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Sample records for enhanced ellipsometry biosensor

  1. Polarization-sensitive surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry biosensor using the photoelastic modulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Ho, Ho Pui; Wu, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    A surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) is reported. We show that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan , cos and ellipse orientation angle , can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals at the f......A surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) is reported. We show that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan , cos and ellipse orientation angle , can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals...... at the first and second harmonics of the modulated frequency under a certain birefringence geometry. This leads to accurate measurement of refractive index variations within the evanescent field region close to the gold sensor surface, thereby enabling biosensing applications. Our experimental results confirm...

  2. Development of biosensor based on imaging ellipsometry and biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, G., E-mail: gajin@imech.ac.c [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Bei-si-huan west Rd., Beijing 100190 (China); Meng, Y.H.; Liu, L.; Niu, Y.; Chen, S. [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Bei-si-huan west Rd., Beijing 100190 (China); Cai, Q.; Jiang, T.J. [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2011-02-28

    So far, combined with a microfluidic reactor array system, an engineering system of biosensor based on imaging ellipsometry is installed for biomedical applications, such as antibody screen, hepatitis B markers detection, cancer markers spectrum and virus recognition, etc. Furthermore, the biosensor in total internal reflection (TIR) mode has be improved by a spectroscopic light, optimization settings of polarization and low noise CCD which brings an obvious improvement of 10 time increase in the sensitivity and SNR, and 50 times lower concentration in the detection limit with a throughput of 48 independent channels and the time resolution of 0.04 S.

  3. Gas detection by means of surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nooke, Alida

    2012-11-01

    This thesis investigated gas sensing by means of surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry. Surface plasmons were excited in a 40 - 50 nm gold layer by a He-Ne-laser using the Kretschmann configuration, which was arranged on a self-made copper measuring cell. A fixed angle of incidence and the ellipsometric parameter {Delta} as the measured value were used to monitor changes in the gas phase. Different types of gases were investigated: flammable (hydrocarbons and hydrogen), oxidising (oxygen and ozone), toxic (carbon monoxide) and inert (helium and nitrogen). The gas types can be distinguished by their refractive indices, whereas the sensor responds instantly relative to the reference gas with an increase or a decrease in {Delta}. Diluting the analyte gas with a reference gas (nitrogen or air) allowed the detection limits to be determined, these lay in the low % range. The sensor stability was also enhanced as well as the sensitivity by modifying the gold layers with a 3-10 nm additional layer. These additional layers consisted of the inorganic materials TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2} and Fe: SnO{sub 2} which were deposited by different coating processes. Surface investigations were made of every utilised layer: scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope measurements for surface topology and spectroscopic ellipsometry mapping to determine the optical constants and the layer thicknesses. All applied materials protected the gold layer from contaminations and thus prolonged the life span of the sensor. Furthermore, the detection limits were reduced significantly, to the low ppm range. The material Fe: SnO{sub 2} demonstrates a special behaviour in reaction with the toxic gas carbon monoxide: Due to the iron doping, the response to carbon monoxide is extraordinary and concentrations below 1 ppm were detected. In order to approach a future application in industry, the sensor system was adapted to a stainless steel tube. With this measuring

  4. Enhanced sensitivity to dielectric function and thickness of absorbing thin films by combining total internal reflection ellipsometry with standard ellipsometry and reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizana, A; Foldyna, M; Garcia-Caurel, E; Stchakovsky, M; Georges, B; Nicolas, D

    2013-01-01

    High sensitivity of spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectometry for the characterization of thin films can strongly decrease when layers, typically metals, absorb a significant fraction of the light. In this paper, we propose a solution to overcome this drawback using total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and exciting a surface longitudinal wave: a plasmon-polariton. As in the attenuated total reflectance technique, TIRE exploits a minimum in the intensity of reflected transversal magnetic (TM) polarized light and enhances the sensitivity of standard methods to thicknesses of absorbing films. Samples under study were stacks of three films, ZnO : Al/Ag/ZnO : Al, deposited on glass substrates. The thickness of the silver layer varied from sample to sample. We performed measurements with a UV–visible phase-modulated ellipsometer, an IR Mueller ellipsometer and a UV–NIR reflectometer. We used the variance–covariance formalism to evaluate the sensitivity of the ellipsometric data to different parameters of the optical model. Results have shown that using TIRE doubled the sensitivity to the silver layer thickness when compared with the standard ellipsometry. Moreover, the thickness of the ZnO : Al layer below the silver layer can be reliably quantified, unlike for the fit of the standard ellipsometry data, which is limited by the absorption of the silver layer. (paper)

  5. Enhanced sensitivity to dielectric function and thickness of absorbing thin films by combining total internal reflection ellipsometry with standard ellipsometry and reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizana, A.; Foldyna, M.; Stchakovsky, M.; Georges, B.; Nicolas, D.; Garcia-Caurel, E.

    2013-03-01

    High sensitivity of spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectometry for the characterization of thin films can strongly decrease when layers, typically metals, absorb a significant fraction of the light. In this paper, we propose a solution to overcome this drawback using total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and exciting a surface longitudinal wave: a plasmon-polariton. As in the attenuated total reflectance technique, TIRE exploits a minimum in the intensity of reflected transversal magnetic (TM) polarized light and enhances the sensitivity of standard methods to thicknesses of absorbing films. Samples under study were stacks of three films, ZnO : Al/Ag/ZnO : Al, deposited on glass substrates. The thickness of the silver layer varied from sample to sample. We performed measurements with a UV-visible phase-modulated ellipsometer, an IR Mueller ellipsometer and a UV-NIR reflectometer. We used the variance-covariance formalism to evaluate the sensitivity of the ellipsometric data to different parameters of the optical model. Results have shown that using TIRE doubled the sensitivity to the silver layer thickness when compared with the standard ellipsometry. Moreover, the thickness of the ZnO : Al layer below the silver layer can be reliably quantified, unlike for the fit of the standard ellipsometry data, which is limited by the absorption of the silver layer.

  6. Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  7. Discrete dipole approximation simulation of bead enhanced diffraction grating biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, Khalid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    We present the discrete dipole approximation simulation of light scattering from bead enhanced diffraction biosensor and report the effect of bead material, number of beads forming the grating and spatial randomness on the diffraction intensities of 1st and 0th orders. The dipole models of gratings are formed by volume slicing and image processing while the spatial locations of the beads on the substrate surface are randomly computed using discrete probability distribution. The effect of beads reduction on far-field scattering of 632.8 nm incident field, from fully occupied gratings to very coarse gratings, is studied for various bead materials. Our findings give insight into many difficult or experimentally impossible aspects of this genre of biosensors and establish that bead enhanced grating may be used for rapid and precise detection of small amounts of biomolecules. The results of simulations also show excellent qualitative similarities with experimental observations. - Highlights: • DDA was used to study the relationship between the number of beads forming gratings and ratio of first and zeroth order diffraction intensities. • A very flexible modeling program was developed to design complicated objects for DDA. • Material and spatial effects of bead distribution on surfaces were studied. • It has been shown that bead enhanced grating biosensor can be useful for fast detection of small amounts of biomolecules. • Experimental results qualitatively support the simulations and thus open a way to optimize the grating biosensors.

  8. Micro-array versus nano-array platforms: a comparative study for ODN detection based on SPR enhanced ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celen, Burcu; Piskin, Erhan; Demirel, Goekhan

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and sensitive detection of DNA has recently attracted worldwide attention for a variety of disease diagnoses and detection of harmful bacteria in food and drink. In this paper, we carried out a comparative study based on surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry (SPREE) for the detection of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) using micro- and nano-array platforms. The micro-arrayed surfaces were fabricated by a photolithography approach using different types of mask having varying size and shape. Well-ordered arrays of high aspect ratio polymeric nanotubes were also obtained using high molecular weight polystyrene (PS) and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes having 200 nm pore diameters. The SPREE sensors were then prepared by direct coupling of thiolated probe-ODNs, which contain suitable spacer arms, on gold-coated micro- and nano-arrayed surfaces. We experimentally demonstrated that, for the first time, gold-coated free standing polymeric nano-arrayed platforms can easily be produced and lead to a significant sensor sensitivity gain compared to that of the conventional SPREE surfaces of about four times. We believe that such an enhancement in sensor response could be useful for next generation sensor systems.

  9. Micro-array versus nano-array platforms: a comparative study for ODN detection based on SPR enhanced ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celen, Burcu; Demirel, Gökhan; Piskin, Erhan

    2011-04-01

    The rapid and sensitive detection of DNA has recently attracted worldwide attention for a variety of disease diagnoses and detection of harmful bacteria in food and drink. In this paper, we carried out a comparative study based on surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry (SPREE) for the detection of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) using micro- and nano-array platforms. The micro-arrayed surfaces were fabricated by a photolithography approach using different types of mask having varying size and shape. Well-ordered arrays of high aspect ratio polymeric nanotubes were also obtained using high molecular weight polystyrene (PS) and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes having 200 nm pore diameters. The SPREE sensors were then prepared by direct coupling of thiolated probe-ODNs, which contain suitable spacer arms, on gold-coated micro- and nano-arrayed surfaces. We experimentally demonstrated that, for the first time, gold-coated free standing polymeric nano-arrayed platforms can easily be produced and lead to a significant sensor sensitivity gain compared to that of the conventional SPREE surfaces of about four times. We believe that such an enhancement in sensor response could be useful for next generation sensor systems.

  10. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Haeberle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on results on the preparation of thin (2O3 films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate over 4” wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  11. Recent Advances on Luminescent Enhancement-Based Porous Silicon Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Plush, Sally E; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence-based detection paradigms have key advantages over other optical platforms such as absorbance, reflectance or interferometric based detection. However, autofluorescence, low quantum yield and lack of photostability of the fluorophore or emitting molecule are still performance-limiting factors. Recent research has shown the need for enhanced luminescence-based detection to overcome these drawbacks while at the same time improving the sensitivity, selectivity and reducing the detection limits of optical sensors and biosensors. Nanostructures have been reported to significantly improve the spectral properties of the emitting molecules. These structures offer unique electrical, optic and magnetic properties which may be used to tailor the surrounding electrical field of the emitter. Here, the main principles behind luminescence and luminescence enhancement-based detections are reviewed, with an emphasis on europium complexes as the emitting molecule. An overview of the optical porous silicon microcavity (pSiMC) as a biosensing platform and recent proof-of-concept examples on enhanced luminescence-based detection using pSiMCs are provided and discussed.

  12. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  13. Self-Assembly of Protein Nanostructures to Enhance Biosensor Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Bradley; Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie

    The Langmuir adsorption isotherm predicts that the number of bound species on a surface at a given concentration will be directly proportional to the number of binding sites on the surface. Therefore, the number of binding events in a biosensor may be increased at a given analyte concentration if the surface density of binding domains is increased. Here, we demonstrate the formation of block copolymers where one block is a human IgG antibody or a nanobody and self-assemble these molecules into nanostructured films with a high density of binding sites. The type of nanostructure formed and the rate of transport through the protein-polymer layers are explored as a function of coil fraction of the protein-polymer conjugate block copolymers, showing optima for transport and assembly that depend upon the identity of the protein. For small enough analytes, binding to the antibodies and nanobodies is linear with film thickness, indicating that the entire film is accessible. Consistent with the enhanced number of binding sites and the prediction of the Langmuir isotherm, the films improve sensitivity by several orders of magnitude relative to chemisorbed protein layers used in current sensor designs. Current research is integrating this new material technology into prototype sensors. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Reesearch (AFOSR).

  14. Optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-01-01

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL"−"1, which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. - Highlights: • A sensitive and versatile SPR biosensor was constructed for detection of pig IgG. • Biofunctional gold nanostars were used to amplify the response signals. • The strategy employed carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide as biosensing substrate. • The detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  16. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian, E-mail: songdq@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL{sup −1}, which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. - Highlights: • A sensitive and versatile SPR biosensor was constructed for detection of pig IgG. • Biofunctional gold nanostars were used to amplify the response signals. • The strategy employed carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide as biosensing substrate. • The detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  17. Nano-particle enhanced impedimetric biosensor for detection of foodborne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G; Om, A S; Mun, J H

    2007-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illness have been increased the need for rapid and sensitive methods for detection of these pathogens. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification involve prolonged multiple enrichment steps. Even though some immunological rapid assays are available, these assays still need enrichment steps result in delayed detection. Biosensors have shown great potential for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. They are capable of direct monitoring the antigen-antibody reactions in real time. Among the biosensors, impedimetric biosensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions because of their high sensitivity and reagentless operation. In this study a nanoparticle-enhanced impedimetric biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection was developed which detected impedance changes caused by the attachment of the cells to the anti-Salmonella antibodies immobilized on interdigitated gold electrodes. Successive immobilization of neutravidin followed by anti-Salmonella antibodies was performed to the sensing area to create a biological detection surface. To enhance the impedance responses generated by antigen-antibody reactions, anti-Salmonella antibody conjugated nanoparticles were introduced on the sensing area. Using a portable impedance analyzer, the impedance across the interdigital electrodes was measured after the series of antigen-antibody bindings. Bacteria cells present in solution attached to capture antibodies and became tethered to the sensor surface. Attached bacteria cells changed the dielectric constant of the media between the electrodes thereby causing a change in measured impedance. Optimum input frequency was determined by analyzing frequency characteristics of the biosensor over ranges of applied frequencies from 10 Hz to 400 Hz. At 100 Hz of input frequency, the biosensor was most sensitive to the changes of the bacteria concentration and this frequency

  18. Stimuli-Responsive Nanodiamond-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Metastatic Tumor Site Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gu, Mengjie; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Nurrul Lissa Binti; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Metastasis is often critical to cancer progression and linked to poor survival and drug resistance. Early detection of metastasis, as well as identification of metastatic tumor sites, can improve cancer patient survival. Thus, developing technology to improve the detection of cancer metastasis biomarkers can improve both diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we investigated the use of nanodiamonds to develop a stimuli-responsive metastasis detection complex that utilizes matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) as a metastasis biomarker, as MMP9 increased expression has been shown to be indicative of metastasis. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor complex consists of nanodiamonds functionalized with MMP9-specific fluorescent-labeled substrate peptides. Using this design, protease activity of MMP9 can be accurately measured and correlated to MMP9 expression. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor also demonstrated an enhanced ability to protect the base sensor peptide from nonspecific serum protease cleavage. This enhanced peptide stability, combined with a quantitative stimuli-responsive output function, provides strong evidence for the further development of a nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor for metastasis site detection. More importantly, this work provides the foundation for use of nanodiamonds as a platform for stimuli-responsive biosensors and theranostic complexes that can be implemented across a wide range of biomedical applications.

  19. Disposable L-lactate biosensor based on a screen-printed carbon electrode enhanced by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Dandan; He, Yu; Rong, Yuanzhen; Wang, You; Li, Guang

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an amperometric L-lactate biosensor based on a graphene-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was constructed. First, the electrocatalytic performance of the SPCE modified with graphene by a one-step electrodeposition process (OerGO/SPCE) was investigated. The cyclic voltammogram of OerGO/SPCE, which showed a well-defined redox peak, had a smaller peak potential separation than that of SPCE, revealing the improvement in electron transfer speed brought about by modifying with graphene. Next, lactate oxidase and potassium ferricyanide were dropped on the OerGO/SPCE to construct a graphene-modified L-lactate biosensor (LOD/K3[Fe(CN)6]/OerGO/SPCE). The proposed biosensor, with a detection limit of 60 μM, had a high sensitivity (42.42 μA mM-1 cm-2) when working at a low working potential (0.15 V). The linear range was 0.5 mM-15 mM, covering the detecting range of L-lactate in clinical applications. The L-lactate biosensor had a short response time (10 s) and required only 10 μl of the sample. This L-lactate sensor modified with electrodeposited graphene had a larger sensitivity than that based on the bare SPCE. Thus, our low-cost and disposable L-lactate biosensor enhanced by graphene can perform as an attractive electrochemical device that can be manufactured for point-of-care testing (POCT) devices and be employed in POCT applications.

  20. Disposable L-lactate biosensor based on a screen-printed carbon electrode enhanced by graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Dandan; He, Yu; Rong, Yuanzhen; Wang, You; Li, Guang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an amperometric L-lactate biosensor based on a graphene-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was constructed. First, the electrocatalytic performance of the SPCE modified with graphene by a one-step electrodeposition process (OerGO/SPCE) was investigated. The cyclic voltammogram of OerGO/SPCE, which showed a well-defined redox peak, had a smaller peak potential separation than that of SPCE, revealing the improvement in electron transfer speed brought about by modifying with graphene. Next, lactate oxidase and potassium ferricyanide were dropped on the OerGO/SPCE to construct a graphene-modified L-lactate biosensor (LOD/K 3 [Fe(CN) 6 ]/OerGO/SPCE). The proposed biosensor, with a detection limit of 60 μM, had a high sensitivity (42.42 μA mM −1 cm −2 ) when working at a low working potential (0.15 V). The linear range was 0.5 mM–15 mM, covering the detecting range of L-lactate in clinical applications. The L-lactate biosensor had a short response time (10 s) and required only 10 μl of the sample. This L-lactate sensor modified with electrodeposited graphene had a larger sensitivity than that based on the bare SPCE. Thus, our low-cost and disposable L-lactate biosensor enhanced by graphene can perform as an attractive electrochemical device that can be manufactured for point-of-care testing (POCT) devices and be employed in POCT applications. (paper)

  1. Nanostructured Tip-Shaped Biosensors: Application of Six Sigma Approach for Enhanced Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Seong-Joong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2016-12-23

    Nanostructured tip-shaped biosensors have drawn attention for biomolecule detection as they are promising for highly sensitive and specific detection of a target analyte. Using a nanostructured tip, the sensitivity is increased to identify individual molecules because of the high aspect ratio structure. Various detection methods, such as electrochemistry, fluorescence microcopy, and Raman spectroscopy, have been attempted to enhance the sensitivity and the specificity. Due to the confined path of electrons, electrochemical measurement using a nanotip enables the detection of single molecules. When an electric field is combined with capillary action and fluid flow, target molecules can be effectively concentrated onto a nanotip surface for detection. To enhance the concentration efficacy, a dendritic nanotip rather than a single tip could be used to detect target analytes, such as nanoparticles, cells, and DNA. However, reproducible fabrication with relation to specific detection remains a challenge due to the instability of a manufacturing method, resulting in inconsistent shape. In this paper, nanostructured biosensors are reviewed with our experimental results using dendritic nanotips for sequence specific detection of DNA. By the aid of the Six Sigma approach, the fabrication yield of dendritic nanotips increases from 20.0% to 86.6%. Using the nanotips, DNA is concentrated and detected in a sequence specific way with the detection limit equivalent to 1000 CFU/mL. The pros and cons of a nanotip biosensor are evaluated in conjunction with future prospects.

  2. Rapid, enhanced detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using micron-scale, phage-coated magnetoelastic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Vaglenov, Kiril A.; Gerken, Dana M.; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Li, Suiqiong; Petrenko, Valery A.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2012-05-01

    In order to cost-effectively and rapidly detect bacterial food contamination in the field, the potential usefulness of phage-coated magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors has been recently reported. These biosensors are freestanding, mass-sensitive biosensors that can be easily batch-fabricated, thereby reducing the fabrication cost per sensor to a fraction of a cent. In addition, the biosensors can be directly placed on fresh produce surfaces and used to rapidly monitor possible bacterial food contamination without any preceding sample preparation. Previous investigations showed that the limit of detection (LOD) with millimeter-scale ME biosensors was fairly low for fresh produce with smooth surfaces (e.g., tomatoes and shell eggs). However, the LOD is anticipated to be dependent on the size of the biosensors as well as the topography of produce surfaces of interest. This paper presents an investigation into the use of micron-scale, phage-coated ME biosensors for the enhanced detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves.

  3. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced Biosensor Platforms for Detecting the Atherosclerotic Biomarker VCAM1 Based on Bioconjugation with Uniformly Oriented VCAM1-Targeting Nanobodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duy Tien Ta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface bioconjugation of biomolecules has gained enormous attention for developing advanced biomaterials including biosensors. While conventional immobilization (by physisorption or covalent couplings using the functional groups of the endogenous amino acids usually results in surfaces with low activity, reproducibility and reusability, the application of methods that allow for a covalent and uniformly oriented coupling can circumvent these limitations. In this study, the nanobody targeting Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (NbVCAM1, an atherosclerotic biomarker, is engineered with a C-terminal alkyne function via Expressed Protein Ligation (EPL. Conjugation of this nanobody to azidified silicon wafers and Biacore™ C1 sensor chips is achieved via Copper(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC “click” chemistry to detect VCAM1 binding via ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, respectively. The resulting surfaces, covered with uniformly oriented nanobodies, clearly show an increased antigen binding affinity, sensitivity, detection limit, quantitation limit and reusability as compared to surfaces prepared by random conjugation. These findings demonstrate the added value of a combined EPL and CuAAC approach as it results in strong control over the surface orientation of the nanobodies and an improved detecting power of their targets—a must for the development of advanced miniaturized, multi-biomarker biosensor platforms.

  5. Plasma Enhanced Growth of Carbon Nanotubes For Ultrasensitive Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Li, J.; Ye, Q.; Koehne, J.; Chen, H.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The multitude of considerations facing nanostructure growth and integration lends itself to combinatorial optimization approaches. Rapid optimization becomes even more important with wafer-scale growth and integration processes. Here we discuss methodology for developing plasma enhanced CVD growth techniques for achieving individual, vertically aligned carbon nanostructures that show excellent properties as ultrasensitive electrodes for nucleic acid detection. We utilize high throughput strategies for optimizing the upstream and downstream processing and integration of carbon nanotube electrodes as functional elements in various device types. An overview of ultrasensitive carbon nanotube based sensor arrays for electrochemical biosensing applications and the high throughput methodology utilized to combine novel electrode technology with conventional MEMS processing will be presented.

  6. Enhanced sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor by using oblique deposited silver nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chih-Chia; Wu, Pin Chieh; Tseng, Ming Lun; Lin, Wen-Chi; Chen, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor is demonstrated to be enhanced by oblique deposited silver nanorods. Silver nanorods are thermally deposited on silver nanothin film by oblique angle deposition (OAD). The length of the nanorods can be tuned by controlling the deposition parameters of thermal deposition. By measuring the phase difference between the p and s waves of surface plasmon resonance heterodyne interferometer with different wavelength of incident light, we have demonstrated that maximum sensitivity of glucose detection down to 7.1 × 10(-8) refractive index units could be achieved with optimal deposition parameters of silver nanorods.

  7. Enhancing the sensitivity of slow light MZI biosensors through multi-hole defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kun; Zhao, Yiliang; Hu, Shuren; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate enhanced detection sensitivity of a slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) sensor by incorporating multi-hole defects (MHDs). Slow light MZI biosensors with a one-dimensional photonic crystal in one arm have been previously shown to improve the performance of traditional MZI sensors based on the increased lightmatter interaction that takes place in the photonic crystal region of the structure. Introducing MHDs in the photonic crystal region increases the available surface area for molecular attachment and further increases the enhanced lightmatter interaction capability of slow light MZIs. The MHDs allow analyte to interact with a greater fraction of the guided wave in the MZI. For a slow light MHD MZI sensor with a 16 μm long sensing arm, a bulk sensitivity of 151,000 rad/RIU-cm is demonstrated experimentally, which is approximately two-fold higher than our previously reported slow light MZI sensors and thirteen-fold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter length sensing regions. For the label-free detection of nucleic acids, the slow light MZI with MHDs also exhibits a two-fold sensitivity improvement in experiment compared to the slow light MZI without MHDs. Because the detection sensitivity of slow light MHD MZIs scales with the length of the sensing arm, the tradeoff between detection limit and device size can be appropriately mitigated for different applications. All experimental results presented in this work are in good agreement with finite difference-time domain-calculations. Overall, the slow light MZI biosensors with MHDs are a promising platform for highly sensitive and multiplexed lab-on-chip systems.

  8. Use of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Biosensor Response to the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kee-Shyuan; Lee, Yook Heng; Musa, Ahmad; Salmah, Abdul Aziz; Zamri, Ishak

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 5.48 ±1.37 nm. An electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied. The amperometric biosensor was based on the reaction of ALP with the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P). The incorporation of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles together with ALP into a sol gel/chitosan biosensor membrane has led to the enhancement of the biosensor response, with an improved linear response range to the substrate AA2P (5-120 μM) and increased sensitivity. Using the inhibition property of the ALP, the biosensor was applied to the determination of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The use of Fe3O4 nanoparticles gives a two-fold improvement in the sensitivity towards 2,4-D, with a linear response range of 0.5-30 μgL-1. Exposure of the biosensor to other toxicants such as heavy metals demonstrated only slight interference from metals such as Hg2+, Cu2+, Ag2+ and Pb2+. The biosensor was shown to be useful for the determination of the herbicide 2, 4-D because good recovery of 95-100 percent was obtained, even though the analysis was performed in water samples with a complex matrix. Furthermore, the results from the analysis of 2,4-D in water samples using the biosensor correlated well with a HPLC method. PMID:27873839

  9. Use of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Biosensor Response to the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Zamri

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 5.48 ±1.37 nm. An electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied. The amperometric biosensor was based on the reaction of ALP with the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P. The incorporation of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles together with ALP into a sol gel/chitosan biosensor membrane has led to the enhancement of the biosensor response, with an improved linear response range to the substrate AA2P (5-120 μM and increased sensitivity. Using the inhibition property of the ALP, the biosensor was applied to the determination of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. The use of Fe3O4 nanoparticles gives a two-fold improvement in the sensitivity towards 2,4-D, with a linear response range of 0.5-30 μgL-1. Exposure of the biosensor to other toxicants such as heavy metals demonstrated only slight interference from metals such as Hg2+, Cu2+, Ag2+ and Pb2+. The biosensor was shown to be useful for the determination of the herbicide 2, 4-D because good recovery of 95-100 percent was obtained, even though the analysis was performed in water samples with a complex matrix. Furthermore, the results from the analysis of 2,4-D in water samples using the biosensor correlated well with a HPLC method.

  10. A Simple Metallothionein-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Arsenic and Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Irvine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins (MTs are a family of cysteine-rich proteins whose biological roles include the regulation of essential metal ions and protection against the harmful effects of toxic metals. Due to its high affinity for many toxic, soft metals, recombinant human MT isoform 1a was incorporated into an electrochemical-based biosensor for the detection of As3+ and Hg2+. A simple design was chosen to maximize its potential in environmental monitoring and MT was physically adsorbed onto paper discs placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs. This system was tested with concentrations of arsenic and mercury typical of contaminated water sources ranging from 5 to 1000 ppb. The analytical performance of the MT-adsorbed paper discs on SPCEs demonstrated a greater than three-fold signal enhancement and a lower detection limit compared to blank SPCEs, 13 ppb for As3+ and 45 ppb for Hg2+. While not being as low as some of the recommended drinking water limits, the sensitivity of the simple MT-biosensor would be potentially useful in monitoring of areas of concern with a known contamination problem. This paper describes the ability of the metal binding protein metallothionein to enhance the effectiveness of a simple, low-cost electrochemical sensor.

  11. Optical resonance-enhanced absorption-based near-field immunochip biosensor for allergen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Irene; Morgan, Michael R A; Lindner, Wolfgang; Pittner, Fritz

    2008-04-15

    An optical immunochip biosensor has been developed as a rapid method for allergen detection in complex food matrixes, and its application evaluated for the detection of the egg white allergens, ovalbumin and ovomucoid. The optical near-field phenomenon underlying the basic principle of the sensor design is called resonance-enhanced absorption (REA), which utilizes gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as signal transducers in a highly sensitive interferometric setup. Using this approach, a novel, simple, and rapid colorimetric solid-phase immunoassay on a planar chip substrate was realized in direct and sandwich assay formats, with a detection system that does not require any instrumentation for readout. Semiquantitative immunochemical responses are directly visible to the naked eye of the analyst. The biosensor shows concentration-dependent color development by capturing antibody-functionalized Au NPs on allergen-coated chips and has a detection limit of 1 ng/mL. To establish a rapid method, we took advantage of the physicochemical microenvironment of the Au NP-antibody bioconjugate to be bound directly over an interacting poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) interlayer by an immobilized antigen. In the direct assay format, a coating time with allergen of only 5 min under "soft" nondenaturing conditions was sufficient for accurate reproducibility and sensitivity. In conclusion, the REA-based immunochip sensor is easy to fabricate, is reproducible and selective in its performance, has minimal technical requirements, and will enable high-throughput screening of affinity binding interactions in technological and medical applications.

  12. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis; Samartzis, Peter C.; Stamataki, Katerina; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis; Schimowski, Xavier; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Loppinet, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films

  13. Nanopolyaniline as immobilization template for signal enhancement of surface plasmon resonance biosensor - A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarun, Dzaraini; Abdul Azem, Nor Hazirah Kamel; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Mohd, Ahmad Faiza; Abdullah @ Mohd Noor, Mashita

    2012-07-01

    A technique for the enhancement of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) signal for sensing biomolecular interactions is described. Polyaniline (PANI) of particle size in the range of 1 to 15 nm was synthesized and used as the template for the immobilization of protein molecules. Biomolecular interactions of unbound and PANI-bound proteins with antibody molecules were SPR-monitored using a model system comprising of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and anti BSA. A 7-fold increased in the signal was recorded from interactions of the PANI-bound BSA with anti BSA compared to the interactions of its unbound counterpart. This preliminary observation provides new avenue in immunosensor technology for improving the detection sensitivity of SPR biosensor; and thereby increasing the lower detection limit of biomolecules.

  14. Interferometric snapshot spectro-ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Vamara; Jin, Moonseob; Choi, Inho; Chegal, Won; Kim, Daesuk

    2018-01-22

    We propose a snapshot spectroscopic ellipsometry and its applications for real-time thin-film thickness measurement. The proposed system employs an interferometric polarization-modulation module that can measure the spectroscopic ellipsometric phase for thin-film deposited on a substrate with a measurement speed of around 20 msec. It requires neither moving parts nor time dependent modulation devices. The accuracy of the proposed interferometric snapshot spectro-ellipsometer is analyzed through comparison with commercial equipment results.

  15. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Granqvist

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations.

  16. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Niko; Hanning, Anders; Eng, Lars; Tuppurainen, Jussi; Viitala, Tapani

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations. PMID:24217357

  17. Enhancement of affinity-based biosensors: effect of sensing chamber geometry on sensitivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lynn, Nicholas Scott; Šípová, Hana; Adam, Pavel; Homola, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2013), s. 1413-1421 ISSN 1473-0197 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : SURFACE-BASED BIOSENSORS * DIFFUSION * PLASMON RESONANCE BIOSENSOR Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 5.748, year: 2013

  18. Enhancement in sensitivity of graphene-based zinc oxide assisted bimetallic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Kushwaha, Angad S.; Srivastava, Monika; Mishra, H.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    In the present communication, a highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with Kretschmann configuration having alternate layers, prism/zinc oxide/silver/gold/graphene/biomolecules (ss-DNA) is presented. The optimization of the proposed configuration has been accomplished by keeping the constant thickness of zinc oxide (32 nm), silver (32 nm), graphene (0.34 nm) layer and biomolecules (100 nm) for different values of gold layer thickness (1, 3 and 5 nm). The sensitivity of the proposed SPR biosensor has been demonstrated for a number of design parameters such as gold layer thickness, number of graphene layer, refractive index of biomolecules and the thickness of biomolecules layer. SPR biosensor with optimized geometry has greater sensitivity (66 deg/RIU) than the conventional (52 deg/RIU) as well as other graphene-based (53.2 deg/RIU) SPR biosensor. The effect of zinc oxide layer thickness on the sensitivity of SPR biosensor has also been analysed. From the analysis, it is found that the sensitivity increases significantly by increasing the thickness of zinc oxide layer. It means zinc oxide intermediate layer plays an important role to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The sensitivity of SPR biosensor also increases by increasing the number of graphene layer (upto nine layer).

  19. A user's guide to ellipsometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tompkins, Harland G

    1992-01-01

    This book is specifically designed for the user who wishes expanded use of ellipsometry beyond the relatively limited number of turn-key applications. The book provides a concise discussion of theory and instrumentation before describing how to use optical parameters to determine material properties and optical parameters for inaccessible substrates and unknown films, and how to measure extremely thin films. The book also addresses polysilicon, a material commonly used in the microelectronics industry, and the effect of substrate roughness. This book's concepts and applications are reinforced

  20. Spectral ellipsometry of nanodiamond composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yastrebov, S.G.; Ivanov-Omskij, V.I.; Gordeev, S.K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of spectral ellipsometry were applied for analysis of optical properties of nanodiamond based composite in spectral region 1.4-5 eV. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding of ultradispersed nanodiamond powder in the course of heterogeneous chemical reaction of decomposition of methane, forming pyrocarbon interconnecting nanodiamond grains. The energy of σ + π plasmon of pyrocarbon component of nanodiamond composite was restored which proves to be ∼ 24 eV; using this value, an estimation was done of pyrocarbon matrix density, which occurs to be 2 g/cm 3 [ru

  1. Optimization of silicon oxynitrides by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for an interferometric biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Sung Joong; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Myung; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, silicon oxynitride layers deposited with different plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) conditions were fabricated and optimized, in order to make an interferometric sensor for detecting biochemical reactions. For the optimization of PECVD silicon oxynitride layers, the influence of the N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio was investigated. RF power in the PEVCD process was also adjusted under the optimized N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio. The optimized silicon oxynitride layer was deposited with 15 W in chamber under 25/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow rates. The clad layer was deposited with 20 W in chamber under 400/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow condition. An integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometric biosensor based on optical waveguide technology was fabricated under the optimized PECVD conditions. The adsorption reaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the silicon oxynitride surface was performed and verified with this device.

  2. Self-Assembly Carbon Nanotubes on Cantilever Biosensor for Sensitivity Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Johnny H [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Sun Shaoqing [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Ye Jianshan [Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Lim, T M [Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, highly sensitive and selective as well as cost-effective sensing and detection of biomolecules (e.g. virus, bacterial, DNA and protein) by MEMS/NEMS (Micro- /Nano Electro- Mechanical-System) structures have attracted extensive attention for its importance in clinical diagnostics, treatment, and various genome projects. Meanwhile, Substantial research efforts have been spent on the improvement of sensitivity of bioMEMS structures. Among a variety of methods that have been investigated, surface modification by nanoparticles (NPs) turns out to be an attractive way, which provides a platform for the enhancement of the sensitivity for biosensor devices. However, conventional applications for surface modification were mostly implemented on microelectrodes. Thus, in this paper, we demonstrate a new approach for surface enhancement on Au-coated silicon microcantilevers in micro-/nano-system. By self-assembly surface binding of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the Au monolayer on top of the Si microcantilever surfaces, much larger surface area could be created for bio-molecular binding (such as antibodies or single DNA strands, which act as probes to capture target molecules). Therefore, this could enable specific interactions and selective binding to target biomolecules with a very low sample size, which greatly increases the sensitivity of detection. It should be noted that functionalization of MWCNTs with terminal carboxylic functionalities (in DCC solution) onto the Au surfaces of Si microchips have been introduced in our study. Further applications of MWCNTs functionalization are worth exploring in biomolecular detection for their exceptional mechanical and unique electronic properties. The successful binding of MWCNTs was testified as shown obviously on AFM image.

  3. Facile hydrothermal growth graphene/ZnO nanocomposite for development of enhanced biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sze Shin; Tan, Michelle T T; Loh, Hwei-San; Khiew, Poi Sim; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2016-01-15

    Graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite was synthesised via a facile, green and efficient approach consisted of novel liquid phase exfoliation and solvothermal growth for sensing application. Highly pristine graphene was synthesised through mild sonication treatment of graphite in a mixture of ethanol and water at an optimum ratio. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) affirmed the hydrothermal growth of pure zinc oxide nanoparticles from zinc nitrate hexahydrate precursor. The as-prepared graphene/zinc oxide (G/ZnO) nanocomposite was characterised comprehensively to evaluate its morphology, crystallinity, composition and purity. All results clearly indicate that zinc oxide particles were homogenously distributed on graphene sheets, without any severe aggregation. The electrochemical performance of graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry analysis. The resulting electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a linear range of 1-15 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9977. The sensitivity of the graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite-modified hydrogen peroxide sensor was 3.2580 μAmM(-1) with a limit of detection of 7.4357 μM. An electrochemical DNA sensor platform was then fabricated for the detection of Avian Influenza H5 gene based on graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite. The results obtained from amperometry study indicate that the graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite-enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor is significantly more sensitive (P < 0.05) and efficient than the conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Facile hydrothermal growth graphene/ZnO nanocomposite for development of enhanced biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, Sze Shin [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Center of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Tan, Michelle T.T., E-mail: Michelle.Tan@nottingham.edu.my [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Center of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Loh, Hwei-San [School of Biosciences, Faculty of Science, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Biotechnology Research Centre, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Khiew, Poi Sim [Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Center of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Chiu, Wee Siong [Low Dimensional Materials Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-01-15

    Graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite was synthesised via a facile, green and efficient approach consisted of novel liquid phase exfoliation and solvothermal growth for sensing application. Highly pristine graphene was synthesised through mild sonication treatment of graphite in a mixture of ethanol and water at an optimum ratio. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) affirmed the hydrothermal growth of pure zinc oxide nanoparticles from zinc nitrate hexahydrate precursor. The as-prepared graphene/zinc oxide (G/ZnO) nanocomposite was characterised comprehensively to evaluate its morphology, crystallinity, composition and purity. All results clearly indicate that zinc oxide particles were homogenously distributed on graphene sheets, without any severe aggregation. The electrochemical performance of graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry analysis. The resulting electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in a linear range of 1–15 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9977. The sensitivity of the graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite-modified hydrogen peroxide sensor was 3.2580 μAmM{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 7.4357 μM. An electrochemical DNA sensor platform was then fabricated for the detection of Avian Influenza H5 gene based on graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite. The results obtained from amperometry study indicate that the graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite-enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor is significantly more sensitive (P < 0.05) and efficient than the conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. - Highlights: • One step, green and facile exfoliation of graphite in ethanol/water mixture. • G/ZnO nanocomposite prepared via simple, green low temperature solvothermal method. • CV and amperometric study of G/ZnO nanocomposite towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with R{sup 2} of 0.9977.

  5. An amperometric penicillin biosensor with enhanced sensitivity based on co-immobilization of carbon nanotubes, hematein, and β-lactamase on glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bi; Ma Ming; Su Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    An amperometric penicillin biosensor with enhanced sensitivity was successfully developed by co-immobilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), hematein, and β-lactamase on glassy carbon electrode using a layer-by-layer assembly technique. Under catalysis of the immobilized enzyme, penicillin was hydrolyzed, decreasing the local pH. The pH change was monitored amperometrically with hematein as a pH-sensitive redox probe. MWCNTs were used as an electron transfer enhancer as well as an efficient immobilization matrix for the sensitivity enhancement. The effects of immobilization procedure, working potential, enzyme quantity, buffer concentration, and sample matrix were investigated. The biosensor offered a minimum detection limit of 50 nM (19 μg L -1 ) for penicillin V, lower than those of the conventional pH change-based biosensors by more than two orders of magnitude. The electrode-to-electrode variation of the response sensitivity was 7.0% RSD.

  6. Biosensors and environmental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Preedy, Victor R; Patel, Vinood B

    2012-01-01

    ..., bacterial biosensors, antibody-based biosensors, enzymatic, amperometric and electrochemical aspects, quorum sensing, DNA-biosensors, cantilever biosensors, bioluminescence and other methods and applications...

  7. Application of ellipsometry techniques to biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arwin, Hans, E-mail: han@ifm.liu.s

    2011-02-28

    Ellipsometry is well-suited for bioadsorption studies and numerous reports, mainly using null ellipsometry, are found on this subject whereas investigations addressing structural properties of thin biolayers are few. Here two examples based on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) on the latter are briefly discussed. In the first example, time evolution of thickness, spectral refractive index and surface mass density of a fibrinogen matrix forming on a silicon substrate are investigated with SE and a structural model of the protein matrix is discussed. In the second example a model dielectric function concept for protein monolayers is presented. The model allows parameterization of the optical properties which facilitates monitoring of temperature induced degradation of a protein layer. More recently, photonic structures in beetles have been studied with SE. It is shown here that full Mueller-matrix SE can resolve very complex nanostructures in scarab beetles, more specifically chiral structures causing reflected light to become circularly polarized.

  8. Enhanced sensing of dengue virus DNA detection using O{sub 2} plasma treated-silicon nanowire based electrical biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.F.A., E-mail: siti_fatimah0410@yahoo.com [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yusof, N.A., E-mail: azahy@upm.edu.my [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hashim, U. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hushiarian, R. [La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Victoria, 3086 (Australia); Nuzaihan, M.N.M. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hamidon, M.N. [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zawawi, R.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fathil, M.F.M. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-10-26

    Dengue Virus (DENV) has become one of the most serious arthropod-borne viral diseases, causing death globally. The existing methods for DENV detection suffer from the late stage treatment due to antibodies-based detection which is feasible only after five days following the onset of the illness. Here, we demonstrated the highly effective molecular electronic based detection utilizing silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process as a sensing device for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) related to DENV in an early stage diagnosis. To transform the fabricated devices as a functional sensing element, three-step procedure consist of SiNW surface modification, DNA immobilization and DNA hybridization were employed. The detection principle works by detecting the changes in current of SiNW which bridge the source and drain terminal to sense the immobilization of probe DNA and their hybridization with target DNA. The oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma was proposed as an effective strategy for increasing the binding amounts of target DNA by modified the SiNW surface. It was found that the detection limit of the optimized O{sub 2} plasma treated-SiNW device could be reduced to 1.985 × 10{sup −14} M with a linear detection range of the sequence-specific DNA from 1.0 × 10{sup −9} M to 1.0 × 10{sup −13} M. In addition, the developed biosensor device was able to discriminate between complementary, single mismatch and non-complementary DNA sequences. This highly sensitive assay was then applied to the detection of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product of DENV-DNA, making it as a potential method for disease diagnosis through electrical biosensor. - Highlights: • Molecular electronic detection of Dengue Virus (DENV) DNA using SiNW biosensor is presented. • Oxygen plasma surface treatment as an enhancer technique for device sensitivity is highlighted. • The limit of detection (Lo

  9. Enhanced sensing of dengue virus DNA detection using O_2 plasma treated-silicon nanowire based electrical biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.F.A.; Yusof, N.A.; Hashim, U.; Hushiarian, R.; Nuzaihan, M.N.M.; Hamidon, M.N.; Zawawi, R.M.; Fathil, M.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Virus (DENV) has become one of the most serious arthropod-borne viral diseases, causing death globally. The existing methods for DENV detection suffer from the late stage treatment due to antibodies-based detection which is feasible only after five days following the onset of the illness. Here, we demonstrated the highly effective molecular electronic based detection utilizing silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process as a sensing device for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) related to DENV in an early stage diagnosis. To transform the fabricated devices as a functional sensing element, three-step procedure consist of SiNW surface modification, DNA immobilization and DNA hybridization were employed. The detection principle works by detecting the changes in current of SiNW which bridge the source and drain terminal to sense the immobilization of probe DNA and their hybridization with target DNA. The oxygen (O_2) plasma was proposed as an effective strategy for increasing the binding amounts of target DNA by modified the SiNW surface. It was found that the detection limit of the optimized O_2 plasma treated-SiNW device could be reduced to 1.985 × 10"−"1"4 M with a linear detection range of the sequence-specific DNA from 1.0 × 10"−"9 M to 1.0 × 10"−"1"3 M. In addition, the developed biosensor device was able to discriminate between complementary, single mismatch and non-complementary DNA sequences. This highly sensitive assay was then applied to the detection of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product of DENV-DNA, making it as a potential method for disease diagnosis through electrical biosensor. - Highlights: • Molecular electronic detection of Dengue Virus (DENV) DNA using SiNW biosensor is presented. • Oxygen plasma surface treatment as an enhancer technique for device sensitivity is highlighted. • The limit of detection (LoD) as low as 1.985

  10. Enhanced Plasmonic Biosensors of Hybrid Gold Nanoparticle-Graphene Oxide-Based Label-Free Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Chen, Chi-Chu; Yang, Cheng-Du; Kao, Yu-Sheng; Wu, Wei-Ren

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we propose a modified gold nanoparticle-graphene oxide sheet (AuNP-GO) nanocomposite to detect two different interactions between proteins and hybrid nanocomposites for use in biomedical applications. GO sheets have high bioaffinity, which facilitates the attachment of biomolecules to carboxyl groups and has led to its use in the development of sensing mechanisms. When GO sheets are decorated with AuNPs, they introduce localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the resonance energy transfer of spectral changes. Our results suggest a promising future for AuNP-GO-based label-free immunoassays to detect disease biomarkers and rapidly diagnose infectious diseases. The results showed the detection of antiBSA in 10 ng/ml of hCG non-specific interfering protein with dynamic responses ranging from 1.45 nM to 145 fM, and a LOD of 145 fM. Considering the wide range of potential applications of GO sheets as a host material for a variety of nanoparticles, the approach developed here may be beneficial for the future integration of nanoparticles with GO nanosheets for blood sensing. The excellent anti-interference characteristics allow for the use of the biosensor in clinical analysis and point-of-care testing (POCT) diagnostics of rapid immunoassay products, and it may also be a potential tool for the measurement of biomarkers in human serum.

  11. Ellipsometry of functional organic surfaces and films

    CERN Document Server

    Hinrichs, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Ellipsometry is the method of choice to determin the properties of surfaces and thin films. It provides comprehensive and sensitive characterization in a contactless and non-invasive measurements. This book gives a state-of-the-art survey of ellipsometric investigations of organic films and surfaces, from laboratory to synchrotron applications, with a special focus on in-situ use in processing environments and at solid-liquid interfaces.

  12. Jet Fuel Thermal Stability Investigations Using Ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Leigh; Vasu, Subith S.; Klettlinger, Jennifer Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Jet fuels are typically used for endothermic cooling in practical engines where their thermal stability is very important. In this work the thermal stability of Sasol IPK (a synthetic jet fuel) with varying levels of naphthalene has been studied on stainless steel substrates using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the temperature range 385-400 K. Ellipsometry is an optical technique that measures the changes in a light beam’s polarization and intensity after it reflects off of a thin film to determine the film’s thickness and optical properties. All of the tubes used were rated as thermally unstable by the color standard portion of the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test, and this was confirmed by the deposit thicknesses observed using ellipsometry. A new amorphous model on a stainless steel substrate was used to model the data and obtain the results. It was observed that, as would be expected, increasing the temperature of the tube increased the overall deposit amount for a constant concentration of naphthalene. The repeatability of these measurements was assessed using multiple trials of the same fuel at 385 K. Lastly, the effect of increasing the naphthalene concentration in the fuel at a constant temperature was found to increase the deposit thickness.In conclusion, ellipsometry was used to investigate the thermal stability of jet fuels on stainless steel substrate. The effects of increasing temperature and addition of naphthalene on stainless steel tubes with Sasol IPK fuel were investigated. It was found, as expected, that increasing temperature lead to an increase in deposit thickness. It wasAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics6also found that increasing amounts of naphthalene increased the maximum deposit thickness. The repeatability of these measurements was investigated using multiple tests at the same conditions. The present work provides as a better quantitative tool compared to the widely used JFTOT technique. Future work will expand on the

  13. The intertwined history of polarimetry and ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, R.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Ellipsometry and reflection polarimetry are almost synonymous. Therefore it is not surprising that ellipsometry and polarimetry share a common history which is that of optical polarization. The discoveries in the late 1600s by Bartholinus and Huyghens of double refraction by Iceland spar and the unusual properties of the twin beams thus generated presented insurmountable difficulties for the entrenched corpuscular-ray theory of Newton and caused research on polarization to remain stagnant in the 1700s. Major breakthroughs came in the early 1800s when Malus discovered polarization of light by reflection and his cosine-squared law and Fresnel and Arago enunciated their laws of interference of polarized light that helped establish the transverse vector nature of luminous vibrations. Important further research immediately followed on optical rotatory power by Arago, Biot, and Pasteur that ushered fundamental and practical applications of polarimetry in chemistry and biology. Fresnel deserves to be recognized as a founder of ellipsometry by virtue of his laws of reflection of polarized light at interfaces between dissimilar media and his identification and production of circular and elliptical polarization. The later part of the 19th century witnessed significant discoveries of magneto-optic and electro-optic effects by Faraday, Kerr, and Pockels that greatly enriched polarization optics and physics. The 1896 discovery of the Zeeman effect launched the exciting field of solar polarimetry. The 1864 crown achievement of Maxwell's electromagnetic (EM) theory provided a unified framework for the analysis of polarization phenomena across the entire EM spectrum.

  14. An amperometric penicillin biosensor with enhanced sensitivity based on co-immobilization of carbon nanotubes, hematein, and {beta}-lactamase on glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Bi; Ma Ming [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Su Xiaoli, E-mail: xsu@hunnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2010-07-26

    An amperometric penicillin biosensor with enhanced sensitivity was successfully developed by co-immobilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), hematein, and {beta}-lactamase on glassy carbon electrode using a layer-by-layer assembly technique. Under catalysis of the immobilized enzyme, penicillin was hydrolyzed, decreasing the local pH. The pH change was monitored amperometrically with hematein as a pH-sensitive redox probe. MWCNTs were used as an electron transfer enhancer as well as an efficient immobilization matrix for the sensitivity enhancement. The effects of immobilization procedure, working potential, enzyme quantity, buffer concentration, and sample matrix were investigated. The biosensor offered a minimum detection limit of 50 nM (19 {mu}g L{sup -1}) for penicillin V, lower than those of the conventional pH change-based biosensors by more than two orders of magnitude. The electrode-to-electrode variation of the response sensitivity was 7.0% RSD.

  15. Graphene–Gold Nanoparticles Hybrid—Synthesis, Functionalization, and Application in a Electrochemical and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Khalil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Graphene is a single-atom-thick two-dimensional carbon nanosheet with outstanding chemical, electrical, material, optical, and physical properties due to its large surface area, high electron mobility, thermal conductivity, and stability. These extraordinary features of graphene make it a key component for different applications in the biosensing and imaging arena. However, the use of graphene alone is correlated with certain limitations, such as irreversible self-agglomerations, less colloidal stability, poor reliability/repeatability, and non-specificity. The addition of gold nanostructures (AuNS with graphene produces the graphene–AuNS hybrid nanocomposite which minimizes the limitations as well as providing additional synergistic properties, that is, higher effective surface area, catalytic activity, electrical conductivity, water solubility, and biocompatibility. This review focuses on the fundamental features of graphene, the multidimensional synthesis, and multipurpose applications of graphene–Au nanocomposites. The paper highlights the graphene–gold nanoparticle (AuNP as the platform substrate for the fabrication of electrochemical and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-based biosensors in diverse applications as well as SERS-directed bio-imaging, which is considered as an emerging sector for monitoring stem cell differentiation, and detection and treatment of cancer.

  16. Microbial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Yu; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    A microbial biosensor is an analytical device that couples microorganisms with a transducer to enable rapid, accurate and sensitive detection of target analytes in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental monitoring, defense, food processing and safety. The earlier microbial biosensors used the respiratory and metabolic functions of the microorganisms to detect a substance that is either a substrate or an inhibitor of these processes. Recently, genetically engineered microorganisms based on fusing of the lux, gfp or lacZ gene reporters to an inducible gene promoter have been widely applied to assay toxicity and bioavailability. This paper reviews the recent trends in the development and application of microbial biosensors. Current advances and prospective future direction in developing microbial biosensor have also been discussed

  17. A microfluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic biosensor using aptamer functionalized nanopillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, J.; Palla, M.; Bosco, F. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a microchip incorporating an aptamer-functionalized nanopillar substrate, enabling the specific detection of low-abundance biomolecules using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In a temperature controlled microchamber, aptamers immobilized on the nanostructure surface...

  18. Impedimetric biosensors and immunosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodromidis, M.I.

    2007-01-01

    The development of methods targeting the direct monitoring of antibody-antigen interactions is particularly attractive. The design of label-free affinity-based probing concepts is the objective of much current research, at both academic and industrial levels, towards establishing alternative methods to the already existing ELISA-based immunoassays. Among these, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) represents one of the most powerful methods, due to the ability of EIS-based sensors to be more easily integrated into multi-array or microprocessor, controlled diagnostic tools. During the last decade, EIS and the concept of biochemical capacitors have been widely used for probing various types of biomolecular interactions (immunosensors, DNA hybridization, protein-protein interactions). So far, impedimetric or capacitive immunosensors have been successfully applied at the academic level. However, no prototypes have been released into the market, since major fundamental issues still exist. Even though this fact has brought the reliability of impedimetric immunosensors into question, features associated with electrochemical approaches, namely the ability to be miniaturized, remote control of implanted sensors, low cost of electrode mass production and cost effective instrumentation (without need of high-energy sources) keep impedimetric sensors particularly attractive as compared to other approaches based on microbalances, surface plasmon resonance or ellipsometry. This lecture outlines the theoretical background of impedimetric immunosensors and presents different types of impedimetric biosensors as well as the instrumental approaches that have been so far proposed in the literature. (author)

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for DNA detection on nanoparticle island substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Ho, Ho Pui; Lee, Rebecca K.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a study on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties of Ag nanoparticle island substrates (NIS) and their applications for target oligonucleotide (OND) detection. It has been found that the surface nanostructure of NIS samples can be controlled with a good degree of repro......We present a study on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties of Ag nanoparticle island substrates (NIS) and their applications for target oligonucleotide (OND) detection. It has been found that the surface nanostructure of NIS samples can be controlled with a good degree...

  20. Optical properties of metals by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, E.T.; Inagaki, T.; Williams, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    The use of spectroscopic ellipsometry for the accurate determination of the optical properties of liquid and solid metals is discussed and illustrated with previously published data for Li and Na. New data on liquid Sn and Hg from 0.6 to 3.7 eV are presented. Liquid Sn is Drude-like. The optical properties of Hg deviate from the Drude expressions, but simultaneous measurements of reflectance and ellipsometric parameters yield consistent results with no evidence for vectorial surface effects

  1. How spectroscopic ellipsometry can aid graphene technology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria, E-mail: maria.losurdo@cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2014-11-28

    We explore the effects of substrate, grain size, oxidation and cleaning on the optical properties of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline monolayer graphene exploiting spectroscopic ellipsometry in the NIR-Vis–UV range. Both Drude–Lorentz oscillators' and point-by-point fit approaches are used to analyze the ellipsometric spectra. For monolayer graphene, since anisotropy cannot be resolved, an isotropic model is used. A prominent absorption peak at approximately 4.8 eV, which is a mixture of π–π* interband transitions at the M-point of the Brillouin zone and of the π-plasmonic excitation, is observed. We discuss the sensitivity of this peak to the structural and cleaning quality of graphene. The comparison with previous published dielectric function spectra of graphene is discussed giving a rationale for the observed differences. - Highlights: • Optical properties of graphene are determined by ellipsometry on copper and on glass. • Optical spectra reveal the cleaning quality of transferred graphene. • Sensitivity of absorption peak to graphene structural quality is proven. • Optical properties are proven to be sensitive to oxidation of graphene. • Electronic interaction with substrate affects graphene optical properties.

  2. Use of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Biosensor Response to the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Kee-Shyuan; Lee, Yook Heng; Musa, Ahmad; Salmah, Abdul Aziz; Zamri, Ishak

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 5.48 ±1.37 nm. An electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied. The amperometric biosensor was based on the reaction of ALP with the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P). The incorporation of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles together wit...

  3. Plasmonic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ryan T

    2015-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and popularity of film-based SPR sensing. This review surveys the current plasmonic biosensor landscape with emphasis on the basic operating principles of each plasmonic sensing technique and the practical considerations when developing a sensing platform with the various techniques. The 'gold standard' film SPR technique is reviewed briefly, but special emphasis is devoted to the up-and-coming localized surface plasmon resonance and plasmonically coupled sensor technology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Electrochemical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Cosnier, Serge

    2015-01-01

    "This is an excellent book on modern electrochemical biosensors, edited by Professor Cosnier and written by leading international experts. It covers state-of-the-art topics of this important field in a clear and timely manner."-Prof. Joseph Wang, UC San Diego, USA  "This book covers, in 13 well-illustrated chapters, the potential of electrochemical methods intimately combined with a biological component for the assay of various analytes of biological and environmental interest. Particular attention is devoted to the description of electrochemical microtools in close contact with a biological cell for exocytosis monitoring and to the use of nanomaterials in the electrochemical biosensor architecture for signal improvement. Interestingly, one chapter describes the concept and design of self-powered biosensors derived from biofuel cells. Each topic is reviewed by experts very active in the field. This timely book is well suited for providing a good overview of current research trends devoted to electrochemical...

  5. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  6. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis

  7. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang, E-mail: wangdang511@126.com; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  8. Enhanced amperometric response of a glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase based bienzyme glucose biosensor modified with a film of polymerized toluidine blue containing reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fang; Gong, Wencheng; Wang, Lili; Chen, Zilin

    2015-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was used to construct a bienzyme biosensor containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx). A poly(toluidine blue) (pTB) film containing RGO acted as both enzyme immobilization matrix and electron transfer mediator. The bienzyme biosensor was characterized by electrochemical techniques and displays a highly sensitive amperometric response to glucose and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) at a potential as low as −0.1 V (vs. SCE). It is shown that use of RGO causes a strong enhancement on the amperometric responses. H 2 O 2 formed by the action of GOx in the presence of oxygen can be further reduced by HRP in the pTB film contacting the RGO modified electrode. In the absence of oxygen, glucose oxidation proceeds by another mechanism in which electron transfer occurs from GOx to the electrode and with pTB acting as the mediator. Amperometric responses to glucose and H2O2 follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The experimental conditions were optimized, and under these conditions glucose can be determined in the 80 μM to 3.0 mM range with a detection limit of 50 μM. H 2 O 2 , in turn, can be quantified in up to 30.0 μM concentration with a detection limit of 0.2 μM. The bienzyme biosensor is reproducible, repeatable and stable. Finally, it has been successfully applied to the determination of glucose in plasma samples. (author)

  9. ENHANCING DIRECT ELECTRON TRANSFER OF GLUCOSE OXIDASE USING A GOLD NANOPARTICLE |TITANATE NANOTUBE NANOCOMPOSITE ON A BIOSENSOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ruoxia; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Jiamei; Zhu, Jie; Wong, Danny K.Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we have developed a gold nanoparticle (GNP) decorated titanate nanotubes (TNT) nanocomposite that aids in the direct electron transfer of a large enzyme, such as glucose oxidase (GOD), in which the electroactive site of flavin adenine dinucleotide is deeply buried within the enzyme. The ionic liquid, brominated 1-decyl-3-methyl imidazole, was used to immobilise the nanocomposite and the enzyme on a glassy carbon electrode to further aid in the electron transfer between GOD and the electrode surface. Nafion was also added to anchor the biosensor scaffold. Initially, the tubiform geometry of titanate nanomaterials and the GNP-TNT nanocomposite was confirmed by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques before glucose oxidase was entrapped in the nanocomposite. Based on voltammetric results, this biosensor showed a strong electrocatalytic capability towards glucose (with a heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of 7.1 s −1 at 180 mV s −1 ) and the calibration for glucose exhibited a high sensitivity (5.1 μA mM −1 ) and a wide linear range (0.01–1.2 mM). These results demonstrated superior analytical performance of our biosensor over others fabricated using bulkier TiO 2 nanoparticles or nanobundles, which could be attributed to a high degree of biocompatibility to glucose oxidase and electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite

  10. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  11. Expanded beam (macro-imaging) ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, M., E-mail: fried@mfa.kfki.h [Res. Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Juhasz, G.; Major, C.; Petrik, P.; Polgar, O. [Res. Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Horvath, Z. [Res. Inst. for Solid State Physics and Optics (SZFKI), H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Nutsch, A. [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie IISB, Schottkystr. 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-02-28

    Our aim was to make possible to use spectroscopic ellipsometry for mapping purposes during one measuring cycle (minimum one rotation period of polarizer or analyzer) on many sample points. Our new technique uses non-collimated (non-parallel, mostly diffuse) illumination with an angle of incidence sensitive pinhole camera detector system and it works as an unusual kind of imaging ellipsometry. Adding multicolour supplemets, it provides spectral (a few wavelengths on a 2D image or a full spectrum along a line) information from rapid measurements of many points on a large (several dm2) area. This technique can be expanded by upscaling the geometry (upscaling the dimensions of the instrument, and characteristic imaging parameters such as focal lengths, distances, etc.). The lateral resolution is limited by the minimum resolved-angle determined by the detector system, mainly by the diameter of the pinhole. (The diameter of the pinhole is a compromise between the light intensity and the lateral resolution.) Small-aperture (25 mm diameter) polarizers are incorporated into both the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state detection (PSD) components of the instrument. The detection is almost without background because the pinhole serves as a filter against the scattered light. One rapid measuring cycle (less than 10 s) is enough to determine the polarization state at all the points inside the illuminated area. The collected data can be processed very fast (seconds) providing nearly real-time thicknesses and/or refractive index maps over many points of the sample surface even in the case of multilayer samples. The speed of the measuring system makes it suitable for using even on production lines. The necessary (in each sample-point different) angle-of-incidence and the mirror-effect calibration are made via well-known and optimized structures such as silicon/silicon-dioxide samples. The precision is suitable for detecting sub-nanometer thickness and a

  12. Expanded beam (macro-imaging) ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, M.; Juhasz, G.; Major, C.; Petrik, P.; Polgar, O.; Horvath, Z.; Nutsch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to make possible to use spectroscopic ellipsometry for mapping purposes during one measuring cycle (minimum one rotation period of polarizer or analyzer) on many sample points. Our new technique uses non-collimated (non-parallel, mostly diffuse) illumination with an angle of incidence sensitive pinhole camera detector system and it works as an unusual kind of imaging ellipsometry. Adding multicolour supplemets, it provides spectral (a few wavelengths on a 2D image or a full spectrum along a line) information from rapid measurements of many points on a large (several dm2) area. This technique can be expanded by upscaling the geometry (upscaling the dimensions of the instrument, and characteristic imaging parameters such as focal lengths, distances, etc.). The lateral resolution is limited by the minimum resolved-angle determined by the detector system, mainly by the diameter of the pinhole. (The diameter of the pinhole is a compromise between the light intensity and the lateral resolution.) Small-aperture (25 mm diameter) polarizers are incorporated into both the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state detection (PSD) components of the instrument. The detection is almost without background because the pinhole serves as a filter against the scattered light. One rapid measuring cycle (less than 10 s) is enough to determine the polarization state at all the points inside the illuminated area. The collected data can be processed very fast (seconds) providing nearly real-time thicknesses and/or refractive index maps over many points of the sample surface even in the case of multilayer samples. The speed of the measuring system makes it suitable for using even on production lines. The necessary (in each sample-point different) angle-of-incidence and the mirror-effect calibration are made via well-known and optimized structures such as silicon/silicon-dioxide samples. The precision is suitable for detecting sub-nanometer thickness and a

  13. Study on the effect of nanoparticle bimetallic coreshell Au-Ag for sensitivity enhancement of biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widayanti; Abraha, K

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic Au-Ag core-shell, a type of composite spherical nanoparticle consisting of a spherical Au core covered by Ag shell, have been used as active material for biomolecular analyte detection based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. SPR technology evolved into a key technology for characterization of biomolecular interaction. In this paper, we want to show the influence of nanoparticle bimettalic Au-Ag coreshell for optic respon of LSPR biosensor through attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum. The method consist of several steps begin from make a model LSPR system with Kretschmann configuration, dielectric function determination of composite bimetallic coreshell nanoparticle using effective medium theory approximation and the last is reflectivity calculation for size variation of core and shell bimetallic nanoparticle. Our result show that, by varying the radius of core and shell thickness, the peak of the reflectivity (ATR spectrum) shifted to the different angle of incident light and the addition of coreshell in SPR biosensor leads to enhancement the sensitivity. (paper)

  14. Spectral ellipsometry of a nanodiamond composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yastrebov, S. G.; Gordeev, S. K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I. A.; Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2006-01-01

    Optical properties of a nanodiamond composite were analyzed by methods of spectral ellipsometry in the range of photon energies 1.4-5 eV, which are characteristic of π-π* transitions in amorphous carbon. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding nanodiamond powder with subsequent binding of diamond nanoparticles by pyrocarbon formed as a result of the heterogeneous chemical reaction of methane decomposition. The dispersion curves of the imaginary and real parts of the dielectric function were reconstructed. It is shown that the imaginary part of the dielectric function can be represented as the sum of two components generated by the two types of π-π* optical transitions. The maximum contribution of the transitions of the first and second types manifests itself at energies of 2.6 and 5.6 eV, respectively, which correspond to peaks in optical density at 2.9 and 6.11 eV. It was established that the main specific features of the normalized optical density of the nanodiamond composite almost coincide with those for poly(para-phenylenevinylene). It was found that the energy of a σ + π plasmon of the pyrocarbon component of the nanodiamond composite is 24.2 eV. On the basis on this value, the pyrocarbon density matrix was estimated to be 2 g/cm 3 . Within the concepts of optimum filling of an elementary volume by carbon atoms in an amorphous material with such a density, the allotropic composition of the pyrocarbon matrix was restored

  15. Determination of Sudan I in paprika powder by molecularly imprinted polymers-thin layer chromatography-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Hu, Yaxi; Chen, Da; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Grant, Edward; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-10-01

    Sudan I is a carcinogenic and mutagenic azo-compound that has been utilized as a common adulterant in spice and spice blends to impart a desirable red color to foods. A novel biosensor combining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), thin layer chromatography (TLC) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) could determine Sudan I levels in paprika powder to 1 ppm (or 2 ng/spot). Sudan I spiked paprika extracts (spiking levels: 0, 1, 5, 10, 40, 70 and 100 ppm) were prepared. Sudan I imprinted polymers were synthesized by employing the interaction between Sudan I (template) and methacrylic acid (functional monomer), followed by washing to remove Sudan I leaving the Sudan I-binding sites exposed. MIPs were used as a stationary phase for TLC and could selectively retain Sudan I at the original spot with little interference. A gold colloid SERS substrate could enhance Raman intensity for Sudan I in this MIP-TLC system. Principal component analysis plot and partial least squares regression (R(2)=0.978) models were constructed and a linear regression model (R(2)=0.983) correlated spiking levels (5, 10, 40, 70 and 100 ppm) with the peak intensities (721 cm(-1)) of Sudan I SERS spectra. Both separation (30-40s) and detection (1s or 0.1s) were extremely fast by using both commercial bench-top and custom made portable Raman spectrometers. This biosensor can be applied as a rapid, low-cost and reliable tool for screening Sudan I adulteration in foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanopatterned Bulk Metallic Glass Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Emily R; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Yu, Roy; Corona, Sydney L; Li, Jinyang; Vaddiraju, Sagar; Legassey, Allen; Loye, Ayomiposi; Balestrini, Jenna; Solly, Dawson A; Schroers, Jan; Taylor, André D; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Herzog, Raimund I; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-12-22

    Nanopatterning as a surface area enhancement method has the potential to increase signal and sensitivity of biosensors. Platinum-based bulk metallic glass (Pt-BMG) is a biocompatible material with electrical properties conducive for biosensor electrode applications, which can be processed in air at comparably low temperatures to produce nonrandom topography at the nanoscale. Work presented here employs nanopatterned Pt-BMG electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase enzyme to explore the impact of nonrandom and highly reproducible nanoscale surface area enhancement on glucose biosensor performance. Electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric voltammetry (AV) were completed to compare the performance of 200 nm Pt-BMG electrodes vs Flat Pt-BMG control electrodes. Glucose dosing response was studied in a range of 2 mM to 10 mM. Effective current density dynamic range for the 200 nm Pt-BMG was 10-12 times greater than that of the Flat BMG control. Nanopatterned electrode sensitivity was measured to be 3.28 μA/cm 2 /mM, which was also an order of magnitude greater than the flat electrode. These results suggest that nonrandom nanotopography is a scalable and customizable engineering tool which can be integrated with Pt-BMGs to produce biocompatible biosensors with enhanced signal and sensitivity.

  17. Spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of nano-crystalline diamondfilms prepared at various substrate temperatures and pulsed plasma frequencies using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with linear antenna delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mistrík, J.; Janíček, P.; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, František; Fekete, Ladislav; Jäger, Aleš; Nesládek, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 571, č. 1 (2014), s. 230-237 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Grant - others: COST Nano TP(XE) MP0901; OP VK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0306 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * thin films * microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition * pulsed plasma * low deposition temperature Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.759, year: 2014

  18. Hierarchical porous microspheres of the Co3O4@graphene with enhanced electrocatalytic performance for electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, MinHo; Jeong, Jae-Min; Lee, Kyoung G; Kim, Do Hyun; Lee, Seok Jae; Choi, Bong Gill

    2017-03-15

    The integration of organic and inorganic building blocks into hierarchical porous architectures makes potentially desirable electrocatalytic materials in many electrochemical applications due to their combination of attractive qualities of dissimilar components and well-constructed charge transfer pathways. Herein, we demonstrate the preparation of the hierarchical porous Co 3 O 4 @graphene (Co 3 O 4 @G) microspheres by one-step hydrothermal method to achieve high electrocatalytic performance for enzyme-free biosensor applications. The obtained Co 3 O 4 @G microspheres are consisted of the interconnected networks of Co 3 O 4 and graphene sheets, and thus provide large accessible active sites through porous structure, while graphene sheets offer continuous electron pathways for efficient electrocatalytic reaction of Co 3 O 4 . These structural merits with synergy effect of Co 3 O 4 and graphene lead to a high performance of enzyme-free detection for glucose: high sensitivity, good selectivity, and remarkable stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biosensors and preparation thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A low-temp. prepn. method for a biosensor device with a layer of reagent on the sensor surface is disclosed. During manufg. biol. interaction between the biosensor substrate and the reagent layer material is reduced, e.g. by cooling the biosensor substrate and depositing the reagent layer on the

  20. Cholinesterase-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Recently, cholinesterase-based biosensors are widely used for assaying anticholinergic compounds. Primarily biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening of inhibitors, such as organophosphates and carbamates. The present review is aimed at compilation of the most important facts about cholinesterase based biosensors, types of physico-chemical transduction, immobilization strategies and practical applications.

  1. Luminous composite ultrathin films of CdTe quantum dots/silk fibroin co-assembled with layered doubled hydroxide: Enhanced photoluminescence and biosensor application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sohail Haroone

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs luminescent films are extensively applied to optoelectronics and optical devices. However, QDs aggregation results in the quenching of their fluorescence property which limits their practical applications to a greater extent. In order to resolve this issue, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA functionalized Cadmium Tellurium (CdTe QDs were stabilized by silk fibroin (SB and co-assembled with layered doubled hydroxide (LDH to form (QDs@SF/LDHn ultrathin films (UTFs via the layer-by-layer (LBL technique. UV–Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy showed a stepwise and normal growth of the films upon increasing the number of deposition cycles. XRD and AFM studies confirmed the formation of a periodic layered structure and regular surface morphology of the thin films. As compared to (CdTe QDs/LDHnUTFs, the (CdTe QDs@SF/LDHnUTFs displayed fluorescence enhancement and longer fluorescent lifetime, both in solid states and aqueous solutions. Furthermore compared with the solution state, the fluorescence enhancement of SF-RC and SF-β are, respectively, 7 times and 17 times in the (CdTe QDs@SF/LDHn UTFs, indicating that the LDH nanosheets favor the fluorescence enhancement effect on the CdTe QDs@SF. The fabricated materials displayed fluorescence response to a biological molecule such as immune globulin, lgG. Thus, the (CdTe QDs@SF/LDHn UTFs has a potential to be used as biosensor. Keywords: CdTe quantum dots, Silk fibroin, Layered doubled hydroxide, Co-assembly, Fluorescence enhancement

  2. Enhanced electrochemical sensitivity of enzyme precipitate coating (EPC)-based glucose oxidase biosensors with increased free CNT loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Jun, Sun-Ae; Kwon, Yongchai; Ha, Su; Sang, Byong-In; Kim, Jungbae

    2015-02-01

    Enzymatic electrodes were fabricated by using three different immobilizations of glucose oxidase (GOx): covalent enzyme attachment (CA), enzyme coating (EC), and enzyme precipitate coating (EPC), here referred to as CA-E, EC-E, and EPC-E, respectively. When additional carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were introduced from 0 to 75wt% for the EPC-E design, its initial biosensor sensitivity was improved from 2.40×10(-3) to 16.26×10(-3) A∙M(-1)∙cm(-2), while its electron charge transfer rate constant was increased from 0.33 to 1.47s(-1). When a fixed ratio of CNTs was added for three different electrode systems, EPC-E showed the best glucose sensitivity and long-term thermal stability. For example, when 75wt% of additional CNTs was added, the initial sensitivity of EPC-E was 16.26×10(-3) A∙M(-1)∙cm(-2), while those of EC-E and CA-E were only 6.42×10(-3) and 1.18×10(-3) A∙M(-1)∙cm(-2), respectively. Furthermore, EPC-E retained 63% of its initial sensitivity after thermal treatment at 40°C over 41days, while EC-E and CA-E showed only 12% and 1% of initial sensitivities, respectively. Consequently, the EPC approach with additional CNTs achieved both high sensitivity and long-term stability, which are required for continuous and accurate glucose monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    OpenAIRE

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Sapsford, Kim E.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensor...

  4. Biosensors of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S; Tillmann, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Biosensors are devices which utilize both an electrical component (transducer) and a biological component to study an environment. They are typically used to examine biological structures, organisms and processes. The field of biosensors has now become so large and varied that the technology can often seem impenetrable. Yet the principles which underlie the technology are uncomplicated, even if the details of the mechanisms are elusive. In this review we confine our analysis to relatively current advancements in biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells. This includes biosensors which rely on an added labeled component and biosensors which do not have a labeled component and instead detect the binding event or bound structure on the transducer. Methods to concentrate the bacteria prior to biosensor analysis are also described. The variety of biosensor types and their actual and potential uses are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Biosensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Akshitha

    Improving the sensitivity of existing biosensors is an active research topic that cuts across several disciplines, including engineering and biology. Optical biosensors are the one of the most diverse class of biosensors which can be broadly categorized into two types based on the detection scheme: label-based and label-free detection. In label-based detection, the target bio-molecules are labeled with dyes or tags that fluoresce upon excitation, indicating the presence of target molecules. Label-based detection is highly-sensitive, capable of single molecule detection depending on the detector type used. One method of improving the sensitivity of label-based fluorescence detection is by enhancement of the emission of the labels by coupling them with metal nanostructures. This approach is referred as plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). PEF is achieved by increasing the electric field around the nano metal structures through plasmonics. This increased electric field improves the enhancement from the fluorophores which in turn improves the photon emission from the fluorophores which, in turn, improves the limit of detection. Biosensors taking advantage of the plasmonic properties of metal films and nanostructures have emerged an alternative, low-cost, high sensitivity method for detecting labeled DNA. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors employing noble metal nanostructures have recently attracted considerable attention as a new class of plasmonic nanosensors. In this work, the design, fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanostructures is carried out. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were performed using software from Lumerical Inc. to design a novel LSPR structure that exhibit resonance overlapping with the absorption and emission wavelengths of quantum dots (QD). Simulations of a composite Au/SiO2 nanopillars on silicon substrate were performed using FDTD software to show peak plasmonic enhancement at QD emission wavelength

  6. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Complutense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-08-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated. (author)

  7. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli

    2008-01-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated

  8. Insight into excimer laser crystallization exploiting ellipsometry: Effect of silicon film precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM sez. Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy)], E-mail: maria.losurdo@ba.imip.cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Sacchetti, Alberto; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM sez. Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Mariucci, Luigi; Fortunato, Guglielmo [IFN-CNR, Via Cineto Romano, 42 - 00156 Rome (Italy)

    2007-07-16

    The optical diagnostic of spectroscopic ellipsometry is shown to be an effective tool to investigate the mechanism of excimer laser crystallization (ELC) of silicon thin films. A detailed spectroscopic ellipsometric investigation of the microstructures of polycrystalline Si films obtained on SiO{sub 2}/Si wafers by ELC of a-Si:H and nc-Si films deposited, respectively, by SiH{sub 4} plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and SiF{sub 4}-PECVD is presented. It is shown that ellipsometric spectra of the pseudodielectric function of polysilicon thin films allows to discern the three different ELC regimes of partial melting, super lateral growth and complete melting. Exploiting ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy, it is shown that ELC of nc-Si has very low energy density threshold of 95 mJ/cm{sup 2} for complete melting, and that re-crystallization to large grains of {approx} 2 {mu}m can be achieved by multi-shot irradiation at an energy density as low as 260 mJ/cm{sup 2} when using nc-Si when compared to 340 mJ/cm{sup 2} for the ELC of a-Si films.

  9. Normal-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry for critical dimension monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Hsu-Ting; Kong, Wei; Terry, Fred Lewis

    2001-01-01

    In this letter, we show that normal-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry can be used for high-accuracy topography measurements on surface relief gratings. We present both experimental and theoretical results which show that spectroscopic ellipsometry or reflectance-difference spectroscopy at near-normal incidence coupled with vector diffraction theory for data analysis is capable of high-accuracy critical dimension (CD), feature height, and sidewall angle measurements in the extreme submicron regime. Quantitative comparisons of optical and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) topography measurements from a number of 350 nm line/space reactive-ion-etched Si gratings demonstrate the strong potential for in situ etching monitoring. This technique can be used for both ex situ and in situ applications and has the potential to replace the use of CD-SEM measurements in some applications. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  10. SECTIONING METHOD APPLICATION AT ELLIPSOMETRY OF INHOMOGENEOUS REFLECTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Gorlyak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with investigation of application peculiarities of ellipsometry methods and UF spectrophotometry at mechanical and chemical processing of optical engineering surface elements made of quartz glass. Ellipsometer LEF–3M–1, spectrophotometer SF–26 and interferometer MII–4 are used as experiment tools; they obtain widely known technical characteristics. Polarization characteristics of reflected light beam were measured by ellipsometry method; spectrophotometry method was used for measuring radiation transmission factor in UF spectrum area; by interference method surface layer thickness at quartz glass etching was measured. A method for HF–sectioning of inhomogeneous surface layer of polished quartz glass is developed based on ellipsometry equation for reflection system «inhomogeneous layer – inhomogeneous padding». The method makes it possible to carry out the measuring and analysis of optical characteristics for inhomogeneous layers system on inhomogeneous padding and to reconstruct optical profile of surface layers at quartz glass chemical processing. For definition of refractive index change along the layer depth, approximation of experimental values for polarization characteristics of homogeneous layers system is used. Inhomogeneous surface layer of polished quartz glass consists of an area (with thickness up to 20 nm and layer refractive index less than refractive index for quartz glass and an area (with thickness up to 0,1 μm and layer refractive index larger than refractive index for quartz glass. Ellipsometry and photometry methods are used for definition of technological conditions and optical characteristics of inhomogeneous layers at quartz glass chemical processing for optical elements with minimum radiation losses in UF spectrum area.

  11. Albumin adsorption on oxide thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Bermudez, P., E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, C.U., 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Unidad de Posgrado, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodil, S.E.; Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, C.U., 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    Thin films of tantalum, niobium, zirconium and titanium oxides were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering and their wettability and surface energy, optical properties, roughness, chemical composition and microstructure were characterized using contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, profilometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The purpose of the work was to correlate the surface properties of the films to the Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption, as a first step into the development of an initial in vitro test of the films biocompatibility, based on standardized protein adsorption essays. The films were immersed into BSA solutions with different protein concentrations and protein adsorption was monitored in situ by dynamic ellipsometry; the adsorption-rate was dependent on the solution concentration and the immersion time. The overall BSA adsorption was studied in situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry and it was found to be influenced by the wettability of the films; larger BSA adsorption occurred on the more hydrophobic surface, the ZrO{sub 2} film. On the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and TiO{sub 2} films, hydrophilic surfaces, the overall BSA adsorption increased with the surface roughness or the polar component of the surface energy.

  12. Biosensors and bioelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Karunakaran, Chandran; Benjamin, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics presents the rapidly evolving methodologies that are relevant to biosensors and bioelectronics fabrication and characterization. The book provides a comprehensive understanding of biosensor functionality, and is an interdisciplinary reference that includes a range of interwoven contributing subjects, including electrochemistry, nanoparticles, and conducting polymers. Authored by a team of bioinstrumentation experts, this book serves as a blueprint for performing advanced fabrication and characterization of sensor systems-arming readers with an application-based re

  13. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy competitive binding biosensor development utilizing surface modification of silver nanocubes and a citrulline aptamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Brian M.; Jackson, George W.; Deutz, Nicolaas; Cote, Gerard

    2017-07-01

    A point-of-care (PoC) device with the ability to detect biomarkers at low concentrations in bodily fluids would have an enormous potential for medical diagnostics outside the central laboratory. One method to monitor analytes at low concentrations is by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In this preliminary study toward using SERS for PoC biosensing, the surface of colloidal silver (Ag) nanocubes has been modified to test the feasibility of a competitive binding SERS assay utilizing aptamers against citrulline. Specifically, Ag nanocubes were functionalized with mercaptobenzoic acid, as well as a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol linker that forms an amide bond with the amino acid citrulline. After the functionalization, the nanocubes were characterized by zeta-potential, transmission electron microscopy images, ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, and by SERS. The citrulline aptamers were developed and tested using backscattering interferometry. The data show that our surface modification method does work and that the functionalized nanoparticles can be detected using SERS down to a 24.5 picomolar level. Last, we used microscale thermophoresis to show that the aptamers bind to citrulline with at least a 50 times stronger affinity than other amino acids.

  15. In Situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the Field of Industrial Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Ogieglo, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    Industrial membranes are playing an ever increasing role in the ongoing and necessary transition of our society towards more sustainable growth and development. Already today membranes offer more energy efficient alternatives to the traditional often very energy intensive industrial separation processes such as (cryogenic) distillation or crystallization. For many years reverse osmosis membranes have offered a viable method for the production of potable water via desalination processes and their significance continuously increases. Recently, membrane technology has been demonstrated to play a significant role in potential methods to generate or store energy on an industrial scale. For molecular separations often the key for an efficient membrane operation often lies in the application of an (ultra-) thin organic polymer, inorganic or hybrid selective layer whose interaction with the separated mixture defines the membrane performance. Ellipsometry has started gaining increasing attention in this area due to its large potential to conduct in-situ, non-destructive and very precise analysis of the film-fluid interactions. In this chapter, we aim to review the important recent developments in the application of ellipsometry in industrial membrane-related studies. We briefly introduce the basics of membrane science and discuss the used experimental setups and optical models. Further we focus on fundamental studies of sorption, transport and penetrant-induced phenomena in thin films exposed to organic solvents or high pressure gases. The application of in-situ ellipsometry is discussed for studies of new, promising membrane materials and the use of the technique for emerging direct studies of operating membranes is highlighted.

  16. In Situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the Field of Industrial Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Ogieglo, Wojciech

    2018-05-06

    Industrial membranes are playing an ever increasing role in the ongoing and necessary transition of our society towards more sustainable growth and development. Already today membranes offer more energy efficient alternatives to the traditional often very energy intensive industrial separation processes such as (cryogenic) distillation or crystallization. For many years reverse osmosis membranes have offered a viable method for the production of potable water via desalination processes and their significance continuously increases. Recently, membrane technology has been demonstrated to play a significant role in potential methods to generate or store energy on an industrial scale. For molecular separations often the key for an efficient membrane operation often lies in the application of an (ultra-) thin organic polymer, inorganic or hybrid selective layer whose interaction with the separated mixture defines the membrane performance. Ellipsometry has started gaining increasing attention in this area due to its large potential to conduct in-situ, non-destructive and very precise analysis of the film-fluid interactions. In this chapter, we aim to review the important recent developments in the application of ellipsometry in industrial membrane-related studies. We briefly introduce the basics of membrane science and discuss the used experimental setups and optical models. Further we focus on fundamental studies of sorption, transport and penetrant-induced phenomena in thin films exposed to organic solvents or high pressure gases. The application of in-situ ellipsometry is discussed for studies of new, promising membrane materials and the use of the technique for emerging direct studies of operating membranes is highlighted.

  17. New trends in ellipsometry for thin film diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masetti, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ellipsometric technique is both instrumentation and method for surface characterization through light polarization change measurements. After the improvement of the technique due to electrooptical components (light polarization modulator) and personal computer, ellipsometry today is getting new interest in optical thin film diagnostics because of automatized ellipsometer availability. The realization of a new instrument for light polarization measurement, the FDP (Four Detector Photopolarimeter), will allow the production of ellipsometers with improved characteristics and low cost. A survey on ellipsometric technique trend and preliminary data on the first realized FDP are reported

  18. Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry study of chiral nanocrystalline cellulose films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Galván, Arturo; Muñoz-Pineda, Eloy; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.; Santos, Moliria V.; Järrendahl, Kenneth; Arwin, Hans

    2018-02-01

    Chiral nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) free-standing films were prepared through slow evaporation of aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals in a nematic chiral liquid crystal phase. Mueller matrix (MM) spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to study the polarization and depolarization properties of the chiral films. In the reflection mode, the MM is similar to the matrices reported for the cuticle of some beetles reflecting near circular left-handed polarized light in the visible range. The polarization properties of light transmitted at normal incidence for different polarization states of incident light are discussed. By using a differential decomposition of the MM, the structural circular birefringence and dichroism of a NCC chiral film are evaluated.

  19. Investigation of thin polymer layers for biosensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saftics, András; Agócs, Emil [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Fodor, Bálint [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); Patkó, Dániel; Petrik, Péter [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, H-8200 Egyetem u.10, Veszprém (Hungary); Kolari, Kai; Aalto, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PL 1000, Tietotie 3, 02044 Espoo (Finland); Fürjes, Péter [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, Robert [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, H-8200 Egyetem u.10, Veszprém (Hungary); Kurunczi, Sándor, E-mail: kurunczi.sandor@ttk.mta.hu [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, H-8200 Egyetem u.10, Veszprém (Hungary)

    2013-09-15

    Novel biosensors made of polymers may offer advantages over conventional technology such as possibility of mass production and tunability of the material properties. With the ongoing work on the polymer photonic chip fabrication in our project, simple model samples were tested parallel for future immobilization and accessing conditions for applications in typical aqueous buffers. The model samples consist of a thin, high refractive index polyimide film on top of TEOS on Si wafer. These model samples were measured by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry using different aqueous buffers. The experiments revealed a high drift in aqueous solutions; the drift in the ellipsometric parameters (delta, psi) can be evaluated and presented as changes in thickness and refractive index of the polyimide layer. The first molecular layer of immobilization is based on polyethyleneimine (PEI). The signal for the PEI adsorption was detected on a stable baseline, only after a long conditioning. The stability of polyimide films in aqueous buffer solutions should be improved toward the real biosensor application. Preliminary results are shown on the possibilities to protect the polyimide. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS) has been used to demonstrate the shielding effect of the thin TiO{sub 2} adlayer in biosensor applications.

  20. Characterisation of thin films by phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Das, N.C.

    1998-07-01

    A wide variety of thin film coatings, deposited by different techniques and with potential applications in various important areas, have been characterised by the Phase Modulated Spectroscopic Ellipsometer, installed recently in the Spectroscopy Division, B.A.R.C. The Phase Modulated technique provides a faster and more accurate data acquisition process than the conventional ellipsometry. The measured Ellipsometry spectra are fitted with theoretical spectra generated assuming an appropriate model regarding the sample. The fittings have been done objectively by minimising the squared difference (χ 2 ) between the measured and calculated values of the ellipsometric parameters and thus accurate information have been derived regarding the thickness and optical constants (viz, the refractive index and extinction coefficient) of the different layers, the surface roughness and the inhomogeneities present in the layers. Measurements have been done on (i) ion-implanted Si-wafers to investigate the formation of SiC layers, (ii) phenyl- silane coating on glass to investigate the surface modifications achieved for better adsorption of rhodamine dye on glass, (iii) GaN films on quartz to investigate the formation of high quality GaN layers by sputtering of GaAs targets, (iv) Diamond-like-coating (DLC) samples prepared by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) to investigate the optical properties which would ultimately lead to an accurate estimation of the ratio of sp 3 and sp 2 bonded carbon atoms in the films and (v) SS 304 under different surface treatments to investigate the growth of different passive films. (author)

  1. Sensing of Streptococcus mutans by microscopic imaging ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleel, Mai Ibrahim; Chen, Yu-Da; Chien, Ching-Hang; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2017-05-01

    Microscopic imaging ellipsometry is an optical technique that uses an objective and sensing procedure to measure the ellipsometric parameters Ψ and Δ in the form of microscopic maps. This technique is well known for being noninvasive and label-free. Therefore, it can be used to detect and characterize biological species without any impact. Microscopic imaging ellipsometry was used to measure the optical response of dried Streptococcus mutans cells on a glass substrate. The ellipsometric Ψ and Δ maps were obtained with the Optrel Multiskop system for specular reflection in the visible range (λ=450 to 750 nm). The Ψ and Δ images at 500, 600, and 700 nm were analyzed using three different theoretical models with single-bounce, two-bounce, and multibounce light paths to obtain the optical constants and height distribution. The obtained images of the optical constants show different aspects when comparing the single-bounce analysis with the two-bounce or multibounce analysis in detecting S. mutans samples. Furthermore, the height distributions estimated by two-bounce and multibounce analyses of S. mutans samples were in agreement with the thickness values measured by AFM, which implies that the two-bounce and multibounce analyses can provide information complementary to that obtained by a single-bounce light path.

  2. Characterization of plasmonic effects in thin films and metamaterials using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Wormeester, Herbert; Arwin, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of plasmon resonances at metal–dielectric interfaces of thin films are reviewed. We show how ellipsometry provides valuable non-invasive amplitude and phase information from which one can determine the effective dielectric functions, and how these

  3. A note on the use of ellipsometry for studying the kinetics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ellipsometry is currently one of the most important techniques for characterization of the deposition and growth mode of ultra thin organic films. However, it is well known that for thicknesses normally encountered in organic monolayer films, as would occur for example in self-assembled monolayers, ellipsometry cannot be ...

  4. Android integrated urea biosensor for public health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali P. Naik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of a biosensor with a wireless network on the Android 4.2.1 (Jelly Bean platform has been demonstrated. The present study reports an android integrated user friendly Flow injection analysis-Enzyme thermistor (FIA-ET urea biosensor system. This android-integrated biosensor system will facilitate enhanced consumer health and awareness alongside abridging the gap between the food testing laboratory and the concerned higher authorities. Data received from a flow injection mode urea biosensor has been exploited as an integration point among the analyst, the food consumer and the responsible higher authorities. Using the urea biosensor as an example, an alarm system has also been demonstrated both graphically and through text message on a mobile handset. The presented sensor integrated android system will also facilitate decision making support system in various fields of food quality monitoring and clinical analysis.

  5. Emerging synergy between nanotechnology and implantable biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Tomazos, Ioannis; Burgess, Diane J; Jain, Faquir C; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2010-03-15

    The development of implantable biosensors for continuous monitoring of metabolites is an area of sustained scientific and technological interests. On the other hand, nanotechnology, a discipline which deals with the properties of materials at the nanoscale, is developing as a potent tool to enhance the performance of these biosensors. This article reviews the current state of implantable biosensors, highlighting the synergy between nanotechnology and sensor performance. Emphasis is placed on the electrochemical method of detection in light of its widespread usage and substantial nanotechnology based improvements in various aspects of electrochemical biosensor performance. Finally, issues regarding toxicity and biocompatibility of nanomaterials, along with future prospects for the application of nanotechnology in implantable biosensors, are discussed. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  7. In vitro evaluation of fluorescence glucose biosensor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Sapsford, Kim E

    2014-07-08

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  8. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Aloraefy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  9. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review, with 19 references, is given on challenges and possible opportunities for the development of biosensors for environmental monitoring applications. The high cost and slow turnaround times typically associated with the measurement of regulated pollutants clearly indicates...

  10. Nanochannels Photoelectrochemical Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Ruan, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Li-Bin; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2018-02-06

    Nanochannels have brought new opportunities for biosensor development. Herein, we present the novel concept of a nanochannels photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor based on the integration of a unique Cu x O-nanopyramid-islands (NPIs) photocathode, an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalytic chemistry. The Cu x O-NPIs photocathode possesses good performance, and further assembly with AAO yields a designed architecture composed of vertically aligned, highly ordered nanoarrays on top of the Cu x O-NPIs film. After biocatalytic precipitation (BCP) was stimulated within the channels, the biosensor was used for the successful detection of ALP activity. This study has not only provided a novel paradigm for an unconventional nanochannels PEC biosensor, which can be used for general bioanalytical purposes, but also indicated that the new concept of nanochannel-semiconductor heterostructures is a step toward innovative biomedical applications.

  11. Triggered optical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-10-02

    An optical biosensor is provided for the detection of a multivalent target biomolecule, the biosensor including a substrate having a bilayer membrane thereon, a recognition molecule situated at the surface, the recognition molecule capable of binding with the multivalent target biomolecule, the recognition molecule further characterized as including a fluorescence label thereon and as being movable at the surface and a device for measuring a fluorescence change in response to binding between the recognition molecule and the multivalent target biomolecule.

  12. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of FePt nanoparticle films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.J.; Lo, C.C.H. [Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Yu, A.C.C. [Sony Corporation, Sendai Technology Center, 3-4-1 Sakuragi, Miyagi 985-0842 (Japan); Fan, M. [School of Materials Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The optical properties of a FePt nanoparticle film were investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The FePt nanoparticle film of thickness about 15 nm was prepared by deposition of FePt nanoparticles directly on a Si substrate. The nanoparticle film was annealed at 600 C in vacuum for two hours before the measurements. The optical properties of the FePt nanoparticle film showed distinctively different spectra from those obtained from the bulk and thin film FePt samples, in particular in the low photon energy range (below 3.5 eV) where the nanoparticle film exhibited a relatively flat refractive index and a substantially lower extinction coefficient than the bulk and epitaxial thin film samples. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battie, Y.; Jamon, D.; Lauret, J.S.; Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M.; En Naciri, A.; Loiseau, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S 11 , S 22 and M 11 transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ 0 of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes

  14. Nanostructure characterization of high k materials by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.; Aguas, H.; Fortunato, E.; Martins, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the optical and structural properties of high k materials such as tantalum oxide and titanium oxide were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, where a Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model based in one (amorphous films) or two oscillators (microcrystalline films) was used. The samples were deposited at room temperature by radio frequency magnetron sputtering and then annealed at temperatures from 100 to 500 deg. C. Concerning the tantalum oxide films, the increase of the annealing temperature, up to 500 deg. C does not change the amorphous nature of the films, increasing, however, their density. The same does not happen with the titanium oxide films that are microcrystalline, even when deposited at room temperature. Data concerning the use of a four-layer model based on one and two Tauc-Lorentz dispersions is also discussed, emphasizing its use for the detection of an amorphous incubation layer, normally present on microcrystalline films grown by sputtering

  15. Molecular Approaches to Optical Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fierke, Carol

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this proposal was to develop methodologies for the optimization of field-deployable optical biosensors, in general, and, in particular, to optimize a carbonic anhydrase-based fiber optic zinc biosensor...

  16. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  18. Fabrication of Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Conducting Polyaniline (NSPANI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshikha SAINI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, glucose and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 biosensors based on nanostructured conducting polyaniline (NSPANI (synthesized using sodiumdodecyl sulphate (SDS as structure directing agent were developed. Because of the large specific surface area, excellent conductivity of NSPANI, horseradish peroxidase (HRP and glucose oxidase (GOx could be easily immobilized with high loading and activity. In addition the small dimensions and the high surface-to-volume ratio of the NSCP allow the rapid transmission of electron and enhance current response. The linear dynamic range of optical glucose and H2O2 biosensors is 5–40 mM for glucose and 1–50 mM for H2O2, respectively where as the bulk PANI exhibits linearity between 5-20 mM/l. The miniature optical glucose biosensor also exhibits good reproducibility. The storage stability of optical glucose and H2O2 biosensors is two weeks for glucose and five days for H2O2. The high response value of NSPANI based biosensors as compared to bulk PANI based biosensor reflects higher enzymatic affinity of GOx/NSPANI and HRP/NSPANI with glucose and H2O2 due to biocompatibility, active surface area and high electron communication capability of nanobiopolymer film. In conclusion, the NSPANI based biosensors proposed herein have many advantages such as a low response time, high reproducibility, high sensitivity, stable and wide dynamic range.

  19. Introduction to biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Biosensors in forensic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederickx, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is a device that uses biological materials to detect and monitor the presence of specific chemicals in an area. Traditional methods of volatile detection used by law enforcement agencies and rescue teams typically consist of reliance on canine olfaction. This concept of using dogs to detect specific substances is quite old. However, dogs have some limitations such as cost of training and time of conditioning. Thus, the possibility of using other organisms as biosensors including rats, dolphins, honeybees, and parasitic wasps for detecting explosives, narcotics and cadavers has been developed. Insects have several advantages unshared by mammals. Insects are sensitive, cheap to produce and can be conditioned with impressive speed for a specific chemical-detection task. Moreover, insects might be a preferred sensing method in scenarios that are deemed too dangerous to use mammals. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the biosensors used in forensic sciences.

  1. Deficiency of standard effective-medium approximation for ellipsometry of layers of nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bortchagovsky, E. G.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Lozovski, V.Z.; Mishakova, T.O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, Nov (2015), s. 602848 ISSN 1687-4110 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ellipsometry * layers of nanoparticles * Green function in ?-? representation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.758, year: 2015

  2. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface sensitive tool to probe thin film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtered thin film and multilayer x-ray mirrors are made routinely at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the APS users. Precise film growth control and characterization are very critical in fabricating high-quality x-ray mirrors. Film thickness calibrations are carried out using in situ and ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, interferometry, and x-ray scattering. To better understand the growth and optical properties of different thin film systems, we have carried out a systematic study of sputtered thin films of Au, Rh, Pg Pd, Cu, and Cr, using in situ ellipsometry. Multiple data sets were obtained in situ for each film material with incremental thicknesses and were analyzed with their correlation in mind. We found that in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface-sensitive tool can also be used to probe the growth and morphology of the thin film system. This application of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for metal thin film systems will be discussed

  3. Biosensors: Future Analytical Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors offer considerable promises for attaining the analytic information in a faster, simpler and cheaper manner compared to conventional assays. Biosensing approach is rapidly advancing and applications ranging from metabolite, biological/ chemical warfare agent, food pathogens and adulterant detection to genetic screening and programmed drug delivery have been demonstrated. Innovative efforts, coupling micromachining and nanofabrication may lead to even more powerful devices that would accelerate the realization of large-scale and routine screening. With gradual increase in commercialization a wide range of new biosensors are thus expected to reach the market in the coming years.

  4. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Immobilization techniques in the fabrication of nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzbach, William; Ronkainen, Niina J

    2013-04-11

    The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene.

  8. Electrochemical Biosensors - Sensor Principles and Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Dorothee; MacKenzie, Robert; Vörös, Janos; Reimhult, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Quantification of biological or biochemical processes are of utmost importance for medical, biological and biotechnological applications. However, converting the biological information to an easily processed electronic signal is challenging due to the complexity of connecting an electronic device directly to a biological environment. Electrochemical biosensors provide an attractive means to analyze the content of a biological sample due to the direct conversion of a biological event to an electronic signal. Over the past decades several sensing concepts and related devices have been developed. In this review, the most common traditional techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry, impedance spectroscopy, and various field-effect transistor based methods are presented along with selected promising novel approaches, such as nanowire or magnetic nanoparticle-based biosensing. Additional measurement techniques, which have been shown useful in combination with electrochemical detection, are also summarized, such as the electrochemical versions of surface plasmon resonance, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning probe microscopy. The signal transduction and the general performance of electrochemical sensors are often determined by the surface architectures that connect the sensing element to the biological sample at the nanometer scale. The most common surface modification techniques, the various electrochemical transduction mechanisms, and the choice of the recognition receptor molecules all influence the ultimate sensitivity of the sensor. New nanotechnology-based approaches, such as the use of engineered ion-channels in lipid bilayers, the encapsulation of enzymes into vesicles, polymersomes, or polyelectrolyte capsules provide additional possibilities for signal amplification. In particular, this review highlights the importance of the precise control over the delicate

  9. Analysis of protein interactions at native chloroplast membranes by ellipsometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Kriechbaumer

    Full Text Available Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE. We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins.

  10. Electrochemical biosensors in pharmaceutical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Eric de Souza; Melo, Giselle Rodrigues de

    2010-01-01

    Given the increasing demand for practical and low-cost analytical techniques, biosensors have attracted attention for use in the quality analysis of drugs, medicines, and other analytes of interest in the pharmaceutical area. Biosensors allow quantification not only of the active component in pharmaceutical formulations, but also the analysis of degradation products and metabolites in biological fluids. Thus, this article presents a brief review of biosensor use in pharmaceutical analysis, fo...

  11. Designed graphene-peptide nanocomposites for biosensor applications: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yujie; Wu, Aiguo; Wei, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The modification of graphene with biomacromolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and others extends the potential applications of graphene materials in various fields. The bound biomacromolecules could improve the biocompatibility and bio-recognition ability of graphene-based nanocomposites, therefore could greatly enhance their biosensing performances on both selectivity and sensitivity. In this review, we presented a comprehensive introduction and discussion on recent advance in the synthesis and biosensor applications of graphene-peptide nanocomposites. The biofunctionalization of graphene with specifically designed peptides, and the synthesis strategies of graphene-peptide (monomer, nanofibrils, and nanotubes) nanocomposites were demonstrated. On the other hand, the fabrication of graphene-peptide nanocomposite based biosensor architectures for electrochemical, fluorescent, electronic, and spectroscopic biosensing were further presented. This review includes nearly all the studies on the fabrication and applications of graphene-peptide based biosensors recently, which will promote the future developments of graphene-based biosensors in biomedical detection and environmental analysis. - Highlights: • A comprehensive review on the fabrication and application of graphene-peptide nanocomposites was presented. • The design of peptide sequences for biofunctionalization of various graphene materials was presented. • Multi-strategies on the fabrication of biosensors with graphene-peptide nanocomposites were discussed. • Designed graphene-peptide nanocomposites showed wide biosensor applications.

  12. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  13. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  14. Synthetic Electric Microbial Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    domains and DNA-binding domains into a single protein for deregulation of down stream genes of have been favored [10]. Initially experiments with... Germany DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited.   Talk title: “Synthetic biology based microbial biosensors for the...toolbox” in Heidelberg, Germany Poster title: “Anaerobic whole cell microbial biosensors” Link: http://phdsymposium.embl.org/#home   September, 2014

  15. Biosensor. Seitai sensa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, I [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology

    1993-06-15

    Present state of the art of biosensors is described by taking taste sensors and odor sensors as examples. Bio-devices that response only to specific chemical substances are made using membranes that recognize particular molecules. Biosensors are constructed in combination of bio-devices with electronics devices that transduce the response of bio-devices to electric signals. Enzymes are used often as bio-devices to recognize molecules. They recognize strictly chemical substances and promote chemical reactions. Devices to measure electrochemically substances consumed or produced in the reactions serve as sensors. For taste sensors, inosinic acid or glutamic acid that is a component of taste, is recognized and measured. Combination of various bio-devices other than enzymes with various transducers makes it possible to produce biosensors based on a variety of principles. Odor sensors recognize odors by measuring frequency change of the electrode of quartz oscillator. The change occurs with weight change due to odorous substances absorbed on the oscillator electrode coated with lipids which exist in olfactory cells. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  16. Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry of micrometer-sized SiO2 line gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Cordula; Zellmeier, Matthias; Rappich, Jörg; Ketelsen, Helge; Hinrichs, Karsten

    2017-09-01

    For the design and process control of periodic nano-structured surfaces spectroscopic ellipsometry is already established in the UV-VIS spectral regime. The objective of this work is to show the feasibility of spectroscopic ellipsometry in the infrared, exemplarily, on micrometer-sized SiO2 line gratings grown on silicon wafers. The grating period ranges from 10 to about 34 μm. The IR-ellipsometric spectra of the gratings exhibit complex changes with structure variations. Especially in the spectral range of the oxide stretching modes, the presence of a Rayleigh singularity can lead to pronounced changes of the spectrum with the sample geometry. The IR-ellipsometric spectra of the gratings are well reproducible by calculations with the RCWA method (Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis). Therefore, infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry allows the quantitative characterization and process control of micrometer-sized structures.

  17. In situ nanoparticle diagnostics by multi-wavelength Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gebauer, G

    2003-01-01

    We present and discuss the method of multiple-wavelength Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry for the in situ analysis of nanoparticles. It is applied to the problem of nanoparticles suspended in low-pressure plasmas. We discuss experimental results demonstrating that the size distribution and the complex refractive index can be determined with high accuracy and present a study on the in situ analysis of etching of melamine-formaldehyde nanoparticles suspended in an oxygen plasma. It is also shown that particles with a shell structure (core plus mantle) can be analysed by Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry. Rayleigh-Mie scattering ellipsometry is also applicable to in situ analysis of nanoparticles under high gas pressures and in liquids.

  18. A reduced graphene oxide based electrochemical biosensor for tyrosine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junhua; Qiu, Jingjing; Li, Li; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Xianwen; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Wang, Shiren

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a ‘green’ and safe hydrothermal method has been used to reduce graphene oxide and produce hemin modified graphene nanosheet (HGN) based electrochemical biosensors for the determination of l-tyrosine levels. The as-fabricated HGN biosensors were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experimental results indicated that hemin was successfully immobilized on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (rGO) through π-π interaction. TEM images and EDX results further confirmed the attachment of hemin on the rGO nanosheet. Cyclic voltammetry tests were carried out for the bare glass carbon electrode (GCE), the rGO electrode (rGO/GCE), and the hemin-rGO electrode (HGN/GCE). The HGN/GCE based biosensor exhibits a tyrosine detection linear range from 5 × 10-7 M to 2 × 10-5 M with a detection limitation of 7.5 × 10-8 M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensitivity of this biosensor is 133 times higher than that of the bare GCE. In comparison with other works, electroactive biosensors are easily fabricated, easily controlled and cost-effective. Moreover, the hemin-rGO based biosensors demonstrate higher stability, a broader detection linear range and better detection sensitivity. Study of the oxidation scheme reveals that the rGO enhances the electron transfer between the electrode and the hemin, and the existence of hemin groups effectively electrocatalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine. This study contributes to a widespread clinical application of nanomaterial based biosensor devices with a broader detection linear range, improved stability, enhanced sensitivity and reduced costs.

  19. Protein Detection with Aptamer Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have been developed for different applications. Their use as new biological recognition elements in biosensors promises progress for fast and easy detection of proteins. This new generation of biosensor (aptasensors will be more stable and well adapted to the conditions of real samples because of the specific properties of aptamers.

  20. Affinity biosensors: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Kim R; Mulchandani, Ashok

    1998-01-01

    ..., and government to begin or expand their biosensors research. This volume, Methods in Biotechnology vol. 7: Affinity Biosensors: Techniques and Protocols, describes a variety of classical and emerging transduction technologies that have been interfaced to bioaffinity elements (e.g., antibodies and receptors). Some of the reas...

  1. Recent advances in ZnO nanostructures and thin films for biosensor applications: Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Sunil K.; Saha, Shibu; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.; Gupta, Vinay; Bhansali, Shekhar; Singh, Surinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO nanostructures have shown binding of biomolecules in desired orientation with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, their compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes them suitable candidate for future small integrated biosensor devices. This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films, and their applications in biosensor technology. Highlights: ► This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films. ► Article highlights the importance of ZnO nanostructures as biosensor matrix. ► Article highlights the advances in various biosensors based on ZnO nanostructures. ► Article describes the potential of ZnO based biosensor for new generation healthcare devices. - Abstract: Biosensors have shown great potential for health care and environmental monitoring. The performance of biosensors depends on their components, among which the matrix material, i.e., the layer between the recognition layer of biomolecule and transducer, plays a crucial role in defining the stability, sensitivity and shelf-life of a biosensor. Recently, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures and thin films have attracted much interest as materials for biosensors due to their biocompatibility, chemical stability, high isoelectric point, electrochemical activity, high electron mobility, ease of synthesis by diverse methods and high surface-to-volume ratio. ZnO nanostructures have shown the binding of biomolecules in desired orientations with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes ZnO nanostructures suitable candidate for future small integrated biosensor devices. This review

  2. Recent advances in ZnO nanostructures and thin films for biosensor applications: Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arya, Sunil K., E-mail: sunilarya333@gmail.com [Bioelectronics Program, Institute of Microelectronics, A-Star 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Saha, Shibu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E. [Engineering Science and Materials Department, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (United States); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Bhansali, Shekhar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Singh, Surinder P., E-mail: singh.uprm@gmail.com [National Physical Laboratory, Dr K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2012-08-06

    Graphical abstract: ZnO nanostructures have shown binding of biomolecules in desired orientation with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, their compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes them suitable candidate for future small integrated biosensor devices. This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films, and their applications in biosensor technology. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Article highlights the importance of ZnO nanostructures as biosensor matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Article highlights the advances in various biosensors based on ZnO nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Article describes the potential of ZnO based biosensor for new generation healthcare devices. - Abstract: Biosensors have shown great potential for health care and environmental monitoring. The performance of biosensors depends on their components, among which the matrix material, i.e., the layer between the recognition layer of biomolecule and transducer, plays a crucial role in defining the stability, sensitivity and shelf-life of a biosensor. Recently, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures and thin films have attracted much interest as materials for biosensors due to their biocompatibility, chemical stability, high isoelectric point, electrochemical activity, high electron mobility, ease of synthesis by diverse methods and high surface-to-volume ratio. ZnO nanostructures have shown the binding of biomolecules in desired orientations with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes Zn

  3. Investigation of Optical Properties of Biomolecular Materials for Developing a Novel Fiber Optic Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Harry Hong

    1995-01-01

    Recently considerable efforts have been devoted to the development of optical biosensors for applications such as environmental monitoring and biomedical technology. The research described in this thesis focuses on the development of a novel fiber optic biosensor system for pesticide detection based on enzyme catalyzed chemiluminescence. To optimize the collection efficiency, the tapering effect of a fiber tip has been studied in different cases of light source distribution utilizing fluorescence technique. Our results indicate that a continuously tapered tip with the largest tapering angle is the most efficient configuration when the light source is in a "thick" layer ({> }1 μm) while a combination tapered tip is the best configuration when the light source is either in a thin layer ({offers the flexibility of controlling the number of enzymes on a fiber surface. Multilayer of alkaline phosphatase have been characterized using various techniques including chemiluminescence, ellipsometry and surface plasma resonance. The results indicated that at least 3 layers of enzyme can be assembled on a fiber surface. With this approach, it is possible to immobilize different kinds of enzyme on a fiber surface for biosensors based on a multi-enzyme system. Based on the studies of tapered tip and immobilization schemes, a novel fiber optic biosensor system for the detection of organophosphorous-based pesticide has been developed. The detection mechanism is pesticide inhibition of alkaline phosphatase catalyzed chemiluminescence. Paraoxon with concentration as low as 167 ppb has been detected. This is the first fiber optic chemiluminescence-based biosensor utilizing tapered tips with enzyme immobilized on the fiber surface and a cooled CCD array detector.

  4. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  5. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  6. Improved Biosensors for Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Cheng, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Microbes drive processes in the Earth system far exceeding their physical scale, affecting crop yields, water quality, the mobilization of toxic materials, and fundamental aspects of soil biogeochemistry. The tools of synthetic biology have the potential to significantly improve our understanding of microbial Earth system processes: for example, synthetic microbes can be be programmed to report on environmental conditions that stimulate greenhouse gas production, metal oxidation, biofilm formation, pollutant degradation, and microbe-plant symbioses. However, these tools are only rarely deployed in the lab. This research gap arises because synthetically programmed microbes typically report on their environment by producing molecules that are detected optically (e.g., fluorescent proteins). Fluorescent reporters are ideal for petri-dish applications and have fundamentally changed how we study human health, but their usefulness is quite limited in soils where detecting fluorescence is challenging. Here we describe the construction of gas-reporting biosensors, which release nonpolar gases that can be detected in the headspace of incubation experiments. These constructs can be used to probe microbial processes within soils in real-time noninvasive lab experiments. These biosensors can be combined with traditional omics-based approaches to reveal processes controlling soil microbial behavior and lead to improved environmental management decisions.

  7. Biosensors based on cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G; Zinoviev, Kiril; Plaza, Jose A; Lechuga, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Microcantilevers based-biosensors are a new label-free technique that allows the direct detection of biomolecular interactions in a label-less way and with great accuracy by translating the biointeraction into a nanomechanical motion. Low cost and reliable standard silicon technologies are widely used for the fabrication of cantilevers with well-controlled mechanical properties. Over the last years, the number of applications of these sensors has shown a fast growth in diverse fields, such as genomic or proteomic, because of the biosensor flexibility, the low sample consumption, and the non-pretreated samples required. In this chapter, we report a dedicated design and a fabrication process of highly sensitive microcantilever silicon sensors. We will describe as well an application of the device in the environmental field showing the immunodetection of an organic toxic pesticide as an example. The cantilever biofunctionalization process and the subsequent pesticide determination are detected in real time by monitoring the nanometer-scale bending of the microcantilever due to a differential surface stress generated between both surfaces of the device.

  8. Dissolution and Protection of Aluminium Oxide in Corrosive Aqueous Media - An Ellipsometry and Reflectometry Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsson, P.M.; Postmus, B.R.; Palmqvist, A.E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution of alumina has been studied from wafers in aqueous solution by means of ellipsometry and reflectometry. It was discovered that the dissolution of aluminium oxide is promoted by ethanol amines like N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine and triethanolamine, and that this dissolution is retarded

  9. Stability of UV exposed RR-P3BT films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diware, Mangesh S.; Byun, J. S.; Hwang, S. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2013-01-01

    Stability of regioregular poly(3-butylthiophene) (RR-P3BT) films under irradiation of ultra-violet (UV) light has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. Consistent decrease in dielectric function with UV exposure time showed the degree of degradation of polymer. This work suggests that, protective methods are mandatory to use this kind of material in optical devices.

  10. Ellipsometry of high temperature phase transition in PZT and (ZnLi)O films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deyneka, Alexander; Suchanek, G.; Hubička, Zdeněk; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Gerlach, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 298, - (2004), s. 55-60 ISSN 0015-0193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB1010301 Keywords : ferroelectric film * self-polarization * spectroscopic ellipsometry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.517, year: 2004

  11. Characterization of ion-implanted aluminum and iron by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodkin, J.S.; Franzen, W.; Culbertson, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The change in the optical constants of aluminum alloy and iron samples caused by implantation with nitrogen and chromium ions has been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The objective is to develop a method for simple, non-destructive characterization of ion-implanted metals. 5 refs., 6 figs

  12. Size-selective detection in integrated optical interferometric biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Harmen K P; Ymeti, Aurel; Subramaniam, Vinod; Kanger, Johannes S

    2012-01-01

    We present a new size-selective detection method for integrated optical interferometric biosensors that can strongly enhance their performance. We demonstrate that by launching multiple wavelengths into a Young interferometer waveguide sensor it is feasible to derive refractive index changes from

  13. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  14. Functional Conducting Polymers in the Application of SPR Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapiphun Janmanee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, conducting polymers have emerged as one of the most promising transducers for both chemical, sensors and biosensors owing to their unique electrical, electrochemical and optical properties that can be used to convert chemical information or biointeractions into electrical or optical signals, which can easily be detected by modern techniques. Different approaches to the application of conducting polymers in chemo- or biosensing applications have been extensively studied. In order to enhance the application of conducting polymers into the area of biosensors, one approach is to introduce functional groups, including carboxylic acid, amine, sulfonate, or thiol groups, into the conducting polymer chain and to form a so-called “self-doped” or by doping with negatively charged polyelectrolytes. The functional conducting polymers have been successfully utilized to immobilize enzymes for construction of biosensors. Recently, the combination of SPR and electrochemical, known as electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR, spectroscopy, has been used for in situ investigation of optical and electrical properties of conducting polymer films. Moreover, EC-SPR spectroscopy has been applied for monitoring the interaction between biomolecules and electropolymerized conjugated polymer films in biosensor and immunosensor applications. In this paper, recent development and applications on EC-SPR in biosensors will be reviewed.

  15. Performance of a Cyanobacteria Whole Cell-Based Fluorescence Biosensor for Heavy Metal and Pesticide Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmijah Surif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole cell biosensors always face the challenge of low stability of biological components and short storage life. This paper reports the effects of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA immobilization on a whole cell fluorescence biosensor for the detection of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, and pesticides (dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, and chlorpyrifos. The biosensor was produced by entrapping the cyanobacterium Anabaena torulosa on a cellulose membrane, followed by applying a layer of pHEMA, and attaching it to a well. The well was then fixed to an optical probe which was connected to a fluorescence spectrophotometer and an electronic reader. The optimization of the biosensor using several factors such as amount of HEMA and drying temperature were undertaken. The detection limits of biosensor without pHEMA for Cu, Cd, Pb, 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos were 1.195, 0.027, 0.0100, 0.025 and 0.025 µg/L respectively. The presence of pHEMA increased the limits of detection to 1.410, 0.250, 0.500, 0.235 and 0.117 µg/L respectively. pHEMA is known to enhance the reproducibility of the biosensor with average relative standard deviation (RSD of ±1.76% for all the pollutants tested, 48% better than the biosensor without pHEMA (RSD = ±3.73%. In storability test with Cu 5 µg/L, the biosensor with pHEMA performed 11.5% better than the test without pHEMA on day-10 and 5.2% better on day-25. pHEMA is therefore a good candidate to be used in whole cell biosensors as it increases reproducibility and enhances biosensor storability.

  16. Detection Limits for Nanoscale Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheehan, Paul E; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2005-01-01

    We examine through analytical calculations and finite element simulations how the detection efficiency of disk and wire-like biosensors in unmixed fluids varies with size from the micrometer to nanometer scales...

  17. Biosensors based on gold nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Vidotti,Marcio; Carvalhal,Rafaela F.; Mendes,Renata K.; Ferreira,Danielle C. M.; Kubota,Lauro T.

    2011-01-01

    The present review discusses the latest advances in biosensor technology achieved by the assembly of biomolecules associated with gold nanoparticles in analytical devices. This review is divided in sections according to the biomolecule employed in the biosensor development: (i) immunocompounds; (ii) DNA/RNA and functional DNA/RNA; and (iii) enzymes and Heme proteins. In order to facilitate the comprehension each section was subdivided according to the transduction mode. Gold nanoparticles bas...

  18. Micro- and nanogap based biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, Jules L.

    2017-01-01

    Biosensors are used for the detection of a range of analytes for applications in healthcare, food production, environmental monitoring and biodefence. However, many biosensing platforms are large, expensive, require skilled operators or necessitate the analyte to be labelled. Direct electrochemical detection methods present a particularly attractive platform due to the simplified instrumentation when compared to other techniques such as fluorescence-based biosensors. With modern integrated ci...

  19. Recycling microcavity optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Heather K; Armani, Andrea M

    2011-04-01

    Optical biosensors have tremendous potential for commercial applications in medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety evaluation. In these applications, sensor reuse is desirable to reduce costs. To achieve this, harsh, wet chemistry treatments are required to remove surface chemistry from the sensor, typically resulting in reduced sensor performance and increased noise due to recognition moiety and optical transducer degradation. In the present work, we suggest an alternative, dry-chemistry method, based on O2 plasma treatment. This approach is compatible with typical fabrication of substrate-based optical transducers. This treatment completely removes the recognition moiety, allowing the transducer surface to be refreshed with new recognition elements and thus enabling the sensor to be recycled.

  20. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jin; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna L; Marshall Porterfield, D [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University (United States); Claussen, Jonathan C; Ul Haque, Aeraj; Diggs, Alfred R [Physiological Sensing Facility, Bindley Bioscience Center and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University (United States); McLamore, Eric S [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida (United States); Calvo-Marzal, Percy, E-mail: porterf@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University (United States)

    2011-09-02

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 {+-} 0.5 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 {mu}M), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  2. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jin; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna L; Marshall Porterfield, D; Claussen, Jonathan C; Ul Haque, Aeraj; Diggs, Alfred R; McLamore, Eric S; Calvo-Marzal, Percy

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 ± 0.5 μA mM -1 cm -2 ), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 μM), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H 2 O 2 response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  3. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin; Claussen, Jonathan C.; McLamore, Eric S.; Haque, Aeraj ul; Jaroch, David; Diggs, Alfred R.; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Rickus, Jenna L.; Porterfield, D. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 ± 0.5 µA mM - 1 cm - 2), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 µM), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H2O2 response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  4. Electrochemical and optical biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Rui; Li, Chang Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2011-06-01

    Nanomaterials and nanostructures exhibit unique size-tunable and shape-dependent physicochemical properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Advances of nanomaterials and nanostructures open a new door to develop various novel biosensors. The present work has reviewed the recent progress in electrochemical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescent biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures. An emphasis is put on the research that demonstrates how the performance of biosensors such as the limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity is improved by the use of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  5. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  6. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING: A REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosensors show the potential to complement laboratory-based analytical methods for environmental applications. Although biosensors for potential environmental-monitoring applications have been reported for a wide range of environmental pollutants, from a regulatory perspective, ...

  7. User oriented end-station on VUV pump-probe magneto-optical ellipsometry at ELI beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Shirly; Neuber, Gerd; Brooks, Christopher D.; Besner, Bastian; Hashemi, Maryam; Rübhausen, Michael; Andreasson, Jakob

    2017-11-01

    A state of the art ellipsometer for user operations is being implemented at ELI Beamlines in Prague, Czech Republic. It combines three of the most promising and exotic forms of ellipsometry: VUV, pump-probe and magneto-optical ellipsometry. This new ellipsometer covers a spectral operational range from the NIR up to the VUV, with high through-put between 1 and 40 eV. The ellipsometer also allows measurements of magneto-optical spectra with a 1 kHz switchable magnetic field of up to 1.5 T across the sample combining ellipsometry and Kerr spectroscopy measurements in an unprecedented spectral range. This form of generalized ellipsometry enables users to address diagonal and off-diagonal components of the dielectric tensor within one measurement. Pump-probe measurements enable users to study the dynamic behaviour of the dielectric tensor in order to resolve the time-domain phenomena in the femto to 100 ns range.

  8. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on less aggregated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Xiangjie; Zhou, Ming; Guo, Liping

    2017-03-15

    As a novel single-atom-thick sheet of sp 2 hybridized carbon atoms, graphene (GR) has attracted extensive attention in recent years because of its unique and remarkable properties, such as excellent electrical conductivity, large theoretical specific surface area, and strong mechanical strength. However, due to the π-π interaction, GR sheets are inclined to stack together, which may seriously degrade the performance of GR with the unique single-atom layer. In recent years, an increasing number of GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors are reported, which may reflect that GR has been considered as a kind of hot and promising electrode material for electrochemical sensor and biosensor construction. However, the active sites on GR surface induced by the irreversible GR aggregations would be deeply secluded inside the stacked GR sheets and therefore are not available for the electrocatalysis. So the alleviation or the minimization of the aggregation level for GR sheets would facilitate the exposure of active sites on GR and effectively upgrade the performance of GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. Less aggregated GR with low aggregation and high dispersed structure can be used in improving the electrochemical activity of GR-based electrochemical sensors or biosensors. In this review, we summarize recent advances and new progress for the development of electrochemical sensors based on less aggregated GR. To achieve such goal, many strategies (such as the intercalation of carbon materials, surface modification, and structural engineering) have been applied to alleviate the aggregation level of GR in order to enhance the performance of GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. Finally, the challenges associated with less aggregated GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors as well as related future research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ellipsometry study of optical parameters of AgIn5S8 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Mehmet; Gasanly, Nizami

    2015-12-01

    AgIn5S8 crystals grown by Bridgman method were characterized for optical properties by ellipsometry measurements. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the pseudodielectric function, pseudorefractive index, pseudoextinction coefficient, reflectivity and absorption coefficient were obtained from ellipsometry experiments carried out in the 1.2-6.2 eV range. Direct band gap energy of 1.84 eV was found from the analysis of absorption coefficient vs. photon energy. The oscillator energy, dispersion energy and zero-frequency refractive index, high-frequency dielectric constant values were found from the analysis of the experimental data using Wemple-DiDomenico and Spitzer-Fan models. Crystal structure and atomic composition ratio of the constituent elements in the AgIn5S8 crystal were revealed from structural characterization techniques of X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  10. Ellipsometry study of optical parameters of AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isik, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmet.isik@atilim.edu.tr [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Atilim University, 06836 Ankara (Turkey); Gasanly, Nizami [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Virtual International Scientific Research Centre, Baku State University, 1148 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2015-12-01

    AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} crystals grown by Bridgman method were characterized for optical properties by ellipsometry measurements. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the pseudodielectric function, pseudorefractive index, pseudoextinction coefficient, reflectivity and absorption coefficient were obtained from ellipsometry experiments carried out in the 1.2–6.2 eV range. Direct band gap energy of 1.84 eV was found from the analysis of absorption coefficient vs. photon energy. The oscillator energy, dispersion energy and zero-frequency refractive index, high-frequency dielectric constant values were found from the analysis of the experimental data using Wemple-DiDomenico and Spitzer-Fan models. Crystal structure and atomic composition ratio of the constituent elements in the AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} crystal were revealed from structural characterization techniques of X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  11. Combined ellipsometry and X-ray related techniques for studies of ultrathin organic nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Markus, E-mail: axo@standing-waves.d [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Str. 11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); AXO DRESDEN GmbH, Siegfried-Raedel-Str. 31, 01809 Heidenau (Germany); Roodenko, Katy [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V.-Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Laboratory for Surface and Nanostructure Modification, University of Texas at Dallas-NSERL, 800W. Campbell Rd., Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Pollakowski, Beatrix [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Hinrichs, Karsten [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V.-Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Rappich, Joerg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Abteilung Silizium-Photovoltaik, Kekulestr. 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Esser, Norbert [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V.-Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Bohlen, Alex von; Hergenroeder, Roland [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Str. 11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-07-30

    Ultrathin nanocomposite films of nitrobenzene on silicon were analyzed by Infrared Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (IRSE), X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and X-ray standing waves (XSW) before and after evaporation of gold. Infrared Spectroscopic Ellipsometry measurements were performed for identification of adsorbates and for investigation of the molecular orientation. Results for film thickness were correlated with XRR measurements. Further, XSW measurements of elements incorporated in nitrobenzene (C, N, and O) were performed with soft X-rays. The combination of the different methods allowed to confirm a model for the electrochemically deposited nitrobenzene films before and after gold evaporation. The characterization by XRR and XSW scans using hard X-rays showed that gold had penetrated into the nitrobenzene film and thus changed density and optical properties of this layer significantly. A depth profile correlated to the electron density is deduced from the XRR measurements. This profile allows to localize-in vertical direction-gold islands within the composite film.

  12. The optical properties of transferred graphene and the dielectrics grown on it obtained by ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasikov, Aarne; Kahro, Tauno; Matisen, Leonard; Kodu, Margus; Tarre, Aivar; Seemen, Helina; Alles, Harry

    2018-04-01

    Graphene layers grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method and transferred from Cu-foils to the oxidized Si-substrates were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), Raman and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) methods. The optical properties of transferred CVD graphene layers do not always correspond to the ones of the exfoliated graphene due to the contamination from the chemicals used in the transfer process. However, the real thickness and the mean properties of the transferred CVD graphene layers can be found using ellipsometry if a real thickness of the SiO2 layer is taken into account. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods were used to grow dielectric layers on the transferred graphene and the obtained structures were characterized using optical methods. The approach demonstrated in this work could be useful for the characterization of various materials grown on graphene.

  13. Investigation of SiO2 thin films dielectric constant using ellipsometry technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sangpour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we studied the optical behavior of SiO2 thin films prepared via sol-gel route using spin coating deposition from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS as precursor. Thin films were annealed at different temperatures (400-600oC. Absorption edge and band gap of thin layers were measured using UV-Vis spectrophotometery. Optical refractive index and dielectric constant were measured by ellipsometry technique. Based on our atomic force microscopic (AFM and ellipsometry results, thin layers prepared through this method showed high surface area, and high porosity ranging between 4.9 and 16.9, low density 2 g/cm, and low dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and porosity of layers increased by increasing the temperature due to the changes in surface roughness and particle size.

  14. The negative thermo-optic effect in KTa0.sub.3./sub. : an ellipsometry study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trepakov, Vladimír; Dejneka, Alexandr; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Lynnyková, Anna; Chvostová, Dagmar; Syrnikov, P.; Markovin, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 10 (2015), s. 991-1000 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1941; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : KTa0 3 ellipsometry * band- edge optical transitions * thermo-optics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.858, year: 2015

  15. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  16. Application of Fourier transform infrared ellipsometry to assess the concentration of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard; De Martino, Antonello; Schwartz, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a noninvasive optical characterization technique mainly used in the semiconductor field to characterize bare substrates and thin films. In particular, it allows the gathering of information concerning the physical structure of the sample, such as roughness and film thickness, as well as its optical response. In the mid-infrared (IR) range each molecule exhibits a characteristic absorption fingerprint, which makes this technique chemically selective. Phase-modulated IR ellipsometry does not require a baseline correction procedure or suppression of atmospheric CO2 and water-vapor absorption bands, thus greatly reducing the subjectivity in data analysis. We have found that ellipsometric measurements of thin films, such as the solid residuals left on a plane surface after evaporation of a liquid drop containing a given compound in solution, are particularly favorable for dosing purposes because the intensity of IR absorptions shows a linear behavior along a wide range of solution concentrations of the given compound. Our aim is to illustrate with a concrete example and to justify theoretically the linearity experimentally found between radiation absorption and molecule concentration. For the example, we prepared aqueous solutions of glycogen, a molecule of huge biological importance currently tested in biochemical analyses, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 1 g/l, which correspond to those found in physiological conditions. The results of this example are promising for the application of ellipsometry for dosing purposes in biochemistry and biomedicine.

  17. Electrochemical H2O2 biosensor composed of myoglobin on MoS2 nanoparticle-graphene oxide hybrid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jinho; Lee, Taek; Bapurao G, Bharate; Jo, Jinhee; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2017-07-15

    In this research, the electrochemical biosensor composed of myoglobin (Mb) on molybdenum disulfide nanoparticles (MoS 2 NP) encapsulated with graphene oxide (GO) was fabricated for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Hybrid structure composed of MoS 2 NP and GO (GO@MoS 2 ) was fabricated for the first time to enhance the electrochemical signal of the biosensor. As a sensing material, Mb was introduced to fabricate the biosensor for H 2 O 2 detection. Formation and immobilization of GO@MoS 2 was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Immobilization of Mb, and electrochemical property of biosensor were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometric i-t measurements. Fabricated biosensor showed the electrochemical signal enhanced redox current as -1.86μA at an oxidation potential and 1.95μA at a reduction potential that were enhanced relative to those of electrode prepared without GO@MoS 2 . Also, this biosensor showed the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, and retained the property until 9 days from fabrication. Upon addition of H 2 O 2 , the biosensor showed enhanced amperometric response current with selectivity relative to that of the biosensor prepared without GO@MoS 2 . This novel hybrid material-based biosensor can suggest a milestone in the development of a highly sensitive detecting platform for biosensor fabrication with highly sensitive detection of target molecules other than H 2 O 2 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Hemmen, van J.L.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum oxide films were deposited using remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from oxygen/trimethylaluminum mixtures. Initial studies by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry demonstrated that the aluminum oxide films deposited at temperatures

  19. On-line monitoring of solar cell module production by ellipsometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive analyzing tools are needed at all stages of thin film photovoltaic (PV) development, and on production lines. In thin film PV, layer thicknesses, micro-structure, composition, layer optical properties, and their uniformity (because each elementary cell is connected electrically in series within a big panel) serve as an important starting point in the evaluation of the performance of the cell or module. An important focus is to express the dielectric functions of each component material in terms of a handful of wavelength independent parameters whose variation can cover all process variants of that material. With the resulting database, spectroscopic ellipsometry coupled with multilayer analysis can be developed for on-line point-by-point mapping and on-line line-by-line imaging. This work tries to review the investigations of different types of PV-layers (anti-reflective coating, transparent-conductive oxide (TCO), multi-diode-structure, absorber and window layers) showing the existing dielectric function databases for the thin film components of CdTe, CuInGaSe 2 , thin Si, and TCO layers. Off-line point-by-point mapping can be effective for characterization of non-uniformities in full scale PV panels in developing labs but it is slow in the on-line mode when only 15 points can be obtained (within 1 min) as a 120 cm long panel moves by the mapping station. In the last years [M. Fried et al., Thin Solid Films 519, 2730 (2011)], instrumentation was developed that provides a line image of spectroscopic ellipsometry (wl = 350–1000 nm) data. Up to now a single 30 point line image can be collected in 10 s over a 15 cm width of PV material. This year we are building a 30 and a 60 cm width expanded beam ellipsometer the speed of which will be increased by 10 ×. Then 1800 points can be mapped in a 1 min traverse of a 60 ∗ 120 cm PV panel or flexible roll-to-roll substrate. - Highlights: • Instrumentation developed provides a line image of

  20. On-line monitoring of solar cell module production by ellipsometry technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, M., E-mail: fried@mfa.kfki.hu

    2014-11-28

    Non-destructive analyzing tools are needed at all stages of thin film photovoltaic (PV) development, and on production lines. In thin film PV, layer thicknesses, micro-structure, composition, layer optical properties, and their uniformity (because each elementary cell is connected electrically in series within a big panel) serve as an important starting point in the evaluation of the performance of the cell or module. An important focus is to express the dielectric functions of each component material in terms of a handful of wavelength independent parameters whose variation can cover all process variants of that material. With the resulting database, spectroscopic ellipsometry coupled with multilayer analysis can be developed for on-line point-by-point mapping and on-line line-by-line imaging. This work tries to review the investigations of different types of PV-layers (anti-reflective coating, transparent-conductive oxide (TCO), multi-diode-structure, absorber and window layers) showing the existing dielectric function databases for the thin film components of CdTe, CuInGaSe{sub 2}, thin Si, and TCO layers. Off-line point-by-point mapping can be effective for characterization of non-uniformities in full scale PV panels in developing labs but it is slow in the on-line mode when only 15 points can be obtained (within 1 min) as a 120 cm long panel moves by the mapping station. In the last years [M. Fried et al., Thin Solid Films 519, 2730 (2011)], instrumentation was developed that provides a line image of spectroscopic ellipsometry (wl = 350–1000 nm) data. Up to now a single 30 point line image can be collected in 10 s over a 15 cm width of PV material. This year we are building a 30 and a 60 cm width expanded beam ellipsometer the speed of which will be increased by 10 ×. Then 1800 points can be mapped in a 1 min traverse of a 60 ∗ 120 cm PV panel or flexible roll-to-roll substrate. - Highlights: • Instrumentation developed provides a line image of

  1. Innovations in biomedical nanoengineering: nanowell array biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, YoungTae; Jeong, Sunil; Lee, JuKyung; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan; Lee, HeaYeon

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured biosensors have pioneered biomedical engineering by providing highly sensitive analyses of biomolecules. The nanowell array (NWA)-based biosensing platform is particularly innovative, where the small size of NWs within the array permits extremely profound sensing of a small quantity of biomolecules. Undoubtedly, the NWA geometry of a gently-sloped vertical wall is critical for selective docking of specific proteins without capillary resistances, and nanoprocessing has contributed to the fabrication of NWA electrodes on gold substrate such as molding process, e-beam lithography, and krypton-fluoride (KrF) stepper semiconductor method. The Lee group at the Mara Nanotech has established this NW-based biosensing technology during the past two decades by engineering highly sensitive electrochemical sensors and providing a broad range of detection methods from large molecules (e.g., cells or proteins) to small molecules (e.g., DNA and RNA). Nanosized gold dots in the NWA enhance the detection of electrochemical biosensing to the range of zeptomoles in precision against the complementary target DNA molecules. In this review, we discuss recent innovations in biomedical nanoengineering with a specific focus on novel NWA-based biosensors. We also describe our continuous efforts in achieving a label-free detection without non-specific binding while maintaining the activity and stability of immobilized biomolecules. This research can lay the foundation of a new platform for biomedical nanoengineering systems.

  2. Surface plasmon optics for biosensors with advanced sensitivity and throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic biosensors represent a rapidly advancing technology which enables rapid and sensitive analysis of target analytes. This thesis focuses on novel metallic and polymer structures for plasmonic biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (SPF). It comprises four projects addressing key challenges concerning the enhancement of sensitivity and throughput. In the project 1, an advanced optical platform is developed which relies on reference-compensated angular spectroscopy of hydrogel-guided waves. The developed optical setup provides superior refractive index resolution of 1.2×10 -7 RIU and offers an attractive platform for direct detection of small analytes which cannot be analyzed by regular SPR biosensors. The project 2 carries out theoretical study of SPR imaging with advanced lateral resolution by utilizing Bragg scattered surface plasmons (BSSPs) on sub-wavelength metallic gratings. The results reveal that the proposed concept provides better lateral resolution and fidelity of the images. This feature opens ways for high-throughput SPR biosensors with denser arrays of sensing spots. The project 3 investigates surface plasmon coupled-emission from fluorophores in the vicinity of plasmonic Bragg-gratings. The experimental results provide leads on advancing the collection efficiency of fluorescence light by controlling the directions of fluorescence emission. This functionality can directly improve the sensitivity of fluorescence-based assays. In the last project 4, a novel sensing scheme with actively tuneable plasmonic structures is developed by employing thermo-responsive hydrogel binding matrix. The hydrogel film simultaneously serves as a large capacity binding matrix and provides means for actuating of surface plasmons through reversible swelling and collapsing of the hydrogel. This characteristic is suitable for multiplexing of sensing channels in fluorescence-based biosensor scheme (author)

  3. Micro-and nanoelectromechanical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nicu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Most books dedicated to the issues of bio-sensing are organized by the well-known scheme of a biosensor. In this book, the authors have deliberately decided to break away from the conventional way of treating biosensing research by uniquely addressing biomolecule immobilization methods on a solid surface, fluidics issues and biosensing-related transduction techniques, rather than focusing simply on the biosensor. The aim is to provide a contemporary snapshot of the biosensing landscape without neglecting the seminal references or products where needed, following the downscaling (from the micr

  4. Optical gradients in a-Si:H thin films detected using real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry with virtual interface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junda, Maxwell M.; Karki Gautam, Laxmi; Collins, Robert W.; Podraza, Nikolas J.

    2018-04-01

    Virtual interface analysis (VIA) is applied to real time spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements taken during the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films using various hydrogen dilutions of precursor gases and on different substrates during plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A procedure is developed for optimizing VIA model configurations by adjusting sampling depth into the film and the analyzed spectral range such that model fits with the lowest possible error function are achieved. The optimal VIA configurations are found to be different depending on hydrogen dilution, substrate composition, and instantaneous film thickness. A depth profile in the optical properties of the films is then extracted that results from a variation in an optical absorption broadening parameter in a parametric a-Si:H model as a function of film thickness during deposition. Previously identified relationships are used linking this broadening parameter to the overall shape of the optical properties. This parameter is observed to converge after about 2000-3000 Å of accumulated thickness in all layers, implying that similar order in the a-Si:H network can be reached after sufficient thicknesses. In the early stages of growth, however, significant variations in broadening resulting from substrate- and processing-induced order are detected and tracked as a function of bulk layer thickness yielding an optical property depth profile in the final film. The best results are achieved with the simplest film-on-substrate structures while limitations are identified in cases where films have been deposited on more complex substrate structures.

  5. Ellipsometry of rough CdTe(211)B-Ge(211) surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badano, Giacomo; Ballet, Philippe; Zanatta, Jean-Paul; Baudry, Xavier; Million, Alain; Garland, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the ellipsometric response of semiconductor surfaces is investigated. CdTe(211)B layers were grown on Ge(211) by molecular beam epitaxy using less than optimal growth conditions to enhance the formation of surface roughness. Their optical properties, measured by rotating-compensator ellipsometry, showed small but significant sample-to-sample differences not explainable in terms of nanometer-scale roughness. A critical-point analysis established that the critical-point structure of the dielectric function was the same for all samples. This result suggested that the observed sample-to-sample variations were due to macroscopic roughness, which scatters off-specular light into the detector, thereby causing errors. We introduced tentative corrections for off-specular reflection that fitted the observed differences and thus supported the idea that off-specular reflection was responsible for the observed differences. These results were obtained using CdTe but are easily extensible to other rough opaque materials

  6. Analytical modeling of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourasl, Ali H; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Rahmani, Meisam; Chin, Huei Chaeng; Lim, Cheng Siong; Ismail, Razali; Tan, Michael Loong Peng

    2014-01-15

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes have received widespread attention as promising carbon-based nanoelectronic devices. Due to their exceptional physical, chemical, and electrical properties, namely a high surface-to-volume ratio, their enhanced electron transfer properties, and their high thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes can be used effectively as electrochemical sensors. The integration of carbon nanotubes with a functional group provides a good and solid support for the immobilization of enzymes. The determination of glucose levels using biosensors, particularly in the medical diagnostics and food industries, is gaining mass appeal. Glucose biosensors detect the glucose molecule by catalyzing glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. This action provides high accuracy and a quick detection rate. In this paper, a single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose detection is analytically modeled. In the proposed model, the glucose concentration is presented as a function of gate voltage. Subsequently, the proposed model is compared with existing experimental data. A good consensus between the model and the experimental data is reported. The simulated data demonstrate that the analytical model can be employed with an electrochemical glucose sensor to predict the behavior of the sensing mechanism in biosensors.

  7. Lignin and silicate based hydrogels for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrs, S. L.; Jairam, S.; Vanegas, D. C.; Tong, Z.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Advances in biocompatible materials and electrocatalytic nanomaterials have extended and enhanced the field of biosensors. Immobilization of biorecognition elements on nanomaterial platforms is an efficient technique for developing high fidelity biosensors. Single layer (i.e., Langmuir-Blodgett) protein films are efficient, but disadvantages of this approach include high cost, mass transfer limitations, and Vromer competition for surface binding sites. There is a need for simple, user friendly protein-nanomaterial sensing membranes that can be developed in laboratories or classrooms (i.e., outside of the clean room). In this research, we develop high fidelity nanomaterial platforms for developing electrochemical biosensors using sustainable biomaterials and user-friendly deposition techniques. Catalytic nanomaterial platforms are developed using a combination of self assembled monolayer chemistry and electrodeposition. High performance biomaterials (e.g., nanolignin) are recovered from paper pulp waste and combined with proteins and nanomaterials to form active sensor membranes. These methods are being used to develop electrochemical biosensors for studying physiological transport in biomedical, agricultural, and environmental applications.

  8. Development and testing of a fluorescence biosensor for glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Sapsford, Kim

    2012-06-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive biosensors for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance management of diabetes mellitus and improve patient outcome in intensive care settings. Recent studies have indicated that implantable biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) can provide high sensitivity in quantifying glucose concentrations. However, standard approaches for determining the potential for interference from other biological constituents have not been established. The aim of this work was to design and optimize a FRET-based glucose sensor and assess its specificity to glucose. A sensor based on competitive binding between concanavalin A and dextran, labeled with long-wavelength acceptor and donor fluorophores, was developed. This process included optimization of dextran molecular weight and donor concentration, acceptor to donor ratio, and hydrogel concentration, as well as the number of polymer layers for encapsulation. The biosensor performance was characterized in terms of its response to clinically relevant glucose concentrations. The potential for interference and the development of test methods to evaluate this effect were studied using a potential clinical interferent, maltose. Results indicated that our biosensor had a prediction accuracy of better than 11% and that the robustness to maltose was highly dependent on glucose level.

  9. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  10. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  11. Monitoring of Glucose in Beer Brewing by a Carbon Nanotubes Based Nylon Nanofibrous Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mason

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the design, preparation, and characterization of a novel glucose electrochemical biosensor based on the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOX into a nylon nanofibrous membrane (NFM prepared by electrospinning and functionalized with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT. A disc of such GOX/CNT/NFM membrane (40 μm in thickness was used for coating the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The resulting biosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, with ferrocene methanol as mediator. The binding of GOX around the CNT/NFM greatly enhances the electron transfer, which results in a biosensor with a current five times higher than without CNT. The potential usefulness of the proposed biosensor was demonstrated with the analysis of glucose in commercial beverages and along the monitoring of the brewing process for making beer, from the mashing to the fermentation steps.

  12. Immobilization Techniques in the Fabrication of Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina J. Ronkainen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene.

  13. Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; White, Victor; Dougherty, Dennis; Maurer, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop improved biosensors of a type based on ion channels in biomimetic membranes. These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. As described, these sensors offer a number of advantages over prior sensors of this type.

  14. An electromagnetic system for biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an electromagnetic system for biosensors, in which the system can switch quickly between high magnetic gradients, without the need of movement of mech. elements. This is realized by two independent emu which are sepd. in the region of the pole shoes over a gap, in which a

  15. Development of Biosensors From Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑞红; 孙红; 李霄寒; 于冲

    2017-01-01

    Graphene's success has stimulated great interest and research in the synthesis and characterization of graphene -like 2D materials, single and few -atom -thick layers of van der Waals materials, which show fascinating and technologically useful properties.This review presents an overview of recent electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on graphene and on graphene-like 2D materials.

  16. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  17. Biosensors and multiple mycotoxin analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, B. van der; Spath, S.; Dietrich, H.; Stigter, E.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Osenbruggen, T. van; Koopal, K.

    2003-01-01

    An immunochemical biosensor assay for the detection of multiple mycotoxins in a sample is described.The inhibition assay is designed to measure four different mycotoxins in a single measurement, following extraction, sample clean-up and incubation with an appropriate cocktail of anti-mycotoxin

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on metallic gratings and the energy density in absorbing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmair, M.

    2011-01-01

    Many researchers have stated that the 20th century was the century of electrons but the present one will be the century of the photon. Optics has a long history but in the context of nanooptics and nanophotonics this statement is already proven in the first decade. Improved fabrication facilities and technologies have allowed researches and industry to model light by micro and nano structures like photonic crystals, gratings, wave couplers and in past years also negative index materials. As the feature sizes of the artificial structures, which are all summarized as metamaterials, determine the operation frequencies a miniaturization is necessary for the run towards smaller wavelengths, e.g. negative index materials working in the visible range. This thesis deals with spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) applied for the investigation of metallic gratings. SE is fast, non-invasive and non-destructive and the spectra of stratified layers are easily compared with theoretical simulations. For diffracting systems, rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) which is rigorous in the sense that for a large enough number of Fourier coefficients all diffraction orders are derived exactly, is used as numerical solver for the Maxwell equations. Metallic gratings are simple structures with only a few geometrical parameters and the comparison between theoretical and experimental spectra provide a useful basis for more complicated metamaterials like e.g. negative index materials. Further, the metallic grating supports the excitation of surface plasmons. Due to the periodic structure an additional momentum transfer is provided which is necessary to excite surface plamsons with incident light. These excitation frequencies are clearly visible in the ellipsometric spectra due to a phase shift between s- and p- polarization. Therefore in the first part silicon, gold and silver gratings are analyzed with respect to their geometrical and material parameters and measured and simulated spectra are

  19. A High-Content Assay for Biosensor Validation and for Examining Stimuli that Affect Biosensor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Scott D; Hahn, Klaus M

    2014-12-01

    Biosensors are valuable tools used to monitor many different protein behaviors in vivo. Demand for new biosensors is high, but their development and characterization can be difficult. During biosensor design, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of different biosensor structures on specificity, brightness, and fluorescence responses. By co-expressing the biosensor with upstream proteins that either stimulate or inhibit the activity reported by the biosensor, one can determine the difference between the biosensor's maximally activated and inactivated state, and examine response to specific proteins. We describe here a method for biosensor validation in a 96-well plate format using an automated microscope. This protocol produces dose-response curves, enables efficient examination of many parameters, and unlike cell suspension assays, allows visual inspection (e.g., for cell health and biosensor or regulator localization). Optimization of single-chain and dual-chain Rho GTPase biosensors is addressed, but the assay is applicable to any biosensor that can be expressed or otherwise loaded in adherent cells. The assay can also be used for purposes other than biosensor validation, using a well-characterized biosensor as a readout for effects of upstream molecules. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Optical properties and surface characterization of pulsed laser-deposited Cu2ZnSnS4 by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Cazzaniga, Andrea; Ettlinger, Rebecca B.; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at different temperatures are characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The focus is on confirming results from direct measurement techniques, by finding appropriate models of the surface overlayer for data fitting, and extracting the dielectric function of the films. It is found that the surface overlayer changes with film thickness and deposition temperature. Adopting different ellipsometry measurements and modeling strategies for each film, dielectric functions are extracted and compared. As the deposition temperature is increased, the dielectric functions exhibit additional critical points related to optical transitions in the material other than absorption across the fundamental band gap. In the case of a thin film < 200 nm thick, surface features observed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are accurately reproduced by ellipsometry data fitting. - Highlights: • Inhomogeneous Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition. • The film surface includes secondary phases and topographic structures. • We model a film surface layer that fits ellipsometry data. • Ellipsometry data fits confirm results from direct measurement techniques. • We obtain the dielectric function of inhomogeneous Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 films

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis of a thin film composite membrane consisting of polysulfone on a porous α-alumina support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wormeester, Herbert; Wessling, Matthias; Benes, Nieck E

    2012-02-01

    Exposure of a thin polymer film to a fluid can affect properties of the film such as the density and thickness. In particular in membrane technology, these changes can have important implications for membrane performance. Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a convenient technique for in situ studies of thin films, because of its noninvasive character and very high precision. The applicability of spectroscopic ellipsometry is usually limited to samples with well-defined interfacial regions, whereas in typical composite membranes, often substantial and irregular intrusion of the thin film into the pores of a support exists. In this work, we provide a detailed characterization of a polished porous alumina membrane support, using variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry in combination with atomic force microscopy and mercury porosimetry. Two Spectroscopic ellipsometry optical models are presented that can adequately describe the surface roughness of the support. These models consider the surface roughness as a distinct layer in which the porosity gradually increases toward the outer ambient interface. The first model considers the porosity profile to be linear; the second model assumes an exponential profile. It is shown that the models can be extended to account for a composite membrane geometry, by deposition of a thin polysulfone film onto the support. The developed method facilitates practicability for in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of nonequilibrium systems, i.e., membranes under actual permeation conditions.

  2. Ellipsometry measurements of thickness of oxide and water layers on spherical and flat silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.J.; Netterfield, R.; Wielunski, L.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Ellipsometry has been used to measure the thickness of oxide layers on single crystal silicon surfaces, both flat and spherical and also to measure the extent of adsorption of moisture on the surface as a function of partial water vapour pressure. The measurements form part of an international collaborative project to make a precise determination of the Avogadro constant (ΔN A /N A -8 ) which will then be used to obtain an absolute definition of the kilogram, rather than one in terms of an artefact. Typically the native oxide layer on a cleaned silicon wafer is about 2 nm thick. On a polished sphere this oxide layer is typically 8 to 10 nm thick, the increased thickness being attributed to parameters related to the polishing process. Ellipsometry measurements on an 89 mm diameter polished silicon sphere at both VUW and CSIRO indicated a SiO 2 layer at 7 to 10 nm thick. It was observed that this thickness varied regularly. The crystal orientation of the sphere was determined using electron patterns generated from an electron microscope and the oxide layer was then measured through 180 arcs of great circles along (110) and (100) planes. It was observed that the thickness varied systematically with orientation. The minimum thickness was 7.4 nm at the axis (softest direction in silicon) and the greatest thickness was 9.5 nm at the axis (hardest direction in silicon). This is similar to an orientation dependent cubic pattern which has been observed to be superimposed on polished silicon spheres. At VUW, the sphere was placed in an evacuated bell jar and the ellipsometry signal was observed as the water vapour pressure was progressively increased up to saturation. The amount of water vapour adsorbed at saturation was one or two monolayers, indicating that the sphere does not wet

  3. Combined ellipsometry and refractometry technique for characterisation of liquid crystal based nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warenghem, Marc; Henninot, Jean François; Blach, Jean François; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Kaczmarek, Malgosia; Stchakovsky, Michel

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a technique especially well suited to measure the effective optical properties of a composite material. However, as the sample is optically thick and anisotropic, this technique loses its accuracy for two reasons: anisotropy means that two parameters have to be determined (ordinary and extraordinary indices) and optically thick means a large order of interference. In that case, several dielectric functions can emerge out of the fitting procedure with a similar mean square error and no criterion to discriminate the right solution. In this paper, we develop a methodology to overcome that drawback. It combines ellipsometry with refractometry. The same sample is used in a total internal reflection (TIR) setup and in a spectroscopic ellipsometer. The number of parameters to be determined by the fitting procedure is reduced in analysing two spectra, the correct final solution is found by using the TIR results both as initial values for the parameters and as check for the final dielectric function. A prefitting routine is developed to enter the right initial values in the fitting procedure and so to approach the right solution. As an example, this methodology is used to analyse the optical properties of BaTiO(3) nanoparticles embedded in a nematic liquid crystal. Such a methodology can also be used to analyse experimentally the validity of the mixing laws, since ellipsometry gives the effective dielectric function and thus, can be compared to the dielectric function of the components of the mixture, as it is shown on the example of BaTiO(3)/nematic composite.

  4. Investigation of the optical properties of MoS{sub 2} thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Chanyoung; O' Brien, Maria; Winters, Sinéad [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McEvoy, Niall [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Duesberg, Georg S., E-mail: duesberg@tcd.ie [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research (AMBER) Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-03-10

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films grown by vapor phase sulfurization is reported. By developing an optical dispersion model, the extinction coefficient and refractive index, as well as the thickness of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) films, were extracted. In addition, the optical band gap was obtained from SE and showed a clear dependence on the MoS{sub 2} film thickness, with thinner films having a larger band gap energy. These results are consistent with theory and observations made on MoS{sub 2} flakes prepared by exfoliation, showing the viability of vapor phase derived TMDs for optical applications.

  5. Investigation of the optical properties of MoS2 thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Chanyoung; O'Brien, Maria; Winters, Sinéad; McEvoy, Niall; Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films grown by vapor phase sulfurization is reported. By developing an optical dispersion model, the extinction coefficient and refractive index, as well as the thickness of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) films, were extracted. In addition, the optical band gap was obtained from SE and showed a clear dependence on the MoS 2 film thickness, with thinner films having a larger band gap energy. These results are consistent with theory and observations made on MoS 2 flakes prepared by exfoliation, showing the viability of vapor phase derived TMDs for optical applications

  6. Detection and characterization of single nanoparticles by interferometric phase modulated ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso, F.; Bosch, S.; Tort, N.; Arteaga, O. [Universitat de Barcelona, IN2UB, Dep. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, c/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 (Spain); Sancho-Parramon, J. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, Zagreb 10002 (Croatia); Jover, E.; Bertran, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, IN2UB, Dep. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, c/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 (Spain); Canillas, A., E-mail: acanillas@ub.ed [Universitat de Barcelona, IN2UB, Dep. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, c/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 (Spain)

    2011-02-28

    We introduce a new measurement system called Nanopolar interferometer devoted to monitor and characterize single nanoparticles which is based on the interferometric phase modulated ellipsometry technique. The system collects the backscattered light by the particles in the solid angle subtended by a microscope objective and then analyses its frequency components. The results for the detection of 2 {mu}m and 50 nm particles are explained in terms of a cross polarization effect of the polarization vectors when the beam converts from divergent to parallel in the microscope objective. This explanation is supported with the results of the optical modelling using the exact Mie theory for the light scattered by the particles.

  7. Theory of the ellipsometry of a layer of semiconductor nanoparticles covering the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borshchagyivs'kij, Je.G.; Lozovs'kij, V.Z.; Lozovs'kij, V.Z.; Myishakova, T.O.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical model of ellipsometry of a submonolayer of semiconductor nanoparticles on a surface is built in the frame of the local field method. We calculated the effective susceptibility of the system which had been modeled as a substrate with ellipsoidal particles. These calculations allow us to determine the reflection coefficients and the ellipsometric parameters versus the wavelength and the angle of incidence. It is shown that semiconductor particles on a substrate give a measurable contribution to ellipsometric parameters. We obtain that ellipsometric parameters depend on the concentration and the shape of particles.

  8. Study of CdTe surface by SIMS and RBS ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuck, R.; Hage-Ali, M.; Grob, A.; Siffert, P.

    1978-01-01

    For a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the rectification of metal-cadmium telluride contacts, the surface of bromine-methanol etched CdTe crystals by means of ellipsometry, secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Rutherford backscattering of charged particles (RBS) has been investigated. The results show that these surfaces are contaminated with bromine and that a tellurium surface oxide layer grows, its thickness increasing with time. This surface layer composition has been analyzed at different steps of its evolution [fr

  9. Optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang-Lin

    2014-11-17

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the complex refractive index of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The extraordinary large value of the refractive index in the visible frequency range is obtained. The absorption response shows a strong correlation between the magnitude of the exciton binding energy and band gap energy. Together with the observed giant spin-orbit splitting, these findings advance the fundamental understanding of their novel electronic structures and the development of monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  10. Cu underpotential deposition on Au controlled by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato, Mirko; Cavalleri, Ornella; Mattera, Lorenzo; Canepa, Maurizio [Department of Physics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); CNISM, Genova (Italy); Gussoni, Antonio [IMEM/CNR, Genova (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Panizza, Marco [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Genova (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    We have studied Cu electrodeposition on well defined Au films using real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). SE allows to discriminate the under-potential (UP) and over-potential (OP) regimes. In the UP regime, tiny yet reproducible variations of {psi} and {delta} parameters indicate the formation of two phases with slightly different optical behavior. The phase at the largest coverage is assigned to a Cu monolayer. The SE response in the OP regime shows a marked dependence on the potential scan rate. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Detection and characterization of single nanoparticles by interferometric phase modulated ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, F.; Bosch, S.; Tort, N.; Arteaga, O.; Sancho-Parramon, J.; Jover, E.; Bertran, E.; Canillas, A.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new measurement system called Nanopolar interferometer devoted to monitor and characterize single nanoparticles which is based on the interferometric phase modulated ellipsometry technique. The system collects the backscattered light by the particles in the solid angle subtended by a microscope objective and then analyses its frequency components. The results for the detection of 2 μm and 50 nm particles are explained in terms of a cross polarization effect of the polarization vectors when the beam converts from divergent to parallel in the microscope objective. This explanation is supported with the results of the optical modelling using the exact Mie theory for the light scattered by the particles.

  12. Optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Shen, Chih-Chiang; Su, Sheng-Han; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the complex refractive index of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The extraordinary large value of the refractive index in the visible frequency range is obtained. The absorption response shows a strong correlation between the magnitude of the exciton binding energy and band gap energy. Together with the observed giant spin-orbit splitting, these findings advance the fundamental understanding of their novel electronic structures and the development of monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of optical anisotropy in obliquely deposited hafnia thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokas, R. B., E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Jena, Shuvendu; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-85 (India); Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar [Photonics & Nanotechnology Section, Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre facility, Visakhapatnam-530012 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In present work, HfO{sub 2} thin films have been deposited at various oblique incidences on Si substrates by electron beam evaporation. These refractory oxide films exhibited anisotropy in refractive index predictably due to special columnar microstructure. Spectroscopic ellipsometry being a powerful tool for optical characterization has been employed to investigate optical anisotropy. It was observed that the film deposited at glancing angle (80°) exhibits the highest optical anisotropy. Further, anisotropy was noticed to decrease with lower values of deposition angles while effective refractive index depicts opposite trend. Variation in refractive index and anisotropy has been explained in light of atomic shadowing during growth of thin films at oblique angles.

  14. Real time ellipsometry for monitoring plasma-assisted epitaxial growth of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Losurdo, Maria [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)]. E-mail: maria.losurdo@ba.imip.cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capezzuto, Pio [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Brown, April S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, 128 Hudson Hall, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Tong-Ho [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, 128 Hudson Hall, Durham, NC (United States); Choi, Soojeong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, 128 Hudson Hall, Durham, NC (United States)

    2006-10-31

    GaN is grown on Si-face 4H-SiC(0 0 0 1) substrates using remote plasma-assisted methods including metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (RP-MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry is used for monitoring all the steps of substrate pre-treatments and the heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on SiC. Our characterization emphasis is on understanding the nucleation mechanism and the GaN growth mode, which depend on the SiC surface preparation.

  15. Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-02-17

    Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications.

  16. Recent Development in Optical Fiber Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Bosch Ojeda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable developments can be seen in the field of optical fibre biosensors in the last decade. More sensors for specific analytes have been reported, novel sensing chemistries or transduction principles have been introduced, and applications in various analytical fields have been realised. This review consists of papers mainly reported in the last decade and presents about applications of optical fiber biosensors. Discussions on the trends in optical fiber biosensor applications in real samples are enumerated.

  17. Infrared optical constants of liquid palm oil and palm oil biodiesel determined by the combined ellipsometry-transmission method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Tan, J Y; Ma, Y Q; Liu, L H

    2017-06-20

    The optical constants of vegetable oils and biodiesels are the basic input parameters in the study of the thermal radiation transfer and monitoring the productivity of vegetable oils converting to biodiesels. In this work, a combined ellipsometry-transmission method is presented to obtain the optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel between 20°C and 150°C in the spectral range 600-4100  cm -1 and to study the temperature effect on the optical constants. In the combined method, a modified ellipsometry method is used to measure the optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel for the whole researched wave bands. For the weak absorption regions in which the ellipsometry method cannot give precise absorption indices, the transmission method is conducted to get the absorption indices using the refractive indices obtained by the proposed ellipsometry method. Deionized water and methanol are taken as examples to verify the combined ellipsometry-transmission method. It is shown that the combined method can overcome the deficiencies of the traditional ellipsometry and transmission method, which can be used for the measurements of both strong and weak absorption wave bands. The experimental analyses indicate that temperature exerts a noticeable influence on the infrared optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel. With the increase of temperature, the refractive indices at certain wavenumbers decrease nearly linearly, and the amplitudes of dominant absorption peaks show a decreasing trend. The absorption peaks located around 3550  cm -1 show blueshift trends as temperature increases. Comparing these two kinds of oils, palm oil presents larger values in refractive indices and dominant absorption peaks.

  18. Design of a macroalgae amperometric biosensor; application to the rapid monitoring of organophosphate insecticides in an agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, G S; Lins, J A P; Silva, F G S; Araujo, L C; Silva, F E P S; Mendonça, C D; Badea, M; Hayat, A; Marty, J-L

    2014-09-01

    The immobilization of enzymes onto transducer support is a mature technology and has been successfully implemented to improve biocatalytic processes for diverse applications. However, there exists still need to design more sophisticated and specialized strategies to enhance the functional properties of the biosensors. In this work, a biosensor platform based on innovative fabrication strategy was designed, and employed for the detection of organophosphate (OP) in natural waters. The biosensor was prepared by incorporating acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) to the graphite paste modified with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) mediator, along with the use of a macroalgae (Cladaphropsis membranous) as a functional immobilization support. The novel immobilization design resulted in a synergic effect, and led to enhanced stability and sensitivity of the biosensor. The designed biosensor was used to analyze methyl parathion OP insecticide in water samples collected from a demonstrably contaminated lake of São Luis Island, Maranhão, Northeast of Brazil. Water analysis revealed that the aquatic ecosystem was polluted by sub-ppm concentrations of the OP insecticide, and a good correlation was found between values obtained through biosensor and GC-MS techniques. Our results demonstrated that macroalgae-biosensor could be used as a low-cost and sensitive screening method to detect target analyte. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Gold Nanoparticles on the Response of Phenol Biosensor Containing Photocurable Membrane with Tyrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Musa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of incorporation of gold nanoparticles (50-130 nm in diameter into a series of photocurable methacrylic-acrylic based biosensor membranes containing tyrosinase on the response for phenol detection was investigated. Membranes with different hydrophilicities were prepared from 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate via direct photocuring. A range of gold nanoparticles concentrations from 0.01 to 0.5 % (w/w was incorporated into these membranes during the photocuring process. The addition of gold nanoparticles to the biosensor membrane led to improvement in the response time by a reduction of approximately 5 folds to give response times of 5-10 s. The linear response range of the phenol biosensor was also extended from 24 to 90 mM of phenol. The hydrophilicities of the membrane matrices demonstrated strong influence on the biosensor response and appeared to control the effect of the gold nanoparticles. For less hydrophilic methacrylic-acrylic membranes, the addition of gold nanoparticles led to a poorer sensitivity and detection limit of the biosensor towards phenol. Therefore, for the application of gold nanoparticles in the enhancement of a phenol biosensor response, the nanoparticles should be immobilized in a hydrophilic matrix rather than a hydrophobic material.

  20. A Micro-Platinum Wire Biosensor for Fast and Selective Detection of Alanine Aminotransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Nguyen Thanh Thuy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a miniaturized biosensor based on permselective polymer layers (overoxidized polypyrrole (Ppy and Nafion® modified and enzyme (glutamate oxidase (GlutOx immobilized micro-platinum wire electrode for the detection of alanine aminotransferase (ALT was fabricated. The proposed ALT biosensor was measured electrochemically by constant potential amperometry at +0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The ALT biosensor provides fast response time (~5 s and superior selectivity towards ALT against both negatively and positively charged species (e.g., ascorbic acid (AA and dopamine (DA, respectively. The detection range of the ALT biosensor is found to be 10–900 U/L which covers the range of normal ALT levels presented in the serum and the detection limit and sensitivity are found to be 8.48 U/L and 0.059 nA/(U/L·mm2 (N = 10, respectively. We also found that one-day storage of the ALT biosensor at −20 °C right after the sensor being fabricated can enhance the sensor sensitivity (1.74 times higher than that of the sensor stored at 4 °C. The ALT biosensor is stable after eight weeks of storage at −20 °C. The sensor was tested in spiked ALT samples (ALT activities: 20, 200, 400, and 900 U/L and reasonable recoveries (70%~107% were obtained.

  1. Further In-vitro Characterization of an Implantable Biosensor for Ethanol Monitoring in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Rocchitta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl alcohol may be considered one of the most widespread central nervous system (CNS depressants in Western countries. Because of its toxicological and neurobiological implications, the detection of ethanol in brain extracellular fluid (ECF is of great importance. In a previous study, we described the development and characterization of an implantable biosensor successfully used for the real-time detection of ethanol in the brain of freely-moving rats. The implanted biosensor, integrated in a low-cost telemetry system, was demonstrated to be a reliable device for the short-time monitoring of exogenous ethanol in brain ECF. In this paper we describe a further in-vitro characterization of the above-mentioned biosensor in terms of oxygen, pH and temperature dependence in order to complete its validation. With the aim of enhancing ethanol biosensor performance, different enzyme loadings were investigated in terms of apparent ethanol Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters, viz. IMAX, KM and linear region slope, as well as ascorbic acid interference shielding. The responses of biosensors were studied over a period of 28 days. The overall findings of the present study confirm the original biosensor configuration to be the best of those investigated for in-vivo applications up to one week after implantation.

  2. Characterisation of different single and multilayer films using phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, N.C.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Thakur, S.

    1998-06-01

    Different single layers and multilayer coatings deposited by e-beam evaporation and r.f. sputtering techniques have been characterised by the Phase Modulated Spectroscopic Ellipsometer, installed recently in the Spectroscopy Division, B.A.R.C. The Phase Modulated technique provides a faster and more accurate data acquisition process than the conventional ellipsometry. Measurements have been done on single layers of Cu, Si and ZrO 2 films and on multilayer thin films devices e.g., high reflectivity mirror, beam combiner, beam splitter, narrow band filter etc. consisting of several bilayers of TiO 2 /SiO 2 . The measured Ellipsometry spectra is then fitted with a theoretical spectra generated assuming an appropriate model regarding the sample. The layer thickness and composition have been used as fitting parameters. The optical constants of the substrates have been supplied and a trial dispersion relation have been used for the layers. In case of inhomogeneous layers, trial compositions have been given for the individual components for each layer. The roughness of the layers has been taken into account by assuming the film to be an inhomogeneous mixture of material and voids. The fittings have been done objectively by minimising the squared difference (χ 2 ) between the measured and calculated values of the ellipsometric parameters and thus accurate information have been derived regarding the thickness and optical constants (viz, the refractive index and extinction coefficient) of the different layers, the surface roughness and the inhomogeneities present in the layers. (author)

  3. The optical characterization of organometallic complex thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and photovoltaic diode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özaydın, C. [Batman University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Computer Eng., Batman (Turkey); Güllü, Ö., E-mail: omergullu@gmail.com [Batman University, Science and Art Faculty, Department of Physics, Batman (Turkey); Pakma, O. [Batman University, Science and Art Faculty, Department of Physics, Batman (Turkey); Ilhan, S. [Siirt University, Science and Art Faculty, Department of Chemistry, Siirt (Turkey); Akkılıç, K. [Dicle University, Education Faculty, Department of Physics Education, Diyarbakır (Turkey)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Optical properties and thickness of the A novel organometallic complex (OMC) film were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). • Au/OMC/n-Si metal/interlayer/semiconductor (MIS) diode has been fabricated • This paper presents the I–V analysis of Au/OMC/n-Si MIS diode. • Current–voltage and photovoltaic properties of the diode were investigated. - Abstract: In this work, organometallic complex (OMC) films have been deposited onto glass or silicon substrates by spin coating technique and their photovoltaic application potential has been investigated. Optical properties and thickness of the film have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Also, transmittance spectrum has been taken by UV/vis spectrophotometer. The optical method has been used to determine the band gap value of the films. Also, Au/OMC/n-Si metal/interlayer/semiconductor (MIS) diode has been fabricated. Current–voltage and photovoltaic properties of the structure were investigated. The ideality factor (n) and barrier height (Φ{sub b}) values of the diode were found to be 2.89 and 0.79 eV, respectively. The device shows photovoltaic behavior with a maximum open-circuit voltage of 396 mV and a short circuit current of 33.8 μA under 300 W light.

  4. The optical characterization of organometallic complex thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and photovoltaic diode application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özaydın, C.; Güllü, Ö.; Pakma, O.; Ilhan, S.; Akkılıç, K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Optical properties and thickness of the A novel organometallic complex (OMC) film were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). • Au/OMC/n-Si metal/interlayer/semiconductor (MIS) diode has been fabricated • This paper presents the I–V analysis of Au/OMC/n-Si MIS diode. • Current–voltage and photovoltaic properties of the diode were investigated. - Abstract: In this work, organometallic complex (OMC) films have been deposited onto glass or silicon substrates by spin coating technique and their photovoltaic application potential has been investigated. Optical properties and thickness of the film have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Also, transmittance spectrum has been taken by UV/vis spectrophotometer. The optical method has been used to determine the band gap value of the films. Also, Au/OMC/n-Si metal/interlayer/semiconductor (MIS) diode has been fabricated. Current–voltage and photovoltaic properties of the structure were investigated. The ideality factor (n) and barrier height (Φ_b) values of the diode were found to be 2.89 and 0.79 eV, respectively. The device shows photovoltaic behavior with a maximum open-circuit voltage of 396 mV and a short circuit current of 33.8 μA under 300 W light.

  5. Immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) for the determination of orientation gradients in photoalignment layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C. C.; Stumpe, J.

    2014-09-01

    The capability of the method of immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) (Jung et al. Int Patent WO, 2004/109260) to not only determine three-dimensional refractive indices in anisotropic thin films (which was already possible in the past), but even their gradients along the z-direction (perpendicular to the film plane) is investigated in this paper. It is shown that the determination of orientation gradients in deep-sub-μm films becomes possible by applying ITE in combination with reflection ellipsometry. The technique is supplemented by atomic force microscopy for measuring the film thickness. For a photo-oriented thin film, no gradient was found, as expected. For a photo-oriented film, which was subsequently annealed in a nematic liquid crystalline phase, an order was found similar to the one applied in vertically aligned nematic displays, with a tilt angle varying along the z-direction. For fresh films, gradients were only detected for the refractive index perpendicular to the film plane, as expected.

  6. In situ ellipsometry — A powerful tool for monitoring alkali doping of organic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidu, F.; Ludemann, M.; Schäfer, P.; Gordan, O.D.; Zahn, D.R.T.

    2014-01-01

    The changes of the optical properties of several organic thin films induced by potassium doping were monitored using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The samples were prepared in a high vacuum chamber by organic molecular deposition. Then, potassium (K) was evaporated by passing current through K getters. The three different organic molecules used, show very distinct and different spectral behaviour upon doping. While for Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminium(III) and N,N′-Di-[(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl]-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine only small shifts of the spectral features were noticed, Manganese Phthalocyanine revealed significant changes of the optical properties induced by the K doping. This work indicates that the K doping process can have a dramatic effect on the electronic and the optical properties of the organic molecules, but the effect on the optical spectra remains specific for each organic molecule used, and cannot be easily predicted. - Highlights: • Monitoring organic film growth and doping with in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry • K doped organic thin films • Optical properties of organic thin films change by K doping. • The changes in the optical spectra remain specific for each organic molecule used

  7. The study of genomic DNA adsorption and subsequent interactions using total internal reflection ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabok, Alexei; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Davis, Frank; Higson, Séamus P J

    2007-10-31

    The adsorption of genomic DNA and subsequent interactions between adsorbed and solvated DNA was studied using a novel sensitive optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), which combines spectroscopic ellipsometry with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Single strands of DNA of two species of fish (herring and salmon) were electrostatically adsorbed on top of polyethylenimine films deposited upon gold coated glass slides. The ellipsometric spectra were recorded and data fitting utilized to extract optical parameters (thickness and refractive index) of adsorbed DNA layers. The further adsorption of single stranded DNA from an identical source, i.e. herring ss-DNA on herring ss-DNA or salmon ss-DNA on salmon ss-DNA, on the surface was observed to give rise to substantial film thickness increases at the surface of about 20-21 nm. Conversely adsorption of DNA from alternate species, i.e. salmon ss-DNA on herring ss-DNA or herring ss-DNA on salmon ss-DNA, yielded much smaller changes in thickness of 3-5 nm. AFM studies of the surface roughness of adsorbed layers were in line with the TIRE data.

  8. Smooth and rough Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides studied by total internal reflection ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleńska-Olender, J.; Dworecki, K.; Sęk, S.; Kwinkowski, M.; Kaca, W.

    2013-01-01

    Total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), a label-free optical detection technique for studying interactions between biomolecules, was used to examine the adsorption of various forms of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from Proteus mirabilis S1959, R110, and R45 strains on a gold surface. The thickness of the adsorbed layers was determined by TIRE, with the average values for S1959, R110, and R45 LPS layers being 78 ± 5, 39 ± 3, and 12 ± 2 nm, respectively. The thickness of LPS layers corresponds to the presence and length of O-specific parts in P. mirabilis LPS molecules. Atomic force microscopy was used as a complementary technique for visualizing lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Force measurements seem to confirm the data obtained from TIRE experiments. - Highlights: • Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides were adsorbed on the gold surface. • Thickness of adsorbed layers was determined by total internal reflection ellipsometry. • Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize lipopolysaccharide build-up on gold surface. • Time is important in the evolution of biomolecular film thickness created on gold surface

  9. Smooth and rough Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides studied by total internal reflection ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleńska-Olender, J., E-mail: joannaglenska@wp.pl [Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Świętokrzyski Biobank, Regional Science and Technology Center, 26-060 Chęciny (Poland); Dworecki, K. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Sęk, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Kwinkowski, M.; Kaca, W. [Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2013-12-02

    Total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), a label-free optical detection technique for studying interactions between biomolecules, was used to examine the adsorption of various forms of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from Proteus mirabilis S1959, R110, and R45 strains on a gold surface. The thickness of the adsorbed layers was determined by TIRE, with the average values for S1959, R110, and R45 LPS layers being 78 ± 5, 39 ± 3, and 12 ± 2 nm, respectively. The thickness of LPS layers corresponds to the presence and length of O-specific parts in P. mirabilis LPS molecules. Atomic force microscopy was used as a complementary technique for visualizing lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Force measurements seem to confirm the data obtained from TIRE experiments. - Highlights: • Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides were adsorbed on the gold surface. • Thickness of adsorbed layers was determined by total internal reflection ellipsometry. • Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize lipopolysaccharide build-up on gold surface. • Time is important in the evolution of biomolecular film thickness created on gold surface.

  10. Electrochemical DNA biosensors based on platinum nanoparticles combined carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ningning; Chang Zhu; He Pingang; Fang Yuzhi

    2005-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles were used in combination with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for fabricating sensitivity-enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles were dispersed in Nafion, which were used to fabricate the modification of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Oligonucleotides with amino groups at the 5' end were covalently linked onto carboxylic groups of MWCNTs on the electrode. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement of the intercalated daunomycin. Due to the ability of carbon nanotubes to promote electron-transfer reactions, the high catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles for chemical reactions, the sensitivity of presented electrochemical DNA biosensors was remarkably improved. The detection limit of the method for target DNA was 1.0 x 10 -11 mol l -1

  11. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  12. Fabrication of multianalyte CeO2 nanograin electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor biosensors by using CF4 plasma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyuan Haur Kao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multianalyte CeO2 biosensors have been demonstrated to detect pH, glucose, and urine concentrations. To enhance the multianalyte sensing capability of these biosensors, CF4 plasma treatment was applied to create nanograin structures on the CeO2 membrane surface and thereby increase the contact surface area. Multiple material analyses indicated that crystallization or grainization caused by the incorporation of flourine atoms during plasma treatment might be related to the formation of the nanograins. Because of the changes in surface morphology and crystalline structures, the multianalyte sensing performance was considerably enhanced. Multianalyte CeO2 nanograin electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor biosensors exhibit potential for use in future biomedical sensing device applications. Keywords: Multianalyte biosensor, CeO2 nanograin, EIS, CF4 plasma treatment, Membrane surface

  13. Antibody orientation on biosensor surfaces: a minireview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, A.K.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Detection elements play a key role in analyte recognition in biosensors. Therefore, detection elements with high analyte specificity and binding strength are required. While antibodies (Abs) have been increasingly used as detection elements in biosensors, a key challenge remains – the immobilization

  14. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zulaikha Mazlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM (R2 = 0.979 and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  15. Background reduction in a young interferometer biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H. K P; Subramaniam, V.; Kanger, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical Young interferometer (IOYI) biosensors are among the most sensitive label-free biosensors. Detection limits are in the range of 20 fg/mm2. The applicability of these sensors is however strongly hampered by the large background that originates from both bulk refractive index

  16. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, Siti Zulaikha; Lee, Yook Heng; Hanifah, Sharina Abu

    2017-12-09

    Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM ( R ² = 0.979) and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  17. Ellipsometry measurements of glass transition breadth in bulk films of random, block, and gradient copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, M M; Kim, J; Marrou, S R; Torkelson, J M

    2010-03-01

    Bulk films of random, block and gradient copolymer systems were studied using ellipsometry to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical differentiation technique pioneered by Kawana and Jones for studying the glass transition temperature (T (g)) behavior and thermal expansivities of copolymers possessing different architectures and different levels of nanoheterogeneity. In a series of styrene/n -butyl methacrylate (S/nBMA) random copolymers, T (g) breadths were observed to increase from approximately 17( degrees ) C in styrene-rich cases to almost 30( degrees ) C in nBMA-rich cases, reflecting previous observations of significant nanoheterogeneity in PnBMA homopolymers. The derivative technique also revealed for the first time a substantial increase in glassy-state expansivity with increasing nBMA content in S/nBMA random copolymers, from 1.4x10(-4) K-1 in PS to 3.5x10(-4) K-1 in PnBMA. The first characterization of block copolymer T (g) 's and T (g) breadths by ellipsometry is given, examining the impact of nanophase-segregated copolymer structure on ellipsometric measurements of glass transition. The results show that, while the technique is effective in detecting the two T (g) 's expected in certain block copolymer systems, the details of the glass transition can become suppressed in ellipsometry measurements of a rubbery minor phase under conditions where the matrix is glassy; meanwhile, both transitions are easily discernible by differential scanning calorimetry. Finally, broad glass transition regions were measured in gradient copolymers, yielding in some cases extraordinary T (g) breadths of 69- 71( degrees ) C , factors of 4-5 larger than the T (g) breadths of related homopolymers and random copolymers. Surprisingly, one gradient copolymer demonstrated a slightly narrower T (g) breadth than the S/nBMA random copolymers with the highest nBMA content. This highlights the fact that nanoheterogeneity relevant to the glass transition response in selected

  18. Optical constants of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite thin films measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Dursun, Ibrahim; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Diallo, Elhadj Marwane; Mishra, Pawan; Ng, Tien Khee; Bakr, Osman; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    function) of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Due to the existence of voids, the refractive index of the thin films is around 8% less than the single crystals counterpart. The energy bandgap is around 2.309 eV as obtained

  19. Growth Kinetics and Oxidation Mechanism of ALD TiN Thin Films Monitored by In Situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Groenland, A.W.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was employed to investigate the growth of atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiN thin films from titanium chloride (TiCl4) and ammonia (NH3) and the followed oxidation in dry oxygen. Two regimes were found in the growth including a transient stage prior to a linear regime.

  20. Nanomaterials based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Bansi D; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandey, Chandra Mouli

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors have enormous potential to contribute to the evolution of new molecular diagnostic techniques for patients suffering with cancerous diseases. A major obstacle preventing faster development of biosensors pertains to the fact that cancer is a highly complex set of diseases. The oncologists currently rely on a few biomarkers and histological characterization of tumors. Some of the signatures include epigenetic and genetic markers, protein profiles, changes in gene expression, and post-translational modifications of proteins. These molecular signatures offer new opportunities for development of biosensors for cancer detection. In this context, conducting paper has recently been found to play an important role towards the fabrication of a biosensor for cancer biomarker detection. In this paper we will focus on results of some of the recent studies obtained in our laboratories relating to fabrication and application of nanomaterial modified paper based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection. (paper)

  1. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  2. Potentiometric urea biosensor utilizing nanobiocomposite of chitosan-iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A; Israr, M Q; Sadaf, J R; Nur, O; Willander, M; AlSalhi, M S; Atif, M; Ansari, Anees A; Ahmed, E

    2013-01-01

    The iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) magnetic nanoparticles have been fabricated through a simple, cheap and reproducible approach. Scanning electron microscope, x-rays powder diffraction of the fabricated nanoparticles. Furthermore, the fabrication of potentiometric urea biosensor is carried out through drop casting the initially prepared isopropanol and chitosan solution, containing Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles, on the glass fiber filter with a diameter of 2 cm and a copper wire (of thickness −500 μm) has been utilized to extract the voltage signal from the functionalized nanoparticles. The functionalization of surface of the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles is obtained by the electrostatically immobilization of urease onto the nanobiocomposite of the chitosan- Fe 3 O 4 in order to enhance the sensitivity, specificity, stability and reusability of urea biosensor. Electrochemical detection procedure has been adopted to measure the potentiometric response over the wide logarithmic concentration range of the 0.1 mM to 80 mM. The Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles based urea biosensor depicts good sensitivity with ∼42 mV per decade at room temperature. Durability of the biosensor could be considerably enhanced by applying a thin layer of the nafion. In addition, the reasonably stable output response of the biosensor has been found to be around 12 sec.

  3. Orientation of llama antibodies strongly increases sensitivity of biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Hesselink, Thamara; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Cordewener, Jan H G; Jongsma, Maarten A; Schoffelen, Sanne; van Hest, Jan C M; Zuilhof, Han; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-10-15

    Sensitivity of biosensors depends on the orientation of bio-receptors on the sensor surface. The objective of this study was to organize bio-receptors on surfaces in a way that their analyte binding site is exposed to the analyte solution. VHH proteins recognizing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were used for making biosensors, and azides were introduced in the VHH to function as bioorthogonal reactive groups. The importance of the orientation of bio-receptors was addressed by comparing sensors with randomly oriented VHH (with multiple exposed azide groups) to sensors with uniformly oriented VHH (with only a single azide group). A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip exposing cyclooctyne was reacted to azide functionalized VHH domains, using click chemistry. Comparison between randomly and uniformly oriented bio-receptors showed up to 800-fold increase in biosensor sensitivity. This technique may increase the containment of infectious diseases such as FMDV as its strongly enhanced sensitivity may facilitate early diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu2ZnSnSe4 bulk crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, M.; Lopez, N.; Merino, J. M.; Caballero, R.; Levcenko, S.; Gurieva, G.; Serna, R.; Bodnar, I. V.; Nateprov, A.; Guc, M.; Arushanov, E.; Schorr, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.

    2014-01-01

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry we investigated and analyzed the pseudo-optical constants of Cu 2 ZnSnSe 4 bulk crystals, grown by the Bridgman method, over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range. The structures found in the spectra of the complex pseudodielectric functions were associated to E 0 , E 1A , and E 1B interband transitions and were analyzed in frame of the Adachi's model. The interband transition parameters such as strength, threshold energy, and broadening were evaluated by using the simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, the pseudo-complex refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity were derived over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range

  5. Optical properties of LiGaS2: an ab initio study and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V V; Lin, Z S; Isaenko, L I; Lobanov, S I; Kesler, V G; Kruchinin, V N

    2009-01-01

    Electronic and optical properties of lithium thiogallate crystal, LiGaS 2 , have been investigated by both experimental and theoretical methods. The plane-wave pseudopotential method based on DFT theory has been used for band structure calculations. The electronic parameters of Ga 3d orbitals have been corrected by the DFT+U methods to be consistent with those measured with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Evolution of optical constants of LiGaS 2 over a wide spectral range was determined by developed first-principles theory and dispersion curves were compared with optical parameters defined by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range 1.2-5.0 eV. Good agreement has been achieved between theoretical and experimental results.

  6. In situ study of nitrobenzene grafting on Si(111)-H surfaces by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappich, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut fuer Silizium-Photovoltaik, Kekulestr. 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hinrichs, K. [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    The binding of nitrobenzene (NB) molecules from a solution of 4-nitrobenzene-diazonium-tetrafluoroborate on a Si(111)-H surface was investigated during the electrochemical processing in diluted sulphuric acid by means of infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry (IR-SE). The grafting was monitored by an increase in specific IR absorption bands due to symmetric and anti-symmetric NO{sub 2} stretching vibrations in the 1400-1700 cm{sup -1} regime. The p- and s-polarized reflectances were recorded within 20 s for each spectrum only. NB molecules were detected when bonded to the Si(111) surface but not in the 2 mM solution itself. Oxide formation on the NB grafted Si surface was observed after drying in inert atmosphere and not during the grafting process in the aqueous solution. (author)

  7. Optical properties of gold island films-a spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loncaric, Martin, E-mail: mloncaric@irb.hr; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Zorc, Hrvoje

    2011-02-28

    Metal island films of noble metals are obtained by deposition on glass substrates during the first stage of evaporation process when supported metal nanoparticles are formed. These films show unique optical properties, owing to the localized surface plasmon resonance of free electrons in metal nanoparticles. In the present work we study the optical properties of gold metal island films deposited on glass substrates with different mass thicknesses at different substrate temperatures. The optical characterization is performed by spectroscopic ellipsometry at different angles of incidence and transmittance measurements at normal incidence in the same point of the sample. Fitting of the ellipsometric data allows determining the effective optical constants and thickness of the island film. A multiple oscillator approach was used to successfully represent the dispersion of the effective optical constants of the films.

  8. Deficiency of Standard Effective-Medium Approximation for Ellipsometry of Layers of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Bortchagovsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Correct description of optical properties of layers of disordered interacting nanoparticles is the problem. Contrary to volumes of nanocomposites, when standard models of effective-medium approximations (EMA work well, two-dimensional case of layers has intrinsic anisotropy, which influences interparticle interactions. The deficiency of standard Maxwell-Garnett model in the application to the ellipsometry of layers of gold nanoparticles is demonstrated. It demands the modification of EMA models and one way of this is considered in this paper. Contrary to existing 2D models with phenomenological parameters, the proposed Green function approach uses the same number of parameters as standard 3D EMA models for explicit calculations of effective parameters of layers of disordered nanoparticles.

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of index profile of indium tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Rhaleb, H.; Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Roger, J.P.; Hakam, A.; Ennaoui, A

    2002-11-30

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterisation. It was used to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films deposited by spray pyrol onto Pyrex substrates. Dielectric ITO films often present microstructures which give rise to a variation of the refractive index with the distance from substrate. In this work, it was found that the fit between ellipsometric data and optical models results could be significantly improved when it was assumed that the refractive index of ITO films varied across the upper 60 nm near the film surface. Also, the surface roughness was modelled and compared with that given by the atomic force microscope (AFM)

  10. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of index profile of indium tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Rhaleb, H.; Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Roger, J.P.; Hakam, A.; Ennaoui, A.

    2002-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterisation. It was used to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films deposited by spray pyrolysis onto Pyrex substrates. Dielectric ITO films often present microstructures which give rise to a variation of the refractive index with the distance from substrate. In this work, it was found that the fit between ellipsometric data and optical models results could be significantly improved when it was assumed that the refractive index of ITO films varied across the upper 60 nm near the film surface. Also, the surface roughness was modelled and compared with that given by the atomic force microscope (AFM)

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of index profile of indium tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rhaleb, H.; Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Roger, J. P.; Hakam, A.; Ennaoui, A.

    2002-11-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterisation. It was used to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films deposited by spray pyrolysis onto Pyrex substrates. Dielectric ITO films often present microstructures which give rise to a variation of the refractive index with the distance from substrate. In this work, it was found that the fit between ellipsometric data and optical models results could be significantly improved when it was assumed that the refractive index of ITO films varied across the upper 60 nm near the film surface. Also, the surface roughness was modelled and compared with that given by the atomic force microscope (AFM).

  12. Study of receptor-chaperone interactions using the optical technique of spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P; Abell, Benjamin M; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-07-20

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Registration of T-2 mycotoxin with total internal reflection ellipsometry and QCM impedance methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabok, A V; Tsargorodskaya, A; Holloway, A; Starodub, N F; Gojster, O

    2007-01-15

    A sensitive optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) in conjunction with immune assay approach was exploited for the registration of T-2 mycotoxin in a wide range of concentrations from 100 microg/ml down to 0.15 ng/ml. Association constants of 1.4x10(6) and 1.9x10(7)mol(-1)s for poly- and monoclonal T-2 antibodies, respectively, were evaluated from TIRE kinetic measurements. According to TIRE data fitting, binding of T-2 molecules to antibodies (at saturation) has resulted in the increase in adsorbed layer thickness of 4-5 nm. The QCM impedance measurements data showed anomalously large mass increase and film softening, most likely, due to the binding of large T-2 aggregates to antibodies.

  14. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu2ZnSnS4 bulk poly-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levcenko, S.; Hajdeu-Chicarosh, E.; Garcia-Llamas, E.; Caballero, R.; Serna, R.; Bodnar, I. V.; Victorov, I. A.; Guc, M.; Merino, J. M.; Pérez-Rodriguez, A.; Arushanov, E.; León, M.

    2018-04-01

    The linear optical properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 bulk poly-crystals have been investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 1.2-4.6 eV at room temperature. The characteristic features identified in the optical spectra are explained by using the Adachi analytical model for the interband transitions at the corresponding critical points in the Brillouin zone. The experimental data have been modeled over the entire spectral range taking into account the lowest E0 transition near the fundamental absorption edge and E1A and E1B higher energy interband transitions. In addition, the spectral dependences of the refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity values have been accurately determined and are provided since they are essential data for the design of Cu2ZnSnS4 based optoelectronic devices.

  15. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, M., E-mail: maximo.leon@uam.es; Lopez, N.; Merino, J. M.; Caballero, R. [Department of Applied Physics M12, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Levcenko, S.; Gurieva, G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany); Serna, R. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Bodnar, I. V. [Department of Chemistry, Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Minsk (Belarus); Nateprov, A.; Guc, M.; Arushanov, E. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Chisinau MD 2028 (Moldova, Republic of); Schorr, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Geological Sciences, Free University Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100, Berlin (Germany); Perez-Rodriguez, A. [IREC, Catalonia Institute for Energy Research, C. Jardins de les Dones de Negre 1, 08930 Sant Adrià del Besòs (Barcelona) (Spain); IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-08-11

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry we investigated and analyzed the pseudo-optical constants of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals, grown by the Bridgman method, over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range. The structures found in the spectra of the complex pseudodielectric functions were associated to E{sub 0}, E{sub 1A}, and E{sub 1B} interband transitions and were analyzed in frame of the Adachi's model. The interband transition parameters such as strength, threshold energy, and broadening were evaluated by using the simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, the pseudo-complex refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity were derived over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range.

  16. Modeling the transport properties of epitaxially grown thermoelectric oxide thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2012-02-01

    The influence of oxygen vacancies on the transport properties of epitaxial thermoelectric (Sr,La)TiO3 thin films is determined using electrical and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements. Oxygen vacancy concentration was varied by ex-situ annealing in Ar and Ar/H2. All films exhibited degenerate semiconducting behavior, and electrical conductivity decreased (258–133 S cm−1) with increasing oxygen content. Similar decrease in the Seebeck coefficient is observed and attributed to a decrease in effective mass (7.8–3.2 me ), as determined by SE. Excellent agreement between transport properties deduced from SE and direct electrical measurements suggests that SE is an effective tool for studying oxide thin film thermoelectrics.

  17. Band gap of corundumlike α -Ga2O3 determined by absorption and ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, A.; Artús, L.; Cuscó, R.; Goldhahn, R.; Feneberg, M.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure near the band gap of the corundumlike α phase of Ga2O3 has been investigated by means of optical absorption and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in the ultraviolet (UV) range (400-190 nm). The absorption coefficient in the UV region and the imaginary part of the dielectric function exhibit two prominent absorption thresholds with wide but well-defined structures at 5.6 and 6.3 eV which have been ascribed to allowed direct transitions from crystal-field split valence bands to the conduction band. Excitonic effects with large Gaussian broadening are taken into account through the Elliott-Toyozawa model, which yields an exciton binding energy of 110 meV and direct band gaps of 5.61 and 6.44 eV. The large broadening of the absorption onset is related to the slightly indirect character of the material.

  18. Modeling the transport properties of epitaxially grown thermoelectric oxide thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Abutaha, Anas I.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of oxygen vacancies on the transport properties of epitaxial thermoelectric (Sr,La)TiO3 thin films is determined using electrical and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements. Oxygen vacancy concentration was varied by ex-situ annealing in Ar and Ar/H2. All films exhibited degenerate semiconducting behavior, and electrical conductivity decreased (258–133 S cm−1) with increasing oxygen content. Similar decrease in the Seebeck coefficient is observed and attributed to a decrease in effective mass (7.8–3.2 me ), as determined by SE. Excellent agreement between transport properties deduced from SE and direct electrical measurements suggests that SE is an effective tool for studying oxide thin film thermoelectrics.

  19. Methods of reducing non-specific adsorption in microfluidic biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seokheun; Chae, Junseok

    2010-01-01

    Non-specific adsorption (NSA) of biomolecules is a persistent challenge in microfluidic biosensors. Microfluidic biosensors often have immobilized bioreceptors such as antibodies, enzymes, DNAs, etc, via linker molecules such as SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) to enhance immobilization. However, the linker molecules are very susceptible to NSA, causing false responses and decreasing sensitivity. In this paper, we present design methods to reduce the NSA of alkanethiol SAMs, which are popular linker molecules on microfluidic biosensors. Three design parameters were studied for two different chain-length SAMs (n = 2 and 10): (i) SAM incubation time, (ii) surface roughness [0.8 nm and 4.4 nm RMS (root mean square)] and (iii) gold crystal re-growth along (1 1 1) the target orientation. NSA was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The results suggest that increased SAM incubation time reduces NSA, and that short-chain SAMs respond more favorably than the long-chain SAMs. Both SAMs were shown to be sensitive to surface roughness, and long-chain SAMs reduced NSA by 75%. Gold crystal re-growth along (1 1 1) the target orientation profoundly reduced NSA on the short-chain SAM. On a gold surface where surface roughness was 0.8 nm and there was strong directional alignment along the (1 1 1) gold crystal, final concentrations of nonspecifically bound proteins were 0.05 ng mm −2 (fibrinogen) and 0.075 ng mm −2 (lysozyme)—significantly lower than other known methods. The results show that optimizing three parameters (SAM incubation time, gold surface roughness and gold crystal orientation) improved SAM sensitivity for fibrinogen–anti-fibrinogen conjugates by a factor of 5 in 2.94 pM, suggesting that the methods are effective for reducing NSA in microfluidic biosensors.

  20. Temperature dependent optical properties of ZnO thin film using ellipsometry and photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzourâa, M.-B.; Battie, Y.; Dalmasso, S.; Zaïbi, M.-A.; Oueslati, M.; En Naciri, A.

    2018-05-01

    We report the temperature dependence of the dielectric function, the exciton binding energy and the electronic transitions of crystallized ZnO thin film using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and photoluminescence (PL). ZnO layers were prepared by sol-gel method and deposited on crystalline silicon (Si) by spin coating technique. The ZnO optical properties were determined between 300 K and 620 K. Rigorous study of optical responses was achieved in order to demonstrate the quenching exciton of ZnO as a function of temperature. Numerical technique named constrained cubic splines approximation (CCS), Tauc-Lorentz (TL) and Tanguy dispersion models were selected for the ellipsometry data modeling in order to obtain the dielectric function of ZnO. The results reveals that the exciton bound becomes widely flattening at 470 K on the one hand, and on the other that the Tanguy dispersion law is more appropriate for determining the optical responses of ZnO thin film in the temperature range of 300 K-420 K. The Tauc-Lorentz, for its part, reproduces correctly the ZnO dielectric function in 470 K-620 K temperature range. The temperature dependence of the electronic transition given by SE and PL shows that the exciton quenching was observed in 420 K-∼520 K temperature range. This quenching effect can be explained by the equilibrium between the Coulomb force of exciton and its kinetic energy in the film. The kinetic energy was found to induce three degrees of freedom of the exciton.

  1. Expanded beam spectro-ellipsometry for big area on-line monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, M.; Major, C.; Juhasz, G.; Petrik, P.; Horvath, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Non-destructive analysing tools are needed at all stages of thin film process-development, especially photovoltaic (PV) development, and on production lines. In the case of thin films, layer thicknesses, micro-structure, composition, layer optical properties, and their uniformity are important parameters. An important focus is to express the dielectric functions of each component material in terms of a handful of wavelength independent parameters whose variation can cover all process variants of that material. With the resulting database, spectroscopic ellipsometry coupled with multilayer analysis can be developed for on-line point-by-point mapping and on-line line-by-line imaging. Off-line point-by-point mapping can be effective for characterization of non-uniformities in full scale PV panels or big area (even 450 mm diameter) Si-wafers in developing labs but it is slow in the on-line mode when only 15 points can be obtained (within 1 min) as a 120 cm long panel moves by the mapping station. Last years [M. Fried et al, Thin Solid Films 519, 2730 (2011)], a new instrumentation was developed that provides a line image of spectroscopic ellipsometry (wl=350- 1000 nm) data. Earlier a single 30 point line image could be collected in 10 s over a 15 cm width of PV material. Recent years we have built a 30, a 45 and a 60 cm width expanded beam ellipsometer which speed is increased by 10x. Now, 1800 points can be mapped in a 1 min traverse of a 60*120 cm PV panel or flexible roll-to-roll substrate.

  2. Mueller-matrix ellipsometry studies of optically active structures in scarab beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwin H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of multilayers, photonic crystals, metamaterials and other artificial materials has promoted the use of spectroscopic, variable angle, generalized and Mueller-matrix ellipsometry. Naturally occurring structures may show even higher complexity than artificial structures but with a more narrow range of constituent materials. Fascinating reflection properties result from intricate photonic structures in, for instance, the wing scales and cuticles of insects. Currently there is a large interest to explore such functional supramolecular architectures for exploitation in nanotechnology. In this study, Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied in the spectral range of 250 to 1000 nm to investigate optical response and structures of the cuticle of Scarab beetles of the Cetoniinae subfamily. The cuticle of Cetonia aurata (the rose chafer, la cétoine dorée is green with a metallic appearance and reflects left-handed circular/elliptically polarized light. It has been suggested that the polarization of this metallic gloss is caused by a helical structure in the chitinous cuticle. We find that the polarization effect is limited to the narrow spectral range 470-550 nm whereas for shorter or longer wavelengths the reflection properties are similar to those from a near-dielectric material. Model calculations and parameterization of the nanostructure employing a heliocoidal structure are discussed. As a comparison the polarization effects from light reflected from two other beetles will be presented. Coptomia laevis has a similar appearance as Cetonia aurata but has very different polarization properties. The golden Plusiotis argentiola has very interesting properties showing both left and right-handed polarization depending on incidence angle and wavelength.

  3. Electrochemical biosensors in pharmaceutical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric de Souza Gil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing demand for practical and low-cost analytical techniques, biosensors have attracted attention for use in the quality analysis of drugs, medicines, and other analytes of interest in the pharmaceutical area. Biosensors allow quantification not only of the active component in pharmaceutical formulations, but also the analysis of degradation products and metabolites in biological fluids. Thus, this article presents a brief review of biosensor use in pharmaceutical analysis, focusing on enzymatic electrochemical sensors.Em virtude do aumento da demanda por técnicas analíticas simples e de baixo custo, os biossensores têm atraído a atenção para a análise de fármacos, medicamentos e outros analitos de interesse em controle de qualidade de medicamentos. Os biossensores permitem a quantificação não somente de princípio ativo em formulações farmacêuticas, mas também de produtos de degradação e metabólitos em fluídos biológicos, bem como análise de amostras de interesse clínico e industrial, além de possibilitar a determinação de enantiômeros. Desta forma, este artigo objetiva fazer uma breve revisão a respeito do emprego de biossensores em análise farmacêutica, com ênfase em sensores eletroquímicos enzimáticos.

  4. Capability of parasulfonato calix[6]arene, as an anion dopant, and organic solvents in enhancing the sensitivity and loading of glucose oxidase (GOx) on polypyrrole film in a biosensor: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnavadeh, Vahideh; Zare, Karim; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effects of two solvents (acetonitrile and water) and an anion dopant (para sulfonato calix[6]arene ((C[6]S)(-6))), on the manufacturing and properties of a polypyrrole (Ppy)-based, glucose oxidase amperometric biosensor were studied. Pyrrole was polymerized using galvanostatic mode in two different solvents, and the effect of (C[6]S)(-6) was studied in aqueous solution. The morphology of the obtained polypyrrole films was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Glucose oxidase (GOx) was adsorbed on the Ppy films via cross-linking method. Then the amperometric responses of the Pt/Ppy/GOx electrodes were measured using the amperometric method at the potential of 0.7 V in steps of adding a glucose solution to a potassium phosphate buffer. We found that acetonitrile and (C[6]S)(-6) increase the sensitivity of the enzyme electrode up to 79.30 µA M(-1)cm(-2) in comparison with 31.60 μA M(-1)cm(-2) for the electrode synthesized in calixarene free aqueous solvent. Also (C[6]S)(-6) has the main role in preventing leaching the enzyme from the electrode. This fact increases loading of the enzyme and stability of the biosensor. So that the steady state current density of the aforementioned electrode increases linearly with increasing glucose concentration up to 190 mM. Whereas the linearity was observed up to 61 mM and 80 mM for the electrodes made using calixarene free acetonitrile and aqueous solutions, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A sensitive glucose biosensor based on Ag@C core–shell matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xuan; Dai, Xingxin; Li, Jianguo; Long, Yumei; Li, Weifeng; Tu, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Nano-Ag particles were coated with colloidal carbon (Ag@C) to improve its biocompatibility and chemical stability for the preparation of biosensor. The core–shell structure was evidenced by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed that the carbon shell is rich of function groups such as − OH and − COOH. The as-prepared Ag@C core–shell structure can offer favorable microenvironment for immobilizing glucose oxidase and the direct electrochemistry process of glucose oxidase (GOD) at Ag@C modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was realized. The modified electrode exhibited good response to glucose. Under optimum experimental conditions the biosensor linearly responded to glucose concentration in the range of 0.05–2.5 mM, with a detection limit of 0.02 mM (S/N = 3). The apparent Michaelis–Menten constant (K M app ) of the biosensor is calculated to be 1.7 mM, suggesting high enzymatic activity and affinity toward glucose. In addition, the GOD-Ag@C/Nafion/GCE shows good reproducibility and long-term stability. These results suggested that core–shell structured Ag@C is an ideal matrix for the immobilization of the redox enzymes and further the construction of the sensitive enzyme biosensor. - Highlights: • Enhanced direct electrochemistry of GOD was achieved at Ag@C modified electrode. • A novel glucose biosensor based on Ag@C core–shell structure was developed. • The designed GOD-Ag@C/Nafion/GCE biosensor showed favorable analysis properties. • The biosensor is easy to prepare and can be applied for real sample assay

  6. A sensitive glucose biosensor based on Ag@C core–shell matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Dai, Xingxin; Li, Jianguo [College of Chemistry, Chemical engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Long, Yumei, E-mail: yumeilong@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); The Key Lab of Health Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou (China); Li, Weifeng, E-mail: liweifeng@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Tu, Yifeng [College of Chemistry, Chemical engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); The Key Lab of Health Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou (China)

    2015-04-01

    Nano-Ag particles were coated with colloidal carbon (Ag@C) to improve its biocompatibility and chemical stability for the preparation of biosensor. The core–shell structure was evidenced by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed that the carbon shell is rich of function groups such as − OH and − COOH. The as-prepared Ag@C core–shell structure can offer favorable microenvironment for immobilizing glucose oxidase and the direct electrochemistry process of glucose oxidase (GOD) at Ag@C modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was realized. The modified electrode exhibited good response to glucose. Under optimum experimental conditions the biosensor linearly responded to glucose concentration in the range of 0.05–2.5 mM, with a detection limit of 0.02 mM (S/N = 3). The apparent Michaelis–Menten constant (K{sub M}{sup app}) of the biosensor is calculated to be 1.7 mM, suggesting high enzymatic activity and affinity toward glucose. In addition, the GOD-Ag@C/Nafion/GCE shows good reproducibility and long-term stability. These results suggested that core–shell structured Ag@C is an ideal matrix for the immobilization of the redox enzymes and further the construction of the sensitive enzyme biosensor. - Highlights: • Enhanced direct electrochemistry of GOD was achieved at Ag@C modified electrode. • A novel glucose biosensor based on Ag@C core–shell structure was developed. • The designed GOD-Ag@C/Nafion/GCE biosensor showed favorable analysis properties. • The biosensor is easy to prepare and can be applied for real sample assay.

  7. A Conductive Porous Structured Chitosan-grafted Polyaniline Cryogel for use as a Sialic Acid Biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Numnuam, Apon; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Limbut, Warakorn; Thavarungkul, Panote

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel chitosan grafted polyaniline cryogel was used as support for a highly stable and sensitive biosensor. • The use of two enzymes mediated with ferrocene showed a high selectivity for sialic acid. • The biosensor provided a rapid sialic acid detection in blood. - Abstract: A porous conductive supporting material base on chitosan grafted polyaniline (CPANI) cryogel was developed for the fabrication of a sialic acid biosensor. Two enzymes, N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase (NAL) and pyruvate oxidase (PYO), were employed together with an electrochemical detector. The electron transfer was further enhanced by using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and mediated by ferrocene (Fc) entrapped in the cryogel pores wall. A sialic acid derived electroactive product was detected amperometrically in a flow injection system. The fabricated sialic acid biosensor provided excellent analytical performances with a wide linear range of 0.025 to 15.0 mM and a limit of detection of 18 μM. Under the low applied potential of 0.20 V versus a Ag/AgCl, common electroactive interfering compounds such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and pyruvic acid were not detected and they have no effect on the analysis of sialic acid. The fabricated sialic acid biosensor also demonstrated a high stability after up to 100 injections. The reliability of the biosensor to detect sialic acid in blood plasma was in good agreement (P > 0.05) with a standard periodic-resorcinol spectrophotometric method. This easy to prepare conductive and biocompatible porous structure should be a prospective supporting material for biosensor development

  8. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; de Martino, Antonello; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dušan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V.; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures. PMID:21170135

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria, E-mail: maria.losurdo@ba.imip.cnr.i [National Council of Research-Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, CNR-IMIP (Italy); Bergmair, Michael [Johannes Kepler University Linz, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Surface Optics, Center for Surface- and Nanoanalytics (Austria); Bruno, Giovanni [National Council of Research-Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, CNR-IMIP (Italy); Cattelan, Denis, E-mail: denis.cattelan@horiba.co [HORIBA Scientific, Thin Film Division (France); Cobet, Christoph [ISAS Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin (Germany); Martino, Antonello de [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientique (CNRS-LPICM) (France); Fleischer, Karsten [ISAS Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin (Germany); Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana [Institute of Physics, Center for Solid State Physics and New Materials (Serbia); Esser, Norbert [ISAS Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin (Germany); Galliet, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.gaillet@horiba.co [HORIBA Scientific, Thin Film Division (France); Gajic, Rados [Institute of Physics, Center for Solid State Physics and New Materials (Serbia); Hemzal, Dusan; Hingerl, Kurt [Johannes Kepler University Linz, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Surface Optics, Center for Surface- and Nanoanalytics (Austria); Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientique (CNRS-LPICM) (France); Popovic, Zoran V. [Institute of Physics, Center for Solid State Physics and New Materials (Serbia); Saxl, Ottilia [Institute of Nanotechnology (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures.

  10. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losurdo, Maria; Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; Martino, Antonello de; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dusan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V.; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures.

  11. Comparative advantages of mechanical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlett, J L; Myers, E B; Roukes, M L

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical interactions are fundamental to biology. Mechanical forces of chemical origin determine motility and adhesion on the cellular scale, and govern transport and affinity on the molecular scale. Biological sensing in the mechanical domain provides unique opportunities to measure forces, displacements and mass changes from cellular and subcellular processes. Nanomechanical systems are particularly well matched in size with molecular interactions, and provide a basis for biological probes with single-molecule sensitivity. Here we review micro- and nanoscale biosensors, with a particular focus on fast mechanical biosensing in fluid by mass- and force-based methods, and the challenges presented by non-specific interactions. We explain the general issues that will be critical to the success of any type of next-generation mechanical biosensor, such as the need to improve intrinsic device performance, fabrication reproducibility and system integration. We also discuss the need for a greater understanding of analyte-sensor interactions on the nanoscale and of stochastic processes in the sensing environment.

  12. Biosensor approach to psychopathology classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha Koshelev

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We used a multi-round, two-party exchange game in which a healthy subject played a subject diagnosed with a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistics Manual-IV disorder, and applied a Bayesian clustering approach to the behavior exhibited by the healthy subject. The goal was to characterize quantitatively the style of play elicited in the healthy subject (the proposer by their DSM-diagnosed partner (the responder. The approach exploits the dynamics of the behavior elicited in the healthy proposer as a biosensor for cognitive features that characterize the psychopathology group at the other side of the interaction. Using a large cohort of subjects (n = 574, we found statistically significant clustering of proposers' behavior overlapping with a range of DSM-IV disorders including autism spectrum disorder, borderline personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and major depressive disorder. To further validate these results, we developed a computer agent to replace the human subject in the proposer role (the biosensor and show that it can also detect these same four DSM-defined disorders. These results suggest that the highly developed social sensitivities that humans bring to a two-party social exchange can be exploited and automated to detect important psychopathologies, using an interpersonal behavioral probe not directly related to the defining diagnostic criteria.

  13. Simulation of Biosensor using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheeparamatti, B G; Hebbal, M S; Sheeparamatti, R B; Math, V B; Kadadevaramath, J S

    2006-01-01

    Bio-Micro Electro Mechanical Systems/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems include a wide variety of sensors, actuators, and complex micro/nano devices for biomedical applications. Recent advances in biosensors have shown that sensors based on bending of microfabricated cantilevers have potential advantages over earlier used detection methods. Thus, a simple cantilever beam can be used as a sensor for biomedical, chemical and environmental applications. Here, microfabricated multilayered cantilever beam is exposed to sensing environment. Lower layer being pure structural silicon or polymer and upper layer is of polymer with antigen/antibody immobilized in it. Obviously, it has an affinity towards its counterpart i.e. antibody/antigen. In the sensing environment, if counter elements exists, they get captured by this sensing beam head, and the cantilever beam deflects. This deflection can be sensed and the presence of counter elements in the environment can be predicted. In this work, a finite element model of a biosensor for sensing antibody/antigen reaction is developed and simulated using ANSYS/Multiphysics. The optimal dimensions of the microcantilever beam are selected based on permissible deflection range with the aid of MATLAB. In the model analysis, both weight and surface stress effects on the cantilever are considered. Approximate weights are taken into account because of counter elements, considering their molecular weight and possible number of elements required for sensing. The results obtained in terms of lateral deflection are presented

  14. Electroacoustic miniaturized DNA-biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamby, Jean; Lazerges, Mathieu; Pernelle, Christine; Perrot, Hubert; Girault, Hubert H; Tribollet, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    A micrometer-sized electroacoustic DNA-biosensor was developed. The device included a thin semi-crystalline polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dielectric layer with two Ag microband electrodes on one side and a DNA thiol-labeled monolayer adsorbed on a gold surface on the other. A resonance wave was observed at 29 MHz with a network analyzer, upon AC voltage application between the two Ag electrodes, corresponding to electromechanical coupling induced by molecular dipoles of the PET polymer chain in the dielectric layer. It was found that the device size and geometry were well adapted to detect DNA hybridization, by measuring the capacity of the resonance response evolution: hybridization induced polarization of the dielectric material that affected the electromechanical coupling established in the dielectric layer. The 0.2 mm(2) sensor sensitive area allows detection in small volumes and still has higher detection levels for bioanalytical applications, the non-contact configuration adopted avoids electric faradic reactions that may damage biosensor sensitive layers, and finally, PET is a costless raw material, easy to process and well adapted for large scale production. The well-balanced technological and economic advantages of this kind of device make it a good candidate for biochip integration.

  15. Immobilization of HRP in Mesoporous Silica and Its Application for the Construction of Polyaniline Modified Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chung Chen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline (PANI, an attractive conductive polymer, has been successfully applied in fabricating various types of enzyme-based biosensors. In this study, we have employed mesoporous silica SBA-15 to stably entrap horseradish peroxidase (HRP, and then deposited the loaded SBA-15 on the PANI modified platinum electrode to construct a GA/SBA-15(HRP/PANI/Pt biosensor. The mesoporous structures and morphologies of SBA-15 with or without HRP were characterized. Enzymatic protein assays were employed to evaluate HRP immobilization efficiency. Our results demonstrated that the constructed biosensor displayed a fine linear correlation between cathodic response and H2O2 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 18.5 mM, with enhanced sensitivity. In particular, the current approach provided the PANI modified biosensor with improved stability for multiple measurements.

  16. Characterization of agarose as immobilization matrix model for a microbial biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernetti Mimma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are promising tools for the detection of specific substances in different fields, such as environmental, biomedical, food or agricultural. They allow rapid measurements, no need for complex sample preparation or specialized personnel and easy handling. In order to enhance the managing, miniaturization and stability of the biosensor and to prevent cell leaching, bacteria immobilization is desirable. A systematic characterization procedure to choose a suitable immobilization method and matrix, was proposed in this study. Physical properties, storage stability mass transport phenomena and biocompatibility were evaluated, employing agarose as the model matrix. Preliminary essays with bioluminescent bacteria detecting Tributyltin were also carried out.

  17. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection

    KAUST Repository

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim

    2017-07-19

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a residue-free graphene film using a thin gold supporting layer. A Hall effect device made of this gold-transferred graphene was demonstrated to significantly enhance the sensitivity (≈ 5 times) for hybridization detection, with a linear detection range of 1 pM – 100nM for DNA target. Our findings provide an efficient method to boost the sensitivity of graphene-based biosensors for DNA recognition.

  18. Prospects of conducting polymers in biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Bansi D.; Chaubey, Asha; Singh, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Applications of conducting polymers to biosensors have recently aroused much interest. This is because these molecular electronic materials offer control of different parameters such as polymer layer thickness, electrical properties and bio-reagent loading, etc. Moreover, conducting polymer based biosensors are likely to cater to the pressing requirements such as biocompatibility, possibility of in vivo sensing, continuous monitoring of drugs or metabolites, multi-parametric assays, miniaturization and high information density. This paper deals with the emerging trends in conducting polymer based biosensors during the last about 5 years

  19. Design Strategies for Aptamer-Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Liang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Nandi

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers have been widely used as recognition elements for biosensor construction, especially in the detection of proteins or small molecule targets, and regarded as promising alternatives for antibodies in bioassay areas. In this review, we present an overview of reported design strategies for the fabrication of biosensors and classify them into four basic modes: target-induced structure switching mode, sandwich or sandwich-like mode, target-induced dissociation/displacement mode and competitive replacement mode. In view of the unprecedented advantages brought about by aptamers and smart design strategies, aptamer-based biosensors are expected to be one of the most promising devices in bioassay related applications. PMID:22399891

  20. Improved biosensor-based detection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Described is a new biosensor-based detection system for effector compounds, useful for in vivo applications in e.g. screening and selecting of cells which produce a small molecule effector compound or which take up a small molecule effector compound from its environment. The detection system...... comprises a protein or RNA-based biosensor for the effector compound which indirectly regulates the expression of a reporter gene via two hybrid proteins, providing for fewer false signals or less 'noise', tuning of sensitivity or other advantages over conventional systems where the biosensor directly...

  1. Plasmonic hepatitis B biosensor for the analysis of clinical saliva

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedel, Tomáš; Hageneder, S.; Surman, František; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Noehammer, C.; Hofner, M.; Brynda, Eduard; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Dostálek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 5 (2017), s. 2972-2977 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-09368Y; GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21545 Program:OPPK Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy * biosensors * polymer brushes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  2. Protein Biosensors Based on Polymer Nanowires, Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeksoo Ji

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of biosensors using electrochemical methods is a promising application in the field of biotechnology. High sensitivity sensors for the bio-detection of proteins have been developed using several kinds of nanomaterials. The performance of the sensors depends on the type of nanostructures with which the biomaterials interact. One dimensional (1-D structures such as nanowires, nanotubes and nanorods are proven to have high potential for bio-applications. In this paper we review these three different kinds of nanostructures that have attracted much attention at recent times with their great performance as biosensors. Materials such as polymers, carbon and zinc oxide have been widely used for the fabrication of nanostructures because of their enhanced performance in terms of sensitivity, biocompatibility, and ease of preparation. Thus we consider polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanorods for discussion in this paper. We consider three stages in the development of biosensors: (a fabrication of biomaterials into nanostructures, (b alignment of the nanostructures and (c immobilization of proteins. Two different methods by which the biosensors can be developed at each stage for all the three nanostructures are examined. Finally, we conclude by mentioning some of the major challenges faced by many researchers who seek to fabricate biosensors for real time applications.

  3. Detection of triglyceride using an iridium nano-particle catalyst based amperometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Yin; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Chou, Tse-Chuan

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of triglyceride (TG) using an iridium nano-particle modified carbon based biosensor was successfully carried out in this study. The detection procedures were based on the electrochemical detection of enzymatically produced NADH. TG was hydrolyzed by lipase and the glycerol produced was catalytically oxidized by NAD-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase producing NADH in a solution containing NAD(+). Glyceryl tributyrate, a short chain triglyceride, was chosen as the substrate for the evaluation of this TG biosensor in bovine serum and human serum. A linear response to glyceryl tributyrate in the concentration range of 0 to 10 mM and a sensitivity of 7.5 nA mM(-1) in bovine serum and 7.0 nA mM(-1) in human serum were observed experimentally. The potential interference of species such as uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) was assessed. The incorporation of a selected surfactant and an increase in the incubation temperature appeared to enhance the performance of this biosensor. The conditions for the determination of TG levels in bovine serum using this biosensor were optimized, with sunflower seed oil being used as an analyte to simulate the detection of TG in blood. The experimental results demonstrated that this iridium nano-particle modified working electrode based biosensor provided a relatively simple means for the accurate determination of TG in serum.

  4. Directed Evolution to Engineer Monobody for FRET Biosensor Assembly and Imaging at Live-Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Peng, Qin; Wu, Yiqian; Allen, Molly E; Liang, Jing; Remacle, Albert G; Lopez, Tyler; Ge, Xin; Kay, Brian K; Zhao, Huimin; Strongin, Alex Y; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

    2018-04-19

    Monitoring enzymatic activities at the cell surface is challenging due to the poor efficiency of transport and membrane integration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors. Therefore, we developed a hybrid biosensor with separate donor and acceptor that assemble in situ. The directed evolution and sequence-function analysis technologies were integrated to engineer a monobody variant (PEbody) that binds to R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) dye. PEbody was used for visualizing the dynamic formation/separation of intercellular junctions. We further fused PEbody with the enhanced CFP and an enzyme-specific peptide at the extracellular surface to create a hybrid FRET biosensor upon R-PE capture for monitoring membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) activities. This biosensor revealed asymmetric distribution of MT1-MMP activities, which were high and low at loose and stable cell-cell contacts, respectively. Therefore, directed evolution and rational design are promising tools to engineer molecular binders and hybrid FRET biosensors for monitoring molecular regulations at the surface of living cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Controlling “chemical nose” biosensor characteristics by modulating gold nanoparticle shape and concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit S. Verma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional lock-and-key biosensors often only detect a single pathogen because they incorporate biomolecules with high specificity. “Chemical nose” biosensors are overcoming this limitation and identifying multiple pathogens simultaneously by obtaining a unique set of responses for each pathogen of interest, but the number of pathogens that can be distinguished is limited by the number of responses obtained. Herein, we use a gold nanoparticle-based “chemical nose” to show that changing the shapes of nanoparticles can increase the number of responses available for analysis and expand the types of bacteria that can be identified. Using four shapes of nanoparticles (nanospheres, nanostars, nanocubes, and nanorods, we demonstrate that each shape provides a unique set of responses in the presence of different bacteria, which can be exploited for enhanced specificity of the biosensor. Additionally, the concentration of nanoparticles controls the detection limit of the biosensor, where a lower concentration provides better detection limit. Thus, here we lay a foundation for designing “chemical nose” biosensors and controlling their characteristics using gold nanoparticle morphology and concentration. Keywords: Morphology, Color change, Staphylococcus aureus, Point-of-care, Nanocubes, Nanorods

  6. Electrochemical Biosensor for Nitrite Based on Polyacrylic-Graphene Composite Film with Covalently Immobilized Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Zaidatul Akhmar Raja Jamaluddin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A new biosensor for the analysis of nitrite in food was developed based on hemoglobin (Hb covalently immobilized on the succinimide functionalized poly(n-butyl acrylate-graphene [poly(nBA-rGO] composite film deposited on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode (SPE. The immobilized Hb on the poly(nBA-rGO conducting matrix exhibited electrocatalytic ability for the reduction of nitrite with significant enhancement in the reduction peak at −0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Thus, direct determination of nitrite can be achieved by monitoring the cathodic peak current signal of the proposed polyacrylic-graphene hybrid film-based voltammetric nitrite biosensor. The nitrite biosensor exhibited a reproducible dynamic linear response range from 0.05–5 mg L−1 nitrite and a detection limit of 0.03 mg L−1. No significant interference was observed by potential interfering ions such as Ca2+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, and NO3− ions. Analysis of nitrite in both raw and processed edible bird’s nest (EBN samples demonstrated recovery of close to 100%. The covalent immobilization of Hb on poly(nBA-rGO composite film has improved the performance of the electrochemical nitrite biosensor in terms of broader detection range, lower detection limit, and prolonged biosensor stability.

  7. Novel electrochemical xanthine biosensor based on chitosan–polypyrrole–gold nanoparticles hybrid bio-nanocomposite platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muamer Dervisevic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the electrochemical detection of the adenosine-3-phosphate degradation product, xanthine, using a new xanthine biosensor based on a hybrid bio-nanocomposite platform which has been successfully employed in the evaluation of meat freshness. In the design of the amperometric xanthine biosensor, chitosan–polypyrrole–gold nanoparticles fabricated by an in situ chemical synthesis method on a glassy carbon electrode surface was used to enhance electron transfer and to provide good enzyme affinity. Electrochemical studies were carried out by the modified electrode with immobilized xanthine oxidase on it, after which the biosensor was tested to ascertain the optimization parameters. The Biosensor exhibited a very good linear range of 1–200 μM, low detection limit of 0.25 μM, average response time of 8 seconds, and was not prone to significant interference from uric acid, ascorbic acid, glucose, and sodium benzoate. The resulting bio-nanocomposite xanthine biosensor was tested with fish, beef, and chicken real-sample measurements.

  8. Alpha-fetoprotein detection by using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Chen, Ran-Chou; Li, Ying-Chang; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Chou, Chien

    2007-11-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) detection by using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (LSPCF) fiber-optic biosensor is setup and experimentally demonstrated. It is based on gold nanoparticle (GNP) and coupled with localized surface plasmon wave on the surface of GNP. In this experiment, the fluorophores are labeled on anti-AFP which are bound to protein A conjugated GNP. Thus, LSPCF is excited with high efficiency in the near field of localized surface plasmon wave. Therefore, not only the sensitivity of LSPCF biosensor is enhanced but also the specific selectivity of AFP is improved. Experimentally, the ability of real time measurement in the range of AFP concentration from 0.1ng/ml to 100ng/ml was detected. To compare with conventional methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or radioimmunoassay (RIA), the LSPCF fiber-optic biosensor performs higher or comparable detection sensitivity, respectively.

  9. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of mn doped ZnO nanopencils for development of amperometric glucose biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mayoorika; Pramila; Agrawal, Jitesh; Dixit, Tejendra; Palani, I. A.; Singh, Vipul

    2018-05-01

    Mn doped ZnO nanopencils were synthesized via low temperature hydrothermal process for fabrication of enzymatic electrochemical glucose biosensor. The KMnO4 was found to play a dual role in modifying morphology and inducing Mn doping. Interestingly, two different types of morphologies viz nanorods and nanopencils along with Mn doping in the later were obtained. Incorporation of Mn has shown a tremendous effect on the morphological variations, repression of defects and electrochemical charge transfer at electrode electrolyte interface. The possible reason behind obtained morphological changes has been proposed which in turn were responsible for the improvement in the different figure of merits of as fabricated enzymatic electrochemical biosensor. There has been a 17 fold enhancement in the sensitivity of the as fabricated glucose biosensor from ZnO nanorods to Mn doped ZnO nanopencils which can be attributed to morphological variation and Mn doping.

  10. Label-Free Electrical Detection Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzo Maehashi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Label-free detections of biomolecules have attracted great attention in a lot of life science fields such as genomics, clinical diagnosis and practical pharmacy. In this article, we reviewed amperometric and potentiometric biosensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs. In amperometric detections, CNT-modified electrodes were used as working electrodes to significantly enhance electroactive surface area. In contrast, the potentiometric biosensors were based on aptamer-modified CNT field-effect transistors (CNTFETs. Since aptamers are artificial oligonucleotides and thus are smaller than the Debye length, proteins can be detected with high sensitivity. In this review, we discussed on the technology, characteristics and developments for commercialization in label-free CNT-based biosensors.

  11. Aptamer-functionalized nano-biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials have become one of the most interesting sensing materials because of their unique size- and shape-dependent optical properties, high surface energy and surface-to-volume ratio, and tunable surface properties. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind their target ligands with high affinity. The use of nanomaterials that are bioconjugated with aptamers for selective and sensitive detection of analytes such as small molecules, metal ions, proteins, and cells has been demonstrated. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional aptamers with different types of nanomaterials, including quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Colorimetry, fluorescence, electrochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and magnetic resonance imaging are common detection modes for a broad range of analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity when using aptamer bioconjugated nanomaterials (Apt-NMs). We highlight the important roles that the size and concentration of nanomaterials, the secondary structure and density of aptamers, and the multivalent interactions play in determining the specificity and sensitivity of the nanosensors towards analytes. Advantages and disadvantages of the Apt-NMs for bioapplications are focused.

  12. Aptamer-Functionalized Nano-Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chia Chiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have become one of the most interesting sensing materials because of their unique size- and shape-dependent optical properties, high surface energy and surface-to-volume ratio, and tunable surface properties. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind their target ligands with high affinity. The use of nanomaterials that are bioconjugated with aptamers for selective and sensitive detection of analytes such as small molecules, metal ions, proteins, and cells has been demonstrated. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional aptamers with different types of nanomaterials, including quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Colorimetry, fluorescence, electrochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and magnetic resonance imaging are common detection modes for a broad range of analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity when using aptamer bioconjugated nanomaterials (Apt-NMs. We highlight the important roles that the size and concentration of nanomaterials, the secondary structure and density of aptamers, and the multivalent interactions play in determining the specificity and sensitivity of the nanosensors towards analytes. Advantages and disadvantages of the Apt-NMs for bioapplications are focused.

  13. An Epidermal Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    ...). An epidermal biosensor is a new approach for the early continuous, in vivo detection of the onset of disease by the using genetically modified skin cells to respond to molecules secreted by tumor cells...

  14. An Epidermal Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    ...) An epidermal biosensor was conceived as a new approach for the early continuous, in vivo detection of the onset of disease by the using genetically modified skin cells to respond to molecules secreted by tumor cells...

  15. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  16. Polymer Based Biosensors for Medical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherré, Solène; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2015-01-01

    , environmental monitoring and food safety. The detected element varies from a single molecule (such as glucose), a biopolymer (such as DNA or a protein) to a whole organism (such as bacteria). Due to their easy use and possible miniaturization, biosensors have a high potential to come out of the lab...... and be available for use by everybody. To fulfil these purposes, polymers represent very appropriate materials. Many nano- and microfabrication methods for polymers are available, allowing a fast and cheap production of devices. This chapter will present the general concept of a biosensor in a first part......The objective of this chapter is to give an overview about the newest developments in biosensors made of polymers for medical applications. Biosensors are devices that can recognize and detect a target with high selectivity. They are widely used in many fields such as medical diagnostic...

  17. Biosensors in immunology: the story so far

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathak, S.S.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Optical biosensors are finding a range of applications in immunology. They enable biomolecular interactions to be characterized in real time without the need to label reactants, and, because individual binding steps can be visualized, are particularly suited to complex assays

  18. Biosensors a promising future in measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device which can be used to convert the existence of a molecule or compound into a measurable and useful signal. Biosensors use stimulus to translate changes to recognisable signals and have great importance to society. Applications include diagnosis tools for diseases, security appliances, and other biomedical equipments. Biosensors can also be used in the detection of pathogens and other microbes in foodstuffs, drugs and processing industries. Enormous progress and advancement has been witnessed in this area. Research and development in micro level systems serves to interface biology with novel materials such as nanomaterial. Development of high speed and accurate electronic devices tfor use in medicine and energy storage (such as biofuel cells) is one of the target areas. This paper discusses the importance, use and current and future trend in the application of biosensors

  19. Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry for analysis and control of thin film polycrystalline semiconductor deposition in photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koirala, Prakash; Attygalle, Dinesh; Aryal, Puruswottam; Pradhan, Puja; Chen, Jie [Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Marsillac, Sylvain [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Ferlauto, Andre S.; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Collins, Robert W. [Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2014-11-28

    Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) from the near-infrared to ultraviolet has been applied for analysis of the deposition of polycrystalline thin films that form the basis of two key photovoltaic heterojunction configurations, superstrate SnO{sub 2}/CdS/CdTe and substrate Mo/Cu(In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2}/CdS. The focus of this work is to develop capabilities for monitoring and controlling the key steps in the fabrication of these device structures. Analysis of RTSE data collected during sputter deposition of CdS on a rough SnO{sub 2} transparent top contact provides the time evolution of the CdS effective thickness, or film volume per unit substrate area. This thickness includes interface, bulk, and surface roughness layer components and affects the CdS/CdTe heterojunction performance and the quantum efficiency of the solar cell in the blue region of the solar spectrum. Similarly, analysis of RTSE data collected during co-evaporation of Cu(In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} (CIGS; x ∼ 0.3) on a rough Mo back contact provides the evolution of a second phase of Cu{sub 2−x}Se within the CIGS layer. During the last stage of CIGS deposition, the In, Ga, and Se co-evaporants convert this Cu{sub 2−x}Se phase to CIGS, and RTSE identifies the endpoint, specifically the time at which complete conversion occurs and single-phase, large-grain CIGS is obtained in this key stage. - Highlights: • Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) study of CdS and CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) films. • RTSE during CdS deposition provides the evolution of the CdS effective thickness. • RTSE for CIGS film enables to measure and control the composition and thickness. • The work leads to the development of optical models for processing steps.

  20. Biosensors for cardiac biomarkers detection: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Anjum; Gürbüz, Yaşar; Gurbuz, Yasar; Kolkar Mohammed, Javed Hussain Niazi

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered as a major threat to global health. Therefore, there is a growing demand for a range of portable, rapid and low cost biosensing devices for the detection of CVD. Biosensors can play an important role in the early diagnosis of CVD without having to rely on hospital visits where expensive and time-consuming laboratory tests are recommended. Over the last decade, many biosensors have been developed to detect a wide range of cardiac marker to reduce ...

  1. Immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE): a new method for the precise determination of the 3D indicatrix of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C. C.; Stumpe, J.

    2005-02-01

    The new method of immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) [1] has been developed. It allows the highly accurate determination of the absolute three-dimensional (3D) refractive indices of anisotropic thin films. The method is combined with conventional ellipsometry in transmission and reflection, and the thickness determination of anisotropic films solely by optical methods also becomes more accurate. The method is applied to the determination of the 3D refractive indices of thin spin-coated films of an azobenzene-containing liquid-crystalline copolymer. The development of the anisotropy in these films by photo-orientation and subsequent annealing is demonstrated. Depending on the annealing temperature, oblate or prolate orders are generated.

  2. Synthetic biology for microbial heavy metal biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Sang Jun

    2018-02-01

    Using recombinant DNA technology, various whole-cell biosensors have been developed for detection of environmental pollutants, including heavy metal ions. Whole-cell biosensors have several advantages: easy and inexpensive cultivation, multiple assays, and no requirement of any special techniques for analysis. In the era of synthetic biology, cutting-edge DNA sequencing and gene synthesis technologies have accelerated the development of cell-based biosensors. Here, we summarize current technological advances in whole-cell heavy metal biosensors, including the synthetic biological components (bioparts), sensing and reporter modules, genetic circuits, and chassis cells. We discuss several opportunities for improvement of synthetic cell-based biosensors. First, new functional modules must be discovered in genome databases, and this knowledge must be used to upgrade specific bioparts through molecular engineering. Second, modules must be assembled into functional biosystems in chassis cells. Third, heterogeneity of individual cells in the microbial population must be eliminated. In the perspectives, the development of whole-cell biosensors is also discussed in the aspects of cultivation methods and synthetic cells.

  3. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  4. Biosensors-on-chip: a topical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sensen; Shamsi, Mohtashim H

    2017-01-01

    This review will examine the integration of two fields that are currently at the forefront of science, i.e. biosensors and microfluidics. As a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, microfluidics has been enriched by the integration of various detection tools for analyte detection and quantitation. The application of such microfluidic platforms is greatly increased in the area of biosensors geared towards point-of-care diagnostics. Together, the merger of microfluidics and biosensors has generated miniaturized devices for sample processing and sensitive detection with quantitation. We believe that microfluidic biosensors (biosensors-on-chip) are essential for developing robust and cost effective point-of-care diagnostics. This review is relevant to a variety of disciplines, such as medical science, clinical diagnostics, LOC technologies including MEMs/NEMs, and analytical science. Specifically, this review will appeal to scientists working in the two overlapping fields of biosensors and microfluidics, and will also help new scientists to find their directions in developing point-of-care devices. (topical review)

  5. Vacuum-ultraviolet ellipsometry spectra and optical properties of Ba(Zr,Ti)O.sub.3./sub. films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchaneck, G.; Chernova, Ekaterina; Kleiner, A.; Liebschner, R.; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Meyer, D.C.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Gerlach, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 621, Jan (2017), s. 58-62 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13778S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : barium zirconate titanate thin film * film structure * VUV ellipsometry * optical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.879, year: 2016

  6. Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a biochemical assay for wide class of hydrophobic Coenzyme A esters wherein the analyte is caused to react with a specifically binding, modified protein, and thereby causing a detectable signal. A one step assay for hydrophobic carboxylic acid esters in whole blood, serum...

  7. Biosensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and an electronic component to transduce and detect the signal. A variety of .... aliphatic aldehyde as fol- lows: FMNH2 + .... microorganisms by the use of high temperature. ... ISFET. The oxidation of hypoxanthine to uric acid by xanthine.

  8. Ellipsometry study of process deposition of amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide sputtered thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talagrand, C.; Boddaert, X.; Selmeczi, D.G.; Defranoux, C.; Collot, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an InGaZnO optical study by spectrometric ellipsometry. First of all, the fitting results of different models and different structures are analysed to choose the most appropriate model. The Tauc–Lorentz model is suitable for thickness measurements but a more complex model allows the refractive index and extinction coefficient to be extracted more accurately. Secondly, different InGaZnO process depositions are carried out in order to investigate stability, influence of deposition time and uniformity. Films present satisfactory optical stability over time. InGaZnO optical property evolution as a function of deposition time is related to an increase in temperature. To understand the behaviour of uniformity, mapping measurements are correlated to thin film resistivity. Results show that temperature and resputtering are the two phenomena that affect IGZO uniformity. - Highlights: • Model and structure are investigated to fit IGZO ellipsometric angles. • Maximum refractive index rises with substrate temperature and thus deposition time. • Resputtering leads to inhomogeneity in IGZO electrical and optical properties

  9. Glass transition in thin supported polystyrene films probed by temperature-modulated ellipsometry in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu; Kiyanova, Anna V; Last, Julie; Soofi, Shauheen S; Thode, Christopher; Nealey, Paul F

    2012-08-01

    Glass transition in thin (1-200 nm thick) spin-cast polystyrene films on silicon surfaces is probed by ellipsometry in a controlled vacuum environment. A temperature-modulated modification of the method is used alongside a traditional linear temperature scan. A clear glass transition is detected in films with thicknesses as low as 1-2 nm. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) shows no substantial dependence on thickness for coatings greater than 20 nm. Thinner films demonstrate moderate T(g) depression achieving 18 K for thicknesses 4-7 nm. Less than 4 nm thick samples are excluded from the T(g) comparison due to significant thickness nonuniformity (surface roughness). The transition in 10-20 nm thick films demonstrates excessive broadening. For some samples, the broadened transition is clearly resolved into two separate transitions. The thickness dependence of the glass transition can be well described by a simple 2-layer model. It is also shown that T(g) depression in 5 nm thick films is not sensitive to a wide range of experimental factors including molecular weight characteristics of the polymer, specifications of solvent used for spin casting, substrate composition, and pretreatment of the substrate surface.

  10. Real time monitoring of filament-assisted chemically vapor deposited diamond by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Cong; An, I.; Vedam, K.; Collins, R.W.; Nguyen, H.V.; Messier, R.

    1991-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry over the range 1.5-4.5 eV was applied as a real time probe of the processes occurring in the initial nucleation of thin film diamond by heated-filament assisted chemical vapor deposition. Using both untreated and diamond-polished c-Si substrates, as well as both carburized and uncarburized tungsten filaments, it was possible to separate and characterize competing phenomena, including the increase in surface temperature induced by filament ignition, the formation of carbide layers, contamination of the substrate by tungsten from the filament, annealing of diamond polishing damage, and, finally, diamond nucleation. An accurate measurement of the true temperature of the substrate surface averaged over the top 500 A can be obtained from the energy position of critical points in the c-Si band structure. For diamond deposition, we operated with an initial excess flow of CH 4 to stimulate nucleation. We applied real time feedback and manual control to reduce the CH 4 flow in the first monolayers of deposition. The thickness of diamond and an estimate of its nucleation density can be obtained from real time spectra, and the latter was in good agreement with that obtained from scanning electron microscopy. (orig.)

  11. Ellipsometry study of process deposition of amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide sputtered thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talagrand, C., E-mail: talagrand@emse.fr [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne CMP-GC, Dept PS2, Gardanne, 880 route de Mimet (France); Boddaert, X. [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne CMP-GC, Dept PS2, Gardanne, 880 route de Mimet (France); Selmeczi, D.G.; Defranoux, C. [Semilab Semiconductor Physics Laboratory Co. Ltd., Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Collot, P. [Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Aix-en-Provence, 2 cours des Arts et Métiers (France)

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an InGaZnO optical study by spectrometric ellipsometry. First of all, the fitting results of different models and different structures are analysed to choose the most appropriate model. The Tauc–Lorentz model is suitable for thickness measurements but a more complex model allows the refractive index and extinction coefficient to be extracted more accurately. Secondly, different InGaZnO process depositions are carried out in order to investigate stability, influence of deposition time and uniformity. Films present satisfactory optical stability over time. InGaZnO optical property evolution as a function of deposition time is related to an increase in temperature. To understand the behaviour of uniformity, mapping measurements are correlated to thin film resistivity. Results show that temperature and resputtering are the two phenomena that affect IGZO uniformity. - Highlights: • Model and structure are investigated to fit IGZO ellipsometric angles. • Maximum refractive index rises with substrate temperature and thus deposition time. • Resputtering leads to inhomogeneity in IGZO electrical and optical properties.

  12. Influence of the graphene substrate on morphology of the gold thin film. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostruba, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In metal optics gold assumes a special status because of its practical importance in optoelectronic and nanooptical devices, and its role huge increases when occurs combination of gold with two-dimension materials. We performed spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements on evaporated gold, and gold–graphene nanostructures to determine the optical dielectric function across a broad spectral range from 250 to 1000 nm. It was found that the deposition of gold film on the quartz substrate covered by graphene flake leads to significant changes in structural and dielectric properties of thin gold layer. Such changes can be explained by increasing of the gold cluster size. The model fit of the ellipsometric data demonstrates that the bilayer “graphene-gold” nanostructure can be described as a uniform optically homogeneous layer with modified optical properties. We can suggest that graphene flake creates a matrix for epitaxial alignment of the crystalline structure of the gold film during its growing. Effective doping of the graphene by free electrons of the gold clusters tends to decrease the optical contrast at the graphene-gold interface.

  13. TEM and ellipsometry studies of nanolaminate oxide films prepared using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au; Attard, D.J. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Finnie, K.S. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Triani, G. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Barbe, C.J. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Depagne, C. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Bartlett, J.R. [Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2005-04-30

    Nanolaminate oxide layers consisting of TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been deposited on silicon using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Characterisation of these films has been achieved by use of a range of modern transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques, including plasmon loss imaging, energy filtered imaging and scanning TEM (STEM) X-ray line profiling. These have shown that the target thickness of the individual layers in the nanolaminate structures (20 nm) has been met with a high degree of accuracy, that the layers are extremely flat and parallel and that the interfaces between the layers are compositionally abrupt. Localised crystallisation within the stacks, and responses to electron beam irradiation point to the presence of a stress gradient within the layers. The performance of ellipsometry in characterising multilayer stacks has been benchmarked against the TEM measurements. Errors in determination of individual layer thicknesses were found to increase with growing stack size, as expected given the increasing number of interfaces incorporated in each model. The most sophisticated model gave maximum deviations of {+-}4 nm from the TEM determined values for the 5- and 10-layer stacks.

  14. Segment density profiles of polyelectrolyte brushes determined by Fourier transform ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesalski, Markus; Rühe, Jürgen; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    1999-10-01

    We describe a method for the explicit determination of the segment density profile φ(z) of surface-attached polymer brushes with multiple angle of incidence null-ellipsometry. Because the refractive index contrast between the brush layer and the solvent is weak, multiple reflections are of minor influence and the ellipsometric spectrum is closely related to the Fourier transform of the refractive index profile, thereby allowing for explicit inversion of the ellipsometric data. We chose surface-attached monolayers of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA), a weak polyelectrolyte, as a model system and determined the segment density profile of this system as a function of the pH value of the surrounding medium by the Fourier method. Complementary to the Fourier analysis, fits with error functions are given as well. The brushes were prepared on the bases of high refractive index prisms with the "grafting-from" technique. In water, the brushes swell by more than a factor of 30. The swelling increases with increasing pH because of a growing fraction of dissociated acidic groups leading to a larger electrostatic repulsion.

  15. Novel laser ellipsometry method for the KATRIN condensed {sup 83m}Kr source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zboril, Miroslav [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    One of the systematic effects in the neutrino mass experiment KATRIN are the fluctuations of the electric retarding potential which is experienced by the tritium β electrons on their path through the spectrometer. For the purpose of long-term monitoring of the energy scale stability several calibration electron sources will be utilised at KATRIN. One of them is the condensed {sup 83m}Kr source based on a frozen {sup 83m}Kr film on a HOPG backing at about 20 K. The isomeric state decays via a cascade of highly converted transitions, yielding conversion electron lines with energies ranging from 7.5 keV to 32.1 keV, useful for the energy calibration. The cleanliness of the HOPG backing is crucial as any adsorption of residual gas would shift the kinetic energy of the conversion electrons. The backing is cleaned via laser ablation and resistive heating. The cleanliness is checked via a novel method of laser ellipsometry where the polarisation analysis takes place directly in ultrahigh vacuum. The polarisation analysis is realised by an analyser and light detector at 90 K embedded in the cold baffle. This method allows to determine film thicknesses with a resolution of better than an atomic monolayer. As a byproduct it can be also used to determine the indices of refraction of condensed krypton and of the HOPG backing. The main features of the calibration source will be reviewed and the results of test measurements will be presented.

  16. Spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of interface reactivity in GaAs-based superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Giuva, D.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Bruno, G.; Brown, A.S

    2004-05-01

    Pseudodielectric function spectra of GaAs/GaSb{sub 1-y}As{sub y}, GaSb/GaAs{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} and GaAs/GaP{sub y}As{sub 1-y} superlattices have been measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the 0.75-5.5 eV photon energy range. The analysis of the E{sub 1} interband critical point and modeling of spectra has been carried out to investigate the chemistry of the anion exchange reaction and abruptness of interface composition in the superlattices. It has been found that a ternary compound GaP{sub y}As{sub 1-y} forms in the case of the P-for-As anion exchange reaction. In the case of As-for-Sb anion exchange reaction for (GaSb/GaAs{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y}){sub 20} SLs, SE data show that this anion exchange results in the formation not only of a ternary alloy GaAs{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y}, but also in the formation of isoelectronic compounds AsSb{sub x} that segregate at the GaSb/GaAs interface. In the case of Sb-for-As anion exchange for (GaAs/GaSbyAs{sub 1-y}){sub 20} SLs, Sb segregates at the GaAs surface.

  17. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-based glucose biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, A.; Hövell, W.F.M. van; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Amperometric biosensors for the recognition of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) were fabricated for the first time. The resulting biosensor has potential applications for long-term glucose measurements.

  18. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  19. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of Protein Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-08-01

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length

  20. Bio-inspired patterned networks (BIPS) for development of wearable/disposable biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLamore, E. S.; Convertino, M.; Hondred, John; Das, Suprem; Claussen, J. C.; Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.

    2016-05-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel approach for fabricating point of care (POC) wearable electrochemical biosensors based on 3D patterning of bionanocomposite networks. To create Bio-Inspired Patterned network (BIPS) electrodes, we first generate fractal network in silico models that optimize transport of network fluxes according to an energy function. Network patterns are then inkjet printed onto flexible substrate using conductive graphene ink. We then deposit fractal nanometal structures onto the graphene to create a 3D nanocomposite network. Finally, we biofunctionalize the surface with biorecognition agents using covalent bonding. In this paper, BIPS are used to develop high efficiency, low cost biosensors for measuring glucose as a proof of concept. Our results on the fundamental performance of BIPS sensors show that the biomimetic nanostructures significantly enhance biosensor sensitivity, accuracy, response time, limit of detection, and hysteresis compared to conventional POC non fractal electrodes (serpentine, interdigitated, and screen printed electrodes). BIPs, in particular Apollonian patterned BIPS, represent a new generation of POC biosensors based on nanoscale and microscale fractal networks that significantly improve electrical connectivity, leading to enhanced sensor performance.

  1. Graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold as elite nanomaterials for fabrication of biosensors for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ahlawat, Wandit; Kumar, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2015-08-15

    Technological advancements worldwide at rapid pace in the area of materials science and nanotechnology have made it possible to synthesize nanoparticles with desirable properties not exhibited by the bulk material. Among variety of available nanomaterials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold nanopartilces proved to be elite and offered amazing electrochemical biosensing. This encourages us to write a review which highlights the recent achievements in the construction of genosensor, immunosensor and enzymatic biosensor based on the above nanomaterials. Carbon based nanomaterials offers a direct electron transfer between the functionalized nanomaterials and active site of bioreceptor without involvement of any mediator which not only amplifies the signal but also provide label free sensing. Gold shows affinity towards immunological molecules and is most routinely used for immunological sensing. Zinc oxide can easily immobilize proteins and hence offers a large group of enzyme based biosensor. Modification of the working electrode by introduction of these nanomaterials or combination of two/three of above nanomaterials together and forming a nanocomposite reflected the best results with excellent stability, reproducibility and enhanced sensitivity. Highly attractive electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity of these elite nanomaterials have facilitated achievement of enhanced signal amplification needed for the construction of ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of glucose, cholesterol, Escherichia coli, influenza virus, cancer, human papillomavirus, dopamine, glutamic acid, IgG, IgE, uric acid, ascorbic acid, acetlycholine, cortisol, cytosome, sequence specific DNA and amino acids. Recent researches for bedside biosensors are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen; , Junhong; Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua

    2017-06-14

    The disclosure provides a field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensor and uses thereof. In particular, to FET-based biosensors using thermally reduced graphene-based sheets as a conducting channel decorated with nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates. The present disclosure also relates to FET-based biosensors using metal nitride/graphene hybrid sheets. The disclosure provides a method for detecting a target biomolecule in a sample using the FET-based biosensor described herein.

  3. Recent Progress in Lectin-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent progress in the development of lectin-based biosensors used for the determination of glucose, pathogenic bacteria and toxins, cancer cells, and lectins. Lectin proteins have been widely used for the construction of optical and electrochemical biosensors by exploiting the specific binding affinity to carbohydrates. Among lectin proteins, concanavalin A (Con A is most frequently used for this purpose as glucose- and mannose-selective lectin. Con A is useful for immobilizing enzymes including glucose oxidase (GOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP on the surface of a solid support to construct glucose and hydrogen peroxide sensors, because these enzymes are covered with intrinsic hydrocarbon chains. Con A-modified electrodes can be used as biosensors sensitive to glucose, cancer cells, and pathogenic bacteria covered with hydrocarbon chains. The target substrates are selectively adsorbed to the surface of Con A-modified electrodes through strong affinity of Con A to hydrocarbon chains. A recent topic in the development of lectin-based biosensors is a successful use of nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, for amplifying output signals of the sensors. In addition, lectin-based biosensors are useful for studying glycan expression on living cells.

  4. S-Layer Protein-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Schuster

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights the application of bacterial surface (S- layer proteins as versatile components for the fabrication of biosensors. One technologically relevant feature of S-layer proteins is their ability to self-assemble on many surfaces and interfaces to form a crystalline two-dimensional (2D protein lattice. The S-layer lattice on the surface of a biosensor becomes part of the interface architecture linking the bioreceptor to the transducer interface, which may cause signal amplification. The S-layer lattice as ultrathin, highly porous structure with functional groups in a well-defined special distribution and orientation and an overall anti-fouling characteristics can significantly raise the limit in terms of variety and the ease of bioreceptor immobilization, compactness of bioreceptor molecule arrangement, sensitivity, specificity, and detection limit for many types of biosensors. The present paper discusses and summarizes examples for the successful implementation of S-layer lattices on biosensor surfaces in order to give a comprehensive overview on the application potential of these bioinspired S-layer protein-based biosensors.

  5. S-Layer Protein-Based Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard

    2018-04-11

    The present paper highlights the application of bacterial surface (S-) layer proteins as versatile components for the fabrication of biosensors. One technologically relevant feature of S-layer proteins is their ability to self-assemble on many surfaces and interfaces to form a crystalline two-dimensional (2D) protein lattice. The S-layer lattice on the surface of a biosensor becomes part of the interface architecture linking the bioreceptor to the transducer interface, which may cause signal amplification. The S-layer lattice as ultrathin, highly porous structure with functional groups in a well-defined special distribution and orientation and an overall anti-fouling characteristics can significantly raise the limit in terms of variety and the ease of bioreceptor immobilization, compactness of bioreceptor molecule arrangement, sensitivity, specificity, and detection limit for many types of biosensors. The present paper discusses and summarizes examples for the successful implementation of S-layer lattices on biosensor surfaces in order to give a comprehensive overview on the application potential of these bioinspired S-layer protein-based biosensors.

  6. Functional design of electrolytic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage Preethichandra, D. M.; Mala Ekanayake, E. M. I.; Onoda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensbased on conjugated polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on a Pt modified ITO (indium tin oxide) conductive glass substrate and their performances are described. We have presented a method of developing a highly sensitive and low-cost nano-biosensor for blood glucose measurements. The fabrication method proposed decreases the cost of production significantly as the amount of noble metals used is minimized. A nano-corrugated PPy substrate was developed through pulsed electrochemical deposition. The sensitivity achieved was 325 mA/(Mcm2) and the linear range of the developed sensor was 50-60 mmol/l. Then the application of the electrophoresis helps the glucose oxidase (GOx) on the PPy substrate. The main reason behind this high enzyme loading is the high electric field applied across the sensor surface (working electrode) and the counter electrode where that pushes the nano-scale enzyme particles floating in the phosphate buffer solution towards the substrate. The novel technique used has provided an extremely high sensitivities and very high linear ranges for enzyme (GOx) and therefore can be concluded that this is a very good technique to load enzyme onto the conducting polymer substrates.

  7. Magnetoresistive biosensors for quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahan; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hall, Drew A.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics, as a developing method for study of proteins and identification of diseases, reveals more comprehensive and accurate information of an organism than traditional genomics. A variety of platforms, such as mass spectrometry, optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, magnetic sensors, etc., have been developed for detecting proteins quantitatively. The sandwich immunoassay is widely used as a labeled detection method due to its high specificity and flexibility allowing multiple different types of labels. While optical sensors use enzyme and fluorophore labels to detect proteins with high sensitivity, they often suffer from high background signal and challenges in miniaturization. Magnetic biosensors, including nuclear magnetic resonance sensors, oscillator-based sensors, Hall-effect sensors, and magnetoresistive sensors, use the specific binding events between magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and target proteins to measure the analyte concentration. Compared with other biosensing techniques, magnetic sensors take advantage of the intrinsic lack of magnetic signatures in biological samples to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity, and are compatible with semiconductor-based fabrication process to have low-cost and small-size for point-of-care (POC) applications. Although still in the development stage, magnetic biosensing is a promising technique for in-home testing and portable disease monitoring.

  8. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A., E-mail: osadik@binghamton.ed [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States)

    2010-05-30

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  9. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A.; Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin

    2010-01-01

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  11. Improved sensitivity of a graphene FET biosensor using porphyrin linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Takuya; Ono, Takao; Kanai, Yasushi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2018-06-01

    Graphene FET (G-FET) biosensors have considerable potential due to the superior characteristics of graphene. Realizing this potential requires judicious choice of the linker molecule connecting the target-specific receptor molecule to the graphene surface, yet there are few reports comparing linker molecules for G-FET biosensors. In this study, tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP) was used as a linker for surface modification of a G-FET and the properties of the device were compared to those of a G-FET device modified with the conventional linker 1-pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester (PBASE). TCPP modification resulted in a higher density of receptor immunoglobulin E (IgE) aptamer molecules on the G-FET. The detection limit of the target IgE was enhanced from 13 nM for the PBASE-modified G-FET to 2.2 nM for the TCPP-modified G-FET, suggesting that the TCPP linker is a powerful candidate for G-FET modification.

  12. Biosensors for Sustainable Food Engineering: Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavan, Vasanth; Weng, Xuan; Chand, Rohit

    2018-01-01

    Current food production faces tremendous challenges from growing human population, maintaining clean resources and food qualities, and protecting climate and environment. Food sustainability is mostly a cooperative effort resulting in technology development supported by both governments and enterprises. Multiple attempts have been promoted in tackling challenges and enhancing drivers in food production. Biosensors and biosensing technologies with their applications, are being widely applied to tackling top challenges in food production and its sustainability. Consequently, a growing demand in biosensing technologies exists in food sustainability. Microfluidics represents a technological system integrating multiple technologies. Nanomaterials, with its technology in biosensing, is thought to be the most promising tool in dealing with health, energy, and environmental issues closely related to world populations. The demand of point of care (POC) technologies in this area focus on rapid, simple, accurate, portable, and low-cost analytical instruments. This review provides current viewpoints from the literature on biosensing in food production, food processing, safety and security, food packaging and supply chain, food waste processing, food quality assurance, and food engineering. The current understanding of progress, solution, and future challenges, as well as the commercialization of biosensors are summarized. PMID:29534552

  13. Biosensors for Sustainable Food Engineering: Challenges and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Ragavan, Vasanth; Weng, Xuan; Chand, Rohit

    2018-03-12

    Current food production faces tremendous challenges from growing human population, maintaining clean resources and food qualities, and protecting climate and environment. Food sustainability is mostly a cooperative effort resulting in technology development supported by both governments and enterprises. Multiple attempts have been promoted in tackling challenges and enhancing drivers in food production. Biosensors and biosensing technologies with their applications, are being widely applied to tackling top challenges in food production and its sustainability. Consequently, a growing demand in biosensing technologies exists in food sustainability. Microfluidics represents a technological system integrating multiple technologies. Nanomaterials, with its technology in biosensing, is thought to be the most promising tool in dealing with health, energy, and environmental issues closely related to world populations. The demand of point of care (POC) technologies in this area focus on rapid, simple, accurate, portable, and low-cost analytical instruments. This review provides current viewpoints from the literature on biosensing in food production, food processing, safety and security, food packaging and supply chain, food waste processing, food quality assurance, and food engineering. The current understanding of progress, solution, and future challenges, as well as the commercialization of biosensors are summarized.

  14. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors....

  15. Study of oxide/metal/oxide thin films for transparent electronics and solar cells applications by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Girtan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of a class of Oxide/Metal/Oxide (Oxide = ITO, AZO, TiO2 and Bi2O3, Metal = Au thin films was done by correlating the spectrophotometric studies with the ellispometric models. Films were deposited by successive sputtering from metallic targets In:Sn, Zn:Al, Ti and Bi in reactive atmosphere (for the oxide films and respective inert atmosphere (for the metallic Au interlayer films on glass substrates. The measurements of optical constants n—the refractive index and k—the extinction coefficient, at different incident photon energies for single oxide films and also for the three layers films oxide/metal/oxide samples were made using the spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE technique. The ellipsometry modelling process was coupled with the recorded transmission spectra data of a double beam spectrophotometer and the best fitting parameters were obtained not only by fitting the n and k experimental data with the dispersion fitting curves as usual is practiced in the most reported data in literature, but also by comparing the calculated the transmission coefficient from ellipsometry with the experimental values obtained from direct spectrophotometry measurements. In this way the best dispersion model was deduced for each sample. Very good correlations were obtained for the other different thin films characteristics such as the films thickness, optical band gap and electrical resistivity obtained by other measurements and calculation techniques. The ellipsometric modelling, can hence give the possibility in the future to predict, by ellipsometric simulations, the proper device architecture in function of the preferred optical and electrical properties.

  16. Development of electrochemical biosensors with various types of zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatkina, O. V.; Kucherenko, I. S.; Soldatkin, O. O.; Pyeshkova, V. M.; Dudchenko, O. Y.; Akata Kurç, B.; Dzyadevych, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    In the work, different types of zeolites were used for the development of enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors. Zeolites were added to the biorecognition elements of the biosensors and served as additional components of the biomembranes or adsorbents for enzymes. Three types of biosensors (conductometric, amperometric and potentiometric) were studied. The developed biosensors were compared with the similar biosensors without zeolites. The biosensors contained the following enzymes: urease, glucose oxidase, glutamate oxidase, and acetylcholinesterase and were intended for the detection of urea, glucose, glutamate, and acetylcholine, respectively. Construction of the biosensors using the adsorption of enzymes on zeolites has several advantages: simplicity, good reproducibility, quickness, absence of toxic compounds. These benefits are particularly important for the standardization and further mass production of the biosensors. Furthermore, a biosensor for the sucrose determination contained a three-enzyme system (invertase/mutatorase/glucose oxidase), immobilized by a combination of adsorption on silicalite and cross-linking via glutaraldehyde; such combined immobilization demonstrated better results as compared with adsorption or cross-linking separately. The analysis of urea and sucrose concentrations in the real samples was carried out. The results, obtained with biosensors, had high correlation with the results of traditional analytical methods, thus the developed biosensors are promising for practical applications.

  17. Biosensor Architectures for High-Fidelity Reporting of Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushek, Omer; Lellouch, Annemarie C.; Vaux, David J.; Shahrezaei, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mechanisms of information processing in cellular signaling networks requires quantitative measurements of protein activities in living cells. Biosensors are molecular probes that have been developed to directly track the activity of specific signaling proteins and their use is revolutionizing our understanding of signal transduction. The use of biosensors relies on the assumption that their activity is linearly proportional to the activity of the signaling protein they have been engineered to track. We use mechanistic mathematical models of common biosensor architectures (single-chain FRET-based biosensors), which include both intramolecular and intermolecular reactions, to study the validity of the linearity assumption. As a result of the classic mechanism of zero-order ultrasensitivity, we find that biosensor activity can be highly nonlinear so that small changes in signaling protein activity can give rise to large changes in biosensor activity and vice versa. This nonlinearity is abolished in architectures that favor the formation of biosensor oligomers, but oligomeric biosensors produce complicated FRET states. Based on this finding, we show that high-fidelity reporting is possible when a single-chain intermolecular biosensor is used that cannot undergo intramolecular reactions and is restricted to forming dimers. We provide phase diagrams that compare various trade-offs, including observer effects, which further highlight the utility of biosensor architectures that favor intermolecular over intramolecular binding. We discuss challenges in calibrating and constructing biosensors and highlight the utility of mathematical models in designing novel probes for cellular signaling. PMID:25099816

  18. Glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized at gold nanoparticles decorated graphene-carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Mani, Veerappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Tung; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Lin, Chun-Mao; Hwa, Kuo-Yuan; Chen, Ting-Yo; Chen, Bo-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Biopolymer pectin stabilized gold nanoparticles were prepared at graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (GR-MWNTs/AuNPs) and employed for the determination of glucose. The formation of GR-MWNTs/AuNPs was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was successfully immobilized on GR-MWNTs/AuNPs film and direct electron transfer of GOx was investigated. GOx exhibits highly enhanced redox peaks with formal potential of -0.40 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The amount of electroactive GOx and electron transfer rate constant were found to be 10.5 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2) and 3.36 s(-1), respectively, which were significantly larger than the previous reports. The fabricated amperometric glucose biosensor sensitively detects glucose and showed two linear ranges: (1) 10 μM - 2 mM with LOD of 4.1 μM, (2) 2 mM - 5.2 mM with LOD of 0.95 mM. The comparison of the biosensor performance with reported sensors reveals the significant improvement in overall sensor performance. Moreover, the biosensor exhibited appreciable stability, repeatability, reproducibility and practicality. The other advantages of the fabricated biosensor are simple and green fabrication approach, roughed and stable electrode surface, fast in sensing and highly reproducible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthetic biology and biomimetic chemistry as converging technologies fostering a new generation of smart biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana; Antonacci, Amina; Lambreva, Maya D; Litescu, Simona C; Rea, Giuseppina

    2015-12-15

    Biosensors are powerful tunable systems able to switch between an ON/OFF status in response to an external stimulus. This extraordinary property could be engineered by adopting synthetic biology or biomimetic chemistry to obtain tailor-made biosensors having the desired requirements of robustness, sensitivity and detection range. Recent advances in both disciplines, in fact, allow to re-design the configuration of the sensing elements - either by modifying toggle switches and gene networks, or by producing synthetic entities mimicking key properties of natural molecules. The present review considered the role of synthetic biology in sustaining biosensor technology, reporting examples from the literature and reflecting on the features that make it a useful tool for designing and constructing engineered biological systems for sensing application. Besides, a section dedicated to bioinspired synthetic molecules as powerful tools to enhance biosensor potential is reported, and treated as an extension of the concept of biomimetic chemistry, where organic synthesis is used to generate artificial molecules that mimic natural molecules. Thus, the design of synthetic molecules, such as aptamers, biomimetics, molecular imprinting polymers, peptide nucleic acids, and ribozymes were encompassed as "products" of biomimetic chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Microfluidic-integrated biosensors: prospects for point-of-care diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suveen; Kumar, Saurabh; Ali, Md Azahar; Anand, Pinki; Agrawal, Ved Varun; John, Renu; Maji, Sagar; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing demand to integrate biosensors with microfluidics to provide miniaturized platforms with many favorable properties, such as reduced sample volume, decreased processing time, low cost analysis and low reagent consumption. These microfluidics-integrated biosensors would also have numerous advantages such as laminar flow, minimal handling of hazardous materials, multiple sample detection in parallel, portability and versatility in design. Microfluidics involves the science and technology of manipulation of fluids at the micro- to nano-liter level. It is predicted that combining biosensors with microfluidic chips will yield enhanced analytical capability, and widen the possibilities for applications in clinical diagnostics. The recent developments in microfluidics have helped researchers working in industries and educational institutes to adopt some of these platforms for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. This review focuses on the latest advancements in the fields of microfluidic biosensing technologies, and on the challenges and possible solutions for translation of this technology for POC diagnostic applications. We also discuss the fabrication techniques required for developing microfluidic-integrated biosensors, recently reported biomarkers, and the prospects of POC diagnostics in the medical industry. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  2. Protein Adsorption onto Nanomaterials for the Development of Biosensors and Analytical Devices: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Samir A.; Evans, Elizabeth; Benavidez, Tomás E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    An important consideration for the development of biosensors is the adsorption of the bio recognition element to the surface of a substrate. As the first step in the immobilization process, adsorption affects most immobilization routes and much attention is given into the research of this process to maximize the overall activity of the bio sensor. The use of nanomaterials, specifically nanoparticles and nanostructured films, offers advantageous properties that can be fine-tuned for interaction with specific proteins to maximize activity, minimize structural changes, and enhance the catalytic step. In the biosensor field, protein-nanomaterial interactions are an emerging trend that span across many disciplines. This review addresses recent publications about the proteins most frequently used, their most relevant characteristics, and the conditions required to adsorb them to nanomaterials. When relevant and available, subsequent analytical figures of merits are discussed for selected biosensors. The general trend amongst the research papers allows concluding that the use of nanomaterials has already provided significant improvements in the analytical performance of many biosensors and that this research field will continue to grow. PMID:25892065

  3. Recent advances in nanoplasmonic biosensors: applications and lab-on-a-chip integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Gerardo A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the recent progress in the nanofabrication field and the increasing demand for cost-effective, portable, and easy-to-use point-of-care platforms, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR biosensors have been subjected to a great scientific interest in the last few years. The progress observed in the research of this nanoplasmonic technology is remarkable not only from a nanostructure fabrication point of view but also in the complete development and integration of operative devices and their application. The potential benefits that LSPR biosensors can offer, such as sensor miniaturization, multiplexing opportunities, and enhanced performances, have quickly positioned them as an interesting candidate in the design of lab-on-a-chip (LOC optical biosensor platforms. This review covers specifically the most significant achievements that occurred in recent years towards the integration of this technology in compact devices, with views of obtaining LOC devices. We also discuss the most relevant examples of the use of the nanoplasmonic biosensors for real bioanalytical and clinical applications from assay development and validation to the identification of the implications, requirements, and challenges to be surpassed to achieve fully operative devices.

  4. A Toolbox of Genetically Encoded FRET-Based Biosensors for Rapid l-Lysine Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fast development of microbial production strains for basic and fine chemicals is increasingly carried out in small scale cultivation systems to allow for higher throughput. Such parallelized systems create a need for new rapid online detection systems to quantify the respective target compound. In this regard, biosensors, especially genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based biosensors, offer tremendous opportunities. As a proof-of-concept, we have created a toolbox of FRET-based biosensors for the ratiometric determination of l-lysine in fermentation broth. Methods: The sensor toolbox was constructed based on a sensor that consists of an optimized central lysine-/arginine-/ornithine-binding protein (LAO-BP flanked by two fluorescent proteins (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP, Citrine. Further sensor variants with altered affinity and sensitivity were obtained by circular permutation of the binding protein as well as the introduction of flexible and rigid linkers between the fluorescent proteins and the LAO-BP, respectively. Results: The sensor prototype was applied to monitor the extracellular l-lysine concentration of the l-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum strain DM1933 in a BioLector® microscale cultivation device. The results matched well with data obtained by HPLC analysis and the Ninhydrin assay, demonstrating the high potential of FRET-based biosensors for high-throughput microbial bioprocess optimization.

  5. Vacuum-ultraviolet ellipsometry spectra and structural properties of Pb(Zr,Ti)O.sub.3./sub. films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchaneck, G.; Chvostová, Dagmar; Kousal, J.; Železný, Vladimír; Lynnyková, Anna; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Gerlach, G.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 519, č. 9 (2011), s. 2885-2888 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/09/J017; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002; GA ČR GA202/08/1009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : PZT film * vacuum-ultraviolet ellipsometry * film structure * optical properties Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.890, year: 2011

  6. Spreeta-based biosensor for endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Koopal, K.; Meulenberg, E.; Haasnoot, W.; Irth, H.

    2007-01-01

    The construction and performance of an automated low-cost Spreeta¿-based prototype biosensor system for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is described. The system consists primarily of a Spreeta miniature liquid sensor incorporated into an aluminum flow cell holder, dedicated to

  7. Amperometric biosensors based on conducting nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes a multidisciplinary study towards the development of a glucose biosensor that in the future can be used for in vivo implantations. The research focuses on three major topics, viz. the construction of the glucose sensor, the development of a biocompatible coating and a study of

  8. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  9. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes-Halldorson,Vânia da Silva; Duran,Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  10. Microbial Biosensors for Selective Detection of Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven microbial strains were screened for their ability to detect disaccharides as components of Clark-type oxygen biosensors. Sensors responded to varying degrees to maltose, cellobiose, sucrose, and melibiose, but none responded strongly to lactose. Although microbial sensors are relatively nons...

  11. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  12. Boar taint detection using parasitoid biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the potential for a non-stinging wasp to be used as a biosensor in the pig industry, we trained wasps to 3 individual chemicals associated with boar taint. Training consisted of presenting the odors to hungry wasps while they were feeding on sugar. This associates the chemical with a fo...

  13. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  14. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  15. Development and Applications of Portable Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Tung, Steve

    2015-08-01

    The significance of microfluidics-based and microelectromechanical systems-based biosensors has been widely acknowledged, and many reviews have explored their potential applications in clinical diagnostics, personalized medicine, global health, drug discovery, food safety, and forensics. Because health care costs are increasing, there is an increasing need to remotely monitor the health condition of patients by point-of-care-testing. The demand for biosensors for detection of biological warfare agents has increased, and research is focused on ways of producing small portable devices that would allow fast, accurate, and on-site detection. In the past decade, the demand for rapid and accurate on-site detection of plant disease diagnosis has increased due to emerging pathogens with resistance to pesticides, increased human mobility, and regulations limiting the application of toxic chemicals to prevent spread of diseases. The portability of biosensors for on-site diagnosis is limited due to various issues, including sample preparation techniques, fluid-handling techniques, the limited lifetime of biological reagents, device packaging, integrating electronics for data collection/analysis, and the requirement of external accessories and power. Many microfluidic, electronic, and biological design strategies, such as handling liquids in biosensors without pumps/valves, the application of droplet-based microfluidics, paper-based microfluidic devices, and wireless networking capabilities for data transmission, are being explored. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  16. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Meimaridou, A.; Haasnoot, W.; Meulenberg, E.; Albertus, F.; Mizuguchi, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Irth, H.; Murk, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two

  17. Fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor. The biosensor is particularly suitable for use in microscale work in situ. In one embodiment, the biosensor comprises a reaction chamber disposed adjacent the distal end of a waveguide and adapted to receive therein a quantity of a sample containing an analyte. Leading into the chamber is a plurality of capillary conduits suitable for introducing into the chamber antibodies or other reagents suitable for selective interaction with a predetermined analyte. Following such interaction, the contents of the chamber may be subjected to an incident energy signal for developing fluorescence within the chamber that is detectable via the optical fiber and which is representative of the presence, i.e. concentration, of the selected analyte. Regeneration of the biosensor is accomplished by replacement of the reagents and/or the analyte, or a combination of these, at least in part via one or more of the capillary conduits. The capillary conduits extend from their respective terminal ends that are in fluid communication with the chamber, away from the chamber to respective location(s) remote from the chamber thereby permitting in situ location of the chamber and remote manipulation and/or analysis of the activity with the chamber.

  18. Disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    been used due to its rapid, easy handling and cost effective responses for the toxicity assessment in real water ... in the application of DNA as biosensors as it is found ... used as a preclinical safety assessment tool to screen ... out the work.

  19. Nano technologies for Biosensor and Bio chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.M.; Park, T.J.; Paskaleva, E.E.; Sun, F.; Seo, J.W.; Mehta, K.K.

    2015-01-01

    The bio sensing devices are characterized by their biological receptors, which have specificity to their corresponding analytes. These analytes are a vast and diverse group of biological molecules, DNAs, proteins (such as antibodies), fatty acids, or entire biological systems, such as pathogenic bacteria, viruses, cancerous cells, or other living organisms. A main challenge in the development of biosensor applications is the efficient recognition of a biological signal in a low signal-to-noise ratio environment, and its transduction into an electrochemical, optical, or other signals. The advent of nano material technology greatly increased the potential for achieving exquisite sensitivity of such devises, due to the innate high surface-to-volume ratio and high reactivity of the nano material. The second major challenge facing the biosensor application, that of sca lability, is addressed by multiplexing and miniaturizing of the biosensor devises into a bio chip. In recent years, biosensor and bio chip technologies have made significant progress by taking advantages of diverse kinds of nano materials that are derived from nano technology

  20. Development of Silicalite/Glucose Oxidase-Based Biosensor and Its Application for Glucose Determination in Juices and Nectars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudchenko, Oleksandr Ye; Pyeshkova, Viktoriya M.; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O.; Akata, Burcu; Kasap, Berna O.; Soldatkin, Alexey P.; Dzyadevych, Sergei V.

    2016-02-01

    The application of silicalite for improvement of enzyme adsorption on new stainless steel electrodes is reported. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized by two methods: cross-linking by glutaraldehyde (GOx-GA) and cross-linking by glutaraldehyde along with GOx adsorption on silicalite-modified electrode (SME) (GOx-SME-GA). The GOx-SME-GA biosensors were characterized by a four- to fivefold higher sensitivity than GOx-GA biosensor. It was concluded that silicalite together with GA sufficiently enhances enzyme adhesion on stainless steel electrodes. The developed GOx-SME-GA biosensors were characterized by good reproducibility of biosensor preparation (relative standard deviation (RSD)—18 %), improved signal reproducibility (RSD of glucose determination was 7 %), and good storage stability (29 % loss of activity after 18-day storage). A series of fruit juices and nectars was analyzed using GOx-SME-GA biosensor for determination of glucose concentration. The obtained results showed good correlation with the data of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ( R = 0.99).

  1. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaffino, R L; Mir, M; Samitier, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications. (paper)

  2. Construction and application of a zinc-specific biosensor for assessing the immobilization and bioavailability of zinc in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pulin; Huang Qiaoyun; Chen Wenli

    2012-01-01

    The inducibility and specificity of different czcRS operons in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied by lacZ gene fusions. The data of β-glycosidase activity confirmed that the czcR3 promoter responded quantitatively to zinc. A zinc-specific biosensor, P. putida X4 (pczcR3GFP), was constructed by fusing a promoterless enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) gene with the czcR3 promoter in the chromosome of P. putida X4. In water extracts of four different soils amended with zinc, the reporter strain detected about 90% of the zinc content of the samples. Both the bioavailability assessment and the sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the immobilization of zinc was highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of soils. The results also showed that the lability of zinc decreased over time. It is concluded that the biosensor constitutes an alternative system for the convenient evaluation of zinc toxicity in the environment. - Highlights: ► A zinc-specific bacterial biosensor was developed. ► Four spiked soils were used to test the application of this biosensor. ► The bioavailable zinc in soil-water extracts decreased due to aging. ► The immobilization and speciation of zinc were highly dependent on the soil type. - The immobilization and bioavailability of zinc in soil were investigated as a function of soil type and aging by a newly constructed zinc-specific biosensor coupled with chemical analysis.

  3. FTIR and Vis-FUV real time spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of polymer surface modifications during ion beam bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskarakis, A.; Gravalidis, C.; Logothetidis, S.

    2004-02-01

    The continuously increasing application of polymeric materials in many scientific and technological fields has motivated an extensive use of polymer surface treatments, which modify the physical and chemical properties of polymer surfaces leading to surface activation and promotion of the surface adhesion. Fourier transform IR spectroscopic ellipsometry (FTIRSE) and phase modulated ellipsometry (PME) in the IR and Vis-FUV spectral regions respectively have been employed for in situ and real time monitoring of the structural changes on the polymer surface obtained by Ar + ion bombardment. The polymers were industrially supplied polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) membranes. The Ar + ion bombardment has found to change the chemical bonding of the films and especially the amount of the CO, C-C and CC groups. The detailed study of the FTIRSE spectra reveals important information about the effect of the Ar + ion bombardment on each of the above bonding groups. Also, the modification of the characteristic features, attributed to electronic transitions in specific bonds of PET and PEN macromolecules, has been studied using PME.

  4. FTIR and Vis-FUV real time spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of polymer surface modifications during ion beam bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskarakis, A.; Gravalidis, C.; Logothetidis, S.

    2004-01-01

    The continuously increasing application of polymeric materials in many scientific and technological fields has motivated an extensive use of polymer surface treatments, which modify the physical and chemical properties of polymer surfaces leading to surface activation and promotion of the surface adhesion. Fourier transform IR spectroscopic ellipsometry (FTIRSE) and phase modulated ellipsometry (PME) in the IR and Vis-FUV spectral regions respectively have been employed for in situ and real time monitoring of the structural changes on the polymer surface obtained by Ar + ion bombardment. The polymers were industrially supplied polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) membranes. The Ar + ion bombardment has found to change the chemical bonding of the films and especially the amount of the C-O, C-C and C-C groups. The detailed study of the FTIRSE spectra reveals important information about the effect of the Ar + ion bombardment on each of the above bonding groups. Also, the modification of the characteristic features, attributed to electronic transitions in specific bonds of PET and PEN macromolecules, has been studied using PME

  5. Characterization of silicon-oxide interfaces and organic monolayers by IR-UV ellipsometry and FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P.; Patzner, P.; Osipov, A. V.; Hu, Z. G.; Lingenfelser, D.; Prunici, P.; Schmohl, A.

    2006-08-01

    VUV-laser-induced oxidation of Si(111)-(1×1):H, Si(100):H, and a-Si:H at 157 nm (F II laser) in pure O II and pure H IIO atmospheres was studied between 30°C and 250°C. The oxidation process was monitored in real time by spectroscopic ellipsometry (NIR-UV) and FTIR spectroscopy. The ellipsometric measurements could be simulated with a three-layer model, providing detailed information on the variation of the suboxide interface with the nature of the silicon substrate surface. Besides the silicon-dioxide and suboxide layer, a dense, disordered, roughly monolayer thick silicon layer was included, as found previously by molecular dynamics calculations. The deviations from the classical Deal-Grove mechanism and the self-limited growth of the ultrathin dioxide layers (TMS) groups and n-alkylthiol monolayers on gold-coated silicon. The C-H stretching vibrations of the methylene and methyl groups could be identified by FTIR spectroscopy and IR ellipsometry.

  6. Parametrization of optical properties of indium-tin-oxide thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry: Substrate interfacial reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; de Rosa, R.; Roca, F.; Summonte, C.; Plá, J.; Rizzoli, R.

    2002-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films deposited by sputtering and e-gun evaporation on both transparent (Corning glass) and opaque (c-Si, c-Si/SiO2) substrates and in c-Si/a-Si:H/ITO heterostructures have been analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the range 1.5-5.0 eV. Taking the SE advantage of being applicable to absorbent substrate, ellipsometry is used to determine the spectra of the refractive index and extinction coefficient of the ITO films. The effect of the substrate surface on the ITO optical properties is focused and discussed. To this aim, a parametrized equation combining the Drude model, which considers the free-carrier response at the infrared end, and a double Lorentzian oscillator, which takes into account the interband transition contribution at the UV end, is used to model the ITO optical properties in the useful UV-visible range, whatever the substrate and deposition technique. Ellipsometric analysis is corroborated by sheet resistance measurements.

  7. Future of biosensors: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Frieder W; Yarman, Aysu; Bachmann, Till; Hirsch, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan; Renneberg, Reinhard; Schumacher, Soeren; Wollenberger, Ulla; Teller, Carsten; Bier, Frank F

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors representing the technological counterpart of living senses have found routine application in amperometric enzyme electrodes for decentralized blood glucose measurement, interaction analysis by surface plasmon resonance in drug development, and to some extent DNA chips for expression analysis and enzyme polymorphisms. These technologies have already reached a highly advanced level and need minor improvement at most. The dream of the "100-dollar" personal genome may come true in the next few years provided that the technological hurdles of nanopore technology or of polymerase-based single molecule sequencing can be overcome. Tailor-made recognition elements for biosensors including membrane-bound enzymes and receptors will be prepared by cell-free protein synthesis. As alternatives for biological recognition elements, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been created. They have the potential to substitute antibodies in biosensors and biochips for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances, proteins, viruses, and living cells. They are more stable than proteins and can be produced in large amounts by chemical synthesis. Integration of nanomaterials, especially of graphene, could lead to new miniaturized biosensors with high sensitivity and ultrafast response. In the future individual therapy will include genetic profiling of isoenzymes and polymorphic forms of drug-metabolizing enzymes especially of the cytochrome P450 family. For defining the pharmacokinetics including the clearance of a given genotype enzyme electrodes will be a useful tool. For decentralized online patient control or the integration into everyday "consumables" such as drinking water, foods, hygienic articles, clothing, or for control of air conditioners in buildings and cars and swimming pools, a new generation of "autonomous" biosensors will emerge.

  8. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  9. A DNA biosensor for molecular diagnosis of Aeromonas hydrophila using zinc sulfide nanospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Negahdary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, identification of pathogenic bacteria using modern and accurate methods is inevitable. Integration in electrochemical measurements with nanotechnology has led to the design of efficient and sensitive DNA biosensors against bacterial agents. Here, efforts were made to detect Aeromonas hydrophila using aptamers as probes and zinc sulfide (ZnS nanospheres as signal enhancers and electron transfer facilitators. After modification of the working electrode area (in a screen-printed electrode with ZnS nanospheres through electrodeposition, the coated surface of a modified electrode with ZnS nanospheres was investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The size of synthesized ZnS nanospheres was estimated at about 20–50 nm and their shape was in the form of porous plates in microscopic observations. All electrochemical measurements were performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and constant potential amperometry (CPA techniques. The designed DNA biosensor was able to detect deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA of Aeromonas hydrophila in the range 1.0  ×  10−4 to 1.0  ×  10−9 mol L−1; the limit of detection (LOD in this study was 1  ×  10−13 mol L−1. This DNA biosensor showed satisfactory thermal and pH stability. Reproducibility for this DNA biosensor was measured and the relative standard deviation (RSD of the performance of this DNA biosensor was calculated as 5 % during 42 days.

  10. A paper-based nanomodified electrochemical biosensor for ethanol detection in beers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinti, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cinti@uniroma2.it; Basso, Mattia; Moscone, Danila; Arduini, Fabiana, E-mail: fabiana.arduini@uniroma2.it

    2017-04-01

    Herein, we report the first example of a paper-based screen-printed biosensor for the detection of ethanol in beer samples. Common office paper was adopted to fabricate the analytical device. The properties of this paper-based screen-printed electrode (SPE) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, and they were compared with the well-established polyester-based SPEs as well. Paper demonstrated similar properties when compared with polyester, highlighting suitability towards its utilization in sensor development, with the advantages of low cost and simple disposal by incineration. A nanocomposite formed by Carbon Black (CB) and Prussian Blue nanoparticles (PBNPs), namely CB/PBNPs, was utilized as an electrocatalyst to detect the hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzymatic reaction between alcohol oxidase (AOx) and ethanol. After optimizing the analytical parameters, such as pH, enzyme, concentration, and working potential, the developed biosensor allowed a facile quantification of ethanol up to 10 mM (0.058 %{sub vol}), with a sensitivity of 9.13 μA/mM cm{sup 2} (1574 μA/%{sub vol} cm{sup 2}) and a detection limit equal to 0.52 mM (0.003%{sub vol}). These satisfactory performances rendered the realized paper-based biosensor reliable over the analysis of ethanol contained in four different types of beers, including Pilsner, Weiss, Lager, and alcohol-free. The proposed manufacturing approach offers an affordable and sustainable tool for food quality control and for the realization of different electrochemical sensors and biosensors as well. - Highlights: • Novel ethanol biosensor fabricated onto office paper. • Enhanced hydrogen peroxide detection using Carbon black/Prussian blue nanoparticles. • Only 100 μL required to perform measurements. • Paper-based electrochemical device coupled with a portable potentiostat. • Rapid quantification of ethanol in beer samples.

  11. A paper-based nanomodified electrochemical biosensor for ethanol detection in beers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinti, Stefano; Basso, Mattia; Moscone, Danila; Arduini, Fabiana

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report the first example of a paper-based screen-printed biosensor for the detection of ethanol in beer samples. Common office paper was adopted to fabricate the analytical device. The properties of this paper-based screen-printed electrode (SPE) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, and they were compared with the well-established polyester-based SPEs as well. Paper demonstrated similar properties when compared with polyester, highlighting suitability towards its utilization in sensor development, with the advantages of low cost and simple disposal by incineration. A nanocomposite formed by Carbon Black (CB) and Prussian Blue nanoparticles (PBNPs), namely CB/PBNPs, was utilized as an electrocatalyst to detect the hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzymatic reaction between alcohol oxidase (AOx) and ethanol. After optimizing the analytical parameters, such as pH, enzyme, concentration, and working potential, the developed biosensor allowed a facile quantification of ethanol up to 10 mM (0.058 %_v_o_l), with a sensitivity of 9.13 μA/mM cm"2 (1574 μA/%_v_o_l cm"2) and a detection limit equal to 0.52 mM (0.003%_v_o_l). These satisfactory performances rendered the realized paper-based biosensor reliable over the analysis of ethanol contained in four different types of beers, including Pilsner, Weiss, Lager, and alcohol-free. The proposed manufacturing approach offers an affordable and sustainable tool for food quality control and for the realization of different electrochemical sensors and biosensors as well. - Highlights: • Novel ethanol biosensor fabricated onto office paper. • Enhanced hydrogen peroxide detection using Carbon black/Prussian blue nanoparticles. • Only 100 μL required to perform measurements. • Paper-based electrochemical device coupled with a portable potentiostat. • Rapid quantification of ethanol in beer samples.

  12. Dendrimer-based biosensor for chemiluminescent detection of DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Hun, X.; Qing, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a highly sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA using a novel bio barcode DNA probe modified with gold nanoparticles that were covered with a dendrimer. The modified probe is composed of gold nanoparticles, a dendrimer, the CL reagent, and the DNA. The capture probe DNA was immobilized on magnetic beads covered with gold. It first hybridizes with the target DNA and then with one terminal end of the signal DNA on the barcoded DNA probe. CL was generated by adding H 2 O 2 and Co(II) ions as the catalyst. The immobilization of dendrimer onto the gold nanoparticles can significantly enhance sensitivity and gives a detection limit of 6 fmol L -1 of target DNA. (author)

  13. Bioluminescent bioreporter pad biosensor for monitoring water toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Tim; Eltzov, Evgeni; Marks, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Toxicants in water sources are of concern. We developed a tool that is affordable and easy-to-use for monitoring toxicity in water. It is a biosensor composed of disposable bioreporter pads (calcium alginate matrix with immobilized bacteria) and a non-disposable CMOS photodetector. Various parameters to enhance the sensor's signal have been tested, including the effect of alginate and bacterium concentrations. The effect of various toxicants, as well as, environmental samples were tested by evaluating their effect on bacterial luminescence. This is the first step in the creation of a sensitive and simple operative tool that may be used in different environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PEG Functionalization of Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Microresonator Biosensors to Minimize Non-Specific Adsorption during Targeted, Label-Free Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyongjing Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM optical microresonator biosensors are a powerful tool for targeted detection of analytes at extremely low concentrations. However, in complex environments, non-specific adsorption can significantly reduce their signal to noise ratio, limiting their accuracy. To overcome this, poly(ethylene glycol (PEG can be employed in conjunction with appropriate recognition elements to create a nonfouling surface capable of detecting targeted analytes. This paper investigates a general route for the addition of nonfouling elements to WGM optical biosensors to reduce non-specific adsorption, while also retaining high sensitivity. We use the avidin-biotin analyte-recognition element system, in conjunction with PEG nonfouling elements, as a proof-of-concept, and explore the extent of non-specific adsorption of lysozyme and fibrinogen at multiple concentrations, as well as the ability to detect avidin in a concentration-dependent fashion. Ellipsometry, contact angle measurement, fluorescence microscopy, and optical resonator characterization methods were used to study non-specific adsorption, the quality of the functionalized surface, and the biosensor’s performance. Using a recognition element ratio to nonfouling element ratio of 1:1, we showed that non-specific adsorption could be significantly reduced over the controls, and that high sensitivity could be maintained. Due to the frequent use of biotin-avidin-biotin sandwich complexes in functionalizing sensor surfaces with biotin-labeled recognition elements, this chemistry could provide a common basis for creating a non-fouling surface capable of targeted detection. This should improve the ability of WGM optical biosensors to operate in complex environments, extending their application towards real-world detection.

  15. Immunodetection of salivary biomarkers by an optical microfluidic biosensor with polyethylenimine-modified polythiophene-C70 organic photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos

    2017-08-15

    This work reports a novel optical microfluidic biosensor with highly sensitive organic photodetectors (OPDs) for absorbance-based detection of salivary protein biomarkers at the point of care. The compact and miniaturized biosensor has comprised OPDs made of polythiophene-C 70 bulk heterojunction for the photoactive layer; whilst a calcium-free cathode interfacial layer, made of linear polyethylenimine, was incorporated to the photodetectors to enhance the low cost. The OPDs realized onto a glass chip were aligned to antibody-functionalized chambers of a poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chip, in where immunogold-silver assays were conducted. The biosensor has detected IL-8, IL-1β and MMP-8 protein in spiked saliva with high detection specificity and short analysis time exhibiting detection limits between 80pgmL -1 and 120pgmL -1 . The result for IL-8 was below the clinical established cut-off of 600pgmL -1 , which revealed the potential of the biosensor to early detection of oral cancer. The detection limit was also comparable to other previously reported immunosensors performed with bulky instrumentation or using inorganic photodetectors. The optical detection sensitivity of the polythiophene-C 70 OPD was enhanced by optimizing the thickness of the photoactive layer and anode interfacial layer prior to the saliva immunoassays. Further, the biosensor was tested with unspiked human saliva samples, and the results of measuring IL-8 and IL-1β were in statistical agreement with those provided by two commercial assays of ELISA. The optical microfluidic biosensor reported hereby offers an attractive and cost-effective tool to diagnostics or screening purposes at the point of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosensors in the small scale: methods and technology trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senveli, Sukru U; Tigli, Onur

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a review on biosensors with an emphasis on recent developments in the field. A brief history accompanied by a detailed description of the biosensor concepts is followed by rising trends observed in contemporary micro- and nanoscale biosensors. Performance metrics to quantify and compare different detection mechanisms are presented. A comprehensive analysis on various types and subtypes of biosensors are given. The fields of interest within the scope of this review are label-free electrical, mechanical and optical biosensors as well as other emerging and popular technologies. Especially, the latter half of the last decade is reviewed for the types, methods and results of the most prominently researched detection mechanisms. Tables are provided for comparison of various competing technologies in the literature. The conclusion part summarises the noteworthy advantages and disadvantages of all biosensors reviewed in this study. Furthermore, future directions that the micro- and nanoscale biosensing technologies are expected to take are provided along with the immediate outlook.

  17. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  18. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  19. Fundamental Design Principles for Transcription-Factor-Based Metabolite Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Ahmad A; Liu, Di; Zhang, Fuzhong; Oyarzún, Diego A

    2017-10-20

    Metabolite biosensors are central to current efforts toward precision engineering of metabolism. Although most research has focused on building new biosensors, their tunability remains poorly understood and is fundamental for their broad applicability. Here we asked how genetic modifications shape the dose-response curve of biosensors based on metabolite-responsive transcription factors. Using the lac system in Escherichia coli as a model system, we built promoter libraries with variable operator sites that reveal interdependencies between biosensor dynamic range and response threshold. We developed a phenomenological theory to quantify such design constraints in biosensors with various architectures and tunable parameters. Our theory reveals a maximal achievable dynamic range and exposes tunable parameters for orthogonal control of dynamic range and response threshold. Our work sheds light on fundamental limits of synthetic biology designs and provides quantitative guidelines for biosensor design in applications such as dynamic pathway control, strain optimization, and real-time monitoring of metabolism.

  20. Impedimetric biosensors for medical applications current progress and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Rushworth, Jo V; Goode, Jack A; Pike, Douglas J; Ahmed, Asif; Millner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors discuss the current progress in the medical application of impedimetric biosensors, along with the key challenges in the field. First, a general overview of biosensor development, structure and function is presented, followed by a detailed discussion of impedimetric biosensors and the principles of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Next, the current state-of-the art in terms of the science and technology underpinning impedance-based biosensors is reviewed in detail. The layer-by-layer construction of impedimetric sensors is described, including the design of electrodes, their nano-modification, transducer surface functionalization and the attachment of different bioreceptors. The current challenges of translating lab-based biosensor platforms into commercially-available devices that function with real patient samples at the POC are presented; this includes a consideration of systems integration, microfluidics and biosensor regeneration. The final section of this monograph ...

  1. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Rebecca L; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Flynn, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users...... the remaining panel of participants was 620 pM with a standard deviation of 980 pM. These results demonstrate that when this biosensor assay was designed and executed appropriately, the reported rate constants were consistent, and independent of which protein was immobilized and which biosensor was used....

  2. A Highly Responsive Silicon Nanowire/Amplifier MOSFET Hybrid Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Hybrid Biosensor Jieun Lee1,2, Jaeman Jang1, Bongsik Choi1, Jinsu Yoon1, Jee-Yeon Kim3, Yang-Kyu Choi3, Dong Myong Kim1, Dae Hwan Kim1 & Sung-Jin Choi1...This study demonstrates a hybrid biosensor comprised of a silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with an amplifier MOSFET to improve the current response...of field-effect-transistor (FET)-based biosensors . The hybrid biosensor is fabricated using conventional CMOS technology, which has the potential

  3. Temperature-dependent and anisotropic optical response of layered Pr0.5Ca1.5MnO4 probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majidi, M. A.; Thoeng, E.; Gogoi, P. K.; Wendt, F.; Wang, S. H.; Santoso, I.; Asmara, T. C.; Handayani, I. P.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Nugroho, A. A.; Ruebhausen, M.; Rusydi, A.; Rübhausen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We study the temperature dependence as well as anisotropy of optical conductivity (sigma(1)) in the pseudocubic single crystal Pr0.5Ca1.5MnO4 using spectrocopic ellipsometry. Three transition temperatures are observed and can be linked to charge-orbital (T-CO/OO similar to 320 K),

  4. Dealing with inaccuracies in the analysis on solvent-induced swelling of transparent thin films using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry in the visible wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempelman, Kristianne; Kappert, Emiel; Raaijmaker, Michiel J.T.; Wormeester, Herbert; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of transparent polymer films in the visible wavelength range is greatly reduced in the presence of a liquid ambient. The relatively high refractive index of a liquid ambient strongly amplifies the effects of experimental non-idealities, such as

  5. Optical properties and surface characterization of pulsed laser-deposited Cu2ZnSnS4 by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    2015-01-01

    the dielectric function of the films. It is found that the surface overlayer changes with film thickness and deposition temperature. Adopting different ellipsometry measurements and modeling strategies for each film, dielectric functions are extracted and compared. As the deposition temperature is increased...

  6. Temperature-induced transition of the diffusion mechanism of n-hexane in ultra-thin polystyrene films, resolved by in-situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wormeester, Herbert; Wessling, Matthias; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2013-01-01

    In-situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry is used to study diffusion of liquid n-hexane in silicon wafer supported 150 nm thick polystyrene films, in the temperature range 16e28 C. In the higher part of this temperature range Case II diffusion is shown to be dominant. In this case the temporal evolution of

  7. Determination of cocaine on banknotes through an aptamer-based electrochemiluminescence biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qihong; Chen, Lifen; Luo, Fang; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2011-04-01

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) "sandwich" biosensor has been developed to detect cocaine. The sandwich biosensor was fabricated on the basis of the fact that a single aptamer could be split into two fragments and the two dissociated parts could form a folded, associated complex in the presence of targets. One of these (capture probe), which had hexane-thiol at its 5'-terminus, was immobilized on a gold electrode via thiol-gold binding. The other one (detection probe) was labeled with the ECL reagent tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)-doped silica nanoparticles (RuSiNPs) at its 3'-terminus. Owing to the weak interaction between the two fragments, the sensor exhibited a low ECL signal in the absence of cocaine. After the target cocaine had been added to the solution, it induced association of the two fragments and stabilized the associated complexes, leading to immobilization of RuSiNPs on the electrode surface, and the ECL detected on the electrode surface was enhanced. The enhanced ECL intensity was directly proportional to the logarithm of the cocaine concentration in the range from 1.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-11) mol/L, with a detection limit of 3.7 × 10(-12) mol/L. The biosensor was applied to detect trace amounts of cocaine on banknotes with satisfactory results.

  8. Stepped piezoresistive microcantilever designs for biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu; Urban, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of a piezoresistive microcantilever biosensor strongly depends on its ability to convert the surface stress-induced deflections into large resistance change. To improve the sensitivity, we present stepped microcantilever biosensor designs that show significant resistance change compared with commonly used rectangular designs. The cantilever is made of silicon dioxide with a u-shaped silicon piezoresistor. The surface stress-induced deflections, bimorph deflection, fundamental resonant frequency and self-heating properties of the cantilever are studied using the FEM software. The surface stress-induced deflections are compared against the analytical model derived in this work. Results show that stepped designs have better signal-to-noise ratio than the rectangular ones and cantilevers with l/L between 0.5 and 0.75 are better designs for improving sensitivity. (paper)

  9. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Mohd Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI and cardiac troponin T (cTnT which have been considered as ‘gold standard’. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT. In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI biomarker.

  10. Biosensors for security and bioterrorism applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of biomarker/biosensor interactions for the rapid detection of weapons of bioterrorism, as well as current research trends and future developments and applications. It will be useful to researchers in this field who are interested in new developments in the early detection of such. The authors have collected very valuable and, in some aspects indispensable experience in the area i.e. in the development and application of portable biosensors for the detection of potential hazards. Most efforts are centered on the development of immunochemical assays including flow-lateral systems and engineered antibodies and their fragments. In addition, new approaches to the detection of enzyme inhibitors, direct enzymatic and microbial detection of metabolites and nutrients are elaborated. Some realized prototypes and concept devices applicable for the further use as a basis for the cooperation programs are also discussed. There is a particular focus on electrochemical and optical det...

  11. Covalent Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Hybrid Membranes for the Construction of Optical Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov Yotova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to covalently immobilize horse radish peroxidase (HRP onto new hybrid membranes synthesized by the sol-gel method based on silica precursors, dendrimers and cellulose derivatives. This new system will be used for designing biosensor. For investigation of the properties of membranes, HRP was used as a modeling enzyme. Kinetic parameters, pH and temperature optimum were determined, and the structure of the membranes surface was examined. Results showed higher relative and residual activity of HRP immobilized onto membranes with cellulose acetate butyrate with high molecular weight CAB/H. This novel biosensor could offer a simple, cheap and rapid tool with enhanced sensing performance as well as having potentials to find application in medicine, pharmacy, food and process control and environmental monitoring.

  12. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim; Wu, Dongqin; Ye, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Tra, Vu Thanh; Wei, Qiuping; Fu, Li; Yu, Aimin; Li, Lain-Jong; Lin, Cheng-Te

    2018-01-15

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a residue-free graphene film using a thin gold supporting layer. A Hall effect device made of this gold-transferred graphene was demonstrated to significantly enhance the sensitivity (≈ 5 times) for hybridization detection, with a linear detection range of 1pM to 100nM for DNA target. Our findings provide an efficient method to boost the sensitivity of graphene-based biosensors for DNA recognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with tyrosinase immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, J.; Kang, T.F.; Xue, R.; Ge, C.N.; Cheng, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a biosensor for phenolic compounds that is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with tyrosinase immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs possess excellent inherent electrical conductivity which enhances the electron transfer rate and results in good electrochemical catalytic activity towards the reduction of benzoquinone produced by enzymatic reaction. The biosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, and the experimental conditions were optimized. The cathodic current is linearly related to the concentration of the phenols between 0.4 μM and 10 μM, and the detection limit is 0.2 μM. The method was applied to the determination of phenol in water samples (author)

  14. Directed assembly of carbon nanotubes on soft substrates for use as a flexible biosensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Juntae; Yang Lee, Byung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Hong, Seunghun; Yi, Mihye; Jhon, Young Min

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a method to selectively assemble and align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on soft substrates for use as flexible biosensors. In this strategy, a thin oxide layer was deposited on soft substrates via low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and a linker-free assembly process was applied on the oxide surface where the assembly of carbon nanotubes was guided by methyl-terminated molecular patterns on the oxide surface. The electrical characterization of the fabricated CNT devices exhibited a typical p-type gating effect and 1/f noise behavior. The bare oxide regions near CNTs were functionalized with glutamate oxidase to fabricate selective biosensors to detect two forms of glutamate substances existing in different situations: L-glutamic acid, a neurotransmitting material, and monosodium glutamate, a food additive.

  15. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Fabien [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Stines-Chaumeil, Claire [Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS, Institut de Biochimie et de Genetique Cellulaires, 1 rue Camille Saint Saens, 33077 Bordeaux Cedex (France); Flexer, Victoria [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Andre, Isabelle [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792 Ingenierie des Systemes Biologiques et des Procedes, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Mano, Nicolas, E-mail: mano@crpp-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} A new mutant of PQQ-GDH designed for glucose biosensors application. {yields} First mutant of PQQ-GDH with higher activity for D-glucose than the Wild type. {yields} Position N428 is a key point to increase the enzyme activity. {yields} Molecular modeling shows that the N428 C mutant displays a better interaction for PQQ than the WT. -- Abstract: We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

  16. Nanotechnology: A Tool for Improved Performance on Electrochemical Screen-Printed (BioSensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Jubete

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Screen-printing technology is a low-cost process, widely used in electronics production, especially in the fabrication of disposable electrodes for (biosensor applications. The pastes used for deposition of the successive layers are based on a polymeric binder with metallic dispersions or graphite, and can also contain functional materials such as cofactors, stabilizers and mediators. More recently metal nanoparticles, nanowires and carbon nanotubes have also been included either in these pastes or as a later stage on the working electrode. This review will summarize the use of nanomaterials to improve the electrochemical sensing capability of screen-printed sensors. It will cover mainly disposable sensors and biosensors for biomedical interest and toxicity monitoring, compiling recent examples where several types of metallic and carbon-based nanostructures are responsible for enhancing the performance of these devices.

  17. ZnO nanorod biosensor for highly sensitive detection of specific protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Suk; Park, Won Il; Lee, Chul Ho; Yi, Gyu Chul

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of electrical biosensors based on functionalized ZnO nanorod surfaces with biotin for highly sensitive detection of biological molecules. Due to the clean interface and easy surface modification, the ZnO nanorod sensors can easily detect streptavidin binding down to a concentration of 25 nM, which is more sensitive than previously reported one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure electrical biosensors. In addition, the unique device structure with a micrometer-scale hole at the center of the ZnO nanorod's conducting channel reduces the leakage current from the aqueous solution, hence enhancing device sensitivity. Moreover, ZnO nanorod field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors may open up opportunities to create many other oxide nanorod electrical sensors for highly sensitive and selective real-time detection of a wide variety of biomolecules.

  18. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, Gerardo R.; Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds

  19. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Gerardo R; Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-10-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds.

  20. A New Laccase Biosensor For Polyphenols Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J.F. Rebelo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of polyphenols in human health is a well known fact. Prompted by that, a very intensive research has been directed to get a method to detect them, wich will improve the current ones. Laccase (p-diphenol:dioxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.10.3.2 is a multi-copper oxidase, wich couples catalytic oxidation of phenolic substrates with four electron reduction of dioxygen to water [1]. A maximum catalytic response in oxigenated electrolyte was observed between 4.5 and 5.5 [2], while for pH > 6.9 the laccase was found to be inactive [3]. We prepared a biosensor with laccase immobilised on a polyether sulphone membrane, at pH 4.5, wich was applied at Universal Sensors base electrode. Reduction of the product of oxidation of several polyphenols, catalysed by laccase, was done at a potential for wich the polyphenol of interest was found to respond. Reduction of catechol was found to occur at a potential of -200mV, wich is often referred to in the literature for polyphenolic biosensors. However other polyphenols did not respond at that potential. It was observed that (+- catechin produced a very large cathodic current when +100mV were applied to the laccase biosensor, both in aqueous acetate and 12% ethanol acetate buffer, whereas caffeic acid responded at -50mV. Other polyphenols tested were gallic acid, malvidin, quercetin, rutin, trans-resveratrol

  1. L-arginine biosensors: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Verma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Arginine has been considered as the most potent nutraceutics discovered ever, due to its powerful healing property, and it's been known to scientists as the Miracle Molecule. Arginine detection in fermented food products is necessary because, high level of arginine in foods forms ethyl carbamate (EC during the fermentation process. Therefore, L-arginine detection in fermented food products is very important as a control measure for quality of fermented foods, food supplements and beverages including wine. In clinical analysis arginine detection is important due to their enormous inherent versatility in various metabolic pathways, topmost in the synthesis of Nitric oxide (NO and tumor growth. A number of methods are being used for arginine detection, but biosensors technique holds prime position due to rapid response, high sensitivity and high specificity. However, there are many problems still to be addressed, including selectivity, real time analysis and interference of urea presence in the sample. In the present review we aim to emphasize the significant role of arginine in human physiology and foods. A small attempt has been made to discuss the various techniques used for development of arginine biosensor and how these techniques affect their performance. The choice of transducers for arginine biosensor ranges from optical, pH sensing, ammonia gas sensing, ammonium ion-selective, conductometric and amperometric electrodes because ammonia is formed as a final product.

  2. Design of nanostructured-based glucose biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komirisetty, Archana; Williams, Frances; Pradhan, Aswini; Konda, Rajini B.; Dondapati, Hareesh; Samantaray, Diptirani

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the design of glucose sensors that will be integrated with advanced nano-materials, bio-coatings and electronics to create novel devices that are highly sensitive, inexpensive, accurate, and reliable. In the work presented, a glucose biosensor and its fabrication process flow have been designed. The device is based on electrochemical sensing using a working electrode with bio-functionalized zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-rods. Among all metal oxide nanostructures, ZnO nano-materials play a significant role as a sensing element in biosensors due to their properties such as high isoelectric point (IEP), fast electron transfer, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and chemical stability which are very crucial parameters to achieve high sensitivity. Amperometric enzyme electrodes based on glucose oxidase (GOx) are used due to their stability and high selectivity to glucose. The device also consists of silicon dioxide and titanium layers as well as platinum working and counter electrodes and a silver/silver chloride reference electrode. Currently, the biosensors are being fabricated using the process flow developed. Once completed, the sensors will be bio-functionalized and tested to characterize their performance, including their sensitivity and stability.

  3. Monitoring the layer-by-layer self-assembly of graphene and graphene oxide by spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai-Ge; Chang, Meng-Jie; Wang, Hang-Xing; Xie, Yu-Long; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of graphene oxide, graphene and copper (II) phthalocyanine dye have been successfully fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach. We present the first variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) investigation on these graphene-dye hybrid thin films. The thickness evaluation suggested that our LbL assembly process produces highly uniform and reproducible thin films. We demonstrate that the refractive indices of the graphene-dye thin films undergo dramatic variation in the range close to the absorption of the dyes. This investigation provides new insight to the optical properties of graphene containing thin films and shall help to establish an appropriate optical model for graphene-based hybrid materials.

  4. Optical properties of LiGaS{sub 2}: an ab initio study and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V V [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Lin, Z S [Beijing Center for Crystal R and D, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2711, Beijing 100190 (China); Isaenko, L I; Lobanov, S I [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V G [Laboratory of Physical Bases of Integrated Microelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kruchinin, V N, E-mail: zslin@mail.ipc.ac.c [Laboratory for Ellipsometry of Semiconductor Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-11

    Electronic and optical properties of lithium thiogallate crystal, LiGaS{sub 2}, have been investigated by both experimental and theoretical methods. The plane-wave pseudopotential method based on DFT theory has been used for band structure calculations. The electronic parameters of Ga 3d orbitals have been corrected by the DFT+U methods to be consistent with those measured with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Evolution of optical constants of LiGaS{sub 2} over a wide spectral range was determined by developed first-principles theory and dispersion curves were compared with optical parameters defined by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range 1.2-5.0 eV. Good agreement has been achieved between theoretical and experimental results.

  5. Optical constants of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite thin films measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2016-07-14

    The lack of optical constants information for hybrid perovskite of CH3NH3PbBr3 in thin films form can delay the progress of efficient LED or laser demonstration. Here, we report on the optical constants (complex refractive index and dielectric function) of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Due to the existence of voids, the refractive index of the thin films is around 8% less than the single crystals counterpart. The energy bandgap is around 2.309 eV as obtained from photoluminescence and spectrophotometry spectra, and calculated from the SE analysis. The precise measurement of optical constants will be useful in designing optical devices using CH3NH3PbBr3 thin films.

  6. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gupta, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Carpene, E., E-mail: ettore.carpene@polimi.it [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  7. Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry investigation of homoepitaxial GaN grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tong-Ho; Choi, Soojeong; Wu, Pae; Brown, April [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, 128 Hudson Hall, Durham, NC (United States); Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Moto, Akihiro [Innovation Core SEI, Inc., 3235 Kifer Road, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on GaN template substrates (GaN on sapphire) is investigated with in-situ multi-channel spectroscopic ellipsometry. Growth is performed under various Ga/N flux ratios at growth temperatures in the range 710-780 C. The thermal roughening of the GaN template caused by decomposition of the surface is investigated through the temporal variation of the GaN pseudodielectric function over the temperature range of 650 C to 850 C. The structural, morphological, and optical properties are also discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Investigation of nanocrystalline Epi-Si/γ-Al2O3 heterostructure deposited on Si substrate by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatun, Mosammat Halima; Shahjahan, Mohammad; Ito, Ryoki; Sawada, Kazuaki; Ishida, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    In this work, micro-structural and interfacial studies of the epi-Si/γ-Al 2 O 3 heterostructure were undertaken by spectroscopic ellipsometry, and compared with the results of atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimental ellipsometric data were fitted with the theoretical calculations using effective medium approximation for each layer of the structure. It was observed that the epitaxial silicon layer consists of a fraction of amorphous Si and crystalline Si. The percentage of amorphous silicon increases with the decrease of deposition temperature and with the increase of the deposition rate. The γ-Al 2 O 3 layer produces a hydrostatic pressure on the Si substrate and the amount of hydrostatic pressure was measured to be 8 x 10 9 dyn/cm 2

  9. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO 2 single crystals as a benchmark

  10. An amperometric hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on Co3O4 nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaçar, Ceren; Dalkiran, Berna; Erden, Pınar Esra; Kiliç, Esma

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was constructed by combining the advantageous properties of MWCNTs and Co 3 O 4 . • Incorporating Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles into MWCNTs/gelatin film increased the electron transfer. • Co 3 O 4 /MWCNTs/gelatin/HRP/Nafion/GCE showed strong anti-interference ability. • Hydrogen peroxide was successfully determined in disinfector with an average recovery of 100.78 ± 0.89. - Abstract: In this work a new type of hydrogen peroxide biosensor was fabricated based on the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by cross-linking on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and gelatin. The introduction of MWCNTs and Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles not only enhanced the surface area of the modified electrode for enzyme immobilization but also facilitated the electron transfer rate, resulting in a high sensitivity of the biosensor. The fabrication process of the sensing surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide was investigated by holding the modified electrode at −0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The biosensor showed optimum response within 5 s at pH 7.0. The optimized biosensor showed linear response range of 7.4 × 10 −7 –1.9 × 10 −5 M with a detection limit of 7.4 × 10 −7 . The applicability of the purposed biosensor was tested by detecting hydrogen peroxide in disinfector samples. The average recovery was calculated as 100.78 ± 0.89

  11. Characterization of μc-Si:H/a-Si:H tandem solar cell structures by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Daisuke; Yuguchi, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform the structural characterization of Si thin-film solar cells having submicron-size rough textured surfaces, we have developed an optical model that can be utilized for the spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) analysis of a multilayer solar cell structure consisting of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) layers fabricated on textured SnO 2 :F substrates. To represent the structural non-uniformity in the textured structure, the optical response has been calculated from two regions with different thicknesses of the Si layers. Moreover, in the optical model, the interface layers are modeled by multilayer structures assuming two-phase composites and the volume fractions of the phases in the layers are controlled by the structural curvature factor. The polarized reflection from the μc-Si:H layer that shows extensive surface roughening during the growth has also been modeled. In this study, a state-of-the-art solar cell structure with the textured μc-Si:H (2000 nm)/ZnO (100 nm)/a-Si:H (200 nm)/SnO 2 :F/glass substrate structure has been characterized. The μc-Si:H/a-Si:H textured structure deduced from our SE analysis shows remarkable agreement with that observed by transmission electron microscopy. From the above results, we have demonstrated the high-precision characterization of highly-textured μc-Si:H/a-Si:H solar cell structures. - Highlights: • Characterization of textured μc-Si:H/a-Si:H solar cell structures by ellipsometry • A new optical model using surface area and multilayer models • High precision characterization of submicron-range rough interface structures

  12. Investigating organic multilayers by spectroscopic ellipsometry: specific and non-specific interactions of polyhistidine with NTA self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Solano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A versatile strategy for protein–surface coupling in biochips exploits the affinity for polyhistidine of the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA group loaded with Ni(II. Methods based on optical reflectivity measurements such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE allow for label-free, non-invasive monitoring of molecule adsorption/desorption at surfaces.Results: This paper describes a SE study about the interaction of hexahistidine (His6 on gold substrates functionalized with a thiolate self-assembled monolayer bearing the NTA end group. By systematically applying the difference spectra method, which emphasizes the small changes of the ellipsometry spectral response upon the nanoscale thickening/thinning of the molecular film, we characterized different steps of the process such as the NTA-functionalization of Au, the adsorption of the His6 layer and its eventual displacement after reaction with competitive ligands. The films were investigated in liquid, and ex situ in ambient air. The SE investigation has been complemented by AFM measurements based on nanolithography methods (nanografting mode.Conclusion: Our approach to the SE data, exploiting the full spectroscopic potential of the method and basic optical models, was able to provide a picture of the variation of the film thickness along the process. The combination of δΔi+1,i(λ, δΨi+1,i(λ (layer-addition mode and δΔ†i',i+1(λ, δΨ†i',i+1(λ (layer-removal mode difference spectra allowed us to clearly disentangle the adsorption of His6 on the Ni-free NTA layer, due to non specific interactions, from the formation of a neatly thicker His6 film induced by the Ni(II-loading of the NTA SAM.

  13. Ellipsometry and energy characterization of the electron impact polymerization in the range 0–20 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyn, V.I.

    2016-01-01

    The electron impact polymerization of adsorbed vapors of a hydrocarbon vacuum oil with molecular mass 450 Da (C 32 H 66 ) has been studied in-situ in the range 0–20 eV using ellipsometry and a servo system with the Kelvin's vibrating probe. This allowed registering at the same time the two energy-dependent characteristics (spectra) of the process: the film growth rate and the electrical potential of the irradiated surface. The first spectrum has two resonance maxima near 2.5 and 9.5 eV while the surface potential has only one weak extremum near 9.5 eV. The first growth rate peak at 2.5 eV was connected with a creation of radicals through a resonant process of the dissociative electron attachment and beginning polymerization. The peaks at 9.5 eV in both the spectra mean accelerating polymerization and decreasing surface charge owing to simultaneous birth of highly active radicals and free electrons. The single resonant process controlling both the processes simultaneously is the dissociative attachment of an electron to an anti-bonding molecular orbital, almost the same as at the 2.5 eV but differing by deeper decomposition of the transient anion, among the products of which are now not the radicals only but also free electrons. The kinetic curves obtained in pulsed regimes of the electron bombardment were qualitatively identical for different precursors and were used for calculations of cross sections of these processes. - Highlights: • Obtaining spectra of activated polymerization using ellipsometry and Kelvin probe. • Identified: two resonant and one non-resonant mechanisms of the activation. • The resonances are due to the action of the dissociative electron attachment. • Kinetics of transient processes in adsorbed layer under 20 eV pulsed electron beam.

  14. An improved glycerol biosensor with an Au-FeS-NAD-glycerol-dehydrogenase anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya; Fernando, Sandun

    2017-06-15

    An improved glycerol biosensor was developed via direct attachment of NAD + -glycerol dehydrogenase coenzyme-apoenzyme complex onto supporting gold electrodes, using novel inorganic iron (II) sulfide (FeS)-based single molecular wires. Sensing performance factors, i.e., sensitivity, a detection limit and response time of the FeS and conventional pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-based biosensor were evaluated by dynamic constant potential amperometry at 1.3V under non-buffered conditions. For glycerol concentrations ranging from 1 to 25mM, a 77% increase in sensitivity and a 53% decrease in detection limit were observed for the FeS-based biosensor when compared to the conventional PQQ-based counterpart. The electrochemical behavior of the FeS-based glycerol biosensor was analyzed at different concentrations of glycerol, accompanied by an investigation into the effects of applied potential and scan rate on the current response. Effects of enzyme stimulants ((NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O) concentrations and buffers/pH (potassium phosphate buffer pH 6-8, Tris buffer pH 8-10) on the current responses generated by the FeS-based glycerol biosensor were also studied. The optimal detection conditions were 0.03M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and 0.3µm MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O in non-buffered aqueous electrolyte under stirring whereas under non-stirring, Tris buffer at pH 10 with 0.03M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and 30µm MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O were found to be optimal detection conditions. Interference by glucose, fructose, ethanol, and acetic acid in glycerol detection was studied. The observations indicated a promising enhancement in glycerol detection using the novel FeS-based glycerol sensing electrode compared to the conventional PQQ-based one. These findings support the premise that FeS-based bioanodes are capable of biosensing glycerol successfully and may be applicable for other enzymatic biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Papalia, Giusseppe A.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Beusink, J.B.; Pak, Brian J.; Myszka, David G.; more, more

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users

  16. Silicon-on-Insulator Nanowire Based Optical Waveguide Biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingyu; Liu, Yong; Chen, Yangqing; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire have been developed for label free molecular detection. This paper reviews our work on the design, fabrication and measurement of SOI nanowire based high-sensitivity biosensors employing Vernier effect. Biosensing experiments using cascaded double-ring sensor and Mach-Zehnder- ring sensor integrated with microfluidic channels are demonstrated (paper)

  17. Biosensors engineered from conditionally stable ligand-binding domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Feng, Justin; Mandell, Daniel J.; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Jester, Benjamin Ward; Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2017-09-19

    Disclosed is a biosensor engineered to conditionally respond to the presence of specific small molecules, the biosensors including conditionally stable ligand-binding domains (LBDs) which respond to the presence of specific small molecules, wherein readout of binding is provided by reporter genes or transcription factors (TFs) fused to the LBDs.

  18. Biosensor Urea Berbasis Biopolimer Khitin Sebagai Matriks Immobilisasi

    OpenAIRE

    Nazruddin Nazaruddin

    2007-01-01

    Penelitian tentang biosensor urea menggunakan biopolimer khitin sebagai matriks immobilisasi telah dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja biosensor yang dihasilkan yang meliputi sensitivitas, trayek pengukuran, limit deteksi, waktu respon, koefisien selektifitas, dan waktu hidup. Penelitian meliputi beberapa tahap yaitu pembuatan membran polimer khitin dan immobilisasi enzim urease, pelekatan membran khitin pada elektroda pH, dan pengukuran parameter kinerja elektroda. H...

  19. A biosensor device and a method of manufacturing the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2017-01-01

    A biosensor device (100) for detecting biological particles, the biosensor device (100) comprising a substrate (102), a regular pattern of pores (104) formed in the substrate (102), and a plurality of sensor active structures (106) each of which being arranged on a surface of a corresponding one of

  20. Translating University Biosensor Research to a High School Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Bank, Alex; Turpeinen, Dylan; King, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates is great. To interest more students into STEM degrees, we made our graphene biosensor research portable, inexpensive, and safe to demonstrate technology development to high school students. The students increased their knowledge of biosensors and proteins, and…

  1. A biosensor device and a method of manufacturing the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A biosensor device (100) for detecting biological particles, the biosensor device (100) comprising a substrate (102), a regular pattern of pores (104) formed in the substrate (102), and a plurality of sensor active structures (106) each of which being arranged on a surface of a corresponding one of

  2. Enhanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin I. Bayala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land Surface Temperature (LST is a key parameter in the energy balance model. However, the spatial resolution of the retrieved LST from sensors with high temporal resolution is not accurate enough to be used in local-scale studies. To explore the LST–Normalised Difference Vegetation Index relationship potential and obtain thermal images with high spatial resolution, six enhanced image sharpening techniques were assessed: the disaggregation procedure for radiometric surface temperatures (TsHARP, the Dry Edge Quadratic Function, the Difference of Edges (Ts∗DL and three models supported by the relationship of surface temperature and water stress of vegetation (Normalised Difference Water Index, Normalised Difference Infrared Index and Soil wetness index. Energy Balance Station data and in situ measurements were used to validate the enhanced LST images over a mixed agricultural landscape in the sub-humid Pampean Region of Argentina (PRA, during 2006–2010. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (EOS-MODIS thermal datasets were assessed for different spatial resolutions (e.g., 960, 720 and 240 m and the performances were compared with global and local TsHARP procedures. Results suggest that the Ts∗DL technique is the most adequate for simulating LST to high spatial resolution over the heterogeneous landscape of a sub-humid region, showing an average root mean square error of less than 1 K.

  3. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  4. Introduction to Biosensors From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors discusses underlying circuitry of sensors for biomedical and biological engineers as well as biomedical sensing modalities for electrical engineers while providing an applications-based approach to the study of biosensors with over 13 extensive, hands-on labs. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors and ending with more complicated biosensors. This book also: Provides electrical engineers with the specific knowledge they need to understand biological sensing modalities Provides biomedical engineers with a solid background in circuits and systems Includes complete coverage of temperature sensors, electrochemical sensors, DNA and immunosensors, piezoelectric sensors and immunosensing in a micofluidic device Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors aims to provide an interdisciplinary approach to biosensors that will be apprecia...

  5. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Xu, Jin; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Xiangyang; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-17

    Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  6. DNA Nanotechnology-Enabled Interfacial Engineering for Biosensor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dekai; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai

    2018-06-12

    Biosensors represent biomimetic analytical tools for addressing increasing needs in medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, security, and biodefense. Nevertheless, widespread real-world applications of biosensors remain challenging due to limitations of performance, including sensitivity, specificity, speed, and reproducibility. In this review, we present a DNA nanotechnology-enabled interfacial engineering approach for improving the performance of biosensors. We first introduce the main challenges of the biosensing interfaces, especially under the context of controlling the DNA interfacial assembly. We then summarize recent progress in DNA nanotechnology and efforts to harness DNA nanostructures to engineer various biological interfaces, with a particular focus on the use of framework nucleic acids. We also discuss the implementation of biosensors to detect physiologically relevant nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules, ions, and other biomarkers. This review highlights promising applications of DNA nanotechnology in interfacial engineering for biosensors and related areas.

  7. Introduction to biosensors from electric circuits to immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    This book equips students with a thorough understanding of various types of sensors and biosensors that can be used for chemical, biological, and biomedical applications, including but not limited to temperature sensors, strain sensor, light sensors, spectrophotometric sensors, pulse oximeter, optical fiber probes, fluorescence sensors, pH sensor, ion-selective electrodes, piezoelectric sensors, glucose sensors, DNA and immunosensors, lab-on-a-chip biosensors, paper-based lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and microcontroller-based sensors. The author treats the study of biosensors with an applications-based approach, including over 15 extensive, hands-on labs given at the end of each chapter. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors, and ending with more complicated biosensors. New to this second edition are sections on op-amp filters, pulse oximetry, meat quality monitoring, advanced fluorescent dyes, autofluorescence, various...

  8. Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Qi, Hairong [Knoxville, TN; Wang, Xiaoling [San Jose, CA

    2012-04-17

    A method of biosensor-based detection of toxins comprises the steps of providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

  9. Review of Micro/Nanotechnologies for Microbial Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won eLim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A microbial biosensor is an analytical device with a biologically integrated transducer that generates a measurable signal indicating the analyte concentration. This method is ideally suited for the analysis of extracellular chemicals and the environment, and for metabolic sensory-regulation. Although microbial biosensors show promise for application in various detection fields, some limitations still remain such as poor selectivity, low sensitivity, and impractical portability. To overcome such limitations, microbial biosensors have been integrated with many recently developed micro/nanotechnologies and applied to a wide range of detection purposes. This review article discusses micro/nanotechnologies that have been integrated with microbial biosensors and summarizes recent advances and the applications achieved through such novel integration. Future perspectives on the combination of micro/nanotechnologies and microbial biosensors will be discussed, and the necessary developments and improvements will be strategically deliberated.

  10. Multiplexed lateral flow biosensors: Technological advances for radically improving point-of-care diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-09-15

    Lateral flow biosensors are a leading technology in point-of-care diagnostics due to their simplicity, rapidness and low cost. Their primacy in this arena continues through technological breakthroughs such as multiplexing: the detection of more than one biomarker in a single assay. Multiplexing capacity is critical for improving diagnostic efficiency, enhancing the diagnostic precision for specific diseases and reducing diagnostic cost. Here we review, for the first time, the various types and strategies employed for creating multiplexed lateral flow biosensors. These are classified into four main categories in terms of specific application or multiplexing level, namely linear, parameter, spatial and conceptual. We describe the practical applications and implications for each approach and compare their advantages and disadvantages. Importantly, multiplexing is still subject to limitations of the traditional lateral flow biosensor, such as sensitivity and specificity. However, by pushing the limitations of the traditional medium into the multiplex arena, several technological breakthroughs are emerging with novel solutions that further expand the utility of lateral flow biosensing for point-of-care applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid detection of urinary polyomavirus BK by heterodyne-based surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Chen; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2014-01-01

    In renal transplant patients, immunosuppressive therapy may result in the reactivation of polyomavirus BK (BKV), leading to polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN), which inevitably causes allograft failure. Since the treatment outcomes of PVAN remain unsatisfactory, early identification and continuous monitoring of BKV reactivation and reduction of immunosuppressants are essential to prevent PVAN development. The present study demonstrated that the developed dual-channel heterodyne-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is applicable for the rapid detection of urinary BKV. The use of a symmetrical reference channel integrated with the poly(ethylene glycol)-based low-fouling self-assembled monolayer to reduce the environmental variations and the nonspecific noise was proven to enhance the sensitivity in urinary BKV detection. Experimentally, the detection limit of the biosensor for BKV detection was estimated to be around 8500 copies/mL. In addition, urine samples from five renal transplant patients were tested to rapidly distinguish PVAN-positive and PVAN-negative renal transplant patients. By virtue of its simplicity, rapidity, and applicability, the SPR biosensor is a remarkable potential to be used for continuous clinical monitoring of BKV reactivation.

  12. Nanomaterials-based biosensors for detection of microorganisms and microbial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutarlie, Laura; Ow, Sian Yang; Su, Xiaodi

    2017-04-01

    Detection of microorganisms and microbial toxins is important for health and safety. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, nanomaterials have been extensively used to develop biosensors for rapid detection of microorganisms with microbial cells and toxins as target analytes. In this paper, the design principles of nanomaterials-based biosensors for four selected analyte categories (bacteria cells, toxins, mycotoxins, and protozoa cells), closely associated with the target analytes' properties is reviewed. Five signal transducing methods that are less equipment intensive (colorimetric, fluorimetric, surface enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemical, and magnetic relaxometry methods) is described and compared for their sensory performance (in term oflimit of detection, dynamic range, and response time) for all analyte categories. In the end, the suitability of these five sensing principles for on-site or field applications is discussed. With a comprehensive coverage of nanomaterials, design principles, sensing principles, and assessment on the sensory performance and suitability for on-site application, this review offers valuable insight and perspective for designing suitable nanomaterials-based microorganism biosensors for a given application. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electrodeposition of enzymes-integrated mesoporous composite films by interfacial templating: A paradigm for electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dongming; Tan, Yiwei

    2014-01-01

    The development of nanostructured electrodes for electrochemical biosensors is of significant interest for modern detection, portable devices, and enhanced performance. However, development of such sensors still remains challenging due to the time-consuming, detriment-to-nature, and costly modifications of both electrodes and enzymes. In this work, we report a simple one-step approach to fabricating high-performance, direct electron transfer (DET) based nanoporous enzyme-embedded electrodes by electrodeposition coupled with recent progress in potential-controlled interfacial surfactant assemblies. In contrast to those previously electrodeposited mesoporous materials that are not bioactive, we imparted the biofunctionality to electrodeposited mesoporous thin films by means of the amphiphilic phospholipid templates strongly interacting with enzymes. Thus, phospholipid-templated mesoporous ZnO films covalently inlaid with the pristine enzymes were prepared by simple one-step electrodeposition. We further demonstrate two examples of such hybrid film electrodes embedded with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glucose oxidase (GOx), which are effectively employed as electrochemical biosensors for amperometric sensing of ethanol and glucose without using any electron relays. The favorable mass transport and large contact surface area provided by nanopores play an important role in improving the performance of these two biosensors, such as excellent sensitivities, low detection limits, and fast response. The matrix mesoporous films acting as effective electronic bridges are responsible for DET between enzyme molecules and metal electrode

  14. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A DNA biosensor based on the electrocatalytic oxidation of amine by a threading intercalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhiqiang; Tansil, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor for the detection of DNA based a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) capture probe (CP) modified indium tin oxide electrode (ITO) is described in this report. After hybridization, a threading intercalator, N,N'-bis[(3-propyl)-imidazole]-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (PIND) imidazole complexed with Ru(bpy) 2 Cl (PIND-Ru, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), was introduced to the biosensor. PIND-Ru selectively intercalated to double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) and became immobilized on the biosensor surface. Voltammetric tests showed highly stable and reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction processes and the peak currents can directly be utilized for DNA quantification. When the tests were conducted in an amine-containing medium, Tris-HCl buffer for example, a remarkable improvement in the voltammetric response and noticeable enhancements of voltammetric and amperometric sensitivities were observed due to the electrocatalytic activity of the [Ru(bpy) 2 Cl] redox moieties. Electrocatalytic current was observed when as little as 3.0 attomoles of DNA was present in the sample solution

  16. Flexible electrochemical biosensors based on graphene nanowalls for the real-time measurement of lactate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianwei; Sun, Tai; Song, Xuefen; Ran, Qincui; Yu, Chongsheng; Yang, Jun; Feng, Hua; Yu, Leyong; Wei, Dapeng

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate a flexible biosensor for lactate detection based on l-lactate oxidase immobilized by chitosan film cross-linked with glutaraldehyde on the surface of a graphene nanowall (GNW) electrode. The oxygen-plasma technique was developed to enhance the wettability of the GNWs, and the strength of the sensor’s oxidation response depended on the concentration of lactate. First, in order to eliminate interference from other substances, biosensors were primarily tested in deionized water and displayed good electrochemical reversibility at different scan rates (20-100 mV s-1), a large index range (1.0 μM to 10.0 mM) and a low detection limit (1.0 μM) for lactate. Next, these sensors were further examined in phosphate buffer solution (to mimick human body fluids), and still exhibited high sensitivity, stability and flexibility. These results show that the GNW-based lactate biosensors possess important potential for application in clinical analysis, sports medicine and the food industry.

  17. Gold and TiO2 Nanostructure Surfaces for Assembling of Electrochemical Biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curulli, A.; Zane, D.

    2008-01-01

    Devices based on nano materials are emerging as a powerful and general class of ultrasensitive sensors for the direct detection of biological and chemical species. In this work, we report the preparation and the full characterization of nano materials such as gold nano wires and TiO 2 nano structured films to be used for assembling of electrochemical biosensors. Gold nano wires were prepared by electroless deposition within the pores of polycarbonate particle track-etched membranes (PMS). Glucose oxidase was deposited onto the nano wires using self-assembling monolayer as an anchor layer for the enzyme molecules. Finally, cyclic voltammetry was performed for different enzymes to test the applicability of gold nano wires as biosensors. Considering another interesting nano material, the realization of functionalized TiO 2 thin films on Si substrates for the immobilization of enzymes is reported. Glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase immobilized onto TiO 2 -based nano structured surfaces exhibited a pair of well-defined and quasi reversible voltammetric peaks. The electron exchange between the enzyme and the electrodes was greatly enhanced in the TiO 2 nano structured environment. The electrocatalytic activity of HRP and GOD embedded in TiO 2 electrodes toward H 2 O 2 and glucose, respectively, may have a potential perspective in the fabrication of third-generation biosensors based on direct electrochemistry of enzymes.

  18. Label-free detection of sex determining region Y (SRY) via capacitive biosensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we present for the first time, the use of a simple fractal capacitive biosensor for the quantification and detection of sex-determining region Y (SRY) genes. This section of genetic code, which is found on the Y chromosome, finds importance for study as it causes fetuses to develop characteristics of male sex-like gonads when a mutation occurs. It is also an important genetic code in men, and disorders involving the SRY gene can cause infertility and sexual malfunction that lead to a variety of gene mutational disorders. We have therefore designed silicon-based, label-free fractal capacitive biosensors to quantify various proteins and genes. We take advantage of a good dielectric material, Parylene C for enhancing the performance of the sensors. We have integrated these sensors with a simple microchannel for easy handling of fluids on the detection area. The read-out value of an Agilent LCR meter used to measure capacitance of the sensor at a frequency of 1 MHz determined gene specificity and gene quantification. These data revealed that the capacitance measurement of the capacitive biosensor for the SRY gene depended on both the target and the concentration of DNA. The experimental outcomes in the present study can be used to detect DNA and its variations in crucial fields that have a great impact on our daily lives, such as clinical and veterinary diagnostics, industrial and environmental testing and forensic sciences.

  19. Impedimetric Dengue Biosensor based on Functionalized Graphene Oxide Wrapped Silica Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Seon-Ah; Poudyal, Shishir; Marinero, Ernesto E.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D graphene oxide based material design. • Fabrication of a label-free dengue DNA and RNA impedimetric biosensor. • Design of a surface-based dengue sensor with good selectivity and detection limit. - Abstract: A composite of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) functionalized graphene oxide (APTES-GO) wrapped on SiO 2 particles (SiO 2 @APTES-GO) was prepared via self-assembly. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ATR-Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirmed wrapping of the SiO 2 particles by the APTES-GO sheets. An impedimetric biosensor was constructed and used to sensitively detect dengue DNA and dengue RNA via primer hybridization using different oligonucleotide sequences. The results demonstrated that the SiO 2 @APTES-GO electrode material led to enhanced dengue RNA detection sensitivity with selectivity and detection limit (1 femto-Molar), compared to both APTES-GO and APTES-SiO 2 . The three-dimensional structure, higher contact area, electrical properties and the ability for rapid hybridization offered by the SiO 2 @APTES-GO led to the successful design of a dengue biosensor with the lowest detection limit reported to date.

  20. An electrodynamic preconcentrator integrated thermoelectric biosensor chip for continuous monitoring of biochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Min-gu; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Sim, Jaesam; Kim, Jongbaeg; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrated sensor chip for continuous monitoring of a biochemical process. It is composed of a preconcentrator and a thermoelectric biosensor. In the preconcentrator, the concentration of the injected biochemical sample is electrodynamically condensed. Then, in the downstream thermoelectric biosensor, the preconcentrated target molecules react with sequentially injected capture molecules and generate reaction heat. The reaction heat is detected based on the thermoelectric effect, and an integrated split-flow microchannel improves the sensor stability by providing ability to self-compensate thermal noise. These sequential preconcentration and detection processes are performed in completely label-free and continuous conditions and consequently enhance the sensor sensitivity. The performance of the integrated biosensor chip was evaluated at various flow rates and applied voltages. First, in order to verify characteristics of the fabricated preconcentrator, 10 µm -diameter polystyrene (PS) particles were used. The particles were concentrated by applying ac voltage from 0 to 16 V pp at 3 MHz at various flow rates. In the experimental result, approximately 92.8% of concentration efficiency was achieved at a voltage over 16 V pp and at a flow rate below 100 µl h −1 . The downstream thermoelectric biosensor was characterized by measuring reaction heat of biotin–streptavidin interaction. The preconcentrated streptavidin-coated PS particles flow into the reaction chamber and react with titrated biotin. The measured output voltage was 288.2 µV at a flow rate of 100 µl h −1 without preconcentration. However, by using proposed preconcentrator, an output voltage of 812.3 µV was achieved with a 16 V pp -applied preconcentration in the same given sample and flow rate. According to these results, the proposed label-free biomolecular preconcentration and detection technique can be applied in continuous and high-throughput biochemical applications

  1. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.

  3. Biosensors and invasive monitoring in clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Córcoles, Emma P

    2013-01-01

    This volume examines the advances of invasive monitoring by means of biosensors and microdialysis. Physical and physiological parameters are commonly monitored in clinical settings using invasive techniques due to their positive outcome in patients’ diagnosis and treatment. Biochemical parameters, however, still rely on off-line measurements and require large pieces of equipment. Biosensing and sampling devices present excellent capabilities for their use in continuous monitoring of patients’ biochemical parameters. However, certain issues remain to be solved in order to ensure a more widespread use of these techniques in today’s medical practices.

  4. More About Thin-Membrane Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, George D.; Worley, Jennings F., III

    1994-01-01

    Report presents additional information about device described in "Thin-Membrane Sensor With Biochemical Switch" (MFS-26121). Device is modular sensor that puts out electrical signal indicative of chemical or biological agent. Signal produced as membrane-crossing ion current triggered by chemical reaction between agent and recognition protein conjugated to channel blocker. Prototype of biosensor useful in numerous laboratory, industrial, or field applications; such as to detect bacterial toxins in food, to screen for disease-producing micro-organisms, or to warn of toxins or pollutants in air.

  5. Optical Biosensors to Explore Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Andersen, Nils H. Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    their capability to work in biosensor devices. For example, Raman spectroscopy can be non-invasive and can provide 1 μm of spatial resolution in 1 second of collection time, well suited for sensing. Moreover, it may give information at the single cell and even approaching the single molecule scale. Here we present...... protein may be used as an efficient sensor in an organic environment via a biomimetic membrane model. The combination of both biomimetic membranes and protein membranes as a signal transduction medium has interesting applications in biology and medicine. It is crucial that the matrix where a protein...

  6. Amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on in situ reconstituted cholesterol oxidase on an immobilized monolayer of flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Juan-C; Espuelas, Javier; Castillo, Juan-R

    2004-10-01

    A new amperometric biosensor for determining cholesterol based on deflavination of the enzyme cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and subsequent reconstitution of the apo-protein with a complexed flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) monolayer is described. The charge transfer mediator pyrroquinoline quinone (PQQ) was covalently bound to a cystamine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on an Au electrode. Boronic acid (BA) was then bound to PQQ using the carbodiimide procedure, and the BA ligand was complexed to the FAD molecules on which the apo-ChOx was subsequently reconstituted. The effective release of the FAD from the enzyme and the successful reconstitution were verified using molecular fluorescence and cyclic voltammetry. The optimal orientation of FAD toward the PQQ mediator and the distances between FAD and PQQ and between PQQ and electrode enhance the charge transfer, very high sensitivity (about 2,500 nAmM(-1)cm(-2)) being obtained for cholesterol determination. The biosensor is selective toward electroactive interferents (ascorbic acid and uric acid) and was tested in reference serum samples, demonstrating excellent accuracy (relative errors below 3% in all cases). The biosensor activity can be successfully regenerated in a simple process by successive reconstitution with batches of recently prepared apo-ChOx on the same immobilized Au/SAM-PQQ-BA-FAD monolayer (it was tested five times); the lifetime of the biosensor is about 45-60 days.

  7. Real Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Analysis of First Stage CuIn1−xGaxSe2 Growth: Indium-Gallium Selenide Co-Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Pradhan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE has been applied for in-situ monitoring of the first stage of copper indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS thin film deposition by the three-stage co-evaporation process used for fabrication of high efficiency thin film photovoltaic (PV devices. The first stage entails the growth of indium-gallium selenide (In1−xGax2Se3 (IGS on a substrate of Mo-coated soda lime glass maintained at a temperature of 400 °C. This is a critical stage of CIGS deposition because a large fraction of the final film thickness is deposited, and as a result precise compositional control is desired in order to achieve the optimum performance of the resulting CIGS solar cell. RTSE is sensitive to monolayer level film growth processes and can provide accurate measurements of bulk and surface roughness layer thicknesses. These in turn enable accurate measurements of the bulk layer optical response in the form of the complex dielectric function ε = ε1 − iε2, spectra. Here, RTSE has been used to obtain the (ε1, ε2 spectra at the measurement temperature of 400 °C for IGS thin films of different Ga contents (x deduced from different ranges of accumulated bulk layer thickness during the deposition process. Applying an analytical expression in common for each of the (ε1, ε2 spectra of these IGS films, oscillator parameters have been obtained in the best fits and these parameters in turn have been fitted with polynomials in x. From the resulting database of polynomial coefficients, the (ε1, ε2 spectra can be generated for any composition of IGS from the single parameter, x. The results have served as an RTSE fingerprint for IGS composition and have provided further structural information beyond simply thicknesses, for example information related to film density and grain size. The deduced IGS structural evolution and the (ε1, ε2 spectra have been interpreted as well in relation to observations from scanning electron microscopy, X

  8. Biosensor enhancement using grooved micromixers: Part II, experimental studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lynn, Nicholas Scott; Bocková, Markéta; Adam, Pavel; Homola, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 11 (2015), s. 5524-5530 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Escherichia coli bacteria * Surface plasmon resonance * Microfluidics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.886, year: 2015

  9. Biosensor enhancement using grooved micromixers: Part I, numerical studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lynn, Nicholas Scott; Homola, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 11 (2015), s. 5516-5523 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Numerical methods * Micromixers * Analytes Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.886, year: 2015

  10. A Highly Responsive Silicon Nanowire/Amplifier MOSFET Hybrid Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Jang, Jaeman; Choi, Bongsik; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-07-21

    This study demonstrates a hybrid biosensor comprised of a silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with an amplifier MOSFET to improve the current response of field-effect-transistor (FET)-based biosensors. The hybrid biosensor is fabricated using conventional CMOS technology, which has the potential advantage of high density and low noise performance. The biosensor shows a current response of 5.74 decades per pH for pH detection, which is 2.5 × 10(5) times larger than that of a single SiNW sensor. In addition, we demonstrate charged polymer detection using the biosensor, with a high current change of 4.5 × 10(5) with a 500 nM concentration of poly(allylamine hydrochloride). In addition, we demonstrate a wide dynamic range can be obtained by adjusting the liquid gate voltage. We expect that this biosensor will be advantageous and practical for biosensor applications which requires lower noise, high speed, and high density.

  11. Localization effects in the disordered Ta interlayer of multilayer Ta–FeNi films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovaleva, Natalia; Chvostová, Dagmar; Pacherová, Oliva; Fekete, Ladislav; Kugel, K.I.; Pudonin, F.A.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 18 (2017), s. 1-5, č. článku 183104. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13778S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dc transport * wide-band * spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques * disordered metallic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  12. Ellipsometry applied to phase transitions and relaxation phenomena in Ni.sub.2./sub.MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Tyunina, Marina; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Chernenko, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 14 (2012), "141908-1"-"141908-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010517; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : shape memory alloy * ellipsometry * Ni 2 MnGa Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4757393

  13. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prachi, E-mail: prachi.singh@st.niituniversity.in; Rathore, Deepshikha, E-mail: deep.nano@gmail.com [NIIT University, Neemrana, NH-8, Alwar, Rajasthan, India, 301705 (India)

    2016-05-06

    NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  14. Interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavering, Thomas A.; Meller, Scott A.; Evans, Mishell K.; Pennington, Charles; Jones, Mark E.; VanTassell, Roger; Murphy, Kent A.; Velander, William H.; Valdes, E.

    2000-12-01

    With the proliferation of biological weapons, the outbreak of food poisoning occurrences, and the spread of antibiotic resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria, the demand has arisen for portable systems capable of rapid, specific, and quantitative target detection. The ability to detect minute quantities of targets will provide the means to quickly assess a health hazardous situation so that the appropriate response can be orchestrated. Conventional test results generally require hours or even several days to be reported, and there is no change for real-time feedback. An interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor has successfully demonstrated real time detection of target molecules. The microcantilever biosensor effectively combines advanced technology from silicon micromachining, optical fiber sensor, and biochemistry to create a novel detection device. This approach utilizes affinity coatings on micromachiend cantilever beams to attract target molecules. The presence of the target molecule causes bending in the cantilever beam, which is monitored using an optical displacement system. Dose-response trials have shown measured responses at nanogram/ml concentrations of target molecules. Sensitivity is expected to extend from the nanogram to the picogram range of total captured mass as the microcantilever sensors are optimized.

  15. Diabetes mellitus: biosensors for research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A P; Pickup, J C

    1985-01-01

    The condition of diabetes mellitus is described with particular reference to the parameters that it would be desirable to monitor in order to improve management and understanding of the disease. Previous attention has largely focused on analysis of glucose, but many other intermediates of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism are deranged in diabetes and may be alternative measures of control. The need for laboratory analysers, self-monitoring, closed-loop devices and alarms are detailed and the problems associated with implantable sensors discussed. Progress in the development of biosensors is reviewed using glucose sensors as the main example. Electrochemical, optoelectronic and calorimetric approaches to sensing are considered and it is concluded that configurations based either on hydrogen peroxide detection or on mediated electron transfer are most likely to provide a raid route to in vivo monitoring. The extension of biosensor technology to tackle other important substrates is discussed, the principal hurdle to success being seen as the lack of long-term stability of the biological component.

  16. Recent Advances in Magnetic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Giouroudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of portable biosening devices for the detection of biological entities such as biomolecules, pathogens, and cells has become extremely significant over the past years. Scientific research, driven by the promise for miniaturization and integration of complex laboratory equipment on inexpensive, reliable, and accurate devices, has successfully shifted several analytical and diagnostic methods to the submillimeter scale. The miniaturization process was made possible with the birth of microfluidics, a technology that could confine, manipulate, and mix very small volumes of liquids on devices integrated on standard silicon technology chips. Such devices are then directly translating the presence of these entities into an electronic signal that can be read out with a portable instrumentation. For the aforementioned tasks, the use of magnetic markers (magnetic particles—MPs—functionalized with ligands in combination with the application of magnetic fields is being strongly investigated by research groups worldwide. The greatest merits of using magnetic fields are that they can be applied either externally or from integrated microconductors and they can be well-tuned by adjusting the applied current on the microconductors. Moreover, the magnetic markers can be manipulated inside microfluidic channels by high gradient magnetic fields that can in turn be detected by magnetic sensors. All the above make this technology an ideal candidate for the development of such microfluidic biosensors. In this review, focus is given only to very recent advances in biosensors that use microfluidics in combination with magnetic sensors and magnetic markers/nanoparticles.

  17. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gilbertsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice.

  18. Construction and characterization of novel stress-responsive Deinococcal biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Youg

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we constructed a recombinant whole-cell biosensor to detect mutagens (H2O2, mitomycin C, MNNG, bleomycin) using Deinococcus radiodurans and evaluated its possibility for actual application. We performed DNA microarray analysis and selected 10 candidate genes for biosensor recombinant plasmid construction. The expression of ddrA, ddrB, DR 0 161, DR 0 589, and pprA was highly increased after treatment of the target mutagens. Putative promoter region of the genes were used for LacZ-based biosensor plasmid construction by replacing groESL promoter of pRADZ3. Pormoter activity and specificity of the five recombinant LacZ-based biosensor strains harboring the recombinant plasmids was measured. The result indicated that the promoter region of ddrA is the most suitable promoter for the biosensor development. Red pigment-based biosensor plasmid was constructed by displacing lacZ with crtI. The sensor strain was constructed by transforming the sensor plasmid into crtI deleted mutant D. radiodurans strain. Finally, macroscopic detection of the target mutagens by the biosensor strain was evaluated. The strength of red pigment biosynthesis by this recombinant strain in response to the target mutagens was weaker than our expectation. Continuous damage to the sensor strain by the mutagens in the medium might be the main reason for this low red-pigment biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that the LacZ-based biosensor is more effective than the biosensor using red pigment as indicator for the mutagen detection

  19. Construction and characterization of novel stress-responsive Deinococcal biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Youg

    2012-01-15

    In this research, we constructed a recombinant whole-cell biosensor to detect mutagens (H2O2, mitomycin C, MNNG, bleomycin) using Deinococcus radiodurans and evaluated its possibility for actual application. We performed DNA microarray analysis and selected 10 candidate genes for biosensor recombinant plasmid construction. The expression of ddrA, ddrB, DR{sub 0}161, DR{sub 0}589, and pprA was highly increased after treatment of the target mutagens. Putative promoter region of the genes were used for LacZ-based biosensor plasmid construction by replacing groESL promoter of pRADZ3. Pormoter activity and specificity of the five recombinant LacZ-based biosensor strains harboring the recombinant plasmids was measured. The result indicated that the promoter region of ddrA is the most suitable promoter for the biosensor development. Red pigment-based biosensor plasmid was constructed by displacing lacZ with crtI. The sensor strain was constructed by transforming the sensor plasmid into crtI deleted mutant D. radiodurans strain. Finally, macroscopic detection of the target mutagens by the biosensor strain was evaluated. The strength of red pigment biosynthesis by this recombinant strain in response to the target mutagens was weaker than our expectation. Continuous damage to the sensor strain by the mutagens in the medium might be the main reason for this low red-pigment biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that the LacZ-based biosensor is more effective than the biosensor using red pigment as indicator for the mutagen detection.

  20. In situ electro-polymerization of nitrogen doped carbon dots and their application in an electrochemiluminescence biosensor for the detection of intracellular lead ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chengyi; Liang, Wenbin; Wang, Haijun; Zheng, Yingning; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-04-25

    Here, a novel sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor using N doped carbon dots (N-CDs) in situ electro-polymerized onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) as luminophores, and Pd-Au hexoctahedrons (Pd@Au HOHs) as enhancers, was developed for the detection of intracellular lead ions (Pb(2+)).

  1. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  2. F F1-ATPase as biosensor to detect single virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, XiaoLong; Zhang, Yun; Yue, JiaChang; Jiang, PeiDong; Zhang, ZhenXi

    2006-01-01

    F F 1 -ATPase within chromatophore was constructed as a biosensor (immuno-rotary biosensor) for the purpose of capturing single virus. Capture of virus was based on antibody-antigen reaction. The detection of virus based on proton flux change driven by ATP-synthesis of F F 1 -ATPase, which was indicated by F1300, was directly observed by a fluorescence microscope. The results demonstrate that the biosensor loading of virus particles has remarkable signal-to-noise ratio (3.8:1) compared to its control at single molecular level, and will be convenient, quick, and even super-sensitive for detecting virus particles

  3. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal-clad...... waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Development of biosensors and their application in metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay

    2015-01-01

    and ease of implementation with high-throughput analysis. Here we describe recent progress in biosensor development and their applications in a metabolic engineering context. We also highlight examples of how biosensors can be integrated with synthetic circuits to exert feedback regulation...... for the desired phenotypes. However, methods available for microbial genome diversification far exceed our ability to screen and select for those variants with optimal performance. Genetically encoded biosensors have shown the potential to address this gap, given their ability to respond to small molecule binding...

  5. Surface roughness estimation of MBE grown CdTe/GaAs(211)B by ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakaya, Merve, E-mail: mervegunnar@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Izmir 35430 (Turkey); Bilgilisoy, Elif; Arı, Ozan; Selamet, Yusuf [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, Izmir 35430 (Turkey)

    2016-07-15

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) ranging from 1.24 eV to 5.05 eV is used to obtain the film thickness and optical properties of high index (211) CdTe films. A three-layer optical model (oxide/CdTe/GaAs) was chosen for the ex-situ ellipsometric data analysis. Surface roughness cannot be determined by the optical model if oxide is included. We show that roughness can be accurately estimated, without any optical model, by utilizing the correlation between SE data (namely the imaginary part of the dielectric function, <ε{sub 2} > or phase angle, ψ) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) roughness. <ε{sub 2} > and ψ values at 3.31 eV, which corresponds to E{sub 1} critical transition energy of CdTe band structure, are chosen for the correlation since E{sub 1} gives higher resolution than the other critical transition energies. On the other hand, due to the anisotropic characteristic of (211) oriented CdTe surfaces, SE data (<ε{sub 2} > and ψ) shows varieties for different azimuthal angle measurements. For this reason, in order to estimate the surface roughness by considering these correlations, it is shown that SE measurements need to be taken at the same surface azimuthal angle. Estimating surface roughness in this manner is an accurate way to eliminate cumbersome surface roughness measurement by AFM.

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis of GaAs1-xNx layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Sedrine, N.; Rihani, J.; Stehle, J.L.; Harmand, J.C.; Chtourou, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present the effect of nitrogen incorporation on the dielectric function of GaAsN samples, grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by a rapid thermal annealing (for 90 s at 680 deg. C). The GaAs 1-x N x samples with N content up to 1.5% (x = 0.0%, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1.5%), are investigated using room temperature spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The optical transitions in the spectral region around 3 eV are analyzed by fitting analytical critical point line shapes to the second derivative of the dielectric function. It was found that the features associated with E 1 and E 1 + Δ 1 transitions are blue-shifted and become less sharp with increasing nitrogen incorporation, in contrast to the case of E 0 transition energy in GaAs 1-x N x . An increase of the split-off Δ 1 energy with nitrogen content was also obtained, in agreement to results found with MOVPE GaAs 1-x N x grown samples

  7. Investigation of the dielectric function of solution-processed InGaZnO films using ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jung; Yoon, Jae Jin; Hwang, Soo Min; Choi, Jun Hyuk; Hwang, Soon Yong; Ghong, Tae Ho; Barange, Nilesh; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Young Dong; Joo, Jinho

    2012-07-01

    The optical properties of InGaZnO (IGZO) films grown through the sol-gel process as a function of sintering time were investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The IGZO precursor sol was prepared by mixing In nitrate, Ga nitrate, and Zn acetate at a molar ratio of In:Ga:Zn = 3:1:1. The solution was deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate via spin coating. Sintering was performed at 400 degrees C for 1-15 h in an ambient atmosphere. The optical properties were measured over the range 1.12-6.52 eV via variable angle SE, at room temperature. The angle of incidence was varied from 50 to 70 degrees in 5 degree steps. To extract the pure optical properties of IGZO, multilayer-structure calculation with Tauc-Lorentz dispersion relation for IGZO was performed. The changes in the dielectric function of the IGZO films with varying sintering time were observed. The resultant optical properties can be related to the concentration of oxygen vacancies in the material, which can be controlled by the sintering time.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of spiral interdigitated electrodes based biosensor for salivary glucose detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelyn, P. Y. P.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Voon, C. H.; Liu, Wei-Wen; Kahar, S. M.; Huda, A. R. N.; Lee, H. Cheun

    2017-03-01

    This work introduces the non-invasive glucose monitoring technique by using the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technologically fabricated spiral Interdigitated Electrodes (IDE) based biosensor. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image explores the morphology of spiral IDE while Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) determines the elements induced in spiral IDE. Oral saliva of two patients are collected and tested on the spiral IDE sensor with electrical characterization as glucose detection results. However, both patients exhibit their glucose level characteristics inconsistently. Therefore, this work could be extended and enhanced by adding Glutaraldehyde in between 3-Aminoproply)triethoxysilane (APTES) modified and glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme immobilized layer with FTIR validation for bonding attachment.

  9. High sensitivity cardiac troponin I detection in physiological environment using AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangadharan, Indu; Regmi, Abiral; Chen, Yen-Wen; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, Geng-Yen; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Shiesh, Shu-Chu; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2018-02-15

    In this study, we report the development of a high sensitivity assay for the detection of cardiac troponin I using electrical double layer gated high field AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensor. The unique gating mechanism overcomes the drawback of charge screening seen in traditional FET based biosensors, allowing detection of target proteins in physiological solutions without sample processing steps. Troponin I specific antibody and aptamer are used as receptors. The tests carried out using purified protein solution and clinical serum samples depict high sensitivity, specificity and wide dynamic range (0.006-148ng/mL). No additional wash or sample pre-treatment steps are required, which greatly simplifies the biosensor system. The miniaturized HEMT chip is packaged in a polymer substrate and easily integrated with a portable measurement unit, to carry out quantitative troponin I detection in serum samples with < 2µl sample volume in 5min. The integrated prototype biosensor unit demonstrates the potential of the method as a rapid, inexpensive, high sensitivity CVD biomarker assay. The highly simplified protocols and enhanced sensor performance make our biosensor an ideal choice for point of care diagnostics and personal healthcare systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-BSA Film for the Construction of a Durable HRP Biosensor Modified with NanoAu Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangcheng Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have investigated the contribution of bovine serum albumin (BSA to the durability of the electrochemically synthesized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT film on a platinum (Pt electrode. The electrode was capable to effectively adsorb the nano Au particles (AuNPs to form a uniform layout, which was then able to immobilize the horseradish peroxidase (HRP to construct a functional HRP/AuNPs/PEDOT(BSA/Pt biosensor. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to evaluate the performance of the biosensor through the measurement of hydrogen peroxide. Our results revealed a satisfied linear correlation between the cathodic current and the concentration of H2O2. Furthermore, the addition of oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD+, as the electron transfer mediator in the detection solution could dramatically enhance the sensitivity of detection by about 35.5%. The main advantages of the current biosensor are its durability, sensitivity, reliability, and biocompatibility.

  11. Redox-flexible NADH oxidase biosensor: A platform for various dehydrogenase bioassays and biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serban, Simona; El Murr, Nabil

    2006-01-01

    A generic amperometric bioassay based on the enzymatic oxidation catalysed by the stable NADH oxidase (NAox) from Thermus thermophilus has been developed for NADH measurements. The NAox uses O 2 as its natural electron acceptor and produces H 2 O 2 in a two-electron process. Electrochemical and spectrophotometric experiments showed that the NAox used in this work, presents a very good activity towards its substrate and, in contrary to previously mentioned NADH oxidases, does not require the addition of any exogenous flavin cofactor neither to promote nor to maintain its activity. In addition, the NAox used also works with artificial electron acceptors like ferrocene derivatives. O 2 was successfully replaced by redox mediators such as hydroxymethyl ferrocene (FcCH 2 OH) for the regeneration of the active enzyme. Combining the NAox with the mediator and the horseradish peroxidase we developed an original, high sensitive 'redox-flexible' NADH amperometric bioassay working in a large window of applied potentials in both oxidation and reduction modes. The biosensor has a continuous and complementary linearity range permitting to measure NADH concentrations starting from 5 x 10 -6 M in reduction until 2 x 10 3 M in oxidation. This redox-flexibility allows choosing the applied potential in order to avoid electrochemical interferences. The association of the 'redox-flexible' concept with NADH dependent enzymes opens a novel strategy for dehydrogenases based bioassays and biosensors. The great number of dehydrogenases available makes the concept applicable for numerous substrates to analyse. Moreover it allows the development of a wide range of biosensors on the basis of a generic platform. This gives several advantages over the previous manufacturing techniques and offers a general and flexible scheme for the fabrication of biosensors presenting high sensitivities, wide calibration ranges and less affected by electrochemical interferences

  12. A sensitive fluorescence biosensor for alkaline phosphatase activity based on the Cu(II)-dependent DNAzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yajuan; Wang, Lixu [College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350116 (China); Luo, Fang, E-mail: luofang0812@163.com [College of Biological Science and Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350116 (China); Lin, Cuiying, E-mail: lcuiying@fzu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350116 (China); Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan [College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350116 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) plays an important role in phosphate metabolism processes; deviation from its normal level may indicate different kinds of diseases, so it is highly necessary to develop some simple and sensitive methods to monitor the ALP level. In this study, a simple, high selective, and sensitive fluorescent biosensor has been proposed for ALP activity determination. The Cu(II)-dependent DNAzyme (Cu-Enzyme) are divided into two parts: Cu-Enzyme 1 and Cu-Enzyme 2, and labelled with alkyne and azido groups, respectively. The Cu-substrate (Cu-Sub) is labelled with a FAM fluorophore (6-carboxyfluorescein) at the 3′-end and an additional quencher (BHQ1) at the 5′-end. The 5′-end of Cu-Enzyme 1 is labelled with BHQ1 as well. The hybridization of the Cu-Enzyme 1 and Cu-Enzyme 2 with Cu-Sub strand results in the low background fluorescence signal because the fluorescence from FAM is quenched. The addition of ALP can hydrolyze AA-P into AA, which can reduce Cu(II) into Cu(I) and in turn catalyze the cycloaddition of Cu-Enzyme 1 and Cu-Enzyme 2 to form a modified Cu-Enzyme. Then the modified Cu-Enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of the Cu-Sub strands into two pieces. One piece containing FAM fluorophore can easily diffuse into solution and give off a strong fluorescence signal. The enhanced fluorescent intensity has a linear relationship with the ALP concentration in the range of 0.36–54.55 U L{sup −1} with the detection limit of 0.14 U L{sup −1} (S/N = 3). The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to detect ALP in serum samples with satisfied results. - Highlights: • We have proposed a simple, high selective and sensitive fluorescent biosensor for ALP. • The biosensor combines the high selectivity and the click reaction and the high sensitivity of the fluorescence detection. • The biosensor has been successfully applied to detect ALP in serum samples with satisfied results.

  13. Applications of Ionic Liquids in Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra V. Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs are salt that exist in the liquid phase at and around 298 K and are comprised of a bulky, asymmetric organic cation and the anion usually inorganic ion but some ILs also with organic anion. ILs have attracted much attention as a replacement for traditional organic solvents as they possess many attractive properties. Among these properties, intrinsic ion conductivity, low volatility, high chemical and thermal stability, low combustibility, and wide electrochemical windows are few. Due to negligible or nonzero volatility of these solvents, they are considered “greener” for the environment as they do not evaporate like volatile organic compounds (VOCs. ILs have been widely used in electrodeposition, electrosynthesis, electrocatalysis, electrochemical capacitor, lubricants, plasticizers, solvent, lithium batteries, solvents to manufacture nanomaterials, extraction, gas absorption agents, and so forth. Besides a brief discussion of the introduction, history, and properties of ILs the major purpose of this review paper is to provide an overview on the advantages of ILs for the synthesis of conducting polymer and nanoparticle when compared to conventional media and also to focus on the electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on IL/composite modified macrodisk electrodes. Subsequently, recent developments and major strategies for enhancing sensing performance are discussed.

  14. Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Walter F. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Biological organisms are potentially the most sensitive and selective biological detection systems known, yet we are currently severely limited in our ability to exploit biological interactions in sensory devices, due in part to the limited stability of biological systems and derived materials. This proposal addresses an important aspect of integrating biological sensory materials in a solid state device. If successful, such technology could enable entirely new classes of robust biosensors that could be miniaturized and deployed in the field. The critical aims of the proposed work were 1) the calibration of a more versatile approach to measuring pH, 2) the use of this method to monitor pH changes caused by the light-induced pumping of protons across vesicles with bacteriorhodopsin integrated into the membranes (either polymer or lipid); 3) the preparation of bilayer assemblies on platinum surfaces; 4) the enhanced detection of lightinduced pH changes driven by bR-loaded supported bilayers. I have developed a methodology that may enable that at interfaces and developed a methodology to characterize the functionality of bilayer membranes with reconstituted membrane proteins. The integrity of the supported bilayer films however must be optimized prior to the full realization of the work originally envisioned in the original proposal. Nevertheless, the work performed on this project and the encouraging results it has produced has demonstrated that these goals are challenging yet within reach.

  15. Biosensors to Diagnose Chagas Disease: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Gaso, María-Isabel; Villarreal-Gómez, Luis-Jesús; Beyssen, Denis; Sarry, Frédéric; Reyna, Marco-Antonio; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos-Napoleón

    2017-11-15

    Chagas disease (CD), which mostly affects those living in deprived areas, has become one of Latin America's main public health problems. Effective prevention of the disease requires early diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and regular blood monitoring of the infected individual. However, the majority of the Trypanosoma cruzi infections go undiagnosed because of mild symptoms, limited access to medical attention and to a high variability in the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests. Consequently, more affordable and accessible detection technologies capable of providing early diagnosis and T. cruzi load measurements in settings where CD is most prevalent are needed to enable enhanced intervention strategies. This work analyzes the potential contribution of biosensing technologies, reviewing examples that have been tested and contrasted with traditional methods, both serological and parasitological (i.e., molecular detection by PCR), and discusses some emerging biosensing technologies that have been applied for this public health issue. Even if biosensing technologies still require further research efforts to develop portable systems, we arrive at the conclusion that biosensors could improve the accuracy of CD diagnosis and the follow-up of patients' treatments in terms of the rapidity of results, small sample volume, high integration, ease of use, real-time and low cost detection when compared with current conventional technologies.

  16. Multifunctional substrates of thin porous alumina for cell biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Toccafondi, Chiara; Thorat, Sanjay B.; La Rocca, Rosanna; Scarpellini, Alice; Salerno, Marco; Dante, Silvia; Das, Gobind

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated anodic porous alumina from thin films (100/500 nm) of aluminium deposited on technological substrates of silicon/glass, and investigated the feasibility of this material as a surface for the development of analytical biosensors aiming to assess the status of living cells. To this goal, porous alumina surfaces with fixed pitch and variable pore size were analyzed for various functionalities. Gold coated (about 25 nm) alumina revealed surface enhanced Raman scattering increasing with the decrease in wall thickness, with factor up to values of approximately 104 with respect to the flat gold surface. Bare porous alumina was employed for micro-patterning and observation via fluorescence images of dye molecules, which demonstrated the surface capability for a drug-loading device. NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in vitro and examined after 2 days since seeding, and no significant (P > 0.05) differences in their proliferation were observed on porous and non-porous materials. The effect on cell cultures of pore size in the range of 50–130 nm—with pore pitch of about 250 nm—showed no significant differences in cell viability and similar levels in all cases as on a control substrate. Future work will address combination of all above capabilities into a single device.

  17. Multifunctional substrates of thin porous alumina for cell biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Toccafondi, Chiara

    2014-02-27

    We have fabricated anodic porous alumina from thin films (100/500 nm) of aluminium deposited on technological substrates of silicon/glass, and investigated the feasibility of this material as a surface for the development of analytical biosensors aiming to assess the status of living cells. To this goal, porous alumina surfaces with fixed pitch and variable pore size were analyzed for various functionalities. Gold coated (about 25 nm) alumina revealed surface enhanced Raman scattering increasing with the decrease in wall thickness, with factor up to values of approximately 104 with respect to the flat gold surface. Bare porous alumina was employed for micro-patterning and observation via fluorescence images of dye molecules, which demonstrated the surface capability for a drug-loading device. NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in vitro and examined after 2 days since seeding, and no significant (P > 0.05) differences in their proliferation were observed on porous and non-porous materials. The effect on cell cultures of pore size in the range of 50–130 nm—with pore pitch of about 250 nm—showed no significant differences in cell viability and similar levels in all cases as on a control substrate. Future work will address combination of all above capabilities into a single device.

  18. Biosensors for GMO Testing: Nearly 25 Years of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Paniagua López, Marta; Manzanares-Palenzuela, Carmen Lorena; López-Ruiz, Beatriz

    2018-09-03

    In the nearly two decades since genetically modified organisms (GMOs) were first commercialized, genetically engineered crops have gained ground on their conventional counterparts, reaching 185 million hectares worldwide in 2016. The technology has bestowed most of its benefits on enhancing crop productivity with two main traits currently dominating the market: insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant crops. Despite their rapid and vast adoption by farmers worldwide, GMOs have generated heated debates, especially in European countries (EU), driven mostly by consumers concerned about safety of transgenic foods and about the potential impact on the environment. The need to monitor and to verify the presence and the amount of GMOs in agricultural crops and in food products has generated interest in analytical methods for sensitive, accurate, rapid, and cheap detection of these products. DNA biosensors have been envisioned as a novel DNA-detection technology that would one day substitute current amplification-based methods, providing hand-held, quick, and ultrasensitive gene-level detection. This review summarizes the contributions made in nearly 20 years of research regarding the application of genosensing technology for the qualitative and quantitative determination of transgenic traits.

  19. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerman, Kagan

    2001-01-01

    The utility and advantages of an indicator free and MB based sequence specific DNA hybridization biosensor based on guanine and adenine oxidation signals and MB reduction signals have been demonstrated...

  20. Modelling of Amperometric Biosensor Used for Synergistic Substrates Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainius Simelevicius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the operation of an amperometric biosensor producing a chemically amplified signal is modelled numerically. The chemical amplification is achieved by using synergistic substrates. The model is based on non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three layers (compartments: a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on the electrode surface, a dialysis membrane covering the enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer which is modelled by the Nernst approach. The equation system is solved numerically by using the finite difference technique. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by altering the model parameters influencing the enzyme kinetics as well as the mass transport by diffusion. The biosensor action was analyzed with a special emphasis to the effect of the chemical amplification. The simulation results qualitatively explain and confirm the experimentally observed effect of the synergistic substrates conversion on the biosensor response.

  1. Integration of Fractal Biosensor in a Digital Microfluidic Platform

    KAUST Repository

    Mashraei, Yousof; Sivashankar, Shilpa; Buttner, Ulrich; Salama, Khaled N.

    2016-01-01

    fractal electrode biosensor that is used for both droplet actuation and sensing C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration levels to assess cardiac disease risk. Our proposed electrode is the first two-terminal electrode design to be integrated into DMF

  2. Biosensors for detection of mercury in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontidean, Ibolya; Mortari, Alessia; Leth, Suzanne; Brown, Nigel L.; Karlson, Ulrich; Larsen, Martin M.; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Corbisier, Philippe; Csoeregi, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Biosensors based on whole bacterial cells and on bacterial heavy metal binding protein were used to determine the mercury concentration in soil. The soil samples were collected in a vegetable garden accidentally contaminated with elemental mercury 25 years earlier. Bioavailable mercury was measured using different sensors: a protein-based biosensor, a whole bacterial cell based biosensor, and a plant sensor, i.e. morphological and biochemical responses in primary leaves and roots of bean seedlings grown in the mercury-contaminated soil. For comparison the total mercury concentration of the soil samples was determined by AAS. Whole bacterial cell and protein-based biosensors gave accurate responses proportional to the total amount of mercury in the soil samples. On the contrary, plant sensors were found to be less useful indicators of soil mercury contamination, as determined by plant biomass, mercury content of primary leaves and enzyme activities

  3. Enzymatic biosensors based on the use of metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xinhao; Gu, Wei; Li, Bingyu; Chen, Ningning; Zhao, Kai; Xian, Yuezhong

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, various techniques have been developed to obtain materials at a nanoscale level to design biosensors with high sensitivity, selectivity and efficiency. Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are of particular interests and have received much attention because of their unique physical, chemical and catalytic properties. This review summarizes the progress made in enzymatic biosensors based on the use of MONPs. Synthetic methods, strategies for immobilization, and the functions of MONPs in enzymatic biosensing systems are reviewed and discussed. The article is subdivided into sections on enzymatic biosensors based on (a) zinc oxide nanoparticles, (b) titanium oxide nanoparticles, (c) iron oxide nanoparticles, and (d) other metal oxide nanoparticles. While substantial advances have been made in MONPs-based enzymatic biosensors, their applications to real samples still lie ahead because issues such as reproducibility and sensor stability have to be solved. (author)

  4. Development of FRET biosensors for mammalian and plant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, D.; van Voorst Vader, L.; Borst, J.W.; Goedhart, J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors are increasingly used in visualising signalling processes in different organisms. Sensors based on green fluorescent protein technology are providing a great opportunity for using Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a tool that allows for monitoring dynamic

  5. Interdigitated electrodes as impedance and capacitance biosensors: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, N. S.; Ramli, M. M.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Halin, D. S. C.; Isa, S. S. M.; Talip, L. F. A.; Danial, N. S.; Murad, S. A. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) are made of two individually addressable interdigitated comb-like electrode structures. IDEs are one of the most favored transducers, widely utilized in technological applications especially in the field of biological and chemical sensors due to their inexpensive, ease of fabrication process and high sensitivity. In order to detect and analyze a biochemical molecule or analyte, the impedance and capacitance signal need to be obtained. This paper investigates the working principle and influencer of the impedance and capacitance biosensors. The impedance biosensor depends on the resistance and capacitance while the capacitance biosensor influenced by the dielectric permittivity. However, the geometry and structures of the interdigitated electrodes affect both impedance and capacitance biosensor. The details have been discussed in this paper.

  6. Preparation and electrochemical application of a new biosensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrocatalytic behaviour of oxidized acetaminophen was studied at the surface of the biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. The advantages of this ..... each case, a few ml of methanol was added to sample, and then it was ...

  7. Plasmon based biosensor for distinguishing different peptides mutation states

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Toma, Andrea; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Alabastri, Alessandro; Leoncini, Marco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    of the cuboid nanostructures. The electric field distribution for the nanocuboids with varying matrix dimensions/inter-particle gap was also investigated. These SERS devices were employed as biosensors through the investigation of both myoglobin and wild

  8. Biosensor Urea Berbasis Biopolimer Khitin Sebagai Matriks Immobilisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazruddin Nazaruddin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tentang biosensor urea menggunakan biopolimer khitin sebagai matriks immobilisasi telah dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja biosensor yang dihasilkan yang meliputi sensitivitas, trayek pengukuran, limit deteksi, waktu respon, koefisien selektifitas, dan waktu hidup. Penelitian meliputi beberapa tahap yaitu pembuatan membran polimer khitin dan immobilisasi enzim urease, pelekatan membran khitin pada elektroda pH, dan pengukuran parameter kinerja elektroda. Hasil pengukuran menunjukkan sensitivitas biosensor urea berbasis membran khitin adalah 19,11 mV/dekade, trayek pengukuran 10-4 – 10-8 M, limit deteksi 10-8 M, waktu respon 3,10–6,02 menit, dengan urutan kekuatan ion penggangu: NH4Cl > NaCl > CH3COONa > campuran garam > KCl > CaCl2 > asam askorbat. Kata kunci: biosensor, immobilisasi, khitin, urea

  9. CMOS Electrochemical Instrumentation for Biosensor Microsystems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biosensors play a critical role in healthcare and have a quickly growing commercial market. Compared to traditional optical-based sensing, electrochemical biosensors are attractive due to superior performance in response time, cost, complexity and potential for miniaturization. To address the shortcomings of traditional benchtop electrochemical instruments, in recent years, many complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS instrumentation circuits have been reported for electrochemical biosensors. This paper provides a review and analysis of CMOS electrochemical instrumentation circuits. First, important concepts in electrochemical sensing are presented from an instrumentation point of view. Then, electrochemical instrumentation circuits are organized into functional classes, and reported CMOS circuits are reviewed and analyzed to illuminate design options and performance tradeoffs. Finally, recent trends and challenges toward on-CMOS sensor integration that could enable highly miniaturized electrochemical biosensor microsystems are discussed. The information in the paper can guide next generation electrochemical sensor design.

  10. Electrochemical Biosensors - Sensor Principles and Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Reimhult

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of biological or biochemical processes are of utmost importancefor medical, biological and biotechnological applications. However, converting the biologicalinformation to an easily processed electronic signal is challenging due to the complexity ofconnecting an electronic device directly to a biological environment. Electrochemical biosensorsprovide an attractive means to analyze the content of a biological sample due to thedirect conversion of a biological event to an electronic signal. Over the past decades severalsensing concepts and related devices have been developed. In this review, the most commontraditional techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry,impedance spectroscopy, and various field-effect transistor based methods are presented alongwith selected promising novel approaches, such as nanowire or magnetic nanoparticle-basedbiosensing. Additional measurement techniques, which have been shown useful in combinationwith electrochemical detection, are also summarized, such as the electrochemical versionsof surface plasmon resonance, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, ellipsometry,quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning probe microscopy.The signal transduction and the general performance of electrochemical sensors are often determinedby the surface architectures that connect the sensing element to the biological sampleat the nanometer scale. The most common surface modification techniques, the various electrochemicaltransduction mechanisms, and the choice of the recognition receptor moleculesall influence the ultimate sensitivity of the sensor. New nanotechnology-based approaches,such as the use of engineered ion-channels in lipid bilayers, the encapsulation of enzymesinto vesicles, polymersomes, or polyelectrolyte capsules provide additional possibilities forsignal amplification.In particular, this review highlights the importance of the precise control over the

  11. Innovative configurations of electrochemical DNA biosensors (a review)

    OpenAIRE

    Girousi, Stella; Karastogianni, Sofia; Serpi, Constantina

    2011-01-01

    In the field of electrochemical biosensing, transition metal complexes achieved a significant importance as hybridization indicators or electroactive markers of DNA. Their incorporation in electro-chemical DNA biosensors enables to offer a promising perspective in understanding of the biological activity of some chemical compounds. In this context, the development of innovative configurations of electrochemical DNA biosensors applied to life sciences during the last years were reviewed ...

  12. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-02-24

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies.

  13. Ring-Interferometric Sol-Gel Bio-Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory (Inventor); Cohen, David (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A biosensor embodying the invention includes a sensing volume having an array of pores sized for immobilizing a first biological entity tending to bind to a second biological entity in such a manner as to change an index of refraction of the sensing volume. The biosensor further includes a ring interferometer, one volumetric section of the ring interferometer being the sensing volume, a laser for supplying light to the ring interferometer, and a photodetector for receiving light from the interferometer.

  14. Engineering prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise; Snoek, Tim; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2016-01-01

    ,cis-muconic acid at different levels, and found that reporter gene output correlated with production. The transplantation of prokaryotic transcriptional activators into the eukaryotic chassis illustrates the potential of a hitherto untapped biosensor resource useful for biotechnological applications....... real-time monitoring of production has attracted attention. Here we applied systematic engineering of multiple parameters to search for a general biosensor design in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on small-molecule binding transcriptional activators from the prokaryote superfamily...

  15. Detection of foodborne pathogens using surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubová, Vendula; Brynda, Eduard; Krasová, B.; Škvor, J.; Homola, Jiří; Dostálek, Jakub; Tobiška, Petr; Rošický, Jiří

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 100-105 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : optical sensors * surface plasmon resonance * biosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  16. Biosensor Regeneration: A Review of Common Techniques and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, J A; Rushworth, J V H; Millner, P A

    2015-06-16

    Biosensors are ideally portable, low-cost tools for the rapid detection of pathogens, proteins, and other analytes. The global biosensor market is currently worth over 10 billion dollars annually and is a burgeoning field of interdisciplinary research that is hailed as a potential revolution in consumer, healthcare, and industrial testing. A key barrier to the widespread adoption of biosensors, however, is their cost. Although many systems have been validated in the laboratory setting and biosensors for a range of analytes are proven at the concept level, many have yet to make a strong commercial case for their acceptance. Though it is true with the development of cheaper electrodes, circuits, and components that there is a downward pressure on costs, there is also an emerging trend toward the development of multianalyte biosensors that is pushing in the other direction. One way to reduce the cost that is suitable for certain systems is to enable their reuse, thus reducing the cost per test. Regenerating biosensors is a technique that can often be used in conjunction with existing systems in order to reduce costs and accelerate the commercialization process. This article discusses the merits and drawbacks of regeneration schemes that have been proven in various biosensor systems and indicates parameters for successful regeneration based on a systematic review of the literature. It also outlines some of the difficulties encountered when considering the role of regeneration at the point of use. A brief meta-analysis has been included in this review to develop a working definition for biosensor regeneration, and using this analysis only ∼60% of the reported studies analyzed were deemed a success. This highlights the variation within the field and the need to normalize regeneration as a standard process across the field by establishing a consensus term.

  17. Biosensor Applications of MAPLE Deposited Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Califano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE is a thin film deposition technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD for deposition of delicate (polymers, complex biological molecules, etc. materials in undamaged form. The main difference of MAPLE technique with respect to PLD is the target: it is a frozen solution or suspension of the (guest molecules to be deposited in a volatile substance (matrix. Since laser beam energy is mainly absorbed by the matrix, damages to the delicate guest molecules are avoided, or at least reduced. Lipase, an enzyme catalyzing reactions borne by triglycerides, has been used in biosensors for detection of β-hydroxyacid esters and triglycerides in blood serum. Enzymes immobilization on a substrate is therefore required. In this paper we show that it is possible, using MAPLE technique, to deposit lipase on a substrate, as shown by AFM observation, preserving its conformational structure, as shown by FTIR analysis.

  18. Silica suspended waveguide splitter-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. C.; Hawk, R. M.; Armani, A. M.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, a novel integrated optical waveguide 50/50 splitter was developed. It is fabricated using standard lithographic methods, a pair of etching steps and a laser reflow step. However, unlike other integrated waveguide splitters, the waveguide is elevated off of the silicon substrate, improving its interaction with biomolecules in solution and in a flow field. Additionally, because it is fabricated from silica, it has very low optical loss, resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio, making it ideal for biosensing. By functionalizing the device using an epoxy-silane method using small samples and confining the protein solutions to the device, we enable highly efficient detection of CREB with only 1 μL of solution. Therefore, the waveguide coupler sensor is representative of the next generation of ultra-sensitive optical biosensors, and, when combined with microfluidic capabilities, it will be an ideal candidate for a more fully-realized lab-on-a-chip device.

  19. The Scanning TMR Microscope for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal N. Vyas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR scanning microscopeset-up capable of quantitatively imaging the magnetic stray field patterns of micron-sizedelements in 3D. By incorporating an Anderson loop measurement circuit for impedancematching, we are able to detect magnetoresistance changes of as little as 0.006%/Oe. By 3Drastering a mounted TMR sensor over our magnetic barcodes, we are able to characterisethe complex domain structures by displaying the real component, the amplitude and thephase of the sensor’s impedance. The modular design, incorporating a TMR sensor withan optical microscope, renders this set-up a versatile platform for studying and imagingimmobilised magnetic carriers and barcodes currently employed in biosensor platforms,magnetotactic bacteria and other complex magnetic domain structures of micron-sizedentities. The quantitative nature of the instrument and its ability to produce vector maps ofmagnetic stray fields has the potential to provide significant advantages over other commonlyused scanning magnetometry techniques.

  20. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uichi Akiba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements.