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Sample records for enhanced mitochondrial complex

  1. Enhanced mitochondrial complex gene function and reduced liver size may mediate improved feed efficiency of beef cattle during compensatory growth.

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    Connor, Erin E; Kahl, Stanislaw; Elsasser, Theodore H; Parker, Joel S; Li, Robert W; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Baldwin, Ransom L; Barao, Scott M

    2010-03-01

    Growing ruminants under extended dietary restriction exhibit compensatory growth upon ad libitum feeding, which is associated with increased feed efficiency, lower basal energy requirements, and changes in circulating concentrations of metabolic hormones. To identify mechanisms contributing to these physiological changes, 8-month-old steers were fed either ad libitum (control; n = 6) or 60-70% of intake of control animals (feed-restricted; n = 6) for a period of 12 weeks. All steers were fed ad libitum for the remaining 8 weeks of experimentation (realimentation). Liver was biopsied at days -14, +1, and +14 relative to realimentation for gene expression analysis by microarray hybridization. During early realimentation, feed-restricted steers exhibited greater rates of gain and feed efficiency than controls and an increase in expression of genes functioning in cellular metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. Gene expression changes during feed restriction were similar to those reported in mice, indicating similar effects of caloric restriction across species. Based on expression of genes involved in cell division and growth and upregulation of genes encoding mitochondrial complex proteins in early realimentation, it was concluded that reduced hepatic size and increased mitochondrial function may contribute to improved feed efficiency observed during compensatory growth.

  2. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

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    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. HINT2 triggers mitochondrial Ca2+ influx by regulating the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) complex and enhances gemcitabine apoptotic effect in pancreatic cancer.

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    Chen, Linghui; Sun, Qiang; Zhou, Dongkai; Song, Wei; Yang, Qifan; Ju, Bingjie; Zhang, Lufei; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Hu, Zhenhua; Yao, Hangping; Zheng, Shusen; Wang, Weilin

    2017-12-28

    In early studies, it was shown that HINT2, which sensitizes cells to mitochondrial apoptosis, is down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells (Martin et al., 2006). However, the molecular mechanism of this effect is unknown. Immunohistochemistry revealed that HINT2 expression is relatively low in pancreatic cancer tissues, compared to that in adjacent tissues (P cancer patients. Up-regulation of HINT2 was shown to trigger pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis, decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), promote intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and elevate mitochondrial Ca2+ levels. However, co-treatment of HINT2 overexpressing BxPC-3 cells with ruthenium red partially inhibited HINT2-induced apoptosis, which was associated with a reduction in ΔΨm and an increase in intracellular ROS and mitochondrial Ca2+. According to our results, mitochondrial calcium uptake1 and 2 (MICU1 and MICU2) were down-regulated and the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) was up-regulated in cells transduced with Adv-HINT2. Therefore, we deduced that HINT2 triggers apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating mitochondrial Ca2+ influx through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). In addition, we found that HINT2 can sensitize BxPC-3 and L3.6pl cells to gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and that gemcitabine up-regulates HINT2 expression. This indicates that gemcitabine-induced apoptosis is related to HINT2 levels. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impaired translocation and activation of mitochondrial Akt1 mitigated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation Complex V activity in diabetic myocardium.

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    Yang, Jia-Ying; Deng, Wu; Chen, Yumay; Fan, Weiwei; Baldwin, Kenneth M; Jope, Richard S; Wallace, Douglas C; Wang, Ping H

    2013-06-01

    Insulin can translocate Akt to mitochondria in cardiac muscle. The goals of this study were to define sub-mitochondrial localization of the translocated Akt, to dissect the effects of insulin on Akt isoform translocation, and to determine the direct effect of mitochondrial Akt activation on Complex V activity in normal and diabetic myocardium. The translocated Akt sequentially localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space, inner membrane, and matrix. To confirm Akt translocation, in vitro import assay showed rapid entry of Akt into mitochondria. Akt isoforms were differentially regulated by insulin stimulation, only Akt1 translocated into mitochondria. In the insulin-resistant Type 2 diabetes model, Akt1 translocation was blunted. Mitochondrial activation of Akt1 increased Complex V activity by 24% in normal myocardium in vivo and restored Complex V activity in diabetic myocardium. Basal mitochondrial Complex V activity was lower by 22% in the Akt1(-/-) myocardium. Insulin-stimulated Complex V activity was not impaired in the Akt1(-/-) myocardium, due to compensatory translocation of Akt2 to mitochondria. Akt1 is the primary isoform that relayed insulin signaling to mitochondria and modulated mitochondrial Complex V activity. Activation of mitochondrial Akt1 enhanced ATP production and increased phosphocreatine in cardiac muscle cells. Dysregulation of this signal pathway might impair mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic myocardium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impaired cardiac mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are important players in the development of various cardiovascular diseases, but their roles in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain unknown. We examined whether mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was impaired with enhanced...

  6. Mangiferin Accelerates Glycolysis and Enhances Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

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    Zhongbo Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main causes of hyperglycemia is inefficient or impaired glucose utilization by skeletal muscle, which can be exacerbated by chronic high caloric intake. Previously, we identified a natural compound, mangiferin (MGF that improved glucose utilization in high fat diet (HFD-induced insulin resistant mice. To further identify the molecular mechanisms of MGF action on glucose metabolism, we conducted targeted metabolomics and transcriptomics studies of glycolyic and mitochondrial bioenergetics pathways in skeletal muscle. These data revealed that MGF increased glycolytic metabolites that were further augmented as glycolysis proceeded from the early to the late steps. Consistent with an MGF-stimulation of glycolytic flux there was a concomitant increase in the expression of enzymes catalyzing glycolysis. MGF also increased important metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, such as α-ketoglutarate and fumarate. Interestingly however, there was a reduction in succinate, a metabolite that also feeds into the electron transport chain to produce energy. MGF increased succinate clearance by enhancing the expression and activity of succinate dehydrogenase, leading to increased ATP production. At the transcriptional level, MGF induced mRNAs of mitochondrial genes and their transcriptional factors. Together, these data suggest that MGF upregulates mitochondrial oxidative capacity that likely drives the acceleration of glycolysis flux.

  7. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

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    Masakazu Kohda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4 as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3 and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21 as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder.

  8. Erythropoietin treatment enhances muscle mitochondrial capacity in humans

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    Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity...... in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over 8 weeks with oral iron (100 mg) supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis....... rhEpo treatment increased OXPHOS (from 92 ± 5 to 113 ± 7 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1)) and ETS (107 ± 4 to 143 ± 14 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), p muscle....

  9. Pancreatic mitochondrial complex I exhibits aberrant hyperactivity in diabetes

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    Jinzi Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that NADH/NAD+ redox balance is heavily perturbed in diabetes, and the NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is a major source of oxidative stress in diabetic tissues. In mitochondria, complex I is the only site for NADH oxidation and NAD+ regeneration and is also a major site for production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. Yet how complex I responds to the NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance and any potential consequences of such response in diabetic pancreas have not been investigated. We report here that pancreatic mitochondrial complex I showed aberrant hyperactivity in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Further studies focusing on streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes indicate that complex I hyperactivity could be attenuated by metformin. Moreover, complex I hyperactivity was accompanied by increased activities of complexes II to IV, but not complex V, suggesting that overflow of NADH via complex I in diabetes could be diverted to ROS production. Indeed in diabetic pancreas, ROS production and oxidative stress increased and mitochondrial ATP production decreased, which can be attributed to impaired pancreatic mitochondrial membrane potential that is responsible for increased cell death. Additionally, cellular defense systems such as glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, sirtuin 3, and NQO1 were found to be compromised in diabetic pancreas. Our findings point to the direction that complex I aberrant hyperactivity in pancreas could be a major source of oxidative stress and β cell failure in diabetes. Therefore, inhibiting pancreatic complex I hyperactivity and attenuating its ROS production by various means in diabetes might serve as a promising approach for anti-diabetic therapies.

  10. Photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-based visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living cells.

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    Karbowski, Mariusz; Cleland, Megan M; Roelofs, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Technological improvements in microscopy and the development of mitochondria-specific imaging molecular tools have illuminated the dynamic rearrangements of these essential organelles. These rearrangements are mainly the result of two opposing processes: mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial fission. Consistent with this, in addition to mitochondrial motility, these two processes are major factors determining the overall degree of continuity of the mitochondrial network, as well as the average size of mitochondria within the cell. In this chapter, we detail the use of advanced confocal microscopy and mitochondrial matrix-targeted photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (mito-PAGFP) for the investigation of mitochondrial dynamics. We focus on direct visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living mammalian cells. These assays were instrumental in important recent discoveries within the field of mitochondrial biology, including the role of mitochondrial fusion in the activation of mitochondrial steps in apoptosis, participation of Bcl-2 family proteins in mitochondrial morphogenesis, and stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion. We present some basic directions that should be helpful in designing mito-PAGFP-based experiments. Furthermore, since analyses of mitochondrial fusion using mito-PAGFP-based assays rely on time-lapse imaging, critical parameters of time-lapse microscopy and cell preparation are also discussed.

  11. Fatal hypertensive crisis as presentation of mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

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    Lohmeier, K.; Distelmaier, F.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Mayatepek, E.; Hoehn, T.

    2007-01-01

    Complex I deficiency is a frequent defect of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We report on a 3-year-old boy, who rapidly deteriorated after sudden flushing and collapse. This fatal and unusual case was characterized by widely uncontrollable arterial hypertension. It might indicate that

  12. High incubation temperatures enhance mitochondrial energy metabolism in reptile embryos.

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    Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Teng; Gao, Jing; Ma, Liang; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-03-09

    Developmental rate increases exponentially with increasing temperature in ectothermic animals, but the biochemical basis underlying this thermal dependence is largely unexplored. We measured mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities of turtle embryos (Pelodiscus sinensis) incubated at different temperatures to identify the metabolic basis of the rapid development occurring at high temperatures in reptile embryos. Developmental rate increased with increasing incubation temperatures in the embryos of P. sinensis. Correspondingly, in addition to the thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities, high-temperature incubation further enhanced mitochondrial respiration and COX activities in the embryos. This suggests that embryos may adjust mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities in response to developmental temperature to achieve high developmental rates at high temperatures. Our study highlights the importance of biochemical investigations in understanding the proximate mechanisms by which temperature affects embryonic development.

  13. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency

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    Ehinger, Johannes K.; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J.; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J.; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [13C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  14. Antibiotic tigecycline enhances cisplatin activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

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    Tan, Jun; Song, Meijun; Zhou, Mi; Hu, Yaoren

    2017-01-29

    Targeting mitochondrial metabolism has been recently demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various cancer. In this work, we demonstrate that antibiotic tigecycline is selectively against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage. Tigecycline is more effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of HCC than normal liver cells. Importantly, tigecycline significantly enhances the inhibitory effects of chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in HCC in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, tigecycline specifically inhibits mitochondrial translation as shown by the decreased protein levels of Cox-1 and -2 but not Cox-4 or Grp78, and increased mRNA levels of Cox-1 and -2 but not Cox-4 in HCC cells exposed to tigecycline. In addition, tigecycline significantly induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCC cells via decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, complex I and IV activities, mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels. Tigecycline also increases levels of mitochondrial superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and ROS levels. Consistent with oxidative stress, oxidative damage on DNA, protein and lipid are also observed in tigecycline-treated cells. Importantly, antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) reverses the effects of tigecycline, suggesting that oxidative stress is required for the action of tigecycline in HCC cells. We further show that HCC cells have higher level of mitochondrial biogenesis than normal liver cells which might explain the different sensitivity to tigecycline between HCC and normal liver cells. Our work is the first to demonstrate that tigecycline is a promising candidate for HCC treatment and highlight the therapeutic value of targeting mitochondrial metabolism in HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitors and Forced Oxidative Phosphorylation Synergize in Inducing Cancer Cell Death

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    Roberta Palorini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells generally rely mostly on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS for ATP production. In fact, they are particularly sensitive to glycolysis inhibition and glucose depletion. On the other hand mitochondrial dysfunctions, involved in the onset of the Warburg effect, are sometimes also associated with the resistance to apoptosis that characterizes cancer cells. Therefore, combined treatments targeting both glycolysis and mitochondria function, exploiting peculiar tumor features, might be lethal for cancer cells. In this study, we show that glucose deprivation and mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors synergize in inducing cancer cell death. In particular, our results reveal that low doses of Complex I inhibitors, ineffective on immortalized cells and in high glucose growth, become specifically cytotoxic on cancer cells deprived of glucose. Importantly, the cytotoxic effect of the inhibitors on cancer cells is strongly enhanced by forskolin, a PKA pathway activator, that we have previously shown to stimulate OXPHOS. Taken together, we demonstrate that induction in cancer cells of a switch from a glycolytic to a more respirative metabolism, obtained by glucose depletion or mitochondrial activity stimulation, strongly increases their sensitivity to low doses of mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors. Our findings might be a valuable approach to eradicate cancer cells.

  16. Mitochondrial complex I inhibitors and forced oxidative phosphorylation synergize in inducing cancer cell death.

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    Palorini, Roberta; Simonetto, Tiziana; Cirulli, Claudia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells generally rely mostly on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for ATP production. In fact, they are particularly sensitive to glycolysis inhibition and glucose depletion. On the other hand mitochondrial dysfunctions, involved in the onset of the Warburg effect, are sometimes also associated with the resistance to apoptosis that characterizes cancer cells. Therefore, combined treatments targeting both glycolysis and mitochondria function, exploiting peculiar tumor features, might be lethal for cancer cells. In this study, we show that glucose deprivation and mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors synergize in inducing cancer cell death. In particular, our results reveal that low doses of Complex I inhibitors, ineffective on immortalized cells and in high glucose growth, become specifically cytotoxic on cancer cells deprived of glucose. Importantly, the cytotoxic effect of the inhibitors on cancer cells is strongly enhanced by forskolin, a PKA pathway activator, that we have previously shown to stimulate OXPHOS. Taken together, we demonstrate that induction in cancer cells of a switch from a glycolytic to a more respirative metabolism, obtained by glucose depletion or mitochondrial activity stimulation, strongly increases their sensitivity to low doses of mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors. Our findings might be a valuable approach to eradicate cancer cells.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA background modulates the assembly kinetics of OXPHOS complexes in a cellular model of mitochondrial disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pello, R.; Martin, M.A.; Carelli, V.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Achilli, A.; Pala, M.; Torroni, A.; Gomez-Duran, A.; Ruiz-Pesini, E.; Martinuzzi, A.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Arenas, J.; Ugalde, C.

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disorder, is mostly due to three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in respiratory chain complex I subunit genes: 3460/ND1, 11778/ND4 and 14484/ND6. Despite considerable clinical evidences, a genetic modifying role of the

  18. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox state are unaltered in Trypanosoma cruzi isolates with compromised mitochondrial complex I subunit genes.

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    Carranza, Julio César; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Mendonça, Marco Aurélio G; de Oliveira, Thays C; Gadelha, Fernanda R; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-06-01

    In trypanosomatids the involvement of mitochondrial complex I in NADH oxidation has long been debated. Here, we took advantage of natural Trypanosoma cruzi mutants which present conspicuous deletions in ND4, ND5 and ND7 genes coding for complex I subunits to further investigate its functionality. Mitochondrial bioenergetics of wild type and complex I mutants showed no significant differences in oxygen consumption or respiratory control ratios in the presence of NADH-linked substrates or FADH(2)-generating succinate. No correlation could be established between mitochondrial membrane potentials and ND deletions. Since release of reactive oxygen species occurs at complex I, we measured mitochondrial H(2)O(2) formation induced by different substrates. Significant differences not associated to ND deletions were observed among the parasite isolates, demonstrating that these mutations are not important for the control of oxidant production. Our data support the notion that complex I has a limited function in T. cruzi.

  19. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

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    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  20. Attenuation of polyglutamine-induced toxicity by enhancement of mitochondrial OXPHOS in yeast and fly models of aging

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    Ruetenik, Andrea L.; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ruan, Kai; Zhu, Yi; Li, Chong; Zhai, R. Grace; Barrientos, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial biogenesis and function are common in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD). We have previously shown that in yeast models of HD, enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis through overexpression of Hap4, the catalytic subunit of the transcriptional complex that regulates mitochondrial gene expression, alleviates the growth arrest induced by expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract peptides in rapidly dividing cells. However, the mechanism through which HAP4 overexpression exerts this protection remains unclear. Furthermore, it remains unexplored whether HAP4 overexpression and increased respiratory function during growth can also protect against polyQ-induced toxicity during yeast chronological lifespan. Here, we show that in yeast, mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are essential for protection against the polyQ-induced growth defect by HAP4 overexpression. In addition, we show that not only increased HAP4 levels, but also alternative interventions, including calorie restriction, that result in enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis confer protection against polyQ toxicity during stationary phase. The data obtained in yeast models guided experiments in a fly model of HD, where we show that enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis can also protect against neurodegeneration and behavioral deficits. Our results suggest that therapeutic interventions aiming at the enhancement of mitochondrial respiration and OXPHOS could reduce polyQ toxicity and delay disease onset. PMID:28357370

  1. Immortalized Parkinson's disease lymphocytes have enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity

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    Sarah J. Annesley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In combination with studies of post-mortem Parkinson's disease (PD brains, pharmacological and genetic models of PD have suggested that two fundamental interacting cellular processes are impaired – proteostasis and mitochondrial respiration. We have re-examined the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in lymphoblasts isolated from individuals with idiopathic PD and an age-matched control group. As previously reported for various PD cell types, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by PD lymphoblasts was significantly elevated. However, this was not due to an impairment of mitochondrial respiration, as is often assumed. Instead, basal mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis are dramatically elevated in PD lymphoblasts. The mitochondrial mass, genome copy number and membrane potential were unaltered, but the expression of indicative respiratory complex proteins was also elevated. This explains the increased oxygen consumption rates by each of the respiratory complexes in experimentally uncoupled mitochondria of iPD cells. However, it was not attributable to increased activity of the stress- and energy-sensing protein kinase AMPK, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity. The respiratory differences between iPD and control cells were sufficiently dramatic as to provide a potentially sensitive and reliable biomarker of the disease state, unaffected by disease duration (time since diagnosis or clinical severity. Lymphoblasts from control and PD individuals thus occupy two distinct, quasi-stable steady states; a ‘normal’ and a ‘hyperactive’ state characterized by two different metabolic rates. The apparent stability of the ‘hyperactive’ state in patient-derived lymphoblasts in the face of patient ageing, ongoing disease and mounting disease severity suggests an early, permanent switch to an alternative metabolic steady state. With its associated, elevated ROS production, the ‘hyperactive’ state might not cause

  2. Manganese ions enhance mitochondrial H2O2emission from Krebs cycle oxidoreductases by inducing permeability transition.

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    Bonke, Erik; Siebels, Ilka; Zwicker, Klaus; Dröse, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Manganese-induced toxicity has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We could recently show in mechanistic studies that Mn 2+ ions induce hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) production from the ubiquinone binding site of mitochondrial complex II (II Q ) and generally enhance H 2 O 2 formation by accelerating the rate of superoxide dismutation. The present study with intact mitochondria reveals that manganese additionally enhances H 2 O 2 emission by inducing mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). In mitochondria fed by NADH-generating substrates, the combination of Mn 2+ and different respiratory chain inhibitors led to a dynamically increasing H 2 O 2 emission which was sensitive to the mPT inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) as well as Ru-360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Under these conditions, flavin-containing enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix, e.g. the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase (OGDH), were major sources of ROS. With succinate as substrate, Mn 2+ stimulated ROS production mainly at complex II, whereby the applied succinate concentration had a marked effect on the tendency for mPT. Also Ca 2+ increased the rate of H 2 O 2 emission by mPT, while no direct effect on ROS-production of complex II was observed. The present study reveals a complex scenario through which manganese affects mitochondrial H 2 O 2 emission: stimulating its production from distinct sites (e.g. site II Q ), accelerating superoxide dismutation and enhancing the emission via mPT which also leads to the loss of soluble components of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems and favors the ROS production from flavin-containing oxidoreductases of the Krebs cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. StAR Enhances Transcription of Genes Encoding the Mitochondrial Proteases Involved in Its Own Degradation

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    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  4. Mutation of C20orf7 Disrupts Complex I Assembly and Causes Lethal Neonatal Mitochondrial Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiana, Canny; Pagliarini, David J.; McKenzie, Matthew; Kirby, Denise M.; Salemi, Renato; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Hutchison, Wendy M.; Vascotto, Katherine A.; Smith, Stacey M.; Newbold, Robert F.; Christodoulou, John; Calvo, Sarah; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ryan, Michael T.; Thorburn, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first and largest multimeric complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Human complex I comprises seven Subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA and 38 nuclear-encoded subunits that are assembled together in a process that is only partially

  5. Two weeks of metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of AMPK kinase dead but not wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas M Kristensen

    Full Text Available Metformin is used as an anti-diabetic drug. Metformin ameliorates insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and skeletal muscle. Reduced mitochondrial content has been reported in type 2 diabetic muscles and it may contribute to decreased insulin sensitivity characteristic for diabetic muscles. The molecular mechanism behind the effect of metformin is not fully clarified but inhibition of complex I in the mitochondria and also activation of the 5'AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK has been reported in muscle. Furthermore, both AMPK activation and metformin treatment have been associated with stimulation of mitochondrial function and biogenesis. However, a causal relationship in skeletal muscle has not been investigated. We hypothesized that potential effects of in vivo metformin treatment on mitochondrial function and protein expressions in skeletal muscle are dependent upon AMPK signaling. We investigated this by two weeks of oral metformin treatment of muscle specific kinase dead α(2 (KD AMPK mice and wild type (WT littermates. We measured mitochondrial respiration and protein activity and expressions of key enzymes involved in mitochondrial carbohydrate and fat metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial respiration, HAD and CS activity, PDH and complex I-V and cytochrome c protein expression were all reduced in AMPK KD compared to WT tibialis anterior muscles. Surprisingly, metformin treatment only enhanced respiration in AMPK KD mice and thereby rescued the respiration defect compared to the WT mice. Metformin did not influence protein activities or expressions in either WT or AMPK KD mice.We conclude that two weeks of in vivo metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in the mitochondrial deficient AMPK KD but not WT mice. The improvement seems to be unrelated to AMPK, and does not involve changes in key mitochondrial proteins.

  6. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Yamamoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders.

  7. PDE 5 inhibitor improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing mitochondrial function in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hea Min; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Kim, Koon Soon; Lee, Jae Min; Hong, Jun Hwa; Park, Kang Seo

    2017-11-04

    Adipocytes are involved in many metabolic disorders. It was recently reported that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) is expressed in human adipose tissue. In addition, PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in humans. However, the mechanism underlying the role of PDE5 inhibitors as an insulin sensitizer remains largely unknown. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the PDE5 inhibitor udenafil in insulin signaling in adipocytes and whether this is mediated through the regulation of mitochondrial function. To study the mechanism underlying the insulin sensitizing action of PDE5 inhibitors, we evaluated quantitative changes in protein or mRNA levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), and fatty acid oxidation with varying udenafil concentrations in 3T3-L1 cells. Our cell study suggested that udenafil enhanced the insulin signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 cells. Following udenafil treatment, basal mitochondrial OCR, maximal OxPhos capacity, and OxPhos gene expression significantly increased. Finally, we examined whether udenafil can affect the fatty acid oxidation process. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with udenafil (10 and 20 μM) significantly increased fatty acid oxidation rate in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) significantly increased. We demonstrated that the PDE5 inhibitor udenafil enhances insulin sensitivity by improving mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 cells. This might be the mechanism underlying the PDE5 inhibitor-enhanced insulin signaling in adipocytes. This also suggests that udenafil may provide benefit in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other related cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The prohibitin protein complex promotes mitochondrial stabilization and cell survival in hematologic malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeremy A.; Robles-Escajeda, Elisa; Oaxaca, Derrick M.; Padilla, Diana L.; Kirken, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Prohibitins (PHB1 and PHB2) have been proposed to play important roles in cancer development and progression, however their oncogenic mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. Previously, we showed that the PHB1 and PHB2 protein complex is required for mitochondrial homeostasis and survival of normal human lymphocytes. In this study, novel evidence is provided that indicates mitochondrial prohibitins are overexpressed in hematologic tumor cells and promote cell survival under conditions of oxidative stress. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed both proteins to be primarily confined to mitochondria in primary patient lymphoid and myeloid tumor cells and tumor cell lines, including Kit225 cells. Subsequently, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHB1 and PHB2 in Kit225 cells significantly enhanced sensitivity to H2O2-induced cell death, suggesting a protective or anti-apoptotic function in hematologic malignancies. Indeed, PHB1 and PHB2 protein levels were significantly higher in tumor cells isolated from leukemia and lymphoma patients compared to PBMCs from healthy donors. These findings suggest that PHB1 and PHB2 are upregulated during tumorigenesis to maintain mitochondrial integrity and therefore may serve as novel biomarkers and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention in certain types of hematologic malignancies. PMID:29029444

  9. Role of Mitochondrial Complex IV in Age-Dependent Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Soro-Arnaiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with progressive white adipose tissue (WAT enlargement initiated early in life, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here we show that mitochondrial complex IV (CIV activity and assembly are already repressed in white adipocytes of middle-aged mice and involve a HIF1A-dependent decline of essential CIV components such as COX5B. At the molecular level, HIF1A binds to the Cox5b proximal promoter and represses its expression. Silencing of Cox5b decreased fatty acid oxidation and promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. Moreover, local in vivo Cox5b silencing in WAT of young mice increased the size of adipocytes, whereas restoration of COX5B expression in aging mice counteracted adipocyte enlargement. An age-dependent reduction in COX5B gene expression was also found in human visceral adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings establish a pivotal role for CIV dysfunction in progressive white adipocyte enlargement during aging, which can be restored to alleviate age-dependent WAT expansion.

  10. Blue native electrophoresis to study mitochondrial complex I in C. elegans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ecker, D. van den; Brand, M.A.M. van den; Bossinger, O.; Mayatepek, E.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Distelmaier, F.

    2010-01-01

    Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) is an essential tool for investigating mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. However, with current BN-PAGE protocols for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), large worm amounts and high quantities of mitochondrial protein are required to

  11. Metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes have normal mitochondrial complex I respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Rabøl, R; Hansen, C N

    2012-01-01

    The glucose-lowering drug metformin has been shown to inhibit complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in skeletal muscle. To investigate this effect in vivo we studied skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and content from patients with type 2 diabetes treated with me...

  12. Creatine Enhances Mitochondrial-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Survival After Demyelinating Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Kelly A; Chapey, Kristen S; Nanescu, Sonia E; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-08

    Chronic oligodendrocyte loss, which occurs in the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS), contributes to axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Current therapies are able to reduce MS severity, but do not prevent transition into the progressive phase of the disease, which is characterized by chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, pharmacological compounds that promote oligodendrocyte survival could be beneficial for neuroprotection in MS. Here, we investigated the role of creatine, an organic acid involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) buffering, in oligodendrocyte function. We found that creatine increased mitochondrial ATP production directly in oligodendrocyte lineage cell cultures and exerted robust protection on oligodendrocytes by preventing cell death in both naive and lipopolysaccharide-treated mixed glia. Moreover, lysolecithin-mediated demyelination in mice deficient in the creatine-synthesizing enzyme guanidinoacetate-methyltransferase (Gamt) did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell recruitment, but resulted in exacerbated apoptosis of regenerated oligodendrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Remarkably, creatine administration into Gamt-deficient and wild-type mice with demyelinating injury reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, thereby increasing oligodendrocyte density and myelin basic protein staining in CNS lesions. We found that creatine did not affect the recruitment of macrophages/microglia into lesions, suggesting that creatine affects oligodendrocyte survival independently of inflammation. Together, our results demonstrate a novel function for creatine in promoting oligodendrocyte viability during CNS remyelination.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report that creatine enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and protects against caspase-dependent oligodendrocyte apoptosis during CNS remyelination. This work has important implications for the development of therapeutic targets for diseases characterized by

  13. Growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae Is Enhanced in Cells with Impaired Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käding, Nadja; Kaufhold, Inga; Müller, Constanze; Szaszák, Marta; Shima, Kensuke; Weinmaier, Thomas; Lomas, Rodrigo; Conesa, Ana; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rattei, Thomas; Rupp, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Effective growth and replication of obligate intracellular pathogens depend on host cell metabolism. How this is connected to host cell mitochondrial function has not been studied so far. Recent studies suggest that growth of intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia pneumoniae is enhanced in a low oxygen environment, arguing for a particular mechanistic role of the mitochondrial respiration in controlling intracellular progeny. Metabolic changes in C. pneumoniae infected epithelial cells were analyzed under normoxic (O2 ≈ 20%) and hypoxic conditions (O2 pneumoniae under normoxia impaired mitochondrial function characterized by an enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS generation. Knockdown and mutation of the host cell ATP synthase resulted in an increased chlamydial replication already under normoxic conditions. As expected, mitochondrial hyperpolarization was observed in non-infected control cells cultured under hypoxic conditions, which was beneficial for C. pneumoniae growth. Taken together, functional and genetically encoded mitochondrial dysfunction strongly promotes intracellular growth of C. pneumoniae.

  14. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  15. Defective oxidative phosphorylation in thyroid oncocytic carcinoma is associated with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complexes I and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Elena; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Biondi, Annalisa; Ghelli, Anna; Carelli, Valerio; Baracca, Alessandra; Tallini, Giovanni; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Lenaz, Giorgio; Rugolo, Michela; Romeo, Giovanni

    2006-06-15

    Oncocytic tumors are characterized by cells with an aberrant accumulation of mitochondria. To assess mitochondrial function in neoplastic oncocytic cells, we studied the thyroid oncocytic cell line XTC.UC1 and compared it with other thyroid non-oncocytic cell lines. Only XTC.UC1 cells were unable to survive in galactose, a condition forcing cells to rely solely on mitochondria for energy production. The rate of respiration and mitochondrial ATP synthesis driven by complex I substrates was severely reduced in XTC.UC1 cells. Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of complexes I and III was dramatically decreased in these cells compared with controls, in conjunction with a strongly enhanced production of reactive oxygen species. Osteosarcoma-derived transmitochondrial cell hybrids (cybrids) carrying XTC.UC1 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were generated to discriminate whether the energetic failure depended on mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations. In galactose medium, XTC.UC1 cybrid clones showed reduced viability and ATP content, similarly to the parental XTC.UC1, clearly pointing to the existence of mtDNA alterations. Sequencing of XTC.UC1 mtDNA identified a frameshift mutation in ND1 and a nonconservative substitution in cytochrome b, two mutations with a clear pathogenic potential. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that mitochondrial dysfunction of XTC.UC1 is due to a combined complex I/III defect associated with mtDNA mutations, as proven by the transfer of the defective energetic phenotype with the mitochondrial genome into the cybrids.

  16. Physiological Levels of Nitric Oxide Diminish Mitochondrial Superoxide. Potential Role of Mitochondrial Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes and Nitrosothiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I. Dikalov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide radicals and superoxide overproduction contributes to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction and diminished nitric oxide levels are early steps in the development of these pathological conditions. It is known that physiological production of nitric oxide reduces oxidative stress and inflammation, however, the precise mechanism of “antioxidant” effect of nitric oxide is not clear. In this work we tested the hypothesis that physiological levels of nitric oxide diminish mitochondrial superoxide production without inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In order to test this hypothesis we analyzed effect of low physiological fluxes of nitric oxide (20 nM/min on superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by ESR spin probes and Amplex Red in isolated rat brain mitochondria. Indeed, low levels of nitric oxide substantially attenuated both basal and antimycin A-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species in the presence of succinate or glutamate/malate as mitochondrial substrates. Furthermore, slow releasing NO donor DPTA-NONOate (100 μM did not change oxygen consumption in State 4 and State 3. However, the NO-donor strongly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of uncoupling agent CCCP, which is likely associated with inhibition of the over-reduced complex IV in uncoupled mitochondria. We have examined accumulation of dinitrosyl iron complexes and nitrosothiols in mitochondria treated with fast-releasing NO donor MAHMA NONOate (10 μM for 30 min until complete release of NO. Following treatment with NO donor, mitochondria were frozen for direct detection of dinitrosyl iron complexes using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR while accumulation of nitrosothiols was measured by ferrous-N-Methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate complex, Fe(MGD2, in lysed mitochondria. Treatment of mitochondria with NO-donor gave rise to ESR signal of dinitrosyl iron complexes while ESR

  17. Physiological Levels of Nitric Oxide Diminish Mitochondrial Superoxide. Potential Role of Mitochondrial Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes and Nitrosothiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Mayorov, Vladimir I; Panov, Alexander V

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide radicals and superoxide overproduction contributes to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction and diminished nitric oxide levels are early steps in the development of these pathological conditions. It is known that physiological production of nitric oxide reduces oxidative stress and inflammation, however, the precise mechanism of "antioxidant" effect of nitric oxide is not clear. In this work we tested the hypothesis that physiological levels of nitric oxide diminish mitochondrial superoxide production without inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In order to test this hypothesis we analyzed effect of low physiological fluxes of nitric oxide (20 nM/min) on superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by ESR spin probes and Amplex Red in isolated rat brain mitochondria. Indeed, low levels of nitric oxide substantially attenuated both basal and antimycin A-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species in the presence of succinate or glutamate/malate as mitochondrial substrates. Furthermore, slow releasing NO donor DPTA-NONOate (100 μM) did not change oxygen consumption in State 4 and State 3. However, the NO-donor strongly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of uncoupling agent CCCP, which is likely associated with inhibition of the over-reduced complex IV in uncoupled mitochondria. We have examined accumulation of dinitrosyl iron complexes and nitrosothiols in mitochondria treated with fast-releasing NO donor MAHMA NONOate (10 μM) for 30 min until complete release of NO. Following treatment with NO donor, mitochondria were frozen for direct detection of dinitrosyl iron complexes using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) while accumulation of nitrosothiols was measured by ferrous-N-Methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate complex, Fe(MGD)2, in lysed mitochondria. Treatment of mitochondria with NO-donor gave rise to ESR signal of dinitrosyl iron complexes while ESR spectra of Fe

  18. Mitochondrial Complexes I and II Are More Susceptible to Autophagy Deficiency in Mouse β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Joo Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDamaged mitochondria are removed by autophagy. Therefore, impairment of autophagy induces the accumulation of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction in most mammalian cells. Here, we investigated mitochondrial function and the expression of mitochondrial complexes in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7-deficient β-cells.MethodsTo evaluate the effect of autophagy deficiency on mitochondrial function in pancreatic β-cells, we isolated islets from Atg7F/F:RIP-Cre+ mice and wild-type littermates. Oxygen consumption rate and intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP content were measured. The expression of mitochondrial complex genes in Atg7-deficient islets and in β-TC6 cells transfected with siAtg7 was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.ResultsBaseline oxygen consumption rate of Atg7-deficient islets was significantly lower than that of control islets (P<0.05. Intracellular ATP content of Atg7-deficient islets during glucose stimulation was also significantly lower than that of control islets (P<0.05. By Oxygraph-2k analysis, mitochondrial respiration in Atg7-deficient islets was significantly decreased overall, although state 3 respiration and responses to antimycin A were unaffected. The mRNA levels of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V in Atg7-deficient islets were significantly lower than in control islets (P<0.05. Down-regulation of Atg7 in β-TC6 cells also reduced the expression of complexes I and II, with marginal significance (P<0.1.ConclusionImpairment of autophagy in pancreatic β-cells suppressed the expression of some mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. Among the complexes, I and II seem to be most vulnerable to autophagy deficiency.

  19. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells. PMID:26864567

  20. Mitochondria poised at a fission-fusion balance?: A quantitative assessment of mitochondrial network complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Zamponi, Nahuel; Billoni, Orlando V; Cannas, Sergio A; Helguera, Pablo R; Chialvo, Dante R

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial networks have been shown to exhibit a variety of complex behaviors, including cell-wide oscillations of mitochondrial energy states, as well as a phase transition in response to oxidative stress. Since functional status and structural properties are often intertwined, in this work we look at the structural properties of the organelle in normal mouse embryonic fibroblasts, describing its most relevant features. Subsequently we manipulated mitochondrial morphology using two interventions with opposite effects: over-expression of mitofusin 1, a protein that promotes mitochondria fusion, and paraquat treatment, a compound that induces mitochondrial fragmentation due to oxidative stress. Quantitative analysis of the organelle's structural clusters revealed that healthy mitochondrial networks were in a status intermediate between the extremes of highly fragmented and completely fusioned networks. This was confirmed by a comparison of our empirical findings with those of a recently described computatio...

  1. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan; D Warren Spence; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial per...

  2. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L.M.; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R

    2016-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. Although atRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether atRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity. atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrial β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally, atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α and 1β and nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification. atRA also increased β-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδ revealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis and β-oxidation by atRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice, atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition of atRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects of atRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show that atRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasing atRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid β-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26921399

  3. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanendra Tomar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter (MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca2+ in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1 have severely impaired [Ca2+]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  5. Decreased in vitro mitochondrial function is associated with enhanced brain metabolism, blood flow, and memory in Surf1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Halloran, Jonathan J; Hussong, Stacy A; Burbank, Raquel R; Bresnen, Andrew; Liu, Yuhong; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Muir, Eric; Duong, Timothy Q; Bokov, Alex F; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Richardson, Arlan G; Van Remmen, Holly; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have challenged the prevailing view that reduced mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress are correlated with reduced longevity. Mice carrying a homozygous knockout (KO) of the Surf1 gene showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain Complex IV activity, yet displayed increased lifespan and reduced brain damage after excitotoxic insults. In the present study, we examined brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics, and memory of Surf1 KO mice using in vitro measures of mitochondrial function, in vivo neuroimaging, and behavioral testing. We show that decreased respiration and increased generation of hydrogen peroxide in isolated Surf1 KO brain mitochondria are associated with increased brain glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, and lactate levels, and with enhanced memory in Surf1 KO mice. These metabolic and functional changes in Surf1 KO brains were accompanied by higher levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, and by increases in the activated form of cyclic AMP response element-binding factor, which is integral to memory formation. These findings suggest that Surf1 deficiency-induced metabolic alterations may have positive effects on brain function. Exploring the relationship between mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress, and brain function will enhance our understanding of cognitive aging and of age-related neurologic disorders.

  6. Nitrate-containing beetroot enhances myocyte metabolism and mitochondrial content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Vaughan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beetroot (甜菜 tián cài juice consumption is of current interest for improving aerobic performance by acting as a vasodilator and possibly through alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and physiology. This work explored the effects of a commercially available beetroot supplement on metabolism, gene expression, and mitochondrial content in cultured myocytes. C2C12 myocytes were treated with various concentrations of the beetroot supplement for various durations. Glycolytic metabolism and oxidative metabolism were quantified via measurement of extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption, respectively. Metabolic gene expression was measured using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and mitochondrial content was assessed with flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cells treated with beetroot exhibited significantly increased oxidative metabolism, concurrently with elevated metabolic gene expression including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha, nuclear respiratory factor 1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and glucose transporter 4, leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our data show that treatment with a beetroot supplement increases basal oxidative metabolism. Our observations are also among the first to demonstrate that beetroot extract is an inducer of metabolic gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis. These observations support the need for further investigation into the therapeutic and pharmacological effects of nitrate-containing supplements for health and athletic benefits.

  7. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Stockburger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer’s disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  8. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhongqi [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Yu, Huimei [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Cui, Ni [Bethune Medical College, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China); Wu, Yao [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Sun, Liankun, E-mail: sunlk@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Wang, Guangyi, E-mail: wgymd@sina.com [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.

  9. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  10. Perturbation in mitochondrial network dynamics and in complex I dependent cellular respiration in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Marina; Brenner-Lavie, Hanit; Ari, Shunit Gal-Ben; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondria have been suggested to be involved in the pathology of bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying mitochondrial dysfunction is unclear. Mitochondrial network dynamics, which reflects cellular metabolic state, is important for embryonic development, synapse formation, and neurodegeneration. This study aimed to investigate mitochondrial network dynamics and its plausible association with abnormal cellular oxygen consumption in schizophrenia. Viable Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes (lymphoblastoids) from DSM-IV diagnosed patients with schizophrenia (n = 17), BD (n = 15), and healthy control subjects (n = 15) were assessed for mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial dynamics, and relevant protein levels by oxygraph, confocal microscopy, and immunoblotting, respectively. Respiration of schizophrenia-derived lymphoblastoids was significantly lower compared with control subjects, and was twice as sensitive to dopamine (DA)-induced inhibition. Unlike DA, haloperidol inhibited complex I-driven respiration to a similar extent in both schizophrenia and the control cells. Both drugs interact with complex I but at different sites. At the site of DA interaction, we found alterations in protein levels of three subunits of complex I in schizophrenia. In addition, we observed structural and connectivity perturbations in the mitochondrial network, associated with alterations in the profusion protein OPA1, which was similarly reduced in schizophrenia prefrontal cortex specimens. None of these alterations were observed in the BD cells, which were similar to control cells. We show impaired mitochondrial network dynamics associated with reduced cellular respiration and complex I abnormalities in schizophrenia but not in BD. If these findings represent disease-specific alterations, they may become an endophenotype biomarker for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  11. Diminished exercise capacity and mitochondrial bc1 complex deficiency in tafazzin-knockdown mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey ePowers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The phospholipid, cardiolipin, is essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and optimal function. Cardiolipin-deficiency in humans, Barth syndrome, is characterized by exercise intolerance, dilated cardiomyopathy, neutropenia and 3-methyl-glutaconic aciduria. The causative gene is the mitochondrial acyl-transferase, tafazzin that is essential for remodeling acyl chains of cardiolipin. We sought to determine metabolic rates in tafazzin-deficient mice during resting and exercise, and investigate the impact of cardiolipin deficiency on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities. Tafazzin knockdown in mice markedly impaired oxygen consumption rates during an exercise, without any significant effect on resting metabolic rates. CL-deficiency resulted in significant reduction of mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity in neonatal cardiomyocytes that is likely to be caused by diminished activity of complex-III, which requires CL for its assembly and optimal activity. Our results may provide mechanistic insights of Barth syndrome pathogenesis.

  12. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Natalia P. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Bulteau, Anne Laure [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Salazar, Julio [Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Etienne C. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Nunez, Marco T., E-mail: mnunez@uchile.cl [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  13. Metal plasmon enhanced europium complex luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Feng [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Aldea, Gabriela [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry Iasi, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Nunzi, Jean-Michel, E-mail: nunzijm@queensu.c [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    The plasmon enhanced luminescence of a rare-earth complex Tris(6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8-heptafluoro-2, 2-dimethyl-3, 5-octanedionato) europium (Eu(fod){sub 3}) was investigated. A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film was successfully adopted as a spacer to separate the Eu complex from the silver island film (SIF), and five-fold enhancement of the radiative decay rate of the Eu complex on SIF was demonstrated based on the luminescence intensity and lifetime measurement. Investigation of the distance dependent luminescence indicates that 7 nm is an optimal distance for SIF enhanced Eu luminescence. Plasmon enhanced rare-earth luminescence based on an organic film spacer would find potential applications in plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices.

  14. A novel mitochondrial ATP6 frameshift mutation causing isolated complex V deficiency, ataxia and encephalomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher B; Hahn, Dagmar; Schröter, Barbara; Richter, Uwe; Battersby, Brendan J; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Marttinen, Paula; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Schaller, André

    2017-06-01

    We describe a novel frameshift mutation in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene in a 4-year-old girl associated with ataxia, microcephaly, developmental delay and intellectual disability. A heteroplasmic frameshift mutation in the MT-ATP6 gene was confirmed in the patient's skeletal muscle and blood. The mutation was not detectable in the mother's DNA extracted from blood or buccal cells. Enzymatic and oxymetric analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory system in the patients' skeletal muscle and skin fibroblasts demonstrated an isolated complex V deficiency. Native PAGE with subsequent immunoblotting for complex V revealed impaired complex V assembly and accumulation of ATPase subcomplexes. Whilst northern blotting confirmed equal presence of ATP8/6 mRNA, metabolic (35)S-labelling of mitochondrial translation products showed a severe depletion of the ATP6 protein together with aberrant translation product accumulation. In conclusion, this novel isolated complex V defect expands the clinical and genetic spectrum of mitochondrial defects of complex V deficiency. Furthermore, this work confirms the benefit of native PAGE as an additional diagnostic method for the identification of OXPHOS defects, as the presence of complex V subcomplexes is associated with pathogenic mutations of mtDNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Complex forms of mitochondrial DNA in human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Zeuthen, J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed lymphoblast......Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed...

  16. A role for human mitochondrial complex II in the production of reactive oxygen species in human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major generator of cellular oxidative stress, thought to be an underlying cause of the carcinogenic and ageing process in many tissues including skin. Previous studies of the relative contributions of the respiratory chain (RC complexes I, II and III towards production of reactive oxygen species (ROS have focussed on rat tissues and certainly not on human skin which is surprising as this tissue is regularly exposed to UVA in sunlight, a potent generator of cellular oxidative stress. In a novel approach we have used an array of established specific metabolic inhibitors and DHR123 fluorescence to study the relative roles of the mitochondrial RC complexes in cellular ROS production in 2 types of human skin cells. These include additional enhancement of ROS production by exposure to physiological levels of UVA. The effects within epidermal and dermal derived skin cells are compared to other tissue cell types as well as those harbouring a compromised mitochondrial status (Rho-zero A549. The results show that the complex II inhibitor, TTFA, was the only RC inhibitor to significantly increase UVA-induced ROS production in both skin cell types (P<0.05 suggesting that the role of human skin complex II in terms of influencing ROS production is more important than previously thought particularly in comparison to liver cells. Interestingly, two-fold greater maximal activity of complex II enzyme was observed in both skin cell types compared to liver (P<0.001. The activities of RC enzymes appear to decrease with increasing age and telomere length is correlated with ageing. Our study showed that the level of maximal complex II activity was higher in the MRC5/hTERT (human lung fibroblasts transfected with telomerase cells than the corresponding wild type cells (P=0.0012 which can be considered (in terms of telomerase activity as models of younger and older cells respectively.

  17. Gene expression profiling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS complex I in Friedreich ataxia (FRDA patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Salehi

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is the most frequent progressive autosomal recessive disorder associated with unstable expansion of GAA trinucleotide repeats in the first intron of the FXN gene, which encodes for the mitochondrial frataxin protein. The number of repeats correlates with disease severity, where impaired transcription of the FXN gene results in reduced expression of the frataxin protein. Gene expression studies provide insights into disease pathogenicity and identify potential biomarkers, an important goal of translational research in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, using real-time PCR (RT-PCR, the expression profiles of mitochondrial (mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA genes that encode for the mitochondrial subunits of respiratory oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS complex I in the blood panels of 21 FRDA patients and 24 healthy controls were investigated. Here, the expression pattern of mtDNA-encoded complex I subunits was distinctly different from the expression pattern of nDNA-encoded complex I subunits, where significant (p<0.05 down-regulation of the mitochondrial ND2, ND4L, and ND6 complex I genes, compared to controls, were observed. In addition, the expression pattern of one nDNA-encoded gene, NDUFA1, was significantly (p<0.05 down-regulated compared to control. These findings suggest, for the first time, that the regulation of complex I subunit expression in FRDA is complex, rather than merely being a reflection of global co-regulation, and may provide important clues toward novel therapeutic strategies for FRDA and mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

  18. Highly Divergent Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Complexes in Tetrahymena thermophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nina, Praveen Balabaskaran; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kane, Lesley A.; van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mather, Michael W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    The F-type ATP synthase complex is a rotary nano-motor driven by proton motive force to synthesize ATP. Its F(1) sector catalyzes ATP synthesis, whereas the F(o) sector conducts the protons and provides a stator for the rotary action of the complex. Components of both F(1) and F(o) sectors are

  19. Growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae Is Enhanced in Cells with Impaired Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Käding

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective growth and replication of obligate intracellular pathogens depend on host cell metabolism. How this is connected to host cell mitochondrial function has not been studied so far. Recent studies suggest that growth of intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia pneumoniae is enhanced in a low oxygen environment, arguing for a particular mechanistic role of the mitochondrial respiration in controlling intracellular progeny. Metabolic changes in C. pneumoniae infected epithelial cells were analyzed under normoxic (O2 ≈ 20% and hypoxic conditions (O2 < 3%. We observed that infection of epithelial cells with C. pneumoniae under normoxia impaired mitochondrial function characterized by an enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS generation. Knockdown and mutation of the host cell ATP synthase resulted in an increased chlamydial replication already under normoxic conditions. As expected, mitochondrial hyperpolarization was observed in non-infected control cells cultured under hypoxic conditions, which was beneficial for C. pneumoniae growth. Taken together, functional and genetically encoded mitochondrial dysfunction strongly promotes intracellular growth of C. pneumoniae.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle tissue of complex regional pain syndrome type I patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.; Roestenberg, P.M.H.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Goris, R.J.A.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in the pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). Since the mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major source of ROS, we hypothesized that mitochondria play a role in the pathophysiology of CRPS I. The hypothesis was

  1. Triacylglycerol infusion improves exercise endurance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy due to complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roef, MJ; de Meer, K; Reijngoud, DJ; Straver, HWHC; de Barse, M; Kalhan, SC; Berger, R

    Background: A high-fat diet has been recommended for the treatment of patients with mitochondrial myopathy due to complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) deficiency (CID). Objective: This study evaluated the effects of intravenous infusion of isoenergetic amounts of triacylglycerol or glucose on substrate

  2. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Angerer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine motif proteins (LYRMs of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6 or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1 of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria.

  3. Dietary nitrate increases arginine availability and protects mitochondrial complex I and energetics in the hypoxic rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Branco-Price, Cristina; West, James A; Cowburn, Andrew S; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Johnson, Randall S; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxic exposure is associated with impaired cardiac energetics in humans and altered mitochondrial function, with suppressed complex I-supported respiration, in rat heart. This response might limit reactive oxygen species generation, but at the cost of impaired electron transport chain (ETC) activity. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves mitochondrial efficiency and can promote tissue oxygenation by enhancing blood flow. We therefore hypothesised that ETC dysfunction, impaired energetics and oxidative damage in the hearts of rats exposed to chronic hypoxia could be alleviated by sustained administration of a moderate dose of dietary nitrate. Male Wistar rats (n = 40) were given water supplemented with 0.7 mmol l(-1) NaCl (as control) or 0.7 mmol l(-1) NaNO3, elevating plasma nitrate levels by 80%, and were exposed to 13% O2 (hypoxia) or normoxia (n = 10 per group) for 14 days. Respiration rates, ETC protein levels, mitochondrial density, ATP content and protein carbonylation were measured in cardiac muscle. Complex I respiration rates and protein levels were 33% lower in hypoxic/NaCl rats compared with normoxic/NaCl controls. Protein carbonylation was 65% higher in hearts of hypoxic rats compared with controls, indicating increased oxidative stress, whilst ATP levels were 62% lower. Respiration rates, complex I protein and activity, protein carbonylation and ATP levels were all fully protected in the hearts of nitrate-supplemented hypoxic rats. Both in normoxia and hypoxia, dietary nitrate suppressed cardiac arginase expression and activity and markedly elevated cardiac l-arginine concentrations, unmasking a novel mechanism of action by which nitrate enhances tissue NO bioavailability. Dietary nitrate therefore alleviates metabolic abnormalities in the hypoxic heart, improving myocardial energetics. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  4. Perm1 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative capacity, and fatigue resistance in adult skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshitake; Hazen, Bethany C.; Gandra, Paulo G.; Ward, Samuel R.; Schenk, Simon; Russell, Aaron P.; Kralli, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity are important determinants of muscle function and whole-body health. Mitochondrial content and function are enhanced by endurance exercise and impaired in states or diseases where muscle function is compromised, such as myopathies, muscular dystrophies, neuromuscular diseases, and age-related muscle atrophy. Hence, elucidating the mechanisms that control muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative function can provide new insights into states and diseases that affect muscle health. In past studies, we identified Perm1 (PPARGC1- and ESRR-induced regulator, muscle 1) as a gene induced by endurance exercise in skeletal muscle, and regulating mitochondrial oxidative function in cultured myotubes. The capacity of Perm1 to regulate muscle mitochondrial content and function in vivo is not yet known. In this study, we use adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to increase Perm1 expression in skeletal muscles of 4-wk-old mice. Compared to control vector, AAV1-Perm1 leads to significant increases in mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity (by 40–80%). Moreover, AAV1-Perm1–transduced muscles show increased capillary density and resistance to fatigue (by 33 and 31%, respectively), without prominent changes in fiber-type composition. These findings suggest that Perm1 selectively regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, and implicate Perm1 in muscle adaptations that also occur in response to endurance exercise.—Cho, Y., Hazen, B. C., Gandra, P. G., Ward, S. R., Schenk, S., Russell, A. P., Kralli, A. Perm1 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative capacity, and fatigue resistance in adult skeletal muscle. PMID:26481306

  5. Role of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes in capsaicin mediated oxidative stress leading to apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pramanik, Kartick C; Boreddy, Srinivas Reddy; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    .... The generation of ROS was inhibited by catalase and EUK-134. To delineate the mechanism of ROS generation, enzymatic activities of mitochondrial complex-I and complex-III were determined in the pure mitochondria...

  6. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  7. Melatonin enhances neural stem cell differentiation and engraftment by increasing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Fernandez-Gil, Beatriz I; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Tejada, Miguel A; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Rusanova, Iryna; Garcia-Verdugo, José M; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; López, Luis Carlos; Velez-Pardo, Carlos; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Ferrer, José M; Escames, Germaine

    2017-09-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are regarded as a promising therapeutic approach to protecting and restoring damaged neurons in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (PD and AD, respectively). However, new research suggests that NSC differentiation is required to make this strategy effective. Several studies have demonstrated that melatonin increases mature neuronal markers, which reflects NSC differentiation into neurons. Nevertheless, the possible involvement of mitochondria in the effects of melatonin during NSC differentiation has not yet been fully established. We therefore tested the impact of melatonin on NSC proliferation and differentiation in an attempt to determine whether these actions depend on modulating mitochondrial activity. We measured proliferation and differentiation markers, mitochondrial structural and functional parameters as well as oxidative stress indicators and also evaluated cell transplant engraftment. This enabled us to show that melatonin (25 μM) induces NSC differentiation into oligodendrocytes and neurons. These effects depend on increased mitochondrial mass/DNA/complexes, mitochondrial respiration, and membrane potential as well as ATP synthesis in NSCs. It is also interesting to note that melatonin prevented oxidative stress caused by high levels of mitochondrial activity. Finally, we found that melatonin enriches NSC engraftment in the ND mouse model following transplantation. We concluded that a combined therapy involving transplantation of NSCs pretreated with pharmacological doses of melatonin could efficiently restore neuronal cell populations in PD and AD mouse models depending on mitochondrial activity promotion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Roles of Pyruvate, NADH, and Mitochondrial Complex I in Redox Balance and Imbalance in β Cell Function and Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells not only use glucose as an energy source, but also sense blood glucose levels for insulin secretion. While pyruvate and NADH metabolic pathways are known to be involved in regulating insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation, the roles of many other components along the metabolic pathways remain poorly understood. Such is the case for mitochondrial complex I (NADH/ubiquinone oxidoreductase. It is known that normal complex I function is absolutely required for episodic insulin secretion after a meal, but the role of complex I in β cells in the diabetic pancreas remains to be investigated. In this paper, we review the roles of pyruvate, NADH, and complex I in insulin secretion and hypothesize that complex I plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction in the diabetic pancreas. This hypothesis is based on the establishment that chronic hyperglycemia overloads complex I with NADH leading to enhanced complex I production of reactive oxygen species. As nearly all metabolic pathways are impaired in diabetes, understanding how complex I in the β cells copes with elevated levels of NADH in the diabetic pancreas may provide potential therapeutic strategies for diabetes.

  9. Mitochondrial-nuclear interactions and accelerated compensatory evolution: evidence from the primate cytochrome C oxidase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Naoki; Akashi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Accelerated rates of mitochondrial protein evolution have been proposed to reflect Darwinian coadaptation for efficient energy production for mammalian flight and brain activity. However, several features of mammalian mtDNA (absence of recombination, small effective population size, and high mutation rate) promote genome degradation through the accumulation of weakly deleterious mutations. Here, we present evidence for "compensatory" adaptive substitutions in nuclear DNA- (nDNA) encoded mitochondrial proteins to prevent fitness decline in primate mitochondrial protein complexes. We show that high mutation rate and small effective population size, key features of primate mitochondrial genomes, can accelerate compensatory adaptive evolution in nDNA-encoded genes. We combine phylogenetic information and the 3D structure of the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) complex to test for accelerated compensatory changes among interacting sites. Physical interactions among mtDNA- and nDNA-encoded components are critical in COX evolution; amino acids in close physical proximity in the 3D structure show a strong tendency for correlated evolution among lineages. Only nuclear-encoded components of COX show evidence for positive selection and adaptive nDNA-encoded changes tend to follow mtDNA-encoded amino acid changes at nearby sites in the 3D structure. This bias in the temporal order of substitutions supports compensatory weak selection as a major factor in accelerated primate COX evolution.

  10. Novel Cancer Therapeutics with Allosteric Modulation of the Mitochondrial C-Raf-DAPK Complex by Raf Inhibitor Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Ta; Chuang, Mei-Jen; Tang, Shou-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Chen, Yu-Chi; Sun, Guang-Huan; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Ho, Jar-Yi; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Chen, Ming-Rong; Lin, Chung-Chih; Chang, Sun-Yran; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Cha, Tai-Lung

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of cells. Mitochondrial C-Raf is a potential cancer therapeutic target, as it regulates mitochondrial function and is localized to the mitochondria by its N-terminal domain. However, Raf inhibitor monotherapy can induce S338 phosphorylation of C-Raf (pC-Raf(S338)) and impede therapy. This study identified the interaction of C-Raf with S308 phosphorylated DAPK (pDAPK(S308)), which together became colocalized in the mitochondria to facilitate mitochondrial remodeling. Combined use of the Raf inhibitors sorafenib and GW5074 had synergistic anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo, but targeted mitochondrial function, rather than the canonical Raf signaling pathway. C-Raf depletion in knockout MEF(C-Raf-/-) or siRNA knockdown ACHN renal cancer cells abrogated the cytotoxicity of combination therapy. Crystal structure simulation showed that GW5074 bound to C-Raf and induced a C-Raf conformational change that enhanced sorafenib-binding affinity. In the presence of pDAPK(S308), this drug-target interaction compromised the mitochondrial targeting effect of the N-terminal domain of C-Raf, which induced two-hit damages to cancer cells. First, combination therapy facilitated pC-Raf(S338) and pDAPK(S308) translocation from mitochondria to cytoplasm, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Second, ROS facilitated PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of pDAPK(S308) to DAPK. PP2A then dissociated from the C-Raf-DAPK complex and induced profound cancer cell death. Increased pDAPK(S308) modification was also observed in renal cancer tissues, which correlated with poor disease-free survival and poor overall survival in renal cancer patients. Besides mediating the anticancer effect, pDAPK(S308) may serve as a predictive biomarker for Raf inhibitors combination therapy, suggesting an ideal preclinical model that is worthy of clinical translation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. TNF-α mediates mitochondrial uncoupling and enhances ROS-dependent cell migration via NF-κB activation in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastl, L; Sauer, S W; Ruppert, T; Beissbarth, T; Becker, M S; Süss, D; Krammer, P H; Gülow, K

    2014-01-03

    Development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is accompanied by a continuous increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. To investigate the primary source of ROS in liver cells, we used tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as stimulus. Applying inhibitors against the respiratory chain complexes, we identified mitochondria as primary source of ROS production. TNF-α altered mitochondrial integrity by mimicking a mild uncoupling effect in liver cells, as indicated by a 40% reduction in membrane potential and ATP depletion (35%). TNF-α-induced ROS production activated NF-κB 3.5-fold and subsequently enhanced migration up to 12.7-fold. This study identifies complex I and complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain as point of release of ROS upon TNF-α stimulation of liver cells, which enhances cell migration by activating NF-κB signalling. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Farnesylated Coxiella burnetii Effector Forms a Multimeric Complex at the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Laura F; Moffatt, Jennifer H; Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael J; Khoo, Chen Ai; Roy, Craig R; Stojanovski, Diana; Newton, Hayley J

    2017-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, establishes a unique lysosome-derived intracellular niche termed the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). The Dot/Icm-type IVB secretion system is essential for the biogenesis of the CCV and the intracellular replication of Coxiella Effector proteins, translocated into the host cell through this apparatus, act to modulate host trafficking and signaling processes to facilitate CCV development. Here we investigated the role of CBU0077, a conserved Coxiella effector that had previously been observed to localize to lysosomal membranes. CBU0077 was dispensable for the intracellular replication of Coxiella in HeLa and THP-1 cells and did not appear to participate in CCV biogenesis. Intriguingly, native and epitope-tagged CBU0077 produced by Coxiella displayed specific punctate localization at host cell mitochondria. As such, we designated CBU0077 MceA (mitochondrial Coxiellaeffector protein A). Analysis of ectopically expressed MceA truncations revealed that the capacity to traffic to mitochondria is encoded within the first 84 amino acids of this protein. MceA is farnesylated by the host cell; however, this does not impact mitochondrial localization. Examination of mitochondria isolated from infected cells revealed that MceA is specifically integrated into the mitochondrial outer membrane and forms a complex of approximately 120 kDa. Engineering Coxiella to express either MceA tagged with 3×FLAG or MceA tagged with 2×hemagglutinin allowed us to perform immunoprecipitation experiments that showed that MceA forms a homo-oligomeric species at the mitochondrial outer membrane during infection. This research reveals that mitochondria are a bona fide target of Coxiella effectors and MceA is a complex-forming effector at the mitochondrial outer membrane during Coxiella infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Compromised mitochondrial complex II in models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laço, Mário N; Oliveira, Catarina R; Paulson, Henry L; Rego, A Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), also known as Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 3, is an inherited dominant autosomal neurodegenerative disorder. An expansion of Cytosine-Adenine-Guanine (CAG) repeats in the ATXN3 gene is translated as an expanded polyglutamine domain in the disease protein, ataxin-3. Selective neurodegeneration in MJD is evident in several subcortical brain regions including the cerebellum. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as a mechanism of neurodegeneration in polyglutamine disorders. In this study, we used different cell models and transgenic mice to assess the importance of mitochondria on cytotoxicity observed in MJD. Transiently transfected HEK cell lines with expanded (Q84) ataxin-3 exhibited a higher susceptibility to 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex II. Increased susceptibility to 3-NP was also detected in stably transfected PC6-3 cells that inducibly express expanded (Q108) ataxin-3 in a tetracycline-regulated manner. Moreover, cerebellar granule cells from MJD transgenic mice were more sensitive to 3-NP inhibition than wild-type cerebellar neurons. PC6-3 (Q108) cells differentiated into a neuronal-like phenotype with nerve growth factor (NGF) exhibited a significant decrease in mitochondrial complex II activity. Mitochondria from MJD transgenic mouse model and lymphoblast cell lines derived from MJD patients also showed a trend toward reduced complex II activity. Our results suggest that mitochondrial complex II activity is moderately compromised in MJD, which may designate a common feature in polyglutamine toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Native mitochondrial RNA-binding complexes in kinetoplastid RNA editing differ in guide RNA composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madina, Bhaskara R.; Kumar, Vikas; Metz, Richard; Mooers, Blaine H.M.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastids require extensive U-insertion/deletion editing that progresses 3′-to-5′ in small blocks, each directed by a guide RNA (gRNA), and exhibits substrate and developmental stage-specificity by unsolved mechanisms. Here, we address compositionally related factors, collectively known as the mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 (MRB1) or gRNA-binding complex (GRBC), that contain gRNA, have a dynamic protein composition, and transiently associate with several mitochondrial factors including RNA editing core complexes (RECC) and ribosomes. MRB1 controls editing by still unknown mechanisms. We performed the first next-generation sequencing study of native subcomplexes of MRB1, immunoselected via either RNA helicase 2 (REH2), that binds RNA and associates with unwinding activity, or MRB3010, that affects an early editing step. The particles contain either REH2 or MRB3010 but share the core GAP1 and other proteins detected by RNA photo-crosslinking. Analyses of the first editing blocks indicate an enrichment of several initiating gRNAs in the MRB3010-purified complex. Our data also indicate fast evolution of mRNA 3′ ends and strain-specific alternative 3′ editing within 3′ UTR or C-terminal protein-coding sequence that could impact mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, we found robust specific copurification of edited and pre-edited mRNAs, suggesting that these particles may bind both mRNA and gRNA editing substrates. We propose that multiple subcomplexes of MRB1 with different RNA/protein composition serve as a scaffold for specific assembly of editing substrates and RECC, thereby forming the editing holoenzyme. The MRB3010-subcomplex may promote early editing through its preferential recruitment of initiating gRNAs. PMID:24865612

  15. Voltage-Dependent Regulation of Complex II Energized Mitochondrial Oxygen Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Bai; Fink, Brian D.; Liping Yu; Sivitz, William I.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen consumption by isolated mitochondria is generally measured during state 4 respiration (no ATP production) or state 3 (maximal ATP production at high ADP availability). However, mitochondria in vivo do not function at either extreme. Here we used ADP recycling methodology to assess muscle mitochondrial function over intermediate clamped ADP concentrations. In so doing, we uncovered a previously unrecognized biphasic respiratory pattern wherein O2 flux on the complex II substrate, succin...

  16. Native mitochondrial RNA-binding complexes in kinetoplastid RNA editing differ in guide RNA composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madina, Bhaskara R; Kumar, Vikas; Metz, Richard; Mooers, Blaine H M; Bundschuh, Ralf; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastids require extensive U-insertion/deletion editing that progresses 3'-to-5' in small blocks, each directed by a guide RNA (gRNA), and exhibits substrate and developmental stage-specificity by unsolved mechanisms. Here, we address compositionally related factors, collectively known as the mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 (MRB1) or gRNA-binding complex (GRBC), that contain gRNA, have a dynamic protein composition, and transiently associate with several mitochondrial factors including RNA editing core complexes (RECC) and ribosomes. MRB1 controls editing by still unknown mechanisms. We performed the first next-generation sequencing study of native subcomplexes of MRB1, immunoselected via either RNA helicase 2 (REH2), that binds RNA and associates with unwinding activity, or MRB3010, that affects an early editing step. The particles contain either REH2 or MRB3010 but share the core GAP1 and other proteins detected by RNA photo-crosslinking. Analyses of the first editing blocks indicate an enrichment of several initiating gRNAs in the MRB3010-purified complex. Our data also indicate fast evolution of mRNA 3' ends and strain-specific alternative 3' editing within 3' UTR or C-terminal protein-coding sequence that could impact mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, we found robust specific copurification of edited and pre-edited mRNAs, suggesting that these particles may bind both mRNA and gRNA editing substrates. We propose that multiple subcomplexes of MRB1 with different RNA/protein composition serve as a scaffold for specific assembly of editing substrates and RECC, thereby forming the editing holoenzyme. The MRB3010-subcomplex may promote early editing through its preferential recruitment of initiating gRNAs. © 2014 Madina et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Mosaic origins of a complex chimeric mitochondrial gene in Silene vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Storchova

    Full Text Available Chimeric genes are significant sources of evolutionary innovation that are normally created when portions of two or more protein coding regions fuse to form a new open reading frame. In plant mitochondria astonishingly high numbers of different novel chimeric genes have been reported, where they are generated through processes of rearrangement and recombination. Nonetheless, because most studies do not find or report nucleotide variation within the same chimeric gene, evolution after the origination of these chimeric genes remains unstudied. Here we identify two alleles of a complex chimera in Silene vulgaris that are divergent in nucleotide sequence, genomic position relative to other mitochondrial genes, and expression patterns. Structural patterns suggest a history partially influenced by gene conversion between the chimeric gene and functional copies of subunit 1 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase gene (atp1. We identified small repeat structures within the chimeras that are likely recombination sites allowing generation of the chimera. These results establish the potential for chimeric gene divergence in different plant mitochondrial lineages within the same species. This result contrasts with the absence of diversity within mitochondrial chimeras found in crop species.

  18. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Almeida

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits. Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest-covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats-to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5 and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND

  19. Effects of tramadol, clonazepam, and their combination on brain mitochondrial complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Ghaffar, Hamdy M Abdel; El Husseiny, Rabee M R

    2015-12-01

    The present study is an unsubstantiated qualitative assessment of the abused drugs-tramadol and clonazepam. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the effects of tramadol, clonazepam, and their combination on mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes were influential at therapeutic or at progressively increasing doses. The study comprised of a total of 70 healthy male rats, aged 3 months. According to the drug intake regimen, animals were divided into seven groups: control, tramadol therapeutic, clonazepam therapeutic, combination therapeutic, tramadol abuse, clonazepam abuse, and combination abuse group. At the end of the experiment, brain mitochondrial ETC complexes (I, II, III, and IV) were evaluated. Histopathological examinations were also performed on brain tissues. The results showed that groups that received tramadol (therapeutic and abuse) suffered from weight loss. Tramadol abuse group and combination abuse group showed significant decrease in the activities of I, III, and IV complexes but not in the activity of complex II. In conclusion, tramadol but not clonazepam has been found to partially inhibit the activities of respiratory chain complexes I, III, and IV but not the activity of complex II and such inhibition occurred only at doses that exceeded the maximum recommended adult human daily therapeutic doses. This result explains the clinical and histopathological effects of tramadol, such as seizures and red neurons (marker for apoptosis), respectively. © The Author(s) 2012.

  20. Acute and chronic administration of cannabidiol increases mitochondrial complex and creatine kinase activity in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira S. Valvassori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of cannabidiol (CBD on mitochondrial complex and creatine kinase (CK activity in the rat brain using spectrophotometry. Method: Male adult Wistar rats were given intraperitoneal injections of vehicle or CBD (15, 30, or 60 mg/kg in an acute (single dose or chronic (once daily for 14 consecutive days regimen. The activities of mitochondrial complexes and CK were measured in the hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex. Results: Both acute and chronic injection of CBD increased the activity of the mitochondrial complexes (I, II, II-III, and IV and CK in the rat brain. Conclusions: Considering that metabolism impairment is certainly involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders, the modulation of energy metabolism (e.g., by increased mitochondrial complex and CK activity by CBD could be an important mechanism implicated in the action of CBD.

  1. Voltage-Dependent Regulation of Complex II Energized Mitochondrial Oxygen Flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bai

    Full Text Available Oxygen consumption by isolated mitochondria is generally measured during state 4 respiration (no ATP production or state 3 (maximal ATP production at high ADP availability. However, mitochondria in vivo do not function at either extreme. Here we used ADP recycling methodology to assess muscle mitochondrial function over intermediate clamped ADP concentrations. In so doing, we uncovered a previously unrecognized biphasic respiratory pattern wherein O2 flux on the complex II substrate, succinate, initially increased and peaked over low clamped ADP concentrations then decreased markedly at higher clamped concentrations. Mechanistic studies revealed no evidence that the observed changes in O2 flux were due to altered opening or function of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore or to changes in reactive oxygen. Based on metabolite and functional metabolic data, we propose a multifactorial mechanism that consists of coordinate changes that follow from reduced membrane potential (as the ADP concentration in increased. These changes include altered directional electron flow, altered NADH/NAD+ redox cycling, metabolite exit, and OAA inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. In summary, we report a previously unrecognized pattern for complex II energized O2 flux. Moreover, our findings suggest that the ADP recycling approach might be more widely adapted for mitochondrial studies.

  2. Cerebral glucose utilization and platelet mitochondrial complex I activity in schizophrenia: A FDG-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Bonne, Omer; Chisin, Roland; Klein, Ehud; Lester, Hava; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Yona, Ilan; Freedman, Nanette

    2007-05-09

    Altered cerebral energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction in periphery and in brain are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This study investigated whether cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) abnormalities are linked to altered mitochondrial complex I activity in the periphery, in schizophrenia. Sixteen schizophrenic patients, 8 with total positive PANSS score >or=20 (high positive schizophrenics; HPS), and 8 with total positive score complex I activity in platelets mitochondria and underwent FDG-PET scans at rest. Complex I activity was significantly increased only in HPS and was positively correlated with positive PANSS scores. Images were spatially normalized to an SPM template, their intensities normalized based on average brain activity. Hypermetabolism was observed in the basal ganglia, thalamus, amygdala, and brainstem of both patient groups compared with controls, and in LPS patients extended to parts of cerebellum, left and right cingulate gyrus, parietal and frontal lobes. rCGM in basal ganglia and thalamus significantly and positively correlated with complex I activity in the HPS. In the LPS, a negative correlation was identified in the cerebellum and brainstem. In the control group, however, no areas demonstrated significant positive or negative correlation. These results suggest that the correlation between peripheral complex I activity and rCGM in regions implicated in schizophrenia, could be a pathological factor that is differentially expressed in subgroups of schizophrenic patients.

  3. Mitochondrial Targeting of Metformin Enhances Its Activity against Pancreatic Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boukalová, Štěpána; Štursa, J.; Werner, L.; Ezrová, Zuzana; Černý, Jiří; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Pecinová, Alena; Dong, L.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Neužil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2016), s. 2875-2886 ISSN 1535-7163 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02203S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-31604A; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : ELECTRON-TRANSPORT CHAIN * RESPIRATORY COMPLEX-II * SUCCINATE Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (FGU-C) Impact factor: 5.764, year: 2016

  4. Copper dopamine complex induces mitochondrial autophagy preceding caspase-independent apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Irmgard; Perez-Pastene, Carolina; Couve, Eduardo; Caviedes, Pablo; Ledoux, Susan; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2009-05-15

    Parkinsonism is one of the major neurological symptoms in Wilson disease, and young workers who worked in the copper smelting industry also developed Parkinsonism. We have reported the specific neurotoxic action of copper dopamine complex in neurons with dopamine uptake. Copper dopamine complex (100 microm) induces cell death in RCSN-3 cells by disrupting the cellular redox state, as demonstrated by a 1.9-fold increase in oxidized glutathione levels and a 56% cell death inhibition in the presence of 500 microm ascorbic acid; disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential with a spherical shape and well preserved morphology determined by transmission electron microscopy; inhibition (72%, p copper dopamine complex induces mitochondrial autophagy followed by caspase-3-independent apoptotic cell death. However, a different cell death mechanism was observed when 100 microm copper dopamine complex was incubated in the presence of 100 microm dicoumarol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H quinone:oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2, also known as DT-diaphorase and NQ01), because a more extensive and rapid cell death was observed. In addition, cyclosporine A had no effect on phosphatidylserine externalization, significant portions of compact chromatin were observed within a vacuolated nuclear membrane, DNA laddering was less pronounced, the mitochondria morphology was more affected, and the number of cells with autophagic vacuoles was a near 4-fold less.

  5. Benzaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone Derived from Limonene Complexed with Copper Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Leishmania amazonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britta, Elizandra Aparecida; Barbosa Silva, Ana Paula; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; Silva, Cleuza Conceição; Sernaglia, Rosana Lázara; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects more than 12 million people. Treatment presents several problems, including high toxicity and many adverse effects, leading to the discontinuation of treatment and emergence of resistant strains. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the in vitro antileishmanial activity of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper, termed BenzCo, against Leishmania amazonensis. BenzCo inhibited the growth of the promastigote and axenic amastigote forms, with IC50 concentrations of 3.8 and 9.5 µM, respectively, with 72 h of incubation. Intracellular amastigotes were inhibited by the compound, with an IC50 of 10.7 µM. BenzCo altered the shape, size, and ultrastructure of the parasites. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed in protozoa treated with BenzCo but caused no alterations in the plasma membrane. Additionally, BenzCo induced lipoperoxidation and the production of mitochondrial superoxide anion radicals in promastigotes and axenic amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. Conclusion/Significance Our studies indicated that the antileishmania activity of BenzCo might be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, leading to parasite death. PMID:22870222

  6. Targeting metabolic plasticity in breast cancer cells via mitochondrial complex I modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qijin; Biener-Ramanujan, Eva; Yang, Wei; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneity commonly observed in clinical tumors stems both from the genetic diversity as well as from the differential metabolic adaptation of multiple cancer types during their struggle to maintain uncontrolled proliferation and invasion in vivo. This study aims to identify a potential metabolic window of such adaptation in aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. With a multidisciplinary approach using high-resolution imaging, cell metabolism assays, proteomic profiling and animal models of human tumor xenografts and via clinically-relevant pharmacological approach for modulating mitochondrial complex I function in human breast cancer cell lines, we report a novel route to target metabolic plasticity in human breast cancer cells. By a systematic modulation of mitochondrial function and by mitigating metabolic switch phenotype in aggressive human breast cancer cells, we demonstrate that the resulting metabolic adaptation signatures can predictably decrease tumorigenic potential in vivo. Proteomic profiling of the metabolic adaptation in these cells further revealed novel protein-pathway interactograms highlighting the importance of antioxidant machinery in the observed metabolic adaptation. Improved metabolic adaptation potential in aggressive human breast cancer cells contribute to improving mitochondrial function and reducing metabolic switch phenotype-which may be vital for targeting primary tumor growth in vivo.

  7. Benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper induced mitochondrial dysfunction in Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizandra Aparecida Britta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects more than 12 million people. Treatment presents several problems, including high toxicity and many adverse effects, leading to the discontinuation of treatment and emergence of resistant strains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the in vitro antileishmanial activity of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper, termed BenzCo, against Leishmania amazonensis. BenzCo inhibited the growth of the promastigote and axenic amastigote forms, with IC(50 concentrations of 3.8 and 9.5 µM, respectively, with 72 h of incubation. Intracellular amastigotes were inhibited by the compound, with an IC(50 of 10.7 µM. BenzCo altered the shape, size, and ultrastructure of the parasites. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed in protozoa treated with BenzCo but caused no alterations in the plasma membrane. Additionally, BenzCo induced lipoperoxidation and the production of mitochondrial superoxide anion radicals in promastigotes and axenic amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies indicated that the antileishmania activity of BenzCo might be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, leading to parasite death.

  8. Infertility and recurrent miscarriage with complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takamasa; Yasuda, Kayo; Miyazawa, Masaki; Mitsushita, Junji; Johnson, Thomas E; Hartman, Phil S; Ishii, Naoaki

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with some forms of both male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient knowledge of the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. There are a number of animal models for understanding age-dependent decrease of reproductive ability and diabetic embryopathy, especially abnormal spermatogenesis, oogenesis and embryogenesis with mitochondrial dysfunctions. Several important processes occur in mitochondria, including ATP synthesis, calcium ion storage, induction of apoptosis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These events have different effects on the several aspects of reproductive function. Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, developed after studies with the mev-1 mutant of the nematode C. elegans, offer the ability to carefully regulate expression of doxycycline-induced mutated SDHC(V69E) levels and hence modulate endogenous oxidative stress. The mev-1 models have served to illuminate the effects of complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial ROS production, although interestingly they maintain normal mitochondrial and intracellular ATP levels. In this review, the reproductive dysfunctions are presented focusing on fertility potentials in each gamete, early embryogenesis, maternal conditions with placental function and neonatal development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Mechanistic Investigations of the Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitor Rotenone in the Context of Pharmacological and Safety Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sabrina; Freyberger, Alexius; Lawrenz, Bettina; Schladt, Ludwig; Schmuck, Gabriele; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2017-04-04

    Inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are suggested to exert anti-tumor activity on those tumors relying on oxidative metabolism and are therefore of interest to oncology research. Nevertheless, the safety profile of these inhibitors should be thoroughly assessed. Rotenone, a proven complex I inhibitor, has shown anti-carcinogenic activity in several studies. In this context rotenone was used in this study as a tool compound with the aim to identify suitable biomarker candidates and provide enhanced mechanistic insights into the molecular and cellular effects of complex I inhibitors. Rats were treated with 400 ppm rotenone daily for 1, 3 or 14 consecutive days followed by necropsy. Classical clinical endpoints, including hematology, clinical chemistry and histopathology with supporting investigations (FACS-analysis, enzymatic activity assays) were examined as well as gene expression analysis. Through these investigations, we identified liver, bone marrow and bone as target organs amongst approx. 40 organs evaluated at least histopathologically. Our results suggest blood analysis, bone marrow parameters, assessment of lactate in serum and glycogen in liver, and especially gene expression analysis in liver as useful parameters for an experimental model to help to characterize the profile of complex I inhibitors with respect to a tolerable risk-benefit balance.

  10. UQCRC2 mutation in a patient with mitochondrial complex III deficiency causing recurrent liver failure, lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaignard, Pauline; Eyer, Didier; Lebigot, Elise; Oliveira, Christophe; Therond, Patrice; Boutron, Audrey; Slama, Abdelhamid

    2017-07-01

    An isolated mitochondrial complex III (CIII) defect constitutes a rare cause of mitochondrial disorder. Here we present the second case involving UQCRC2 gene, which encodes core protein 2, one of the 11 structural subunits of CIII. The patient has the same mutation (c.547C>T; p.Arg183Trp) as the first case and presented with neonatal lactic acidosis, hypoglycemia and severe episodes of liver failure. Our study expands the few reported cases of CIII deficiency of nuclear origin.

  11. Metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I of cancer cells to reduce tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, William W; Weinberg, Samuel E; Hamanaka, Robert B; Soberanes, Saul; Sullivan, Lucas B; Anso, Elena; Glasauer, Andrea; Dufour, Eric; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Budigner, GR Scott; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological and laboratory-based studies suggest that the anti-diabetic drug metformin prevents cancer progression. How metformin diminishes tumor growth is not fully understood. In this study, we report that in human cancer cells, metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) activity and cellular respiration. Metformin inhibited cellular proliferation in the presence of glucose, but induced cell death upon glucose deprivation, indicating that cancer cells rely exclusively on glycolysis for survival in the presence of metformin. Metformin also reduced hypoxic activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). All of these effects of metformin were reversed when the metformin-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH dehydrogenase NDI1 was overexpressed. In vivo, the administration of metformin to mice inhibited the growth of control human cancer cells but not those expressing NDI1. Thus, we have demonstrated that metformin's inhibitory effects on cancer progression are cancer cell autonomous and depend on its ability to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02242.001 PMID:24843020

  12. Hepatic S6K1 Partially Regulates Lifespan of Mice with Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi K. Ito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The inactivation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1 recapitulates aspects of caloric restriction and mTORC1 inhibition to achieve prolonged longevity in invertebrate and mouse models. In addition to delaying normative aging, inhibition of mTORC1 extends the shortened lifespan of yeast, fly, and mouse models with severe mitochondrial disease. Here we tested whether disruption of S6K1 can recapitulate the beneficial effects of mTORC1 inhibition in the Ndufs4 knockout (NKO mouse model of Leigh Syndrome caused by Complex I deficiency. These NKO mice develop profound neurodegeneration resulting in brain lesions and death around 50–60 days of age. Our results show that liver-specific, as well as whole body, S6K1 deletion modestly prolongs survival and delays onset of neurological symptoms in NKO mice. In contrast, we observed no survival benefit in NKO mice specifically disrupted for S6K1 in neurons or adipocytes. Body weight was reduced in WT mice upon disruption of S6K1 in adipocytes or whole body, but not altered when S6K1 was disrupted only in neurons or liver. Taken together, these data indicate that decreased S6K1 activity in liver is sufficient to delay the neurological and survival defects caused by deficiency of Complex I and suggest that mTOR signaling can modulate mitochondrial disease and metabolism via cell non-autonomous mechanisms.

  13. Mdm35p imports Ups proteins into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by functional complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yasushi; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2010-09-01

    Ups1p, Ups2p, and Ups3p are three homologous proteins that control phospholipid metabolism in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). The Ups proteins are atypical IMS proteins in that they lack the two major IMS-targeting signals, bipartite presequences and cysteine motifs. Here, we show that Ups protein import is mediated by another IMS protein, Mdm35p. In vitro import assays show that import of Ups proteins requires Mdm35p. Loss of Mdm35p led to a decrease in steady state levels of Ups proteins in mitochondria. In addition, mdm35Delta cells displayed a similar phenotype to ups1Deltaups2Deltaups3Delta cells. Interestingly, unlike typical import machineries, Mdm35p associated stably with Ups proteins at a steady state after import. Demonstrating that Mdm35p is a functional component of Ups-Mdm35p complexes, restoration of Ups protein levels in mdm35Delta mitochondria failed to restore phospholipid metabolism. These findings provide a novel mechanism in which the formation of functional protein complexes drives mitochondrial protein import.

  14. The antioxidant Trolox restores mitochondrial membrane potential and Ca2+ -stimulated ATP production in human complex I deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Visch, H.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Mayatepek, E.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Malfunction of mitochondrial complex I caused by nuclear gene mutations causes early-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Previous work using cultured fibroblasts of complex-I-deficient patients revealed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reductions in both total Ca(2+) content of the

  15. Acute exercise induces tumour suppressor protein p53 translocation to the mitochondria and promotes a p53-Tfam-mitochondrial DNA complex in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Ayesha; Hood, David A

    2013-07-15

    The major tumour suppressor protein p53 plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial content and function in skeletal muscle. p53 has been shown to reside in the mitochondria complexed with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); however, the physiological repercussions of mitochondrial p53 remain unknown. We endeavoured to elucidate whether an acute bout of endurance exercise could mediate an increase in mitochondrial p53 levels. C57Bl6 mice (n = 6 per group) were randomly assigned to sedentary, acute exercise (AE, 15 m min(-1) for 90 min) or acute exercise + 3 h recovery (AER) groups. Exercise concomitantly increased the mRNA content of nuclear-encoded (PGC-1α, Tfam, NRF-1, COX-IV, citrate synthase) and mtDNA-encoded (COX-I) genes in the AE group, and further by ∼5-fold in the AER group. Nuclear p53 protein levels were reduced in the AE and AER groups, while in contrast, the abundance of p53 was drastically enhanced by ∼2.4-fold and ∼3.9-fold in subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria, respectively, in the AER conditions. Within the mitochondria, the interaction of p53 with mtDNA at the D-loop and with Tfam was elevated by ∼4.6-fold and ∼3.6-fold, respectively, in the AER group. In the absence of p53, the enhanced COX-I mRNA content observed with AE and AER was abrogated. This study is the first to indicate that endurance exercise can signal to localize p53 to the mitochondria where it may serve to positively modulate the activity of the mitochondrial transcription factor Tfam. Our findings help us understand the mechanisms underlying the effects of exercise as a therapeutic intervention designed to trigger the pro-metabolic functions of p53.

  16. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD(+) ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD(+) ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Imaizumi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD. This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical.

  18. Complete Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induces an Up-Regulation of Respiratory Fluxes That Is Abolished by Traces of Functional Complex I1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Kristen; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular NAD+ recycling and accounts for approximately 40% of mitochondrial ATP production. To understand how complex I function impacts respiration and plant development, we isolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines that lack complex I activity due to the absence of the catalytic subunit NDUFV1 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein1) and compared these plants with ndufs4 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase Fe-S protein4) mutants possessing trace amounts of complex I. Unlike ndufs4 plants, ndufv1 lines were largely unable to establish seedlings in the absence of externally supplied sucrose. Measurements of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis revealed that compared with ndufv1, the complex I amounts retained by ndufs4 did not increase mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation capacities. No major differences were seen in the mitochondrial proteomes, cellular metabolomes, or transcriptomes between ndufv1 and ndufs4. The analysis of fluxes through the respiratory pathway revealed that in ndufv1, fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were dramatically increased compared with ndufs4, which showed near wild-type-like fluxes. This indicates that the strong growth defects seen for plants lacking complex I originate from a switch in the metabolic mode of mitochondria and an up-regulation of respiratory fluxes. Partial reversion of these phenotypes when traces of active complex I are present suggests that complex I is essential for plant development and likely acts as a negative regulator of respiratory fluxes. PMID:26134164

  19. Mitochondrial proteomic profile of complex IV deficiency fibroblasts: rearrangement of oxidative phosphorylation complex/supercomplex and other metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Severo, Karina; Gómez-Caudillo, Leopoldo; Quezada, Héctor; García-Trejo, José de Jesús; Cárdenas-Conejo, Alan; Vázquez-Memije, Martha Elisa; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando

    Mitochondriopathies are multisystem diseases affecting the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Skin fibroblasts are a good model for the study of these diseases. Fibroblasts with a complex IV mitochondriopathy were used to determine the molecular mechanism and the main affected functions in this disease. Skin fibroblast were grown to assure disease phenotype. Mitochondria were isolated from these cells and their proteome extracted for protein identification. Identified proteins were validated with the MitoMiner database. Disease phenotype was corroborated on skin fibroblasts, which presented a complex IV defect. The mitochondrial proteome of these cells showed that the most affected proteins belonged to the OXPHOS system, mainly to the complexes that form supercomplexes or respirosomes (I, III, IV, and V). Defects in complex IV seemed to be due to assembly issues, which might prevent supercomplexes formation and efficient substrate channeling. It was also found that this mitochondriopathy affects other processes that are related to DNA genetic information flow (replication, transcription, and translation) as well as beta oxidation and tricarboxylic acid cycle. These data, as a whole, could be used for the better stratification of these diseases, as well as to optimize management and treatment options. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. RNA silencing of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease enhances mitochondrial function and synaptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2013-12-01

    An age-dependent increase in mRNA levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the microtubule-associated protein Tau, and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) genes are reported to be toxic to neurons affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying toxic nature of these genes is not completely understood. The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of RNA silencing of APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes in AD pathogenesis. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, we first silenced RNA for APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes, and then performed real-time RT-PCR analysis to measure mRNA levels of 34 genes that are involved in AD pathogenesis. Using biochemical assays, we also assessed mitochondrial function by measuring levels of H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP production, and GTPase enzymatic activity. We found that increased mRNA expression of synaptic function and mitochondrial fission genes, and reduced levels of mitochondrial fusion genes in RNA silenced the SHSY5Y cells for APP, Tau and VDAC1 genes relative to the control SHSY5Y cells. In addition, RNA-silenced APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes in SHSY5Y cells showed reduced levels of H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, fission-linked GTPase activity, and increased cytochrome oxidase activity and ATP production. These findings suggest that a reduction of human APP, Tau, and VDAC1 may enhance synaptic activity, may improve mitochondrial maintenance and function, and may protect against toxicities of AD-related genes. Thus, these findings also suggest that the reduction of APP, Tau, and VDAC1 mRNA expressions may have therapeutic value for patients with AD. © 2013.

  1. Ruthenium(II) complexes: DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cellular localization, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Ji; Han, Bing-Jie; Xie, Yang-Yin; Lin, Gan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-11-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate DNA-binding and cytotoxic activity of the four new Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (1), [Ru(bpy)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (2), [Ru(phen)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (3) and [Ru(dmp)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (4). The complexes interact with DNA through intercalative mode and show relatively high cytotoxic activity against A549 cells, no cytotoxicity toward MG-63 cells. Complexes 1-4 can enhance the levels of ROS in A549 cells and induce the decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential. These complexes inhibit the cell growth in A549 cells at G0/G1 or S phase. Complex 3 activated caspase 7, and down-regulated the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Complexes 1-4 induce apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.

  3. GSK3 inactivation is involved in mitochondrial complex IV defect in transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1-induced senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Jung, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Yong-Hak; Lee, Young-Kyoung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, The Graduate School, Ajou University, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Chul [Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Seong Hwang, Eun [Department of Life Science, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Gyesoon, E-mail: ypeace@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, The Graduate School, Ajou University, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-10

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF {beta}1) induces Mv1Lu cell senescence by persistently producing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) through decreased complex IV activity. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of TGF {beta}1 on mitochondrial complex IV activity. TGF {beta}1 progressively phosphorylated the negative regulatory sites of both glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) {alpha} and {beta}, corresponding well to the intracellular ROS generation profile. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, did not alter this GSK3 phosphorylation (inactivation), whereas pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 by SB415286 significantly increased mitochondrial ROS, implying that GSK3 phosphorylation is an upstream event of the ROS generation. GSK3 inhibition by SB415286 decreased complex IV activity and cellular O{sub 2} consumption rate and eventually induced senescence of Mv1Lu cell. Similar results were obtained with siRNA-mediated knockdown of GSK3. Moreover, we found that GSK3 not only exists in cytosol but also in mitochondria of Mv1Lu cell and the mitochondrial GSK3 binds complex IV subunit 6b which has no electron carrier and is topologically located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Involvement of subunit 6b in controlling complex IV activity and overall respiration rate was proved with siRNA-mediated knockdown of subunit 6b. Finally, TGF {beta}1 treatment decreased the binding of the subunit 6b to GSK3 and subunit 6b phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that GSK3 inactivation is importantly involved in TGF {beta}1-induced complex IV defects through decreasing phosphorylation of the subunit 6b, thereby contributing to senescence-associated mitochondrial ROS generation.

  4. Genetic variation and origin of parthenogenesis in the Aspidoscelis cozumela complex: evidence from mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manríquez-Morán, Norma L; Cruz, Fausto R Méndez-de la; Murphy, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Parthenogenesis is a form of clonal reproduction. Eggs develop in the absence of sperm and offspring are genetically identical to their mother. Although common in invertebrates, it occurs in only a few species of squamate reptiles. Parthenogenetic reptiles have their origin in interspecific hybridization, and their populations are exclusively female. Because of its high mutation rate and maternal inheritance, mitochondrial DNA sequence data can evaluate the origin and evolution of all-female vertebrates. Partial sequences from two mitochondrial genes, Cytb and ND4, were analyzed to investigate questions about the origin of parthenogenesis in the Aspidoscelis cozumela complex, which includes A. cozumela, A. maslini and A. rodecki. Low levels of divergence were detected among parthenogenetic species, and between them and A. angusticeps, confirming it as the maternal species of the parthenoforms. A gene tree was constructed using sequences from three populations of A. angusticeps and nine of its unisexual daughter species. The phylogeny suggests that two independent hybridization events between A. angusticeps and A. deppii formed three unisexual species. One hybridization resulted in A. rodecki and the other formed A. maslini and A. cozumela. Although A. cozumela has the haplotype characteristic of A. maslini from Puerto Morelos, it is considered to be a different species based on karyological and morphological characteristics and its geographical isolation.

  5. Post-translational oxidative modification and inactivation of mitochondrial complex I in epileptogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryan, Kristen; Backos, Donald S; Reigan, Philip; Patel, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy, but whether or not they have a functional impact on mitochondrial processes during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis) is unknown...

  6. Silencing of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene enhances glioma radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Youl [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Hyun [Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeen-Woo, E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •Silencing of the IDPm gene enhances IR-induced autophagy in glioma cells. •Autophagy inhibition augmented apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells. •Results offer a redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are elevated in organisms that have been exposed to ionizing radiation and are protagonists in the induction of cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of mitochondrial redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage are primary functions of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPm) via the supply of NADPH for antioxidant systems. In the present study, we report an autophagic response to ionizing radiation in A172 glioma cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the IDPm gene. Autophagy in A172 transfectant cells was associated with enhanced autophagolysosome formation and GFP–LC3 punctuation/aggregation. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine augmented apoptotic cell death of irradiated A172 cells transfected with IDPm siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that autophagy functions as a survival mechanism in A172 cells against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and the sensitizing effect of IDPm siRNA and autophagy inhibitor on the ionizing radiation-induced apoptotic cell death of glioma cells offers a novel redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  7. Analysis of complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of three members of the Montastraea annularis coral species complex (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Hironobu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2005-11-01

    Complete mitochondrial nucleotide sequences of two individuals each of Montastraea annularis, Montastraea faveolata, and Montastraea franksi were determined. Gene composition and order differed substantially from the sea anemone Metridium senile, but were identical to that of the phylogenetically distant coral genus Acropora. However, characteristics of the non-coding regions differed between the two scleractinian genera. Among members of the M. annularis complex, only 25 of 16,134 base pair positions were variable. Sixteen of these occurred in one colony of M. franksi, which (together with additional data) indicates the existence of multiple divergent mitochondrial lineages in this species. Overall, rates of evolution for these mitochondrial genomes were extremely slow (0.03 0.04% per million years based on the fossil record of the M. annularis complex). At higher taxonomic levels, patterns of genetic divergence and synonymous/nonsynonymous substitutions suggest non-neutral and unequal rates of evolution between the two lineages to which Montastraea and Acropora belong.

  8. Mitochondrial sequence data expose the putative cosmopolitan polychaete Scoloplos armiger (Annelida, Orbiniidae as a species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Sylvia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polychaetes assigned as Scoloplos armiger (Orbiniidae show a cosmopolitan distribution and have been encountered in all zoogeographic regions. Sibling S. armiger-like species have been revealed by recent studies using RAPDs and AFLP genetic data. We sequenced a ~12 kb fragment of the Scoloplos cf. armiger mitochondrial genome and developed primers for variable regions including the 3' end of the cox3 gene, trnQ, and most of nad6. A phylogenetic analysis of this 528-nucleotide fragment was carried out for S. armiger-like individuals from the Eastern North Atlantic as well as Pacific regions. The aim of this study is to test the cosmopolitan status, as well as to clarify the systematics of this species complex in the Eastern North Atlantic, while using a few specimens from the Pacific Ocean for comparision. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the cox3-trnQ-nad6 data set recovered five different clades of Scoloplos cf. armiger. The fragment of the mitochondrial genome of Scoloplos cf. armiger is 12,042 bp long and contains 13 protein coding genes, 15 of the 22 expected tRNAs, and the large ribosomal subunit (rrnl. Conclusion The sequenced cox3-trnQ-nad6 fragment proved to be very useful in phylogenetic analyses of Scoloplos cf. armiger. Due to its larger sampling scale this study goes beyond previous analyses which used RAPD and AFLP markers. The results of this study clearly supports that Scoloplos armiger represents a species complex and not a cosmopolitan species. We find at least two S. armiger-like species within the Pacific region and three different S. armiger-like species in the North Atlantic. Implications for the taxonomy and the impact on ecological studies are discussed.

  9. Functional dissection of the proton pumping modules of mitochondrial complex I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dröse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial complex I, the largest and most complicated proton pump of the respiratory chain, links the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone to the pumping of four protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space. In humans, defects in complex I are involved in a wide range of degenerative disorders. Recent progress in the X-ray structural analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic complex I confirmed that the redox reactions are confined entirely to the hydrophilic peripheral arm of the L-shaped molecule and take place at a remarkable distance from the membrane domain. While this clearly implies that the proton pumping within the membrane arm of complex I is driven indirectly via long-range conformational coupling, the molecular mechanism and the number, identity, and localization of the pump-sites remains unclear. Here, we report that upon deletion of the gene for a small accessory subunit of the Yarrowia complex I, a stable subcomplex (nb8mΔ is formed that lacks the distal part of the membrane domain as revealed by single particle analysis. The analysis of the subunit composition of holo and subcomplex by three complementary proteomic approaches revealed that two (ND4 and ND5 of the three subunits with homology to bacterial Mrp-type Na(+/H(+ antiporters that have been discussed as prime candidates for harbouring the proton pumps were missing in nb8mΔ. Nevertheless, nb8mΔ still pumps protons at half the stoichiometry of the complete enzyme. Our results provide evidence that the membrane arm of complex I harbours two functionally distinct pump modules that are connected in series by the long helical transmission element recently identified by X-ray structural analysis.

  10. GhMCS1, the Cotton Orthologue of Human GRIM-19, Is a Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I and Associated with Cotton Fibre Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Wu, Ai-Min; Du, Shao-Jun; Tang, Kai; Wang, Yun; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    GRIM-19 (Gene associated with Retinoid-Interferon-induced Mortality 19) is a subunit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I in mammalian systems, and it has been demonstrated to be a multifunctional protein involved in the cell cycle, cell motility and innate immunity. However, little is known about the molecular functions of its homologues in plants. Here, we characterised GhMCS1, an orthologue of human GRIM-19 from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), and found that it was essential for maintaining complex integrity and mitochondrial function in cotton. GhMCS1 was detected in various cotton tissues, with high levels expressed in developing fibres and flowers and lower levels in leaves, roots and ovules. In fibres at different developmental stages, GhMCS1 expression peaked at 5-15 days post anthesis (dpa) and then decreased at 20 dpa and diminished at 25 dpa. By Western blot analysis, GhMCS1 was observed to be localised to the mitochondria of cotton leaves and to colocalise with complex I. In Arabidopsis, GhMCS1 overexpression enhanced the assembly of complex I and thus respiratory activity, whereas the GhMCS1 homologue (At1g04630) knockdown mutants showed significantly decreased respiratory activities. Furthermore, the mutants presented with some phenotypic changes, such as smaller whole-plant architecture, poorly developed seeds and fewer trichomes. More importantly, in the cotton fibres, both the GhMCS1 transcript and protein levels were correlated with respiratory activity and fibre developmental phase. Our results suggest that GhMCS1, a functional ortholog of the human GRIM-19, is an essential subunit of mitochondrial complex I and is involved in cotton fibre development. The present data may deepen our knowledge on the potential roles of mitochondria in fibre morphogenesis.

  11. Screening for active small molecules in mitochondrial complex I deficient patient's fibroblasts, reveals AICAR as the most beneficial compound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Golubitzky

    Full Text Available Congenital deficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (CI is a common defect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Despite major advances in the biochemical and molecular diagnostics and the deciphering of CI structure, function assembly and pathomechanism, there is currently no satisfactory cure for patients with mitochondrial complex I defects. Small molecules provide one feasible therapeutic option, however their use has not been systematically evaluated using a standardized experimental system. In order to evaluate potentially therapeutic compounds, we set up a relatively simple system measuring different parameters using only a small amount of patient's fibroblasts, in glucose free medium, where growth is highly OXPOS dependent. Ten different compounds were screened using fibroblasts derived from seven CI patients, harboring different mutations.5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (AICAR was found to be the most beneficial compound improving growth and ATP content while decreasing ROS production. AICAR also increased mitochondrial biogenesis without altering mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ. Fluorescence microscopy data supported increased mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of the AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK. Other compounds such as; bezafibrate and oltipraz were rated as favorable while polyphenolic phytochemicals (resverastrol, grape seed extract, genistein and epigallocatechin gallate were found not significant or detrimental. Although the results have to be verified by more thorough investigation of additional OXPHOS parameters, preliminary rapid screening of potential therapeutic compounds in individual patient's fibroblasts could direct and advance personalized medical treatment.

  12. Clonal expansion of mutated mitochondrial DNA is associated with tumor formation and complex I deficiency in the benign renal oncocytoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasparre, G.; Hervouet, E.; Laplanche, E de; Demont, J.; Pennisi, L.F.; Colombel, M.; Mege-Lechevallier, F.; Scoazec, J.Y.; Bonora, E.; Smeets, R.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Lazar, V.; Lespinasse, J.; Giraud, S.; Godinot, C.; Romeo, G.; Simonnet, H.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are frequent in cancers but it is not yet clearly established whether they are modifier events involved in cancer progression or whether they are a consequence of tumorigenesis. Here we show a benign tumor type in which mtDNA mutations that lead to complex I

  13. The Protective Effects of Salidroside from Exhaustive Exercise-Induced Heart Injury by Enhancing the PGC-1α–NRF1/NRF2 Pathway and Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the hypothesis that salidroside (SAL can protect heart from exhaustive exercise-induced injury by enhancing mitochondrial respiratory function and mitochondrial biogenesis key signaling pathway PGC-1α–NRF1/NRF2 in rats. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (C, exhaustive exercise (EE, low-dose SAL (LS, and high-dose SAL (HS. After one-time exhaustive swimming exercise, we measured the changes in cardiomyocyte ultrastructure and cardiac marker enzymes and mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS complexes activities in situ. We also measured mitochondrial biogenesis master regulator PGC-1α and its downstream transcription factors, NRF1 and NRF2, expression at gene and protein levels. Results. Compared to C group, the EE group showed marked myocardium ultrastructure injury and decrease of mitochondrial respiratory function P<0.05 and protein levels of PGC-1α, NRF1, and NRF2 P<0.05 but a significant increase of PGC-1α, NRF1, and NRF2 genes levels P<0.05; compared to EE group, SAL ameliorated myocardium injury, increased mitochondrial respiratory function P<0.05, and elevated both gene and protein levels of PGC-1α, NRF-1, and NRF-2. Conclusion. Salidroside can protect the heart from exhaustive exercise-induced injury. It might act by improving myocardial mitochondrial respiratory function by stimulating the expression of PGC-1α–NRF1/NRF2 pathway.

  14. Ca2+ and Mg2+-enhanced reduction of arsenazo III to its anion free radical metabolite and generation of superoxide anion by an outer mitochondrial membrane azoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, S N; Mason, R P; Docampo, R

    1984-12-10

    At the concentrations usually employed as a Ca2+ indicator, arsenazo III underwent a one-electron reduction by rat liver mitochondria to produce an azo anion radical as demonstrated by electron-spin resonance spectroscopy. Either NADH or NADPH could serve as a source of reducing equivalents for the production of this free radical by intact rat liver mitochondria. Under aerobic conditions, addition of arsenazo III to rat liver mitochondria produced an increase in electron flow from NAD(P)H to molecular oxygen, generating superoxide anion. NAD(P)H generated from endogenous mitochondrial NAD(P)+ by intramitochondrial reactions could not be used for the NAD(P)H azoreductase reaction unless the mitochondria were solubilized by detergent or anaerobiosis. In addition, NAD(P)H azoreductase activity was higher in the crude outer mitochondrial membrane fraction than in mitoplasts and intact mitochondria. The steady-state concentration of the azo anion radical and the arsenazo III-stimulated cyanide-insensitive oxygen consumption were enhanced by calcium and magnesium, suggesting that, in addition to an enhanced azo anion radical-stabilization by complexation with the metal ions, enhanced reduction of arsenazo III also occurred. Accordingly, addition of cations to crude outer mitochondrial membrane preparations increased arsenazo III-stimulated cyanide-insensitive O2 consumption, H2O2 formation, and NAD(P)H oxidation. Antipyrylazo III was much less effective than arsenazo III in increasing superoxide anion formation by rat liver mitochondria and gave a much weaker electron spin resonance spectrum of an azo anion radical. These results provide direct evidence of an azoreductase activity associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane and of a stimulation of arsenazo III reduction by cations.

  15. Novel Mitochondrial Complex II Isolated from Trypanosoma cruzi Is Composed of 12 Peptides Including a Heterodimeric Ip Subunit*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Jorge; Mogi, Tatsushi; Mineki, Shigeru; Takashima, Eizo; Mineki, Reiko; Hirawake, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Ōmura, Satoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory enzymes play a central role in energy production in aerobic organisms. They differentiated from the α-proteobacteria-derived ancestors by adding noncatalytic subunits. An exception is Complex II (succinate: ubiquinone reductase), which is composed of four α-proteobacteria-derived catalytic subunits (SDH1-SDH4). Complex II often plays a pivotal role in adaptation of parasites in host organisms and would be a potential target for new drugs. We p...

  16. Mitochondrial complex I deactivation is related to superoxide production in acute hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Hernansanz-Agustín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria use oxygen as the final acceptor of the respiratory chain, but its incomplete reduction can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, especially superoxide. Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in different cell types, but the triggering mechanism is still unknown. Herein, we show that complex I is involved in this superoxide burst under acute hypoxia in endothelial cells. We have also studied the possible mechanisms by which complex I could be involved in this burst, discarding reverse electron transport in complex I and the implication of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1. We show that complex I transition from the active to ‘deactive’ form is enhanced by acute hypoxia in endothelial cells and brain tissue, and we suggest that it can trigger ROS production through its Na+/H+ antiporter activity. These results highlight the role of complex I as a key actor in redox signalling in acute hypoxia.

  17. A CMC1-knockout reveals translation-independent control of human mitochondrial complex IV biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourens, Myriam; Barrientos, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Defects in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (CIV) frequently cause encephalocardiomyopathies. Human CIV assembly involves 14 subunits of dual genetic origin and multiple nucleus-encoded ancillary factors. Biogenesis of the mitochondrion-encoded copper/heme-containing COX1 subunit initiates the CIV assembly process. Here, we show that the intermembrane space twin CX9C protein CMC1 forms an early CIV assembly intermediate with COX1 and two assembly factors, the cardiomyopathy proteins COA3 and COX14. A TALEN-mediated CMC1 knockout HEK293T cell line displayed normal COX1 synthesis but decreased CIV activity owing to the instability of newly synthetized COX1. We demonstrate that CMC1 stabilizes a COX1-COA3-COX14 complex before the incorporation of COX4 and COX5a subunits. Additionally, we show that CMC1 acts independently of CIV assembly factors relevant to COX1 metallation (COX10, COX11, and SURF1) or late stability (MITRAC7). Furthermore, whereas human COX14 and COA3 have been proposed to affect COX1 mRNA translation, our data indicate that CMC1 regulates turnover of newly synthesized COX1 prior to and during COX1 maturation, without affecting the rate of COX1 synthesis. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Effects of aging on activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes and oxidative damage in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarková, Z; Kuka, S; Račay, P; Lehotský, J; Dobrota, D; Mištuna, D; Kaplán, P

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and accumulation of oxidative damage have been implicated to be the major factors of aging. However, data on age-related changes in activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes remain controversial and molecular mechanisms responsible for ETC dysfunction are still largely unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of aging on activities of ETC complexes and oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in cardiac mitochondria from adult (6-month-old), old (15-month-old) and senescent (26-month-old) rats. ETC complexes I-IV displayed different extent of inhibition with age. The most significant decline occurred in complex IV activity, whereas complex II activity was unchanged in old rats and was only slightly reduced in senescent rats. Compared to adult, old and senescent rat hearts had significantly higher levels of malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and dityrosine, while thiol group content was reduced. Despite marked increase in HNE content with age (25 and 76 % for 15- and 26-month-old rats, respectively) Western blot analysis revealed only few HNE-protein adducts. The present study suggests that non-uniform decline in activities of ETC complexes is due, at least in part, to mitochondrial oxidative damage; however, lipid peroxidation products appear to have a limited impact on enzyme functions.

  19. Complete Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induces an Up-Regulation of Respiratory Fluxes That Is Abolished by Traces of Functional Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Kristina; Obata, Toshihiro; Feher, Kristen; Bock, Ralph; Fernie, Alisdair R; Meyer, Etienne H

    2015-08-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular NAD(+) recycling and accounts for approximately 40% of mitochondrial ATP production. To understand how complex I function impacts respiration and plant development, we isolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines that lack complex I activity due to the absence of the catalytic subunit NDUFV1 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein1) and compared these plants with ndufs4 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase Fe-S protein4) mutants possessing trace amounts of complex I. Unlike ndufs4 plants, ndufv1 lines were largely unable to establish seedlings in the absence of externally supplied sucrose. Measurements of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis revealed that compared with ndufv1, the complex I amounts retained by ndufs4 did not increase mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation capacities. No major differences were seen in the mitochondrial proteomes, cellular metabolomes, or transcriptomes between ndufv1 and ndufs4. The analysis of fluxes through the respiratory pathway revealed that in ndufv1, fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were dramatically increased compared with ndufs4, which showed near wild-type-like fluxes. This indicates that the strong growth defects seen for plants lacking complex I originate from a switch in the metabolic mode of mitochondria and an up-regulation of respiratory fluxes. Partial reversion of these phenotypes when traces of active complex I are present suggests that complex I is essential for plant development and likely acts as a negative regulator of respiratory fluxes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  1. Inhibitors of ROS production by the ubiquinone-binding site of mitochondrial complex I identified by chemical screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Adam L.; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R.; Shi, Tong; Hughes, Robert E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species is often considered an unavoidable consequence of aerobic metabolism and currently cannot be manipulated without perturbing oxidative phosphorylation. Antioxidants are widely used to suppress effects of reactive oxygen species after formation, but they can never fully prevent immediate effects at the sites of production. To identify site-selective inhibitors of mitochondrial superoxide/H2O2 production that do not interfere with mitochondrial energy metabolism, we developed a robust small-molecule screen and secondary profiling strategy. We describe the discovery and characterization of a compound (N-cyclohexyl-4-(4-nitrophenoxy)benzenesulfonamide; CN-POBS) that selectively inhibits superoxide/H2O2 production from the ubiquinone-binding site of complex I (site IQ) with no effects on superoxide/H2O2 production from other sites or on oxidative phosphorylation. Structure/activity studies identified a core structure that is important for potency and selectivity for site IQ. By employing CN-POBS in mitochondria respiring on NADH-generating substrates, we show that site IQ does not produce significant amounts of superoxide/H2O2 during forward electron transport on glutamate plus malate. Our screening platform promises to facilitate further discovery of direct modulators of mitochondrially-derived oxidative damage and advance our ability to understand and manipulate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23994103

  2. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.ferramosca@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Rimoli, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Mollo, Ernesto [Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pozzuoli (Italy); Zara, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Terlizzi, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-05-13

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. -- Highlights: •Novel insight toward the potential use of the algal metabolites for the treatment of human diseases. •Caulerpin and caulerpinic acid inhibit respiratory complex II activity. •Both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells.

  4. Combined Inhibition of the Renin-Angiotensin System and Neprilysin Positively Influences Complex Mitochondrial Adaptations in Progressive Experimental Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Grois

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of the renin angiotensin system and neprilysin (RAS-/NEP-inhibitors proved to be extraordinarily beneficial in systolic heart failure. Furthermore, compelling evidence exists that impaired mitochondrial pathways are causatively involved in progressive left ventricular (LV dysfunction. Consequently, we aimed to assess whether RAS-/NEP-inhibition can attenuate mitochondrial adaptations in experimental heart failure (HF.By progressive right ventricular pacing, distinct HF stages were induced in 15 rabbits, and 6 animals served as controls (CTRL. Six animals with manifest HF (CHF were treated with the RAS-/NEP-inhibitor omapatrilat. Echocardiographic studies and invasive blood pressure measurements were undertaken during HF progression. Mitochondria were isolated from LV tissue, respectively, and further worked up for proteomic analysis using the SWATH technique. Enzymatic activities of citrate synthase and the electron transfer chain (ETC complexes I, II, and IV were assessed. Ultrastructural analyses were performed by transmission electron microscopy. During progression to overt HF, intricate expression changes were mainly detected for proteins belonging to the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glucose and fat metabolism, and the ETC complexes, even though ETC complex I, II, or IV enzymatic activities were not significantly influenced. Treatment with a RAS-/NEP-inhibitor then reversed some maladaptive metabolic adaptations, positively influenced the decline of citrate synthase activity, and altered the composition of each respiratory chain complex, even though this was again not accompanied by altered ETC complex enzymatic activities. Finally, ultrastructural evidence pointed to a reduction of autophagolytic and degenerative processes with omapatrilat-treatment.This study describes complex adaptations of the mitochondrial proteome in experimental tachycardia-induced heart failure and shows that a combined RAS-/NEP-inhibition can beneficially

  5. Mitochondrial Complex 1 Activity Measured by Spectrophotometry Is Reduced across All Brain Regions in Ageing and More Specifically in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Amelia Kate; Craig, Emma Louise; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function, in particular complex 1 of the electron transport chain (ETC), has been shown to decrease during normal ageing and in neurodegenerative disease. However, there is some debate concerning which area of the brain has the greatest complex 1 activity. It is important to identify the pattern of activity in order to be able to gauge the effect of age or disease related changes. We determined complex 1 activity spectrophotometrically in the cortex, brainstem and cerebellum of middle aged mice (70-71 weeks), a cerebellar ataxic neurodegeneration model (pcd5J) and young wild type controls. We share our updated protocol on the measurements of complex1 activity and find that mitochondrial fractions isolated from frozen tissues can be measured for robust activity. We show that complex 1 activity is clearly highest in the cortex when compared with brainstem and cerebellum (p<0.003). Cerebellum and brainstem mitochondria exhibit similar levels of complex 1 activity in wild type brains. In the aged brain we see similar levels of complex 1 activity in all three-brain regions. The specific activity of complex 1 measured in the aged cortex is significantly decreased when compared with controls (p<0.0001). Both the cerebellum and brainstem mitochondria also show significantly reduced activity with ageing (p<0.05). The mouse model of ataxia predictably has a lower complex 1 activity in the cerebellum, and although reductions are measured in the cortex and brain stem, the remaining activity is higher than in the aged brains. We present clear evidence that complex 1 activity decreases across the brain with age and much more specifically in the cerebellum of the pcd5j mouse. Mitochondrial impairment can be a region specific phenomenon in disease, but in ageing appears to affect the entire brain, abolishing the pattern of higher activity in cortical regions.

  6. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Koenitzer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2 reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval.

  7. Evidence that metformin exerts its anti-diabetic effects through inhibition of complex 1 of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, M R; Doran, E; Halestrap, A P

    2000-01-01

    Although metformin is widely used for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes, its mode of action remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that its primary site of action is through a direct inhibition of complex 1 of the respiratory chain. Metformin(50 microM) inhibited mitochondrial oxidation of glutamate+malate in hepatoma cells by 13 and 30% after 24 and 60 h exposure respectively, but succinate oxidation was unaffected. Metformin also caused time-dependent inhibition of complex 1 in isolated mitochondria, whereas in sub-mitochondrial particles inhibition was immediate but required very high metformin concentrations (K(0.5),79 mM). These data are compatible with the slow membrane-potential-driven accumulation of the positively charged drug within the mitochondrial matrix leading to inhibition of complex 1. Metformin inhibition of gluconeogenesis from L-lactate in isolated rat hepatocytes was also time- and concentration-dependent, and accompanied by changes in metabolite levels similar to those induced by other inhibitors of gluconeogenesis acting on complex 1. Freeze-clamped livers from metformin-treated rats exhibited similar changes in metabolite concentrations. We conclude that the drug's pharmacological effects are mediated, at least in part, through a time-dependent, self-limiting inhibition of the respiratory chain that restrains hepatic gluconeogenesis while increasing glucose utilization in peripheral tissues. Lactic acidosis, an occasional side effect, canal so be explained in this way. PMID:10839993

  8. Modulation of Mitochondrial Complex I Activity Averts Cognitive Decline in Multiple Animal Models of Familial Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of therapeutic strategies to prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD is of great importance. We show that mild inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with small molecule CP2 reduces levels of amyloid beta and phospho-Tau and averts cognitive decline in three animal models of familial AD. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical studies confirmed that CP2 competes with flavin mononucleotide for binding to the redox center of complex I leading to elevated AMP/ATP ratio and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in neurons and mouse brain without inducing oxidative damage or inflammation. Furthermore, modulation of complex I activity augmented mitochondrial bioenergetics increasing coupling efficiency of respiratory chain and neuronal resistance to stress. Concomitant reduction of glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity and restoration of axonal trafficking resulted in elevated levels of neurotrophic factors and synaptic proteins in adult AD mice. Our results suggest that metabolic reprogramming induced by modulation of mitochondrial complex I activity represents promising therapeutic strategy for AD.

  9. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome type I in children with mitochondrial disease and maternal inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimoto, T; Baldwin, E E; Gold, J I; Boles, R G

    2008-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I), previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), is an idiopathic condition characterised by localised, abnormally intense and prolonged pain, allodynia and autonomic nervous system changes (ie, swelling, skin colour and temperature changes and altered perspiration) that usually appear following a "noxious" trigger such as trauma or surgery. The objective of this report is to demonstrate that children with CRPS-I can have additional dysautonomic conditions secondary to an underlying maternally inherited mitochondrial disease, an association not previously published. Medical records of about 500 patients seen by one paediatric metabolic geneticist were reviewed to identify children meeting established CRPS diagnostic criteria. CRPS-I was present in eight children in seven families, each of which also had additional functional/dysautonomic conditions, the most common (> or = 4 cases per condition) being gastrointestinal dysmotility, migraine, cyclic vomiting and chronic fatigue. All seven probands studied met Nijmegen (2002) diagnostic criteria for definite mitochondrial disease on the basis of the clinical signs and symptoms and biochemical analyses. Six of the seven families met our pedigree-based criteria for probable maternal inheritance. In one tertiary-care paediatric genetics practice, children meeting the CRPS-I diagnostic criteria frequently had additional autonomic-related conditions secondary to maternally inherited mitochondrial disease, suggesting that mitochondrial DNA sequence variants can predispose children towards the development of CRPS-I and other dysautonomias. CRPS-I should be considered in patients with mitochondrial disease who complain of idiopathic pain. Maternally inherited mitochondrial disease may not be a rare cause of CRPS-I, especially in children who present with other manifestations of dysautonomia.

  10. Frequent feedback enhances complex motor skill learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, G; Shea, C H; Matschiner, S

    1998-06-01

    Feedback frequency effects on the learning of a complex motor skill, the production of slalom-type movements on a ski-simulator, were examined. In Experiment 1, a movement feature that characterizes expert performance was identified. Participants (N = 8) practiced the task for 6 days. Significant changes across practice were found for movement amplitude and relative force onset. Relative force onset is considered a measure of movement efficiency; relatively late force onsets characterize expert performance. In Experiment 2, different groups of participants (N = 27) were given concurrent feedback about force onset on either 100% or 50% of the practice trials; a control group was given no feedback. The following hypothesis was tested: Contrary to previous findings concerning relatively simple tasks, for the learning of a complex task such as the one used here, a high relative feedback frequency (100%) is more beneficial for learning than a reduced feedback frequency (50%). Participants practiced the task on 2 consecutive days and performed a retention test without feedback on Day 3. The 100% feedback group demonstrated later relative force onsets than the control group in retention; the 50% feedback group showed intermediate performance. The results provide support for the notion that high feedback frequencies are beneficial for the learning of complex motor skills, at least until a certain level of expertise is achieved. That finding suggests that there may be an interaction between task difficulty and feedback frequency similar to the interaction found in the summary-KR literature.

  11. Ethanol and age enhances fluoride toxicity through oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Shailender Singh; Mahmood, Akhtar; Ojha, Sudarshan

    2013-12-01

    Fluoride toxicity and alcohol abuse are the two serious public health problems in many parts of the world. The current study was an attempt to investigate the effect of alcohol administration and age on fluoride toxicity in rat intestine. Six and 18 months old female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to sodium fluoride (NaF, 25 mg/kg), 30 % ethanol (EtOH, 1 ml/kg), and NaF+EtOH (25 mg/kg+1 ml/kg) for a period of 20, 40, and 90 days. The levels of lipid peroxidation were increased, while the content of reduced glutathione, total, and protein thiol was decreased with NaF treatment. Under these conditions, animals showed an age-related decline in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase which were further aggravated upon NaF or/and EtOH treatment. Mitochondrial respiration rate and the activities of complexes I, II, and IV enzymes of electron transport chain were decreased, while the levels of nitric oxide and citrulline were increased with age and NaF or/and EtOH treatment. Histological examination revealed large reactive lymphoid follicles, excess of lymphocytes in lamina propria of villi, villous edema, focal ileitis, necrosis of villi, and ulceration in NaF- or/and EtOH-treated animals in both the age groups. These findings suggest that fluoride mediate its toxic effects on intestine through oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions which are further augmented with alcohol consumption and advancing age.

  12. The Protective Effects of Salidroside from Exhaustive Exercise-Induced Heart Injury by Enhancing the PGC-1 α–NRF1/NRF2 Pathway and Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-fei; Cui, Yu-juan; Chang, Yu-mei; Jiang, Cai-wu; Meng, Zhen-zhi; Xu, Peng; Liu, Hai-yan; Wang, Dong-ying; Cao, Xue-bin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that salidroside (SAL) can protect heart from exhaustive exercise-induced injury by enhancing mitochondrial respiratory function and mitochondrial biogenesis key signaling pathway PGC-1α–NRF1/NRF2 in rats. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (C), exhaustive exercise (EE), low-dose SAL (LS), and high-dose SAL (HS). After one-time exhaustive swimming exercise, we measured the changes in cardiomyocyte ultrastructure and cardiac marker enzymes and mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) complexes activities in situ. We also measured mitochondrial biogenesis master regulator PGC-1α and its downstream transcription factors, NRF1 and NRF2, expression at gene and protein levels. Results. Compared to C group, the EE group showed marked myocardium ultrastructure injury and decrease of mitochondrial respiratory function (P Salidroside can protect the heart from exhaustive exercise-induced injury. It might act by improving myocardial mitochondrial respiratory function by stimulating the expression of PGC-1α–NRF1/NRF2 pathway. PMID:26167242

  13. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complex I and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Lindsay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS emission is a critical component in the etiolo-gy of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complex I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rote-none, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study sug-gests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III.

  14. Long-term electromagnetic field treatment enhances brain mitochondrial function of both Alzheimer's transgenic mice and normal mice: a mechanism for electromagnetic field-induced cognitive benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic, N; Bradshaw, P C; Mamcarz, M; Lin, X; Wang, L; Cao, C; Arendash, G W

    2011-06-30

    We have recently reported that long-term exposure to high frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) treatment not only prevents or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg) mice, but also improves memory in normal mice. To elucidate the possible mechanism(s) for these EMF-induced cognitive benefits, brain mitochondrial function was evaluated in aged Tg mice and non-transgenic (NT) littermates following 1 month of daily EMF exposure. In Tg mice, EMF treatment enhanced brain mitochondrial function by 50-150% across six established measures, being greatest in cognitively-important brain areas (e.g. cerebral cortex and hippocampus). EMF treatment also increased brain mitochondrial function in normal aged mice, although the enhancement was not as robust and less widespread compared to that of Tg mice. The EMF-induced enhancement of brain mitochondrial function in Tg mice was accompanied by 5-10 fold increases in soluble Aβ1-40 within the same mitochondrial preparations. These increases in mitochondrial soluble amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) were apparently due to the ability of EMF treatment to disaggregate Aβ oligomers, which are believed to be the form of Aβ causative to mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Finally, the EMF-induced mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice occurred through non-thermal effects because brain temperatures were either stable or decreased during/after EMF treatment. These results collectively suggest that brain mitochondrial enhancement may be a primary mechanism through which EMF treatment provides cognitive benefit to both Tg and NT mice. Especially in the context that mitochondrial dysfunction is an early and prominent characteristic of Alzheimer's pathogenesis, EMF treatment could have profound value in the disease's prevention and treatment through intervention at the mitochondrial level. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  15. Tagging and tracking individual networks within a complex mitochondrial web with photoactivatable GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twig, Gilad; Graf, Solomon A; Wikstrom, Jakob D; Mohamed, Hibo; Haigh, Sarah E; Elorza, Alvaro; Deutsch, Motti; Zurgil, Naomi; Reynolds, Nicole; Shirihai, Orian S

    2006-07-01

    Assembly of mitochondria into networks supports fuel metabolism and calcium transport and is involved in the cellular response to apoptotic stimuli. A mitochondrial network is defined as a continuous matrix lumen whose boundaries limit molecular diffusion. Observation of individual networks has proven challenging in live cells that possess dense populations of mitochondria. Investigation into the electrical and morphological properties of mitochondrial networks has therefore not yielded consistent conclusions. In this study we used matrix-targeted, photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to tag single mitochondrial networks. This approach, coupled with real-time monitoring of mitochondrial membrane potential, permitted the examination of matrix lumen continuity and fusion and fission events over time. We found that adjacent and intertwined mitochondrial structures often represent a collection of distinct networks. We additionally found that all areas of a single network are invariably equipotential, suggesting that a heterogeneous pattern of membrane potential within a cell's mitochondria represents differences between discrete networks. Interestingly, fission events frequently occurred without any gross morphological changes and particularly without fragmentation. These events, which are invisible under standard confocal microscopy, redefine the mitochondrial network boundaries and result in electrically disconnected daughter units.

  16. The Potential Role of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Link between Mitochondrial Complex I Dysfunction and Inflammation in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kyunghee Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of the inflammatory system are two of the most consistently reported findings in bipolar disorder (BD. More specifically, altered levels of inflammatory cytokines and decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I subunits have been found in the brain and periphery of patients with BD, which could lead to increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial production of ROS and inflammation may be closely linked through a redox sensor known as nod-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3. Upon sensing mitochondrial release of ROS, NLRP3 assembles the NLRP3 inflammasome, which releases caspase 1 to begin the inflammatory cascade. In this review, we discuss the potential role of the NLRP3 inflammasome as a link between complex I dysfunction and inflammation in BD and its therapeutic implications.

  17. MICU2, a paralog of MICU1, resides within the mitochondrial uniporter complex to regulate calcium handling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Plovanich

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial calcium uptake is present in nearly all vertebrate tissues and is believed to be critical in shaping calcium signaling, regulating ATP synthesis and controlling cell death. Calcium uptake occurs through a channel called the uniporter that resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, we used comparative genomics to identify MICU1 and MCU as the key regulatory and putative pore-forming subunits of this channel, respectively. Using bioinformatics, we now report that the human genome encodes two additional paralogs of MICU1, which we call MICU2 and MICU3, each of which likely arose by gene duplication and exhibits distinct patterns of organ expression. We demonstrate that MICU1 and MICU2 are expressed in HeLa and HEK293T cells, and provide multiple lines of biochemical evidence that MCU, MICU1 and MICU2 reside within a complex and cross-stabilize each other's protein expression in a cell-type dependent manner. Using in vivo RNAi technology to silence MICU1, MICU2 or both proteins in mouse liver, we observe an additive impairment in calcium handling without adversely impacting mitochondrial respiration or membrane potential. The results identify MICU2 as a new component of the uniporter complex that may contribute to the tissue-specific regulation of this channel.

  18. Succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex II) is a source of reactive oxygen species in plants and regulates development and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Douglas; Caverzan, Andréia; Rauber, Rafael; de Souza Ferreira, Eduardo; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Galina, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are signaling molecules that regulate plant development and responses to stresses. Mitochondria are the source of most ROS in heterotrophic cells, and mitochondrial complex I and complex III are regarded as the main sites of ROS production in plant mitochondria. Recent studies have demonstrated that succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) also contributes to mitochondrial ROS production. However, the ability of SDH to generate ROS in plants is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of SDH in mitochondrial ROS production. Our results demonstrated that SDH is a direct source of ROS in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, and the induction of ROS production by specific SDH inhibitors impaired plant growth. In addition, this effect was accompanied by the down-regulation of cell cycle genes and the up-regulation of stress-related genes. However, the partial inhibition of SDH by a competitive inhibitor decreased ROS production, which was associated with increased shoot and root growth, and prevented the down-regulation of cell cycle genes and the induction of stress-related genes by noncompetitive inhibitors. In conclusion, SDH plays an important role in ROS production, being a direct source of ROS in plant mitochondria and regulating plant development and stress responses. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. OM2, a Novel Oligomannuronate-Chromium(III Complex, Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Metabolism in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via the AMPK-PGC1α Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiejie Hao

    Full Text Available In our previous studies, we prepared novel oligomannuronate-chromium(III complexes (OM2, OM4 from marine alginate, and found that these compounds sensitize insulin action better than oligomannuronate(OM, chromium, and metformin in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. In the present study, we studied their effects on mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid metabolism, and the underlying molecular mechanisms in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes.We firstly used the pGL3-PGC1α and pGL3-ATGL promoter plasmids to compare their effects on PGC1α and ATGL transcription activities. Then mitochondrial biogenesis was quantified by transmission electron microscopy and MitoTracker staining. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were measured by an oxygen biosensor system and ³H-labelled water scintillation. The mitochondrial DNA and mRNA involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid oxidation were evaluated by real-time PCR. AMPK together with other protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. The inhibitor compound C and siRNA of PGC1α were used to inhibit the OM2-induced AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway. And we found that OM2 stimulated AMPK-PGC1α pathway in the 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which were correlated with induced mitochondrial biogenesis, improved mitochondrial function, and reduced lipid accumulation by enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation and augmented ATGL protein expression.Our data indicated that the marine oligosaccharide-derived OM2 might represent a novel class of molecules that could be useful for type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment by up-regulating AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway.

  20. Erythropoietin enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiomyocytes exposed to chronic hypoxia through Akt/eNOS signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Shengkai; Xiao, Yingbin; Chen, Lin

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation of cardiomyocytes to chronic hypoxia in cyanotic patients remains unclear. Mitochondrial biogenesis is enhanced in myocardium from cyanotic patients, which is possibly an adaptive response. Erythropoietin (EPO) in blood and its receptor (EPOR) on cardiomyocytes are upregulated by chronic hypoxia, suggesting that EPO-EPOR interaction is increased, which is inferred to positively regulate mitochondrial biogenesis through protein kinase B (Akt)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signalling pathway. H9c2 cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 1 week and treated with different doses of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO). Mitochondrial number, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator alpha (PGC-1α) mRNA expression increased in a dose-dependent manner induced by rhEPO. Akt and eNOS were significantly phosphorylated by rhEPO. Both blocking Akt with Wortmannin and silencing eNOS expression with shRNA plasmid decreased the mtDNA copy number and PGC-1α mRNA expression induced by rhEPO. Blocking Akt was associated with the decreased phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. RNA interference led to a reduction in the total and phosphorylated proteins of eNOS. Thus EPO enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiomyocytes exposed to chronic hypoxia, at least partly through Akt/eNOS signalling, which might be an adaptive mechanism of cardiomyocytes associated with the increased EPO-EPOR interaction in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 form a complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Console, Lara; Giangregorio, Nicola; Indiveri, Cesare; Tonazzi, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 are members of the carnitine system, which are responsible of the regulation of the mitochondrial CoA/acyl-CoA ratio and of supplying substrates for the ß-oxidation to mitochondria. This study, using cross-Linking reagent, Blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation followed by detection with immunoblotting, shows conclusive evidence about the interaction between carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase supporting the channeling of acylcarnitines and carnitine at level of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  2. Idebenone increases mitochondrial complex I activity in fibroblasts from LHON patients while producing contradictory effects on respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angebault, Claire; Gueguen, Naïg; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Guillet, Virginie; Verny, Christophe; Cassereau, Julien; Ferre, Marc; Milea, Dan; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Bonneau, Dominique; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal; Loiseau, Dominique

    2011-12-22

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is caused by mutations in the complex I subunits of the respiratory chain. Although patients have been treated with idebenone since 1992, the efficacy of the drug is still a matter of debate. We evaluated the effect of idebenone in fibroblasts from LHON patients using enzymatic and polarographic measurements. Complex I activity was 42% greater in treated fibroblasts compared to controls (p = 0.002). Despite this complex I activity improvement, the effects on mitochondrial respiration were contradictory, leading to impairment in some cases and stimulation in others. These results indicate that idebenone is able to compensate the complex I deficiency in LHON patient cells with variable effects on respiration, indicating that the patients might not be equally likely to benefit from the treatment.

  3. Idebenone increases mitochondrial complex I activity in fibroblasts from LHON patients while producing contradictory effects on respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angebault Claire

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is caused by mutations in the complex I subunits of the respiratory chain. Although patients have been treated with idebenone since 1992, the efficacy of the drug is still a matter of debate. Methods We evaluated the effect of idebenone in fibroblasts from LHON patients using enzymatic and polarographic measurements. Results Complex I activity was 42% greater in treated fibroblasts compared to controls (p = 0.002. Despite this complex I activity improvement, the effects on mitochondrial respiration were contradictory, leading to impairment in some cases and stimulation in others. Conclusion These results indicate that idebenone is able to compensate the complex I deficiency in LHON patient cells with variable effects on respiration, indicating that the patients might not be equally likely to benefit from the treatment.

  4. Idebenone increases mitochondrial complex I activity in fibroblasts from LHON patients while producing contradictory effects on respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angebault, Claire; Gueguen, Naig; Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is caused by mutations in the complex I subunits of the respiratory chain. Although patients have been treated with idebenone since 1992, the efficacy of the drug is still a matter of debate. Methods: We evaluated the effect...... of idebenone in fibroblasts from LHON patients using enzymatic and polarographic measurements. Results: Complex I activity was 42% greater in treated fibroblasts compared to controls (p = 0.002). Despite this complex I activity improvement, the effects on mitochondrial respiration were contradictory, leading...... to impairment in some cases and stimulation in others. Conclusion: These results indicate that idebenone is able to compensate the complex I deficiency in LHON patient cells with variable effects on respiration, indicating that the patients might not be equally likely to benefit from the treatment....

  5. The Protective Effects of Salidroside from Exhaustive Exercise-Induced Heart Injury by Enhancing the PGC-1 α -NRF1/NRF2 Pathway and Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ping, Zheng; Zhang, Long-fei; Cui, Yu-juan; Chang, Yu-mei; Jiang, Cai-wu; Meng, Zhen-zhi; Xu, Peng; Liu, Hai-yan; Wang, Dong-ying; Cao, Xue-bin

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that salidroside (SAL) can protect heart from exhaustive exercise-induced injury by enhancing mitochondrial respiratory function and mitochondrial biogenesis key signaling pathway PGC-1α-NRF1/NRF2 in rats...

  6. Complex I inhibition augments dichloroacetate cytotoxicity through enhancing oxidative stress in VM-M3 glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Ward

    Full Text Available The robust glycolytic metabolism of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has proven them susceptible to increases in oxidative metabolism induced by the pyruvate mimetic dichloroacetate (DCA. Recent reports demonstrate that the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhances the damaging oxidative stress associated with DCA treatment in cancer cells. We sought to elucidate the role of metformin's reported activity as a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor in the enhancement of DCA cytotoxicity in VM-M3 GBM cells. Metformin potentiated DCA-induced superoxide production, which was required for enhanced cytotoxicity towards VM-M3 cells observed with the combination. Similarly, rotenone enhanced oxidative stress resultant from DCA treatment and this too was required for the noted augmentation of cytotoxicity. Adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK activation was not observed with the concentration of metformin required to enhance DCA activity. Moreover, addition of an activator of AMPK did not enhance DCA cytotoxicity, whereas an inhibitor of AMPK heightened the cytotoxicity of the combination. Our data indicate that metformin enhancement of DCA cytotoxicity is dependent on complex I inhibition. Particularly, that complex I inhibition cooperates with DCA-induction of glucose oxidation to enhance cytotoxic oxidative stress in VM-M3 GBM cells.

  7. Single Molecule Tracking and Localization of Mitochondrial Protein Complexes in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, Timo; Busch, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are the power plant of most non-green eukaryotic cells. An understanding of their function and regulation is only possible with the knowledge of the spatiotemporal dynamics of their proteins. Mitochondrial membrane proteins involved in diverse functions like protein import, cell respiration, metabolite transport, and mitochondrial morphology are mobile within membranes. Here, we provide a protocol for a superresolution fluorescence microscopy technique named tracking and localization microscopy (TALM) that allows for localization and diffusion analysis of single mitochondrial membrane proteins in situ in cell cultures. This noninvasive imaging technique is a useful tool to reveal the spatiotemporal organization of proteins in diverse mitochondrial membrane compartments in living cells. Proteins of interest are tagged with the HaloTag® and specifically labeled with functionalized rhodamine dyes. The method profits from low abundance of proteins and therefore works better with substoichiometric labeling of HaloTag®-tagged proteins. In particular, the use of photostable bright rhodamine dyes enables the specific tagging and localization of single molecules with a calculated precision below 20 nm and the recording of single trajectories.

  8. Detection of protein thiols in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes and associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Kelly K; Bailey, Shannon M

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and identify mitochondrial proteins that are sensitive to oxidative modification and inactivation by reactive species is important in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury. In particular, cysteine residues play critical roles in maintaining the functional and structural integrity of numerous proteins in the mitochondrion and throughout the cell. To define changes in mitochondrial protein thiol status, proteomic approaches have been developed in which unmodified, reduced thiols (i.e., R-SH or thiolate species R-S(-)) are tagged with thiol-labeling reagents that can be visualized following gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting techniques. Herein, we describe the use of one thiol-labeling approach in combination with blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) to detect reactive thiol groups within mitochondrial proteins including those of the oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) system. Labeling or "tagging" of protein thiol groups in combination with various gel electrophoresis and proteomics techniques is a valuable way to measure alterations in cellular or organelle thiol proteomes in response to drug treatment, disease state, or metabolic/oxidative stress. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting mitochondrial complex I using BAY 87-2243 reduces melanoma tumor growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schockel, L.; Glasauer, A.; Basit, F.; Bitschar, K.; Truong, H.; Erdmann, G.; Algire, C.; Hagebarth, A.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Kopitz, C.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Heroult, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have demonstrated that functional mitochondria are required for tumorigenesis, suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) might be a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effects of BAY 87-2243, a small molecule

  10. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number and the activities of electron transport chain complexes and pyruvate dehydrogenase in the frontal cortex from subjects with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, F; Chauhan, V; Kaur, K; Brown, W T; LaFauci, G; Wegiel, J; Chauhan, A

    2013-09-03

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with social deficits and behavioral abnormalities. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may contribute to the etiology of autism. This is the first study to compare the activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes (I-V) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), as well as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in the frontal cortex tissues from autistic and age-matched control subjects. The activities of complexes I, V and PDH were most affected in autism (n=14) being significantly reduced by 31%, 36% and 35%, respectively. When 99% confidence interval (CI) of control group was taken as a reference range, impaired activities of complexes I, III and V were observed in 43%, 29% and 43% of autistic subjects, respectively. Reduced activities of all five ETC complexes were observed in 14% of autistic cases, and the activities of multiple complexes were decreased in 29% of autistic subjects. These results suggest that defects in complexes I and III (sites of mitochondrial free radical generation) and complex V (adenosine triphosphate synthase) are more prevalent in autism. PDH activity was also reduced in 57% of autistic subjects. The ratios of mtDNA of three mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4 and Cyt B (that encode for subunits of complexes I and III) to nuclear DNA were significantly increased in autism, suggesting a higher mtDNA copy number in autism. Compared with the 95% CI of the control group, 44% of autistic children showed higher copy numbers of all three mitochondrial genes examined. Furthermore, ND4 and Cyt B deletions were observed in 44% and 33% of autistic children, respectively. This study indicates that autism is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain.

  11. Initial brain aging: heterogeneity of mitochondrial size is associated with decline in complex I-linked respiration in cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Kirsten; Yokota, Takashi; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Sherazi, Niloofar; Fakouri, Nima Borhan; Desler, Claus; Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Larsen, Steen; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Dela, Flemming; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard; Lauritzen, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by declining mitochondrial respiration. We hypothesized that mitochondrial morphology and dynamics would reflect this decline. Using hippocampus and frontal cortex of a segmental progeroid mouse model lacking Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB m/m ) and C57Bl/6 (WT) controls and comparing young (2-5 months) to middle-aged mice (13-14 months), we found that complex I-linked state 3 respiration (CI) was reduced at middle age in CSB m/m hippocampus, but not in CSB m/m cortex or WT brain. In hippocampus of both genotypes, mitochondrial size heterogeneity increased with age. Notably, an inverse correlation between heterogeneity and CI was found in both genotypes, indicating that heterogeneity reflects mitochondrial dysfunction. The ratio between fission and fusion gene expression reflected age-related alterations in mitochondrial morphology but not heterogeneity. Mitochondrial DNA content was lower, and hypoxia-induced factor 1α mRNA was greater at both ages in CSB m/m compared to WT brain. Our findings show that decreased CI and increased mitochondrial size heterogeneity are highly associated and point to declining mitochondrial quality control as an initial event in brain aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Forty percent methionine restriction decreases mitochondrial oxygen radical production and leak at complex I during forward electron flow and lowers oxidative damage to proteins and mitochondrial DNA in rat kidney and brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Pilar; Gomez, Jose; Sanchez, Ines; Naudi, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; López-Torres, Monica; Pamplona, Reinald; Barja, Gustavo

    2009-12-01

    Eighty percent dietary methionine restriction (MetR) in rodents (without calorie restriction), like dietary restriction (DR), increases maximum longevity and strongly decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress. Eighty percent MetR also lowers the degree of membrane fatty acid unsaturation in rat liver. Mitochondrial ROS generation and the degree of fatty acid unsaturation are the only two known factors linking oxidative stress with longevity in vertebrates. However, it is unknown whether 40% MetR, the relevant methionine restriction degree to clarify the mechanisms of action of standard (40%) DR can reproduce these effects in mitochondria from vital tissues of strong relevance for aging. Here we study the effect of 40% MetR on ROS production and oxidative stress in rat brain and kidney mitochondria. Male Wistar rats were fed during 7 weeks semipurified diets differing only in their methionine content: control or 40% MetR diets. It was found that 40% MetR decreases mitochondrial ROS production and percent free radical leak (by 62-71%) at complex I during forward (but not during reverse) electron flow in both brain and kidney mitochondria, increases the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of brain mitochondria, lowers oxidative damage to kidney mitochondrial DNA, and decreases specific markers of mitochondrial protein oxidation, lipoxidation, and glycoxidation in both tissues. Forty percent MetR also decreased the amount of respiratory complexes I, III, and IV and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in brain mitochondria and complex IV in kidney mitochondria, without changing the degree of mitochondrial membrane fatty acid unsaturation. Forty percent MetR, differing from 80% MetR, did not inhibit the increase in rat body weight. These changes are very similar to the ones previously found during dietary and protein restriction in rats. We conclude that methionine is the only dietary factor responsible for the decrease in

  13. Scanning mutagenesis of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib eAhsan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated Ser-residue and the sequences of the flanking amino acids are highly conserved. We have used the synthetic peptide-based kinase client assay plus recombinant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α and E1α-kinase to perform scanning mutagenesis of the residues flanking the site of phosphorylation. Consistent with the results from phylogenetic analysis of the flanking sequences, the direct peptide-based kinase assays tolerated very few changes. Even conservative changes such as Leu, Ile, or Val for Met, or Glu for Asp, gave very marked reductions in phosphorylation. Overall the results indicate that regulation of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation is an extreme example of multiple, interdependent instances of co-evolution.

  14. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  15. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  16. Lipophilic triphenylphosphonium derivatives enhance radiation-induced cell killing via inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Sakai, Yuri; Bo, Tomoki; Nagane, Masaki; Nishimura, Eri; Yamamori, Tohru; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Inanami, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    It has recently been reported that radiation enhances mitochondrial energy metabolism in various tumor cell lines. To examine how this radiation-induced alteration in mitochondrial function influences tumor cell viability, various lipophilic triphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) cation derivatives and related compounds such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-oxy-piperidin (Tempol) with TPP(+) (named "Mito-") were designed to inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Mito-(CH2)10-Tempol (M10T) and its derivatives, Mito-(CH2)5-Tempol (M5T), Mito-(CH2)10-Tempol-Methyl (M10T-Me), Mito-C10H21 (M10), and C10H21-Tempol (10T), were prepared. In HeLa human cervical adenocarcinoma cells and A549 human lung carcinoma cells, the fractional uptake of the compound into mitochondria was highest among the TTP(+) analogs conjugated with Tempol (M10T, M5T, and 10T). M10T, M10T-Me, and M10 exhibited strong cytotoxicity and enhanced X-irradiation-induced reproductive cell death, while 10T and M5T did not. Furthermore, M10T, M10T-Me, and M10 decreased basal mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP. M10T treatment inhibited X-ray-induced increases in ATP production. These results indicate that the TPP cation and a long hydrocarbon linker are essential for radiosensitization of tumor cells. The reduction in intracellular ATP by lipophilic TPP(+) is partly responsible for the observed radiosensitization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitors and Forced Oxidative Phosphorylation Synergize in Inducing Cancer Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Palorini; Tiziana Simonetto; Claudia Cirulli; Ferdinando Chiaradonna

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells generally rely mostly on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for ATP production. In fact, they are particularly sensitive to glycolysis inhibition and glucose depletion. On the other hand mitochondrial dysfunctions, involved in the onset of the Warburg effect, are sometimes also associated with the resistance to apoptosis that characterizes cancer cells. Therefore, combined treatments targeting both glycolysis and mitochondria function, exploiting peculiar t...

  18. Ptc7p Dephosphorylates Select Mitochondrial Proteins to Enhance Metabolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper maintenance of mitochondrial activity is essential for metabolic homeostasis. Widespread phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins may be an important element of this process; yet, little is known about which enzymes control mitochondrial phosphorylation or which phosphosites have functional impact. We investigate these issues by disrupting Ptc7p, a conserved but largely uncharacterized mitochondrial matrix PP2C-type phosphatase. Loss of Ptc7p causes respiratory growth defects concomitant with elevated phosphorylation of select matrix proteins. Among these, Δptc7 yeast exhibit an increase in phosphorylation of Cit1p, the canonical citrate synthase of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, that diminishes its activity. We find that phosphorylation of S462 can eliminate Cit1p enzymatic activity likely by disrupting its proper dimerization, and that Ptc7p-driven dephosphorylation rescues Cit1p activity. Collectively, our work connects Ptc7p to an essential TCA cycle function and to additional phosphorylation events that may affect mitochondrial activity inadvertently or in a regulatory manner.

  19. A deubiquitylating complex required for neosynthesis of a yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kanga

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin system is known to be involved in maintaining the integrity of mitochondria, but little is known about the role of deubiquitylating (DUB enzymes in such functions. Budding yeast cells deleted for UBP13 and its close homolog UBP9 displayed a high incidence of petite colonies and slow respiratory growth at 37°C. Both Ubp9 and Ubp13 interacted directly with Duf1 (DUB-associated factor 1, a WD40 motif-containing protein. Duf1 activates the DUB activity of recombinant Ubp9 and Ubp13 in vitro and deletion of DUF1 resulted in the same respiratory phenotype as the deletion of both UBP9 and UBP13. We show that the mitochondrial defects of these mutants resulted from a strong decrease at 37°C in the de novo biosynthesis of Atp9, a membrane-bound component of ATP synthase encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The defect appears at the level of ATP9 mRNA translation, while its maturation remained unchanged in the mutants. This study describes a new role of the ubiquitin system in mitochondrial biogenesis.

  20. GSNOR Deficiency Enhances In Situ Skeletal Muscle Strength, Fatigue Resistance, and RyR1 S-Nitrosylation Without Impacting Mitochondrial Content and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Younghye; Cao, Yenong; Zhu, Jingjing; Xu, Yuanyuan; Balkan, Wayne; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Diaz, Francisca; Kerrick, W. Glenn; Hare, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Nitric oxide (NO) plays important, but incompletely defined roles in skeletal muscle. NO exerts its regulatory effects partly though S-nitrosylation, which is balanced by denitrosylation by enzymes such as S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), whose functions in skeletal muscle remain to be fully deciphered. Results: GSNOR null (GSNOR−/−) tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed normal growth and were stronger and more fatigue resistant than controls in situ. However, GSNOR−/− lumbrical muscles showed normal contractility and Ca2+ handling in vitro, suggesting important differences in GSNOR function between muscles or between in vitro and in situ environments. GSNOR−/− TA muscles exhibited normal mitochondrial content, and capillary densities, but reduced type IIA fiber content. GSNOR inhibition did not impact mitochondrial respiratory complex I, III, or IV activities. These findings argue that enhanced GSNOR−/− TA contractility is not driven by changes in mitochondrial content or activity, fiber type, or blood vessel density. However, loss of GSNOR led to RyR1 hypernitrosylation, which is believed to increase muscle force output under physiological conditions. cGMP synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) was decreased in resting GSNOR−/− muscle and was more responsive to agonist (DETANO, BAY 41, and BAY 58) stimulation, suggesting that GSNOR modulates cGMP production in skeletal muscle. Innovation: GSNOR may act as a “brake” on skeletal muscle contractile performance under physiological conditions by modulating nitrosylation/denitrosylation balance. Conclusions: GSNOR may play important roles in skeletal muscle contractility, RyR1 S-nitrosylation, fiber type specification, and sGC activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 165–181. PMID:27412893

  1. Respiratory complex I dysfunction due to mitochondrial DNA mutations shifts the voltage threshold for opening of the permeability transition pore toward resting levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Anna Maria; Angelin, Alessia; Ghelli, Anna; Mariani, Elisa; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Rugolo, Michela

    2009-01-23

    We have studied mitochondrial bioenergetics in HL180 cells (a cybrid line harboring the T14484C/ND6 and G14279A/ND6 mtDNA mutations of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, leading to an approximately 50% decrease of ATP synthesis) and XTC.UC1 cells (derived from a thyroid oncocytoma bearing a disruptive frameshift mutation in MT-ND1, which impairs complex I assembly). The addition of rotenone to HL180 cells and of antimycin A to XTC.UC1 cells caused fast mitochondrial membrane depolarization that was prevented by treatment with cyclosporin A, intracellular Ca2+ chelators, and antioxidant. Both cell lines also displayed an anomalous response to oligomycin, with rapid onset of depolarization that was prevented by cyclosporin A and by overexpression of Bcl-2. These findings indicate that depolarization by respiratory chain inhibitors and oligomycin was due to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). A shift of the threshold voltage for PTP opening close to the resting potential may therefore be the underlying cause facilitating cell death in diseases affecting complex I activity. This study provides a unifying reading frame for previous observations on mitochondrial dysfunction, bioenergetic defects, and Ca2+ deregulation in mitochondrial diseases. Therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing the PTP voltage threshold may be instrumental in ameliorating the course of complex I-dependent mitochondrial diseases.

  2. Myofibroblast differentiation and its functional properties are inhibited by nicotine and e-cigarette via mitochondrial OXPHOS complex III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei; Lerner, Chad; Sundar, Isaac K; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-03-03

    Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco products including e-cigarettes. Fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation is a key process during wound healing and is dysregulated in lung diseases. The role of nicotine and e-cigarette derived nicotine on cellular functions including profibrotic response and other functional aspects is not known. We hypothesized that nicotine and e-cigarettes affect myofibroblast differentiation, gel contraction, and wound healing via mitochondria stress through nicotinic receptor-dependent mechanisms. To test the hypothesis, we exposed human lung fibroblasts with various doses of nicotine and e-cigarette condensate and determined myofibroblast differentiation, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), wound healing, and gel contraction at different time points. We found that both nicotine and e-cigarette inhibit myofibroblast differentiation as shown by smooth muscle actin and collagen type I, alpha 1 abundance. Nicotine and e-cigarette inhibited OXPHOS complex III accompanied by increased MitoROS, and this effect was augmented by complex III inhibitor antimycin A. These mitochondrial associated effects by nicotine resulted in inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation. These effects were associated with inhibition of wound healing and gel contraction suggesting that nicotine is responsible for dysregulated repair during injurious responses. Thus, our data suggest that nicotine causes dysregulated repair by inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation via OXPHOS pathway.

  3. Nucleotide and aminoacyl-tRNA specificity of the mammalian mitochondrial elongation factor EF-Tu.Ts complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woriax, V L; Spremulli, G H; Spremulli, L L

    1996-06-03

    The bovine mitochondrial elongation factor Tu.Ts complex (EF-Tu.Tsmt) promotes the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to ribosomes. In the presence of GTP, this complex functions catalytically. Both dGTP and ddGTP can replace GTP although about 4-fold higher concentrations are required. ATP, CTP and UTP are not active. ITP can replace GTP when used at 10- to 20-fold higher concentrations. The catalytic use of EF-Tu.Tsmt is inhibited by GDP but not by GMP. XDP also inhibits although about 20-fold higher concentrations are required. EF-Tu.Tsmt will promote the binding of Phe-tRNA to either Escherichia coli or mitochondrial ribosomes. Unlike E. coli EF-Tu, EF-Tu.Tsmt will promote the binding of AcPhe-tRNA to ribosomes about 25% as efficiently as Phe-tRNA. EF-Tu.Tsmt is active in catalyzing the binding of E. coli Met-tRNAmmet to ribosomes. EF-Tu.Tsmt has about 30% as much activity with E. coli Met-tRNAimet but has essentially no activity with E. coli fMet-tRNAimet. Neither yeast Met-tRNAimet nor fMet-tRNAimet is recognized by bovine EF-Tu.Tsmt.

  4. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D.; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Arnold, Samuel L. M.; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. Although atRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determin...

  5. The Mugil curema species complex (Pisces, Mugilidae): a new karyotype for the Pacific white mullet mitochondrial lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirchio, Mauro; Oliveira, Claudio; Siccha-Ramirez, Zoila R.; de Sene, Viviani F.; Sola, Luciana; Milana, Valentina; Rossi, Anna Rita

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent molecular phylogenetic analyses have shown that the Mugil curema Valenciennes, 1836 species complex includes M. incilis Hancock, 1830, M. thoburni (Jordan & Starks, 1896) and at least four “M. curema” mitochondrial lineages, considered as cryptic species. The cytogenetic data on some representatives of the species complex have shown a high cytogenetic diversity. This research reports the results of cytogenetic and molecular analyses of white mullet collected in Ecuador. The analyzed specimens were molecularly assigned to the Mugil sp. O, the putative cryptic species present in the Pacific Ocean and showed a 2n = 46 karyotype, which is composed of 2 metacentric and 44 subtelocentric/acrocentric chromosomes. This karyotype is different from the one described for M. incilis (2n = 48) and from those of the two western Atlantic lineages Mugil curema (2n = 28), and Mugil margaritae (2n = 24). Data suggest the need for a morphological analysis to assign a species name to this Pacific lineage. PMID:28919961

  6. Image enhancement and denoising by complex diffusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Guy; Sochen, Nir; Zeevi, Yehoshua Y

    2004-08-01

    The linear and nonlinear scale spaces, generated by the inherently real-valued diffusion equation, are generalized to complex diffusion processes, by incorporating the free Schrödinger equation. A fundamental solution for the linear case of the complex diffusion equation is developed. Analysis of its behavior shows that the generalized diffusion process combines properties of both forward and inverse diffusion. We prove that the imaginary part is a smoothed second derivative, scaled by time, when the complex diffusion coefficient approaches the real axis. Based on this observation, we develop two examples of nonlinear complex processes, useful in image processing: a regularized shock filter for image enhancement and a ramp preserving denoising process.

  7. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Spence, D. Warren; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R. PMID:21629741

  8. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and Huntington's disease (HD. Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R.

  9. Gold nanoparticles enhance TRAIL sensitivity through Drp1-mediated apoptotic and autophagic mitochondrial fission in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Sunkui; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Peiyan; Wang, Yange; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Keman; Ren, Lei; Ye, Shefang

    2017-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its agonistic receptors have been identified as highly promising antitumor agents preferentially eliminating cancer cells with minimal damage, the emergence of TRAIL resistance in most cancers may contribute to therapeutic failure. Thus, there is an urgent need for new approaches to overcome TRAIL resistance. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are one of the most promising nanomaterials that show immense antitumor potential via targeting various cellular and molecular processes; however, the effects of AuNPs on TRAIL sensitivity in cancer cells remain unclear. In this study, we found that AuNPs combined with TRAIL exhibited a greater potency in promoting apoptosis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells compared with TRAIL alone, suggesting that AuNPs sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL. Further experiments demonstrated that the combination of TRAIL and AuNPs was more effective in causing excessive mitochondrial fragmentation in cancer cells accompanied by a dramatic increase in mitochondrial recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitochondrial dysfunctions, and enhancement of autophagy induction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of Drp1 or inhibition of autophagy could effectively alleviate apoptosis in cells exposed to TRAIL combined with AuNPs. In vivo studies revealed that AuNPs augmented TRAIL sensitivity in tumor-bearing mice. Our data indicated that AuNPs potentiate apoptotic response to TRAIL in NSCLC cells through Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and TRAIL combined with AuNPs can be a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC.

  10. Different Roles of Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Complex Subunits in Growth and Infectivity ofTrypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel A; Lander, Noelia; Bertolini, Mayara S; Storey, Melissa; Vercesi, Anibal E; Docampo, Roberto

    2017-05-09

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the agent of Chagas disease, and the finding that this parasite possesses a mitochondrial calcium uniporter (TcMCU) with characteristics similar to that of mammalian mitochondria was fundamental for the discovery of the molecular nature of MCU in eukaryotes. We report here that ablation of TcMCU , or its paralog TcMCUb , by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 led to a marked decrease in mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake without affecting the membrane potential of these cells, whereas overexpression of each gene caused a significant increase in the ability of mitochondria to accumulate Ca 2+ While TcMCU- knockout (KO) epimastigotes were viable and able to differentiate into trypomastigotes, infect host cells, and replicate normally, ablation of TcMCUb resulted in epimastigotes having an important growth defect, lower rates of respiration and metacyclogenesis, more pronounced autophagy changes under starvation, and significantly reduced infectivity. Overexpression of TcMCUb , in contrast to what was proposed for its mammalian ortholog, did not result in a dominant negative effect on TcMCU. IMPORTANCE The finding of a mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in Trypanosoma cruzi was essential for the discovery of the molecular nature of this transporter in mammals. In this work, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique that we recently developed for T. cruzi to knock out two components of the uniporter: MCU, the pore subunit, and MCUb, which was proposed as a negative regulator of MCU in human cells. In contrast to what occurs in human cells, MCU is not essential, while MCUb is essential for growth, differentiation, and infectivity; has a bioenergetic role; and does not act as a dominant negative subunit of MCU. Copyright © 2017 Chiurillo et al.

  11. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  12. Utilizing small nutrient compounds as enhancers of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Craig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise, when performed regularly as part of a training program, leads to increases in whole-body and skeletal muscle-specific oxidative capacity. At the cellular level, this adaptive response is manifested by an increased number of oxidative fibres (Type I and IIA myosin heavy chain, an increase in capillarity and an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis (increased volume and functional capacity is fundamentally important as it leads to greater rates of oxidative phosphorylation and an improved capacity to utilize fatty acids during sub-maximal exercise. Given the importance of mitochondrial biogenesis for skeletal muscle performance, considerable attention has been given to understanding the molecular cues stimulated by endurance exercise that culminate in this adaptive response. In turn, this research has led to the identification of pharmaceutical compounds, functional foods and small nutritional bioactive ingredients that appear able to amplify exercise-responsive signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. The aim of this review is to discuss these purported exercise mimetics and bioactive ingredients in the context of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. We will examine proposed modes of action, discuss evidence of application in skeletal muscle in vivo and finally comment on the feasibility of such approaches to support endurance-training applications in humans.

  13. Parkinson’s Disease: A Complex Interplay of Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ciccone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the most common age-related neurodegenerative diseases. This pathology causes a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra. Several reports have claimed a role of defective nuclear and mitochondrial DNA repair pathways in PD etiology, in particular, of the Base Excision Repair (BER system. In addition, recent findings, related to PD progression, indicate that oxidative stress pathways involving c-Abl and GST could also be implicated in this pathology. This review focuses on recently described networks most likely involved in an integrated manner in the course of PD.

  14. Mitochondrial phenotypic flexibility enhances energy savings during winter fast in king penguin chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Marmillot, Vincent; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien

    2014-08-01

    Energy conservation is a key priority for organisms that live in environments with seasonal shortages in resource supplies or that spontaneously fast during their annual cycle. The aim of this study was to determine whether the high fasting endurance of winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks (Aptenodytes patagonicus) is associated with an adjustment of mitochondrial bioenergetics in pectoralis muscle, the largest skeletal muscle in penguins. The rates of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and ATP synthesis and mitochondrial efficiency (ATP/O ratio) were measured in winter-acclimatized chicks. We used pyruvate/malate and palmitoyl-l-carnitine/malate as respiratory substrates and results from naturally fasted chicks were compared to experimentally re-fed chicks. Bioenergetics analysis of pectoralis muscle revealed that mitochondria are on average 15% more energy efficient in naturally fasted than in experimentally fed chicks, indicating that fasted birds consume less nutrients to sustain their energy-demanding processes. We also found that moderate reductions in temperature from 38°C to 30°C further increase by 23% the energy coupling efficiency at the level of mitochondria, suggesting that king penguin chicks realize additional energy savings while becoming hypothermic during winter. It has been calculated that this adjustment of mitochondrial efficiency in skeletal muscle may contribute to nearly 25% of fasting-induced reduction in mass-specific metabolic rate measured in vivo. The present study shows that the regulation of mitochondrial efficiency triggers the development of an economical management of resources, which would maximize the conservation of endogenous fuel stores by decreasing the cost of living in fasted winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Quinacrine induces apoptosis in cancer cells by forming a functional bridge between TRAIL-DR5 complex and modulating the mitochondrial intrinsic cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sarita; Tripathi, Neha; Preet, Ranjan; Siddharth, Sumit; Nayak, Anmada; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2017-01-01

    Death Receptor 5 (DR5) is known to be an important anti-cancer drug target. TRAIL is a natural ligand of DR5, but its drug action is limited because of several factors. A few agonistic ligands were identified as TRAIL-DR5 axis modulators, which enhance the cellular apoptosis. Literature suggest that quinacrine (QC) acts as a DR5 agonistic ligand. However, the detailed mechanism explaining how QC interacts with TRAIL-DR5 axis has not been established. Also focused in vitro and in vivo experimental analysis to validate the hypothesis is not yet performed. In this work, extensive studies have been carried out using in silico analysis (molecular dynamics), in vitro analysis (cell based assays) and in vivo analysis (based on mice xenograft model), to delineate the mechanism of QC action in modulating the TRAIL-DR5 signaling. The MD simulations helped in identifying the important residues contributing to the formation of a QC-TRAIL-DR5 complex, which provide extra stability to it, consequently leading to the enhanced cellular apoptosis. QC caused a dose dependent increase of DR5 expression in cancer cells but not in normal breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A. QC showed a synergistic effect with TRAIL in causing cancer cell apoptosis. In DR5-KD MCF-10A-Tr (DR5 knocked down) cells, TRAIL+ QC failed to significantly increase the apoptosis but over expression of full length DR5 in DR5-silence cells induced apoptosis, further supporting DR5 as a drug target for QC. An increase in the release of reactive species (ROS and RNS) and activation of enzymes (FADD, CASPASES 3, 8, 9 and cytochrome-C) indicated the involvement of mitochondrial intrinsic pathway in TRAIL+QC mediated apoptosis. In vivo study pointed out that TRAIL+QC co-administration increases the expression of DR5 and reduce the tumor size in xenograft mice. This combined in silico, in vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that QC enhances the cellular apoptosis via the modulation of TRAIL-DR5 complexation and the

  16. The Effect of Aging on Mitochondrial Complex I and the Extent of Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarkova, Zuzana; Kovalska, Maria; Timkova, Veronika; Racay, Peter; Lehotsky, Jan; Kaplan, Peter

    2016-08-01

    One of the characteristic features of the aging is dysfunction of mitochondria. Its role in the regulation of metabolism and apoptosis suggests a possible link between these cellular processes. This study investigates the relationship of respiratory complex I with aging-related oxidative stress in the cerebral mitochondria. Deterioration of complex I seen in senescent (26-months old) mitochondria was accompanied by decline in total thiol group content, increase of HNE and HNE-protein adducts as well as decreased content of complex I subunits, GRIM-19 and NDUFV2. On the other hand, decline of complex I might be related with the mitochondrial apoptosis through increased Bax/Bcl-2 cascade in 15-month old animal brains. Higher amount of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL with the lower content of GRIM-19 could maintain to some extent elevated oxidative stress in mitochondria as seen in the senescent group. In the cortical M1 region increased presence of TUNEL+ cells and more than 20-times higher density of Fluoro-Jade C+ cells in 26-months old was observed, suggesting significant neurodegenerative effect of aging in the neuronal cells. Our study supports a scenario in which the age-related decline of complex I might sensitize neurons to the action of death agonists, such as Bax through lipid and protein oxidative stimuli in mitochondria. Although aging is associated with oxidative stress, these changes did not increase progressively with age, as similar extent of lesions was observed in oxidative stress markers of the both aged groups.

  17. DJ-1 preserving mitochondrial complex I activity plays a critical role in resveratrol-mediated cardioprotection against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Xiao-Ran; Zhao, Le; Duan, Guang-Ling; Xiao, Lin; Chen, He-Ping

    2018-02-01

    Resveratrol has been demonstrated to have cardioprotective effects by attenuating ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced oxidative stress injury, but its in-depth molecular mechanisms against I/R-induced oxidative stress is not fully elaborated. DJ-1 plays a role in maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity and is closely associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, this study sought to determine the contribution of DJ-1-mediated maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity to the anti-oxidative stress effect of Resveratrol in the H9c2 cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). The results showed that Resveratrol significantly attenuated the H/R-induced viability loss and lactate dehydrogenase leakage, accompanied by decreases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde contents and increases in the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio. Furthermore, Resveratrol increased the expression and mitochondrial translocation of DJ-1 and promoted the direct binding of DJ-1 with complex I subunits ND1 and NDUFS4, which in turn improved mitochondrial complex I activity and inhibited mitochondria-derived ROS production after H/R. Intriguingly, the anti-oxidative stress effect of Resveratrol could be partially blocked by DJ-1 siRNA and Complex I inhibitor Rotenone, respectively. Conclusively, these results indicated that DJ-1 is necessary for Resveratrol-mediated cardioprotective effects against H/R-induced oxidative stress damage, at least in part, through preserving mitochondrial complex I activity, and subsequently decreasing mitochondrial ROS generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioengineered nisin derivatives with enhanced activity in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Susan; Field, Des; Daly, Karen M.; O'Connor, Paula M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nisin A is the best known and most extensively characterized lantibiotic. As it is ribosomally synthesized, bioengineering‐based strategies can be used to generate variants. We have previously demonstrated that bioengineering of the hinge region of nisin A can result in the generation of variants with enhanced anti‐microbial activity against Gram‐positive pathogens. Here we created a larger bank of hinge variant producers and screened for producers that exhibit enhanced bioactivity as assessed by agar‐based assays against a selection of target strains. Further analysis of 12 ‘lead’ variants reveals that in many cases enhanced bioactivity is not attributable to enhanced specific activity but is instead as a consequence of an enhanced ability to diffuse through complex polymers. In the case of two variants, which contain the residues SVA and NAK, respectively, within the hinge region, we demonstrate that this enhanced trait enables the peptides to dramatically outperform nisin A with respect to controlling Listeria monocytogenes in commercially produced chocolate milk that contains carrageenan as a stabilizer. PMID:22260415

  19. Solubility Enhancement of Raloxifene Using Inclusion Complexes and Cogrinding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal H. Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to enhance the solubility and dissolution of practically water-insoluble drug raloxifene HCl (RLX, for the same two approaches that were used. In the first approach, drug was kneaded with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD, and in the second one drug was cogrinded with modified guar gum (MGG. The drug-cyclodextrin complex and drug-MGG cogrind mixtures were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction studies, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The solubility and dissolution study reveals that solubility and dissolution rate of RLX remarkably increased in both methods. It was concluded that the prepared inclusion complex showed a remarkable increase in solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble drug raloxifene. In the cogrinding mixture, a natural modified gum is used as a surfactant and enhances the solubility and dissolution of RLX without requiring addition of organic solvent or high temperature for its preparation; thus, process is less cumbersome and cost effective. But when both methods were compared; HPβCD complexation method showed significant enhancement of drug solubility.

  20. Enhanced targeting of mitochondrial peroxide defense by the combined use of thiosemicarbazones and inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R

    2016-02-01

    Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prx3) accounts for about 90% of mitochondrial peroxidase activity, and its marked upregulation in many cancers is important for cell survival. Prx3 oxidation can critically alter peroxide signaling and defense and can be a seminal event in promoting cell death. Here it is shown that this mechanism can be exploited pharmacologically by combinations of clinically available drugs that compromise Prx3 function in different ways. Clinically relevant levels of the thiosemicarbazone iron chelators triapine (Tp) and 2,2'-Dipyridyl-N,N-dimethylsemicarbazone (Dp44mT) promote selective oxidation of mitochondrial Prx3, but not cytosolic Prx1, in multiple human lung and ovarian cancer lines. Decreased cell survival closely correlates with Prx3 oxidation. However, Prx3 oxidation is not merely an indicator of cell death as cytotoxic concentrations of cisplatin do not cause Prx3 oxidation. The siRNA-mediated suppression of either Prx3 or thioredoxin-2, which supports Prx3, enhances Tp's cytotoxicity. Tp-mediated Prx3 oxidation is driven by enhanced peroxide generation, but not by nitric oxide. Many tumors overexpress thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) which supports Prx activity. Direct inhibitors of TrxR (e.g. auranofin, cisplatin) markedly enhanced Tp's cytotoxicity, and auranofin enhanced Prx3 oxidation by low dose Tp. Together, these results support an important role for Prx3 oxidation in the cytotoxicity of Tp, and demonstrate that TrxR inhibitors can significantly enhance Tp's cytotoxicity. Thiosemicarbazone-based regimens could prove effective for targeting Prx3 in a variety of cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPL12 interacts directly with mitochondrial RNA polymerase to modulate mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibo; Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S

    2007-04-27

    The core human mitochondrial transcription machinery comprises a single subunit bacteriophage-related RNA polymerase, POLRMT, the high mobility group box DNA-binding protein h-mtTFA/TFAM, and two transcriptional co-activator proteins, h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 that also have rRNA methyltransferase activity. Recapitulation of specific initiation of transcription in vitro can be achieved by a complex of POL-RMT, h-mtTFA, and either h-mtTFB1 or h-mtTFB2. However, the nature of mitochondrial transcription complexes in vivo and the potential involvement of additional proteins in the transcription process in human mitochondria have not been extensively investigated. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription and translation are physically coupled via the formation of a multiprotein complex nucleated by the binding of Nam1p to the amino-terminal domain of mtRNA polymerase (Rpo41p). This model system paradigm led us to search for proteins that interact with POLRMT to regulate mitochondrial gene expression in humans. Using an affinity capture strategy to identify POL-RMT-binding proteins, we identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein L7/L12 (MRPL12) as a protein in HeLa mitochondrial extracts that interacts specifically with POLRMT in vitro. Purified recombinant MRPL12 binds to POLRMT and stimulates mitochondrial transcription activity in vitro, demonstrating that this interaction is both direct and functional. Finally, from HeLa cells that overexpress FLAG epitope-tagged MRPL12, increased steady-state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts are observed and MRPL12-POLRMT complexes can be co-immunoprecipitated, providing strong evidence that this interaction enhances mitochondrial transcription or RNA stability in vivo. We speculate that the MRPL12 interaction with POLRMT is likely part of a novel regulatory mechanism that coordinates mitochondrial transcription with translation and/or ribosome biogenesis during human mitochondrial gene expression.

  2. NAD⁺ repletion improves mitochondrial and stem cell function and enhances life span in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wu, Yibo; Gariani, Karim; Wang, Xu; Luan, Peiling; D'Amico, Davide; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Lutolf, Matthias P; Aebersold, Ruedi; Schoonjans, Kristina; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-17

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration yet are susceptible to senescence during aging. We demonstrate the importance of the amount of the oxidized form of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its effect on mitochondrial activity as a pivotal switch to modulate muscle SC (MuSC) senescence. Treatment with the NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) induced the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and synthesis of prohibitin proteins, and this rejuvenated MuSCs in aged mice. NR also prevented MuSC senescence in the mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J) mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We furthermore demonstrate that NR delays senescence of neural SCs and melanocyte SCs and increases mouse life span. Strategies that conserve cellular NAD(+) may reprogram dysfunctional SCs and improve life span in mammals. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Enhanced base excision repair capacity in carotid atherosclerosis may protect nuclear DNA but not mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; B. Dahl, Tuva; Skjelland, Mona

    2016-01-01

    disease-free carotid specimens from patients with carotid plaques and 10 non-atherosclerotic control arteries. Genomic integrity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA copy number, oxidative DNA damage and BER proteins were evaluated in a subgroup of plaques and controls. Our major findings were: (i) The BER pathway...... genes in atherosclerosis may contribute to lesional nuclear DNA stability but appears insufficient to maintain mtDNA integrity, potentially influencing mitochondrial function in cells within the atherosclerotic lesion.......Lesional and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, potentially leading to accumulation of DNA base lesions within atherosclerotic plaques. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway counteracting oxidative DNA damage, our knowledge on BER...

  4. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a constituent of the mammalian mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex, and is essential for oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero-Martos, Estefanía; Ortega-Vila, Bernardo; Pol-Fuster, Josep; Cisneros-Barroso, Eugenia; Ruiz-Guerra, Laura; Medina-Dols, Aina; Heine-Suñer, Damián; Lladó, Jerònia; Olmos, Gabriel; Vives-Bauzà, Cristofol

    2016-10-01

    Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been associated with a broad spectrum of mental disorders. DISC1 is a multi-compartmentalized protein found in the cytoplasm, centrosome, nuclei and mostly enriched in mitochondria. In order to shed light on DISC1 mitochondrial function, we have studied its topology within the organelle. We show in here that in mammals DISC1 resides in the 'Mitochondrial contact site and Cristae Organizing system' (MICOS) complex, involved in cristae organization. DISC1 knockdown in SH-SY5Y cells causes MICOS disassembly and fragmentation of the mitochondrial morphology network. Moreover, DISC1 depleted cells have decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and steady state levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits. As a consequence, OXPHOS complexes and supercomplexes are partially disassembled in DISC1 knockdown cells, which suffer severe bioenergetic defects, evidenced by impaired oxygen consumption, adenosine triphosphate synthesis and mitochondrial membrane potential. Transfection of recombinant full-length human DISC1 restores MICOS complex assembly and rescues OXPHOS function, meanwhile overexpression of the DISC1 truncated form Δ597-854, known to be pathogenic, fails to rescue the bioenergetic impairment caused by DISC1 knockdown. These results should contribute to reveal DISC1 physiological function and potential pathogenic role in severe mental illnesses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Apolipoprotein O expression in mouse liver enhances hepatic lipid accumulation by impairing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Wu, Chen-Lu; Yu, Bi-Lian; Liu, Ling; Hu, Jia-Rui

    2017-09-09

    Apolipoprotein O (ApoO) was recently observed in the cellular mitochondrial inner membrane, which plays a role in mitochondrial function and is associated with myocardiopathy. Empirical information on the physiological functions of apoO is therefore limited. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of apoO on hepatic fatty acid metabolism. An adenoviral vector expressing hApoO was constructed and introduced into chow diet and high-fat diet induced mice and the L02 human hepatoma cell line. High levels of hApoO mRNA and protein were detected in the liver, and the expression of lipid metabolism genes was significantly altered compared with negative controls. The liver function indices (serum ALT and AST) were clearly elevated, and the ultrastructure of cellular mitochondria was distinctly altered in the liver after apoO overexpression. Further, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased with hApoO treatment in L02 cells. These results establish a link between apoO and lipid accumulation and could suggest a new pathway for regulating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Melanogenesis inhibits respiration in B16-F10 melanoma cells whereas enhances mitochondrial cell content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meira, Willian Vanderlei; Heinrich, Tassiele Andréa; Cadena, Silvia Maria Suter Correia; Martinez, Glaucia Regina, E-mail: grmartinez@ufpr.br

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is a rare and aggressive skin tumor; the survival of patients diagnosed late is fairly low. This high mortality rate is due to the characteristics of the cells that allow them to be resistant to radiotherapy and conventional chemotherapy, besides of being able to evade the immune system. Melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair and eye color, seems to be involved in this resistance. The main function of melanin is to protect the cells against ultraviolet (UV) light by absorbing this radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging. But this pigment may have also a role as photosensitizer, because when it is irradiated with UVA light (320-400 nm), the generation of ROS was detected. Besides, the melanogenesis stimulation on B16-F10 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest, induction of a quiescent state, change in the expression of several proteins and alterations on ADP/ATP ratio. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of melanogenesis stimulation in mitochondrial function of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Therefore, we analyzed cells respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) and mitochondria mass in B16-F10 melanoma cells stimulated with 0.4 mM L-tyrosine and 10 mM NH{sub 4}Cl. Our results showed that the induction of melanin synthesis was able to reduce significantly the oxygen consumption after 48 h of stimulation, without changes of mitochondrial membrane potential when compared to non-stimulated cells. Despite of respiration inhibition, the mitochondria mass was higher in cells with melanogenesis stimulation. We suggest that the stimulation in the melanin synthesis might be promoting the inhibition of electrons transport chain by some intermediate compound from the synthesis of the pigment and this effect could contribute to explain the entry in the quiescent state. - Highlights: • Melanoma pigmentation alters mitochondrial respiration. • Induction of melanin synthesis by 48 h do not change mitochondrial membrane

  7. Quality Enhancement by Inclusion Complex Formation of Simvastatin Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emőke Rédai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simvastatin is an inhibitor of hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. To enhance its bioavailability by inclusion complexation, as host molecule randommethyl-β-cyclodextrin had been used. After evaluating the complexes we chose the kneading product in 1:2 molar ratio for incorporation of 10 mg simvastatin tablets. Materials and methods: We prepared homogenous mixtures of the inclusion complex and some excipients. The tablets were prepared by direct compression. The tablets were evaluated in regard to: weight uniformity, thickness, diameter, hardness, friability, disintegration and dissolution profile. Results: Weights are in the range of 196-208 mg, diameter 6.83-6.86 mm, height 3.86-4.01 mm, hardness 78.3-113.1 N, friability 0.75- 1.19 %, disintegration above 15 minutes. The dissolved amounts of simvastatin from the tablets are higher compared to the dissolution of pure simvastatin, but lower than the dissolution of the complex itself. Excipients, like disintegrants and lubricants greatly influence the dissolution properties of the tablets. Conclusions: According to our results, tablets containing inclusion complex of simvastatin exhibit better solubility, according to the dissolved amount of simvastatin, than pure drug alone. Proper physical parameters of the tablets are obtained by application of 5 % Primellose

  8. Distinct Effects of miR-210 Reduction on Neurogenesis: Increased Neuronal Survival of Inflammation But Reduced Proliferation Associated with Mitochondrial Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A; Sun, Xiaoyun; Xu, Lijun; Ouyang, Yi-Bing; Giffard, Rona G

    2017-03-15

    Neurogenesis is essential to brain development and plays a central role in the response to brain injury. Stroke and head trauma stimulate proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs); however, the survival of young neurons is sharply reduced by postinjury inflammation. Cellular mitochondria are critical to successful neurogenesis and are a major target of inflammatory injury. Mitochondrial protection was shown to improve survival of young neurons. This study tested whether reducing cellular microRNA-210 (miR-210) would enhance mitochondrial function and improve survival of young murine neurons under inflammatory conditions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of miR-210 inhibition to enhance and protect mitochondrial function through upregulation of mitochondrial proteins. Here, miR-210 inhibition significantly increased neuronal survival and protected the activity of mitochondrial enzymes cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase in differentiating NSC cultures exposed to inflammatory mediators. Unexpectedly, we found that reducing miR-210 significantly attenuated NSC proliferation upon induction of differentiation. Further investigation revealed that increased mitochondrial function suppressed the shift to primarily glycolytic metabolism and reduced mitochondrial length characteristic of dividing cells. Activation of AMP-regulated protein kinase-retinoblastoma signaling is important in NSC proliferation and the reduction of this activation observed by miR-210 inhibition is one mechanism contributing to the reduced proliferation. Postinjury neurogenesis occurs as a burst of proliferation that peaks in days, followed by migration and differentiation over weeks. Our studies suggest that mitochondrial protective miR-210 inhibition should be delayed until after the initial burst of proliferation, but could be beneficial during the prolonged differentiation stage.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasing the success of endogenous neurogenesis after brain injury

  9. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M. W.; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the pati...

  10. Cytosolic calcium mediates RIP1/RIP3 complex-dependent necroptosis through JNK activation and mitochondrial ROS production in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Wu, Xiaxia; Gao, Hongwei; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Wenwen; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Jinhua; Du, Guanhua; Chen, Xiuping

    2017-07-01

    Necroptosis is a form of programmed necrosis mediated by signaling complexes with receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 kinases as the main mediators. However, the underlying execution pathways of this phenomenon have yet to be elucidated in detail. In this study, a RIP1/RIP3 complex was formed in 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (MAM)-treated HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. With this formation, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increased, mitochondrial depolarization occurred, and ATP concentrations decreased. This process was identified as necroptosis. This finding was confirmed by experiments showing that MAM-induced cell death was attenuated by the pharmacological or genetic blockage of necroptosis signaling, including RIP1 inhibitor necrostatin-1s (Nec-1s) and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of RIP1 and RIP3, but was unaffected by caspase inhibitor z-vad-fmk or necrosis inhibitor 2-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-3-pentylamino-maleimide (IM54). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis further revealed the ultrastructural features of MAM-induced necroptosis. MAM-induced RIP1/RIP3 complex triggered necroptosis through cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) accumulation and sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Both calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and JNK inhibitor SP600125 could attenuate necroptotic features, including mitochondrial ROS elevation, mitochondrial depolarization, and ATP depletion. 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), which is a mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, was found to effectively reverse both MAM induced mitochondrial ROS generation and cell death, indicating the complex II was the ROS-producing site. The essential role of mitochondrial ROS was confirmed by the protective effect of overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). MAM-induced necroptosis was independent of TNFα, p53, MLKL, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In summary, our study demonstrated that RIP1/RIP3 complex-triggered cytosolic calcium

  11. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation effectively sensitizes renal cell carcinoma to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Ao, Jinsong; Yu, Dan; Rao, Ting; Ruan, Yuan; Yao, Xiaobin

    2017-08-26

    The functional importance of mitochondrial protein translation has been recently documented in the context of various cancers but not renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In lines with these efforts, our work demonstrates that mitochondrial translation inhibition by tigecycline or depletion of EF-Tu mitochondrial translation factor effectively targets RCC and significantly sensitizes RCC response to chemotherapy. We show that antibiotic tigecycline inhibits multiple biological functions of RCC, including growth, colony formation and survival. It also significantly enhances in vitro and in vivo efficacy of paclitaxel in RCC. Tigecycline preferentially inhibits translation of mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes that contain mitochondrially encoded subunits. As a consequence of mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibition, decreased mitochondrial respiration is observed in RCC cells exposed to tigecycline. In contrast, tigecycline is ineffective in RCC ρ0 cells that lack mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial respiration, further confirm mitochondrial translation inhibition as the mechanism of tigecycline's action in RCC. Importantly, genetic inhibition of mitochondrial translation by EF-Tu knockdown reproduced the inhibitory effects of tigecycline. Finally, we show the association between mitochondrial translation inhibition and suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Our work used pharmacological and genetic strategies to demonstrate the important roles of mitochondrial translation in RCC and emphasize the therapeutic value of sensitizing RCC to chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chounghun Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function (“Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle” [1], “Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle” [2]. However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE, low-intensity (LE and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE. Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice” [3].

  13. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-06-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function ("Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle" [1], "Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle" [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE), low-intensity (LE) and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE). Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice" [3].

  14. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {beta} deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Shaikh M., E-mail: rmizanoor@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Choudhury, Mahua; Janssen, Rachel C.; Baquero, Karalee C. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Miyazaki, Makoto [Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Friedman, Jacob E. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP{beta}) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBP{beta} expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBP{beta} deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBP{beta} in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBP{beta} might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR

  15. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. © The Author. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  16. A mutation screening of oncogenes, tumor suppressor gene TP53 and nuclear encoded mitochondrial complex I genes in oncocytic thyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Cecilia; de Biase, Dario; Kurelac, Ivana; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Caria, Paola; Vanni, Roberta; Romeo, Giovanni; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Bonora, Elena

    2015-03-21

    Thyroid neoplasias with oncocytic features represent a specific phenotype in non-medullary thyroid cancer, reflecting the unique biological phenomenon of mitochondrial hyperplasia in the cytoplasm. Oncocytic thyroid cells are characterized by a prominent eosinophilia (or oxyphilia) caused by mitochondrial abundance. Although disruptive mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the most significant hallmark of such tumors, oncocytomas may be envisioned as heterogeneous neoplasms, characterized by multiple nuclear and mitochondrial gene lesions. We investigated the nuclear mutational profile of oncocytic tumors to pinpoint the mutations that may trigger the early oncogenic hit. Total DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues from 45 biopsies of oncocytic tumors. High-resolution melting was used for mutation screening of mitochondrial complex I subunits genes. Specific nuclear rearrangements were investigated by RT-PCR (RET/PTC) or on isolated nuclei by interphase FISH (PAX8/PPARγ). Recurrent point mutations were analyzed by direct sequencing. In our oncocytic tumor samples, we identified rare TP53 mutations. The series of analyzed cases did not include poorly- or undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas, and none of the TP53 mutated cases had significant mitotic activity or high-grade features. Thus, the presence of disruptive TP53 mutations was completely unexpected. In addition, novel mutations in nuclear-encoded complex I genes were identified. These findings suggest that nuclear genetic lesions altering the bioenergetics competence of thyroid cells may give rise to an aberrant mitochondria-centered compensatory mechanism and ultimately to the oncocytic phenotype.

  17. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  18. Reduction of brain mitochondrial β-oxidation impairs complex I and V in chronic alcohol intake: the underlying mechanism for neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Haorah

    Full Text Available Neuropathy and neurocognitive deficits are common among chronic alcohol users, which are believed to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain. The specific type of brain mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (mRCC that are adversely affected by alcohol abuse has not been studied. Thus, we examined the alterations of mRCC in freshly isolated mitochondria from mice brain that were pair-fed the ethanol (4% v/v and control liquid diets for 7-8 weeks. We observed that alcohol intake severely reduced the levels of complex I and V. A reduction in complex I was associated with a decrease in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (cPT1 and cPT2 levels. The mitochondrial outer (cPT1 and inner (cPT2 membrane transporter enzymes are specialized in acylation of fatty acid from outer to inner membrane of mitochondria for ATP production. Thus, our results showed that alterations of cPT1 and cPT2 paralleled a decrease β-oxidation of palmitate and ATP production, suggesting that impairment of substrate entry step (complex I function can cause a negative impact on ATP production (complex V function. Disruption of cPT1/cPT2 was accompanied by an increase in cytochrome C leakage, while reduction of complex I and V paralleled a decrease in depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ, monitored by JC-1 fluorescence and ATP production in alcohol intake. We noted that acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC, a cofactor of cPT1 and cPT2 prevented the adverse effects of alcohol while coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was not very effective against alcohol insults. These results suggest that understanding the molecular, biochemical, and signaling mechanisms of the CNS mitochondrial β-oxidation such as ALC can mitigate alcohol related neurological disorders.

  19. Disease-Associated Mutations in the HSPD1 Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of the Mitochondrial HSP60/HSP10 Chaperonin Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) forms together with heat shock protein 10 (HSP10) double-barrel chaperonin complexes that are essential for folding to the native state of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix space. Two extremely rare monogenic disorders have been described that are caused by missen...

  20. Immunohistochemical analysis of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in skeletal muscle from patients with mitochondrial DNA encoded tRNA gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paepe, B. De; Smet, J.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Seneca, S.; Martin, J.J.; Bleecker, J. De; Meirleir, L. de; Lissens, W.; Coster, R. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial diseases display a heterogeneous spectrum of clinical phenotypes and therefore the identification of the underlying gene defect is often a difficult task. AIMS: To develop an immunohistochemical approach to stain skeletal muscle for the five multi-protein complexes that

  1. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolstenhome, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    We have completed sequencing segments of the maize mitochondrial (mt) DNA that contains all five of the exons (A-E) of the gene (nad1) for subunit I of the respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase. Analysis of these sequences indicates that exons B and C are joined by a continuous group II intron, but the remaining exons are associated with partial group II introns and are encoded at widely separated locations in the maize mtDNA molecule. We have shown that mature transcripts of the maize nad1 gene contain 23 edited nucleotides, and that transcripts of maize and soybean mat-r genes contain 15 and 14 edits, respectively. The majority of edits in nad1 transcripts result in amino acid replacements that increase similarity between the maize NAD1 protein and NAD1 proteins of other plant species and of animal species. We found that the intron between exons b and c is not edited. From data obtained using PCR and sequencing we have shown that transcripts containing all possible exon combinations exist in maize mitochondria.

  2. Resveratrol Co-Treatment Attenuates the Effects of HIV Protease Inhibitors on Rat Body Weight and Enhances Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Symington

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS emerged as a global health pandemic, with sub-Saharan Africa the hardest hit. While the successful roll-out of antiretroviral (ARV therapy provided significant relief to HIV-positive individuals, such treatment can also elicit damaging side-effects. Here especially HIV protease inhibitors (PIs are implicated in the onset of cardio-metabolic complications such as type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. As there is a paucity of data regarding suitable co-treatments within this context, this preclinical study investigated whether resveratrol (RSV, aspirin (ASP or vitamin C (VitC co-treatment is able to blunt side-effects in a rat model of chronic PI exposure (Lopinavir/Ritonavir treatment for 4 months. Body weights and weight gain, blood metabolite levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, echocardiography and cardiac mitochondrial respiration were assessed in PI-treated rats ± various co-treatments. Our data reveal that PI treatment significantly lowered body weight and cardiac respiratory function while no significant changes were found for heart function and blood metabolite levels. Moreover, all co-treatments ameliorated the PI-induced decrease in body weight after 4 months of PI treatment, while RSV co-treatment enhanced cardiac mitochondrial respiratory capacity in PI-treated rats. This pilot study therefore provides novel hypotheses regarding RSV co-treatment that should be further assessed in greater detail.

  3. Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in the Scleractinia/Corallimorpharia Complex: Implications for Coral Phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Fang; Kitahara, Marcelo Visentini; Luo, Haiwei; Tracey, Dianne; Geller, Jonathan; Fukami, Hironobu; Miller, David John; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    Corallimorpharia is a small Order of skeleton-less animals that is closely related to the reef-building corals (Scleractinia) and of fundamental interest in the context of understanding the potential impacts of climate change in the future on coral reefs. The relationship between the nominal Orders Corallimorpharia and Scleractinia is controversial—the former is either the closest outgroup to the Scleractinia or alternatively is derived from corals via skeleton loss. This latter scenario, the “naked coral” hypothesis, is strongly supported by analyses based on mitochondrial (mt) protein sequences, whereas the former is equally strongly supported by analyses of mt nucleotide sequences. The “naked coral” hypothesis seeks to link skeleton loss in the putative ancestor of corallimorpharians with a period of elevated oceanic CO2 during the Cretaceous, leading to the idea that these skeleton-less animals may be harbingers for the fate of coral reefs under global climate change. In an attempt to better understand their evolutionary relationships, we examined mt genome organization in a representative range (12 species, representing 3 of the 4 extant families) of corallimorpharians and compared these patterns with other Hexacorallia. The most surprising finding was that mt genome organization in Corallimorphus profundus, a deep-water species that is the most scleractinian-like of all corallimorpharians on the basis of morphology, was much more similar to the common scleractinian pattern than to those of other corallimorpharians. This finding is consistent with the idea that C. profundus represents a key position in the coral corallimorpharian transition. PMID:24769753

  4. Phylogenetic assessment of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa species complex (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Ricoy, Maigualida; Marshall, Jonathon C; Domínguez, Jorge

    2009-08-01

    The Aporrectodea caliginosa species complex includes the most abundant earthworms in grasslands and agricultural ecosystems of the Paleartic region. Historically this complex consisted of the following taxa: A. caliginosa s.s.Savigny, 1826, A. trapezoides Dugés (1828), A. tuberculata (Eisen, 1874), and A. nocturna Evans (1946). These four taxa are morphologically very similar and difficult to differentiate because of their morphological variability. Consequently, their taxonomic status and their phylogenetic relationships have been a matter of discussion for more than a century. To study these questions, we sequenced the COII (686 bp), 12S (362 bp), 16S (1200 bp), ND1 (917 bp), and tRNAs(Asn-Asp-Val-Leu-Ala-Ser-Leu) (402 bp) mitochondrial and 28S (809 bp) nuclear gene regions for 85 European earthworms from 27 different localities belonging to the A. caliginosa species complex and four outgroup taxa. DNA sequences were analyzed using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian approaches of phylogenetic inference. The resulting trees were combined with morphological, ecological, and genomic evidence to test species boundaries (i.e., integrative approach). Our molecular analyses showed that A. caliginosa s.s. and A. tuberculata form a sister clade to A. trapezoides, A. longa, and A. nocturna, which indicates that A. longa is part of the A. caliginosa species complex. We confirm the species status of all these taxa and identify two hitherto unrecognized Aporrectodea species in Corsica (France). Moreover our analyses also showed the presence of highly divergent lineages within A. caliginosa, A. trapezoides, and A. longa, suggesting the existence of cryptic diversity within these taxa.

  5. Superoxide Is Produced by the Reduced Flavin in Mitochondrial Complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryde, Kenneth R.; Hirst, Judy

    2011-01-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a major source of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria and a contributor to cellular oxidative stress. In isolated complex I the reduced flavin is known to react with molecular oxygen to form predominantly superoxide, but studies using intact mitochondria contend that superoxide may result from a semiquinone species that responds to the proton-motive force (Δp) also. Here, we use bovine heart submitochondrial particles to show that a single mechanism describes superoxide production by complex I under all conditions (during both NADH oxidation and reverse electron transfer). NADH-induced superoxide production is inhibited by complex I flavin-site inhibitors but not by inhibitors of ubiquinone reduction, and it is independent of Δp. Reverse electron transfer (RET) through complex I in submitochondrial particles, driven by succinate oxidation and the Δp created by ATP hydrolysis, reduces the flavin, leading to NAD+ and O2 reduction. RET-induced superoxide production is inhibited by both flavin-site and ubiquinone-reduction inhibitors. The potential dependence of NADH-induced superoxide production (set by the NAD+ potential) matches that of RET-induced superoxide production (set by the succinate potential and Δp), and they both match the potential dependence of the flavin. Therefore, both NADH- and RET-induced superoxide are produced by the flavin, according to the same molecular mechanism. The unified mechanism describes how reactive oxygen species production by complex I responds to changes in cellular conditions. It establishes a route to understanding causative connections between the enzyme and its pathological effects and to developing rational strategies for addressing them. PMID:21393237

  6. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  7. Monitoring of singlet oxygen luminescence and mitochondrial autofluorescence after illumination of hypericin/mitochondria complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovajova, D; Jancura, D; Miskovsky, P

    2013-01-01

    A study of hypericin (Hyp) interaction with mitochondria isolated from U-87 MG glioma cells as well as the time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen (1O2) formation and annihilation after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is presented in this work. Interaction between Hyp and mitocho......A study of hypericin (Hyp) interaction with mitochondria isolated from U-87 MG glioma cells as well as the time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen (1O2) formation and annihilation after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is presented in this work. Interaction between Hyp...... to approximately 10% at the highest used Hyp bulk concentration. Photosensitized production of 1O2 in mitochondria after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is characterized by a rise lifetime of 8 s and shows saturation behaviour with respect to Hyp concentration. The lifetime of 1O2 depends...... of photoactivated Hyp on the mitochondria respiration chain was evaluated by the monitoring of time-resolved NAD(P)H fluorescence. We have demonstrated the rise of the NAD(P)H content after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex....

  8. Evidence for Two Sites of Superoxide Production by Mitochondrial NADH-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treberg, Jason R.; Quinlan, Casey L.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) can form superoxide during forward electron flow (NADH-oxidizing) or, at sufficiently high protonmotive force, during reverse electron transport from the ubiquinone (Q) pool (NAD+-reducing). We designed an assay system to allow titration of the redox state of the superoxide-generating site during reverse electron transport in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria: a protonmotive force generated by ATP hydrolysis, succinate:malonate to alter electron supply and modulate the redox state of the Q pool, and inhibition of complex III to prevent QH2 oxidation via the Q cycle. Stepwise oxidation of the QH2/Q pool by increasing malonate concentration slowed the rates of both reverse electron transport and rotenone-sensitive superoxide production by complex I. However, the superoxide production rate was not uniquely related to the resultant potential of the NADH/NAD+ redox couple. Thus, there is a superoxide producer during reverse electron transport at complex I that responds to Q pool redox state and is not in equilibrium with the NAD reduction state. In contrast, superoxide production during forward electron transport in the presence of rotenone was uniquely related to NAD redox state. These results support a two-site model of complex I superoxide production; one site in equilibrium with the NAD pool, presumably the flavin of the FMN moiety (site IF) and the other dependent not only on NAD redox state, but also on protonmotive force and the reduction state of the Q pool, presumably a semiquinone in the Q-binding site (site IQ). PMID:21659507

  9. Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia and mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome are associated with neuronal complex I defect and mtDNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakonen, Anna H; Goffart, Steffi; Marjavaara, Sanna; Paetau, Anders; Cooper, Helen; Mattila, Kimmo; Lampinen, Milla; Sajantila, Antti; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Suomalainen, Anu

    2008-12-01

    Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder caused by the recessive mutation in PEO1, leading to an Y508C change in the mitochondrial helicase Twinkle, in its helicase domain. However, no mitochondrial dysfunction has been found in this disease. We studied here the consequences of IOSCA for the central nervous system, as well as the in vitro performance of the IOSCA mutant protein. The results of the mtDNA analyses were compared to findings in a similar juvenile or adult-onset ataxia syndrome, mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS), caused by the W748S mutation in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase (POLG). We show here that IOSCA brain does not harbor mtDNA deletions or increased amount of mtDNA point mutations, whereas MIRAS brain shows multiple deletions of mtDNA. However, IOSCA, and to a lesser extent also MIRAS, show mtDNA depletion in the brain and the liver. In both diseases, especially large neurons show respiratory chain complex I (CI) deficiency, but also CIV is decreased in IOSCA. Helicase activity, hexamerization and nucleoid structure of the IOSCA mutant were, however, unaffected. The lack of in vitro helicase defect or cell culture phenotype suggest that Twinkle-Y508C dysfunction affects mtDNA maintenance in a highly context and cell-type specific manner. Our results indicate that IOSCA is a new member of the mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes.

  10. Comparative mitochondrial proteomics: perspective in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitochondria are the most complex and the most important organelles of eukaryotic cells, which are involved in many cellular processes, including energy metabolism, apoptosis, and aging. And mitochondria have been identified as the "hot spot" by researchers for exploring relevant associated dysfunctions in many fields. The emergence of comparative proteomics enables us to have a close look at the mitochondrial proteome in a comprehensive and effective manner under various conditions and cellular circumstances. Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry is still the most popular techniques to study comparative mitochondrial proteomics. Furthermore, many new techniques, such as ICAT, MudPIT, and SILAC, equip researchers with more flexibilities inselecting proper methods. This article also reviews the recent development of comparative mitochondrial proteomics on diverse human diseases. And the results of mitochondrial proteomics enhance a better understanding of the pathogenesis associated with mitochondria and provide promising therapeutic targets.

  11. Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (mdivi-1) enhances death receptor-mediated apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingnan; Hansen, Karyn; Edwards, Robert; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based strategy is a promising targeted therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of cancers including ovarian cancer. However, the inherent or acquired resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL limits the potential application of TRAIL-mediated therapy. In this study, we identified that mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (mdivi-1) is able to enhance the sensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells to death receptor ligands including TRAIL, FAS ligands, and TNF-α. Importantly, the combination of TRAIL and mdivi-1 has no apparent cytotoxic effect on non-transformed human cells, indicating a significant therapeutic window. We identified that caspase-8 and not the modulation of TRAIL receptors is required for the combination effect of TRAIL and mdivi-1. We further demonstrated that the enhanced efficacy of combination of mdivi-1 and death ligands is not dependent on the originally reported target of mdivi-1, Drp1, and is also not dependent on the two important pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak. Thus, our study presents a novel strategy in enhancing the apoptotic effect of death receptor ligands and provides a new effective TRAIL-based combination approach for treating human ovarian cancer. PMID:25446129

  12. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  13. Simple, complex and hyper-complex understanding - enhanced sensitivity in observation of information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bering Keiding, Tina

      In Erkentniss als Konstruktion Luhmann formulates 5 conditions which one must pay attention to in production of (scientific) knowledge. The conditions are formulated in general terms. They rather pin points what must be keep in mind in empirical research, than prescribe strategies for construct......  In Erkentniss als Konstruktion Luhmann formulates 5 conditions which one must pay attention to in production of (scientific) knowledge. The conditions are formulated in general terms. They rather pin points what must be keep in mind in empirical research, than prescribe strategies...... for construction and analysis of empirical information. A quick overview on empirical research drawing on Luhmann reveals a diverse complex of analytical strategies and empirical methods. Despite differences between strategies and methods they have in common that understanding of uttered information is crucial...... enhanced transparency in selection of understanding as well as enhanced sensitivity and definition in dept. The contribution suggest that we distinguish between three types of understanding; simple, complex and hyper-complex understanding. Simple understanding is the simultaneous selection of understanding...

  14. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Images PMID:6432847

  15. Enhancement of space plasma images by complex wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vitor Moura; Domingues, Margarete Oliveira; Mendes, Odim, E-mail: vitor.souza@inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pagamisse, Aylton [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Fav. de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Stenborg, Guilhermo Adrian [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The Sun is a natural laboratory for plasma processes. A myriad of instruments aboard satellites and on ground record(ed) the plasma emission in different ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum to help understand such processes. In particular, in the outer part of the solar atmosphere, the solar corona, we can observe a multitude of electrodynamical phenomena. There, the faint corona emission and the associated dynamic plasma structures (e.g., coronal mass ejections - CMEs) recorded in white light images can be used as basis for some insight of this physical scenario. In order to characterize the dynamics and morphology of such structures in a better way, it seems crucial that some features of those images should be enhanced. To deal with this need, a new approach using a complex wavelet transform methodology was developed. With the proposed methodology, we can highlight the plasma ejections improving the identification of those structures. (author)

  16. Nuclear expression of mitochondrial ND4 leads to the protein assembling in complex I and prevents optic atrophy and visual loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Cwerman-Thibault

    Full Text Available Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is due to mitochondrial DNA mutations; in ∼70% of all cases, a point mutation in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4, ND4, gene leads to central vision loss. We optimized allotopic expression (nuclear transcription of a gene that is normally transcribed inside the mitochondria aimed at designing a gene therapy for ND4; its coding sequence was associated with the cis-acting elements of the human COX10 mRNA to allow the efficient mitochondrial delivery of the protein. After ocular administration to adult rats of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector containing the human ND4 gene, we demonstrated that: (i the sustained expression of human ND4 did not lead to harmful effects, instead the human protein is efficiently imported inside the mitochondria and assembled in respiratory chain complex I; (ii the presence of the human protein in the experimental model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy significantly prevents retinal ganglion cell degeneration and preserves both complex I function in optic nerves and visual function. Hence, the use of optimized allotopic expression is relevant for treating mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in the organelle genome.

  17. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Tae-Boo [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seok-Il [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jae-Youn [Laboratory of Modulation of Radiobiological Responses, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Gyu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Han, E-mail: yhlee87@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  18. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist or N-acetylcysteine combined with omeprazol protect against mitochondrial complex II inhibition in a rat model of gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Petronilho, Fabricia C; Araújo, João H; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Cardoso, Mariane R; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-03-01

    The pathophysiology of gastritis involves an imbalance between gastric acid attack and mucosal defence. In addition, the gastric mucosal injury results in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Several studies have shown the association of mitochondrial disorders with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activity in the stomach of rats with gastritis induced by indomethacin (IDM) and treated with omeprazole (OM), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist RC-3095. Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, NAC, RC-3095, combination of OM plus RC-3095, OM plus NAC and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24 hr; IDM was administered. The rats were killed 6 hr later, and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and respiratory chain activity. Our results showed that complex I and IV activities were not affected by administration of IDM. On the other hand, complex II and III activities were inhibited. In addition, OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC did not reverse complex II activity inhibition. However, the complex III activity inhibition was reversed only with the combined use of OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC. Our results are in agreement with previous studies indicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract disease and we suggest that GRPR antagonism might be a novel therapeutic strategy in gastritis. © 2010 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2010 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  19. Nuclear markers support the mitochondrial phylogeny of Vipera ursinii-renardi complex (Squamata: Viperidae) and species status for the Greek meadow viper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizsei, Edvárd; Jablonski, Daniel; Roussos, Stephanos A; Dimaki, Maria; Ioannidis, Yannis; Nilson, Göran; Nagy, Zoltán T

    2017-01-31

    Meadow vipers (Vipera ursinii-renardi complex) are small-bodied snakes that live in either lowland grasslands or montane subalpine-alpine meadows spanning a distribution from France to western China. This complex has previously been the focus of several taxonomic studies which were based mainly on morphological, allozyme or immunological characters and did not clearly resolve the relationships between the various taxa. Recent mitochondrial DNA analyses found unexpected relationships within the complex which had taxonomical consequences for the detected lineages. The most surprising was the basal phylogenetic position of Vipera ursinii graeca, a taxon described almost 30 years ago from the mountains of Greece. We present here new analyses of three nuclear markers (BDNF, NT3, PRLR; a first for studies of meadow and steppe vipers) as well as analyses of newly obtained mitochondrial DNA sequences (CYT B, ND4).Our Bayesian analyses of nuclear sequences are concordant with previous studies of mitochondrial DNA, in that the phylogenetic position of the graeca clade is a clearly distinguished and distinct lineage separated from all other taxa in the complex. These phylogenetic results are also supported by a distinct morphology, ecology and isolated distribution of this unique taxon. Based on several data sets and an integrative species concept we recommend to elevate this taxon to species level: Vipera graeca Nilson & Andrén, 1988 stat. nov.

  20. Genetic variability of Echinococcus granulosus complex in various geographical populations of Iran inferred by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotin, Adel; Mahami-Oskouei, Mahmoud; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Baratchian, Mehdi; Bordbar, Ali; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the genetic variability and population structure of Echinococcus granulosus complex, 79 isolates were sequenced from different host species covering human, dog, camel, goat, sheep and cattle as of various geographical sub-populations of Iran (Northwestern, Northern, and Southeastern). In addition, 36 sequences of other geographical populations (Western, Southeastern and Central Iran), were directly retrieved from GenBank database for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene. The confirmed isolates were grouped as G1 genotype (n=92), G6 genotype (n=14), G3 genotype (n=8) and G2 genotype (n=1). 50 unique haplotypes were identified based on the analyzed sequences of cox1. A parsimonious network of the sequence haplotypes displayed star-like features in the overall population containing IR23 (22: 19.1%) as the most common haplotype. According to the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) test, the high value of haplotype diversity of E. granulosus complex was shown the total genetic variability within populations while nucleotide diversity was low in all populations. Neutrality indices of the cox1 (Tajima's D and Fu's Fs tests) were shown negative values in Western-Northwestern, Northern and Southeastern populations which indicating significant divergence from neutrality and positive but not significant in Central isolates. A pairwise fixation index (Fst) as a degree of gene flow was generally low value for all populations (0.00647-0.15198). The statistically Fst values indicate that Echinococcus sensu stricto (genotype G1-G3) populations are not genetically well differentiated in various geographical regions of Iran. To appraise the hypothetical evolutionary scenario, further study is needed to analyze concatenated mitogenomes and as well a panel of single locus nuclear markers should be considered in wider areas of Iran and neighboring countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Complex Role of the Mitochondrial Targeting Signal in the Function of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Revealed by Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Transgenesis in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Goro; Ishii, Tomohiro; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Jo, Youngah; Bahat, Assaf; Orly, Joseph; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Parker, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) stimulates the regulated production of steroid hormones in the adrenal cortex and gonads by facilitating the delivery of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane. To explore key aspects of StAR function within bona fide steroidogenic cells, we used a transgenic mouse model to explore the function of StAR proteins in vivo. We first validated this transgenic bacterial artificial chromosome reconstitution system by targeting enhanced green...

  2. Evaluation by blue native polyacrylamide electrophoresis colorimetric staining of the effects of physical exercise on the activities of mitochondrial complexes in rat muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnar A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Blue native polyacrylamide electrophoresis (BN-PAGE is a technique developed for the analysis of membrane complexes. Combined with histochemical staining, it permits the analysis and quantification of the activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation enzymes using whole muscle homogenates, without the need to isolate muscle mitochondria. Mitochondrial complex activities were measured by emerging gels in a solution containing all specific substrates for NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase enzymes (complexes I and IV, respectively and the colored bands obtained were measured by optique densitometry. The objective of the present study was the application of BN-PAGE colorimetric staining for enzymatic characterization of mitochondrial complexes I and IV in rat muscles with different morphological and biochemical properties. We also investigated these activities at different times after acute exercise of rat soleus muscle. Although having fewer mitochondria than oxidative muscles, white gastrocnemius muscle presented a significantly higher activity (26.7 ± 9.5 in terms of complex I/V ratio compared to the red gastrocnemius (3.8 ± 0.65, P < 0.05 and soleus (9.8 ± 0.9, P < 0.001 muscles. Furthermore, the complex IV/V ratio of white gastrocnemius muscle was always significantly higher when compared to the other muscles. Ninety-five minutes of exhaustive physical exercise induced a decrease in complex I/V and complex IV/V ratios after all resting times (0, 3 and 6 h compared to control (P < 0.05, probably reflecting the oxidative damage due to increasing free radical production in mitochondria. These results demonstrate the possible and useful application of BN-PAGE-histochemical staining to physical exercise studies.

  3. Multiparameter metabolic analysis reveals a close link between attenuated mitochondrial bioenergetic function and enhanced glycolysis dependency in human tumor cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Min Wu; Andy Neilson; Amy L. Swift; Rebecca Moran; James Tamagnine; Diane Parslow; Suzanne Armistead; Kristie Lemire; Jim Orrell; Jay Teich; Steve Chomicz; David A. Ferrick

    .... Using a novel approach to measure cellular metabolic rates in vitro, the bioenergetic basis of this increased glycolysis and reduced mitochondrial respiration was investigated in two human cancer...

  4. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  5. Enhancement of FSO communications links under complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnajjar, Satea H.; Noori, Ammar A.; Moosa, Arwa A.

    2017-06-01

    Free space optical communication is a line-of-sight (LOS) technology that uses lasers to provide optical bandwidth connections. Potential disturbance arising from the weather condition is one of the most effective factors that influence the bi-directional free space optics (FSO) performance. The complex weather condition in the Middle East region and Arabian Gulf has been dominated by dust storms activities. Dust storms directly affect the characteristics of FSO and consequently lead to an increase in the bit error rate (BER) and deterioration Q-factor to bad levels due to the high attenuation factor. In this research, the authors compare the differences between two bi-directional FSOs. One is the traditional link, and the other has been developed to enhance the system performance under the dust storms condition. The proposed design consists of dual FSO channels, and each one includes erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) optical amplifiers. This design has demonstrated the proficiency in addressing the attenuation that occurs due to weather stickers. The results prove there is an improvement in performance by measuring the Q-factor. In addition, BER can be significantly improved, and further communicating distance can be achieved by utilizing 1550 nm with multiple channels and EDFA.

  6. Solar upconversion with plasmon-enhanced bimolecular complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, Jennifer [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-04-14

    Upconversion of sub-bandgap photons is a promising approach to exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit in solar technologies. However, due to the low quantum efficiencies and narrow absorption bandwidths of upconverters, existing systems have only led to fractional percent improvements in photovoltaic devices (~0.01%). In this project, we aimed to develop an efficient upconverting material that could improve cell efficiencies by at least one absolute percent. To achieve this goal, we first used thermodynamic calculations to determine cell efficiencies with realistic upconverting materials. Then, we designed, synthesized, and characterized nanoantennas that promise >100x enhancement in both the upconverter absorption cross-section and emissive radiative rate. Concurrently, we optimized the upconverer by designing new ionic and molecular complexes that promise efficient solid-state upconversion. Lastly, with Bosch, we simulated record-efficiency semi-transparent cells that will allow for ready incorporation of our upconverting materials. While we were not successful in designing record efficiency upconverters during our three years of funding, we gained significant insight into the existing limitations of upconverters and how to best address these challenges. Ongoing work is aimed at addressing these limitations, to make upconversion a cost-competitive solar technology in future years.

  7. Data showing the compositional complexity of the mitochondrial proteome of a unicellular eukaryote (Acanthamoeba castellanii, supergroup Amoebozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawryluk, Ryan M R; Chisholm, Kenneth A; Pinto, Devanand M; Gray, Michael W

    2014-12-01

    This article describes and directly links to 1033 Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial protein sequences. Of these, 709 are supported by Mass Spectrometry (MS) data (676 nucleus-encoded and 33 mitochondrion-encoded). Two of these entries are previously unannotated mtDNA-encoded proteins, which we identify as highly divergent mitochondrial ribosomal proteins. Our analysis corrects many A. castellanii protein sequences that were incorrectly inferred previously from genomic data deposited in NCBI.

  8. Non-invasive evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates for cerebral infarction by PET imaging of mitochondrial complex-I activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Ishii, Takayuki; Koide, Hiroyuki; Kiyokawa, Chiaki; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Harada, Norihiro; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2016-07-01

    The development of a diagnostic technology that can accurately determine the pathological progression of ischemic stroke and evaluate the therapeutic effects of cerebroprotective agents has been desired. We previously developed a novel PET probe, 2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-18F-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one ([18F]BCPP-EF) for detecting activity of mitochondrial complex I (MC-I). This probe was shown to visualize neuronal damage in the living brain of rodent and primate models of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, [18F]BCPP-EF was applied to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a neuroprotectant, liposomal FK506 (FK506-liposomes), on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The PET imaging using [18F]BCPP-EF showed a prominent reduction in the MC-I activity in the ischemic brain hemisphere. Treatment with FK506-liposomes remarkably increased the uptake of [18F]BCPP-EF in the ischemic side corresponding to the improvement of blood flow disorders and motor function deficits throughout the 7 days after I/R. Additionally, the PET scan could diagnose the extent of the brain damage accurately and showed the neuroprotective effect of FK506-liposomes at Day 7, at which 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining couldn’t visualize them. Our study demonstrated that the PET technology using [18F]BCPP-EF has a potent capacity to evaluate the therapeutic effect of drug candidates in living brain.

  9. Depleted energy charge and increased pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by mitochondrial complex I inhibition are mitigated by coenzyme Q1 in the isolated perfused rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Robert D; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Audi, Said H; Zhang, Xiao; Lindemer, Brian J; Townsley, Mary I; Merker, Marilyn P

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with various forms of lung injury and disease that also involve alterations in pulmonary endothelial permeability, but the relationship, if any, between the two is not well understood. This question was addressed by perfusing isolated intact rat lung with a buffered physiological saline solution in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (20 μM). Compared to control, rotenone depressed whole lung tissue ATP from 5.66 ± 0.46 (SEM) to 2.34 ± 0.15 µmol · g(-1) dry lung, with concomitant increases in the ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios. Rotenone also increased lung perfusate lactate (from 12.36 ± 1.64 to 38.62 ± 3.14 µmol · 15 min(-1) perfusion · g(-1) dry lung) and the lactate:pyruvate ratio, but had no detectable impact on lung tissue GSH:GSSG redox status. The amphipathic quinone coenzyme Q1 (CoQ1; 50 μM) mitigated the impact of rotenone on the adenine nucleotide balance, wherein mitigation was blocked by NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 or mitochondrial complex III inhibitors. In separate studies, rotenone increased the pulmonary vascular endothelial filtration coefficient (Kf) from 0.043 ± 0.010 to 0.156 ± 0.037 ml · min(-1) · cm H2O(-1) · g(-1) dry lung, and CoQ1 protected against the effect of rotenone on Kf. A second complex I inhibitor, piericidin A, qualitatively reproduced the impact of rotenone on Kf and the lactate:pyruvate ratio. Taken together, the observations imply that pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity depends on mitochondrial bioenergetics as reflected in lung tissue ATP levels and that compensatory activation of whole lung glycolysis cannot protect against pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability in response to mitochondrial blockade. The study further suggests that low-molecular-weight amphipathic quinones may have therapeutic utility in protecting lung barrier function in mitochondrial insufficiency. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Depleted energy charge and increased pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by mitochondrial complex I inhibition are mitigated by coenzyme Q1 in the isolated perfused rat lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Robert D.; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Audi, Said H.; Zhang, Xiao; Lindemer, Brian J.; Townsley, Mary I.; Merker, Marilyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with various forms of lung injury and disease that also involve alterations in pulmonary endothelial permeability, but the relationship, if any, between the two is not well understood. This question was addressed by perfusing the isolated intact rat lung with a buffered physiological saline solution in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (20 uM). As compared to control, rotenone depressed whole lung tissue ATP from 5.66 ± 0.46 (SEM) to 2.34 ± 0.15 (SEM) μmol·gram−1 dry lung, with concomitant increases in the ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios. Rotenone also increased lung perfusate lactate (from 12.36 ± 1.64 (SEM) to 38.62 ± 3.14 μmol·15 min−1 perfusion·gm−1 dry lung) and the lactate:pyruvate ratio, but had no detectable impact on lung tissue GSH:GSSG redox status. The amphipathic quinone, coenzyme Q1 (CoQ1; 50 μM) mitigated the impact of rotenone on the adenine nucleotide balance, wherein mitigation was blocked by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) or mitochondrial complex III inhibitors. In separate studies, rotenone increased the pulmonary vascular endothelial filtration coefficient (Kf) from 0.043 ± 0.010 (SEM) to 0.156 ± 0.037 (SEM) ml·min−1·cm H2O−1·gm−1 dry lung weight, and CoQ1 protected against the effect of rotenone on Kf. A second complex I inhibitor, piericidin A, qualitatively reproduced the impact of rotenone on Kf and the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Taken together, the observations imply that pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity depends on mitochondrial bioenergetics as reflected in lung tissue ATP levels and that compensatory activation of whole lung glycolysis cannot protect against pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability in response to mitochondrial blockade. The study further suggests that low molecular weight amphipathic quinones may have therapeutic utility in protecting lung barrier function in mitochondrial insufficiency. PMID:23912160

  11. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  12. PPAR{delta} is a fatty acid sensor, which enhances mitochondrial oxidation in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Frigerio, Francesca; Boergesen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    is the PPAR subtype expressed at the highest level in insulinoma cells and rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, PPARdelta displays high transcriptional activity and acts in pronounced synergy with RXR. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids mimic the effects of synthetic PPARdelta agonists. Using shRNA......-mediated knockdown we demonstrate that the ability of unsaturated fatty acids to stimulate fatty acid metabolism is dependent on PPARdelta. Activation of PPARdelta increases the fatty acid oxidation potential in INS-1E beta-cells, enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from islets, and protects GSIS...

  13. Vimar Is a Novel Regulator of Mitochondrial Fission through Miro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianggong Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As fundamental processes in mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fusion, fission and transport are regulated by several core components, including Miro. As an atypical Rho-like small GTPase with high molecular mass, the exchange of GDP/GTP in Miro may require assistance from a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF. However, the GEF for Miro has not been identified. While studying mitochondrial morphology in Drosophila, we incidentally observed that the loss of vimar, a gene encoding an atypical GEF, enhanced mitochondrial fission under normal physiological conditions. Because Vimar could co-immunoprecipitate with Miro in vitro, we speculated that Vimar might be the GEF of Miro. In support of this hypothesis, a loss-of-function (LOF vimar mutant rescued mitochondrial enlargement induced by a gain-of-function (GOF Miro transgene; whereas a GOF vimar transgene enhanced Miro function. In addition, vimar lost its effect under the expression of a constitutively GTP-bound or GDP-bound Miro mutant background. These results indicate a genetic dependence of vimar on Miro. Moreover, we found that mitochondrial fission played a functional role in high-calcium induced necrosis, and a LOF vimar mutant rescued the mitochondrial fission defect and cell death. This result can also be explained by vimar's function through Miro, because Miro's effect on mitochondrial morphology is altered upon binding with calcium. In addition, a PINK1 mutant, which induced mitochondrial enlargement and had been considered as a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease (PD, caused fly muscle defects, and the loss of vimar could rescue these defects. Furthermore, we found that the mammalian homolog of Vimar, RAP1GDS1, played a similar role in regulating mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a functional conservation of this GEF member. The Miro/Vimar complex may be a promising drug target for diseases in which mitochondrial fission and fusion are dysfunctional.

  14. Mitochondrial complex I deficiency leads to the retardation of early embryonic development in Ndufs4 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The NDUFS4 gene encodes an 18-kD subunit of mitochondria complex I, and mutations in this gene lead to the development of a severe neurodegenerative disease called Leigh syndrome (LS in humans. To investigate the disease phenotypes and molecular mechanisms of Leigh syndrome, the Ndufs4 knockout (KO mouse has been widely used as a novel animal model. Because the homozygotes cannot survive beyond child-bearing age, whether Ndufs4 and mitochondrial complex I influence early embryonic development remains unknown. In our study, we attempted to investigate embryonic development in Ndufs4 KO mice, which can be regarded as a Leigh disease model and were created through the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat and Cas9 (CRISPR associated-mediated genome editing system. Methods We first designed a single guide RNA (sgRNA targeting exon 2 of Ndufs4 to delete the NDUFS4 protein in mouse embryos to mimic Leigh syndrome. Then, we described the phenotypes of our mouse model by forced swimming and the open-field test as well as by assessing other behavioral characteristics. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI was performed to obtain KO embryos to test the influence of NDUFS4 deletion on early embryonic development. Results In this study, we first generated Ndufs4 KO mice with physical and behavioral phenotypes similar to Leigh syndrome using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The low developmental rate of KO embryos that were derived from knockout gametes indicated that the absence of NDUFS4 impaired the development of preimplantation embryos. Discussion In this paper, we first obtained Ndufs4 KO mice that could mimic Leigh syndrome using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Then, we identified the role of NDUFS4 in early embryonic development, shedding light on its roles in the respiratory chain and fertility. Our model provides a useful tool with which to investigate the function of Ndufs4. Although the pathological mechanisms of the disease

  15. Mitochondrial complex I deficiency leads to the retardation of early embryonic development in Ndufs4 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Huang, Ya-Ping; Wu, Han; Song, Ke; Wan, Cong; Chi, A-Ni; Xiao, Ya-Mei; Zhao, Xiao-Yang

    2017-01-01

    The NDUFS4 gene encodes an 18-kD subunit of mitochondria complex I, and mutations in this gene lead to the development of a severe neurodegenerative disease called Leigh syndrome (LS) in humans. To investigate the disease phenotypes and molecular mechanisms of Leigh syndrome, the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse has been widely used as a novel animal model. Because the homozygotes cannot survive beyond child-bearing age, whether Ndufs4 and mitochondrial complex I influence early embryonic development remains unknown. In our study, we attempted to investigate embryonic development in Ndufs4 KO mice, which can be regarded as a Leigh disease model and were created through the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) and Cas9 (CRISPR associated)-mediated genome editing system. We first designed a single guide RNA (sgRNA) targeting exon 2 of Ndufs4 to delete the NDUFS4 protein in mouse embryos to mimic Leigh syndrome. Then, we described the phenotypes of our mouse model by forced swimming and the open-field test as well as by assessing other behavioral characteristics. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was performed to obtain KO embryos to test the influence of NDUFS4 deletion on early embryonic development. In this study, we first generated Ndufs4 KO mice with physical and behavioral phenotypes similar to Leigh syndrome using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The low developmental rate of KO embryos that were derived from knockout gametes indicated that the absence of NDUFS4 impaired the development of preimplantation embryos. In this paper, we first obtained Ndufs4 KO mice that could mimic Leigh syndrome using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Then, we identified the role of NDUFS4 in early embryonic development, shedding light on its roles in the respiratory chain and fertility. Our model provides a useful tool with which to investigate the function of Ndufs4. Although the pathological mechanisms of the disease need to be discovered, it helps to understand the

  16. Failure of Isoflurane Cardiac Preconditioning in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Mice Involves Aberrant Regulation of MicroRNA-21, Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase, and Mitochondrial Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhi-Dong; Li, Yingchuan; Qiao, Shigang; Bai, Xiaowen; Warltier, David C; Kersten, Judy R; Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Liang, Mingyu

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes impairs the cardioprotective effect of volatile anesthetics, yet the mechanisms are still murky. We examined the regulatory effect of isoflurane on microRNA-21, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, and mitochondrial respiratory complex I in type 2 diabetic mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was produced in obese type 2 diabetic (db/db) and C57BL/6 control mice ex vivo in the presence or absence of isoflurane administered before ischemia. Cardiac microRNA-21 was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction. The dimers and monomers of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase were measured by Western blot analysis. Mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence was determined in Langendorff-perfused hearts. Body weight and fasting blood glucose were greater in db/db than C57BL/6 mice. Isoflurane decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 35 ± 8 mmHg in control to 23 ± 9 mmHg (P = 0.019, n = 8 mice/group, mean ± SD) and elevated ±dP/dt 2 h after post-ischemic reperfusion in C57BL/6 mice. These beneficial effects of isoflurane were lost in db/db mice. Isoflurane elevated microRNA-21 and the ratio of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase dimers/monomers and decreased mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels 5 min after ischemia in C57BL/6 but not db/db mice. MicroRNA-21 knockout blocked these favorable effects of isoflurane, whereas endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout had no effect on the expression of microRNA-21 but blocked the inhibitory effect of isoflurane preconditioning on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Failure of isoflurane cardiac preconditioning in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice is associated with aberrant regulation of microRNA-21, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, and mitochondrial respiratory complex I.

  17. Palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex formulation enhances activities of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases and respiratory complexes I-IV in the heart of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K; Krishnan, C V

    2009-08-01

    Age-related decline in the capacity to withstand stress, such as ischemia and reperfusion, results in congestive heart failure. Though the mechanisms underlying cardiac decay are not clear, age dependent somatic damages to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), loss of mitochondrial function, and a resultant increase in oxidative stress in heart muscle cells may be responsible for the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The effect of a safe nutritional supplement, POLY-MVA, containing the active ingredient palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex, was evaluated on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV in heart mitochondria of aged male albino rats of Wistar strain. Administration of 0.05 ml/kg of POLY-MVA (which is equivalent to 0.38 mg complexed alpha-lipoic acid/kg, p.o), once daily for 30 days, was significantly (pKrebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. The unique electronic and redox properties of palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex appear to be a key to this physiological effectiveness. The results strongly suggest that this formulation might be effective to protect the aging associated risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Dimebon ameliorates amyloid-β induced impairments of mitochondrial form and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Schamim H; Eckmann, Janett; Renner, Kathrin; Eckert, Gunter P; Leuner, Kristina; Muller, Walter E

    2012-01-01

    Due to their role in producing energy, as major sources of free radicals, and as critical regulators of apoptosis, mitochondria play a dominant role in the central nervous system (CNS). Mitochondrial dysfunction represents one major pathomechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including impaired function of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and deficits of mitochondrial dynamics, such as impaired balance between fission and fusion mechanisms and reduced mitochondrial trafficking. Major consequences are enhanced depletion of mitochondria in axons and dendrites, synaptic dysfunction, and finally neuronal loss. Interfering with impaired mitochondrial dynamics has been proposed as novel strategy for antidementia drugs. Dimebon has been shown to improve cognition in animal models and seems to be beneficial in AD patients. Regardless of the final proof of Dimebon's clinical efficacy, it might specifically interfere with mechanisms relevant for the cognitive decline, especially by improving impaired mitochondrial function and/or dynamics in AD. Herein, we tested the effects of Dimebon on mitochondrial function and dynamics in a cellular model, overexpressing neurotoxic Aβ peptides, one of the hallmarks of AD. Dimebon exerted pronounced effects on mitochondrial morphology, respiratory chain complex activities, and enlarged mitochondrial mass. In summary, form and function of mitochondria are altered in the Aβ overexpressing cell model and precisely those changes are restored by nanomolar Dimebon treatment. Our findings support the idea that Dimebon improves mitochondrial function and that these "disease specific" effects might be relevant for interpretation and planning of future clinical trials.

  19. ATM-mediated mitochondrial damage response triggered by nuclear DNA damage in normal human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Sasatani, Megumi; Kawai, Hidehiko; Kamiya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junya; Komatsu, Kenshi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2017-11-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) elevates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in response to the energy requirement for DNA damage responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) released during mitochondrial OXPHOS may cause oxidative damage to mitochondria in irradiated cells. In this paper, we investigated the association between nuclear DNA damage and mitochondrial damage following IR in normal human lung fibroblasts. In contrast to low-doses of acute single radiation, continuous exposure of chronic radiation or long-term exposure of fractionated radiation (FR) induced persistent Rad51 and γ-H2AX foci at least 24 hours after IR in irradiated cells. Additionally, long-term FR increased mitochondrial ROS accompanied with enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) activity. Mitochondrial ROS released from the respiratory chain complex I caused oxidative damage to mitochondria. Inhibition of ATM kinase or ATM loss eliminated nuclear DNA damage recognition and mitochondrial radiation responses. Consequently, nuclear DNA damage activates ATM which in turn increases ROS level and subsequently induces mitochondrial damage in irradiated cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that ATM is essential in the mitochondrial radiation responses in irradiated cells. We further demonstrated that ATM is involved in signal transduction from nucleus to the mitochondria in response to IR.

  20. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse

  1. Complex anxiety disorders : Risk factors, underlying mechanisms, and treatment enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to address lacunas in the current knowledge of complex anxiety disorders. This is an important topic since complex anxiety disorders tend to develop a chronic course and because current guidelines are incomplete. In this thesis, several studies are presented regarding the various

  2. Mitochondrial synapses: intracellular communication and signal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Communication is a central theme in biology. Consequently, specialized structures have evolved to permit rapid communication among cells, tissues, organs, and physiological systems, thus enhancing the overall function and adaptation of the organism. A prime example is the neuronal synapse. In the brain, synaptic communication establishes neuronal networks with the capacity to integrate, process, and store information, giving rise to complex output signals capable of orchestrating functions across the organism. At the intracellular level, discoveries now reveal the existence of 'mitochondrial synapses' establishing mitochondrial networks, with defined chromatin-modifying mitochondrial output signals capable of orchestrating gene expression across the genome. These discoveries raise the possibility that in addition to their role as powerhouses and neuromodulators, mitochondria behave as intracellular signal-processing networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion...

  4. Nitric Oxide Regulation of Mitochondrial Processes: Commonality in Medical Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-07-16

    The vital status of diverse classes of eukaryotic mitochondria is reflected by the high degree of evolutionary modification functionally linked to ongoing multifaceted organelle development. From this teleological perspective, a logistical enhancement of eukaryotic cellular energy requirements indicates a convergence of metabolic processes within the mitochondrial matrix for optimal synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate and necessitates an evolutionarily driven retrofit of the primordial endosymbiont bacterial plasma membrane into the inner mitochondrial membrane. The biochemical complexity of eukaryotic inner membrane electron transport complexes linked to temporally-defined, state-dependent, fluctuations in mitochondrial oxygen utilization is capable of generating deleterious reactive oxygen species. Within this functional context, an extensive neurochemical literature supports the role of the free radical gas nitric oxide (NO) as a key signaling molecule involved in the regulation of multiple aspects of mitochondrial respiration/oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, the unique chemical properties of NO underlie its rapid metabolism in vivo within a mechanistic spectrum of small oxidative molecules, free and protein-bound thiol adducts, and reversible binding to ferrous heme iron centers. Recent compelling work has identified a medically relevant dual regulation pathway for mitochondrial NO expression mediated by traditionally characterized NO synthases (NOS) and by enzymatic reduction of available cellular nitrite pools by a diverse class of cytosolic and mitochondrial nitrite reductases. Accordingly, our short review presents selected medically-based discussion topics relating to multi-faceted NO regulation of mitochondrial functions in human health and disease states.

  5. Disease-causing mutations affecting surface residues of mitochondrial glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase impair stability, heteromeric complex formation and mitochondria architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiesing, Jessica; Lohmöller, Benjamin; Schweizer, Michaela; Tidow, Henning; Gersting, Søren W; Muntau, Ania C; Braulke, Thomas; Mühlhausen, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The neurometabolic disorder glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding the mitochondrial matrix protein glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH), which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes. Twenty percent of all pathogenic mutations affect single amino acid residues on the surface of GCDH resulting in a severe clinical phenotype. We report here on heterologous expression studies of 18 missense mutations identified in GA1 patients affecting surface amino acids. Western blot and pulse chase experiments revealed that the stability of half of the GCDH mutants was significantly reduced. In silico analyses showed that none of the mutations impaired the 3D structure of GCDH. Immunofluorescence co-localisation studies in HeLa cells demonstrated that all GCDH mutants were correctly translocated into mitochondria. Surprisingly, the expression of p.Arg88Cys GCDH as well as further substitutions by alanine, lysine, or methionine but not histidine or leucine resulted in the disruption of mitochondrial architecture forming longitudinal structures composed of stacks of cristae and partial loss of the outer mitochondrial membrane. The expression of mitochondrial fusion or fission proteins was not affected in these cells. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analyses revealed that all GCDH mutants exhibit an increased binding affinity to electron transfer flavoprotein beta, whereas only p.Tyr155His GCDH showed a reduced interaction with dihydrolipoamide succinyl transferase. Our data underscore the impact of GCDH protein interactions mediated by amino acid residues on the surface of GCDH required for proper enzymatic activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  7. Chrysin as an Anti-Cancer Agent Exerts Selective Toxicity by Directly Inhibiting Mitochondrial Complex II and V in CLL B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Ahmad; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Seydi, Enayatollah; Sadeghi, Leila; Mohseni, Alireza; Pirahmadi, Nahal; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-03-16

    We investigated the effect of chrysin on isolated normal and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-lymphocytes and their isolated mitochondria. We report that a selective and significant increase in cytotoxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, ADP/ATP ratio, caspase 3 activation and finally apoptosis in chrysin-treated CLL B- lymphocytes. Also we determined that chrysin selectively inhibits complex II and ATPases in cancerous mitochondria. In this study we proved that the ability of chrysin to promote apoptosis in CLL B-lymphocytes performed by selectively targeting of mitochondria. Our findings may provide a potential therapeutic approach for using chrysin to target mitochondria in CLL B-lymphocytes.

  8. Enhancement of the nucleosomal pattern in sequences of lower complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Shapiro, Kevin; Trifonov, Edward N.

    1997-01-01

    of a nucleosome database separated according to linguistic complexity. The pattern extracted from the subset of the simpler nucleosome sequences not only possesses all major attributes of the known nucleosomal pattern, but is substantially stronger with respect to amplitude in comparison with the total database......Intuitively, the complexity of a given DNA sequence is related to the number of various superimposed biological messages it contains. Here we assess the expectation that in nucleosome DNA sequences of lower linguistic complexity, the nucleosome DNA positioning pattern would be more pronounced than...... in those of higher linguistic complexity. The nucleosome DNA positioning pattern is one of the weakest (highly degenerate) sequence patterns. It has been extracted recently by specially designed multiple alignment procedures. We applied the most sensitive of these procedures to nearly equal subsets...

  9. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate efficiently kills breast tumour-initiating cells in a complex II-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Bing; Stantic, Marina; Zobalova, Renata; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Stapelberg, Michael; Stursa, Jan; Prokopova, Katerina; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that breast cancer involves tumour-initiating cells (TICs), which play a role in initiation, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and relapse of the disease. Emerging drugs that target TICs are becoming a focus of contemporary research. Mitocans, a group of compounds that induce apoptosis of cancer cells by destabilising their mitochondria, are showing their potential in killing TICs. In this project, we investigated mitochondrially targeted vitamin E s...

  10. How the nucleus and mitochondria communicate in energy production during stress: nuclear MtATP6, an early-stress responsive gene, regulates the mitochondrial F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Ali Asghar; Ebrahimie, Eemaeil; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Babgohari, Mahbobeh Zamani; Deihimi, Tahereh; Djavaheri, Mohammad; Ramezani, Amin

    2013-07-01

    A small number of stress-responsive genes, such as those of the mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase complex, are encoded by both the nucleus and mitochondria. The regulatory mechanism of these joint products is mysterious. The expression of 6-kDa subunit (MtATP6), a relatively uncharacterized nucleus-encoded subunit of F0 part, was measured during salinity stress in salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive cultivated wheat genotypes, as well as in the wild wheat genotypes, Triticum and Aegilops using qRT-PCR. The MtATP6 expression was suddenly induced 3 h after NaCl treatment in all genotypes, indicating an early inducible stress-responsive behavior. Promoter analysis showed that the MtATP6 promoter includes cis-acting elements such as ABRE, MYC, MYB, GTLs, and W-boxes, suggesting a role for this gene in abscisic acid-mediated signaling, energy metabolism, and stress response. It seems that 6-kDa subunit, as an early response gene and nuclear regulatory factor, translocates to mitochondria and completes the F1F0-ATP synthase complex to enhance ATP production and maintain ion homeostasis under stress conditions. These communications between nucleus and mitochondria are required for inducing mitochondrial responses to stress pathways. Dual targeting of 6-kDa subunit may comprise as a mean of inter-organelle communication and save energy for the cell. Interestingly, MtATP6 showed higher and longer expression in the salt-tolerant wheat and the wild genotypes compared to the salt-sensitive genotype. Apparently, salt-sensitive genotypes have lower ATP production efficiency and weaker energy management than wild genotypes; a stress tolerance mechanism that has not been transferred to cultivated genotypes.

  11. Exercise Combined with Rhodiola sacra Supplementation Improves Exercise Capacity and Ameliorates Exhaustive Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage through Enhancement of Mitochondrial Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoshan Dun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence has firmly established that increased exercise capacity (EC is associated with considerable improvements in the survival of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD and that antistress capacity is a prognostic predictor of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with CVD. Previous studies have indicated that aerobic exercise (AE and supplementation with Rhodiola sacra (RS, a natural plant pharmaceutical, improve EC and enable resistance to stress; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study explored the ability of AE and RS, alone or combined, to improve EC and ameliorate exhaustive exercise- (EE- induced stress and elucidate the mechanism involved. We found that AE and RS significantly increased EC in mice and ameliorated EE-induced stress damage in skeletal and cardiac muscles (SCM; furthermore, a synergistic effect was detected for the first time. To our knowledge, the present work is the first to report that AE and RS activate mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, and biogenesis in SCM, both in the resting state and after EE. These data indicate that AE and RS synergistically improve EC in mice and protect SCM from EE-induced stress by enhancing mitochondrial quality control, including the activation of mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, and biogenesis, both at rest and after EE.

  12. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  13. Exome sequencing identifies NFS1 deficiency in a novel Fe-S cluster disease, infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Sali M K; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F; Lahiry, Piya; Siu, Victoria M; Prasad, Chitra; Kronick, Jonathan B; Ramsay, David A; Rupar, C Anthony; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are a class of highly conserved and ubiquitous prosthetic groups with unique chemical properties that allow the proteins that contain them, Fe-S proteins, to assist in various key biochemical pathways. Mutations in Fe-S proteins often disrupt Fe-S cluster assembly leading to a spectrum of severe disorders such as Friedreich's ataxia or iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme (ISCU) myopathy. Herein, we describe infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency, a novel autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by lactic acidemia, hypotonia, respiratory chain complex II and III deficiency, multisystem organ failure and abnormal mitochondria. Through autozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, in silico analyses, population studies and functional tests, we identified c.215G>A, p.Arg72Gln in NFS1 as the likely causative mutation. We describe the first disease in man likely caused by deficiency in NFS1, a cysteine desulfurase that is implicated in respiratory chain function and iron maintenance by initiating Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Our results further demonstrate the importance of sufficient NFS1 expression in human physiology.

  14. Node Attribute-enhanced Community Detection in Complex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Caiyan; Li, Yafang; Carson, Matthew B; Wang, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jian

    2017-05-25

    Community detection involves grouping the nodes of a network such that nodes in the same community are more densely connected to each other than to the rest of the network. Previous studies have focused mainly on identifying communities in networks using node connectivity. However, each node in a network may be associated with many attributes. Identifying communities in networks combining node attributes has become increasingly popular in recent years. Most existing methods operate on networks with attributes of binary, categorical, or numerical type only. In this study, we introduce kNN-enhance, a simple and flexible community detection approach that uses node attribute enhancement. This approach adds the k Nearest Neighbor (kNN) graph of node attributes to alleviate the sparsity and the noise effect of an original network, thereby strengthening the community structure in the network. We use two testing algorithms, kNN-nearest and kNN-Kmeans, to partition the newly generated, attribute-enhanced graph. Our analyses of synthetic and real world networks have shown that the proposed algorithms achieve better performance compared to existing state-of-the-art algorithms. Further, the algorithms are able to deal with networks containing different combinations of binary, categorical, or numerical attributes and could be easily extended to the analysis of massive networks.

  15. Age modulates Fe3O4 nanoparticles liver toxicity: dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and coupling in middle-aged as compared to young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratli, Yosra; Charles, Anne-Laure; Wolff, Valérie; Ben Tahar, Lotfi; Smiri, Leila; Bouitbir, Jamal; Zoll, Joffrey; Sakly, Mohsen; Auger, Cyril; Vogel, Thomas; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Tebourbi, Olfa; Geny, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and mitochondrial coupling in young (3 months) and middle-aged (18 months) rat liver, organ largely involved in body iron detoxification. Isolated liver mitochondria were extracted using differential centrifugations. Maximal oxidative capacities (V(max), complexes I, III, and IV activities), V(succ) (complexes II, III, and IV activities), and V tmpd, (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (V(max)/V0) were determined in controls conditions and after exposure to 250, 300, and 350 μ g/ml Fe3O4 in young and middle-aged rats. In young liver mitochondria, exposure to IONPs did not alter mitochondrial function. In contrast, IONPs dose-dependently impaired all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in middle-aged rat liver: V(max) (from 30 ± 1.6 to 17.9 ± 1.5; P V(succ) (from 33.9 ± 1.7 to 24.3 ± 1.0; P V(tmpd) (from 43.0 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 2.2 µmol O2/min/g protein; P < 0.001) using Fe3O4 350 µg/ml. Mitochondrial coupling also decreased. Interestingly, 350 μ g/ml Fe3O4 in the form of Fe(3+) solution did not impair liver mitochondrial function in middle-aged rats. Thus, IONPs showed a specific toxicity in middle-aged rats suggesting caution when using it in old age.

  16. Age Modulates Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Liver Toxicity: Dose-Dependent Decrease in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complexes Activities and Coupling in Middle-Aged as Compared to Young Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra Baratli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and mitochondrial coupling in young (3 months and middle-aged (18 months rat liver, organ largely involved in body iron detoxification. Isolated liver mitochondria were extracted using differential centrifugations. Maximal oxidative capacities (Vmax, complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, and Vtmpd, (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 were determined in controls conditions and after exposure to 250, 300, and 350 μg/ml Fe3O4 in young and middle-aged rats. In young liver mitochondria, exposure to IONPs did not alter mitochondrial function. In contrast, IONPs dose-dependently impaired all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in middle-aged rat liver: Vmax (from 30 ± 1.6 to 17.9 ± 1.5; P<0.001, Vsucc (from 33.9 ± 1.7 to 24.3 ± 1.0; P<0.01, Vtmpd (from 43.0 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 2.2 µmol O2/min/g protein; P<0.001 using Fe3O4 350 µg/ml. Mitochondrial coupling also decreased. Interestingly, 350 μg/ml Fe3O4 in the form of Fe3+ solution did not impair liver mitochondrial function in middle-aged rats. Thus, IONPs showed a specific toxicity in middle-aged rats suggesting caution when using it in old age.

  17. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  18. Two weeks of metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of AMPK kinase dead but not wild type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Larsen, Steen; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is used as an anti-diabetic drug. Metformin ameliorates insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and skeletal muscle. Reduced mitochondrial content has been reported in type 2 diabetic muscles and it may contribute to decreased insulin sensitivity characteristic for ...

  19. Complex multi-enhancer contacts captured by genome architecture mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagrie, Robert A; Scialdone, Antonio; Schueler, Markus; Kraemer, Dorothee C A; Chotalia, Mita; Xie, Sheila Q; Barbieri, Mariano; de Santiago, Inês; Lavitas, Liron-Mark; Branco, Miguel R; Fraser, James; Dostie, Josée; Game, Laurence; Dillon, Niall; Edwards, Paul A W; Nicodemi, Mario; Pombo, Ana

    2017-03-23

    The organization of the genome in the nucleus and the interactions of genes with their regulatory elements are key features of transcriptional control and their disruption can cause disease. Here we report a genome-wide method, genome architecture mapping (GAM), for measuring chromatin contacts and other features of three-dimensional chromatin topology on the basis of sequencing DNA from a large collection of thin nuclear sections. We apply GAM to mouse embryonic stem cells and identify enrichment for specific interactions between active genes and enhancers across very large genomic distances using a mathematical model termed SLICE (statistical inference of co-segregation). GAM also reveals an abundance of three-way contacts across the genome, especially between regions that are highly transcribed or contain super-enhancers, providing a level of insight into genome architecture that, owing to the technical limitations of current technologies, has previously remained unattainable. Furthermore, GAM highlights a role for gene-expression-specific contacts in organizing the genome in mammalian nuclei.

  20. Mitochondrial aconitase modification, functional inhibition, and evidence for a supramolecular complex of the TCA cycle by the renal toxicant S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Eric A; Gygi, Steven P; Adams, Michael L; Pierce, Robert H; Fausto, Nelson; Aebersold, Ruedi H; Nelson, Sidney D; Bruschi, Sam A

    2002-05-28

    Metabolism of the common industrial gas tetrafluoroethylene in mammals results in the formation of S-(1,1,2,2)-tetrafluoroethyl-L-cysteine (TFEC), which can be bioactivated by a mitochondrial C-S lyase commonly referred to as beta-lyase. The resultant "reactive intermediate", difluorothioacetyl fluoride (DFTAF), is a potent thioalkylating and protein-modifying species. Previously, we have identified mitochondrial HSP70, HSP60, aspartate aminotransferase, and the E2 and E3 subunits of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alphaKGDH) complex as specific proteins structurally modified during this process. Moreover, functional alterations to the alphaKGDH complex were also detected and implicated in the progression of injury. We report here the identification, by tandem mass spectrometry, and functional characterization of the final remaining major protein species modified by DFTAF, previously designated as P99(unk), as mitochondrial aconitase. Aconitase activity was maximally inhibited by 56.5% in renal homogenates after a 6 h exposure to TFEC. In comparison to alphaKGDH, aconitase inhibition (up to 79%) in a cell culture model for TFEC-mediated cytotoxicity was greater and preceded alphaKGDH inhibition, indicating that aconitase modification may constitute an early event in TFEC-mediated mitochondrial damage and cell death. These findings largely define the initial lesion of TFEC-mediated cell death and also have implications for the modeling of mitochondrial enzymatic architecture and the localization and identity of renal mitochondrial cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyase.

  1. Propofol affinity to mitochondrial membranes does not alter mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Luís M; Correia, Fernando; Pinto, Pedro A; Campos, Sónia P; Fernandes, Telma; Videira, Romeu; Oliveira, M M; Peixoto, Francisco P; Antunes, Luís M

    2017-05-15

    The molecular mechanisms of hepatotoxicity after propofol anaesthesia have not been fully elucidated, although there is a relation with mitochondrial dysfunction. The action of propofol on mitochondrial hepatic functions in a rat model was evaluated by infusion for 4h with 25 and 62.5mg/kg/h propofol or 3.125ml/kg/h (vehicle). Liver mitochondrial respiratory rates were evaluated as well as mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ), calcium fluxes, mitochondrial enzymatic activities (Complex I-V) and oxidative stress biomarkers (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, lipid peroxidation and the oxidised/reduced glutathione ratio). Biophysical interactions with membrane models were also performed. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential was decreased and the opening time of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore was slightly reduced for the highest dose. The activity of complex II was stimulated by propofol, which also causes fluctuations on some respiratory parameters, whereas the antioxidant system was affected in a nonspecific manner. Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that propofol is preferably located in deeper regions of the bilayer and has a high affinity to mitochondrial membranes. It is suggested that propofol interacts with liver mitochondrial membranes with mild modification in mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates NF-κB to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics and prevent neuropathy in sensory neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ali; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Smith, Darrell R; Balakrishnan, Savitha; Tessler, Lori; Martens, Corina; Morrow, Dwane; Schartner, Emily; Frizzi, Katie E; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes causes mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons that may contribute to peripheral neuropathy. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes sensory neuron survival and axon regeneration and prevents axonal dwindling, nerve conduction deficits and thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF protects sensory neuron function during diabetes through normalization of impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we investigated whether the NF-κB signal transduction pathway was mobilized by CNTF. Neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons derived from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats was reduced compared to neurons from control rats and exposure to CNTF for 24 h enhanced neurite outgrowth. CNTF also activated NF-κB, as assessed by Western blotting for the NF-κB p50 subunit and reporter assays for NF-κB promoter activity. Conversely, blockade of NF-κB signaling using SN50 peptide inhibited CNTF-mediated neurite outgrowth. Studies in mice with STZ-induced diabetes demonstrated that systemic therapy with CNTF prevented functional indices of peripheral neuropathy along with deficiencies in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) NF-κB p50 expression and DNA binding activity. DRG neurons derived from STZ-diabetic mice also exhibited deficiencies in maximal oxygen consumption rate and associated spare respiratory capacity that were corrected by exposure to CNTF for 24 h in an NF-κB-dependent manner. We propose that the ability of CNTF to enhance axon regeneration and protect peripheral nerve from structural and functional indices of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with targeting of mitochondrial function, in part via NF-κB activation, and improvement of cellular bioenergetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developmental evaluation applying complexity concepts to enhance innovation and use

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2011-01-01

    Developmental evaluation (DE) offers a powerful approach to monitoring and supporting social innovations by working in partnership with program decision makers. In this book, eminent authority Michael Quinn Patton shows how to conduct evaluations within a DE framework. Patton draws on insights about complex dynamic systems, uncertainty, nonlinearity, and emergence. He illustrates how DE can be used for a range of purposes: ongoing program development, adapting effective principles of practice to local contexts, generating innovations and taking them to scale, and facilitating rapid response in crisis situations. Students and practicing evaluators will appreciate the book's extensive case examples and stories, cartoons, clear writing style, "closer look" sidebars, and summary tables. Provided is essential guidance for making evaluations useful, practical, and credible in support of social change.

  4. LHON/MELAS overlap mutation in ND1 subunit of mitochondrial complex I affects ubiquinone binding as revealed by modeling in Escherichia coli NDH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pätsi, Jukka; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Pakanen, Salla; Hinttala, Reetta; Uusimaa, Johanna; Majamaa, Kari; Nyström, Thomas; Kervinen, Marko; Hassinen, Ilmo E

    2012-02-01

    Defects in complex I due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA are associated with clinical features ranging from single organ manifestation like Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) to multiorgan disorders like mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Specific mutations cause overlap syndromes combining several phenotypes, but the mechanisms of their biochemical effects are largely unknown. The m.3376G>A transition leading to p.E24K substitution in ND1 with LHON/MELAS phenotype was modeled here in a homologous position (NuoH-E36K) in the Escherichia coli enzyme and it almost totally abolished complex I activity. The more conservative mutation NuoH-E36Q resulted in higher apparent K(m) for ubiquinone and diminished inhibitor sensitivity. A NuoH homolog of the m.3865A>G transition, which has been found concomitantly in the overlap syndrome patient with the m.3376G>A, had only a minor effect. Consequences of a primary LHON-mutation m.3460G>A affecting the same extramembrane loop as the m.3376G>A substitution were also studied in the E. coli model and were found to be mild. The results indicate that the overlap syndrome-associated m.3376G>A transition in MTND1 is the pathogenic mutation and m.3865A>G transition has minor, if any, effect on presentation of the disease. The kinetic effects of the NuoH-E36Q mutation suggest its proximity to the putative ubiquinone binding domain in 49kD/PSST subunits. In all, m.3376G>A perturbs ubiquinone binding, a phenomenon found in LHON, and decreases the activity of fully assembled complex I as in MELAS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A new disease-related mutation for mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome affects the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lertrit, P.; Noer, A.S.; Kapsa, R.; Marzuki, S. (Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia)); Jean-Francois, M.J.B.; Thyagarajan, D.; Byrne, E. (St. Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)); Dennett, X. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)); Lethlean, K. (Prince Henry Hospital, Sydney (Australia))

    1992-09-01

    The molecular lesions in two patients exhibiting classical clinical manifestations of MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome have been investigated. A recently reported disease-related A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243 of the mtDNA, in the DHU loop of tRNA[sup Leu], was detected by restriction-enzyme analysis of the relevant PCR-amplified segment of the mtDNA of one patient but was not observed, by either restriction-enzyme analysis or nucleotide sequencing, in the other. To define the molecular lesion in the patient who does not have the A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243, the total mitochondrial genome of the patient has been sequenced. An A[yields]G base substitution at nt 11084, leading to a Thr-to-Ala amino acid replacement in the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I, is suggested to be a disease-related mutation. 49 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Mitochondrial genome of the homoscleromorph Oscarella carmela (Porifera, Demospongiae) reveals unexpected complexity in the common ancestor of sponges and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2007-02-01

    Homoscleromorpha is a small group in the phylum Porifera (Sponges) characterized by several morphological features (basement membrane, acrosomes in spermatozoa, and cross-striated rootlets of the flagellar basal apparatus) shared with eumetazoan animals but not found in most other sponges. To clarify the phylogenetic position of this group, we determined and analyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of the homoscleromorph sponge Oscarella carmela (Porifera, Demospongiae). O. carmela mtDNA is 20,327 bp and contains the largest complement of genes reported for animal mtDNA, including a putative gene for the C subunit of the twin-arginine translocase (tatC) that has never been found in animal mtDNA. The genes in O. carmela mtDNA are arranged in 2 clusters with opposite transcriptional orientations, a gene arrangement reminiscent of those in several cnidarian mtDNAs but unlike those reported in sponges. At the same time, phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences from 12 mitochondrial (mt) protein genes strongly support the phylogenetic affinity between the Homoscleromorpha and other demosponges. Altogether, our data suggest that homoscleromorphs are demosponges that have retained ancestral features in both mt genome and morphological organization lost in other taxa and that the most recent common ancestor of sponges and other animals was morphologically and genetically more complex than previously thought.

  7. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... by a dystrophic morphology. The results add to the complexity of the pathogenesis underlying mitochondrial myopathies, and expand the knowledge about the impact of energy deficiency on another aspect of muscle structure and function....

  8. Quercetin up-regulates mitochondrial complex-I activity to protect against programmed cell death in rotenone model of Parkinson's disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppagounder, S S; Madathil, S K; Pandey, M; Haobam, R; Rajamma, U; Mohanakumar, K P

    2013-04-16

    We tested quercetin, a dietary bioflavonoid with potent free radical scavenging action and antioxidant activity, for its neuroprotective effects in rotenone-induced hemi-parkinsonian rats. Rats were infused unilaterally with rotenone into the substantia nigra, and quercetin (25-75mg/kg, i.p.) was administered at 12-h intervals for 4days, and analyzed on the 5th day. Amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced unilateral rotations were significantly reduced in quercetin-treated rats, when analyzed on 14th or 16th day post-surgery, respectively. Quercetin possessed potent hydroxyl radical scavenging action in a cells-free, Fenton-like reaction in test tubes, and in isolated mitochondria when measured by salicylate hydroxylation method. We observed dose-dependent attenuation of the rotenone-induced loss in striatal dopamine, and nigral oxidized and reduced glutathione, as well as the increases in endogenous antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) activities supporting the notion that quercetin-effect is mediated via its powerful hydroxyl radicals-scavenging and antioxidant actions. Quercetin's dose-dependent ability to up-regulate mitochondrial complex-I activity, as evidenced by NADH-oxidation, and as seen in blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) staining in both the contra- and ipsi-lateral nigra suggests the containment of reactive oxygen production at the mitochondrial level. Rotenone-induced induction of NADH-diaphorase activity in the nigral neurons, and its attenuation by quercetin pointed to the possible involvement of nitric oxide too. Reversal of neuronal death induced by rotenone as observed by increased tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells and decreased TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining in the substantia nigra confirmed the potential of quercetin to revamp dopaminergic cells following oxidative stress mediated programmed cell death and neuronal demise. The present study strongly implicates quercetin's potential

  9. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Ł. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Czechowski, N. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Piatkowski, D. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Litvin, R. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Mackowski, S. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P. [Ma Chung Univ., Malang (Indonesia). Ma Chung Research Center for Photosynthetic Pigments; Pichler, S. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom). Inst. of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology; Cogdell, R. J. [Univ. Linz (Austria). Inst. fur Halbleiter-und Festkorperphysik; Heiss, W. [Univ. Linz (Austria). Inst. fur Halbleiter-und Festkorperphysik

    2011-10-24

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  10. Carbonic Anhydrase Subunits Form a Matrix-exposed Domain Attached to the Membrane Arm of Mitochondrial Complex I in Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Jänsch, Lothar; Klodmann, Jennifer; Heinemeyer, Jesco; Perales, Mariano; Zabaleta, Eduardo; Boekema, Egbert J.; Braun, Hans-Peter; Jansch, L.

    2006-01-01

    Complex I of Arabidopsis includes five structurally related subunits representing γ-type carbonic anhydrases termed CA1, CA2, CA3, CAL1, and CAL2. The position of these subunits within complex I was investigated. Direct analysis of isolated subcomplexes of complex I by liquid chromatography linked

  11. Mitochondrial vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-05-26

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications.

  12. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  13. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in respiratory complex-I in never-smoker lung cancer patients contribute to lung cancer progression and associated with EGFR gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Santanu; Soudry, Ethan; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Shao, Chunbo; Yee, John; Lam, Stephan; Lam, Wan; Zhang, Wei; Gazdar, Adi F; Fisher, Paul B; Sidransky, David

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were reported in different cancers. However, the nature and role of mtDNA mutation in never-smoker lung cancer patients including patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and KRAS gene mutation are unknown. In the present study, we sequenced entire mitochondrial genome (16.5 kb) in matched normal and tumors obtained from 30 never-smoker and 30 current-smoker lung cancer patients, and determined the mtDNA content. All the patients' samples were sequenced for KRAS (exon 2) and EGFR (exon 19 and 21) gene mutation. The impact of forced overexpression of a respiratory complex-I gene mutation was evaluated in a lung cancer cell line. We observed significantly higher (P = 0.006) mtDNA mutation in the never-smokers compared to the current-smoker lung cancer patients. MtDNA mutation was significantly higher (P = 0.026) in the never-smoker Asian compared to the current-smoker Caucasian patients' population. MtDNA mutation was significantly (P = 0.007) associated with EGFR gene mutation in the never-smoker patients. We also observed a significant increase (P = 0.037) in mtDNA content among the never-smoker lung cancer patients. The majority of the coding mtDNA mutations targeted respiratory complex-I and forced overexpression of one of these mutations resulted in increased in vitro proliferation, invasion, and superoxide production in lung cancer cells. We observed a higher prevalence and new relationship between mtDNA alterations among never-smoker lung cancer patients and EGFR gene mutation. Moreover, a representative mutation produced strong growth effects after forced overexpression in lung cancer cells. Signature mtDNA mutations provide a basis to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for never-smoker lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of mitochondrial myopathies include muscle weakness or exercise intolerance, heart failure or rhythm disturbances, dementia, movement disorders, stroke-like episodes, deafness, blindness, droopy ...

  15. Effect of beer consumption on levels of complex I and complex IV liver and heart mitochondrial enzymes and coenzymes Q9 and Q10 in adriamycin-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Belles, Victoria; Torres, Carmen; Muñiz, Pilar; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar

    2010-04-01

    There is increasing evidence indicating that the dietary intake of food with high antioxidant capacity may protect mitochondria from damage and exert positive effects on different pathogenic processes. The present study was designed to evaluate the possible protective effect of alcohol-free beer intake on chain components dysfunction of liver and heart mitochondria, and to compare with the effect of alcohol beer intake. The study was carried out in rat heart and liver mitochondria by inducing with Adriamycin the dysfunction of the respiratory chain. Heart and liver mitochondria were isolated from rats and subjected to oxidative stress with two doses of Adriamycin (5 mg/Kg) 7 days from the beginning of consumption of both alcohol-free and alcohol beer during 31 days. Complexes I and IV and the levels of coenzymes Q(9) and Q(10) were evaluated and compared with a control group. Liver and heart mitochondria isolated from rats treated with Adryamicin showed a decrease in levels of complex I and complex IV enzymatic activity and in levels of coenzymes Q(9) and Q(10). Beer intake for itself does not affect any of the studied parameters. Therefore, the consumption of both alcohol and alcohol-free beer by rats treated with Adriamycin prevents the inhibition of enzymatic activities of complexes I and IV and the oxidation of coenzymes Q(9) and Q(10) in rat heart and liver mitochondria. These results indicate that alcohol-free beer prevents adriamycin-induced damage to mitochondrial chain components and, therefore, helps to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction.

  16. Pyruvate induces transient tumor hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption and potentiates the anti-tumor effect of a hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Takakusagi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug (HAP of bromo isophosphoramide mustard that is selectively activated within hypoxic regions in solid tumors. Our recent study showed that intravenously administered bolus pyruvate can transiently induce hypoxia in tumors. We investigated the mechanism underlying the induction of transient hypoxia and the combination use of pyruvate to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of TH-302. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: The hypoxia-dependent cytotoxicity of TH-302 was evaluated by a viability assay in murine SCCVII and human HT29 cells. Modulation in cellular oxygen consumption and in vivo tumor oxygenation by the pyruvate treatment was monitored by extracellular flux analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR oxygen imaging, respectively. The enhancement of the anti-tumor effect of TH-302 by pyruvate treatment was evaluated by monitoring the growth suppression of the tumor xenografts inoculated subcutaneously in mice. TH-302 preferentially inhibited the growth of both SCCVII and HT29 cells under hypoxic conditions (0.1% O2, with minimal effect under aerobic conditions (21% O2. Basal oxygen consumption rates increased after the pyruvate treatment in SCCVII cells in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that pyruvate enhances the mitochondrial respiration to consume excess cellular oxygen. In vivo EPR oxygen imaging showed that the intravenous administration of pyruvate globally induced the transient hypoxia 30 min after the injection in SCCVII and HT29 tumors at the size of 500-1500 mm(3. Pretreatment of SCCVII tumor bearing mice with pyruvate 30 min prior to TH-302 administration, initiated with small tumors (∼ 550 mm(3, significantly delayed tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our in vitro and in vivo studies showed that pyruvate induces transient hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption in tumor cells. TH-302 therapy can be potentiated by pyruvate pretreatment if started at the

  17. Environment dictates dependence on mitochondrial complex I for NAD+ and aspartate production and determines cancer cell sensitivity to metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, Dan Y.; Sullivan, Lucas B.; Luengo, Alba; Hosios, Aaron M.; Bush, Lauren N.; Gitego, Nadege; Davidson, Shawn M.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Metformin use is associated with reduced cancer mortality, but how metformin impacts cancer outcomes is controversial. While metformin can act cell autonomously to inhibit tumor growth, the doses of metformin that inhibit proliferation in tissue culture are much higher than what has been described in vivo. Here, we show that environment drastically alters sensitivity to metformin and other complex I inhibitors. We find that complex I supports proliferation by regenerating NAD+, and metformin’...

  18. Aloe QDM complex enhances specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing in vivo in metabolic disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Kim, Jiyeon; An, Jinho; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2017-03-01

    We developed spontaneous diet-induced metabolic disease in mice by feeding them a high-fat diet for 23 weeks and administered Aloe QDM complex for 16 weeks to examine its restorative effect on immune disorders and metabolic syndrome. A series of immune functional assays indicated Aloe QDM complex enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and antigen-specific immunity as determined by the restored functions of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and IgG production. The elevated serum TNF-α level was also regulated by Aloe QDM complex treatment, which suggested its complex therapeutic potential. As for metabolic phenotypes, oral administration of Aloe QDM complex significantly improved diabetic symptoms, including high fasting glucose levels and glucose tolerance, and distinctly alleviated lipid accumulation in adipose and hepatic tissue. The simultaneous restoration of Aloe QDM complex on metabolic syndrome and host immune dysfunction, especially on the specific CTL killing was first elucidated in our study.

  19. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis during myogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Remels, A.H.V.; Langen, R.C.J.; Schrauwen, P.; Schaart, G.; Schols, A.M.W.J.; Gosker, H. R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis associated with myogenic differentiation are poorly defined. Therefore, C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into multi-nucleated myotubes and parameters/regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were investigated. Mitochondrial respiration, citrate synthase- and ?-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity as well as protein content of complexes I, II, III and V of the mitochondrial respiratory chain increased 4-8 fold during differen...

  20. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an intense spectrum. It is proposed that complexes of adenine (dAMP) with silver generate the observed spectra. Adenine and dAMP can be distinguished spectroscopically due to various different complexe...

  2. Soya phospholipid complex of mangiferin enhances its hepatoprotectivity by improving its bioavailability and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sauvik; Ahmmed, Sk Milan; Saha, Bishnu Pada; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2014-05-01

    Mangiferin is a xanthonoid present in Mangifera indica. It has been reported for a variety of pharmacological activities, including hepatoprotection. However, the major disadvantage of mangiferin is its reduced biological activity due to poor absorption, low bioavailability and rapid elimination from the body after administration. The aim of this study was to prepare a phospholipid complex of mangiferin to overcome these limitations and to investigate the impact of the complex on hepatoprotective activity and bioavailability. The results showed that the complex has an enhanced hepatoprotective and in vivo antioxidant activity as compared to pure mangiferin at the same dose level (30 and 60 mg kg⁻¹). The complex restored the levels of serum hepatic marker enzymes and liver antioxidant enzymes with respect to carbon tetrachloride-treated animals. The complex also increased the bioavailability of mangiferin in rat serum by 9.75-fold compared to pure mangiferin at the same dose level and enhanced the elimination half-life (t(1/2 el)) from 1.71 ± 0.12 h⁻¹ to 3.52 ± 0.27 h⁻¹. The results suggested that the complexation of mangiferin with soya phospholipid enhanced the hepatoprotection and in vivo antioxidant activity, which may be due to the improved bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of mangiferin in rat serum. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W. [Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. ATP Depletion Via Mitochondrial F1F0 Complex by Lethal Factor is an Early Event in B. Anthracis-Induced Sudden Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell W. Woodberry

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis’ primary virulence factor is a tripartite anthrax toxin consisting of edema factor (EF, lethal factor (LF and protective antigen (PA. In complex with PA, EF and LF are internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis. EF is a calmodulin- dependent adenylate cyclase that induces tissue edema. LF is a zinc-metalloprotease that cleaves members of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases. Lethal toxin (LT: PA plus LF-induced death of macrophages is primarily attributed to expression of the sensitive Nalp1b allele, inflammasome formation and activation of caspase-1, but early events that initiate these processes are unknown. Here we provide evidence that an early essential event in pyroptosis of alveolar macrophages is LF-mediated depletion of cellular ATP. The underlying mechanism involves interaction of LF with F1F0-complex gamma and beta subunits leading to increased ATPase activity in mitochondria. In support, mitochondrial DNA-depleted MH-S cells have decreased F1F0 ATPase activity due to the lack of F06 and F08 polypeptides and show increased resistance to LT. We conclude that ATP depletion is an important early event in LT-induced sudden cell death and its prevention increases survival of toxin-sensitive cells.

  5. Specific Methylation of Asp160 (49 kDa subunit) Located inside the Quinone Binding Cavity of Bovine Mitochondrial Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Masatoshi; Inaoka, Hiroyuki; Masuya, Takahiro; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Aoki, Wataru; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-06-14

    Asp160 in the 49 kDa subunit of bovine mitochondrial complex I, which is located in the inner part of the quinone binding cavity, is considered to be an essential residue for energy conversion of the enzyme. To elucidate the catalytic function of this residue, we attempted to specifically methylate 49 kDa Asp160 [Asp(COO)-CH3] through a ligand-directed tosyl (LDT) chemistry technique with an acetogenin derivative (ALM) as a high-affinity ligand. We confirmed the specific methylation of 49 kDa Asp160 through liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the tryptic digests of the 49 kDa subunit. The binding affinity of a quinazoline-type inhibitor ([(125)I]AzQ) occupying the quinone binding cavity was not affected by methylation, indicating that this chemical modification does not induce significant structural changes inside the quinone binding cavity. The methylation of 49 kDa Asp160 did not lead to the complete loss of catalytic activity; the modified enzyme retained partial electron transfer and proton translocation activities. These results along with the fact that 49 kDa Asp160 elicits a very strong nucleophilicity against various LDT reagents in the local protein environment strongly suggest that this residue is free from strict interactions (such as electrostatic interaction) arising from nearby residue(s) and is functionally important but not essential for the energy conversion of complex I.

  6. Mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone enhances extracellular calcium-dependent nitric oxide production and reduces glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rubio, Sandra; Hidalgo, Ana B; Ferrín, Gustavo; Bello, Rosario I; González, Raul; Gahete, Manuel D; Ranchal, Isidora; Rodríguez, Blanca A; Barrera, Pilar; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; Linares, Clara I; Castaño, Justo P; Victor, Victor M; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntané, Jordi

    2009-12-01

    Ca(2+) mobilization, nitric oxide (NO), and oxidative stress have been involved in cell death induced by hydrophobic bile acid in hepatocytes. The aim of the study was the elucidation of the effect of the antioxidant mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone (Mito Q) on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NO production, and cell death in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated HepG2 cells. The role of the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by Ca(2+) chelators (EGTA or BAPTA-AM), agonist of Ca(2+) entrance (A23187) or NO (L-NAME or NO donor), was assessed during Mito Q cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. Cell death, NO synthase (NOS)-1, -2, and -3 expression, Ca(2+) mobilization, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and NOS-3 expression and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented and L-NAME enhanced GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca(2+) entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, reduced the expression of NOS-3 and enhanced cell death in control and GCDCA-treated cells. Mito Q prevented the reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NOS-3 expression, NO production, and cell death in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The conclusion is that the recovery of Ca(2+)-dependent NOS-3 expression by Mito Q may be considered an additional cytoprotective property of an antioxidant.

  7. Environment Dictates Dependence on Mitochondrial Complex I for NAD+ and Aspartate Production and Determines Cancer Cell Sensitivity to Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Dan Y; Sullivan, Lucas B; Luengo, Alba; Hosios, Aaron M; Bush, Lauren N; Gitego, Nadege; Davidson, Shawn M; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Thomas, Craig J; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2016-11-08

    Metformin use is associated with reduced cancer mortality, but how metformin impacts cancer outcomes is controversial. Although metformin can act on cells autonomously to inhibit tumor growth, the doses of metformin that inhibit proliferation in tissue culture are much higher than what has been described in vivo. Here, we show that the environment drastically alters sensitivity to metformin and other complex I inhibitors. We find that complex I supports proliferation by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)+, and metformin's anti-proliferative effect is due to loss of NAD+/NADH homeostasis and inhibition of aspartate biosynthesis. However, complex I is only one of many inputs that determines the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio, and dependency on complex I is dictated by the activity of other pathways that affect NAD+ regeneration and aspartate levels. This suggests that cancer drug sensitivity and resistance are not intrinsic properties of cancer cells, and demonstrates that the environment can dictate sensitivity to therapies that impact cell metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial complex II participates in normoxic and hypoxic regulation of alpha-keto acids in the murine heart.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhling, J.; Tiefenbach, M.; Lopez-Barneo, J.; Piruat, J.I.; Garcia-Flores, P.; Pfeil, U.; Gries, B.; Muhlfeld, C.; Weigand, M.A.; Kummer, W.; Weissmann, N.; Paddenberg, R.

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Keto acids (alpha-KAs) are not just metabolic intermediates but are also powerful modulators of different cellular pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis that alpha-KA concentrations are regulated by complex II (succinate dehydrogenase=SDH), which represents an intersection between the

  9. Mitochondrial membrane potential in human neutrophils is maintained by complex III activity in the absence of supercomplex organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. van Raam (Bram); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); F.R.C. de Wit (Frank); D. Roos (Dirk); A.J. Verhoeven (Arthur); T.W. Kuijpers (Taco W.)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Neutrophils depend mainly on glycolysis for their enegry provision. Their mitochondria maintain a membrace potential (ΔΨm), which is usually generated by the repiratory chain complexes. We investigated the source of ΔΨm in neutrophils, as compared to peripheral blood

  10. Idebenone increases mitochondrial complex I activity in fibroblasts from LHON patients while producing contradictory effects on respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angebault, Claire; Gueguen, Naig; Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is caused by mutations in the complex I subunits of the respiratory chain. Although patients have been treated with idebenone since 1992, the efficacy of the drug is still a matter of debate. Methods: We evaluated the effect...

  11. Enhanced brain penetration of hexamethonium in complexes with derivatives of fullerene C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrovskiy, L B; Litasova, E V; Dumpis, M A; Nikolaev, D N; Yakovleva, E E; Dravolina, O A; Bespalov, A Yu

    2016-05-01

    The present report describes development of hexamethonium complexes based on fullerene C60. Hexamethonium has a limited penetration into CNS and therefore can antagonize central effects of nicotine only when given at high doses. In the present studies conducted in laboratory rodents, intraperitoneal administration of hexamethonium-fullerene complexes blocked effects of nicotine (convulsions and locomotor stimulation). When compared to equimolar doses of hexamethonium, complexes of hexamethonium with derivatives of fullerene C60 were 40 times more potent indicating an enhanced ability to interact with central nicotine receptors. Thus, fullerene C60 derivatives should be explored further as potential carrier systems for polar drug delivery into CNS.

  12. Roles of mitochondrial Src tyrosine kinase and zinc in nitric oxide-induced cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Xing, F; Zheng, H; Xi, J; Cui, X; Xu, Z

    2013-07-01

    While nitric oxide (NO) induces cardioprotection by targeting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), the precise mitochondrial signaling events that mediate the action of NO remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test whether NO induces cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion by inhibiting oxidative stress through mitochondrial zinc and Src tyrosine kinase. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) given before the onset of ischemia reduced cell death in rat cardiomyocytes subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion, and this was abolished by the zinc chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) and the Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2. SNAP also prevented loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) at reperfusion, an effect that was blocked by TPEN and PP2. SNAP increased mitochondrion-free zinc upon reperfusion and enhanced mitochondrial Src phosphorylation in a zinc-dependent manner. SNAP inhibited both mitochondrial complex I activity and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation at reperfusion through zinc and Src tyrosine kinase. Finally, the anti-infarct effect of SNAP was abrogated by TPEN and PP2 applied at reperfusion in isolated rat hearts. In conclusion, NO induces cardioprotection at reperfusion by targeting mitochondria through attenuation of oxidative stress resulted from the inhibition of complex I at reperfusion. Activation of mitochondrial Src tyrosine kinase by zinc may account for the inhibition of complex I.

  13. Language Learning and Design-Based Research: Increased complexity for sure, enhanced impact perhaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeves, Thomas; McKenney, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Reeves, T., & McKenney, S. (2013). Language Learning and Design-Based Research: Increased complexity for sure, enhanced impact perhaps. In J. Rodriguez, & C. Pardo-Ballester (Eds.), Design-based Research in CALL (pp. 9-21). San Marcos, Texas: Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium

  14. Mitochondrial function in the brain links anxiety with social subordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Fiona; van der Kooij, Michael A.; Zanoletti, Olivia; Lozano, Laura; Cantó, Carles; Sandi, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies are integral aspects of social groups, yet whether personality traits may predispose individuals to a particular rank remains unclear. Here we show that trait anxiety directly influences social dominance in male outbred rats and identify an important mediating role for mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens. High-anxious animals that are prone to become subordinate during a social encounter with a low-anxious rat exhibit reduced mitochondrial complex I and II proteins and respiratory capacity as well as decreased ATP and increased ROS production in the nucleus accumbens. A causal link for these findings is indicated by pharmacological approaches. In a dyadic contest between anxiety-matched animals, microinfusion of specific mitochondrial complex I or II inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens reduced social rank, mimicking the low probability to become dominant observed in high-anxious animals. Conversely, intraaccumbal infusion of nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3 known to enhance brain energy metabolism, prevented the development of a subordinate status in high-anxious individuals. We conclude that mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens is crucial for social hierarchy establishment and is critically involved in the low social competitiveness associated with high anxiety. Our findings highlight a key role for brain energy metabolism in social behavior and point to mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens as a potential marker and avenue of treatment for anxiety-related social disorders. PMID:26621716

  15. Selenium supplementation induces mitochondrial biogenesis in trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Alisha; Dong, Lan-Feng; Holland, Olivia; Vanderlelie, Jessica; Pasdar, Elham A; Neuzil, Jiri; Perkins, Anthony V

    2015-08-01

    Placental oxidative stress has been implicated in pregnancy complications and previous work has shown that selenium can protect trophoblast mitochondria from oxidative stress. This report examines mitochondrial function and content in trophoblasts supplemented with selenium. Swan-71, JEG-3 and BeWo cells and placental tissue were incubated with sodium selenite or selenomethionine. Mitochondrial function was examined in a respirometer. Mitochondrial content was determined using RT-PCR. The levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis markers selenoprotein H, PGC-1α and NRF-1 was examined by western blotting. Mitochondrial respiration was significantly enhanced post selenium supplementation in cells and tissues. Selenium supplementation increased mitochondrial content and up-regulated mitochondrial biogenesis mediators in cells. These results emphasise the importance of selenium in mitochondrial regeneration in trophoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A common origin of complex life cycles in parasitic flatworms: evidence from the complete mitochondrial genome of Microcotyle sebastis (Monogenea: Platyhelminthes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eom Keeseon S

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parasitic Platyhelminthes (Neodermata contains three parasitic groups of flatworms, each having a unique morphology, and life style: Monogenea (primarily ectoparasitic, Trematoda (endoparasitic flukes, and Cestoda (endoparasitic tapeworms. The evolutionary origin of complex life cyles (multiple obligate hosts, as found in Trematoda and Cestoda and of endo-/ecto-parasitism in these groups is still under debate and these questions can be resolved, only if the phylogenetic position of the Monogenea within the Neodermata clade is correctly estimated. Results To test the interrelationships of the major parasitic flatworm groups, we estimated the phylogeny of the Neodermata using complete available mitochondrial genome sequences and a newly characterized sequence of a polyopisthocotylean monogenean Microcotyle sebastis. Comparisons of inferred amino acid sequences and gene arrangement patterns with other published flatworm mtDNAs indicate Monogenea are sister group to a clade of Trematoda+Cestoda. Conclusion Results confirm that vertebrates were the first host for stem group neodermatans and that the addition of a second, invertebrate, host was a single event occurring in the Trematoda+Cestoda lineage. In other words, the move from direct life cycles with one host to complex life cycles with multiple hosts was a single evolutionary event. In association with the evolution of life cycle patterns, our result supports the hypothesis that the most recent common ancestor of the Neodermata giving rise to the Monogenea adopted vertebrate ectoparasitism as its initial life cycle pattern and that the intermediate hosts of the Trematoda (molluscs and Cestoda (crustaceans were subsequently added into the endoparasitic life cycles of the Trematoda+Cestoda clade after the common ancestor of these branched off from the monogenean lineage. Complex life cycles, involving one or more intermediate hosts, arose through the addition of

  17. Autophagy Inhibition Enhances the Mitochondrial-Mediated Apoptosis Induced by Mangrove (Avicennia marina) Extract in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Esau, Luke

    2015-01-10

    Aims: Avicennia marina (AM) is a widely distributed mangrove plant that has been used in traditional medicine for centuries for the treatment of a number of diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the leaf ethyl acetate extract of AM for its cytotoxic and apoptotic potential along with in-depth investigations of its mechanism of action in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Study Design: The ethyl acetate extract of leaves and stems of AM was tested against estrogen positive breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using various assays. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, from July 2013-June 2014. Methodology: Dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition of cancer cells was measured using MTT assay. The mechanisms of apoptosis induction were determined using various assays: phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3/7 activation, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell cycle analysis, autophagy, and protein expression using western blotting. The modulation of apoptotic genes (p53, Mdm2, NF-kB, Bad, Bax, Bcl-2 and Casp7) was also determined using real time PCR. Results: The AM extract inhibited breast cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis in a concentration dependent manner. We demonstrated a non-classical mode of apoptosis induction in MCF-7 cells by AM extract, where ROS production altered the mitochondrial membrane potential to induce apoptosis. Breast cancer cells treated with 200 µg/ml concentration of AM extract showed increased ROS production and disrupted MMP but no PARP-1 cleavage and a marked decrease in Caspase-7 protein levels (24 and 48 h) were detected. A significant amount of autophagy was also observed at the same concentration. However, treatment of MCF-7 cells with 200 µg/ml of AM extract along with the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine, significantly increased the apoptosis from 20% to 45

  18. Suppression of Cpn10 increases mitochondrial fission and dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jung Park

    Full Text Available To date, several regulatory proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics have been identified. However, the precise mechanism coordinating these complex processes remains unclear. Mitochondrial chaperones regulate mitochondrial function and structure. Chaperonin 10 (Cpn10 interacts with heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and functions as a co-chaperone. In this study, we found that down-regulation of Cpn10 highly promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in SK-N-MC and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of Drp1 suppressed the mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Cpn10 reduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in 3-NP-treated cells was markedly enhanced by Cpn10 knock down. Depletion of Cpn10 synergistically increased cell death in response to 3-NP treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of Drp1 recovered Cpn10-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in 3-NP-treated cells. Moreover, an ROS scavenger suppressed cell death mediated by Cpn10 knockdown in 3-NP-treated cells. Taken together, these results showed that down-regulation of Cpn10 increased mitochondrial fragmentation and potentiated 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  20. Mitochondrial protein quality control: the mechanisms guarding mitochondrial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohovych, Iryna; Chan, Sherine S L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondria are complex dynamic organelles pivotal for cellular physiology and human health. Failure to maintain mitochondrial health leads to numerous maladies that include late-onset neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, a decline in mitochondrial health is prevalent with aging. A set of evolutionary conserved mechanisms known as mitochondrial quality control (MQC) is involved in recognition and correction of the mitochondrial proteome. Here, we review current knowledge and latest developments in MQC. We particularly focus on the proteolytic aspect of MQC and its impact on health and aging. While our knowledge about MQC is steadily growing, critical gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of how MQC modules sense damage and preserve mitochondrial welfare, particularly in higher organisms. Delineating how coordinated action of the MQC modules orchestrates physiological responses on both organellar and cellular levels will further elucidate the current picture of MQC's role and function in health, cellular stress, and degenerative diseases.

  1. Lack of mitochondrial ferritin aggravated neurological deficits via enhancing oxidative stress in a traumatic brain injury murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ligang; Wang, Libo; Dai, Zhibo; Wu, Pei; Shi, Huaizhang; Zhao, Shiguang

    2017-12-22

    Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mitochondrial ferritin (Ftmt) is reported to be closely related to oxidative stress. However, whether Ftmt is involved in TBI-induced oxidative stress and neurological deficits remains unknown. In the present study, the controlled cortical impact model was established in wild-type and Ftmt knockout mice as a TBI model. The Ftmt expression, oxidative stress, neurological deficits, and brain injury were measured. We found that Ftmt expression was gradually decreased from 3 to 14 days post-TBI, while oxidative stress was gradually increased, as evidenced by reduced GSH and superoxide dismutase levels and elevated malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels. Interestingly, the extent of reduced Ftmt expression in the brain was linearly correlated with oxidative stress. Knockout of Ftmt significantly exacerbated TBI-induced oxidative stress, intracerebral hemorrhage, brain infarction, edema, neurological severity score, memory impairment, and neurological deficits. However, all these effects in Ftmt knockout mice were markedly mitigated by pharmacological inhibition of oxidative stress using an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these results reveal an important correlation between Ftmt and oxidative stress after TBI. Ftmt deficiency aggravates TBI-induced brain injuries and neurological deficits, which at least partially through increasing oxidative stress levels. Our data suggest that Ftmt may be a promising molecular target for the treatment of TBI. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence of Chlorophylls in Light-Harvesting Complexes Coupled to Silver Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kowalska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate metal-enhanced fluorescence of peridinin-chlorophyll protein coupled to silver nanowires using optical microscopy combined with spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In particular we study two different sample geometries: first, in which the light-harvesting complexes are deposited onto silver nanowires, and second, where solution of both nanostructures are mixed prior deposition on a substrate. The results indicate that for the peridinin-chlorophyll complexes placed in the vicinity of the silver nanowires we observe higher intensities of fluorescence emission as compared to the reference sample, where no nanowires are present. Enhancement factors estimated for the sample where the light-harvesting complexes are mixed together with the silver nanowires prior deposition on a substrate are generally larger in comparison to the other geometry of a hybrid nanostructure. While fluorescence spectra are identical both in terms of overall shape and maximum wavelength for peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complexes both isolated and coupled to metallic nanostructures, we conclude that interaction with plasmon excitations in the latter remains neutral to the functionality of the biological system. Fluorescence transients measured for the PCP complexes coupled to the silver nanowires indicate shortening of the fluorescence lifetime pointing towards modifications of radiative rate due to plasmonic interactions. Our results can be applied for developing ways to plasmonically control the light-harvesting capability of photosynthetic complexes.

  3. Improved enhancement of ninhydrin developed fingerprints by cadmium complexation using low temperature photoluminescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilovic, M; Kobus, H J; Margot, P A; Warrener, R N

    1986-04-01

    Fingerprints developed with ninhydrin form stable, colored complexes when treated with various metal salts. Many of these colored complexes can be used to increase the sensitivity of detection of latent prints because of photoluminescent properties. The intensity of this photoluminescence is increased at low temperature (77K), and this is a common characteristic of each of the complexes formed with salts of the IIb group of the Periodic Table. Spectral characteristics of these Group IIb metal complexes and the influence of environmental factors on their formation are reported. These data have helped determine optimal conditions for the enhancement of ninhydrin developed fingerprints. Taking into account spectral characteristics, solubility, versatility, stability, and reproducibility, the use of the cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate complex is advocated for general use for fingerprint enhancement. The use of zinc nitrate is favored if toxicological considerations are paramount, but ninhydrin development has to be carefully controlled if optimal results are to be obtained. Limited applications for mercuric complexes are found when a red shift is desired to remove background effects.

  4. A Novel Cytosolic Isoform of Mitochondrial Trans-2-Enoyl-CoA Reductase Enhances Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gyu Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMitochondrial trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase (MECR is involved in mitochondrial synthesis of fatty acids and is highly expressed in mitochondria. MECR is also known as nuclear receptor binding factor-1, which was originally reported with yeast two-hybrid screening as a binding protein of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα. However, MECR and PPARα are localized at different compartment, mitochondria, and the nucleus, respectively. Therefore, the presence of a cytosolic or nuclear isoform of MECR is necessary for functional interaction between MECR and PPARα.MethodsTo identify the expression pattern of MECR and the cytosolic form of MECR (cMECR, we performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR with various tissue samples from Sprague-Dawley rats. To confirm the interaction between cMECR and PPARα, we performed several binding assays such as yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. To observe subcellular localization of these proteins, immunocytochemistry was performed. A luciferase assay was used to measure PPARα activity.ResultsWe provide evidence of an alternatively spliced variant of the rat MECR gene that yields cMECR. The cMECR lacks the N-terminal 76 amino acids of MECR and shows uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and nucleus of HeLa cells. cMECR directly bound PPARα in the nucleus and increased PPARα-dependent luciferase activity in HeLa cells.ConclusionWe found the cytosolic form of MECR (cMECR was expressed in the cytosolic and/or nuclear region, directly binds with PPARα, and enhances PPARα activity.

  5. A Novel Cytosolic Isoform of Mitochondrial Trans-2-Enoyl-CoA Reductase Enhances Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Gyu; Yoo, Jae Cheal; Kim, Eunju; Lee, Young-Sun; Yarishkin, Oleg V; Lee, Da Yong; Lee, Kun Ho; Hong, Seong-Geun; Hwang, Eun Mi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase (MECR) is involved in mitochondrial synthesis of fatty acids and is highly expressed in mitochondria. MECR is also known as nuclear receptor binding factor-1, which was originally reported with yeast two-hybrid screening as a binding protein of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). However, MECR and PPARα are localized at different compartment, mitochondria, and the nucleus, respectively. Therefore, the presence of a cytosolic or nuclear isoform of MECR is necessary for functional interaction between MECR and PPARα. To identify the expression pattern of MECR and the cytosolic form of MECR (cMECR), we performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with various tissue samples from Sprague-Dawley rats. To confirm the interaction between cMECR and PPARα, we performed several binding assays such as yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. To observe subcellular localization of these proteins, immunocytochemistry was performed. A luciferase assay was used to measure PPARα activity. We provide evidence of an alternatively spliced variant of the rat MECR gene that yields cMECR. The cMECR lacks the N-terminal 76 amino acids of MECR and shows uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and nucleus of HeLa cells. cMECR directly bound PPARα in the nucleus and increased PPARα-dependent luciferase activity in HeLa cells. We found the cytosolic form of MECR (cMECR) was expressed in the cytosolic and/or nuclear region, directly binds with PPARα, and enhances PPARα activity.

  6. Anaplerotic triheptanoin diet enhances mitochondrial substrate use to remodel the metabolome and improve lifespan, motor function, and sociability in MeCP2-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Park

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene that encodes methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2. Symptoms range in severity and include psychomotor disabilities, seizures, ataxia, and intellectual disability. Symptom onset is between 6-18 months of age, a critical period of brain development that is highly energy-dependent. Notably, patients with RTT have evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as abnormal levels of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin, suggesting overall metabolic imbalance. We hypothesized that one contributor to RTT symptoms is energy deficiency due to defective nutrient substrate utilization by the TCA cycle. This energy deficit would lead to a metabolic imbalance, but would be treatable by providing anaplerotic substrates to the TCA cycle to enhance energy production. We show that dietary therapy with triheptanoin significantly increased longevity and improved motor function and social interaction in male mice hemizygous for Mecp2 knockout. Anaplerotic therapy in Mecp2 knockout mice also improved indicators of impaired substrate utilization, decreased adiposity, increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, decreased serum leptin and insulin, and improved mitochondrial morphology in skeletal muscle. Untargeted metabolomics of liver and skeletal muscle revealed increases in levels of TCA cycle intermediates with triheptanoin diet, as well as normalizations of glucose and fatty acid biochemical pathways consistent with the improved metabolic phenotype in Mecp2 knockout mice on triheptanoin. These results suggest that an approach using dietary supplementation with anaplerotic substrate is effective in improving symptoms and metabolic health in RTT.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships and the evolution of mimicry in the Chauliognathus yellow-black species complex (Coleoptera: Cantharidae inferred from mitochondrial COI sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmar Machado

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic relationships of twelve species of Chauliognathus were investigated by studying the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene. A 678 bp fragment of the COI gene was sequenced to test the hypothesis that the Müllerian mimicry species of the "yellow-black" complex make up a monophyletic clade, separated from species with other colour patterns. The data set was analysed by neighbour-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood procedures. The results support a single origin of the yellow-black colour pattern during the evolution of the genus, with one main clade formed by Chauliognathus lineatus, C. tetrapunctatus, C. riograndensis, C. flavipes, C. octomaculatus, C. fallax, and another one formed by two species, C. expansus and C sp 1, plus an orange-black-coloured species. The nucleotide divergences found between C. sp 3 (black and the other species studied fall within the level expected for species from different genera. The similarity of colour patterns of the yellow-black species has been considered an example of Müllerian mimicry by conservation of the ancestral state with some minor modifications.

  8. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) mutations in pituitary tumors: could this be a new role for mitochondrial complex II and/or Krebs cycle defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xekouki, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or mitochondrial complex II is a multimeric enzyme that is bound to the inner membrane of mitochondria and has a dual role as it serves both as a critical step of the tricarboxylic acid or Krebs cycle and as a member of the respiratory chain that transfers electrons directly to the ubiquinone pool. Mutations in SDH subunits have been implicated in the formation of familial paragangliomas (PGLs) and/or pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and in Carney-Stratakis syndrome. More recently, SDH defects were associated with predisposition to a Cowden disease phenotype, renal, and thyroid cancer. We recently described a kindred with the coexistence of familial PGLs and an aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, harboring an SDHD mutation. The pituitary tumor showed loss of heterozygosity at the SDHD locus, indicating the possibility that SDHD's loss was causatively linked to the development of the neoplasm. In total, 29 cases of pituitary adenomas presenting in association with PHEOs and/or extra-adrenal PGLs have been reported in the literature since 1952. Although a number of other genetic defects are possible in these cases, we speculate that the association of PHEOs and/or PGLs with pituitary tumors is a new syndromic association and a novel phenotype for SDH defects.

  9. Mitochondrial complex I bridges a connection between regulation of carbon flexibility and gastrointestinal commensalism in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient assimilation of alternative carbon sources in glucose-limited host niches is critical for colonization of Candida albicans, a commensal yeast that frequently causes opportunistic infection in human. C. albicans evolved mechanistically to regulate alternative carbon assimilation for the promotion of fungal growth and commensalism in mammalian hosts. However, this highly adaptive mechanism that C. albicans employs to cope with alternative carbon assimilation has yet to be clearly understood. Here we identified a novel role of C. albicans mitochondrial complex I (CI in regulating assimilation of alternative carbon sources such as mannitol. Our data demonstrate that CI dysfunction by deleting the subunit Nuo2 decreases the level of NAD+, downregulates the NAD+-dependent mannitol dehydrogenase activity, and consequently inhibits hyphal growth and biofilm formation in conditions when the carbon source is mannitol, but not fermentative sugars like glucose. Mannitol-dependent morphogenesis is controlled by a ROS-induced signaling pathway involving Hog1 activation and Brg1 repression. In vivo studies show that nuo2Δ/Δ mutant cells are severely compromised in gastrointestinal colonization and the defect can be rescued by a glucose-rich diet. Thus, our findings unravel a mechanism by which C. albicans regulates carbon flexibility and commensalism. Alternative carbon assimilation might represent a fitness advantage for commensal fungi in successful colonization of host niches.

  10. Ubiquinol-cytochrome-c reductase 7.2 kDa protein of mitochondrial complex III is steroid-responsive and increases in cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hung; Servant, Nicolas; Chalifour, Lorraine E

    2007-10-01

    Women and men do not respond identically to cardiac insults; premenopausal women are somewhat protected from cardiovascular disease. Our objective was to isolate and characterize hormone-responsive genes in the heart. Differential display identified an estrogen-inducible fragment that was found to encode the ubiquinol-cytochrome-c reductase (UCCR) 7.2 kDa protein of the mitochondrial respiratory complex III. We found UCCR7.2 mRNA to be highly expressed in the heart, and this expression increased in hearts of 4-, 10-, and 28-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) compared with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Oral hydralazine treatment to reduce hypertension reduced SHR UCCR7.2 expression. Cardiac UCCR7.2 mRNA expression was also increased significantly after a 5/6 nephrectomy compared with mock surgery. Cardiac expression after ovariectomy was 50% that of intact rats. Supplementation of ovariectomized rats with estrogen had no effect, whereas progesterone increased cardiac expression, although not to intact levels. No change in cardiac UCCR7.2 expression was found when intact rats were treated with either tamoxifen or ICI 182780. Thus, UCCR7.2 expression is reduced in the absence of ovarian hormones, but is not directly regulated by estrogen in the heart. We conclude that UCCR7.2 is a steroid hormone-responsive gene in the heart, with expression increased in cardiac hypertrophy and in response to hypertension.

  11. Otolith shape analysis and mitochondrial DNA markers distinguish three sand smelt species in the Atherina boyeri species complex in western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinar, A. S.; Chaoui, L.; Quignard, J. P.; Aurelle, D.; Kara, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Atherina boyeri is a common euryhaline teleost fish in the Mediterranean and adjacent areas, which inhabits coastal and estuarine waters, including coastal lagoons and more rarely inland waters. Several recent studies have pointed the possible existence of three distinct groups or species, one lagoon/freshwater group and two 'punctuated and unpunctuated on the flanks' marine groups, within an A. boyeri species complex. This study is a combined approach using otolith shape and molecular markers to better define the structure of the species in the western Mediterranean. Genetic differentiation and species delimitation among nine Atherina boyeri populations from several marine and lagoon/brakish habitat sites in Algeria, Tunisia and France were investigated using three mitochondrial (control region, Cyt b and 16S) and one nuclear markers (2nd intron of S7). For further phylogenetic and phylogeographic study, we added sequences from Genbank covering more areas (Ionian Sea, Adriatic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Black Sea, Atlantic). Five groups were found. Two of them perfectly corresponded to two species already recognized Atherina presbyter and Atherina hepsetus, both living in marine waters; and three additional, including Atherina boyeri (brackish and freshwater environments) and two independent groups of marine punctated and unpunctated individuals. Those findings are corroborated by the study of the otolith contour shape of 362 individuals of seven populations from different habitats using Fourier analysis. Individuals could be discriminated into five groups based on the first two functions (Wilk's lambda = 0.07, p < 0.001). Samples from Ziama inlet, marine punctuated individuals and unpunctuated marine specimens from Annaba's Gulf formed three well separated groups. Specimens from Mellah and Mauguio lagoons formed another group. The last one includes individuals from Bizerte and Thau lagoons. The divergences between them strongly support the potential species within the

  12. Sp1 expression is disrupted in schizophrenia; a possible mechanism for the abnormal expression of mitochondrial complex I genes, NDUFV1 and NDUFV2.

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    Dorit Ben-Shachar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevailing hypothesis regards schizophrenia as a polygenic disease, in which multiple genes combine with each other and with environmental stimuli to produce the variance of its clinical symptoms. We investigated whether the ubiquitous transcription factor Sp1 is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and consequently can affect the expression of genes implicated in this disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: mRNA of Sp1 and of mitochondrial complex I subunits (NDUFV1, NDUFV2 was analyzed in three postmortem brain regions obtained from the Stanley Foundation Brain Collection, and in lymphocytes of schizophrenic patients and controls. Sp1 role in the transcription of these genes was studied as well. Sp1 was abnormally expressed in schizophrenia in both brain and periphery. Its mRNA alteration pattern paralleled that of NDUFV1 and NDUFV2, decreasing in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, while increasing in the parieto-occipital cortex and in lymphocytes of schizophrenic patients as compared with controls. Moreover, a high and significant correlation between these genes existed in normal subjects, but was distorted in patients. Sp1 role in the regulation of complex I subunits, was demonstrated by the ability of the Sp1/DNA binding inhibitor, mithramycin, to inhibit the transcription of NDUFV1 and NDUFV2, in neuroblastoma cells. In addition, Sp1 activated NDUFV2 promoter by binding to its three GC-boxes. Both activation and binding were inhibited by mithramycin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that abnormality in Sp1, which can be the main activator/repressor or act in combination with additional transcription factors and is subjected to environmental stimuli, can contribute to the polygenic and clinically heterogeneous nature of schizophrenia.

  13. The SDH mutation database: an online resource for succinate dehydrogenase sequence variants involved in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes encode the subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. SDHA, a flavoprotein and SDHB, an iron-sulfur protein together constitute the catalytic domain, while SDHC and SDHD encode membrane anchors that allow the complex to participate in the respiratory chain as complex II. Germline mutations of SDHD and SDHB are a major cause of the hereditary forms of the tumors paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. The largest subunit, SDHA, is mutated in patients with Leigh syndrome and late-onset optic atrophy, but has not as yet been identified as a factor in hereditary cancer. Description The SDH mutation database is based on the recently described Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants currently described in the database were extracted from the published literature and in some cases annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. Researchers can also directly submit new sequence variants online. Since the identification of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB as classic tumor suppressor genes in 2000 and 2001, studies from research groups around the world have identified a total of 120 variants. Here we introduce all reported paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma related sequence variations in these genes, in addition to all reported mutations of SDHA. The database is now accessible online. Conclusion The SDH mutation database offers a valuable tool and resource for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma, clinical geneticists needing an overview of current knowledge, and geneticists and other researchers needing a solid foundation for further exploration of both these tumor syndromes and SDHA-related phenotypes.

  14. Enhancing the Photovoltaic Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells with a Down-Conversion Eu-Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Chen, Wangchao; Zheng, Jiawei; Zhu, Liangzheng; Mo, Li'e; Li, Zhaoqian; Hu, Linhua; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Zhang, Changneng; Dai, Songyuan

    2017-08-16

    Organometal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have shown high photovoltaic performance but poor utilization of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Lanthanide complexes have a wide absorption range in the UV region and they can down-convert the absorbed UV light into visible light, which provides a possibility for PSCs to utilize UV light for higher photocurrent, efficiency, and stability. In this study, we use a transparent luminescent down-converting layer (LDL) of Eu-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Eu-complex) to improve the light utilization efficiency of PSCs. Compared with the uncoated PSC, the PSC coated with Eu-complex LDL on the reverse of the fluorine-doped tin oxide glass displayed an enhancement of 11.8% in short-circuit current density (Jsc) and 15.3% in efficiency due to the Eu-complex LDL re-emitting UV light (300-380 nm) in the visible range. It is indicated that the Eu-complex LDL plays the role of enhancing the power conversion efficiency as well as reducing UV degradation for PSCs.

  15. Studies on inclusion complex as potential systems for enhancement of oral bioavailability of olmesartan medoxomil

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    Hetal Paresh Thakkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Olmesartan medoxomil (OLM, an anti-hypertensive agent administered orally, has absolute bioavailability of only 26% due to the poor aqueous solubility (7.75 μg/ml. Inclusion complexation with cyclodextrins (CD has been reported to increase the aqueous solubility of various compounds. Aim: The present investigation aimed to enhancing the oral bioavailability of OLM by inclusion complexation with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD. Materials and Methods: The inclusion complexes with HP-β-CD were prepared using two different methods, viz., physical mixture and kneading. The prepared complexes were characterized for various parameters such as drug content, aqueous solubility, dissolution study, in vitro diffusion, intestinal permeability and stability study. The formation of the inclusion complex was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The solubility, dissolution, diffusion rate, and intestinal permeability of the prepared complexes were found to be significantly higher than that of the plain drug. Among the two methods used for formation of inclusion complex, KN method gave higher solubility rates and hence is a better method when compared with PM. Conclusion: The approach seems to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of OLM.

  16. Using mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data for disentangling population structure in complex pest species: a case study with Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Roy

    Full Text Available Among global changes induced by human activities, association of breakdown of geographical barriers and impoverishered biodiversity of agroecosystems may have a strong evolutionary impact on pest species. As a consequence of trade networks' expansion, secondary contacts between incipient species, if hybrid incompatibility is not yet reached, may result in hybrid swarms, even more when empty niches are available as usual in crop fields and farms. By providing important sources of genetic novelty for organisms to adapt in changing environments, hybridization may be strongly involved in the emergence of invasive populations. Because national and international trade networks offered multiple hybridization opportunities during the previous and current centuries, population structure of many pest species is expected to be the most intricate and its inference often blurred when using fast-evolving markers. Here we show that mito-nuclear sequence datasets may be the most helpful in disentangling successive layers of admixture in the composition of pest populations. As a model we used D. gallinae s. l., a mesostigmatid mite complex of two species primarily parasitizing birds, namely D. gallinae L1 and D. gallinae s. str. The latter is a pest species, considered invading layer farms in Brazil. The structure of the pest as represented by isolates from both wild and domestic birds, from European (with a focus on France, Australian and Brazilian farms, revealed past hybridization events and very recent contact between deeply divergent lineages. The role of wild birds in the dissemination of mites appears to be null in European and Australian farms, but not in Brazilian ones. In French farms, some recent secondary contact is obviously consecutive to trade flows. Scenarios of populations' history were established, showing five different combinations of more or less dramatic bottlenecks and founder events, nearly interspecific hybridizations and recent

  17. Correlation between mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu LIU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. A growing number of studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Therefore, this review will mainly discuss the research progress on the correlation between PD and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial autophapy as well as mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial complex Ⅰ inhibition.doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.012

  18. Acute mental stress induces mitochondrial bioenergetic crisis and hyper-fission along with aberrant mitophagy in the gut mucosa in rodent model of stress-related mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rudranil; Mazumder, Somnath; Sarkar, Souvik; Debsharma, Subhashis; Siddiqui, Asim Azhar; Saha, Shubhra Jyoti; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Saha, Debanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2017-10-07

    Psychological stress, depression and anxiety lead to multiple organ dysfunctions wherein stress-related mucosal disease (SRMD) is common to people experiencing stress and also occur as a side effect in patients admitted to intensive care units; however the underlying molecular aetiology is still obscure. We report that in rat-SRMD model, cold restraint-stress severely damaged gut mitochondrial functions to generate superoxide anion (O2(•-)), depleted ATP and shifted mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics towards enhanced fission to induce mucosal injury. Activation of mitophagy to clear damaged and fragmented mitochondria was evident from mitochondrial translocation of Parkin and PINK1 along with enhanced mitochondrial proteome ubiquitination, depletion of mitochondrial DNA copy number and TOM 20. However, excess and sustained accumulation of O2(•-)-generating defective mitochondria overpowered the mitophagic machinery, ultimately triggering Bax-dependent apoptosis and NF-κB-intervened pro-inflammatory mucosal injury. We further observed that stress-induced enhanced serum corticosterone stimulated mitochondrial recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which contributed to gut mitochondrial dysfunctions as documented from reduced ETC complex 1 activity, mitochondrial O2(•-) accumulation, depolarization and hyper-fission. GR-antagonism by RU486 or specific scavenging of mitochondrial O2(•-) by a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO ameliorated stress-induced mucosal damage. Gut mitopathology and mucosal injury were also averted when the perception of mental stress was blocked by pre-treatment with a sedative or antipsychotic. Altogether, we suggest the role of mitochondrial GR-O2(•-)-fission cohort in brain-mitochondria cross-talk during acute mental stress and advocate the utilization of this pathway as a potential target to prevent mitochondrial unrest and gastropathy bypassing central nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Enhancing the Transition-based RRT to deal with complex cost spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Devaurs, Didier; Siméon, Thierry; Cortés, Juan

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The Transition-based RRT (T-RRT) algorithm enables to solve motion planning problems involving configuration spaces over which cost functions are defined, or cost spaces for short. T-RRT has been successfully applied to diverse problems in robotics and structural biology. In this paper, we aim at enhancing T-RRT to solve ever more difficult problems involving larger and more complex cost spaces. We compare several variants of T-RRT by evaluating them on various motion ...

  20. Cellulase-Xylanase Synergy in Designer Cellulosomes for Enhanced Degradation of a Complex Cellulosic Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraïs, Sarah; Barak, Yoav; Caspi, Jonathan; Hadar, Yitzhak; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval; Wilson, David B.; Bayer, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Designer cellulosomes are precision-engineered multienzyme complexes in which the molecular architecture and enzyme content are exquisitely controlled. This system was used to examine enzyme cooperation for improved synergy among Thermobifida fusca glycoside hydrolases. Two T. fusca cellulases, Cel48A exoglucanase and Cel5A endoglucanase, and two T. fusca xylanases, endoxylanases Xyn10B and Xyn11A, were selected as enzymatic components of a mixed cellulase/xylanase-containing designer cellulosome. The resultant mixed multienzyme complex was fabricated on a single scaffoldin subunit bearing all four enzymes. Conversion of T. fusca enzymes to the cellulosomal mode followed by their subsequent incorporation into a tetravalent cellulosome led to assemblies with enhanced activity (~2.4-fold) on wheat straw as a complex cellulosic substrate. The enhanced synergy was caused by the proximity of the enzymes on the complex compared to the free-enzyme systems. The hydrolytic properties of the tetravalent designer cellulosome were compared with the combined action of two separate divalent cellulase- and xylanase-containing cellulosomes. Significantly, the tetravalent designer cellulosome system exhibited an ~2-fold enhancement in enzymatic activity compared to the activity of the mixture of two distinct divalent scaffoldin-borne enzymes. These results provide additional evidence that close proximity between cellulases and xylanases is key to the observed concerted degradation of the complex cellulosic substrate in which the integrated enzymes complement each other by promoting access to the relevant polysaccharide components of the substrate. The data demonstrate that cooperation among xylanases and cellulases can be augmented by their integration into a single designer cellulosome. PMID:21157512

  1. MoDnm1 Dynamin Mediating Peroxisomal and Mitochondrial Fission in Complex with MoFis1 and MoMdv1 Is Important for Development of Functional Appressorium in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaili Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamins are large superfamily GTPase proteins that are involved in various cellular processes including budding of transport vesicles, division of organelles, cytokinesis, and pathogen resistance. Here, we characterized several dynamin-related proteins from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and found that MoDnm1 is required for normal functions, including vegetative growth, conidiogenesis, and full pathogenicity. In addition, we found that MoDnm1 co-localizes with peroxisomes and mitochondria, which is consistent with the conserved role of dynamin proteins. Importantly, MoDnm1-dependent peroxisomal and mitochondrial fission involves functions of mitochondrial fission protein MoFis1 and WD-40 repeat protein MoMdv1. These two proteins display similar cellular functions and subcellular localizations as MoDnm1, and are also required for full pathogenicity. Further studies showed that MoDnm1, MoFis1 and MoMdv1 are in complex to regulate not only peroxisomal and mitochondrial fission, pexophagy and mitophagy progression, but also appressorium function and host penetration. In summary, our studies provide new insights into how MoDnm1 interacts with its partner proteins to mediate peroxisomal and mitochondrial functions and how such regulatory events may link to differentiation and pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus.

  2. Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia and mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome are associated with neuronal complex I defect and mtDNA depletion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hakonen, Anna H; Goffart, Steffi; Marjavaara, Sanna; Paetau, Anders; Cooper, Helen; Mattila, Kimmo; Lampinen, Milla; Sajantila, Antti; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Suomalainen, Anu

    2008-01-01

    Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder caused by the recessive mutation in PEO1, leading to an Y508C change in the mitochondrial helicase Twinkle, in its helicase domain...

  3. Intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement of microbial infection in macrophages: disease regulation by immune complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Mahalingam, Prof Suresh; Marovich, Mary A; Ubol, Sukathida; Mosser, Prof David M

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms can replicate in macrophages, and cell entry of these pathogens via non-neutralising IgG antibody complexes can result in increased intracellular infection through idiosyncratic Fcγ-receptor signalling. The activation of Fcγ receptors usually leads to phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ligation of monocyte or macrophage Fcγ receptors by IgG immune complexes, rather than aiding host defences, can suppress innate immunity, increase production of interleukin 10, and bias T-helper-1 (Th1) responses to Th2 responses, leading to increased infectious output by infected cells. This intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection modulates the severity of diseases as disparate as dengue haemorrhagic fever and leishmaniasis. Intrinsic ADE is distinct from extrinsic ADE, whereby complexes of infectious agents with non-neutralising antibodies lead to an increased number of infected cells. Intrinsic ADE might be involved in many protozoan, bacterial, and viral infections. We review insights into intracellular mechanisms and implications of enhanced pathogenesis after ligation of macrophage Fcγ receptors by infectious immune complexes. PMID:20883967

  4. Study on silicon oxide coated on silver nanocrystal to enhance fluorescence intensity of rare earth complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Yan-rong; Lin, Xue-mei; Wang, Ai-ling; Wang, Zhong-xia; Kang, Jie; Chu, Hai-bin, E-mail: binghai99@gmail.com; Zhao, Yong-liang, E-mail: hxzhaoyl@163.com

    2014-10-15

    Twelve kinds of rare earth complexes were synthesized using halo-benzoic acid as anion ligand and Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} as central ions, respectively. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, rare earth coordination titration and electrospray ionization mass spectra, from which the compositions of the complexes were confirmed to be RE(p-FBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O, RE(p-ClBA){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O, RE(p-BrBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O, RE(o-FBA){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O, RE(o-ClBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O, RE(o-BrBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (RE=Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}). Besides, IR spectra and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy indicated that the carboxyl oxygen atoms of ligands coordinated to the rare earth ions. Moreover, Ag@SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared via a modified Stöber method. The average diameters of silver cores were typically between 60 nm and 70 nm, and the thicknesses of the SiO{sub 2} shells were around 10 nm, 15 nm and 25 nm, respectively. The influence of Ag@SiO{sub 2} NPs on the luminescence properties of the rare earth complexes showed that the luminescence intensities of rare earth complexes were enhanced remarkably. As the thickness of SiO{sub 2} shell increases in the range of 10–25 nm, the effect of metal-enhanced fluorescence become obvious. The mechanism of the changes of the fluorescence intensity is also discussed. - Highlights: • Among 10–25 nm, the thicker the shell thickness, the better the fluorescence effect. • The strong the intensity of the pure complexes, the smaller the multiple enhanced. • The intensity of Sm(p-BrBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O is the strongest among Sm(p-XBA){sub 3}·nH{sub 2}O complexes. • The intensity of Dy(p-ClBA){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O is the strongest among Dy(p-XBA){sub 3}·nH{sub 2}O complexes. • When halogen is in o-position, the intensity of RE(o-ClBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O is the strongest.

  5. The Effect of Mitochondrial Supplements on Mitochondrial Activity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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    Leanna M. Delhey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction is typically guided by expert opinion with a paucity of empirical evidence of the effect of treatment on mitochondrial activity. We examined citrate synthase and Complex I and IV activities using a validated buccal swab method in 127 children with autism spectrum disorder with and without mitochondrial disease, a portion of which were on common mitochondrial supplements. Mixed-model linear regression determined whether specific supplements altered the absolute mitochondrial activity as well as the relationship between the activities of mitochondrial components. Complex I activity was increased by fatty acid and folate supplementation, but folate only effected those with mitochondrial disease. Citrate synthase activity was increased by antioxidant supplementation but only for the mitochondrial disease subgroup. The relationship between Complex I and IV was modulated by folate while the relationship between Complex I and Citrate Synthase was modulated by both folate and B12. This study provides empirical support for common mitochondrial treatments and demonstrates that the relationship between activities of mitochondrial components might be a marker to follow in addition to absolute activities. Measurements of mitochondrial activity that can be practically repeated over time may be very useful to monitor the biochemical effects of treatments.

  6. Amphiphilic Ditopic Bis-Aqua Gd-AAZTA-like Complexes Enhance Relaxivity of Lipidic MRI Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Giuseppe; Tei, Lorenzo; Carniato, Fabio; Botta, Mauro

    2016-08-05

    Two amphiphilic mono- and dimeric GdAAZTA-like chelates composed of stable bis-aquo Gd(III) complexes (q=2) linked to one (for the monomer) or two dodecyl aliphatic chains (for the dimer) were synthesized. Both chelates showed high relaxivity when incorporated into the lipid bilayer of liposomes or after interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). The ditopic complex shows a significantly decreased internal motion relative to the monomeric complex, associated with an enhanced relaxivity (r1 ≈60 mm(-1)  s(-1) , at 30 MHz and 310 K). The presence of two metal-bound water molecules in fast exchange and the restricted rotational freedom make the relaxivity of this system the highest measured for paramagnetic liposomes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Enhanced conductivity of thin film polyaniline by self-assembled transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, David M; Martin, Justin J; Hira, Steven M; Timpson, Cliff J; Gaffney, Jean P; Jones, Wayne E

    2007-01-16

    In a recent study, the transition metal complex, cis-dichlorobis(2-,2'-dipyridyl)ruthenium (II) (Ru(bpy)2Cl2), and the macrocycle Ru(TPP)CO (TPP:- tetraphenylporphine) were bound to pyridine terminated self-assembled monolayers on quartz. Following modification of the quartz surface with metal complexes, the conducting polymer polyaniline was deposited via in situ polymerization. The sheet conductivity (as measured by the four-probe method) of the resulting polyaniline films deposited onto Ru(bpy)2Cl2 and Ru(TPP)CO surfaces was significantly enhanced relative to films deposited onto unmodified quartz. It is postulated that either the macrocycle or the transition metal complex-modified surface interacts with the conducting polymer as it is forming, resulting in a more ordered expanded coil conformation for the polymer. The net result of such an interaction is a thin film possessing significantly greater electrical conductivity.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced mitochondrial motility arrest and presynaptic docking contribute to BDNF-enhanced synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo; Ji, Yun-Song; Sun, Xu-lu; Liu, Xiang-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2014-01-17

    Appropriate mitochondrial transport and distribution are essential for neurons because of the high energy and Ca(2+) buffering requirements at synapses. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an essential role in regulating synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, whether and how BDNF can regulate mitochondrial transport and distribution are still unclear. Here, we find that in cultured hippocampal neurons, application of BDNF for 15 min decreased the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons, a process dependent on the activation of the TrkB receptor and its downstream PI3K and phospholipase-Cγ signaling pathways. Moreover, the BDNF-induced mitochondrial stopping requires the activation of transient receptor potential canonical 3 and 6 (TRPC3 and TRPC6) channels and elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The Ca(2+) sensor Miro1 plays an important role in this process. Finally, the BDNF-induced mitochondrial stopping leads to the accumulation of more mitochondria at presynaptic sites. Mutant Miro1 lacking the ability to bind Ca(2+) prevents BDNF-induced mitochondrial presynaptic accumulation and synaptic transmission, suggesting that Miro1-mediated mitochondrial motility is involved in BDNF-induced mitochondrial presynaptic docking and neurotransmission. Together, these data suggest that mitochondrial transport and distribution play essential roles in BDNF-mediated synaptic transmission.

  9. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons

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    Shanshan Sun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD, a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen–glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XFe24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP+ ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance.

  10. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanshan; Hu, Fangyuan; Wu, Jihong; Zhang, Shenghai

    2017-04-01

    Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen-glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XF e 24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP + ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a Purported Inhibitor of Chaperone Protein GRP78, as an Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Reyna; Pao, Peng-Wen; Hofman, Florence M.; Chen, Thomas C.; Louie, Stan G.; Pirrung, Michael C.; Schönthal, Axel H.

    2013-01-01

    Verrucosidin (VCD) belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78) expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD’s anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose), but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin). However, VCD’s strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin) might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed. PMID:23755268

  12. Genetic differentiation and phylogeography of Mediterranean-North Eastern Atlantic blue shark (Prionace glauca, L. 1758 using mitochondrial DNA: panmixia or complex stock structure?

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    Agostino Leone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The blue shark (Prionace glauca, Linnaeus 1758 is one of the most abundant epipelagic shark inhabiting all the oceans except the poles, including the Mediterranean Sea, but its genetic structure has not been confirmed at basin and interoceanic distances. Past tagging programs in the Atlantic Ocean failed to find evidence of migration of blue sharks between the Mediterranean and the adjacent Atlantic, despite the extreme vagility of the species. Although the high rate of by-catch in the Mediterranean basin, to date no genetic study on Mediterranean blue shark was carried out, which constitutes a significant knowledge gap, considering that this population is classified as “Critically Endangered”, unlike its open-ocean counterpart. Methods Blue shark phylogeography and demography in the Mediterranean Sea and North-Eastern Atlantic Ocean were inferred using two mitochondrial genes (Cytb and control region amplified from 207 and 170 individuals respectively, collected from six localities across the Mediterranean and two from the North-Eastern Atlantic. Results Although no obvious pattern of geographical differentiation was apparent from the haplotype network, Φst analyses indicated significant genetic structure among four geographical groups. Demographic analyses suggest that these populations have experienced a constant population expansion in the last 0.4–0.1 million of years. Discussion The weak, but significant, differences in Mediterranean and adjacent North-eastern Atlantic blue sharks revealed a complex phylogeographic structure, which appears to reject the assumption of panmixia across the study area, but also supports a certain degree of population connectivity across the Strait of Gibraltar, despite the lack of evidence of migratory movements observed by tagging data. Analyses of spatial genetic structure in relation to sex-ratio and size could indicate some level of sex/stage biased migratory behaviour.

  13. Comparing amyloid-β deposition, neuroinflammation, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial complex I activity in brain: a PET study in aged monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Hideo; Nishiyama, Shingo; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Kanazawa, Masakatsu; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Harada, Norihiro [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Central Research Laboratory, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition, translocator protein (TSPO) activity, regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc), and mitochondrial complex I (MC-I) activity in the brain of aged monkeys. PET scans with {sup 11}C-PIB (Aβ), {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF (MC-I), {sup 11}C-DPA-713 (TSPO), and {sup 18}F-FDG (rCMRglc) were performed in aged monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in the conscious state and under isoflurane anaesthesia. {sup 11}C-PIB binding to Aβ and {sup 11}C-DPA-713 binding to TSPO were evaluated in terms of standard uptake values (SUV). The total volume of distribution (V{sub T}) of {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF and rCMRglc with {sup 18}F-FDG were calculated using arterial blood sampling. Isoflurane did not affect MC-I activity measured in terms of {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF uptake in living brain. There was a significant negative correlation between {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF binding (V{sub T}) and {sup 11}C-PIB uptake (SUVR), and there was a significant positive correlation between {sup 11}C-DPA-713 uptake (SUV) and {sup 11}C-PIB uptake. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between rCMRglc ratio and {sup 11}C-PIB uptake. {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF could be a potential PET probe for quantitative imaging of impaired MC-I activity that is correlated with Aβ deposition in the living brain. (orig.)

  14. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a purported inhibitor of chaperone protein GRP78, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I.

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    Simmy Thomas

    Full Text Available Verrucosidin (VCD belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78 expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD's anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin. However, VCD's strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed.

  15. Of mice and the 'Age of Discovery': the complex history of colonization of the Azorean archipelago by the house mouse (Mus musculus) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, S I; Mathias, M L; Searle, J B

    2015-01-01

    Humans have introduced many species onto remote oceanic islands. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a human commensal and has consequently been transported to oceanic islands around the globe as an accidental stowaway. The history of these introductions can tell us not only about the mice themselves but also about the people that transported them. Following a phylogeographic approach, we used mitochondrial D-loop sequence variation (within an 849- to 864-bp fragment) to study house mouse colonization of the Azores. A total of 239 sequences were obtained from all nine islands, and interpretation was helped by previously published Iberian sequences and 66 newly generated Spanish sequences. A Bayesian analysis revealed presence in the Azores of most of the D-loop clades previously described in the domesticus subspecies of the house mouse, suggesting a complex colonization history of the archipelago as a whole from multiple geographical origins, but much less heterogeneity (often single colonization?) within islands. The expected historical link with mainland Portugal was reflected in the pattern of D-loop variation of some of the islands but not all. A more unexpected association with a distant North European source area was also detected in three islands, possibly reflecting human contact with the Azores prior to the 15th century discovery by Portuguese mariners. Widening the scope to colonization of the Macaronesian islands as a whole, human linkages between the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, Portugal and Spain were revealed through the sharing of mouse sequences between these areas. From these and other data, we suggest mouse studies may help resolve historical uncertainties relating to the 'Age of Discovery'. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

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    Seung Hun Jeong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Echinochrome A (Ech A is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM, mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M, mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT, single strand binding protein (SSBP and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM. In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variants of respiratory complex I that uniquely characterize haplogroup T2 are associated with increased risk of age-related macular degeneration.

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    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a chronic neurodegenerative and neovascular retinal disease, is the leading cause of blindness in elderly people of western European origin. While structural and functional alterations in mitochondria (mt and their metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative and vascular diseases, the relationship of inherited variants in the mitochondrial genome and mt haplogroup subtypes with advanced AMD has not been reported in large prospective cohorts. METHODOLOGY/PRINICIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the relationship of inherited mtDNA variants with advanced AMD in 1168 people using a three-stage design on samples from 12-year and 10-year prospective studies on the natural history of age-related eye disease. In Stage I we resequenced the entire genome in 99 elderly AMD-free controls and 215 people with advanced AMD from the 12-year study. A consistent association with AMD in 14 of 17 SNPs characterizing the mtDNA T haplogroup emerged. Further analysis revealed these associations were driven entirely by the T2 haplogroup, and characterized by two variants in Complex I genes (A11812G of MT-ND4 and A14233G of MT-ND6. We genotyped T haplogroups in an independent sample of 490 cases and 61 controls from the same study (Stage II and in 56 cases and 246 controls from the 10-year study (Stage III. People in the T2 haplogroup were approximately 2.5 times more likely to have advanced AMD than their peers (odds ratio [OR] = 2.54, 95%CI 1.36-4.80, PComplex I are reasonable targets for novel functional analyses and therapeutic research in AMD.

  18. Enhanced Cardiac Akt/Protein Kinase B Signaling Contributes to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy in Part by Impairing Mitochondrial Function via Transcriptional Repression of Mitochondrion-Targeted Nuclear Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Adam R.; O'Neill, Brian T.; Bugger, Heiko; Riehle, Christian; Tuinei, Joseph; Buchanan, Jonathan; Tsushima, Kensuke; Wang, Li; Caro, Pilar; Guo, Aili; Sloan, Crystal; Kim, Bum Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Pereira, Renata O.; McCrory, Mark A.; Nye, Brenna G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Shioi, Tetsuo; Weimer, Bart C.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained Akt activation induces cardiac hypertrophy (LVH), which may lead to heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that Akt activation contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological LVH. Akt activation induced LVH and progressive repression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathways. Preventing LVH by inhibiting mTOR failed to prevent the decline in mitochondrial function, but glucose utilization was maintained. Akt activation represses expression of mitochondrial regulatory, FAO, and oxidative phosphorylation genes in vivo that correlate with the duration of Akt activation in part by reducing FOXO-mediated transcriptional activation of mitochondrion-targeted nuclear genes in concert with reduced signaling via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/PGC-1α and other transcriptional regulators. In cultured myocytes, Akt activation disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics, which could be partially reversed by maintaining nuclear FOXO but not by increasing PGC-1α. Thus, although short-term Akt activation may be cardioprotective during ischemia by reducing mitochondrial metabolism and increasing glycolysis, long-term Akt activation in the adult heart contributes to pathological LVH in part by reducing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. PMID:25535334

  19. A Joint Salt and Pepper Noise Removal and Resolution Enhancement Algorithm in Complex Wavelet Domain

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    Shirin Salehi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing image resolution enhancement algorithms assume that the image is clean and noise free, but this assumption is not practically valid. One strategy for interpolation of noisy images is to denoise the image first and then interpolate the denoised image. However, this strategy does not lead to satisfying results because denoising may smooth image details and also other artifacts such as blurring and blocking introduced due to image denoising will be amplified in the following interpolation stage. Thus, in this paper we propose a joint salt and pepper noise removal and resolution enhancement algorithm using dual-tree complex wavelet transform and feedforward neural networks. In this algorithm, the wavelet subbands corresponding to noise free high resolution image are estimated from noisy low resolution image by multi-layer perceptron (MLP. Therefore the noise free high resolution image is obtained by complex wavelet reconstruction of the estimated subbands. Takeing advantages of complex wavelet transform such as nearly shift invariance and directional selectivity the subband estimation by neural networks is done with high accuracy. As it is verified in the experimental results, the proposed algorithm has better performance both subjectively and objectively and is able to maintain the image fine structures well.

  20. Enhancement of Hydrogen Storage Behavior of Complex Hydrides via Bimetallic Nanocatalysts Doping

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    Prakash C. Sharma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pristine complex quaternary hydride (LiBH4/2LiNH2 and its destabilized counterpart (LiBH4/2LiNH2/nanoMgH2 have recently shown promising reversible hydrogen storage capacity under moderate operating conditions. The destabilization of complex hydride via nanocrystalline MgH2 apparently lowers the thermodynamic heat values and thus enhances the reversible hydrogen storage behavior at moderate temperatures. However, the kinetics of these materials is rather low and needs to be improved for on-board vehicular applications. Nanocatalyst additives such as nano Ni, nano Fe, nano Co, nano Mn and nano Cu at low concentrations on the complex hydride host structures have demonstrated a reduction in the decomposition temperature and overall increase in the hydrogen desorption reaction rates. Bi-metallic nanocatalysts such as the combination of nano Fe and nano Ni have shown further pronounced kinetics enhancement in comparison to their individual counterparts. Additionally, the vital advantage of using bi-metallic nanocatalysts is to enable the synergistic effects and characteristics of the two transitional nanometal species on the host hydride matrix for the optimized hydrogen storage behavior.

  1. Complex multi-enhancer contacts captured by Genome Architecture Mapping (GAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagrie, Robert A.; Scialdone, Antonio; Schueler, Markus; Kraemer, Dorothee C.A.; Chotalia, Mita; Xie, Sheila Q.; Barbieri, Mariano; de Santiago, Inês; Lavitas, Liron-Mark; Branco, Miguel R.; Fraser, James; Dostie, Josée; Game, Laurence; Dillon, Niall; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Nicodemi, Mario; Pombo, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Summary The organization of the genome in the nucleus and the interactions of genes with their regulatory elements are key features of transcriptional control and their disruption can cause disease. We developed a novel genome-wide method, Genome Architecture Mapping (GAM), for measuring chromatin contacts, and other features of three-dimensional chromatin topology, based on sequencing DNA from a large collection of thin nuclear sections. We apply GAM to mouse embryonic stem cells and identify an enrichment for specific interactions between active genes and enhancers across very large genomic distances, using a mathematical model ‘SLICE’ (Statistical Inference of Co-segregation). GAM also reveals an abundance of three-way contacts genome-wide, especially between regions that are highly transcribed or contain super-enhancers, highlighting a previously inaccessible complexity in genome architecture and a major role for gene-expression specific contacts in organizing the genome in mammalian nuclei. PMID:28273065

  2. Fluorescence enhancement of quercetin complexes by silver nanoparticles and its analytical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Liangliang; Wu, Xia; Huang, Fei; Wang, Minqin; Liu, Xiaodan

    2014-03-01

    It is found that the plasmon effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) helps to enhance the fluorescence intensity of the quercetin (Qu) and nucleic acids system. Qu exhibited strong fluorescence enhancement when it bound to nucleic acids in the presence of AgNPs. Based on this, a sensitive method for the determination of nucleic acids was developed. The detection limits for the nucleic acids (S/N = 3) were reduced to the ng mL-1 level. The interaction mechanism of the AgNPs-fish sperm DNA (fsDNA)-Qu system was also investigated in this paper. This complex system of Qu and AgNPs was also successfully used for the detection of nucleic acids in agarose gel electrophoresis analysis. Preliminary results indicated that AgNPs also helped to improve sensitivity in the fluorescence image analysis of Qu combined with cellular contents in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts.

  3. A cohesin-OCT4 complex mediates Sox enhancers to prime an early embryonic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Nesrine; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Hiriart, Emilye; Yang, Henry; Bezerra, Hudson; Gualazzi, Maria-Giovanna; Stefanovic, Sonia; Guénantin, Anne-Claire; Evans, Sylvia M; Pucéat, Michel

    2015-04-08

    Short- and long-scales intra- and inter-chromosomal interactions are linked to gene transcription, but the molecular events underlying these structures and how they affect cell fate decision during embryonic development are poorly understood. One of the first embryonic cell fate decisions (that is, mesendoderm determination) is driven by the POU factor OCT4, acting in concert with the high-mobility group genes Sox-2 and Sox-17. Here we report a chromatin-remodelling mechanism and enhancer function that mediate cell fate switching. OCT4 alters the higher-order chromatin structure at both Sox-2 and Sox-17 loci. OCT4 titrates out cohesin and switches the Sox-17 enhancer from a locked (within an inter-chromosomal Sox-2 enhancer/CCCTC-binding factor CTCF/cohesin loop) to an active (within an intra-chromosomal Sox-17 promoter/enhancer/cohesin loop) state. SALL4 concomitantly mobilizes the polycomb complexes at the Soxs loci. Thus, OCT4/SALL4-driven cohesin- and polycombs-mediated changes in higher-order chromatin structure mediate instruction of early cell fate in embryonic cells.

  4. A cohesin–OCT4 complex mediates Sox enhancers to prime an early embryonic lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Nesrine; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Hiriart, Emilye; Yang, Henry; Bezerra, Hudson; Gualazzi, Maria-Giovanna; Stefanovic, Sonia; Guénantin, Anne-Claire; Evans, Sylvia M.; Pucéat, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Short- and long-scales intra-and inter-chromosomal interactions are linked to gene transcription, but the molecular events underlying these structures and how they affect cell fate decision during embryonic development are poorly understood. One of the first embryonic cell fate decisions (that is, mesendoderm determination) is driven by the POU factor OCT4, acting in concert with the high-mobility group genes Sox-2 and Sox-17. Here we report a chromatin-remodelling mechanism and enhancer function that mediate cell fate switching. OCT4 alters the higher-order chromatin structure at both Sox-2 and Sox-17 loci. OCT4 titrates out cohesin and switches the Sox-17 enhancer from a locked (within an interchromosomal Sox-2 enhancer/CCCTC-binding factor CTCF/cohesin loop) to an active (within an intra-chromosomal Sox-17 promoter/enhancer/cohesin loop) state. SALL4 concomitantly mobilizes the polycomb complexes at the Soxs loci. Thus, OCT4/SALL4-driven cohesin- and polycombs-mediated changes in higher-order chromatin structure mediate instruction of early cell fate in embryonic cells. PMID:25851587

  5. Enhanced reactive oxygen species through direct copper sulfide nanoparticle-doxorubicin complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Cupo, Michela; Guo, Liangran; Scott, Julie; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Yan, Bingfang; Lu, Wei

    2017-12-01

    CuS-based nanostructures loading the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX) exerted excellent cancer photothermal chemotherapy under multi-external stimuli. The DOX loading was generally designed through electrostatic interaction or chemical linkers. However, the interaction between DOX molecules and CuS nanoparticles has not been investigated. In this work, we use PEGylated hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) to directly load DOX through the DOX/Cu2+ chelation process. Distinctively, the synthesized PEG–HCuSNPs–DOX release the DOX/Cu2+ complexes into surrounding environment, which generate significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a controlled manner by near-infrared laser. The CuS nanoparticle-mediated photothermal ablation facilitates the ROS-induced cancer cell killing effect. Our current work reveals a DOX/Cu2+-mediated ROS-enhanced cell-killing effect in addition to conventional photothermal chemotherapy through the direct CuS nanoparticle-DOX complexation.

  6. Supramolecular Complexation of Carbohydrates for the Bioavailability Enhancement of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2015-10-27

    In this review, a comprehensive overview of advances in the supramolecular complexes of carbohydrates and poorly soluble drugs is presented. Through the complexation process, poorly soluble drugs could be efficiently delivered to their desired destinations. Carbohydrates, the most abundant biomolecules, have diverse physicochemical properties owing to their inherent three-dimensional structures, hydrogen bonding, and molecular recognition abilities. In this regard, oligosaccharides and their derivatives have been utilized for the bioavailability enhancement of hydrophobic drugs via increasing the solubility or stability. By extension, polysaccharides and their derivatives can form self-assembled architectures with poorly soluble drugs and have shown increased bioavailability in terms of the sustained or controlled drug release. These supramolecular systems using carbohydrate will be developed consistently in the field of pharmaceutical and medical application.

  7. Complex-formation-enhanced fluorescence quenching effect for efficient detection of picric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aixiang; Yang, Longmei; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Gaobin; Kong, Lin; Zhang, Xuanjun; Tian, Yupeng; Tao, Xutang; Yang, Jiaxiang

    2014-09-15

    Amine-functionalized α-cyanostilbene derivatives (Z)-2-(4-aminophenyl)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)acrylonitrile (ABA) and (Z)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)-2-[4-(butylamino)phenyl]acrylonitrile (BBA) were designed for specific recognition of picric acid (PA), an environmental and biological pollutant. The 1:1 host-guest complexes formed between the chemosensors and PA enhanced fluorescence quenching, thus leading to sensitive and selective detection in aqueous media and the solid phase. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. RNA-guided complex from a bacterial immune system enhances target recognition through seed sequence interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenheft, Blake; van Duijn, Esther; Bultema, Jelle B.; Waghmare, Sakharam P.; Zhou, Kaihong; Barendregt, Arjan; Westphal, Wiebke; Heck, Albert J. R.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Dickman, Mark J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Prokaryotes have evolved multiple versions of an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that targets foreign nucleic acids. In each case, transcripts derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are thought to selectively target invading phage and plasmids in a sequence-specific process involving a variable cassette of CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. The CRISPR locus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) includes four cas genes that are unique to and conserved in microorganisms harboring the Csy-type (CRISPR system yersinia) immune system. Here we show that the Csy proteins (Csy1–4) assemble into a 350 kDa ribonucleoprotein complex that facilitates target recognition by enhancing sequence-specific hybridization between the CRISPR RNA and complementary target sequences. Target recognition is enthalpically driven and localized to a “seed sequence” at the 5′ end of the CRISPR RNA spacer. Structural analysis of the complex by small-angle X-ray scattering and single particle electron microscopy reveals a crescent-shaped particle that bears striking resemblance to the architecture of a large CRISPR-associated complex from Escherichia coli, termed Cascade. Although similarity between these two complexes is not evident at the sequence level, their unequal subunit stoichiometry and quaternary architecture reveal conserved structural features that may be common among diverse CRISPR-mediated defense systems. PMID:21536913

  9. The sirtuin inhibitor nicotinamide enhances neuronal cell survival during acute anoxic injury through AKT, BAD, PARP, and mitochondrial associated "anti-apoptotic" pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Zhao-Zhong; Lin, Shi-Hua; Li, Faqi; Maiese, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    Understanding the role of nicotinamide (NIC) in different cell systems represents a significant challenge in several respects. Recently, NIC has been reported to have diverse roles during cell biology. In the absence of NIC, sirtuin protein activity is enhanced and pyrazinamidase/nicotinamidase 1 (PNC1) expression, an enzyme that deaminates NIC to convert NIC into nicotinic acid, is increased to lead to lifespan extension during calorie restriction, at least in yeast. Yet, NIC may be critical for cell survival as well as the modulation of inflammatory injury during both experimental models as well as in clinical studies. We therefore investigated some of the underlying signal transduction pathways that could be critical for the determination of the neuroprotective properties of NIC. We examined neuronal injury by trypan blue exclusion, DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, Akt1 phosphorylation, Bad phosphorylation, mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activity, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylation. Application of NIC (12.5 mM) significantly increased neuronal survival from 38 -/+ 3% of anoxia treated alone to 68 +/- 3%, decreased DNA fragmentation and membrane PS exposure from 67 -/+ 4% and 61 -/+ 5% of anoxia treated alone to 30 +/- 4% and 26 +/- 4% respectively. We further demonstrate that NIC functions through Akt1 activation, Bad phosphorylation, and the downstream modulation of mitochrondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, caspase 1, 3, and 8 - like activities, and PARP integrity to prevent genomic DNA degradation and PS externalization during anoxia. Yet, NIC does not alter the activity of either the MAPKs p38 or JNK, suggesting that protection by NIC during anoxia is independent of the p38 and JNK pathways. Additional investigations targeted to elucidate the cellular pathways responsible for the ability of NIC to modulate both lifespan extension and

  10. Jaeumganghwa-Tang Induces Apoptosis via the Mitochondrial Pathway and Lactobacillus Fermentation Enhances Its Anti-Cancer Activity in HT1080 Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aeyung; Im, Minju; Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Yang, Hye Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Jaeumganghwa-tang (JGT, Zi-yin-jiang-huo-tang in Chinese and Jiin-koka-to in Japanese) is an oriental herbal formula that has long been used as a traditional medicine to treat respiratory and kidney diseases. Recent studies revealed that JGT exhibited potent inhibitory effects on allergies, inflammation, pain, convulsions, and prostate hyperplasia. Several constituent herbs in JGT induce apoptotic cancer cell death. However, the anti-cancer activity of JGT has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of JGT using highly tumorigenic HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. In addition, we examined whether the Lactobacillus fermentation of JGT enhanced its anti-cancer activity using an in vivo xenograft model because fermentation of herbal extracts is thought to strengthen their therapeutic effects. Data revealed that JGT suppressed the growth of cancer cells efficiently by stimulating G1 cell cycle arrest and then inducing apoptotic cell death by causing mitochondrial damage and activating caspases. The phosphorylation of p38 and ERK also played a role in JGT-induced cell death. In vitro experiments demonstrated that JGT fermented with Lactobacillus acidophilus, designated fJGT162, elicited similar patterns of cell death as did non-fermented JGT. Meanwhile, the daily oral administration of 120 mg/kg fJGT162 to HT1080-bearing BALB/c nude mice suppressed tumor growth dramatically (up to 90%) compared with saline treatment, whereas the administration of non-fermented JGT suppressed tumor growth by ~70%. Collectively, these results suggest that JGT and fJGT162 are safe and useful complementary and alternative anti-cancer herbal therapies, and that Lactobacillus fermentation improves the in vivo anti-cancer efficacy of JGT significantly. PMID:26020238

  11. Role of Mitochondrial Metabolism in the Control of Early Lineage Progression and Aging Phenotypes in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Ebert, Birgit; Schäffner, Iris; Moss, Jonathan; Fiebig, Christian; Shin, Jaehoon; Moore, Darcie L; Ghosh, Laboni; Trinchero, Mariela F; Stockburger, Carola; Friedland, Kristina; Steib, Kathrin; von Wittgenstein, Julia; Keiner, Silke; Redecker, Christoph; Hölter, Sabine M; Xiang, Wei; Wurst, Wolfgang; Jagasia, Ravi; Schinder, Alejandro F; Ming, Guo-Li; Toni, Nicolas; Jessberger, Sebastian; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D Chichung

    2017-02-08

    Precise regulation of cellular metabolism is hypothesized to constitute a vital component of the developmental sequence underlying the life-long generation of hippocampal neurons from quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). The identity of stage-specific metabolic programs and their impact on adult neurogenesis are largely unknown. We show that the adult hippocampal neurogenic lineage is critically dependent on the mitochondrial electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation machinery at the stage of the fast proliferating intermediate progenitor cell. Perturbation of mitochondrial complex function by ablation of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) reproduces multiple hallmarks of aging in hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas pharmacological enhancement of mitochondrial function ameliorates age-associated neurogenesis defects. Together with the finding of age-associated alterations in mitochondrial function and morphology in NSCs, these data link mitochondrial complex function to efficient lineage progression of adult NSCs and identify mitochondrial function as a potential target to ameliorate neurogenesis-defects in the aging hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  13. Fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction regulates mitochondrial-network structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Wellman, Tyler J.; Martinez, Nuria; Allen, Philip G.; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2015-10-01

    Cells can be exposed to irregular mechanical fluctuations, such as those arising from changes in blood pressure. Here, we report that ATP production, assessed through changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, is downregulated in vascular smooth muscle cells in culture exposed to monotonous stretch cycles when compared with cells exposed to a variable cyclic stretch that incorporates physiological levels of cycle-by-cycle variability in stretch amplitude. Variable stretch enhances ATP production by increasing the expression of ATP synthase’s catalytic domain, cytochrome c oxidase and its tyrosine phosphorylation, mitofusins and PGC-1α. Such a fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction mechanism is mediated by motor proteins and by the enhancement of microtubule-, actin- and mitochondrial-network complexity. We also show that, in aorta rings isolated from rats, monotonous stretch downregulates--whereas variable stretch maintains--physiological vessel-wall contractility through mitochondrial ATP production. Our results have implications for ATP-dependent and mechanosensitive intracellular processes.

  14. Mitochondrial flash as a novel biomarker of mitochondrial respiration in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guohua; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Huiliang; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Wang, Wang

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial respiration through electron transport chain (ETC) activity generates ATP and reactive oxygen species in eukaryotic cells. The modulation of mitochondrial respiration in vivo or under physiological conditions remains elusive largely due to the lack of appropriate approach to monitor ETC activity in a real-time manner. Here, we show that ETC-coupled mitochondrial flash is a novel biomarker for monitoring mitochondrial respiration under pathophysiological conditions in cultured adult cardiac myocyte and perfused beating heart. Through real-time confocal imaging, we follow the frequency of a transient bursting fluorescent signal, named mitochondrial flash, from individual mitochondria within intact cells expressing a mitochondrial matrix-targeted probe, mt-cpYFP (mitochondrial-circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein). This mt-cpYFP recorded mitochondrial flash has been shown to be composed of a major superoxide signal with a minor alkalization signal within the mitochondrial matrix. Through manipulating physiological substrates for mitochondrial respiration, we find a close coupling between flash frequency and the ETC electron flow, as measured by oxygen consumption rate in cardiac myocyte. Stimulating electron flow under physiological conditions increases flash frequency. On the other hand, partially block or slowdown electron flow by inhibiting the F0F1 ATPase, which represents a pathological condition, transiently increases then decreases flash frequency. Limiting electron entrance at complex I by knocking out Ndufs4, an assembling subunit of complex I, suppresses mitochondrial flash activity. These results suggest that mitochondrial electron flow can be monitored by real-time imaging of mitochondrial flash. The mitochondrial flash frequency could be used as a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiration under physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Enhancement of levodopa stability when complexed with β-cyclodextrin in transdermal patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, Rana; Al-Shar'i, Nizar; Tashtoush, Bassam; Athamneh, Tamara

    2016-11-03

    Levodopa is a promising candidate for administration via the transdermal route because it exhibits a short plasma half-life and has a small window of absorption in the upper section of the small intestine. The aim of this study was to prepare stable levodopa transdermal patches. Both xanthan gum and Carbopol 971 polymers were selected with ethylcellulose constituting the backing layer of the prepared patches. The effect of adding β-cyclodextrin on the prepared patches was investigated. The uniformity in thickness, weight and content of the studied patches was acceptable. Physicochemical characterization revealed that there was no interaction between levodopa and the applied polymer. The results proved that levodopa precipitated as an amorphous form in carbopol patches. Controlled drug release was achieved for all the tested patches over a 6 h period. However, increased permeation was achieved for the carbopol patches. Although cyclodextrin did not enhance levodopa permeation, the stability study confirmed that levodopa stability was enhanced when complexed with β-cyclodextrin. The cumulative amount of drug released from carbopol patches is slightly higher than that of xanthan patches. The optimal stability was achieved in the carbopol/levodopa:β-cyclodextrin patch. The levodopa-β-cyclodextrin complex was successfully characterized using X-ray diffraction, NMR analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. In conclusion, carbopol/levodopa:β-cyclodextrin patches can be considered as a promising stable and effective transdermal drug-delivery system.

  16. Semiconducting polymer encapsulated mesoporous silica particles with conjugated Europium complexes: toward enhanced luminescence under aqueous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jixi; Prabhakar, Neeraj; Näreoja, Tuomas; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of lanthanide organic complexes in meso-organized hybrid materials for luminescence applications have attracted immense interest due to the possibility of controlled segregation at the nanoscopic level for novel optical properties. Aimed at enhancing the luminescence intensity and stability of the hybrid materials in aqueous media, we developed polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) stabilized, semiconducting polymer (poly(9-vinylcarbazole), PVK) encapsulated mesoporous silica hybrid particles grafted with Europium(III) complexes. Monosilylated β-diketonate ligands (1-(2-naphthoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoroacetonate, NTA) were first co-condensed in the mesoporous silica particles as pendent groups for bridging and anchoring the lanthanide complexes, resulting in particles with an mean diameter of ∼ 450 nm and a bimodal pore size distribution centered at 3.5 and 5.3 nm. PVK was encapsulated on the resulted particles by a solvent-induced surface precipitation process, in order to seal the mesopores and protect Europium ions from luminescence quenching by producing a hydrophobic environment. The obtained polymer encapsulated MSN-EuLC@PVK-PVP particles exhibit significantly higher intrinsic quantum yield (Φ(Ln) = 39%) and longer lifetime (τ(obs) = 0.51 ms), as compared with those without polymer encapsulation. Most importantly, a high luminescence stability was realized when MSN-EuLC@PVK-PVP particles were dispersed in various aqueous media, showing no noticeable quenching effect. The beneficial features and positive attributes of both mesoporous silica and semiconducting polymers as lanthanide-complex host were merged in a single hybrid carrier, opening up the possibility of using these hybrid luminescent materials under complex aqueous conditions such as biological/physiological environments.

  17. Mutations in the ND5 subunit of complex I of the mitochondrial DNA are a frequent cause of oxidative phosphorylation disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M.J.; Spruijt, L.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Schoonderwoerd, K.C.; Hendrickx, A.; Smeets, H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Detection of mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is usually limited to common mutations and the transfer RNA genes. However, mutations in other mtDNA regions can be an important cause of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) disease as well. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether regions

  18. Kinetic activity, membrane mitochondrial potential, lipid peroxidation, intracellular pH and calcium of frozen/thawed bovine spermatozoa treated with metabolic enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, R; Gallo, A; Cecchini, S

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the progressive decline of sperm motility during storage there is a need to find substances capable of enhancing sperm energy metabolism and motility and/or preserving it from oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate in frozen/thawed bovine spermatozoa the effect of several compounds, such as myo-inositol, pentoxifylline, penicillamine + hypotaurine + epinephrine mixture (PHE), caffeine and coenzyme Q10+ zinc + d-aspartate mixture (CZA), on either kinetic or metabolic parameters. Sperm kinetics was evaluated by Sperm Class Analyser whereas specific fluorochromes were used to evaluated mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular pH, intracellular calcium concentration and lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation was also evaluated by TBARS analysis. Treatments significantly affected total and progressive motility with different dynamics in relation to the incubation time. After the first hour of incubation, CZA treatment produced the best performance in total and progressive sperm motility as well as in curvilinear velocity, average path velocity and amplitude of head displacement, whereas pentoxifylline stimulated the highest straight-line velocity. MMP showed higher values (p lipid peroxidation were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the incubation time rather than the treatments. Intracellular pH varied significantly (p < 0.01) in relation to either the incubation time or treatments. In particular, it showed a progressive increase throughout incubation with values in control group significantly higher than in myo-inositol, PHE, caffeine, pentoxifylline and CZA groups (7.37 ± 0.03 vs. 7.29 ± 0.03, 7.28 ± 0.03, 7.26 ± 0.03, 7.22 ± 0.03 and 7.00 ± 0.03, respectively; p < 0.01).; however, among treatments, CZA displayed the lowest values. Significant correlations were found between sperm kinetic and metabolic parameters. These findings provide new comparative information on the effects of putative metabolic

  19. Detection of complex molecular samples by low-cost surface enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hsuan-Chao; Banadaki, Yaser Mohammadi; Sharifi, Safura

    2017-04-01

    Raman scattering is a well-known technique for detecting and identifying complex molecular samples. The weak Raman signals are enormously enhanced in the presence of a nano-patterned metallic surface next to the specimen. This paper reports new techniques to obtain the nanostructures required for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) without costly and sophisticated fabrication steps, which are nanoimprint lithography (NIL), electrochemical deposition, electron beam induced deposition, and focus ion beam (FIB). 20 nm Au thicknesses of sputtered Au were deposited on etched household aluminum foil (base substrate) for vitro application. The Raman signal were caused by the Aluminum pre-etched times. In preliminary results, enhancement factors of 106 times were observed from SERS substrate for in vitro measurements. Moreover, the ability to perform in vivo measurements was demonstrated after removing the base aluminum foil substrate. This application allows Raman signals to be obtained from the surface or interior of opaque specimens. The nano-patterned gold may also be coupled in a probe to a remote spectrometer via an articulated arm. This opens up Raman spectroscopy for use in a clinical environment.

  20. Structural Studies of the Yeast Mitochondrial Degradosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    and nuclear exosome complexes, which consist of 10-12 different nuclease subunits, the mitochondrial degradosome is composed of only two large subunits - an RNase (Dss1p) and a helicase (Suv3p), belonging the Ski2 class of DExH box RNA helicases. Both subunits are encoded on the yeast nuclear genome...... and imported to the mitochondrial matrix posttranslationally. In an effort to understand the complex mechanisms underlying control of RNA turnover and surveillance in eukaryotic organisms, we are studying the structure of the mitochondrial degradosome as a model system for the more complex exosomes. Dss1p...

  1. Mitochondrial elongation-mediated glucose metabolism reprogramming is essential for tumour cell survival during energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Huang, Q; Long, X; Guo, X; Sun, X; Jin, X; Li, Z; Ren, T; Yuan, P; Huang, X; Zhang, H; Xing, J

    2017-08-24

    To date, mechanisms of tumour cell survival under energy stress are not well understood. Cumulative evidence is beginning to reveal that specific mitochondrial morphologies are often associated with energetic states and survival of cells. However, the functional roles of mitochondria in the metabolic adaptation of tumour cells to energy stress remain to be elucidated. In this study, we first investigated the changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by nutrition deprivation in tumour cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism. We then systematically explored glucose metabolism reprogramming by energy stress-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and its effect on tumour cell survival. Our results showed that starvation treatment resulted in a dramatic mitochondrial elongation, which was mainly mediated by DRP1S637 phosphorylation through protein kinase A activation and subsequent suppression of mitochondrial translocation of DRP1. We further observed that tumour cells under an energy stress condition exhibited a clear shift from glycolysis towards oxidative phosphorylation, which was reversed by the recovery of mitochondrial fission induced by forced expression of mutant DRP1S637A. Mechanistically, energy stress-induced mitochondrial elongation facilitated cristae formation and assembly of respiratory complexes to enhance oxidative phosphorylation, which in turn exhibited a feedback inhibitory effect on glycolysis through NAD+-dependent SIRT1 activation. In addition, our data indicated that DRP1S637-mediated mitochondrial elongation under energy stress was essential for tumour cell survival both in vitro and in vivo and predicted poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Overall, our study demonstrates that remodelling of mitochondrial morphology plays a critical role in tumour cell adaptation to energy stress by reprogramming glucose metabolism.

  2. New water soluble phosphonate and polycarboxylate complexants for enhanced f element separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.; Lessmann, E.P.; Mendoza, M.D.; Feil, J.F.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    While lipophilic extractant molecules and ion exchange polymeric materials are clearly essential to efficient separation of metal ions by solvent extraction or ion exchange, the most difficult separations often could not be accomplished without the use of water soluble complexants. This report focuses on recent developments in design, synthesis and characterization of phosphonic acid and polycarboxylic acid ligands for enhanced f element separations. Emphasis is on the basic solution chemistry and crystal structures of complexes of the f elements with selected amino-derivatives of methanediphosphonic acid and with tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid. The former series of compounds exhibit high affinity for lanthanides and actinides in acidic solutions. The latter ligand exhibits an unusual (and very useful) ``anti-selectivity`` for uranyl ion in a solvent extraction process, which permits efficient separation of uranyl from more radioactive components of nuclear wastes. Most of the observed effects can be explained through examination of the structure of the ligand, and comparison of the spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters for complexation of various metal ions.

  3. Grape seed extract targets mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress leading to cytoprotective autophagy and apoptotic death in human head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Deep, Gagan; Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major killer worldwide and innovative measures are urgently warranted to lower the morbidity and mortality caused by this malignancy. Aberrant redox and metabolic status in HNSCC cells offer a unique opportunity to specifically target cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of grape seed extract (GSE) to target the redox and bioenergetic alterations in HNSCC cells. GSE treatment decreased the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity, increased the mitochondrial superoxide levels and depleted the levels of cellular antioxidant (glutathione), thus resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in human HNSCC Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Polyethylene glycol-SOD addition reversed the GSE-mediated apoptosis without restoring complex III activity. Along with redox changes, GSE inhibited the extracellular acidification rate (representing glycolysis) and oxygen consumption rate (indicating oxidative phosphorylation) leading to metabolic stress in HNSCC cells. Molecular studies revealed that GSE activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and suppressed Akt/mTOR/4E-BP1/S6K signaling in both Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Interestingly, GSE increased the autophagic load specifically in FaDu cells, and autophagy inhibition significantly augmented the apoptosis in these cells. Consistent with in vitro results, in vivo analyses also showed that GSE feeding in nude mice activated AMPK and induced-autophagy in FaDu xenograft tumor tissues. Overall, these findings are innovative as we for the first time showed that GSE targets ETC complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress, thereby, causing autophagy and apoptotic death in HNSCC cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  5. Cell cycle regulators guide mitochondrial activity in radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Aris T; Li, Jian Jian

    2014-03-20

    There are accruing concerns on potential genotoxic agents present in the environment including low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) that naturally exists on earth's surface and atmosphere and is frequently used in medical diagnosis and nuclear industry. Although its long-term health risk is being evaluated and remains controversial, LDIR is shown to induce temporary but significant adaptive responses in mammalian cells and animals. The mechanisms guiding the mitochondrial function in LDIR-induced adaptive response represent a unique communication between DNA damage and cellular metabolism. Elucidation of the LDIR-regulated mitochondrial activity may reveal new mechanisms adjusting cellular function to cope with hazardous environmental stress. Key cell cycle regulators, including Cyclin D1/CDK4 and Cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) complexes, are actively involved in the regulation of mitochondrial functions via phosphorylation of their mitochondrial targets. Accumulating new evidence supports a concept that the Cyclin B1/CDK1 complex acts as a mediator in the cross talk between radiation-induced DNA damage and mitochondrial functions to coordinate cellular responses to low-level genotoxic stresses. The LDIR-mediated mitochondrial activity via Cyclin B1/CDK1 regulation is an irreplaceable network that is able to harmonize vital cellular functions with adjusted mitochondrial metabolism to enhance cellular homeostasis. Further investigation of the coordinative mechanism that regulates mitochondrial activities in sublethal stress conditions, including LDIR, will reveal new insights of how cells cope with genotoxic injury and will be vital for future targeted therapeutic interventions that reduce environmental injury and cancer risk.

  6. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Deborah E; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease is a heterogeneous group of multisystemic diseases that develop consequent to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. The prevalence of inherited mitochondrial disease has been estimated to be greater than 1 in 5,000 births; however, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease are not taught in most adult-cardiology curricula. Because mitochondrial diseases often occur as a syndrome with resultant multiorgan dysfunction, they might not immediately appear to be specific to the cardiovascular system. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy can be described as a myocardial condition characterized by abnormal heart-muscle structure, function, or both, secondary to genetic defects involving the mitochondrial respiratory chain, in the absence of concomitant coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease, or congenital heart disease. The typical cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial disease--hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, left ventricular myocardial noncompaction, and heart failure--can worsen acutely during a metabolic crisis. The optimal management of mitochondrial disease necessitates the involvement of a multidisciplinary team, careful evaluations of patients, and the anticipation of iatrogenic and noniatrogenic complications. In this review, we describe the complex pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease and its clinical features. We focus on current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, including optimal therapeutic management and long-term monitoring. We hope that this information will serve as a guide for practicing cardiologists who treat patients thus affected.

  7. Mitochondrial Stress Signaling Promotes Cellular Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Alexandra Barbour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aetiology of many complex diseases, as well as the ageing process. Much of the research on mitochondrial dysfunction has focused on how mitochondrial damage may potentiate pathological phenotypes. The purpose of this review is to draw attention to the less well-studied mechanisms by which the cell adapts to mitochondrial perturbations. This involves communication of stress to the cell and successful induction of quality control responses, which include mitophagy, unfolded protein response, upregulation of antioxidant and DNA repair enzymes, morphological changes, and if all else fails apoptosis. The mitochondrion is an inherently stressful environment and we speculate that dysregulation of stress signaling or an inability to switch on these adaptations during times of mitochondrial stress may underpin mitochondrial dysfunction and hence amount to pathological states over time.

  8. Sequencing the hypervariable regions of human mitochondrial DNA using massively parallel sequencing: Enhanced data acquisition for DNA samples encountered in forensic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carey; Peters, Dixie; Warshauer, David; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA testing is a useful tool in the analysis of forensic biological evidence. In cases where nuclear DNA is damaged or limited in quantity, the higher copy number of mitochondrial genomes available in a sample can provide information about the source of a sample. Currently, Sanger-type sequencing (STS) is the primary method to develop mitochondrial DNA profiles. This method is laborious and time consuming. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can increase the amount of information obtained from mitochondrial DNA samples while improving turnaround time by decreasing the numbers of manipulations and more so by exploiting high throughput analyses to obtain interpretable results. In this study 18 buccal swabs, three different tissue samples from five individuals, and four bones samples from casework were sequenced at hypervariable regions I and II using STS and MPS. Sample enrichment for STS and MPS was PCR-based. Library preparation for MPS was performed using Nextera® XT DNA Sample Preparation Kit and sequencing was performed on the MiSeq™ (Illumina, Inc.). MPS yielded full concordance of base calls with STS results, and the newer methodology was able to resolve length heteroplasmy in homopolymeric regions. This study demonstrates short amplicon MPS of mitochondrial DNA is feasible, can provide information not possible with STS, and lays the groundwork for development of a whole genome sequencing strategy for degraded samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. KI motifs of human Knl1 enhance assembly of comprehensive spindle checkpoint complexes around MELT repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Veronica; Overlack, Katharina; Primorac, Ivana; van Gerwen, Suzan; Musacchio, Andrea

    2014-01-06

    The KMN network, a ten-subunit protein complex, mediates the interaction of kinetochores with spindle microtubules and recruits spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) constituents to halt cells in mitosis until attainment of sister chromatid biorientation. Two types of motifs in the KMN subunit Knl1 interact with SAC proteins. Lys-Ile (KI) motifs, found in vertebrates, interact with the TPR motifs of Bub1 and BubR1. Met-Glu-Leu-Thr (MELT) repeats, ubiquitous in evolution, recruit the Bub3/Bub1 complex in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The exact contributions of KI and MELT motifs to SAC signaling and chromosome alignment are unclear. We report here that KI motifs cooperate strongly with the neighboring single MELT motif in the N-terminal 250 residues (Knl1(1-250)) of human Knl1 to seed a comprehensive assembly of SAC proteins. In cells depleted of endogenous Knl1, kinetochore-targeted Knl1(1-250) suffices to restore SAC and chromosome alignment. Individual MELT repeats outside of Knl1(1-250), which lack flanking KI motifs, establish qualitatively similar sets of interactions, but less efficiently. MELT sequences on Knl1 emerge from our analysis as the platforms on which SAC complexes become assembled. Our results show that KI motifs are enhancers of MELT function in assembling SAC signaling complexes, and that they might have evolved to limit the expansion of MELT motifs by providing a more robust mechanism of SAC signaling around a single MELT. We shed light on the mechanism of Bub1 and BubR1 recruitment and identify crucial questions for future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Melatonin and human mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sharafati-Chaleshtori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main causative factors in a wide variety of complications such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, aging process, and septic shock. Decrease in respiratory complex activity, increase in free radical production, increase in mitochondrial synthase activity, increase in nitric oxide production, and impair in electron transport system and/or mitochondrial permeability are considered as the main factors responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, is selectively taken up by mitochondria and acts as a powerful antioxidant, regulating the mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin increases the permeability of membranes and is the stimulator of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. It also acts as an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Melatonin can cause resistance to oxidation damage by fixing the microsomal membranes. Melatonin has been shown to retard aging and inhibit neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, septic shock, diabetes, cancer, and other complications related to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study, other than introducing melatonin, was to present the recent findings on clinical effects in diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction including diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, and diseases related to brain function.

  11. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eBalderas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS, voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, and evidence for its potential coassembly with β subunits. Notoriously, β1 subunit directly interacts with cytochrome c oxidase and mitoBKCa can be modulated by substrates of the respiratory chain. mitoBKCa channel has a central role in protecting the heart from ischemia, where pharmacological activation of the channel impacts the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial Ca2+ preventing cell death likely by impeding uncontrolled opening of the mitochondrial transition pore. Supporting this view, inhibition of mitoBKCa with Iberiotoxin, enhances cytochrome c release from glioma mitochondria. Many tantalizing questions remain. Some of them are: how is mitoBKCa coupled to the respiratory chain? Does mitoBKCa play non-conduction roles in mitochondria physiology? Which are the functional partners of mitoBKCa? What are the roles of mitoBKCa in other cell types? Answers to these questions are essential to define the impact of mitoBKCa channel in mitochondria biology and disease.

  12. Combined effects of cadmium, temperature and hypoxia-reoxygenation on mitochondrial function in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O.; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Ternary interactions of Cd, temperature and H-R alter their individual and binary effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics. • Oxidative stress explains many effects of Cd, H-R and temperature on mitochondria. • Cd accumulation does not explain increased sensitivity of mitochondria to multiple stressors. • Cd induces hormetic responses during H-R stress. • Cd at low dose blunts conversion of complex I active (A)- to deactive (D)-form after H-R. - Abstract: Although aquatic organisms face multiple environmental stressors that may interact to alter adverse outcomes, our knowledge of stressor–stressor interaction on cellular function is limited. We investigated the combined effects of cadmium (Cd), hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R) and temperature on mitochondrial function. Liver mitochondria from juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to Cd (0–20 μM) and H-R (0 and 5 min) at 5, 13 and 25 °C followed by measurements of mitochondrial Cd load, volume, complex I active (A) ↔ deactive (D) transition, membrane potential, ROS release and ultrastructural changes. At high temperature Cd exacerbated H-R-imposed reduction of maximal complex I (CI) respiration whereas at low temperature 5 and 10 μM stimulated maximal CI respiration post H-R. The basal respiration showed a biphasic response at high temperatures with low Cd concentrations reducing the stimulatory effect of H-R and high concentrations enhancing this effect. At low temperature Cd monotonically enhanced H-R-induced stimulation of basal respiration. Cd and H-R reduced both the P/O ratio and the RCR at all 3 temperatures. Temperature rise alone increased mitochondrial Cd load and toxicity, but combined H-R and temperature exposure reduced mitochondrial Cd load but surprisingly exacerbated the mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by H-R was associated with swelling of the organelle and blocking of conversion of CI D to A form. However, low amounts of Cd protected against H

  13. Solubility enhancement, physicochemical characterization and formulation of fast-dissolving tablet of nifedipine-betacyclodextrin complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Changdeo Jagdale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to enhance the dissolution of nifedipine, a poorly water soluble drug by betacyclodextrin complexation and to study the effect of the preparation method on the in vitro dissolution profile. The stoichiometric ratio determined by phase solubility analysis for inclusion complexation of nifedipine with β-cyclodextrin was 1:1. Binary complex was prepared by different methods and was further characterized using XRD, DSC and FT-IR. A saturation solubility study was carried out to evaluate the increase in solubility of nifedipine. The optimized complex was formulated into fast-dissolving tablets by using the superdisintegrants Doshion P544, pregelatinized starch, crospovidone, sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium by direct compression. Tablets were evaluated for friability, hardness, weight variation, disintegration and in vitro dissolution. Tablets showed an enhanced dissolution rate compared to pure nifedipine.Este estudo teve por objetivo principal incrementar a dissolução do nifedipino, fármaco pouco solúvel em água, por meio de sua complexação com β-ciclodextrina e estudar o efeito do método de preparação sobre o perfil de dissolução in vitro. A razão estequiométrica, determinada por ensaio de solubilidade de fase, para a complexação de nifedipino por inclusão em β-ciclodextrina foi 1:1. O complexo binário foi preparado por diferentes métodos, sendo caracterizado utilizando-se difratometria de raios X (XRD, calorimetria diferencial de varredura (DSC e espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FT-IR. Realizou-se estudo de solubilidade de saturação para avaliar o incremento da solubilidade do nifedipino. O complexo otimizado foi formulado em comprimidos de dissolução rápida preparados por compressão direta, nos quais se utilizaram os superdesintegrantes Doshion P544, amido pré-gelatinizado, crospovidona, amidoglicolato de sódio e croscarmelose s

  14. Protective effect of Boerhaavia diffusa L. against mitochondrial dysfunction in angiotensin II induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyappan Prathapan

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. So mitochondria are emerging as one of the important druggable targets in the management of cardiac hypertrophy and other associated complications. In the present study, effects of ethanolic extract of Boerhaavia diffusa (BDE, a green leafy vegetable against mitochondrial dysfunction in angiotensin II (Ang II induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts was evaluated. H9c2 cells challenged with Ang II exhibited pathological hypertrophic responses and mitochondrial dysfunction which was evident from increment in cell volume (49.09±1.13%, protein content (55.17±1.19%, LDH leakage (58.74±1.87%, increased intracellular ROS production (26.25±0.91%, mitochondrial superoxide generation (65.06±2.27%, alteration in mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP and mitochondrial swelling. In addition, activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I-IV, aconitase, NADPH oxidase, thioredoxin reductase, oxygen consumption rate and calcium homeostasis were evaluated. Treatment with BDE significantly prevented the generation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide radicals and protected the mitochondria by preventing dissipation of ΔΨm, opening of mPTP, mitochondrial swelling and enhanced the activities of respiratory chain complexes and oxygen consumption rate in H9c2 cells. Activities of aconitase and thioredoxin reductase which was lowered (33.77±0.68% & 45.81±0.71% respectively due to hypertrophy, were increased in BDE treated cells (P≤0.05. Moreover, BDE also reduced the intracellular calcium overload in Ang II treated cells. Overall results revealed the protective effects of B. diffusa against mitochondrial dysfunction in hypertrophy in H9c2 cells and the present findings may shed new light on the therapeutic potential of B. diffusa in addition to its

  15. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengwei [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Huang, Chenglin [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  16. Enhanced Community Structure Detection in Complex Networks with Partial Background Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Kai-Di; Wang, Si-Qi

    2013-11-01

    Community structure detection in complex networks is important since it can help better understand the network topology and how the network works. However, there is still not a clear and widely-accepted definition of community structure, and in practice, different models may give very different results of communities, making it hard to explain the results. In this paper, different from the traditional methodologies, we design an enhanced semi-supervised learning framework for community detection, which can effectively incorporate the available prior information to guide the detection process and can make the results more explainable. By logical inference, the prior information is more fully utilized. The experiments on both the synthetic and the real-world networks confirm the effectiveness of the framework.

  17. Largely Enhanced Saturable Absorption of a Complex of Plasmonic and Molecular-Like Au Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Si-Jing; Nan, Fan; Yang, Da-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Ya-Lan; Zhou, Li; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-01-01

    A saturable absorber is a nonlinear functional material widely used in laser and photonic nanodevices. Metallic nanostructures have prominent saturable absorption (SA) at the plasmon resonance frequency owing to largely enhanced ground state absorption. However, the SA of plasmonic metal nanostructures is hampered by excited-state absorption processes at very high excitation power, which usually leads to a changeover from SA to reversed SA (SA→RSA). Here, we demonstrate tunable nonlinear absorption behaviours of a nanocomplex of plasmonic and molecular-like Au nanocrystals. The SA→RSA process is efficiently suppressed, and the stepwise SA→SA process is fulfilled owing to energy transfer in the nanocomplex. Our observations offer a strategy for preparation of the saturable absorber complex and have prospective applications in liquid lasers as well as one-photon nonlinear nanodevices. PMID:25875139

  18. Enhanced photovoltaic effect of ruthenium complex-modified graphene oxide with P-type conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei, E-mail: jj_zw_js@sina.com.cn; Bai, Huicong; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Ying; Lin, Shen; Liu, Jian; Yang, Qi; Song, Xi-Ming, E-mail: songlab@lnu.edu.cn

    2014-10-15

    A graphene oxide nanocomposite with bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-(4-methyl-2,2-bipyridine-4-yl) formamide) ruthenium (Ru(phen){sub 2}(bpy-NH{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 2}), a ruthenium complex, was synthesized by amidation reaction between amino group of the ruthenium complex and carboxyl group of GO. The as-prepared Ru(II)–GO composite was characterized by infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, surface photovoltage (SPV) spectrum and transient photovoltage (TPV) technology. This nanocomposite showed a typical p-type character and an enhanced photovoltaic effect at long timescale of about 3 × 10{sup −3} s compared to GO alone. A reversible rise/decay of the photocurrent in response to the on/off illumination step was also observed in a photoelectrochemical cell of the Ru(II)–GO composite. The photocurrent response of the Ru(II)–GO film was remarkably higher than that of GO film. Therefore, this Ru(II)–GO composite is believed to be a promising p-type photoelectric conversion material for further photovoltaic applications. - Highlights: • A new dye-sensitized graphene oxide nanocomposite was reported. • A photo-induced charge transfer process in this nanocomposite was confirmed. • This composite showed a typical p-type conductivity. • This composite showed an enhanced photovoltaic effect at a long timescale.

  19. Enhancements of evolutionary algorithm for the complex requirements of a nurse scheduling problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tein, Lim Huai; Ramli, Razamin

    2014-12-01

    Over the years, nurse scheduling is a noticeable problem that is affected by the global nurse turnover crisis. The more nurses are unsatisfied with their working environment the more severe the condition or implication they tend to leave. Therefore, the current undesirable work schedule is partly due to that working condition. Basically, there is a lack of complimentary requirement between the head nurse's liability and the nurses' need. In particular, subject to highly nurse preferences issue, the sophisticated challenge of doing nurse scheduling is failure to stimulate tolerance behavior between both parties during shifts assignment in real working scenarios. Inevitably, the flexibility in shifts assignment is hard to achieve for the sake of satisfying nurse diverse requests with upholding imperative nurse ward coverage. Hence, Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) is proposed to cater for this complexity in a nurse scheduling problem (NSP). The restriction of EA is discussed and thus, enhancement on the EA operators is suggested so that the EA would have the characteristic of a flexible search. This paper consists of three types of constraints which are the hard, semi-hard and soft constraints that can be handled by the EA with enhanced parent selection and specialized mutation operators. These operators and EA as a whole contribute to the efficiency of constraint handling, fitness computation as well as flexibility in the search, which correspond to the employment of exploration and exploitation principles.

  20. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging analysis of complex adnexal masses: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie - UMR 970 INSERM - Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Balvay, Daniel [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie - UMR 970 INSERM - Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Aubert, Emilie; Bazot, Marc [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Darai, Emile; Rouzier, Roman [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Gynaecology-Obstetrics, Paris (France); Cuenod, Charles A. [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie - UMR 970 INSERM - Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the ability of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to differentiate malignant from benign adnexal tumours. Fifty-six women with 38 malignant and 18 benign tumours underwent MR imaging before surgery for complex adnexal masses. Microvascular parameters were extracted from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI series, using a pharmacokinetic model in the solid tissue of adnexal tumours. These parameters were tissue blood flow (F{sub T}), blood volume fraction (Vb), permeability-surface area product (PS), interstitial volume fraction (Ve), lag time (Dt) and area under the enhancing curve (rAUC). Area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) was calculated as a descriptive tool to assess the overall discrimination of parameters. Malignant tumours displayed higher F{sub T}, Vb, rAUC and lower Ve than benign tumours (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0006, P = 0.04 and P = 0.0002, respectively). F{sub T} was the most relevant factor for discriminating malignant from benign tumours (AUROC = 0.86). Primary ovarian invasive tumours displayed higher F{sub T} and shorter Dt than borderline tumours. Malignant adnexal tumours with associated peritoneal carcinomatosis at surgery displayed a shorter Dt than those without peritoneal carcinomatosis at surgery (P = 0.01). Quantitative DCE-MRI is a feasible and accurate technique to differentiate malignant from benign adnexal tumours and could potentially help oncologists with management decisions. (orig.)

  1. Mitochondrial fusion, fission, and mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joel N; Leuthner, Tess C; Luz, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    Mitochondrial dynamics are regulated by two sets of opposed processes: mitochondrial fusion and fission, and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation (including mitophagy), as well as processes such as intracellular transport. These processes maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, regulate mitochondrial form, volume and function, and are increasingly understood to be critical components of the cellular stress response. Mitochondrial dynamics vary based on developmental stage and age, cell type, environmental factors, and genetic background. Indeed, many mitochondrial homeostasis genes are human disease genes. Emerging evidence indicates that deficiencies in these genes often sensitize to environmental exposures, yet can also be protective under certain circumstances. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics also affects elimination of irreparable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and transmission of mtDNA mutations. We briefly review the basic biology of mitodynamic processes with a focus on mitochondrial fusion and fission, discuss what is known and unknown regarding how these processes respond to chemical and other stressors, and review the literature on interactions between mitochondrial toxicity and genetic variation in mitochondrial fusion and fission genes. Finally, we suggest areas for future research, including elucidating the full range of mitodynamic responses from low to high-level exposures, and from acute to chronic exposures; detailed examination of the physiological consequences of mitodynamic alterations in different cell types; mechanism-based testing of mitotoxicant interactions with interindividual variability in mitodynamics processes; and incorporating other environmental variables that affect mitochondria, such as diet and exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of the mitochondrial proteomes of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to extreme oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyue Yin

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the primary organelles that consume oxygen and provide energy for cellular activities. To investigate the mitochondrial mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions, we generated Drosophila strains that could survive in low- or high-oxygen environments (LOF or HOF, respectively, examined their mitochondria at the ultrastructural level via transmission electron microscopy, studied the activity of their respiratory chain complexes, and quantitatively analyzed the protein abundance responses of the mitochondrial proteomes using Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. A total of 718 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 55 and 75 mitochondrial proteins displayed significant differences in abundance in LOF and HOF, respectively, compared with the control flies. Importantly, these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins are primarily involved in respiration, calcium regulation, the oxidative response, and mitochondrial protein translation. A correlation analysis of the changes in the levels of the mRNAs corresponding to differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins revealed two sets of proteins with different modes of regulation (transcriptional vs. post-transcriptional in both LOF and HOF. We believe that these findings will not only enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions in Drosophila but also provide a clue in studying human disease induced by altered oxygen tension in tissues and cells.

  3. Enhanced electrokinetic remediation of lead-contaminated soil by complexing agents and approaching anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zou, Hua; Ji, Minhui; Li, Xiaolin; Li, Liqiao; Tang, Tang

    2014-02-01

    Optimizing process parameters that affect the remediation time and power consumption can improve the treatment efficiency of the electrokinetic remediation as well as determine the cost of a remediation action. Lab-scale electrokinetic remediation of Pb-contaminated soils was investigated for the effect of complexant ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and acetic acid and approaching anode on the removal efficiency of Pb. When EDTA was added to the catholyte, EDTA dissolved insoluble Pb in soils to form soluble Pb-EDTA complexes, increasing Pb mobility and accordingly removal efficiency. The removal efficiency was enhanced from 47.8 to 61.5 % when the EDTA concentration was increased from 0.1 to 0.2 M, showing that EDTA played an important role in remediation. And the migration rate of Pb was increased to 72.3 % when both EDTA and acetic acid were used in the catholyte. The "approaching anode electrokinetic remediation" process in the presence of both EDTA and acetic acid had a higher Pb-removal efficiency with an average efficiency of 83.8 %. The efficiency of electrokinetic remediation was closely related to Pb speciation. Exchangeable and carbonate-bounded Pb were likely the forms which could be removed. All results indicate that the approaching anode method in the presence of EDTA and acetic acid is an advisable choice for electrokinetic remediation of Pb-contaminated soil.

  4. Enhancing and inhibiting effects of benzenediols on chemiluminescence of a novel cyclometallated iridium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yong Ping; Huang, Li; Tong, Bi Hai; Shi, Ming Juan; Zhang, Wang Bing; Zhang, Qian Feng

    2012-01-01

    A novel chemiluminescence (CL) system, including the cyclometallated iridium(III) complex {tris[1-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)phthalazine]iridium}, potassium permanganate and oxalic acid, is proposed for the determination of benzenediols. This method is based on the fact that hydroquinone and catechol exhibited an inhibiting effect, while resorcinol exhibited an enhancing effect on CL intensity. The optimum conditions for CL emission were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the detection limits of hydroquinone, catechol and resorcinol were 6.4 × 10(-8), 2.7 × 10(-9) and 8.1 × 10(-7)  mol/L, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of benzenediols in different types of water sample. The luminophors of the CL systems were all identified as the metal-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state of the iridium complex. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Mitochondrial impairment in microglia amplifies NLRP3 inflammasome proinflammatory signaling in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Souvarish; Malovic, Emir; Harishchandra, Dilshan S; Ghaisas, Shivani; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Palanisamy, Bharathi N; Rokad, Dharmin; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome signaling pathway is a major contributor to the neuroinflammatory process in the central nervous system. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are key pathophysiological processes of many chronic neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the inter-relationship between mitochondrial defects and neuroinflammation is not well understood. In the present study, we show that impaired mitochondrial function can augment the NLRP3 inflammasome-driven proinflammatory cascade in microglia. Primary mouse microglia treated with the common inflammogen LPS increased NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β expression. Interestingly, exposure of LPS-primed microglial cells to the mitochondrial complex-I inhibitory pesticides rotenone and tebufenpyrad specifically potentiated the NLRP3 induction, ASC speck formation and pro-IL-1β processing to IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that mitochondrial impairment heightened the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated proinflammatory response in microglia. The neurotoxic pesticide-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation was accompanied by bioenergetic defects and lysosomal dysfunction in microglia. Furthermore, the pesticides enhanced mitochondrial ROS generation in primary microglia, while amelioration of mitochondria-derived ROS by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mito-apocynin completely abolished IL-1β release, indicating mitochondrial ROS drives potentiation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in microglia. Exposure to conditioned media obtained from mitochondrial inhibitor-treated, LPS-primed microglial cells, but not unprimed cells, induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in cultured primary mesencephalic and human dopaminergic neuronal cells (LUHMES). Notably, our in vivo results with chronic rotenone rodent models of PD further support the activation of proinflammatory NLRP3 inflammasome signaling due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Collectively, our results demonstrate that mitochondrial

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of the Mitochondria Initiates Excessive Superoxide Production and Mitochondrial Depolarization Causing Decreased mtDNA Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L; Biel, Thomas G; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Rao, V Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation is closely associated with excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Altered redox homeostasis has been implicated in the onset of several diseases including cancer. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and proteins are particularly sensitive to ROS as they are in close proximity to the respiratory chain (RC). Mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted redox agent, selectively damages breast cancer cells possibly through damage induced via enhanced ROS production. However, the effects of MitoQ and other triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) conjugated agents on cancer mitochondrial homeostasis remain unknown. The primary objective of this study was to determine the impact of mitochondria-targeted agent [(MTAs) conjugated to TPP+: mitoTEMPOL, mitoquinone and mitochromanol-acetate] on mitochondrial physiology and mtDNA integrity in breast (MDA-MB-231) and lung (H23) cancer cells. The integrity of the mtDNA was assessed by quantifying the degree of mtDNA fragmentation and copy number, as well as by measuring mitochondrial proteins essential to mtDNA stability and maintenance (TFAM, SSBP1, TWINKLE, POLG and POLRMT). Mitochondrial status was evaluated by measuring superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification and mRNA or protein levels of the RC complexes along with TCA cycle activity. In this study, we demonstrated that all investigated MTAs impair mitochondrial health and decrease mtDNA integrity in MDA-MB-231 and H23 cells. However, differences in the degree of mitochondrial damage and mtDNA degradation suggest unique properties among each MTA that may be cell line, dose and time dependent. Collectively, our study indicates the potential for TPP+ conjugated molecules to impair breast and lung cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial homeostasis.

  7. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuner, Kristina; Schütt, Tanja; Kurz, Christopher; Eckert, Schamim H; Schiller, Carola; Occhipinti, Angelo; Mai, Sören; Jendrach, Marina; Eckert, Gunter P; Kruse, Shane E; Palmiter, Richard D; Brandt, Ulrich; Dröse, Stephan; Wittig, Ilka; Willem, Michael; Haass, Christian; Reichert, Andreas S; Müller, Walter E

    2012-06-15

    Intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers and extracellular Aβ plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Aβ production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are sufficient to increase Aβ generation and thereby initiate a vicious cycle further impairing mitochondrial function. Complex I and III dysfunction was induced in a cell model using the respiratory inhibitors rotenone and antimycin, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced ROS levels. Both treatments lead to elevated levels of Aβ. Presence of an antioxidant rescued mitochondrial function and reduced formation of Aβ, demonstrating that the observed effects depended on ROS. Conversely, cells overproducing Aβ showed impairment of mitochondrial function such as comprised mitochondrial respiration, strongly altered morphology, and reduced intracellular mobility of mitochondria. Again, the capability of these cells to generate Aβ was partly reduced by an antioxidant, indicating that Aβ formation was also ROS dependent. Moreover, mice with a genetic defect in complex I, or AD mice treated with a complex I inhibitor, showed enhanced Aβ levels in vivo. We show for the first time that mitochondrion-derived ROS are sufficient to trigger Aβ production in vitro and in vivo. Several lines of evidence show that mitochondrion-derived ROS result in enhanced amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing, and that Aβ itself leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS levels. We propose that starting from mitochondrial dysfunction a vicious cycle is triggered that contributes to the pathogenesis of sporadic AD.

  8. Semiquantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for accurate classification of complex adnexal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerooni, Anahita Fathi; Malek, Mahrooz; Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Parviz, Sara; Nabil, Mahnaz; Torbati, Leila; Assili, Sanam; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza; Gity, Masoumeh

    2017-02-01

    To identify the best dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) descriptive parameters in predicting malignancy of complex ovarian masses, and develop an optimal decision tree for accurate classification of benign and malignant complex ovarian masses. Preoperative DCE-MR images of 55 sonographically indeterminate ovarian masses (27 benign and 28 malignant) were analyzed prospectively. Four descriptive parameters of the dynamic curve, namely, time-to-peak (TTP), wash-in-rate (WIR), relative signal intensity (SIrel ), and the initial area under the curve (IAUC60 ) were calculated on the normalized curves of specified regions-of-interest (ROIs). A two-tailed Student's t-test and two automated classifiers, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVMs), were used to compare the performance of the mentioned parameters individually and in combination with each other. TTP (P = 6.15E-8) and WIR (P = 5.65E-5) parameters induced the highest sensitivity (89% for LDA, and 97% for SVM) and specificity (93% for LDA, and 100% for SVM), respectively. Regarding the high sensitivity of TTP and high specificity of WIR and through their combination, an accurate and simple decision-tree classifier was designed using the line equation obtained by LDA classification model. The proposed classifier achieved an accuracy of 89% and area under the ROC curve of 93%. In this study an accurate decision-tree classifier based on a combination of TTP and WIR parameters was proposed, which provides a clinically flexible framework to aid radiologists/clinicians to reach a conclusive preoperative diagnosis and patient-specific therapy plan for distinguishing malignant from benign complex ovarian masses. 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:418-427. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  10. IRE1α-TRAF2-ASK1 complex-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to CXC195-induced apoptosis in human bladder carcinoma T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Peng, Lifen; Chao, Haichao; Xi, Haibo; Fu, Bin; Wang, Yibing; Zhu, Zunwei; Wang, Gongxian

    2015-05-08

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC) accounts for approximately 5% of all cancer deaths in humans. Current treatments extend the recurrence interval but do not significantly alter patient survival. The objective of the present study was to investigate the anti-cancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of CXC195 against human UC cell line T24 cells. CXC195 inhibited the cells growth and induced caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in T24 cells. In addition, CXC195 triggered activation of proteins involved in ER stress signaling including GRP78, CHOP, IRE1α, TRAF2, p-ASK1 and p-JNK in T24 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that activation of JNK was induced by the activation of IRE1α through formation of an IRE1α-TRAF2-ASK1 complex. Knockdown of IRE1α by siRNA dramatically abrogated CXC195-induced activation of TRAF2, ASK and JNK, formation of an IRE1α-TRAF2-ASK1 complex and caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in T24 cells. These findings provided new insights to understand the mode of action of CXC195 in treatment of human UC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical exercise promotes memory capability by enhancing hippocampal mitochondrial functions and inhibiting apoptosis in obesity-induced insulin resistance by high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sang; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Tae-Woon

    2018-02-01

    A high-fat diet induces obesity in mice, leading to insulin resistance, decreased mitochondrial function, and increased apoptosis in the hippocampus, which eventually result in memory loss. The present study investigated the effect of physical exercise on memory, hippocampal mitochondrial function, and apoptosis in mice with in insulin resistance caused by obesity due to high-fat diet. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control (CON), control and exercise (CON + EX), high fat diet (HFD), and high fat diet and exercise (HFD + EX). After receiving a high-fat (60%) diet for 20 weeks to induce obesity, the animals were subjected to an exercise routine 6 times per week, for 12 weeks. The exercise duration and intensity gradually increased over 4-week intervals. Hippocampal memory was examined using the step-down avoidance task. Mitochondrial function and apoptosis were also examined in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. We found that obesity owing to a high-fat diet induced insulin resistance and caused a decrease in memory function. Insulin resistance also caused a decrease in mitochondrial function in the hippocampus by reducing Ca 2+ retention and O 2, respiration, increasing the levels of H 2 O 2 , and Cyp-D, and mPTP opening. In addition, apoptosis in the hippocampus increased owing to decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased expression of Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase-3 and TUNEL-positive cells. In contrast, physical exercise led to reduced insulin resistance, improved mitochondrial function, and reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus. The results suggest that physiological stimulations such as exercise improve hippocampal function and suppress apoptosis, potentially preventing the memory loss associated with obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed.

  13. Mitochondrial Aging: Is There a Mitochondrial Clock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorov, Dmitry B; Popkov, Vasily A; Zorova, Ljubava D; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Pevzner, Irina B; Silachev, Denis N; Zorov, Savva D; Jankauskas, Stanislovas S; Babenko, Valentina A; Plotnikov, Egor Y

    2017-09-01

    Fragmentation (fission) of mitochondria, occurring in response to oxidative challenge, leads to heterogeneity in the mitochondrial population. It is assumed that fission provides a way to segregate mitochondrial content between the "young" and "old" phenotype, with the formation of mitochondrial "garbage," which later will be disposed. Fidelity of this process is the basis of mitochondrial homeostasis, which is disrupted in pathological conditions and aging. The asymmetry of the mitochondrial fission is similar to that of their evolutionary ancestors, bacteria, which also undergo an aging process. It is assumed that mitochondrial markers of aging are recognized by the mitochondrial quality control system, preventing the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, which normally are subjected to disposal. Possibly, oncocytoma, with its abnormal proliferation of mitochondria occupying the entire cytoplasm, represents the case when segregation of damaged mitochondria is impaired during mitochondrial division. It is plausible that mitochondria contain a "clock" which counts the degree of mitochondrial senescence as the extent of flagging (by ubiquitination) of damaged mitochondria. Mitochondrial aging captures the essence of the systemic aging which must be analyzed. We assume that the mitochondrial aging mechanism is similar to the mechanism of aging of the immune system which we discuss in detail. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Activated macrophages control human adipocyte mitochondrial bioenergetics via secreted factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Michaela; Sachs, Stephan; Walheim, Ellen; Berti, Lucia; Raedle, Bernhard; Tews, Daniel; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin; Staiger, Harald; Hofmann, Susanna M

    2017-10-01

    Obesity-associated WAT inflammation is characterized by the accumulation and local activation of macrophages (MΦs), and recent data from mouse studies suggest that macrophages are modifiers of adipocyte energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. As mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in humans, herein we aimed to delineate how human macrophages may affect energy metabolism of white adipocytes. Human adipose tissue gene expression analysis for markers of macrophage activation and tissue inflammation (CD11c, CD40, CD163, CD206, CD80, MCP1, TNFα) in relationship to mitochondrial complex I (NDUFB8) and complex III (UQCRC2) was performed on subcutaneous WAT of 24 women (BMI 20-61 kg/m 2 ). Guided by these results, the impact of secreted factors of LPS/IFNγ- and IL10/TGFβ-activated human macrophages (THP1, primary blood-derived) on mitochondrial function in human subcutaneous white adipocytes (SGBS, primary) was determined by extracellular flux analysis (Seahorse technology) and gene/protein expression. Stepwise regression analysis of human WAT gene expression data revealed that a linear combination of CD40 and CD163 was the strongest predictor for mitochondrial complex I (NDUFB8) and complex III (UQCRC2) levels, independent of BMI. IL10/TGFβ-activated MΦs displayed high CD163 and low CD40 expression and secreted factors that decreased UQCRC2 gene/protein expression and ATP-linked respiration in human white adipocytes. In contrast, LPS/IFNγ-activated MΦs showed high CD40 and low CD163 expression and secreted factors that enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial activity resulting in a total difference of 37% in ATP-linked respiration of white adipocytes (p = 0.0024) when comparing the effect of LPS/IFNγ- vs IL10/TGFβ-activated MΦs. Our data demonstrate that macrophages modulate human adipocyte energy metabolism via an activation-dependent paracrine mechanism. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  15. Lutein protects dopaminergic neurons against MPTP-induced apoptotic death and motor dysfunction by ameliorating mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Jagatheesan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Essa, Musthafa Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis plays an important role in various neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), the most widely used neurotoxin mimics the symptoms of PD by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I that stimulates excessive intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and finally leads to mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Lutein, a carotenoid of xanthophyll family, is found abundantly in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale and in egg yolk, animal fat and human eye retinal macula. Increasing evidence indicates that lutein has offers benefits against neuronal damages during diabetic retinopathy, ischemia and AD by virtue of its mitochondrial protective, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. Male C57BL/6 mice (23-26 g) were randomized and grouped in to Control, MPTP, and Lutein treated groups. Lutein significantly reversed the loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons by increasing the striatal dopamine level in mice. Moreover, lutein-ameliorated MPTP induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and motor abnormalities. In addition, lutein repressed the MPTP-induced neuronal damage/apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic markers (Bax, caspases-3, 8 and 9) and enhancing anti-apoptotic marker (Bcl-2) expressions. Our current results revealed that lutein possessed protection on dopaminergic neurons by enhancing antioxidant defense and diminishing mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic death, suggesting the potential benefits of lutein for PD treatment.

  16. Hsp90-binding immunophilin FKBP51 forms complexes with hTERT enhancing telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadari, Mariana; Zgajnar, Nadia R; Gallo, Luciana I; Galigniana, Mario D

    2016-08-01

    FK506-binding proteins are members of the immunophilin family of proteins. Those immunophilins associated to the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein, Hsp90, have been proposed as potential modulators of signalling cascade factors chaperoned by Hsp90. FKBP51 and FKBP52 are the best characterized Hsp90-bound immunophilins first described associated to steroid-receptors. The reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase, hTERT, is also an Hsp90 client-protein and is highly expressed in cancer cells, where it is required to compensate the loss of telomeric DNA after each successive cell division. Because FKBP51 is also a highly expressed protein in cancer tissues, we analyzed its potential association with hTERT·Hsp90 complexes and its possible biological role. In this study it is demonstrated that both immunophilins, FKBP51 and FKBP52, co-immunoprecipitate with hTERT. The Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol disrupts the heterocomplex and favors the partial cytoplasmic relocalization of hTERT in similar manner as the overexpression of the TPR-domain peptide of the immunophilin. While confocal microscopy images show that FKBP51 is primarily localized in mitochondria and hTERT is totally nuclear, upon the onset of oxidative stress, FKBP51 (but not FKBP52) becomes mostly nuclear colocalizing with hTERT, and longer exposure times to peroxide favors hTERT export to mitochondria. Importantly, telomerase activity of hTERT is significantly enhanced by FKBP51. These observations support the emerging role assigned to FKBP51 as antiapoptotic factor in cancer development and progression, and describe for the first time the potential role of this immunophilin favoring the clonal expansion by enhancing telomerase activity. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. HO-1 Is Essential for Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Mediated Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Anti-Inflammation Process in LPS-Treated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG, an important monomer extracted from Polygonum multiflorum, can prevent a number of inflammation associated chronic diseases. However, the mechanism involved in TSG inducing anti-inflammatory role remains unclear. As an inducible antioxidant enzyme, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, is crucial for protecting the mammalian cells against adverse stimuli. Here, we found that the TSG treatment strongly induces the expression of HO-1 in an NRF2-depended manner. Meanwhile, TSG increased the mitochondrial mass through upregulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis activators (PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM as well as the mitochondrial complex IV. Furthermore, TSG attenuated Lipopolysaccharide (LPS mediated RAW264.7 cells activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZnPP, a selective inhibitor of HO-1 activity, was able to attenuate TSG mediated mitochondrial biogenesis and anti-inflammatory process. Finally, we observed that LPS induced obvious mtDNA depletion and ATP deficiency, which indicated a severe damage of mitochondria. TSG restored the LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. ZnPP treatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effects of TSG on mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in LPS stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSG enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function mainly via activation the HO-1. TSG can be developed as a potential drug for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  18. Inhibition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase-Abeta interaction reduces Abeta accumulation and improves mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Chaodong; Lue, Lih-Fen; Guo, Lan; Chen, Doris; Stern, David M; Gunn Moore, Frank J; Xi Chen, John; Arancio, Ottavio; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2011-02-09

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD), an enzyme present in neuronal mitochondria, exacerbates Aβ-induced cell stress. The interaction of ABAD with Aβ exacerbates Aβ-induced mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. Here, we show that inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction, using a decoy peptide (DP) in vitro and in vivo, protects against aberrant mitochondrial and neuronal function and improves spatial learning/memory. Intraperitoneal administration of ABAD-DP [fused to the transduction of human immunodeficiency virus 1-transactivator (Tat) protein and linked to the mitochondrial targeting sequence (Mito) (TAT-mito-DP) to transgenic APP mice (Tg mAPP)] blocked formation of ABAD-Aβ complex in mitochondria, increased oxygen consumption and enzyme activity associated with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress, and improved spatial memory. Similar protective effects were observed in Tg mAPP mice overexpressing neuronal ABAD decoy peptide (Tg mAPP/mito-ABAD). Notably, inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction significantly reduced mitochondrial Aβ accumulation. In parallel, the activity of mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme PreP (presequence peptidase) was enhanced in Tg mAPP mitochondria expressing the ABAD decoy peptide. These data indicate that segregating ABAD from Aβ protects mitochondria/neurons from Aβ toxicity; thus, ABAD-Aβ interaction is an important mechanism underlying Aβ-mediated mitochondrial and neuronal perturbation. Inhibitors of ABAD-Aβ interaction may hold promise as targets for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Inhibition of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Peptide-Binding Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Aβ Interaction Reduces Aβ Accumulation and Improves Mitochondrial Function in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Chaodong; Lue, Lih-Fen; Guo, Lan; Chen, Doris; Stern, David M.; Gunn Moore, Frank J.; Xi Chen, John; Arancio, Ottavio

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD), an enzyme present in neuronal mitochondria, exacerbates Aβ-induced cell stress. The interaction of ABAD with Aβ exacerbates Aβ-induced mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. Here, we show that inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction, using a decoy peptide (DP) in vitro and in vivo, protects against aberrant mitochondrial and neuronal function and improves spatial learning/memory. Intraperitoneal administration of ABAD-DP [fused to the transduction of human immunodeficiency virus 1-transactivator (Tat) protein and linked to the mitochondrial targeting sequence (Mito) (TAT-mito-DP) to transgenic APP mice (Tg mAPP)] blocked formation of ABAD-Aβ complex in mitochondria, increased oxygen consumption and enzyme activity associated with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress, and improved spatial memory. Similar protective effects were observed in Tg mAPP mice overexpressing neuronal ABAD decoy peptide (Tg mAPP/mito-ABAD). Notably, inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction significantly reduced mitochondrial Aβ accumulation. In parallel, the activity of mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme PreP (presequence peptidase) was enhanced in Tg mAPP mitochondria expressing the ABAD decoy peptide. These data indicate that segregating ABAD from Aβ protects mitochondria/neurons from Aβ toxicity; thus, ABAD-Aβ interaction is an important mechanism underlying Aβ-mediated mitochondrial and neuronal perturbation. Inhibitors of ABAD-Aβ interaction may hold promise as targets for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21307267

  20. Color-tuning and stability enhancement of cyclometallated iridium (III) complexes in light-emitting electrochemical cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bünzli, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the design and synthesis of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes for use in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs) are presented, divided into six chapters. Focus is put on the emission color-tuning of various compounds, covering almost the whole visible spectrum between blue and red including first steps towards white-light emission. Secondly, a new systematic approach for an intrinsic stability enhancement of highly pure Ir(III) complexes is investigated. The work is...

  1. Sulforaphane is anticonvulsant and improves mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Borges, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway (Nrf2) has been previously identified to protect the brain against various impacts. Here, we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane in various seizure models and hippocampal mitochondrial bioenergetics. We found that daily injections of sulforaphane for 5 days elevated the seizure thresholds to 6 Hz stimulation and fluorothyl-, but not pentylenetetrazole-induced tonic seizures and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, sulforaphane increased the antioxidant defences within hippocampal formations and blood plasma. In addition, sulforaphane treatment reduced the extent of hippocampal lipid peroxidation 24 h post-SE and protected hippocampal mitochondria against SE-induced reduction in state 2 and uncoupler-stimulated state 3 respiration. SE-mediated partial loss of rotenone-sensitive and complex II-driven respiration was reduced, consistent with the enhanced activities of complexes I and II in sulforaphane-treated SE mice. In mitochondria isolated from both no SE and SE mice, sulforaphane increased state 3 respiration and respiration linked to ATP synthesis, which may contribute to its anticonvulsant and antioxidant effects by providing more ATP for cellular vital and protective functions. However, sulforaphane did not prevent SE-induced hippocampal cell death. In conclusion, sulforaphane and/or Nrf2 activation are viable anticonvulsant strategies, which are antioxidant and enhance mitochondrial function, especially the ability to produce ATP. Sulforaphane was anticonvulsant in two acute mouse models of epilepsy and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). We also found antioxidant effects of sulforaphane in mouse plasma and hippocampal formations, exhibited by increased catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as increased abilities of hippocampal mitochondria to produce ATP. These effects likely underlie

  2. Enhancing gelation ability of a dendritic gelator through complexation with a polyelectrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijian; Yang, Miao; Zhang, Xinjun; Zhang, Lichu; Liu, Bo; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    A poly(urethane amide) (PUA) dendron with long alkyl chains on its periphery was synthesized and then attached to the backbone of a polyelectrolyte, in which each unit contained a positive charge, by ionizing the carboxyl groups on the apexes of the dendrons to form a dendronized polymer. We found that both the PUA dendron and the dendronized polymer could form organogels in toluene. Interestingly, both the minimum gelation concentration and the gelation time of the dendronized polymer gelator were greatly reduced compared with the dendron alone. Our investigations showed that in the gel phase the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between adjacent dendrons creates similar supramolecular structures in both the dendron and the dendronized polymer gelator, which immobilize solvent molecules by means of interactions between dendrons and solvent molecules. Further studies on the gelation kinetics indicated that the polyelectrolyte backbone plays an important role in prearranging the attached dendritic gelators orderly and quickly into the supramolecular structures through a nucleation-elongation mechanism. Therefore, the gel-forming ability of the dendritic PUA gelator is enhanced by being complexed with the polyelectrolyte. In this work, this positive macromolecular effect is discussed in detail.

  3. Novel motor gestures for phonation during inspiration enhance the acoustic complexity of birdsong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, F; Daley, M A

    2001-11-22

    Sound generation based on a pulmonary mechanism typically occurs during the expiratory phase of respiration. Phonation during inspiration has been postulated for the calls of some amphibians and for exceptional sounds in some human languages. No direct evidence exists for phonation during inspiration in birds, but such a mechanism has been proposed to explain very long uninterrupted songs. Here, we report the first physiological evidence for inspiratory sound production in the song of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). Motor gestures of the vocal and respiratory muscles leading to the production of inspiratory phonation differ from those of silent inspirations during song as well as from those leading to phonation during expiration. Inspiratory syllables have a high fundamental frequency, which makes them acoustically distinct from all other zebra finch song syllables. Furthermore, young zebra finches copy these inspiratory syllables from their tutor song, producing them during inspiration. This suggests that physical limitations confine the production of these sounds to the inspiratory phase in zebra finches. These findings directly demonstrate how novel respiratory-vocal coordination can enhance the acoustic structure of birdsong, and thus provide insight into the evolution of song complexity.

  4. Carbon-tuned bonding method significantly enhanced the hydrogen storage of BN-Li complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qing-ming; Zhao, Lina; Luo, You-hua; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Li-xia; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-11-01

    Through first-principles calculations, we found doping carbon atoms onto BN monolayers (BNC) could significantly strengthen the Li bond on this material. Unlike the weak bond strength between Li atoms and the pristine BN layer, it is observed that Li atoms are strongly hybridized and donate their electrons to the doped substrate, which is responsible for the enhanced binding energy. Li adsorbed on the BNC layer can serve as a high-capacity hydrogen storage medium, without forming clusters, which can be recycled at room temperature. Eight polarized H(2) molecules are attached to two Li atoms with an optimal binding energy of 0.16-0.28 eV/H(2), which results from the electrostatic interaction of the polarized charge of hydrogen molecules with the electric field induced by positive Li atoms. This practical carbon-tuned BN-Li complex can work as a very high-capacity hydrogen storage medium with a gravimetric density of hydrogen of 12.2 wt%, which is much higher than the gravimetric goal of 5.5 wt % hydrogen set by the U.S. Department of Energy for 2015.

  5. Improvement of Physical Decline Through Combined Effects of Muscle Enhancement and Mitochondrial Activation by a Gastric Hormone Ghrelin in Male 5/6Nx CKD Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Masanori; Hagiwara, Aika; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Wakino, Shu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Kentaro; Fujii, Chikako; Sato, Masaaki; Mitsuishi, Masanori; Muraki, Ayako; Hayashi, Koichi; Doi, Toshio; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Because a physical decline correlates with an increased risk of a wide range of disease and morbidity, an improvement of physical performance is expected to bring significant clinical benefits. The primary cause of physical decline in 5/6 nephrectomized (5/6Nx) chronic kidney disease model mice has been regarded as a decrease in muscle mass; however, our recent study showed that a decrease in muscle mitochondria plays a critical role. In the present study, we examined the effects of a gastric hormone ghrelin, which has been reported to promote muscle mitochondrial oxidation, on the physical decline in the chronic kidney disease model mice, focusing on the epigenetic modulations of a mitochondrial activator gene, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Ghrelin treatment improved a decline in exercise endurance of 5/6Nx mice, associated with an increase in both of the muscle mass and mitochondrial amount. The expression level of PGC-1α was decreased in the skeletal muscle of 5/6Nx mice, which was associated with an increase in the methylation ratio of the cytosine residue at 260 base pairs upstream of the initiation point. Conversely, ghrelin treatment de-methylated the cytosine residue and increased the expression of PGC-1α. A representative muscle anabolic factor, IGF-1, did not affect the expression of PGC-1α and muscle mitochondrial amount, although it increased muscle mass. As a result, IGF-1 treatment in 5/6Nx mice did not increase the decreased exercise endurance as effectively as ghrelin treatment did. These findings indicate an advantage of ghrelin treatment for a recovery of physical decline.

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and longevity: a causal or protective role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Daniel A; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-10-20

    Among the most highly investigated theories of aging is the mitochondrial theory of aging. The basis of this theory includes a central role for altered or compromised mitochondrial function in the pathophysiologic declines associated with aging. In general, studies in various organisms, including nematodes, rodents, and humans, have largely upheld that aging is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, results from a number of studies directly testing the mitochondrial theory of aging by modulating oxidant production or scavenging in vivo in rodents have generally been inconsistent with predictions of the theory. Interestingly, electron transport chain mutations or deletions in invertebrates and mice that causes mitochondrial dysfunction paradoxically leads to enhanced longevity, further challenging the mitochondrial theory of aging. How can mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to lifespan extension in the mitochondrial mutants, and what does it mean for the mitochondrial theory of aging? It will be important to determine the potential mechanisms that lead to enhanced longevity in the mammalian mitochondrial mutants.

  7. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  8. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Nek5 interacts with mitochondrial proteins and interferes negatively in mitochondrial mediated cell death and respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Hanchuk, Talita D; Papa, Priscila Ferreira; La Guardia, Paolo G; Vercesi, Anibal E; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are involved in energy supply, signaling, cell death and cellular differentiation and have been implicated in several human diseases. Neks (NIMA-related kinases) represent a family of mammal protein kinases that play essential roles in cell-cycle progression, but other functions have recently been related. A yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen was performed to identify and characterize Nek5 interaction partners and the mitochondrial proteins Cox11, MTX-2 and BCLAF1 were retrieved. Apoptosis assay showed protective effects of stable hNek5 expression from Hek293-T's cell death after thapsigargin treatment (2 μM). Nek5 silenced cells as well as cells expressing a "kinase dead" version of Nek5, displayed an increase in ROS formation after 4 h of thapsigargin treatment. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity was found decreased upon stable hNek5expression. Cells silenced for hNek5 on the other hand presented 1.7 fold increased basal rates of respiration, especially at the electrons transfer steps from TMPD to cytochrome c and at the complex II. In conclusion, our data suggest for the first time mitochondrial localization and functions for Nek5 and its participation in cell death and cell respiration regulation. Stable expression of hNek5 in Hek293T cells resulted in enhanced cell viability, decreased cell death and drug resistance, while depletion of hNek5by shRNA overcame cancer cell drug resistance and induced apoptosis in vitro. Stable expression of hNek5 also inhibits thapsigargin promoted apoptosis and the respiratory chain complex IV in HEK293T cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Induction of Mitochondrial Changes Associated with Oxidative Stress on Very Long Chain Fatty Acids (C22:0, C24:0, or C26:0-Treated Human Neuronal Cells (SK-NB-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Zarrouk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease, lipid alterations point towards peroxisomal dysfunctions. Indeed, a cortical accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs: C22:0, C24:0, C26:0, substrates for peroxisomal β-oxidation, has been found in Alzheimer patients. This study was realized to investigate the effects of VLCFAs at the mitochondrial level since mitochondrial dysfunctions play crucial roles in neurodegeneration. On human neuronal SK-NB-E cells treated with C22:0, C24:0, or C26:0 (0.1–20 μM; 48 h, an inhibition of cell growth and mitochondrial dysfunctions were observed by cell counting with trypan blue, MTT assay, and measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm with DiOC6(3. A stimulation of oxidative stress was observed with DHE and MitoSOX used to quantify superoxide anion production on whole cells and at the mitochondrial level, respectively. With C24:0 and C26:0, by Western blotting, lower levels of mitochondrial complexes III and IV were detected. After staining with MitoTracker and by transmission electron microscopy used to study mitochondrial topography, mass and morphology, major changes were detected in VLCFAs treated-cells: modification of the cytoplasmic distribution of mitochondria, presence of large mitochondria, enhancement of the mitochondrial mass. Thus, VLCFAs can be potential risk factors contributing to neurodegeneration by inducing neuronal damages via mitochondrial dysfunctions.

  11. Fluorescence enhancement of the aflatoxin B{sub 1} by forming inclusion complexes with some cyclodextrins and molecular modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghamohammadi, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modarres University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alizadeh, Naader [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modarres University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: alizaden@modares.ac.ir

    2007-12-15

    The interaction between the aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) and three cyclodextrins, {alpha}-cyclodextrin ({alpha}-CD), {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD) and heptakis-2,6-dimethyl-o-{beta}-cyclodextrin (ome-CD), was studied by spectrofluorescence technique. It was found that the inclusion association behavior occurs for the complexes of cyclodextrins with AFB{sub 1}. The fluorescence of AFB{sub 1} is generally enhanced in the complexes with cyclodextrins in aqueous solutions. The inclusion complex constants of the three types of cyclodextrins at different temperatures were evaluated from Benesi-Hildebrand plot and also by non-linear regression analysis. These cyclodextrins can only form the 1:1 (host:guest) inclusion complex in the studied temperature range of 20-50 deg. C. The enthalpy ({delta}H{sup o}) and entropy ({delta}S{sup o}) changes of complexation were extracted from the temperature dependency of complex formation constants (K). Temperature-dependent measurements showed that the association step is controlled by enthalpy-entropy compensation effect. The use of ome-CD generally resulted in the greatest fluorescence intensity. On the other hand, the discrepancy between the exhibited enhanced fluorescence and thermodynamic parameters ({delta}G{sup o}) is proposed to be different only by the orientation of the AFB{sub 1} within the cyclodextrin cavity. To find the most favorable structure, the geometry of complex was investigated by molecular modeling approach employing the semiemperical HF-SCF calculations.

  12. Elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs metabolic adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Crane

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a complex phenomenon that is inherently tied to energy provision and is implicated in many metabolic disorders. Exercise training increases mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle yet it remains unclear if oxidative stress plays a role in regulating these adaptations. We demonstrate that the chronic elevation in mitochondrial oxidative stress present in Sod2 (+/- mice impairs the functional and biochemical mitochondrial adaptations to exercise. Following exercise training Sod2 (+/- mice fail to increase maximal work capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity and mtDNA copy number, despite a normal augmentation of mitochondrial proteins. Additionally, exercised Sod2 (+/- mice cannot compensate for their higher amount of basal mitochondrial oxidative damage and exhibit poor electron transport chain complex assembly that accounts for their compromised adaptation. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative stress does not impact exercise induced mitochondrial biogenesis, but impairs the resulting mitochondrial protein function and can limit metabolic plasticity.

  13. The mitochondrial chaperone protein TRAP1 mitigates α-Synuclein toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Butler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression or mutation of α-Synuclein is associated with protein aggregation and interferes with a number of cellular processes, including mitochondrial integrity and function. We used a whole-genome screen in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to search for novel genetic modifiers of human [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced neurotoxicity. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP1 was found to enhance age-dependent loss of fly head dopamine (DA and DA neuron number resulting from [A53T]α-Synuclein expression. In addition, decreased TRAP1 expression in [A53T]α-Synuclein-expressing flies resulted in enhanced loss of climbing ability and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Overexpression of human TRAP1 was able to rescue these phenotypes. Similarly, human TRAP1 overexpression in rat primary cortical neurons rescued [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced sensitivity to rotenone treatment. In human (nonneuronal cell lines, small interfering RNA directed against TRAP1 enhanced [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced sensitivity to oxidative stress treatment. [A53T]α-Synuclein directly interfered with mitochondrial function, as its expression reduced Complex I activity in HEK293 cells. These effects were blocked by TRAP1 overexpression. Moreover, TRAP1 was able to prevent alteration in mitochondrial morphology caused by [A53T]α-Synuclein overexpression in human SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that [A53T]α-Synuclein toxicity is intimately connected to mitochondrial dysfunction and that toxicity reduction in fly and rat primary neurons and human cell lines can be achieved using overexpression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1. Interestingly, TRAP1 has previously been shown to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, thus providing a potential link of PINK1 via TRAP1 to α-Synuclein.

  14. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: mimetic exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengwei; Huang, Chenglin; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2013-11-08

    Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploration of inclusion complexes of probenecid with α and β-cyclodextrins: Enhancing the utility of the drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Aditi; Saha, Subhadeep; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-09-01

    Herein, we report the formation of inclusion complexes between a poor water soluble drug, namely, probenecid and α/β-cyclodextrins. Solubility of probenecid has been enhanced by formation of inclusion complexes with the two cyclodextrins. The stoichiometries of the inclusion complexes were determined by Job's method using UV-visible spectroscopy. Surface tension and conductance study prove the inclusion phenomenon, while stereo-chemical nature of the inclusion complexes has been explained by 2D ROSEY NMR spectroscopy. FT-IR spectra and HRMS study also support the inclusion process. Association constants for both the inclusion complexes have been calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand method, while the thermodynamic parameters have been estimated with the help of van't Hoff equation. The association constant value was found to be higher in case of β-cyclodextrin than that of α-cyclodextrin which was explained on the basis of their molecular structures.

  16. Mitochondrial dynamics: regulatory mechanisms and emerging role in renal pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming; Brooks, Craig; Liu, Fuyou; Sun, Lin; Dong, Zheng

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria are a class of dynamic organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics is governed by a complex molecular machinery and finely tuned by regulatory proteins. During cell injury or stress, the dynamics is shifted to fission, resulting in mitochondrial fragmentation, which contributes to mitochondrial damage and consequent cell injury and death. Emerging evidence has suggested a role of mitochondrial fragmentation in the pathogenesis of renal diseases including acute kidney injury and diabetic nephropathy. A better understanding of the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and its pathogenic changes may unveil novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Control of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar D. Yoboue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process. It necessitates the contribution of both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes and therefore crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria. It is now well established that cellular mitochondrial content can vary according to a number of stimuli and physiological states in eukaryotes. The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance. The cellular redox state has been considered for a long time as a key element in the regulation of various processes. In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  18. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  19. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glu......Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin...... of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion...... present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D....

  20. Phylogenetic systematics of Barn Owl (Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769 complex inferred from mitochondrial rDNA (16S rRNA taxonomic implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Aliabadian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Barn owl, Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769, occurs worldwide and shows a considerable amount of morphological and geographical variations, leading to the recognition of many subspecies throughout the world. Yet, no comprehensive study has not been done on this species. Data from mitochondrial gene (16S Ribosomal RNA (16S with 569 bp length were analyzed for 41 individuals around the world. Maximum likelihood (ML, maximum parsimony (MP and Bayesian analysis showed two distinct clades including alba clad (old world and furcata clad (new world. The amount of genetic variation within each of these clades ranged from 0.5-1.7 but variation between clades was 3.7. This data may suggest that Barn owls of the Old World may be a separate species from those of the New World.

  1. Chemical Complexity in the Eu-enhanced Monometallic Globular NGC 5986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Olszewski, Edward W.; Walker, Matthew G.

    2017-06-01

    NGC 5986 is a poorly studied but relatively massive Galactic globular cluster that shares several physical and morphological characteristics with “iron-complex” clusters known to exhibit significant metallicity and heavy-element dispersions. In order to determine whether NGC 5986 joins the iron-complex cluster class, we investigated the chemical composition of 25 red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch cluster stars using high-resolution spectra obtained with the Magellan-M2FS instrument. Cluster membership was verified using a combination of radial velocity and [Fe/H] measurements, and we found the cluster to have a mean heliocentric radial velocity of +99.76 km s-1 (σ = 7.44 km s-1). We derived a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.54 dex (σ = 0.08 dex), but the cluster’s small dispersion in [Fe/H] and low [La/Eu] abundance preclude it from being an iron-complex cluster. NGC 5986 has =+0.76 {dex} (σ = 0.08 dex), which is among the highest ratios detected in a Galactic cluster, but the small [Eu/Fe] dispersion is puzzling because such high values near [Fe/H] ˜ -1.5 are typically only found in dwarf galaxies exhibiting large [Eu/Fe] variations. NGC 5986 exhibits classical globular cluster characteristics, such as uniformly enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, a small dispersion in Fe-peak abundances, and (anti)correlated light-element variations. Similar to NGC 2808, we find evidence that NGC 5986 may host at least four to five populations with distinct light-element compositions, and the presence of a clear Mg-Al anticorrelation along with an Al-Si correlation suggests that the cluster gas experienced processing at temperatures ≳65-70 MK. However, the current data do not support burning temperatures exceeding ˜100 MK. We find some evidence that the first- and second-generation stars in NGC 5986 may be fully spatially mixed, which could indicate that the cluster has lost a significant fraction of its original mass. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m

  2. Performance Analysis with Network-Enhanced Complexities: On Fading Measurements, Event-Triggered Mechanisms, and Cyber Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derui Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the real-world systems are usually subject to various complexities such as parameter uncertainties, time-delays, and nonlinear disturbances. For networked systems, especially large-scale systems such as multiagent systems and systems over sensor networks, the complexities are inevitably enhanced in terms of their degrees or intensities because of the usage of the communication networks. Therefore, it would be interesting to (1 examine how this kind of network-enhanced complexities affects the control or filtering performance; and (2 develop some suitable approaches for controller/filter design problems. In this paper, we aim to survey some recent advances on the performance analysis and synthesis with three sorts of fashionable network-enhanced complexities, namely, fading measurements, event-triggered mechanisms, and attack behaviors of adversaries. First, these three kinds of complexities are introduced in detail according to their engineering backgrounds, dynamical characteristic, and modelling techniques. Then, the developments of the performance analysis and synthesis issues for various networked systems are systematically reviewed. Furthermore, some challenges are illustrated by using a thorough literature review and some possible future research directions are highlighted.

  3. Altered Resting-State EEG Microstate Parameters and Enhanced Spatial Complexity in Male Adolescent Patients with Mild Spastic Diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Jia, Huibin; Wu, Xiangci; Yu, Dongchuan; Feng, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the resting-state EEG microstate parameters and spatial complexity in male adolescent patients with mild spastic diplegia (MSD). Resting-state EEG data were collected from male adolescent patients with MSD and healthy controls with eyes closed. EEG microstate and omega complexity analysis were performed. Microstate analysis revealed that the occurrence rate of microstate class A and D were significantly higher and the duration of microstate class B was significantly lower in the patients compared to healthy controls, which indicated that the temporal complexity may be higher and certain cognitive functions may be impaired in these patients. Omega complexity analysis showed that the global omega complexity of alpha-2 band was significantly higher in the patients than the controls. Besides, compared to the anterior regional omega complexities, the posterior regional omega complexities were significantly lower in the delta, theta, alpha-1 and alpha-2 bands, but significantly higher in the beta-2 and gamma-1 bands. And the regional omega complexities in the delta, theta and alpha-1 bands were significantly higher in the patients than controls. The present study reveals that in male adolescent patients with MSD, the temporal and spatial complexities of EEG signal are enhanced, which may be closely associated with the altered brain functions in these patients.

  4. White matter involvement in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Watemberg, Nathan; Luckman, Yehudit; Lev, Dorit

    2005-02-01

    White matter involvement is recently being realized as a common finding in mitochondrial disorders. It is considered an inherent part of the classical mitochondrial syndromes which are usually associated with alterations in the mitochondrial DNA such as: Leigh disease, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis, and stroke like episodes, mitochondrial neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalomyopathy and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. White matter involvement is also described in mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in the nuclear DNA which are transmitted in an autosomal pattern. MRI findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease are: small cyst-like lesions in abnormal white matter, involvement of both cerebral and cerebellar white matter, and a combination of a leukoencephalopathy with bilateral basal ganglia lesions. The clinical manifestations may be disproportionate to the extent of white matter involvement. Other organs may frequently be involved. The onset is often in infancy with a neurodegenerative course. The finding of a leukoencephalopathy in a patient with a complex neurologic picture and multisystem involvement should prompt a thorough mitochondrial evaluation.

  5. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  6. Role of mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system in protein biogenesis of the mitochondrial outer membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnert, Maria; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Zerbes, Ralf M.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Stroud, David A.; von der Malsburg, Karina; Mueller, Judith M.; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Perschil, Inge; Warscheid, Bettina; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Daum, Guenther; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria contain two membranes, the outer membrane and the inner membrane with folded cristae. The mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS) is a large protein complex required for maintaining inner membrane architecture. MINOS interacts with both preprotein transport machineries of

  7. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, Vtmpd (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0, were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P<0.0001, Vsucc (−65%; P<0.0001, and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P<0.001. Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P<0.001. Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P<0.05 and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P<0.001. Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient’s vulnerability to stroke.

  8. Determination of B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical formulations by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Benedito Roberto Alvarenga; Soares, Frederico Luis Felipe; Ardila, Jorge Armando; Durango, Luis Guillermo Cuadrado; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2018-01-05

    The aim of this work was to quantify B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical samples by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy technique using gold colloid substrate. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed according to an adapted Turkevich method. Initial essays were able to suggest the orientation of molecules on gold nanoparticles surface. Central Composite design was performed to obtain the highest SERS signal for nicotinamide and riboflavin. The evaluated parameters in the experimental design were volume of AuNPs, concentration of vitamins and sodium chloride concentration. The best condition for nicotinamide was NaCl 2.3×10-3molL-1 and 700μL of AuNPs colloid and this same condition showed to be adequate to quantify thiamine. The experimental design for riboflavin shows the best condition at NaCl 1.15×10-2molL-1 and 2.8mL of AuNPs colloid. It was possible to quantify thiamine and nicotinamide in presence of others vitamins and excipients in two solid multivitamin formulations using the standard addition procedure. The standard addition curve presented a R2 higher than 0.96 for both nicotinamide and thiamine, at orders of magnitude 10-7 and 10-8molL-1, respectively. The nicotinamide content in a cosmetic gel sample was also quantified by direct analysis presenting R2 0.98. The t-student test presented no significant difference regarding HPLC method. Despite the experimental design performed for riboflavin, it was not possible its quantification in the commercial samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical formulations by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Benedito Roberto Alvarenga; Soares, Frederico Luis Felipe; Ardila, Jorge Armando; Durango, Luis Guillermo Cuadrado; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical samples by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy technique using gold colloid substrate. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed according to an adapted Turkevich method. Initial essays were able to suggest the orientation of molecules on gold nanoparticles surface. Central Composite design was performed to obtain the highest SERS signal for nicotinamide and riboflavin. The evaluated parameters in the experimental design were volume of AuNPs, concentration of vitamins and sodium chloride concentration. The best condition for nicotinamide was NaCl 2.3 × 10- 3 mol L- 1 and 700 μL of AuNPs colloid and this same condition showed to be adequate to quantify thiamine. The experimental design for riboflavin shows the best condition at NaCl 1.15 × 10- 2 mol L- 1 and 2.8 mL of AuNPs colloid. It was possible to quantify thiamine and nicotinamide in presence of others vitamins and excipients in two solid multivitamin formulations using the standard addition procedure. The standard addition curve presented a R2 higher than 0.96 for both nicotinamide and thiamine, at orders of magnitude 10- 7 and 10- 8 mol L- 1, respectively. The nicotinamide content in a cosmetic gel sample was also quantified by direct analysis presenting R2 0.98. The t-student test presented no significant difference regarding HPLC method. Despite the experimental design performed for riboflavin, it was not possible its quantification in the commercial samples.

  10. Gallic acid induces apoptosis and enhances the anticancer effects of cisplatin in human small cell lung cancer H446 cell line via the ROS-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruixuan; Ma, Lijie; Weng, Dan; Yao, Jiahui; Liu, Xueying; Jin, Faguang

    2016-05-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive lung cancer subtype and accounts for more than 15% of all lung cancer cases. Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP)]-based combination chemotherapy is the cornerstone for all stages of SCLC. However, acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) and intolerable toxicities lead to a high mortality rate in SCLC patients. Gallic acid [3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (GA)] is a natural botanic phenolic compound which can induce cell apoptosis in several types of cancers. In the present study, we aimed to explore the anticancer effects of GA on human SCLC H446 cells and its promotive effects on the anticancer activities of cisplatin. The viability of the H446 cells was analyzed by MTT assay. Morphological changes in the H446 cells were observed under an inverted microscope. Apoptosis induction was determined by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) staining. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH‑DA), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by JC-1, and western blotting was used to examine the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that both GA and cisplatin changed the morphology, inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in the H446 cells by inducing generation of ROS, disruption of MMP, downregulation of XIAP expression, and upregulation of Bax, Apaf-1, DIABLO and p53 expression. More importantly, GA combined with cisplatin exhibited synergistic effects on inducing of these pro-apoptotic mediators and modulating the activation of apoptosis-related molecules. However, inhibition of the generation of ROS by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor, reversed the cell apoptosis induced by cisplatin combined with GA. In conclusion, the results from the present study revealed that GA exhibited an anticancer effect on human SCLC H446 cells and enhanced the antitumor activities of cisplatin

  11. Engineering and Sizing Nanoreactors To Confine Metal Complexes for Enhanced Catalytic Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakeri, Mozaffar; Roiban, Lucian; Yazerski, Vital; Prieto Gonzalez, Gonzalo; Klein Gebbink, Bert; de Jongh, Petra E.; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous metal complexes often display superior activity and selectivity in catalysis of chemical transformations. Heterogenization of these complexes by immobilization on solid supports has been used to facilitate recovery, but this is often associated with a decrease in catalytic performance.

  12. Hyperoxia activates ATM independent from mitochondrial ROS and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resseguie, Emily A; Staversky, Rhonda J; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia) are often used to treat individuals with respiratory distress, yet prolonged hyperoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage molecules such as DNA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is activated by nuclear DNA double strand breaks and delays hyperoxia-induced cell death through downstream targets p53 and p21. Evidence for its role in regulating mitochondrial function is emerging, yet it has not been determined if mitochondrial dysfunction or ROS activates ATM. Because ATM maintains mitochondrial homeostasis, we hypothesized that hyperoxia induces both mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS that activate ATM. In A549 lung epithelial cells, hyperoxia decreased mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity at 12h and basal respiration by 48 h. ROS were significantly increased at 24h, yet mitochondrial DNA double strand breaks were not detected. ATM was not required for activating p53 when mitochondrial respiration was inhibited by chronic exposure to antimycin A. Also, ATM was not further activated by mitochondrial ROS, which were enhanced by depleting manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). In contrast, ATM dampened the accumulation of mitochondrial ROS during exposure to hyperoxia. Our findings suggest that hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS do not activate ATM. ATM more likely carries out its canonical response to nuclear DNA damage and may function to attenuate mitochondrial ROS that contribute to oxygen toxicity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A heart that beats for 500 years: age-related changes in cardiac proteasome activity, oxidative protein damage and expression of heat shock proteins, inflammatory factors, and mitochondrial complexes in Arctica islandica, the longest-living noncolonial animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Chris; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Ridgway, Iain

    2014-12-01

    Study of negligibly senescent animals may provide clues that lead to better understanding of the cardiac aging process. To elucidate mechanisms of successful cardiac aging, we investigated age-related changes in proteasome activity, oxidative protein damage and expression of heat shock proteins, inflammatory factors, and mitochondrial complexes in the heart of the ocean quahog Arctica islandica, the longest-lived noncolonial animal (maximum life span potential: 508 years). We found that in the heart of A. islandica the level of oxidatively damaged proteins did not change significantly up to 120 years of age. No significant aging-induced changes were observed in caspase-like and trypsin-like proteasome activity. Chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity showed a significant early-life decline, then it remained stable for up to 182 years. No significant relationship was observed between the extent of protein ubiquitination and age. In the heart of A. islandica, an early-life decline in expression of HSP90 and five mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes was observed. We found significant age-related increases in the expression of three cytokine-like mediators (interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the heart of A. islandica. Collectively, in extremely long-lived molluscs, maintenance of protein homeostasis likely contributes to the preservation of cardiac function. Our data also support the concept that low-grade chronic inflammation in the cardiovascular system is a universal feature of the aging process, which is also manifest in invertebrates. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    , skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), pindex of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (222±13; 115±2; 48±2 umol•g(-1)•min(-1), p... per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, Complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of non-phosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac, skeletal...

  15. The mastodon mitochondrial genome: a mammoth accomplishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Alfred L

    2008-02-01

    The mitochondrial genome of an American mastodon was recently sequenced and used to root a phylogenetic analysis that included full mitochondrial genome sequences from woolly mammoths and the two living elephant genera. The study definitively established that mammoth and Asian elephant mitochondrial DNA lineages are more closely related than either is to African elephants. However, it also suggests that a complex evolutionary picture could ultimately emerge and points to similarities between the early evolution of the Elephantidae and that of the gorilla-human-chimpanzee clade.

  16. Mitochondrial-Targeted Decyl-Triphenylphosphonium Enhances 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Mediated Oxidative Stress and Clonogenic Killing of Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine Schibler

    Full Text Available Therapeutic advances have markedly prolonged overall survival in multiple myeloma (MM but the disease currently remains incurable. In a panel of MM cell lines (MM.1S, OPM-2, H929, and U266, using CD138 immunophenotyping, side population staining, and stem cell-related gene expression, we demonstrate the presence of stem-like tumor cells. Hypoxic culture conditions further increased CD138low stem-like cells with upregulated expression of OCT4 and NANOG. Compared to MM cells, these stem-like cells maintained lower steady-state pro-oxidant levels with increased uptake of the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog. In primary human MM samples, increased glycolytic gene expression correlated with poorer overall and event-free survival outcomes. Notably, stem-like cells showed increased mitochondrial mass, rhodamine 123 accumulation, and orthodox mitochondrial configuration while more condensed mitochondria were noted in the CD138high cells. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG induced ER stress as detected by qPCR (BiP, ATF4 and immunoblotting (BiP, CHOP and increased dihydroethidium probe oxidation both CD138low and CD138high cells. Treatment with a mitochondrial-targeting agent decyl-triphenylphosphonium (10-TPP increased intracellular steady-state pro-oxidant levels in stem-like and mature MM cells. Furthermore, 10-TPP mediated increases in mitochondrial oxidant production were suppressed by ectopic expression of manganese superoxide dismutase. Relative to 2-DG or 10-TPP alone, 2-DG plus 10-TPP combination showed increased caspase 3 activation in MM cells with minimal toxicity to the normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Notably, treatment with polyethylene glycol conjugated catalase significantly reduced 2-DG and/or 10-TPP-induced apoptosis of MM cells. Also, the combination of 2-DG with 10-TPP decreased clonogenic survival of MM cells. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy of metabolic oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity of MM

  17. Effects of endurance training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in Huntington disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sandro Manuel; Gehrig, Saskia Maria; Petersen, Jens A; Frese, Sebastian; Mihaylova, Violeta; Ligon-Auer, Maria; Khmara, Natalia; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Schaller, André; Lundby, Carsten; Toigo, Marco; Jung, Hans H

    2017-12-19

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may represent a pathogenic factor in Huntington disease (HD). Physical exercise leads to enhanced mitochondrial function in healthy participants. However, data on effects of physical exercise on HD skeletal muscle remains scarce. We aimed at investigating adaptations of the skeletal muscle mitochondria to endurance training in HD patients. Thirteen HD patients and 11 healthy controls completed 26 weeks of endurance training. Before and after the training phase muscle biopsies were obtained from M. vastus lateralis. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities, mitochondrial respiratory capacity, capillarization, and muscle fiber type distribution were determined from muscle samples. Citrate synthase activity increased during the training intervention in the whole cohort (P = 0.006). There was no group x time interaction for citrate synthase activity during the training intervention (P = 0.522). Complex III (P = 0.008), Complex V (P = 0.043), and succinate cytochrome c reductase (P = 0.008) activities increased in HD patients and controls by endurance training. An increase in mass-specific mitochondrial respiratory capacity was present in HD patients during the endurance training intervention. Overall capillary-to-fiber ratio increased in HD patients by 8.4% and in healthy controls by 6.4% during the endurance training intervention. Skeletal muscle mitochondria of HD patients are equally responsive to an endurance-training stimulus as in healthy controls. Endurance training is a safe and feasible option to enhance indices of energy metabolism in skeletal muscle of HD patients and may represent a potential therapeutic approach to delay the onset and/or progression of muscular dysfunction. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01879267 . Registered May 24, 2012.

  18. ER-associated mitochondrial division links the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murley, Andrew; Lackner, Laura L; Osman, Christof; West, Matthew; Voeltz, Gia K; Walter, Peter; Nunnari, Jodi

    2013-05-14

    Mitochondrial division is important for mitochondrial distribution and function. Recent data have demonstrated that ER-mitochondria contacts mark mitochondrial division sites, but the molecular basis and functions of these contacts are not understood. Here we show that in yeast, the ER-mitochondria tethering complex, ERMES, and the highly conserved Miro GTPase, Gem1, are spatially and functionally linked to ER-associated mitochondrial division. Gem1 acts as a negative regulator of ER-mitochondria contacts, an activity required for the spatial resolution and distribution of newly generated mitochondrial tips following division. Previous data have demonstrated that ERMES localizes with a subset of actively replicating mitochondrial nucleoids. We show that mitochondrial division is spatially linked to nucleoids and that a majority of these nucleoids segregate prior to division, resulting in their distribution into newly generated tips in the mitochondrial network. Thus, we postulate that ER-associated division serves to link the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial nucleoids in cells. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00422.001.

  19. Regulation of mitochondria-dynactin interaction and mitochondrial retrograde transport in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drerup, Catherine M; Herbert, Amy L; Monk, Kelly R; Nechiporuk, Alex V

    2017-04-17

    Mitochondrial transport in axons is critical for neural circuit health and function. While several proteins have been found that modulate bidirectional mitochondrial motility, factors that regulate unidirectional mitochondrial transport have been harder to identify. In a genetic screen, we found a zebrafish strain in which mitochondria fail to attach to the dynein retrograde motor. This strain carries a loss-of-function mutation in actr10 , a member of the dynein-associated complex dynactin. The abnormal axon morphology and mitochondrial retrograde transport defects observed in actr10 mutants are distinct from dynein and dynactin mutant axonal phenotypes. In addition, Actr10 lacking the dynactin binding domain maintains its ability to bind mitochondria, arguing for a role for Actr10 in dynactin-mitochondria interaction. Finally, genetic interaction studies implicated Drp1 as a partner in Actr10-dependent mitochondrial retrograde transport. Together, this work identifies Actr10 as a factor necessary for dynactin-mitochondria interaction, enhancing our understanding of how mitochondria properly localize in axons.

  20. The Transgenic Overexpression of α-Synuclein and Not Its Related Pathology Associates with Complex I Inhibition*

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Virginie; Yakunin, Eugenia; Saada, Ann; Sharon, Ronit

    2010-01-01

    α-Synuclein (αS) is a protein involved in the cytopathology and genetics of Parkinson disease and is thought to affect mitochondrial complex I activity. Previous studies have shown that mitochondrial toxins and specifically inhibitors of complex I activity enhance αS pathogenesis. Here we show that αS overexpression specifically inhibits complex I activity in dopaminergic cells and in A53T αS transgenic mouse brains. Importantly, our results indicate that the inhibitory effect on complex I ac...

  1. Enhanced splicing correction effect by an oligo-aspartic acid-PNA conjugate and cationic carrier complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Mi; Kim, Myung Hee; Yu, Gwang Sig; Um, Bong Ho; Park, Hee Kyung; Lee, Hyun-il; Lee, Kang Taek; Suh, Yung Doug; Choi, Joon Sig

    2014-02-10

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic structural analogues of DNA