 secretion, respectively. Specific inhibitors were used to investigate the mechanism of homocysteine-mediating COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE2 secretion. Luciferase assay, transcription factor ELISA, and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to determine the role of nuclear factor-κB in FA-mediated inhibition of homocysteine effect on monocytes. The results show that pretreating monocytes with FA inhibited the homocysteine-induced COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of U937 monocytes with homocysteine induced rapid increases in the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK; the inhibitor for ERK and JNK attenuated the homocysteine-induced nuclear factor-κB activation and COX-2 expression. Transcription factor ELISA and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that FA blocked the homocysteine-induced increases in the binding activity and in vivo promoter binding of nuclear factor-κB in monocytes. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism by which FA inhibits homocysteine-induced COX-2 expression in monocytes, and a basis for using FA in pharmaceutical therapy against inflammation.

  6. Variation in dietary salt intake induces coordinated dynamics of monocyte subsets and monocyte-platelet aggregates in humans: implications in end organ inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte activation and tissue infiltration are quantitatively associated with high-salt intake induced target organ inflammation. We hypothesized that high-salt challenge would induce the expansion of CD14++CD16+ monocytes, one of the three monocyte subsets with a pro-inflammatory phenotype, that is associated with target organ inflammation in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dietary intervention study was performed in 20 healthy volunteers, starting with a 3-day usual diet and followed with a 7-day high-salt diet (≥15 g NaCl/day, and a 7-day low-salt diet (≤5 g NaCl/day. The amounts of three monocyte subsets ("classical" CD14++CD16-, "intermediate" CD14++CD16+ and "non-classical" CD14+CD16++ and their associations with monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs were measured by flow cytometry. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI was used to evaluate renal hypoxia. Switching to a high-salt diet resulted in CD14++ monocyte activation and a rapid expansion of CD14++CD16+ subset and MPAs, with a reciprocal decrease in the percentages of CD14++CD16- and CD14+CD16++ subsets. In vitro study using purified CD14++ monocytes revealed that elevation in extracellular [Na(+] could lead to CD14++CD16+ expansion via a ROS dependent manner. In addition, high-salt intake was associated with progressive hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2* signal and enhanced urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 excretion, indicating a temporal and spatial correlation between CD14++CD16+ subset and renal inflammation. The above changes could be completely reversed by a low-salt diet, whereas blood pressure levels remained unchanged during dietary intervention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work demonstrates that short-term increases in dietary salt intake could induce the expansion of CD14++CD16+ monocytes, as well as an elevation of MPAs, which might be the underlying cellular basis of high-salt induced

  7. Enhanced Cortisol Response to Stress in Children in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Spratt, Eve G.; Nicholas, Joyce S.; Brady, Kathleen T.; Carpenter, Laura A.; Hatcher, Charles R.; Meekins, Kirk A.; Furlanetto, Richard W.; Charles, Jane M.

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism often show difficulties in adapting to change. Previous studies of cortisol, a neurobiologic stress hormone reflecting hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity, in children with autism have demonstrated variable results. This study measured cortisol levels in children with and without Autism: (1) at rest; (2) in a novel environment; and (3) in response to a blood draw stressor. A significantly higher serum cortisol response was found in the group of children wit...

  8. Defining response capacity to enhance climate change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompkins, Emma L. [Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom) and Department of Geography, University of Southampton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.tompkins@uea.ac.uk; Neil Adger, W. [Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    Climate change adaptation and mitigation decisions made by governments are usually taken in different policy domains. At the individual level however, adaptation and mitigation activities are undertaken together as part of the management of risk and resources. We propose that a useful starting point to develop a national climate policy is to understand what societal response might mean in practice. First we frame the set of responses at the national policy level as a trade off between investment in the development and diffusion of new technology, and investment in encouraging and enabling society to change its behaviour and or adopt the new technology. We argue that these are the pertinent trade-offs, rather than those usually posited between climate change mitigation and adaptation. The preference for a policy response that focuses more on technological innovation rather than one that focuses on changing social behaviour will be influenced by the capacity of different societies to change their greenhouse gas emissions; by perceived vulnerability to climate impacts; and by capacity to modify social behaviour and physical environment. Starting with this complete vision of response options should enable policy makers to re-evaluate the risk environment and the set of response options available to them. From here, policy makers should consider who is responsible for making climate response decisions and when actions should be taken. Institutional arrangements dictate social and political acceptability of different policies, they structure worldviews, and they determine the provision of resources for investment in technological innovation and social change. The importance of focussing on the timing of the response is emphasised to maximise the potential for adjustments through social learning and institutional change at different policy scales. We argue that the ability to respond to climate change is both enabled and constrained by social and technological conditions

  9. Enhancement of Immune Memory Responses to Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of autophagy gene expression in healthy donors. Completion of these studies will provide novel insights into...induction of highly specific B and T cell responses against viral infections. Despite recent progress in vaccine development, the molecular mechanisms ...BMI 31±8 36±5 The purpose of this application is to find mechanisms that could improve B cell mediated immune response to influenza. This

  10. Repeated social stress enhances the innate immune response to a primary HSV-1 infection in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong-Newsom, P; Powell, N D; Bailey, M T; Padgett, D A; Sheridan, J F

    2010-02-01

    Three to 5 days after a primary HSV-1 infection, macrophages infiltrate into the trigeminal ganglia (TG) and produce anti-viral cytokines to reduce viral replication. Previous research demonstrated that social disruption stress (SDR) enhances the trafficking of monocytes/macrophages from the bone marrow to the spleen and increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. The impact of SDR on the trafficking of these cells to loci of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and subsequent function has not been examined. The following studies were designed to determine whether SDR would enhance the innate immune response during a primary HSV-1 infection by increasing the number of macrophages in the cornea and TG, thus increasing anti-viral cytokine production and reducing viral replication. BALB/c mice were exposed to six cycles of SDR prior to ocular infection with HSV-1 McKrae virus. Flow cytometric analysis of cells from the TG revealed an increase in the percentage of CD11b+ macrophages in SDR mice compared to controls. Immune cell infiltration into the cornea, however, could not be determined due to low cell numbers. Although gene expression of IFN-beta was decreased, SDR increased gene expression of IFN-alpha, and TNF-alpha, in the cornea and TG. Examination of viral proteins showed decreased expression of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), glycoprotein B (gB), glycoprotein H (gH) and latency-associated transcript (LAT) in the TG, however, expression of ICP0 and gB were elevated in the cornea of SDR mice. These results indicate that the innate immune response to HSV-1 was altered and enhanced by the experience of repeated social defeat. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Frontline Science: CXCR7 mediates CD14(+)CD16(+) monocyte transmigration across the blood brain barrier: a potential therapeutic target for NeuroAIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Mike; Williams, Dionna W; Calderon, Tina M; Anastos, Kathryn; Morgello, Susan; Berman, Joan W

    2017-11-01

    CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes transmigrate into the CNS of HIV-positive people in response to chemokines elevated in the brains of infected individuals, including CXCL12. Entry of these cells leads to viral reservoirs, neuroinflammation, and neuronal damage. These may eventually lead to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly improved the lives of HIV-infected people, the prevalence of cognitive deficits remains unchanged despite ART, still affecting >50% of infected individuals. There are no therapies to reduce these deficits or to prevent CNS entry of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes. The goal of this study was to determine whether CXCR7, a receptor for CXCL12, is expressed on CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes and whether a small molecule CXCR7 antagonist (CCX771) can prevent CD14(+)CD16(+) monocyte transmigration into the CNS. We showed for the first time that CXCR7 is on CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes and that it may be a therapeutic target to reduce their entry into the brain. We demonstrated that CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes and not the more abundant CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes or T cells transmigrate to low homeostatic levels of CXCL12. This may be a result of increased CXCR7 on CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes. We showed that CCX771 reduced transmigration of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes but not of CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes from uninfected and HIV-infected individuals and that it reduced CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes. We propose that CXCR7 is a therapeutic target on CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes to limit their CNS entry, thereby reducing neuroinflammation, neuronal damage, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Our data also suggest that CCX771 may reduce CD14(+)CD16(+) monocyte-mediated inflammation in other disorders. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Rewiring monocyte glucose metabolism via C-type lectin signaling protects against disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge; Arts, Rob J W; Ter Horst, Rob; Gresnigt, Mark S; Smeekens, Sanne P; Ratter, Jacqueline M; Lachmandas, Ekta; Boutens, Lily; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Joosten, Leo A B; Notebaart, Richard A; Ardavín, Carlos; Netea, Mihai G

    2017-09-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that play a pivotal role in antifungal immunity, but little is known regarding the cellular metabolic events that regulate their function during infection. Using complementary transcriptomic and immunological studies in human primary monocytes, we show that activation of monocytes by Candida albicans yeast and hyphae was accompanied by metabolic rewiring induced through C-type lectin-signaling pathways. We describe that the innate immune responses against Candida yeast are energy-demanding processes that lead to the mobilization of intracellular metabolite pools and require induction of glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and glutaminolysis, while responses to hyphae primarily rely on glycolysis. Experimental models of systemic candidiasis models validated a central role for glucose metabolism in anti-Candida immunity, as the impairment of glycolysis led to increased susceptibility in mice. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of understanding the complex network of metabolic responses triggered during infections, and unveil new potential targets for therapeutic approaches against fungal diseases.

  13. Plant growth enhancement and associated physiological responses are coregulated by ethylene and gibberellin in response to harpin protein Hpa1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojie; Han, Bing; Xu, Manyu; Han, Liping; Zhao, Yanying; Liu, Zhilan; Dong, Hansong; Zhang, Chunling

    2014-04-01

    The harpin protein Hpa1 produced by the bacterial blight pathogen of rice induces several growth-promoting responses in plants, activating the ethylene signaling pathway, increasing photosynthesis rates and EXPANSIN (EXP) gene expression levels, and thereby enhancing the vegetative growth. This study was attempted to analyze any mechanistic connections among the above and the role of gibberellin in these responses. Hpa1-induced growth enhancement was evaluated in Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice. And growth-promoting responses were determined mainly as an increase of chlorophyll a/b ratio, which indicates a potential elevation of photosynthesis rates, and enhancements of photosynthesis and EXP expression in the three plant species. In Arabidopsis, Hpa1-induced growth-promoting responses were partially compromised by a defect in ethylene perception or gibberellin biosynthesis. In tomato and rice, compromises of Hpa1-induced growth-promoting responses were caused by a pharmacological treatment with an ethylene perception inhibitor or a gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor. In the three plant species, moreover, Hpa1-induced growth-promoting responses were significantly impaired, but not totally eliminated, by abolishing ethylene perception or gibberellin synthesis. However, simultaneous nullifications in both ethylene perception and gibberellin biosynthesis almost canceled the full effects of Hpa1 on plant growth, photosynthesis, and EXP2 expression. Theses results suggest that ethylene and gibberellin coregulate Hpa1-induced plant growth enhancement and associated physiological and molecular responses.

  14. Enhanced emotional responses during social coordination with a virtual partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengsen; Dumas, Guillaume; Kelso, J A Scott; Tognoli, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Emotion and motion, though seldom studied in tandem, are complementary aspects of social experience. This study investigates variations in emotional responses during movement coordination between a human and a Virtual Partner (VP), an agent whose virtual finger movements are driven by the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) equations of Coordination Dynamics. Twenty-one subjects were instructed to coordinate finger movements with the VP in either inphase or antiphase patterns. By adjusting model parameters, we manipulated the 'intention' of VP as cooperative or competitive with the human's instructed goal. Skin potential responses (SPR) were recorded to quantify the intensity of emotional response. At the end of each trial, subjects rated the VP's intention and whether they thought their partner was another human being or a machine. We found greater emotional responses when subjects reported that their partner was human and when coordination was stable. That emotional responses are strongly influenced by dynamic features of the VP's behavior, has implications for mental health, brain disorders and the design of socially cooperative machines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. How does enhancing cognition affect human values? How does this translate into social responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Laura Y

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen a rise in the use of different technologies aimed at enhancing cognition of normal healthy individuals. While values have been acknowledged to be an important aspect of cognitive enhancement practices, the discussion has predominantly focused on just a few values, such as safety, peer pressure, and authenticity. How are values, in a broader sense, affected by enhancing cognitive abilities? Is this dependent on the type of technology or intervention used to attain the enhancement, or does the cognitive domain targeted play a bigger role in how values are affected? Values are not only likely to be affected by cognitive enhancement practices; they also play a crucial role in defining the type of interventions that are likely to be undertaken. This paper explores the way values affect and are affected by enhancing cognitive abilities. Furthermore, it argues that knowledge of the interplay between values and cognitive enhancement makes a strong case for social responsibility around cognitive enhancement practices.

  16. Characterization and enhancement of micro brushless DC motor response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Joseph; Kehlenbeck, Andrew; Humbert, J. Sean; Nothwang, William

    2014-06-01

    Commercially available speed controllers, motors, and propellers typically comprise the powertrains of many micro aerial robotic systems, such as quadrotor vehicles. As on board state sensing and processing improves, actuation bandwidth is becoming a significant bottleneck that limits the performance of the entire closed loop system. The performance of the commercial products can be greatly enhanced through the implementation of classical control methods directly at the powertrain level. In this paper, reduced order open loop models for three representative commercially available powertrains were estimated and were compared with closed loop equivalents. Further performance improvement is realized by the addition of a static inverse to mitigate the steady state structured uncertainty of the system.

  17. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  18. Monocyte targeting and activation by cationic liposomes formulated with a TLR7 agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann; Zucker, Daniel; Parhamifar, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    adaptive immune responses has drawn attention to modulate monocyte responses therapeutically within cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. We present a technology for targeting of nnonocytes and delivery of a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist in fresh blood using liposomes with a positively charged...... cytokines. We envision this technology as a promising tool in future cancer immunotherapy....

  19. Different Regulation of Interleukin-1 Production and Activity in Monocytes and Macrophages: Innate Memory as an Endogenous Mechanism of IL-1 Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz P. Madej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Production and activity of interleukin (IL-1β are kept under strict control in our body, because of its powerful inflammation-promoting capacity. Control of IL-1β production and activity allows IL-1 to exert its defensive activities without causing extensive tissue damage. Monocytes are the major producers of IL-1β during inflammation, but they are also able to produce significant amounts of IL-1 inhibitors such as IL-1Ra and the soluble form of the decoy receptor IL-1R2, in an auto-regulatory feedback loop. Here, we investigated how innate immune memory could modulate production and activity of IL-1β by human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived tissue-like/deactivated macrophages in vitro. Cells were exposed to Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Gram-positive (Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria for 24 h, then allowed to rest, and then re-challenged with the same stimuli. The presence of biologically active IL-1β in cell supernatants was calculated as the ratio between free IL-1β (i.e., the cytokine that is not bound/inhibited by sIL-1R2 and its receptor antagonist IL-1Ra. As expected, we observed that the responsiveness of tissue-like/deactivated macrophages to bacterial stimuli was lower than that of monocytes. After resting and re-stimulation, a memory effect was evident for the production of inflammatory cytokines, whereas production of alarm signals (chemokines was minimally affected. We observed a high variability in the innate memory response among individual donors. This is expected since innate memory largely depends on the previous history of exposure or infections, which is different in different subjects. Overall, innate memory appeared to limit the amount of active IL-1β produced by macrophages in response to a bacterial challenge, while enhancing the responsiveness of monocytes. The functional re-programming of mononuclear phagocytes through modulation of innate memory may provide innovative approaches in the management

  20. Local field enhanced second-harmonic response of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek

    Organic CNHP4 nanofibers showing a strong second-harmonic (SH) response have been successfully implemented as active components in a metal-organic hybrid system. Using nondestructive roll-on transfer technique nanofibers were transferred from the growing mica substrates onto electron...

  1. Enhancement of broiler performance and immune response by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    662. Ma A, Shi W, Niu X, Wang M, Zhong X (2009). Effects of Echinacea purpurea extract on the immunological response to infectious bursal disease vaccine in broilers. Front. Agr. China. 3:1-5. Maass N, Bauer J, Paulicks BR, ...

  2. Enhancement of defense responses by oligandrin against Botrytis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oligandrin is an elicitin-like protein with a molecular mass of ∼10 kDa secreted by Pythium oligandrum. Here, the effect of oligandrin on defense response against Botrytis cinerea in tomato leaves is reported. Tomato seedlings were pretreated with 5 ml oligandrin (10 g/ml) by root submerging and then inoculated with B.

  3. Do Fraternities and Sororities Enhance Socially Responsible Leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Georgianna L.; Hevel, Michael S.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effects of fraternity and sorority membership on first-year college students' development of socially responsible leadership at 24 colleges and universities. The institutions varied in terms of public versus private, size, region, and student residential patterns. Results showed that fraternity members demonstrated…

  4. Enhancement of defense responses by oligandrin against Botrytis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... Here, the effect of oligandrin on defense response against Botrytis cinerea in tomato leaves is reported. Tomato seedlings were pretreated with .... measured with an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The PPO activity .... Protective effect of oligandrin against tomato gray mold in greenhouse. Oligandrin. (μg/ml).

  5. Enhanced antioxidative responses of a salt-resistant wheat cultivar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... Wheat cultivars capable of accumulating minerals under salt stress are of considerable interest for their potential to improve crop productivity and crop quality. This study addressed the role of antioxidative enzymes in the responses of a salt-resistant wheat cultivar Cang 6001 to high-salt stress compared to ...

  6. Power transformation for enhancing responsiveness of quality of life questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, YanYan Ange

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of power transformation of raw scores on the responsiveness of quality of life survey. The procedure maximizes the paired t-test value on the power transformed data to obtain an optimal power range. The parallel between the Box–Cox transformation is also investigated for the quality of life data.

  7. Enhancement of antenna-coupled microbolometers response by impedance matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Simón

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metallic structures were evaluated to determine the one best matches impedance between lithographic antennas and microbolometers. The best was a 0.28λ transmission line section between the antenna and the microbolometer, 12% longer than what RF theory sets, whose behaviour was compared with other structures. The response was 360% higher.

  8. Monocytes infiltrate the pancreas via the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway and differentiate into stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Ino

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that monocytes possess pluripotent plasticity. We previously reported that monocytes could differentiate into hepatic stellate cells. Although stellate cells are also present in the pancreas, their origin remains unclear. An accumulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP(+CD45(- cells was observed in the pancreases and livers of chimeric mice, which were transplanted with a single hematopoietic stem cell isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice and treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. Because the vast majority of EGFP(+CD45(- cells in the pancreas expressed stellate cell-associated antigens such as vimentin, desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, procollagen-I, and α-smooth muscle actin, they were characterized as pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs. EGFP(+ PaSCs were also observed in CCl4-treated mice adoptively transferred with monocytes but not with other cell lineages isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice. The expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and angiotensin II (Ang II increased in the pancreas of CCl4-treated mice and their respective receptors, C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 and Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R, were expressed on Ly6C(high monocytes isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice. We examined the effect of an AT1R antagonist, irbesartan, which is also a CCR2 antagonist, on the migration of monocytes into the pancreas. Monocytes migrated toward MCP-1 but not Ang II in vitro. Irbesartan inhibited not only their in vitro chemotaxis but also in vivo migration of adoptively transferred monocytes from peripheral blood into the pancreas. Irbesartan treatment significantly reduced the numbers of EGFP(+F4/80(+CCR2(+ monocytic cells and EGFP(+ PaSCs in the pancreas of CCl4-treated chimeric mice receiving EGFP(+ bone marrow cells. A specific CCR2 antagonist RS504393 inhibited the occurrence of EGFP(+ PaSCs in injured mice. We propose that CCR2(+ monocytes migrate into the pancreas possibly via the

  9. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this in......To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... after seroconversion lead to persistent infection with high level of antigen production in contrast to infection by homologous virus isolated later. MAb against the V3-IIIB loop and sCD4 inhibited the infection of monocyte/M phi s in a dose dependent manner, indicating that infection requires binding...

  10. Fasting enhances the response of glioma to chemo- and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdie, Fernando; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Wei, Min; Wang, Weijun; Lee, Changhan; Hwang, Saewon; Conti, Peter S; Chen, Thomas C; Longo, Valter D

    2012-01-01

    Glioma, including anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are among the most commonly diagnosed malignant adult brain tumors. GBM is a highly invasive and angiogenic tumor, resulting in a 12 to 15 months median survival. The treatment of GBM is multimodal and includes surgical resection, followed by adjuvant radio-and chemotherapy. We have previously reported that short-term starvation (STS) enhances the therapeutic index of chemo-treatments by differentially protecting normal cells against and/or sensitizing tumor cells to chemotoxicity. To test the effect of starvation on glioma cells in vitro, we treated primary mouse glia, murine GL26, rat C6 and human U251, LN229 and A172 glioma cells with Temozolomide in ad lib and STS mimicking conditions. In vivo, mice with subcutaneous or intracranial models of GL26 glioma were starved for 48 hours prior to radio- or chemotherapy and the effects on tumor progression and survival were measured. Starvation-mimicking conditions sensitized murine, rat and human glioma cells, but not primary mixed glia, to chemotherapy. In vivo, starvation for 48 hours, which causes a significant reduction in blood glucose and circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels, sensitized both subcutaneous and intracranial glioma models to radio-and chemotherapy. Starvation-induced cancer sensitization to radio- or chemotherapy leads to extended survival in the in vivo glioma models tested. These results indicate that fasting and fasting-mimicking interventions could enhance the efficacy of existing cancer treatments against aggressive glioma in patients.

  11. A candidate HIV/AIDS vaccine (MVA-B lacking vaccinia virus gene C6L enhances memory HIV-1-specific T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan García-Arriaza

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV C6 protein has sequence similarities with the poxvirus family Pox_A46, involved in regulation of host immune responses, but its role is unknown. Here, we have characterized the C6 protein and its effects in virus replication, innate immune sensing and immunogenicity in vivo. C6 is a 18.2 kDa protein, which is expressed early during virus infection and localizes to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Deletion of the C6L gene from the poxvirus vector MVA-B expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (MVA-B ΔC6L had no effect on virus growth kinetics; therefore C6 protein is not essential for virus replication. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B ΔC6L in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs are characterized by the up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β and IFN-α/β-inducible genes. In a DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice, flow cytometry analysis revealed that MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell memory immune responses, with most of the HIV-1 responses mediated by the CD8+ T-cell compartment with an effector phenotype. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env- and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔC6L induced more Gag-Pol-Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the levels of antibodies against Env in comparison with MVA-B. These findings revealed that C6 can be considered as an immunomodulator and that deleting C6L gene in MVA-B confers an immunological benefit by enhancing IFN-β-dependent responses and increasing the magnitude and quality of the T-cell memory immune responses to HIV-1 antigens. Our observations are relevant for the improvement of MVA vectors as HIV-1 vaccines.

  12. Maternal Pregravid Obesity Remodels the DNA Methylation Landscape of Cord Blood Monocytes Disrupting Their Inflammatory Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshchandra, Suhas; Wilson, Randall M; Rais, Maham; Marshall, Nicole E; Purnell, Jonathan Q; Thornburg, Kent L; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2017-10-15

    Prepregnancy maternal obesity is associated with adverse outcomes for the offspring, including increased incidence of neonatal bacterial sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. We recently reported that umbilical cord blood (UCB) monocytes from babies born to obese mothers generate a reduced IL-6/TNF-α response to TLR 1/2 and 4 ligands compared to those collected from lean mothers. These observations suggest altered development of the offspring's immune system, which in turn results in dysregulated function. We therefore investigated transcriptional and epigenetic differences within UCB monocytes stratified by prepregnancy maternal body mass index. We show that UCB monocytes from babies born to obese mothers generate a dampened response to LPS stimulation compared with those born to lean mothers, at the level of secreted immune mediators and transcription. Because gene expression profiles of resting UCB monocytes from both groups were comparable, we next investigated the role of epigenetic differences. Indeed, we detected stark differences in methylation levels within promoters and regulatory regions of genes involved in TLR signaling in resting UCB monocytes. Interestingly, the DNA methylation status of resting cells was highly predictive of transcriptional changes post-LPS stimulation, suggesting that cytosine methylation is one of the dominant mechanisms driving functional inadequacy in UCB monocytes obtained from babies born to obese mothers. These data highlight a potentially critical role of maternal pregravid obesity-associated epigenetic changes in influencing the function of an offspring's monocytes at birth. These findings further our understanding of mechanisms that explain the increased risk of infection in neonates born to mothers with high prepregnancy body mass index. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. [Isolation of filamentous fungi capable of enhancing sludge dewaterability and study of mechanisms responsible for the sludge dewaterability enhancement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Jun; Fu, Hao-Yi; Fan, Xian-Feng; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Guan-Yu

    2015-02-01

    To study the influence of filamentous fungi on the sludge dewaterability is very significant for the development of biological treatment methods for enhancing sludge dewaterability. In this study, filamentous fungi capable of enhancing sludge dewaterability were isolated from sewage sludge and the related mechanisms responsible for the sludge dewaterability enhancement were investigated. A filamentous fungus Mucor circinelloides ZG-3 was successfully isolated from sludge, and sludge dewaterability could be drastically improved by this fungus. Further study revealed that the enhancement of sludge dewaterability was influenced by inoculation method, inoculum size and solid content of sludge. The optimal inoculation method was mycelia inoculation, the optimal inoculum size was 10%, and the optimal solid content of sludge was about 4%. Under the optimized conditions, the specific resistance to filtration (SRF) of sludge could be decreased by 75.1% after being treated by M. circinelloides ZG-3. After the treatment, the COD value of sludge supernatant was only 310 mg x L(-1), and the treated sludge still exhibited good settleability. During the treatment of sewage sludge by M. circinelloides ZG-3, the mechanisms responsible for the sludge dewaterability enhancement included the degradation of sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the decrease of sludge pH. Therefore, the treatment of sewage sludge using M. circinelloides ZG-3 is a useful and novel method for sludge conditioning.

  14. Heightened ability of monocytes from sarcoidosis patients to form multi-nucleated giant cells in vitro by supernatants of concanavalin A-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, K; Okamoto, H; Horio, T

    2001-10-01

    The main immunocompetent cells in sarcoidal lesions are epithelioid cells and multi-nucleated giant cells (MGC), both of which are derived from monocyte-macrophage lineage cells. To understand further the relevance of monocytes in sarcoidosis, we examined in vitro MGC formation using monocytes from sarcoidosis patients, patients with other granulomatous diseases (OGD) and healthy control subjects. The supernatant of concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (conditioned medium) generated Langhans type-MGC and foreign body type-MGC from monocytes. Conditioned medium from any three groups had the same ability to form MGC from normal monocytes. On the other hand, MGC were more highly formed using monocytes from sarcoidosis patients than from other groups. When macrophages induced by treatment of monocytes with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were used, the rate of MGC formation in sarcoidosis patients was about threefold or fourfold as much as that in OGD patients or healthy controls, respectively. Oxidized ATP inhibited MGC formation in all groups. The susceptibility of monocytes cultured in conditioned medium for 24 h to 2'- and 3'-o-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)ATP-mediated cytolysis was significantly higher in sarcoidosis patients than other groups. These findings suggest that the ability of monocytes to form MGC through P2x7 receptors is enhanced in sarcoidosis patients.

  15. Bmal1 regulates inflammatory responses in macrophages by modulating enhancer RNA transcription

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yumiko Oishi; Shinichiro Hayashi; Takayuki Isagawa; Motohiko Oshima; Atsushi Iwama; Shigeki Shimba; Hitoshi Okamura; Ichiro Manabe

    2017-01-01

    ...) activation by modulating enhancer activity. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that deletion of Arntl perturbed the time-dependent inflammatory responses elicited by TLR4 activation by Kdo2-lipid A (KLA...

  16. Monocyte imaging after myocardial infarction with 19F MRI at 3 T: a pilot study in explanted porcine hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönner, F; Merx, M W; Klingel, K; Begovatz, P; Flögel, U; Sager, M; Temme, S; Jacoby, C; Salehi Ravesh, M; Grapentin, C; Schubert, R; Bunke, J; Roden, M; Kelm, M; Schrader, J

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of cardiac healing after myocardial infarction and it determines subsequent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study was to explore whether inflammation imaging with two perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions and fluorine magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F MRI) is feasible at 3.0 T with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) using explanted hearts, an (19)F surface coil and dedicated MR sequences. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was induced by balloon angioplasty (50 min) of the distal left anterior descending artery in 12 pigs. One day thereafter, PFCs were injected intravenously to label circulating monocytes. Either emulsified perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether or already clinically applied perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) was applied. Four days after AMI and immediately after gadolinium administration, hearts were explanted and imaged with a 3.0 T Achieva MRI scanner. (19)F MRI could be acquired with an SNR of >15 using an in-plane resolution of 2 × 2 mm(2) within <20 min for both agents. Combined late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and (19)F MRI revealed that (19)F signal was inhomogenously distributed across LGE myocardium reflecting patchy macrophage infiltration as confirmed by histology. In whole hearts, we found an apico-basal (19)F gradient within LGE-positive myocardium. The (19)F-positive volume was always smaller than LGE volume. Ex vivo experiments on isolated monocytes revealed that pig and human cells phagocytize PFCs even more avidly than mouse monocytes. This pilot study demonstrates that (19)F MRI at 3.0 T with clinically applicable PFOB is feasible, thus highlighting the potential of (19)F MRI to monitor the inflammatory response after AMI. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Erythropoietin enhances hippocampal response during memory retrieval in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla; O'Sullivan, Ursula; Harmer, Catherine J

    2007-01-01

    Although erythropoietin (Epo) is best known for its effects on erythropoiesis, recent evidence suggests that it also has neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in animal models of hippocampal function. Such an action in humans would make it an intriguing novel compound for the treatment......) or saline in a between-subjects, double-blind, randomized design. Neural response during picture encoding and retrieval was tested 1 week later. Epo increased hippocampus response during picture retrieval (n = 11) compared with placebo (n = 12; p = 0.04) independent of changes in hematocrit....... This is consistent with upregulation of hippocampal BDNF and neurotrophic actions found in animals and highlights Epo as a promising candidate for treatment of psychiatric disorders....

  18. Enhanced striatal responses during expectancy coding in alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Holst, Ruth J; Clark, Luke; Veltman, Dick J; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with alcohol dependence are known to make disadvantageous decisions, possibly caused by alterations in either reward or punishment sensitivity, which lead to persistent alcohol use despite its adverse consequences. Previous studies in alcohol dependence have mainly focused on reward anticipation processing and results from these studies are mixed. To clarify the nature of the motivational deficit that underlies disadvantageous choice in alcohol dependence, the current study sought to characterize the neural representation of expected value in individuals with alcohol dependence, separating expectancy-related processing of gains and losses, as a function of outcome magnitude and outcome probability. Functional MRI was used to examine brain responses during the expectation of gains and losses in patients with alcohol dependence (n=19) and healthy controls (n=19). The task manipulated outcome magnitude (€1 and €5) and outcome probability (30% and 70%). Compared to healthy controls, patients with alcohol dependence were more responsive to the expectancy of large wins, in the caudate and putamen. This effect was driven by a higher caudate activity in the contrast comparing €5 vs. €1 trials in patients with alcohol dependence. There were no group differences in the responses to the expectancy for loss. The patient group reported lower expectancies of winning in the trial-by-trial ratings. Patients with alcohol dependence showed caudate hyperactivity when expecting wins. The result contrasts with past work using the monetary incentive delay task, showing caudate hypoactivity; the passive nature of our task contrasts with an active response requirement in the MIDT studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    protection against rotavirus infection of mice stimulated by intranasal immunization with chimeric VP4 or VP6 protein. J Virol 1999;73(9):7574–81. [13] Choi...McNeal MM, Rae MN, Bean JA, Ward RL. Antibody-dependent and -independent protection following intranasal immunization of mice with rotavirus particles. J...Williamson ED, Sharp GJ, Eley SM, Vesey PM, Pepper TC, Titball RW, et al. Local and systemic immune response to a microencapsu- lated sub-unit vaccine for

  20. Enhancing wellbeing of employees through corporate social responsibility context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dežmar-Krainz Karmen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During last 25 years technological development has accelerated the globalization process which has caused dramatic changes within and across organization. Business performance is varying, complex, global and is changing faster than ever before. over the time, society expectations have changed, changes have affected customers, partners and employees as well. In order to retain on the global market, organizations integrate corporate social responsibility into their business performance with the objective to reinforce their competitiveness. In the knowledge economy, where knowledge is a significant resource and the demand for more highly skilled workers has increased, employees became the most important and in fact the only remaining realistic challenge of competitive ability. Workplace wellbeing refers to mental, psychological or emotional aspect of employee's life. The awareness of management on the employees' wellbeing which takes into consideration the employees satisfaction, health and professional development is an effective approach in strengthening of an organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyze and assess how socially responsible orientation also incorporated in strategic human resource management can contribute to the achievement of wellbeing of employees. Strategic management of human resources includes the necessary coordination between various employees' health and performance aspects. This contributes to the balance between private and working life. Social responsible activities coordinated through strategic human resource management significantly influence the employees' wellbeing as well as competitiveness of the organization. .

  1. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1 and 30 (Experiment 2 ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing.

  2. Cyclophosphamide enhances glioma virotherapy by inhibiting innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulci, Giulia; Breymann, Laura; Gianni, Davide; Kurozomi, Kazuhiko; Rhee, Sarah S; Yu, Jianhua; Kaur, Balveen; Louis, David N; Weissleder, Ralph; Caligiuri, Michael A; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2006-08-22

    Clinical trials are testing oncolytic viruses (OVs) as therapies for cancer. We have shown that animals that have brain tumors and are treated with a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived OV live significantly longer when cyclophosphamide (CPA) is preadministered. Here, we explore the mechanisms behind this finding. In a syngeneic rat glioma model, intratumoral HSV administration is associated with rapid increase of natural killer cells, microglia/macrophages (CD68+ and CD163+), and IFN-gamma. Pretreatment with CPA enhances HSV replication and oncolysis and reduces an HSV-mediated increase in CD68+ and CD163+ cells and intratumoral IFN-gamma. Molecular imaging shows CPA pretreatment to inhibit HSV-induced infiltration of tumor-associated phagocytic cells. Our results reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms that inhibit intratumoral spread of HSV and suggest a therapeutic path for improving the efficacy of virotherapy as a treatment for cancer.

  3. Tiotropium bromide inhibits human monocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurai M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tiotropium bromide (Spiriva® is used as a bronchodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, clinical evidence suggests that tiotropium bromide may improve COPD by mechanisms beyond bronchodilation. We hypothesized that tiotropium bromide may act as an anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting monocyte chemotaxis, a process that plays an important role in the lung inflammation of COPD. To test this hypothesis monocytes were pretreated with tiotropium bromide prior to exposure to chemotactic agents and monocyte chemotactic activity (MCA was evaluated with a blind chamber technique. Tiotropium bromide inhibited MCA in a dose- and time- dependent manner (respectively, p< 0.01 by directly acting on the monocyte. Acetylcholine (ACh challenge increased MCA (p< 0.01, and tiotropium bromide effectively reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA by ACh. The inhibition of MCA by tiotropium bromide was reversed by a muscarinic type 3 (M3-muscarinic receptor antagonist (p< 0.01, and was not effected by an M2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, a selective M3 receptor agonist, cevimeline, and Gq protein stimulator, Pasteurella multocida toxin, significantly increased MCA (P < 0.01, and tiotropium bromide pretreatment reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA induced by these agents. These results suggest that tiotropium might regulate monocyte chemotaxis, in part, by interfering with M3-muscarinic receptor coupled Gq protein signal transduction. These results provide new insight that an anti-cholinergic therapeutic may provide anti-inflammatory action in the pulmonary system.

  4. Acute monocytic leukemia in an irradiated beagle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Fritz, T.E.; Lombard, L.S.; Poole, C.M.; Norris, W.P.

    1979-01-01

    A purebred female Beagle dog that had received 2,000 R of protracted whole-body ..gamma..-irradiation from /sup 60/Co when 14 months old had hematologic changes consistent with a myeloproliferative disorder 3 years after the termination of radiation exposure. Peripheral blood and bone marrow findings during the 7-month period before death showed progressive anemia with increased numbers of platelets; immature granulocytes, monocytes and promonocytes. A period of partial remission occurred during which time the peripheral blood was aleukemic, although there was marked thrombocytosis and abnormal erythropoiesis which was evidenced by bizarre circulating nucleated red cells, anisocytosis, poikilocytosis and Howell-Jolly bodies. The dog had a terminal crisis with marked leukocytosis, most cells in the peripheral blood being bizarre monocytes and promonocytes. Tissues obtained at necroscopy showed diffuse as well as focal infiltration of the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, heart, kidney and gastrointestinal wall with immature neoplastic cells resembling monocytes and monocytic precursors. The monocytic differentiation of the invasive cell population was confirmed by morphological, cytochemical, histological, ultrastructural and in vitro cell culture studies.

  5. Leishmania major surface protease Gp63 interferes with the function of human monocytes and neutrophils in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A L; Hey, A S; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    In the present study the effect of Leishmania major surface protease Gp63 on the chemotaxis and oxidative burst response of human peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils was investigated. It was shown that prior incubation of cells with Gp63 inhibited chemotaxis of neutrophils but not monocytes...... by heat inactivation of the protease at 70 degrees C for 15 min. Neither neutrophil nor monocyte chemiluminescence was inhibited by Gp63 when cells were stimulated with PMA. Our data suggest that the major surface protease Gp63 might play an important role in the initial stages of Leishmania...

  6. Thrombospondin-1 production is enhanced by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide in THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misa Gokyu

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. Monocytes and macrophages stimulated by periodontopathic bacteria induce inflammatory mediators that cause tooth-supporting structure destruction and alveolar bone resorption. In this study, using a DNA microarray, we identified the enhanced gene expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 in human monocytic cells stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS. TSP-1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during the inflammatory process. Recent studies have suggested that TSP-1 is associated with rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and osteoclastogenesis. TSP-1 is secreted from neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, which mediate immune responses at inflammatory regions. However, TSP-1 expression in periodontitis and the mechanisms underlying TSP-1 expression in human monocytic cells remain unknown. Here using real-time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that TSP-1 mRNA expression level was significantly upregulated in inflamed periodontitis gingival tissues and in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells. TSP-1 was expressed via Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and TLR4 pathways. In P. gingivalis LPS stimulation, TSP-1 expression was dependent upon TLR2 through the activation of NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, IL-17F synergistically enhanced P. gingivalis LPS-induced TSP-1 production. These results suggest that modulation of TSP-1 expression by P. gingivalis plays an important role in the progression and chronicity of periodontitis. It may also contribute a new target molecule for periodontal therapy.

  7. Cholesterol enhances classical conditioning of the rabbit heart rate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Darwish, Deya S; Wang, Desheng; Burhans, Lauren B; Gonzales-Joekes, Jimena; Deci, Stephen; Stankovic, Goran; Sparks, D Larry

    2007-07-19

    The cholesterol-fed rabbit is a model of atherosclerosis and has been proposed as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. Feeding rabbits cholesterol has been shown to increase the number of beta amyloid immunoreactive neurons in the cortex. Addition of copper to the drinking water of cholesterol-fed rabbits can increase this number still further and may lead to plaque-like structures. Classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in cholesterol-fed rabbits is retarded in the presence of these plaque-like structures but may be facilitated in their absence. In a factorial design, rabbits fed 2% cholesterol or a normal diet (0% cholesterol) for 8 weeks with or without copper added to the drinking water were given trace classical conditioning using a tone and periorbital electrodermal stimulation to study the effects of cholesterol and copper on classical conditioning of heart rate and the nictitating membrane response. Cholesterol-fed rabbits showed significant facilitation of heart rate conditioning and conditioning-specific modification of heart rate relative to normal diet controls. Consistent with previous research, cholesterol had minimal effects on classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response when periorbital electrodermal stimulation was used as the unconditioned stimulus. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a significant increase in the number of beta amyloid positive neurons in the cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of the cholesterol-fed rabbits. Supplementation of drinking water with copper increased the number of beta amyloid positive neurons in the cortex of cholesterol-fed rabbits but did not produce plaque-like structures or have a significant effect on heart rate conditioning. The data provide additional support for our finding that, in the absence of plaques, dietary cholesterol may facilitate learning and memory.

  8. Activity enhances dopaminergic long-duration response in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, Peggy; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Mendis, Tilak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dopamine-dependent motor learning mechanism underlies the long-duration response to levodopa in Parkinson disease (PD) based on our studies in a mouse model. By data-mining the motor task performance in dominant and nondominant hands of the subjects in a double-blind randomized trial of levodopa therapy, the effects of activity and dopamine therapy were examined. Methods: We data-mined the Earlier versus Later Levodopa Therapy in Parkinson's Disease (ELLDOPA) study published in 2005 and performed statistical analysis comparing the effects of levodopa and dominance of handedness over 42 weeks. Results: The mean change in finger-tapping counts from baseline before the initiation of therapy to predose at 9 weeks and 40 weeks increased more in the dominant compared to nondominant hand in levodopa-treated subjects in a dose-dependent fashion. There was no significant difference in dominant vs nondominant hands in the placebo group. The short-duration response assessed by the difference of postdose performance compared to predose performance at the same visit did not show any significant difference between dominant vs nondominant hands. Conclusions: Active use of the dominant hand and dopamine replacement therapy produces synergistic effect on long-lasting motor task performance during “off” medication state. Such effect was confined to dopamine-responsive symptoms and not seen in dopamine-resistant symptoms such as gait and balance. We propose that long-lasting motor learning facilitated by activity and dopamine is a form of disease modification that is often seen in trials of medications that have symptomatic effects. PMID:22459675

  9. Assessing and Enhancing Health Care Providers’ Response to Domestic Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Leppäkoski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV. A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n=68, follow-up; n=100 was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants’ quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers’ response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used.

  10. Human Cardiac-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells Fine-Tune Monocyte-Derived Descendants Activities toward Cardiac Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noémie Dam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac repair following MI relies on a finely regulated immune response involving sequential recruitment of monocytes to the injured tissue. Monocyte-derived cells are also critical for tissue homeostasis and healing process. Our previous findings demonstrated the interaction of T and natural killer cells with allogeneic human cardiac-derived stem/progenitor cells (hCPC and suggested their beneficial effect in the context of cardiac repair. Therefore, we investigated here whether monocytes and their descendants could be also modulated by allogeneic hCPC toward a repair/anti-inflammatory phenotype. Through experimental in vitro assays, we assessed the impact of allogeneic hCPC on the recruitment, functions and differentiation of monocytes. We found that allogeneic hCPC at steady state or under inflammatory conditions can incite CCL-2/CCR2-dependent recruitment of circulating CD14+CD16− monocytes and fine-tune their activation toward an anti-inflammatory profile. Allogeneic hCPC also promoted CD14+CD16− monocyte polarization into anti-inflammatory/immune-regulatory macrophages with high phagocytic capacity and IL10 secretion. Moreover, hCPC bended the differentiation of CD14+CD16− monocytes to dendritic cells (DCs toward anti-inflammatory macrophage-like features and impaired their antigen-presenting function in favor of immune-modulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that allogeneic hCPC could reshape monocytes, macrophages as well as DCs responses by favoring their anti-inflammatory/tolerogenic activation/polarization. Thereby, therapeutic allogeneic hCPC might also contribute to post-infarct myocardial healing by modeling the activities of monocytes and their derived descendants.

  11. Monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme expression may be associated with atherosclerosis rather than arteriosclerosis in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Christof; Seibert, Eric; Heine, Gunnar H; Fliser, Danilo; Girndt, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Circulating monocytes can be divided into functionally distinct subpopulations according to their surface expression of CD14 and CD16. Monocytes with high-level expression of both antigens (CD14(++)CD16(+), Mo2 cells) are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. These cells express angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on their surface. They are involved in the association of chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease in kidney patients. Cardiovascular morbidity results from atherosclerosis (plaque-forming, vessel occluding disease) and arteriosclerosis (loss of arterial dampening function). It is unknown whether ACE-expressing proinflammatory monocytes are related to atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, or both. During baseline examination for a prospective study on monocyte ACE expression and mortality, 60 chronic hemodialysis patients of an academic outpatient center were screened for atherosclerosis by carotid artery ultrasound, for arteriosclerosis by pulse pressure measurement, and for ACE expression on Mo2 cells by flow cytometry. ACE expression on Mo2 monocytes was significantly higher in patients with severe compared with those with little or no carotid atherosclerosis. Mo2 ACE correlated with a score to semiquantify atherosclerosis and remained a significant predictor of carotid plaques in multivariate analysis including the other univariately associated variables of age, hemoglobin A1c, and albumin. Mo2 ACE was not related to pulse pressure. ACE expression on Mo2, although being a known predictor of mortality and cardiovascular disease in end-stage renal disease patients, may act via enhancement of atherosclerosis rather than arteriosclerosis.

  12. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-15

    amplitude of the voltage signal. The response current and impedance are given by: l(t) = , [Cos(oi t -O) + jsin(w t -p)] (3.3) Z = Z,,( coso + jsin 0) (3.4...of the effective technique to handle free electrons in conjunction to molecular dynamics framework . 154 f) The force field used in the present study is...the introductory paper on COMPASS by Sun [4.25]. 1+a =Y[K 2(b-b )2+K 3(b-b )3+K(b-b )]+Y[K(2(-) +K(0-0 )3+ b 0 9 0 0 K4,(0-8)4]+y_[K (l- coso )+2(1-os2o

  13. Enhancement of anamnestic immunospecific antibody response in orally immunized chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayo, Susan; Carlsson, Hans-Erik; Zagon, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Production of immunospecific egg yolk antibodies (IgY antibodies) in egg laying hens through oral immunization is an attractive alternative to conventional antibody production in mammals for economic reasons as well as for animal welfare reasons. Oral immunization results in a systemic humoral...... of the immunization in week 18, demonstrating the presence of memory cells following the two initial oral immunizations. Considering that oral immunization results in approximately ten times lower concentrations of immunospecific antibodies in the egg yolk, compared to traditional subcutaneous immunization schemes...... response, but oral booster immunizations lack efficiency. The aim of the present study was to develop immunization schemes in which the concentration of immunospecific IgY would increase following oral booster immunizations. Two groups of egg laying hens (5 in each group) were immunized orally (each...

  14. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  15. Monocytes inhibit hepatitis C virus-induced TRAIL expression on CD56bright NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Dalila; Mantovani, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Grossi, Giulia; Lombardi, Andrea; Mondelli, Mario U; Varchetta, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously shown that culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) enhance tumor necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression on healthy NK cells, but not on those from patients infected with HCV, which was likely dependent on accessory cells. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanisms involved in altered TRAIL upregulation in this setting. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from controls and patients infected with HCV were exposed to HCVcc. Cell depletions were performed to identify cells responsible for NK cell activation. Flow cytometry and ELISA were used to identify the cytokines involved in the NK activation process. In patients infected with HCV, soluble factors secreted by control PBMC restored the ability of NK cells to express TRAIL. Of note, CD14+ cell depletion had identical effects upon virus exposure and promoted increased degranulation. Moreover, increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein a (IL-18BPa) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36RA) were observed after PBMC exposure to HCVcc in patients with HCV. HCVcc-induced NK cell TRAIL expression was inhibited by IL-18BPa and IL-36RA in control subjects. There were statistically significant correlations between IL-18BPa and indices of liver inflammation and fibrosis, supporting a role for this protein in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. During chronic HCV infection, monocytes play a key role in negative regulation of NK cell activation, predominantly via secretion of inhibitors of IL-18 and IL-36. Coordination and collaboration between immune cells are essential to fight pathogens. Herein we show that during HCV infection monocytes secrete IL-18 and IL-36 inhibitory proteins, reducing NK cell activation, and consequently inhibiting their ability to express TRAIL and kill target cells. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the

  16. Skin-resident CD4+ T cells protect against Leishmania major by recruiting and activating inflammatory monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, Nelson D; Volk, Susan W; Scott, Phillip

    2017-04-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells are required for establishing protective immunity against a variety of different pathogens, although the mechanisms mediating protection by CD4+ resident memory T cells are still being defined. In this study we addressed this issue with a population of protective skin-resident, IFNγ-producing CD4+ memory T cells generated following Leishmania major infection. We previously found that resident memory T cells recruit circulating effector T cells to enhance immunity. Here we show that resident memory CD4+ T cells mediate the delayed-hypersensitivity response observed in immune mice and provide protection without circulating T cells. This protection occurs rapidly after challenge, and requires the recruitment and activation of inflammatory monocytes, which limit parasites by production of both reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Overall, these data highlight a novel role for tissue-resident memory cells in recruiting and activating inflammatory monocytes, and underscore the central role that skin-resident T cells play in immunity to cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  17. Weight cycling enhances adipose tissue inflammatory responses in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Barbosa-da-Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation attributed to dysregulated production, release of cytokines and adipokines and to dysregulated glucose-insulin homeostasis and dyslipidemia. Nutritional interventions such as dieting are often accompanied by repeated bouts of weight loss and regain, a phenomenon known as weight cycling (WC. METHODS: In this work we studied the effects of WC on the feed efficiency, blood lipids, carbohydrate metabolism, adiposity and inflammatory markers in C57BL/6 male mice that WC two or three consecutive times by alternation of a high-fat (HF diet with standard chow (SC. RESULTS: The body mass (BM grew up in each cycle of HF feeding, and decreased after each cycle of SC feeding. The alterations observed in the animals feeding HF diet in the oral glucose tolerance test, in blood lipids, and in serum and adipose tissue expression of adipokines were not recuperated after WC. Moreover, the longer the HF feeding was (two, four and six months, more severe the adiposity was. After three consecutive WC, less marked was the BM reduction during SC feeding, while more severe was the BM increase during HF feeding. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that both the HF diet and WC are relevant to BM evolution and fat pad remodeling in mice, with repercussion in blood lipids, homeostasis of glucose-insulin and adipokine levels. The simple reduction of the BM during a WC is not able to recover the high levels of adipokines in the serum and adipose tissue as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokines enhanced during a cycle of HF diet. These findings are significant because a milieu with altered adipokines in association with WC potentially aggravates the chronic inflammation attributed to dysregulated production and release of adipokines in mice.

  18. Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in Childhood Obesity Is Associated with Decreased IL-10 Expression by Monocyte Subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael T Mattos

    Full Text Available Chronic low-grade inflammation is related to the development of comorbidities and poor prognosis in obesity. Monocytes are main sources of cytokines and play a pivotal role in inflammation. We evaluated monocyte frequency, phenotype and cytokine profile of monocyte subsets, to determine their association with the pathogenesis of childhood obesity. Children with obesity were evaluated for biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Monocyte subsets were characterized by flow cytometry, considering cytokine production and activation/recognition molecules. Correlation analysis between clinical parameters and immunological data delineated the monocytes contribution for low-grade inflammation. We observed a higher frequency of non-classical monocytes in the childhood obesity group (CO than normal-weight group (NW. All subsets displayed higher TLR4 expression in CO, but their recognition and antigen presentation functions seem to be diminished due to lower expression of CD40, CD80/86 and HLA-DR. All subsets showed a lower expression of IL-10 in CO and correlation analyses showed changes in IL-10 expression profile. The lower expression of IL-10 may be decisive for the maintenance of the low-grade inflammation status in CO, especially for alterations in non-classical monocytes profile. These cells may contribute to supporting inflammation and loss of regulation in the immune response of children with obesity.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, C.E.

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis is to investigate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in monitoring response of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The role of MRI with respect to achieving personalized breast cancer treatment by improving response monitoring is examined. Our

  20. Comparison of the pro-inflammatory potential of monocytes from healthy adults and those with peripheral arterial disease using an in vitro culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, N T; Madden, J; Calder, P C; Grimble, R F; Shearman, C P; Chan, T; Tull, S P; Dastur, N; Rainger, G E; Nash, G B

    2007-08-01

    We adapted a monocyte:endothelial cell co-culture model to investigate the pro-inflammatory potential of monocytes from patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Isolated monocytes were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) for 24h, after which the ability of the HUVEC to recruit flowing neutrophils was tested. Development of a usable protocol required comparisons of primary HUVEC with cells that had been passaged and/or frozen and thawed, evaluation of optimal culture media and comparison of monocytes from freshly drawn and stored blood. We found, for instance, that expansion of HUVEC was assisted by inclusion of hydrocortisone, but this agent was withdrawn before the test phase because it reduced responses of HUVEC. Using the optimal practical protocol, we found great variation in the ability of monocytes from different donors to cause neutrophil adhesion. Slightly more ( approximately 20%) monocytes from patients with PAD adhered to HUVEC than monocytes from healthy controls, and the monocytes from PAD patients induced approximately 70% greater subsequent adhesion of neutrophils. Thus, we developed a functional model of inflammatory potential usable in clinically-related studies and found that patients with PAD had circulating monocytes with greater than normal ability to activate endothelial cells.

  1. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against carbohydrate epitopes of gp120 have recently been found to inhibit HIV infection of lymphocytes in vitro thereby opening new possibilities for vaccine considerations. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has however come increasingly into focus....... This study therefore investigated the neutralization of HIV in a monocytic cell line (U937) using mAbs against these carbohydrate gp120-epitopes. While antibodies against one of the epitopes (AI) neutralized infection of U937 cells despite binding to the Fc-receptor, one mAb against the sialosyl-Tn epitope...... enhanced infection. This enhancement was independent of complement and could be blocked by mAb Leu3a against the CD4-receptor. The study indicated that enhancement of infection in monocytic cells can occur by the same anti-carbohydrate antibodies that neutralize infection in lymphocytes, and that antibody...

  2. Maggot secretions skew monocyte-macrophage differentiation away from a pro-inflammatory to a pro-angiogenic type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; van Dissel, Jaap T; Nibbering, Peter H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. Earlier we reported maggot secretions to inhibit pro-inflammatory responses of human monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maggot secretions on the differentiation of mono......-DR down-regulated, while receptors involved in phagocytosis remained largely unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: Maggot secretions skew the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages away from a pro-inflammatory to a pro-angiogenic type....

  3. Insoluble immune complexes are most effective at triggering IL-10 production in human monocytes and synergize with TLR ligands and C5a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMartino, Stephen J; Yuan, Weijia; Redecha, Patricia; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Salmon, Jane E

    2008-04-01

    In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a disease of immune complex (IC) deposition, interleukin-10 (IL-10) is thought to promote B-lymphocyte hyperactivity and autoantibody production. Both ICs and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands have been shown to stimulate the production of IL-10 by human monocytes. Using an in vitro model, we studied how IC solubility, complement activation products, and TLR ligands could affect IL-10 production by human monocytes stimulated with ICs. Human monocytes were stimulated with soluble or insoluble heat-aggregated human IgG with or without TLR ligands or C5a. Cytokine levels in cell culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. To study cytokine signaling, cell lysates were analyzed by Western blot for total or tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3. Insoluble ICs were most effective at stimulating production of IL-10, and costimulation LPS enhanced synthesis of IL-10. In addition, stimulation with insoluble ICs together with C5a enhanced the production of IL-10 by 2-4 fold in either the presence or absence of TLR ligands. Increased STAT3 phosphorylation correlated temporally with enhanced IL-10 production and was reduced by an IL-10 receptor blocking antibody, suggesting that IL-10 was responsible for observed STAT3 phosphorylation. Because the immune deposits of SLE are, by definition, insoluble; and because IL-10 is thought to be important for B-cell hyperactivity and autoantibody production, these observations provide a critical link, bridging current views of B-cell hyperactivity with the early concept that SLE may arise from defective clearance of immune complexes.

  4. Immunotargeting with CD154 (CD40 Ligand) Enhances DNA Vaccine Responses in Ducks

    OpenAIRE

    Sheryl L. Gares; Karl P Fischer; Congly, Stephen E.; Lacoste, Stacey; Addison, William R.; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Gutfreund, Klaus S.

    2006-01-01

    Engagement of CD154 on activated T cells with CD40 on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) potentiates adaptive immune responses in mammals. Soluble multimeric forms of CD154 have been used as an adjuvant or in immunotargeting strategies to enhance vaccine responses. The objective of our study was to examine the ability of duck CD154 (DuCD154) to enhance DNA vaccine responses in the duck hepatitis B model. Constructs were generated to express the functional domain of DuCD154 (tCD154), truncated du...

  5. Enhancement of natural killer cell activity in healthy subjects by Immulina®, a Spirulina extract enriched for Braun-type lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Balachandran, Premalatha; Christensen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Immulina®, a commercial extract of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a potent activator of THP-1 monocytes and CD4+ T cells IN VITRO and enhances several immunological functions in mice. We further characterized Immulina® by determining that Braun-type lipoproteins are responsible for a major...

  6. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of heavy ion clinical research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy.

  7. Enhanced regional brain metabolic responses to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    While dopamine (DA) appears to be crucial for cocaine reinforcement, its involvement in cocaine addiction is much less clear. Using PET we have shown persistent reductions in striatal DA D2 receptors (which arc predominantly located on GABA cells) in cocaine abusers. This finding coupled to GABA`s role as an effector for DA led us to investigate if there were GABAergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. In this study we measured regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam, to indirectly assess GABA function (benzodiazepines facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission). Methods: The experimental subjects consisted of 12 active cocaine abusers and 32 age matched controls. Each subject underwent two PET FDG scans obtained within 1 week of each other. The first FDG scan was obtained after administration of placebo (3 cc of saline solution) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG; and the second after administration of lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG. The subjects were blind to the drugs received. Results: Lorazepam-induced sleepiness was significantly greater in abusers than in controls (p<0.001). Lorazepam-induced decreases in brain glucose metabolism were significantly larger in cocaine abusers than in controls. Whereas in controls whole brain metabolism decreased 13{+-}7 %, in cocaine abusers it decreased 21{+-}13 % (p < 0.05). Lorazepam-induced decrements in regional metabolism were significantly larger in striatum (p < 0.0 1), thalamus (p < 0.01) and cerebellum (p < 0.005) of cocaine abusers than of controls (ANOVA diagnosis by condition (placebo versus lorazepam) interaction effect). The only brain region for which the absolute metabolic changes-induced by lorazepam in cocaine abusers were equivalent to those in controls was the orbitofrontal cortex. These results document an accentuated sensitivity to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers which is compatible with disrupted GABAergic function in these patients.

  8. Nucleotides Regulate Secretion of the Inflammatory Chemokine CCL2 from Human Macrophages and Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Higgins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CCL2 is an important inflammatory chemokine involved in monocyte recruitment to inflamed tissues. The extracellular nucleotide signalling molecules UTP and ATP acting via the P2Y2 receptor are known to induce CCL2 secretion in macrophages. We confirmed this in the human THP-1 monocytic cell line showing that UTP is as efficient as LPS at inducing CCL2 at early time points (2–6 hours. Expression and calcium mobilisation experiments confirmed the presence of functional P2Y2 receptors on THP-1 cells. UTP stimulation of human peripheral CD14+ monocytes showed low responses to LPS (4-hour stimulation but a significant increase above background following 6 hours of treatment. The response to UTP in human monocytes was variable and required stimulation >6 hours. With such variability in response we looked for single nucleotide polymorphisms in P2RY2 that could affect the functional response. Sequencing of P2RY2 from THP-1 cells revealed the presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism altering amino acid 312 from arginine to serine (rs3741156. This polymorphism is relatively common at a frequency of 0.276 (n=404 subjects. Finally, we investigated CCL2 secretion in response to LPS or UTP in human macrophages expressing 312Arg-P2Y2 or 312Ser-P2Y2 where only the latter exhibited significant UTP-induced CCL2 secretion (n=5 donors per group.

  9. Pipecolic acid enhancement of GABA response in single neurons of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, K; Hashimoto, T; Wang, M W; Akaike, N; Hitoshi, T; Okano, Y; Kasé, Y; Miyata, T

    1986-03-01

    Using unit recording and microelectrophoresis, influence of pipecolic acid (PA), a major metabolite of lysine in the brain, on GABA and glycine responses was studied in the cerebral cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons of rats. With small currents, PA had no effect on the single neuron activities but enhanced GABA response without affecting glycine response. The finding provides a new evidence that PA may have a connection with central GABA system.

  10. Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Song

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF has been reported to enhance recovery from controlled cortical impact (CCI in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by CCI. The selective C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 antagonist (RS504303 was co-administered with G-CSF for three days after CCI in a chimeric mouse previously transplanted with GFP-expressing (GFP+ blood stem-progenitor cells. Results: The drug significantly impaired infiltration of GFP+ bone marrow-derived cells to the frontal cortex and striatum without impeding recovery performance and hippocampal neurogenesis in the behavioral test, the Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM. Administration of the CCR2 antagonist alone, without G-CSF, was effective in promoting recovery in RAWM. These results support the hypothesis that the direct action of G-CSF on neural cells, independent of its hematopoietic effects, is primarily responsible for enhanced recovery from CCI. In addition, this study confirms the importance of CCR2 and its ligand, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, in mediating the inflammatory response following CCI.

  11. Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shijie; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Acosta, Sandra; Sava, Vasyl; Borlongan, Cesar V; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2017-07-02

    Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF) has been reported to enhance recovery from controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis) and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by CCI. The selective C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist (RS504303) was co-administered with G-CSF for three days after CCI in a chimeric mouse previously transplanted with GFP-expressing (GFP+) blood stem-progenitor cells. The drug significantly impaired infiltration of GFP+ bone marrow-derived cells to the frontal cortex and striatum without impeding recovery performance and hippocampal neurogenesis in the behavioral test, the Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM). Administration of the CCR2 antagonist alone, without G-CSF, was effective in promoting recovery in RAWM. These results support the hypothesis that the direct action of G-CSF on neural cells, independent of its hematopoietic effects, is primarily responsible for enhanced recovery from CCI. In addition, this study confirms the importance of CCR2 and its ligand, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), in mediating the inflammatory response following CCI.

  12. Phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes during post-transplant adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Haufe, Susanne; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-05-01

    Phagocytosis of granulocytes and monocytes presents a major mechanism that contributes to the clearance of pathogens and cell debris. We analyzed the phagocytic activity of the peripheral blood cell monocytes, three monocyte subpopulations and granulocytes before and up to one year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as during transplant-related adverse events. 25 pediatric patients and young adults (median age of 11.0 years) with hemato-oncological malignancies and non malignancies were enrolled in the prospective study. Ingestion of fluorescence-labeled Escherichia coli bacteria was used to assess the phagocytic activity of monocytes and their subpopulations and granulocytes by means of flow cytometry in the patient group as well as in a control group (n=36). During sepsis, a significant increase of phagocytic activity of monocytes (P=0.0003) and a significant decrease of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes (P=0.0003) and the CD14+ CD16++ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0020) occurred. At the onset of a veno-occlusive disease, a significant increase of phagocytic activity in the CD14++ CD16+ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.001) and a significant decrease in the phagocytic activity of the CD14++ CD16- monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0048) were observed. In conclusion, the phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes might be a useful and easy determinable parameter that enables identification of post-transplant complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The alterations of phagocytic activity contribute to the altered immune response that accompanies adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. M2 macrophages exhibit higher sensitivity to oxLDL-induced lipotoxicity than other monocyte/macrophage subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Suleiman A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In obesity, phenotypic switches occur in macrophage populations such that the predominantly M2-polarised anti-inflammatory state seen in lean individuals changes to a predominantly M1-polarised pro-inflammatory state in those who are obese. However, the mechanisms by which these phenotypic shifts occur have not yet been fully elucidated. Results The effects of oxLDL (1-40 μg/ml; 24 h on several parameters relevant to the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR-mediated lipotoxic effects of oxLDL (disruption of ER Ca2+ handling; activation of the UPR transcription factor XBP-1; upregulation of the UPR target genes BiP and CHOP; apoptosis; cell viability were investigated in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages, and also in monocyte-macrophages derived from the THP-1 monocytic cell line. A consistent pattern was observed: M2-polarised macrophages were more sensitive to the lipotoxic effects of oxLDL than either non-polarised macrophages or non-differentiated monocytic cells. Specifically, M2-polarised macrophages were the only cell type to undergo significantly increased apoptosis (Primary cells: 1.23 ± 0.01 basal; THP-1-derived: 1.97 ± 0.12 basal; P P Conclusions We propose that the enhanced susceptibility of M2-polarised macrophages to lipotoxicity seen in the present in vitro study could, over time, contribute to the phenotypic shift seen in obese individuals in vivo. This is because a higher degree of oxLDL-induced lipotoxic cell death within M2 macrophages could contribute to a decrease in numbers of M2 cells, and thus a relative increase in proportion of non-M2 cells, within macrophage populations. Given the pro-inflammatory characteristics of a predominantly M1-polarised state, the data presented here may constitute a useful contribution to our understanding of the origin of the pro-inflammatory nature of obesity, and of the pathogenesis of obesity-associated inflammatory disorders such as Type 2 Diabetes and

  14. Discriminative identification of transcriptional responses of promoters and enhancers after stimulus

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.

    2016-10-17

    Promoters and enhancers regulate the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of expression levels in spatial and temporal manner. Recent findings stemming from the Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) demonstrate that promoters and enhancers, based on their expression profiles after stimulus, belong to different transcription response subclasses. One of the most promising biological features that might explain the difference in transcriptional response between subclasses is the local chromatin environment. We introduce a novel computational framework, PEDAL, for distinguishing effectively transcriptional profiles of promoters and enhancers using solely histone modification marks, chromatin accessibility and binding sites of transcription factors and co-activators. A case study on data from MCF-7 cell-line reveals that PEDAL can identify successfully the transcription response subclasses of promoters and enhancers from two different stimulations. Moreover, we report subsets of input markers that discriminate with minimized classification error MCF-7 promoter and enhancer transcription response subclasses. Our work provides a general computational approach for identifying effectively cell-specific and stimulation-specific promoter and enhancer transcriptional profiles, and thus, contributes to improve our understanding of transcriptional activation in human.

  15. Comparative study of the effect of rivaroxaban and fondaparinux on monocyte's coagulant activity and cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Marc; Joimel, Ulrich; Varin, Rémi; Cazin, Lionel; Gest, Caroline; Le-Cam-Duchez, Veronique; Jin, Jian; Liu, Jielin; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lu, He; Soria, Jeannette; Li, Hong; Soria, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) exposed on activated monocytes and macrophages is involved in thrombosis through activation of factor X and cytokine release, responsible for inflammation and thrombosis. We investigated the effect of two anti-factor Xa drugs: rivaroxaban, a direct anti-Xa inhibitor, and fondaparinux, an antithrombin dependent anti-Xa inhibitor, on monocyte/macrophage procoagulant activity and cytokine release. Rivaroxaban and fondaparinux were tested at pharmacological concentrations on LPS-activated monocytes and on THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, to assess 1) TF expression by flow cytometry 2) prothrombinase activity by its coagulant activity and 3) cytokine release in cell supernatants by antibody based cytokine array and ELISA for IL-8 and TNFα. Rivaroxaban and fondaparinux did not modify TF expression level on activated cells. In contrast procoagulant activity associated to monocytes and macrophages was dose dependently inhibited by rivaroxaban, but not significantly by fondaparinux. These results could explain why patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery with rivaroxaban prophylaxis were able to achieve significant reductions in venous thromboembolism, compared with drugs commonly used, i.e. fondaparinux and low molecular weight heparin. In addition, rivaroxaban and fondaparinux suppressed some chemokine secretion produced by activated macrophages. This may also contribute to their antithrombotic effect in clinic.

  16. Fungal Chitin Induces Trained Immunity in Human Monocytes during Cross-talk of the Host with Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifrim, Daniela C.; Moretti, Silvia; Tocci, Noemi; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Quintin, Jessica; Renga, Giorgia; Oikonomou, Vasilis; De Filippo, Carlotta; Weil, Tobias; Blok, Bastiaan A.; Lenucci, Marcello S.; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Romani, Luigina; Netea, Mihai G.; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is essential to maintain the mutualistic homeostatic interaction between the host and its micro- and mycobiota. Living as a commensal, Saccharomyces cerevisiae could potentially shape the immune response in a significant way. We observed that S. cerevisiae cells induce trained immunity in monocytes in a strain-dependent manner through enhanced TNFα and IL-6 production upon secondary stimulation with TLR ligands, as well as bacterial and fungal commensals. Differential chitin content accounts for the differences in training properties observed among strains, driving induction of trained immunity by increasing cytokine production and direct antimicrobial activity both in vitro and in vivo. These chitin-induced protective properties are intimately associated with its internalization, identifying a critical role of phagosome acidification to facilitate microbial digestion. This study reveals how commensal and passenger microorganisms could be important in promoting health and preventing mucosal diseases by modulating host defense toward pathogens and thus influencing the host microbiota-immune system interactions. PMID:26887946

  17. Elevated atherosclerosis-related gene expression, monocyte activation and microparticle-release are related to increased lipoprotein-associated oxidative stress in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Hjuler Nielsen

    Full Text Available Animal and in vitro studies have suggested that hypercholesterolemia and increased oxidative stress predisposes to monocyte activation and enhanced accumulation of oxidized LDL cholesterol (oxLDL-C through a CD36-dependent mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that elevated oxLDL-C induce proinflammatory monocytes and increased release of monocyte-derived microparticles (MMPs, as well as up-regulation of CD36, chemokine receptors and proinflammatory factors through CD36-dependent pathways and that this is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis in subjects with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, in particular in the presence of Achilles tendon xanthomas (ATX.We studied thirty FH subjects with and without ATX and twenty-three healthy control subjects. Intima-media thickness (IMT and Achilles tendon (AT thickness were measured by ultrasonography. Monocyte classification and MMP analysis were performed by flow cytometry. Monocyte expression of genes involved in atherosclerosis was determined by quantitative PCR. IMT and oxLDL-C were increased in FH subjects, especially in the presence of ATX. In addition, FH subjects had elevated proportions of intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes and higher circulating MMP levels. Stepwise linear regression identified oxLDL-C, gender and intermediate monocytes as predictors of MMPs. Monocyte expression of pro-atherogenic and pro-inflammatory genes regulated by oxLDL-C-CD36 interaction was increased in FH, especially in ATX+ subjects. Monocyte chemokine receptor CX3CR1 was identified as an independent contributor to IMT.Our data support that lipoprotein-associated oxidative stress is involved in accelerated atherosclerosis in FH, particularly in the presence of ATX, by inducing pro-inflammatory monocytes and increased release of MMPs along with elevated monocyte expression of oxLDL-C-induced atherosclerosis-related genes.

  18. Counts of bovine monocyte subsets prior to calving are predictive for postpartum occurrence of mastitis and metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Brianna; Sipka, Anja; Hussen, Jamal; Eger, Melanie; Schukken, Ynte; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim

    2017-02-21

    The heightened susceptibility to infectious diseases in postpartum dairy cows is often attributed to immune dysfunction associated with the transition period. However, the cell populations involved in this immune dysfunction and the dynamics between those populations are not well defined. Monocytes play a crucial role in governing initial immune response in bacterial infections. Bovine monocytes are subdivided in classical (CD14+/CD16-), intermediate (CD14+/CD16+) and non-classical monocytes (CD14-/CD16+) with distinct phenotypic and functional differences. This study investigated the relationship of monocyte subsets counts in blood at 42 and 14 days prior to expected calving date to occurrence of metritis and mastitis within 2 weeks postpartum. In the enrolled prospective cohort of 27 German Holstein cows, housed at the Institute of Animal Nutrition of the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute Braunschweig, Germany, n = 13 developed metritis and/or mastitis postpartum. A multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between prepartum cell counts of monocyte subsets and neutrophils with postpartum disease. Our model revealed that higher counts of the two CD14+ monocyte subsets were predictive of disease. In contrast, higher numbers of the CD14- monocyte subset were negatively associated with disease. Interestingly, the neutrophil count, a common hallmark for inflammatory response, was not associated with the outcome variable at either time point. The results indicate that the number and composition of monocyte subsets before calving are related to the susceptibility to infectious disease within 2 weeks postpartum. Furthermore the oppositional effect of CD14+ and CD14- subsets strengthens the hypothesis that these subsets have different functional roles in the inflammatory response in dairy cows.

  19. The effect of short-chain fatty acids on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Candela, Marco; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné

    2015-01-01

    negligible effects, while both butyrate and propionate strongly modulated gene expression in both immature and mature human monocyte-derived DC. An Ingenuity pathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes suggested that propionate and butyrate modulate leukocyte trafficking, as SCFA strongly......The gut microbiota is essential for human health and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are end-products of microbial fermentation of macronutrients that distribute systemically via the blood....... The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of immature and LPS-matured human monocyte-derived DC to SCFA. Our data revealed distinct effects exerted by each individual SCFA on gene expression in human monocyte-derived DC, especially in the mature ones. Acetate only exerted...

  20. Soluble fibrin inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells: implications for cancer metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Shonak

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble fibrin (sFn is a marker for disseminated intravascular coagulation and may have prognostic significance, especially in metastasis. However, a role for sFn in the etiology of metastatic cancer growth has not been extensively studied. We have reported that sFn cross-linked platelet binding to tumor cells via the major platelet fibrin receptor αIIbβ3, and tumor cell CD54 (ICAM-1, which is the receptor for two of the leukocyte β2 integrins (αLβ2 and aMβ2. We hypothesized that sFn may also affect leukocyte adherence, recognition, and killing of tumor cells. Furthermore, in a rat experimental metastasis model sFn pre-treatment of tumor cells enhanced metastasis by over 60% compared to untreated cells. Other studies have shown that fibrin(ogen binds to the monocyte integrin αMβ2. This study therefore sought to investigate the effect of sFn on β2 integrin mediated monocyte adherence and killing of tumor cells. Methods The role of sFn in monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells was initially studied using static microplate adherence and cytotoxicity assays, and under physiologically relevant flow conditions in a microscope perfusion incubator system. Blocking studies were performed using monoclonal antibodies specific for β2 integrins and CD54, and specific peptides which inhibit sFn binding to these receptors. Results Enhancement of monocyte/tumor cell adherence was observed when only one cell type was bound to sFn, but profound inhibition was observed when sFn was bound to both monocytes and tumor cells. This effect was also reflected in the pattern of monocyte cytotoxicity. Studies using monoclonal blocking antibodies and specific blocking peptides (which did not affect normal coagulation showed that the predominant mechanism of fibrin inhibition is via its binding to αMβ2 on monocytes, and to CD54 on both leukocytes and tumor cells. Conclusion sFn inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity of

  1. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after...... intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI...... semi-automatic software is a reliable and responsive tool for assessing treatment in RA knees joints. Rough manual delineation of the joint to omit enhancement artefacts is necessary....

  2. Modulation of human immune responses by bovine interleukin-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerco den Hartog

    Full Text Available Cytokines can be functionally active across species barriers. Bovine IL-10 has an amino acid sequence identity with human IL-10 of 76.8%. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether bovine IL-10 has immunomodulatory activities on human monocytes and dendritic cells. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy donors, and used directly or allowed to differentiate to dendritic cells under the influence of IL-4 and GM-CSF. Recombinant bovine IL-10 inhibited TLR induced activation of monocytes, and dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced activation of monocyte-derived DCs comparable to human IL-10. By using blocking antibodies to either bovine IL-10 or the human IL-10 receptor it was demonstrated that inhibition of monocyte activation by bovine IL-10 was dependent on binding of bovine IL-10 to the human IL-10R. These data demonstrate that bovine IL-10 potently inhibits the activation of human myeloid cells in response to TLR activation. Bovine IL-10 present in dairy products may thus potentially contribute to the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis and allergy, enhance mucosal tolerance induction and decrease intestinal inflammation and may therefore be applicable in infant foods and in immunomodulatory diets.

  3. Differential down-regulation of HLA-DR on monocyte subpopulations during systemic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Decreased expression of human leukocyte antigen class II (HLA-DR) on monocytes is a hallmark of altered immune status in patients with a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). So far, the analyses were mainly performed without taking into account monocytes subpopulations. Methods We studied this modification on CD14HIGH and CD14LOW monocytes of 20 SIRS patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery (AAS), 20 patients undergoing carotid artery surgery (CAS), and 9 healthy controls, and we investigated mediators and intracellular molecules that may be involved in this process. Results HLA-DR on CD14HIGH monocytes started to decrease during surgery, after blood reperfusion, and was further reduced post-surgery. In contrast, HLA-DR expression on CD14LOW cells only decreased after surgery, and to a lesser extent than on CD14HIGH monocytes. Negative correlations were found between the reduction of HLA-DR expression and the change in cortisol levels for both subpopulations, whereas a negative correlation between interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels and HLA-DR modulation was only observed for CD14HIGH cells. In accordance with these ex vivo results, HLA-DR on CD14HIGH and CD14LOW monocytes of healthy donors was reduced following incubation with hydrocortisone, whereas IL-10 only acted on CD14HIGH subpopulation. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that the expression of IL-10 receptor was higher on CD14HIGH versus CD14LOW monocytes. In addition, hydrocortisone, and to a lesser extent IL-10, reversed the up-regulation of HLA-DR induced by bacterial products. Finally, membrane-associated RING-CH-1 protein (MARCH1) mRNA, a negative regulator of MHC class II, was up-regulated in monocytes of AAS patients on Day 1 post-surgery, and in those of healthy subjects exposed to hydrocortisone. Conclusions This study reveals that HLA-DR expression is modulated differently on CD14HIGH (classical) versus CD14LOW (inflammatory) monocytes after systemic inflammation. PMID

  4. Phenolic compounds alone or in combination may be involved in propolis effects on human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Eliza de Oliveira; Conti, Bruno José; Santiago, Karina Basso; Conte, Fernanda Lopes; Oliveira, Lucas Pires Garcia; Hernandes, Rodrigo Tavanelli; Golim, Marjorie de Assis; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2017-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product with a complex chemical composition. Its isolated compounds exert biological activities; however, its synergistic effects are unknown. The involvement of phenolic acids (caffeic - Caf, dihydrocinnamic - Cin and p-coumaric - Cou) alone or in combination was investigated in the action of propolis in human monocytes. Cell viability was analysed by MTT assay; TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); cell markers expression by flow cytometry; colony-forming units were counted to assess the microbicidal activity; and H2 O2 production was analysed by colorimetric assay. Treatments did not affect monocytes viability. Propolis and combinations containing Caf enhanced TNF-α production by resting cells. Propolis, Cin, Cou and Caf + Cin stimulated IL-6 production. All treatments upregulated IL-10. In LPS-stimulated cells, treatments downregulated IL-6 and maintained TNF-α and IL-10 production. A lower TLR-2 expression was seen than propolis. Caf + Cin enhanced TLR-4 expression. Propolis, Caf and Caf + Cin stimulated H2 O2 production, whereas propolis, Cin, Cou, and Caf + Cin + Cou induced a higher fungicidal activity. Cin and Cin + Cou increased the bactericidal activity of human monocytes. Propolis activated human monocytes, and acids were involved differently in propolis activity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Immunotargeting with CD154 (CD40 ligand) enhances DNA vaccine responses in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gares, Sheryl L; Fischer, Karl P; Congly, Stephen E; Lacoste, Stacey; Addison, William R; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Gutfreund, Klaus S

    2006-08-01

    Engagement of CD154 on activated T cells with CD40 on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) potentiates adaptive immune responses in mammals. Soluble multimeric forms of CD154 have been used as an adjuvant or in immunotargeting strategies to enhance vaccine responses. The objective of our study was to examine the ability of duck CD154 (DuCD154) to enhance DNA vaccine responses in the duck hepatitis B model. Constructs were generated to express the functional domain of DuCD154 (tCD154), truncated duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core antigen (tcore) and chimera of tcore fused to tCD154 (tcore-tCD154). Expression in LMH cells demonstrated that all proteins were secreted and that tCD154 and tcore-tCD154 formed multimers. Ducks immunized with the plasmid ptcore-tCD154 developed accelerated and enhanced core-specific antibody responses compared to ducks immunized with ptcore or ptcore plus ptCD154. Antibody responses were better sustained in both ptcore-tCD154- and ptcore plus ptCD154-immunized ducks. Core-specific proliferative responses of duck peripheral blood mononuclear cells were enhanced in ducks immunized with ptcore-tCD154 or ptcore alone. This study suggests that the role of CD154 in the regulation of adaptive immune responses had already evolved before the divergence of birds and mammals. Thus, targeting of antigens to APCs with CD154 is an effective strategy to enhance DNA vaccine responses not only in mammalian species but also in avian species.

  6. Monocytes and macrophages in tissue repair: Implications for immunoregenerative biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Molly E; Segar, Claire E; Sridhar, Sraeyes; Botchwey, Edward A

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play a critical role in tissue development, homeostasis, and injury repair. These innate immune cells participate in guiding vascular remodeling, stimulation of local stem and progenitor cells, and structural repair of tissues such as muscle and bone. Therefore, there is a great interest in harnessing this powerful endogenous cell source for therapeutic regeneration through immunoregenerative biomaterial engineering. These materials seek to harness specific subpopulations of monocytes/macrophages to promote repair by influencing their recruitment, positioning, differentiation, and function within a damaged tissue. Monocyte and macrophage phenotypes span a continuum of inflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory or pro-regenerative cells (M2), and their heterogeneous functions are highly dependent on microenvironmental cues within the injury niche. Increasing evidence suggests that division of labor among subpopulations of monocytes and macrophages could allow for harnessing regenerative functions over inflammatory functions of myeloid cells; however, the complex balance between necessary functions of inflammatory versus regenerative myeloid cells remains to be fully elucidated. Historically, biomaterial-based therapies for promoting tissue regeneration were designed to minimize the host inflammatory response; although, recent appreciation for the roles that innate immune cells play in tissue repair and material integration has shifted this paradigm. A number of opportunities exist to exploit known signaling systems of specific populations of monocytes/macrophages to promote repair and to better understand the biological and pathological roles of myeloid cells. This review seeks to outline the characteristics of distinct populations of monocytes and macrophages, identify the role of these cells within diverse tissue injury niches, and offer design criteria for immunoregenerative biomaterials given the intrinsic inflammatory response to their

  7. Geosynchronous magnetic field responses to fast solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements: MHD field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Sun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed global MHD simulations of the geosynchronous magnetic field in response to fast solar wind dynamic pressure (Pd enhancements. Taking three Pd enhancement events in 2000 as examples, we found that the main features of the total field B and the dominant component Bz can be efficiently predicted by the MHD model. The predicted B and Bz varies with local time, with the highest level near noon and a slightly lower level around mid-night. However, it is more challenging to accurately predict the responses of the smaller component at the geosynchronous orbit (i.e., Bx and By. In contrast, the limitations of T01 model in predicting responses to fast Pd enhancements are presented.

  8. Transcription factor assisted loading and enhancer dynamics dictate the hepatic fasting response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ido; Baek, Songjoon; Presman, Diego M; Paakinaho, Ville; Swinstead, Erin E; Hager, Gordon L

    2017-03-01

    Fasting elicits transcriptional programs in hepatocytes leading to glucose and ketone production. This transcriptional program is regulated by many transcription factors (TFs). To understand how this complex network regulates the metabolic response to fasting, we aimed at isolating the enhancers and TFs dictating it. Measuring chromatin accessibility revealed that fasting massively reorganizes liver chromatin, exposing numerous fasting-induced enhancers. By utilizing computational methods in combination with dissecting enhancer features and TF cistromes, we implicated four key TFs regulating the fasting response: glucocorticoid receptor (GR), cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB). These TFs regulate fuel production by two distinctly operating modules, each controlling a separate metabolic pathway. The gluconeogenic module operates through assisted loading, whereby GR doubles the number of sites occupied by CREB1 as well as enhances CREB1 binding intensity and increases accessibility of CREB1 binding sites. Importantly, this GR-assisted CREB1 binding was enhancer-selective and did not affect all CREB1-bound enhancers. Single-molecule tracking revealed that GR increases the number and DNA residence time of a portion of chromatin-bound CREB1 molecules. These events collectively result in rapid synergistic gene expression and higher hepatic glucose production. Conversely, the ketogenic module operates via a GR-induced TF cascade, whereby PPARA levels are increased following GR activation, facilitating gradual enhancer maturation next to PPARA target genes and delayed ketogenic gene expression. Our findings reveal a complex network of enhancers and TFs that dynamically cooperate to restore homeostasis upon fasting. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Transcription factor assisted loading and enhancer dynamics dictate the hepatic fasting response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ido; Baek, Songjoon; Presman, Diego M.; Paakinaho, Ville; Swinstead, Erin E.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting elicits transcriptional programs in hepatocytes leading to glucose and ketone production. This transcriptional program is regulated by many transcription factors (TFs). To understand how this complex network regulates the metabolic response to fasting, we aimed at isolating the enhancers and TFs dictating it. Measuring chromatin accessibility revealed that fasting massively reorganizes liver chromatin, exposing numerous fasting-induced enhancers. By utilizing computational methods in combination with dissecting enhancer features and TF cistromes, we implicated four key TFs regulating the fasting response: glucocorticoid receptor (GR), cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB). These TFs regulate fuel production by two distinctly operating modules, each controlling a separate metabolic pathway. The gluconeogenic module operates through assisted loading, whereby GR doubles the number of sites occupied by CREB1 as well as enhances CREB1 binding intensity and increases accessibility of CREB1 binding sites. Importantly, this GR-assisted CREB1 binding was enhancer-selective and did not affect all CREB1-bound enhancers. Single-molecule tracking revealed that GR increases the number and DNA residence time of a portion of chromatin-bound CREB1 molecules. These events collectively result in rapid synergistic gene expression and higher hepatic glucose production. Conversely, the ketogenic module operates via a GR-induced TF cascade, whereby PPARA levels are increased following GR activation, facilitating gradual enhancer maturation next to PPARA target genes and delayed ketogenic gene expression. Our findings reveal a complex network of enhancers and TFs that dynamically cooperate to restore homeostasis upon fasting. PMID:28031249

  10. Transcriptional profiling of human monocytes identifies the inhibitory receptor CD300a as regulator of transendothelial migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharang Ghavampour

    Full Text Available Local inflammatory responses are characterized by the recruitment of circulating leukocytes from the blood to sites of inflammation, a process requiring the directed migration of leukocytes across the vessel wall and hence a penetration of the endothelial lining. To identify underlying signalling events and novel factors involved in these processes we screened for genes differentially expressed in human monocytes following their adhesion to and passage through an endothelial monolayer. Functional annotation clustering of the genes identified revealed an overrepresentation of those associated with inflammation/immune response, in particular early monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Among the gene products so far not implicated in monocyte transendothelial migration was the inhibitory immune receptor CD300a. CD300a mRNA and protein levels were upregulated following transmigration and engagement of the receptor by anti-CD300a antibodies markedly reduced monocyte transendothelial migration. In contrast, siRNA mediated downregulation of CD300a in human monocytes increased their rate of migration. CD300a colocalized and cosedimented with actin filaments and, when activated, caused F-actin cytoskeleton alterations. Thus, monocyte transendothelial migration is accompanied by an elevation of CD300a which serves an inhibitory function possibly required for termination of the actual transmigration.

  11. Modified field enhancement and extinction by plasmonic nanowire dimers due to nonlocal response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2012-01-01

    it in a wide frequency range against analytical results for the extinction cross section of a cylindrical plasmonic nanowire. Our main results concern more complex geometries, namely cylindrical and bow-tie nanowire dimers that can strongly enhance optical fields. For both types of dimers we find that nonlocal...... response can strongly affect both the field enhancement in between the dimers and their respective extinction cross sections. In particular, we give examples of blueshifted maximal field enhancements near hybridized plasmonic dimer resonances that are still large but nearly two times smaller than...

  12. miRNA-1236 inhibits HIV-1 infection of monocytes by repressing translation of cellular factor VprBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Shen, Chan-Juan; Cohen, Éric A; Xiong, Si-Dong; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Primary monocytes are refractory to HIV-1 infection and become permissive upon differentiation into monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) or macrophages. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to interpret HIV-1 restriction in monocytes. Human cellular miRNAs can modulate HIV-1 infection by targeting either conserved regions of the HIV-1 genome or host gene transcripts. We have recently reported that the translation of host protein pur-alpha is repressed by abundant cellular miRNAs to inhibit HIV-1 infection in monocytes. Here, we report that the transcript of another cellular factor, VprBP [Vpr (HIV-1)-binding protein], was repressed by cellular miRNA-1236, which contributes to HIV-1 restriction in monocytes. Transfection of miR-1236 inhibitors enhanced translation of VprBP in monocytes and significantly promoted viral infection; exogenous input of synthesized miR-1236 mimics into MDDCs suppressed translation of VprBP, and, accordingly, significantly impaired viral infection. Our data emphasize the role of miRNA in modulating differentiation-dependent susceptibility of the host cell to HIV-1 infection. Understanding the modulation of HIV-1 infection by cellular miRNAs may provide key small RNAs or the identification of new important protein targets regulated by miRNAs for the development of antiviral strategies.

  13. JAM-C regulates unidirectional monocyte transendothelial migration in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Paul F; Scheiermann, Christoph; Nourshargh, Sussan; Ody, Christiane; Luscinskas, Francis W; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B; Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Imhof, Beat A

    2007-10-01

    Monocyte recruitment from the vasculature involves sequential engagement of multiple receptors, culminating in transendothelial migration and extravasation. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is localized at endothelial intercellular junctions and plays a role in monocyte transmigration. Here, we show that blockade of JAM-B/-C interaction reduced monocyte numbers in the extravascular compartment through increased reverse transmigration rather than by reduced transmigration. This was confirmed in vivo, showing that an anti-JAM-C antibody reduced the number of monocytes in inflammatory tissue and increased the number of monocytes with a reverse-transmigratory phenotype in the peripheral blood. All together, our results suggest a novel mechanism of reducing accumulation of monocytes at inflammation sites by disruption of JAM-C-mediated monocyte retention.

  14. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to Der p 1 allergen enhance the recruitment of Th2 cells: major involvement of the chemokines TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammad, Hamida; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Ratajczak, Céline; Nithiananthan, Asokananthan; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Stewart, Geoffrey A.; Jacquet, Alain; Tonnel, Andre-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen - presenting cells that can orientate the immune response towards a Th1 or a Th2 type. DC produce chemokines that are involved in the recruitment of either Th1 cells, such as IP10 (CXCL10), Th2 cells such as TARC (CCL17) and MDC (CCL22), or non-polarized T

  15. Immunoregulatory profile of monocytes from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients and association with lesion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, É L M; Keesen, T S L; Machado, P R; Guimarães, L H; Carvalho, E M; Dutra, W O; Gollob, K J

    2013-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important tropical disease composed of several clinical forms that adversely affect millions of people globally. Critical cells involved in the host-Leishmania interaction are monocytes and macrophages, which act to protect against infections due to their ability to both control intracellular infections and regulate the subsequent adaptive immune response. Both soluble factors and cell surface receptors are keys in directing the immune response following interaction with pathogens such as Leishmania. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have an essential role in immune responses against infections, but little is known about their role in human infection with Leishmania braziliensis. In this work, we evaluated peripheral blood CD14+ monocytes for the expression of immunoregulatory cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules and TLR9 from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients infected with L. braziliensis and noninfected individuals. Our results showed that patients present decreased expression of co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86 following culture with media alone or after stimulus with soluble Leishmania antigen. Interestingly, TLR9 expression was higher after culture with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA), suggesting a role of this molecule in immunoregulation of active disease. Lastly, higher frequencies of TLR9+ monocytes were correlated with greater lesion size. These findings demonstrate a peripheral monocytes profile compatible with important immunoregulatory potential. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Epigenetic modulators of monocytic function: implication for steady state and disease in the CNS .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nina Papavasiliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic alterations are necessary for the establishment of functional and phenotypic diversity in populations of immune cells of the monocytic lineage. The epigenetic status of individual genes at different time points defines their transcriptional responses throughout development and in response to environmental stimuli. Epigenetic states are defined at the level of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications, as well as at the level of RNA base changes through RNA editing. Drawing from lessons regarding the epigenome and epitranscriptome of cells of the monocytic lineage in the periphery, and from recently published RNAseq data deriving from brain-resident monocytes, we discuss the impact of modulation of these epigenetic states and how they affect processes important for the development of a healthy brain, as well as mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and aging. An understanding of the varied brain responses and pathologies in light of these novel gene regulatory systems in monocytes will lead to important new insights in the understanding of the aging process and the treatment and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease.

  17. Effects of Two Fullerene Derivatives on Monocytes and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacor, Sabrina; Grillo, Alberto; Đorđević, Luka; Zorzet, Sonia; Lucafò, Marianna; Da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Sava, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Two fullerene derivatives (fullerenes 1 and 2), bearing a hydrophilic chain on the pyrrolidinic nitrogen, were developed with the aim to deliver anticancer agents to solid tumors. These two compounds showed a significantly different behaviour on human neoplastic cell lines in vitro in respect to healthy leukocytes. In particular, the pyrrolidinium ring on the fullerene carbon cage brings to a more active compound. In the present work, we describe the effects of these fullerenes on primary cultures of human monocytes and macrophages, two kinds of immune cells representing the first line of defence in the immune response to foreign materials. These compounds are not recognized by circulating monocytes while they get into macrophages. The evaluation of the pronecrotic or proapoptotic effects, analysed by means of analysis of the purinergic receptor P2X7 activation and of ROS scavenging activity, has allowed us to show that fullerene 2, but not its analogue fullerene 1, displays toxicity, even though at concentrations higher than those shown to be active on neoplastic cells.

  18. High-Latitude Thermosphere Neutral Density Response to Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zesta, E.; Connor, H. K.; Su, Y.-J.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Ober, D. M.; Christodoulou, C.; Delay, S.; Oliveira, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the response of the thermosphere to the impact of solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements using observations and global magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulations by the OpenGGCM model. Combining neutral density observations from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites with simultaneous Poynting flux measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16, we find that thermospheric density as well as downward Poynting flux intensified shortly after a sudden enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure. The intensification manifested mostly on the dayside high-latitude region with peak intensity in the vicinity of the noon and prenoon cusp. OpenGGCM modeling results show that the ionospheric Joule heating increased abruptly in response to the sudden enhancement of the dynamic pressure in the same region as the observed Poynting flux and neutral density enhancements. The modeling results show that the enhanced Joule heating coincides, both in time and location, with the appearance of a pair of high-latitude localized field-aligned currents (FACs) in the cusp region. The FACs intensified and extended azimuthally. Coincidental with the solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement, the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By became strongly positive and, in addition, had some large fluctuations. We explore the separate and combined effects of the dynamic pressure and IMF By perturbations, with specifically designed simulation experiments that isolate the effect of each solar wind parameter. We find that the dynamic pressure enhancement is the primary source for the Joule heating and neutral density enhancements, but the IMF By modulates the level of enhancement.

  19. Induction of ceruloplasmin synthesis by IFN-gamma in human monocytic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, B.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Prok, A.; Cathcart, M. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin is a 132-kDa glycoprotein abundant in human plasma. It has multiple in vitro activities, including copper transport, lipid pro- and antioxidant activity, and oxidation of ferrous ion and aromatic amines; however, its physiologic role is uncertain. Although ceruloplasmin is synthesized primarily by the liver in adult humans, production by cells of monocytic origin has been reported. We here show that IFN-gamma is a potent inducer of ceruloplasmin synthesis by monocytic cells. Activation of human monoblastic leukemia U937 cells with IFN-gamma increased the production of ceruloplasmin by at least 20-fold. The identity of the protein was confirmed by plasmin fingerprinting. IFN-gamma also increased ceruloplasmin mRNA. Induction followed a 2- to 4-h lag and was partially blocked by cycloheximide, indicating a requirement for newly synthesized factors. Ceruloplasmin induction in monocytic cells was agonist specific, as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, TNF-alpha, and LPS were completely ineffective. The induction was also cell type specific, as IFN-gamma did not induce ceruloplasmin synthesis in endothelial or smooth muscle cells. In contrast, IFN-gamma was stimulatory in other monocytic cells, including THP-1 cells and human peripheral blood monocytes, and also in HepG2 cells. Ceruloplasmin secreted by IFN-gamma-stimulated U937 cells had ferroxidase activity and was, in fact, the only secreted protein with this activity. Monocytic cell-derived ceruloplasmin may contribute to defense responses via its ferroxidase activity, which may drive iron homeostasis in a direction unfavorable to invasive organisms.

  20. Protein kinase C beta mediates CD40 ligand-induced adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells.