WorldWideScience

Sample records for english general practices

  1. Frequency and effects of non-English consultations in New Zealand general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearn, Andy; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Everts, Hans; Huggard, Peter

    2007-10-26

    To identify the frequency of non-English languages used in general practice consultations and to explore the effects on practice for general practitioners (GPs). Randomly selected Auckland GPs were telephone-interviewed using standardised questions. Interview data were entered electronically in real time and audiotaped. Data were reviewed upon collection and analysed using constant comparison thematic content analysis. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS (v12) software. Eighty GPs were interviewed. Forty-two spoke one or more languages apart from English. Thirty-one different languages were spoken, 83% of which were used in patient consultation. Most GPs (73/80) experienced language difficulties in practice. Three broad issues arose: English language proficiency per se, accented English, and physical problems affecting speech. Four themes reflected the influence of language difficulties on the encounter: information sharing, process effects, cultural issues, and use of interpreters. Non-English language consultations occur commonly within current Auckland general practice with associated issues of misunderstanding and interpretation difficulties. GPs are often called upon to use their own language skills, especially Asian and Pacific Island tongues. Non-English speaking encounters frequently require additional time. Patients with some English language proficiency may cause more anxiety than those with none. Non-professional interpreters may colour or alter patients' meaning and accurate translation is required rather than 'interpretation'.

  2. Business English in Practical Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Čepon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is an attempt to look at the reality of teaching English for Business Purposes (EBP/ Business English (BE from a practical point of view. It approaches the term BE as if through a funnel with English as an International Language (EIL at the top, English Language Teaching/General English (ELT/GE as its sloping sides, English as a Foreign Language (EFL/English as a Second Language (ESL at the top of the funnel's narrow tube, and English for Specific Purposes (ESP at the very bottom, just above where BE, one of its main arms is placed. Special emphasis is laid on key distinctions between BE and ELT/GE, the function of BE teachers and the variety of roles that they assume in BE, on BE teachers as connoisseurs of specialist business expertise, and the importance of carrying out needs analysis as it brings to light some very important information about learners of BE.

  3. Patients' evaluations of patient safety in English general practices: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Marsden, Kate S; Avery, Anthony J; Bell, Brian G; Kadam, Umesh T; Reeves, David; Slight, Sarah P; Perryman, Katherine; Barnett, Jane; Litchfield, Ian; Thomas, Sally; Campbell, Stephen M; Doos, Lucy; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2017-07-01

    Description of safety problems and harm in general practices has previously relied on information from health professionals, with scarce attention paid to experiences of patients. To examine patient-reported experiences and outcomes of patient safety in primary care. Cross-sectional study in 45 general practices across five regions in the north, centre, and south of England. A version of the Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care (PREOS-PC) questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 6736 patients. Main outcome measures included 'practice activation' (what a practice does to create a safe environment); 'patient activation' (how proactive are patients in ensuring safe healthcare delivery); 'experiences of safety events' (safety errors); 'outcomes of safety' (harm); and 'overall perception of safety' (how safe patients rate their practice). Questionnaires were returned by 1244 patients (18.4%). Scores were high for 'practice activation' (mean [standard error] = 80.4 out of 100 [2.0]) and low for 'patient activation' (26.3 out of 100 [2.6]). Of the patients, 45% reported experiencing at least one safety problem in the previous 12 months, mostly related to appointments (33%), diagnosis (17%), patient provider communication (15%), and coordination between providers (14%). Twenty-three per cent of the responders reported some degree of harm in the previous 12 months. The overall assessment of level of safety of practices was generally high (86.0 out of 100 [16.8]). Priority areas for patient safety improvement in general practices in England include appointments, diagnosis, communication, coordination, and patient activation. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  4. General English and English Forspecific Purposes (ESP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laimutė Kitkauskienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the English language take place on different levels, in various settings and contexts. This article is an attempt to survey the link between two types of EnglishGeneral and Specific – as much as they are in-volved in teaching English the students of a higher technical school. Recognizing the fact that teaching English is always based on the language skills acquired at a secondary school one must understand the necessity to make language a professionally oriented subject because it should help to build students’ better professional skill as well as to contribute to their education as persons maturing active members of a society.

  5. Comparing importance and performance from a patient perspective in English general practice: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirdifield, Coral; Godoy Caballero, Ana; Windle, Karen; Jackson, Christine; McKay, Stephen; Schäfer, Willemijn; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2016-04-01

    Patient experience and satisfaction are important indicators of quality in health care. Little is known about where to prioritize efforts to improve patient satisfaction. To investigate patient satisfaction with primary care, as part of the Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe study in England, identifying areas where improvements could be made from patients' perspectives. We conducted a questionnaire survey of general practice patients in three English regions. Patient Values questionnaires assessed what patients thought was important, and Patient Experience questionnaires rated performance of primary care. Fifteen attributes of care were compared using Importance Performance Analysis, a method that simultaneously represents data on importance and performance of a service, enabling identification of its strengths and weaknesses. Patients rated both 'relational' and 'functional' aspects of care as important. Satisfaction with general practice could be improved by concentrating on specific aspects of access (ensuring that patients know how to access out-of-hours services and find it easy to get an appointment), and one aspect of empowerment (after their visit, patients feel able to cope better with their health problem/illness). However, for other attributes (e.g. proximity of the practice to a patient's house or, a short waiting time when contacting the practice), investing additional resources is not likely to increase patient satisfaction. Attributes needing most improvement concerned access to primary care and patient empowerment. More research is needed to identify how to improve access without generating unnecessary additional demand or compromising continuity of care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. General English Ability, Specific Purpose English Ability, and Computer Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapphal, Kanchana

    2003-01-01

    Aims to answer the following research questions: (1) Are general English ability and specific purpose English ability related to computer skills? and (2) Is general English ability transferable to specific purpose English ability? Subjects were third year science students enrolled in an English for academic purposes course. (Author/VWL)

  7. Agile practice guide (English)

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This practice guide provides guidance on when, where, and how to apply agile approaches and provides practical tools for practitioners and organizations wanting to increase agility. This practice guide is aligned with other PMI standards, including A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) - Sixth Edition, and was developed as the result of collaboration between the Project Management Institute and the Agile Alliance.

  8. English Teachers Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saefurrohman; Balinas, Elvira S.

    2016-01-01

    The new language assessment policies in the Philippines and in Indonesia have impact on English teachers' assessment practices. Classroom assessment; as mandated in the current curriculum of both countries swifts from sources of information to the inseparable process of teaching and learning. This study describes Filipino and Indonesian high…

  9. Homework Practices of English and Non-English-Speaking Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelamour, Barbara; Jacobs, D'Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the homework practices of English-speaking and non-English-speaking parents. Using a national data set of 7,992 students across ages and ethnicities, the frequency and type of homework practices were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed significant (though small) differences between the overall homework practices between…

  10. On the Practice Teaching of English Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    The main task of practice teaching of English Reading is to train students' independent reading ability and good reading habits. Extra-curricular reading of English literature and English newspapers and magazines plays an active role in improving English reading ability. The principle of selecting reading materials, the scope of selection and the…

  11. Investigating the meaning of 'good' or 'very good' patient evaluations of care in English general practice: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jenni; Newbould, Jenny; Abel, Gary; Elliott, Marc N; Beckwith, Julia; Llanwarne, Nadia; Elmore, Natasha; Davey, Antoinette; Gibbons, Chris; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin

    2017-03-02

    To examine concordance between responses to patient experience survey items evaluating doctors' interpersonal skills, and subsequent patient interview accounts of their experiences of care. Mixed methods study integrating data from patient questionnaires completed immediately after a video-recorded face-to-face consultation with a general practitioner (GP) and subsequent interviews with the same patients which included playback of the recording. 12 general practices in rural, urban and inner city locations in six areas in England. 50 patients (66% female, aged 19-96 years) consulting face-to-face with 32 participating GPs. Positive responses to interpersonal skills items in a postconsultation questionnaire ('good' and 'very good') were compared with experiences reported during subsequent video elicitation interview (categorised as positive, negative or neutral by independent clinical raters) when reviewing that aspect of care. We extracted 230 textual statements from 50 interview transcripts which related to the evaluation of GPs' interpersonal skills. Raters classified 70.9% (n=163) of these statements as positive, 19.6% (n=45) neutral and 9.6% (n=22) negative. Comments made by individual patients during interviews did not always express the same sentiment as their responses to the questionnaire. Where questionnaire responses indicated that interpersonal skills were 'very good', 84.6% of interview statements concerning that item were classified as positive. However, where patients rated interpersonal skills as 'good', only 41.9% of interview statements were classified as positive, and 18.9% as negative. Positive responses on patient experience questionnaires can mask important negative experiences which patients describe in subsequent interviews. The interpretation of absolute patient experience scores in feedback and public reporting should be done with caution, and clinicians should not be complacent following receipt of 'good' feedback. Relative scores are

  12. General practice registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Catherine; Seal, Alexa; McGirr, Joe; Caton, Tim

    2015-10-05

    The models of practice that general practice registrars (GPRs) envisage undertaking will affect workforce supply. The aim of this research was to determine practice intentions of current GPRs in a regional general practice training program (Coast City Country General Practice Training). Questionnaires were circulated to 220 GPRs undertaking general practice placements to determine characteristics of ideal practice models and intentions for future practice. Responses were received for 99 participants (45%). Current GPRs intend to work an average of less than eight half-day sessions/week, with male participants intending to work more hours (t(91) = 3.528, P = 0.001). More than one-third of this regional cohort intends to practice in metropolitan centres. Proximity to family and friends was the most important factor influencing the choice of practice location. Men ranked remuneration for work as more important (t (88) = -4.280, P GPRs into rural practice.

  13. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The next session will take place: From 5th October 2009 to 5th February 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 5th October 2009 to 5th February 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of $eptember to end of January 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who wish to improve their writing skills....

  14. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The next session will take place: From 5th October 2009 to 5th February 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 5th October 2009 to 5th February 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of $eptember to end of January 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who wish to improve their writing skills. ...

  15. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The next session will take place: From 5th October 2009 to 5th February 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 5th October 2009 to 5th February 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of $eptember to end of January 2010 (2 weeks break at Christmas). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who wish to improve their writin...

  16. Sri Lankan English O Level: Lever for Change. Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Ethel; Webber, Richard

    A discussion of the new Sri Lankan General Certificate of Education (GCE) O-Level standardized test of English focuses on how new ideas in testing have been implemented in the test and on their effect on classroom practice and the quality of English instruction. The discussion begins with a brief outline of the history and context in which the new…

  17. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The next session will take place: from beginning of October 2007 to beginning of February 2008 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages, or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2007 to beginning of February 2008 (3 weeks break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from beginning of Oc...

  18. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The next session will take place: from the beginning of October 2007 to the beginning of February 2008 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from the beginning of October 2007 to the beginning of February 2008 (3 weeks break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next ses...

  19. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The next session will take place: from 25 February or 3 March to end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 25 February or 3 March to end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking their oral skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours. Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 25 February or ...

  20. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The next session will take place: from 25 February or 3 March to end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 25 February or 3 March to end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking. skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours. Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 25 February or 3 Marc...

  1. General and Professional English Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The next session will take place: from 25 February or 3 March to the end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, Tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 25 February or 3 March to the end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their oral skills and improve their vocabulary. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours. Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 25 February or 3 March to end of June 2008 (1/2 weeks break...

  2. English Second Language, General, Special Education, and Speech/Language Personal Teacher Efficacy, English Language Arts Scientifically-Validated Intervention Practice, and Working Memory Development of English Language Learners in High and Low Performing Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The researcher investigated teacher factors contributing to English language arts (ELA) achievement of English language learners (ELLs) over 2 consecutive years, in high and low performing elementary schools with a Hispanic/Latino student population greater than or equal to 30 percent. These factors included personal teacher efficacy, teacher…

  3. Pre-TOEFL guide academic English practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Preparing for TOEFL Do you plan to take TOEFL or IELTS but are not ready for the challenge? Do you need more practice? If you do, then this book is for you. It is also for those who just want to practice their academic English. Whatever your purpose, this book will give you the foundation in academic English you need for TOEFL and IELTS success.

  4. Impact of primary care funding on secondary care utilisation and patient outcomes: a retrospective cross-sectional study of English general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Esperance, Veline; Sutton, Matt; Schofield, Peter; Round, Thomas; Malik, Umer; White, Patrick; Ashworth, Mark

    2017-11-01

    In international studies, greater investment in primary health care is associated with improved population health outcomes. To determine whether investment in general practice is associated with secondary care utilisation, patient satisfaction, and clinical outcomes. Retrospective cross-sectional study of general practices in England, 2014-2015. Practice-level data were stratified into three groups according to GP contract type: national General Medical Services (GMS) contracts, with or without the capitation supplement (mean practice income guarantee), or local Personal Medical Services (PMS) contracts. Regression models were used to explore associations between practice funding (capitation payments and capitation supplements) and secondary care usage, patient satisfaction (general practice patient survey scores), and clinical outcomes (Quality and Outcomes Framework [QOF] scores). The authors conducted financial modelling to predict secondary care cost savings associated with notional changes in primary care funding. Mean capitation payments per patient were £69.82 in GMS practices in receipt of capitation supplements (n = 2784), £78.79 in GMS practices without capitation supplements (n = 1672), and £84.43 in PMS practices (n = 3022). The mean capitation supplement was £5.72 per patient. Financial modelling demonstrated little or no relationship between capitation payments and secondary care costs. In contrast, notional investment in capitation supplements was associated with modelled savings in secondary care costs. The relationship between funding and patient satisfaction was inconsistent. QOF performance was not associated with funding in any practice type. Capitation payments appear to be broadly aligned to patient need in terms of secondary care usage. Supplements to the current capitation formula are associated with reduced secondary care costs. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  5. On Differences between General English Teaching and Business English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenzhong; Liao, Fang

    2008-01-01

    With the accelerating rate of globalization, business exchanges are carried out cross the border, as a result there is a growing demand for talents professional both in English and Business. We can see that at present Business English courses are offered by many language schools in the aim of meeting the need for Business English talent. Many…

  6. Effects of electronic communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, WJ; Moorman, PW; Koppejan-Mulder, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To obtain insight into the effects of electronic communication on GPs by studying those publications in literature describing the effects of structured electronic clinical communication in general practice. Methods: We retrieved all publications in the English language indexed in MEDLINE

  7. Recruitment of general practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health service research often involves the active participation of healthcare professionals. However, their ability and commitment to research varies. This can cause recruitment difficulties and thereby prolong the study period and inflate budgets. Solberg has identified seven R......-factors as determinants for successfully recruiting healthcare professionals: relationships, reputation, requirements, rewards, reciprocity, resolution, and respect. Method: This is a process evaluation of the seven R-factors. We applied these factors to guide the design of our recruitment strategy as well as to make...... adjustments when recruiting general practices in a guideline implementation study. In the guideline implementation study, we studied the effect of outreach visits, quality reports, and new patient stratification tools for low back pain patients. Results: During a period of 15 months, we recruited 60 practices...

  8. The Practice of English Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Jeremy

    Theoretical insights into teaching English as a second language developed in recent years are brought together in a broad methodological approach called the balanced activities approach. The book aims at providing a theoretical background to the approach as well as detailing practical instructional techniques. The first of the three parts of the…

  9. Prostate-specific antigen testing rates remain low in UK general practice: a cross-sectional study in six English cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Naomi; Hughes, Laura J; Turner, Emma L; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Martin, Richard M; Metcalfe, Chris

    2011-11-01

    OBJECTIVE • To estimate rates of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in UK general practices by age, deprivation index and geographical location. SUBJECTS AND METHODS • Practice-based, retrospective data on PSA testing patterns in 2007 were collected from a random sample of 87 general practices using EMIS LV computer systems within the passively observed non-intervention arm of a cluster-randomized controlled trial. • Information for a total of 126 716 men aged 45-89 years with no recorded diagnosis of prostate cancer prior to 1 January 2007 was collected. RESULTS • In all, 7902 (6.2%) of 126 716 men aged 45-89 without a prior diagnosis of prostate cancer underwent at least one PSA test from their general practitioner during 2007 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.6-7.0%; practice-based inter-quartile range 3.6-8.4%]. • PSA testing rates were 1.4% (95% CI 1.1-1.6%) in men aged 45-49, rising to 11.3% (95% CI 10.0-12.9%) at age 75-79 years (P for trend <0.001). • Testing rates were lowest in the three northern centres (3.5-5.7%) vs the three more southern centres (7.1-8.9%; P < 0.001). • For every 20 points increase in the index of multiple deprivation score, the proportion of men tested fell by 1.7% (95% CI -2.5 to -0.8%; P < 0.001). • Lower proportions of men were subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer in practices testing more men (odds ratio for a one unit increase in the natural log of testing 0.76; 95% CI 0.60-0.97; P= 0.025). CONCLUSION • Overall levels of PSA testing in UK general practice remain low, but for those tested there are important variations by age, deprivation and geographical location that do not appear to reflect clinical need or the intention of current policy. • PSA testing in general practice is currently skewed towards older men, and current policy enabling all men to make an informed choice about PSA testing is not being effectively implemented as uptake clearly varies by socioeconomic status. • This reinforces

  10. Labetalol in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    1 The results of the treatment of 8573 hypertensive patients with labetalol in general practice, for periods between 1 month and 5 yr, are reviewed. 2 The data reviewed were obtained from the published literature together with our own published (Kane et al., 1976; Kane et al., 1979) and more recent (unpublished) work. 3 Between 60% and 80% of severe (diastolic blood pressure > 120 mmHg) and previously uncontrolled hypertensives responded satisfactorily to the drug, as did up to 88% of mild to moderate hypertensives. 4 The anti-hypertensive effect of labetalol was not dependent on the frequency of administration, twice and three times daily treatment regimes being equally effective. 5 The withdrawal rate attributable to side-effects was between 6% and 13%. Tiredness, dizziness, headache and upper gastro-intestinal symptoms were the four principal side-effects, but they were usually transient when labetalol treatment was continued. 6 No drug interactions or adverse haematological or biochemical changes were seen. PMID:7093101

  11. Defibrillators in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, C; Kerr, A; Varghese, A; Wilson, C

    1984-01-01

    After a successful pilot scheme introduced in 1975, when six portable defibrillators were provided for health centres, an additional 50 defibrillators were provided in February 1982 for general practitioners to use. Between December 1975 and February 1984 defibrillation was attempted in 54 patients who collapsed with clinical cardiac arrest in the presence of general practitioners or less than five minutes before their arrival. A cardiac output was achieved in 32 patients, 28 survived to reac...

  12. Impetigo in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImpetigo is a common skin infection, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus that mainly occurs in children. Patients with impetigo usually consult their general practitioner, who also treats the vast majority of cases. Impetigo is considered highly infectious, and consequently

  13. Test Reviews: GEPT--General English Proficiency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roever, Carsten; Pan, Yi-Ching

    2008-01-01

    The General English Proficiency Test (GEPT) was developed in 1999, commissioned by the Ministry of Education in Taiwan. The purpose of the test is to provide individuals with a gauge of their English language proficiency and assist employers and educational institutions in selection and placement. Also, it aims to encourage the study of English…

  14. An investigation of the effectiveness of the modular general English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating existing foreign language programs on a regular basis is essential because program evaluation leads to more effective programs. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the modular intensive general English language teaching program applied at a university in Turkey by investigating students' and English ...

  15. Principles and Practices for Teaching English as an International Language. ESL & Applied Linguistics Professional Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsagoff, Lubna, Ed.; McKay, Sandra Lee, Ed.; Hu, Guangwei, Ed.; Renandya, Willy A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    What general principles should inform a socioculturally sensitive pedagogy for teaching English as an International Language and what practices would be consistent with these principles? This text explores the pedagogical implications of the continuing spread of English and its role as an international language, highlighting the importance of…

  16. Nigerian Journal of General Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. The Nigerian Journal of General Practice is the official publication of the Association of General and Private Medical Practitioners of Nigeria. It is a multi-disciplinary, biannual, peer-reviewed biomedical journal that has been published since 1985. It invites scholarly manuscripts relevant to the ...

  17. Using MIQUEST in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Hammersley

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes ten months' experience with MIQUEST software used for the collection of data from computerised databases in General Practice. We report on the following: the MIQUEST software in use, the time costs to the practice, the completeness of confidentiality barriers and the accuracy of data collected using MIQUEST compared with similar data collected by the practice system (EMIS. There were no problems encountered with installation of MIQUEST-related software. With experience, MIQUEST was equal to the practice system for speed and ease of use. The confidentiality safeguards were found to be in accordance with the GMSC/RCGP Guidelines - patients could not be directly, or indirectly, identified from the data extracted by external searches. Inaccuracies in the data collected using MIQUEST were identified, but these were largely attributable to problems with the EMIS-written interpreter available on the practice system at the time, or with the coding schemes used by the practice. In an individual practice, MIQUEST represents an alternative data collection method to the practice-based software. For data collection from multiple general practices it should prove an invaluable tool for Health Authorities and research organisations.

  18. An Ontology to Improve Transparency in Case Definition and Increase Case Finding of Infectious Intestinal Disease: Database Study in English General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Shinneman, Stacy; Yonova, Ivelina; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Elliot, Alex J; Bolton, Frederick; Smith, Gillian E; O'Brien, Sarah

    2017-09-28

    Infectious intestinal disease (IID) has considerable health impact; there are 2 billion cases worldwide resulting in 1 million deaths and 78.7 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Reported IID incidence rates vary and this is partly because terms such as "diarrheal disease" and "acute infectious gastroenteritis" are used interchangeably. Ontologies provide a method of transparently comparing case definitions and disease incidence rates. This study sought to show how differences in case definition in part account for variation in incidence estimates for IID and how an ontological approach provides greater transparency to IID case finding. We compared three IID case definitions: (1) Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) definition based on mapping to the Ninth International Classification of Disease (ICD-9), (2) newer ICD-10 definition, and (3) ontological case definition. We calculated incidence rates and examined the contribution of four supporting concepts related to IID: symptoms, investigations, process of care (eg, notification to public health authorities), and therapies. We created a formal ontology using ontology Web language. The ontological approach identified 5712 more cases of IID than the ICD-10 definition and 4482 more than the RCGP RSC definition from an initial cohort of 1,120,490. Weekly incidence using the ontological definition was 17.93/100,000 (95% CI 15.63-20.41), whereas for the ICD-10 definition the rate was 8.13/100,000 (95% CI 6.70-9.87), and for the RSC definition the rate was 10.24/100,000 (95% CI 8.55-12.12). Codes from the four supporting concepts were generally consistent across our three IID case definitions: 37.38% (3905/10,448) (95% CI 36.16-38.5) for the ontological definition, 38.33% (2287/5966) (95% CI 36.79-39.93) for the RSC definition, and 40.82% (1933/4736) (95% CI 39.03-42.66) for the ICD-10 definition. The proportion of laboratory results associated with a positive test

  19. PEER MODELING FOR CLASSROOM ENGLISH PRACTICE IN PEER TEACHING ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Rokhayani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Giving instructions is a part of basic skills that should be owned by a prospective teacher. Student teachers of English Education Department, as prospective English teachers, should be exposed to an intensive practice of using Classroom English to help them improve competence of giving instructions in English. In the class, they can use peer modeling as a media of reflecting their effort to do rehearsal. Peer teaching can be an alternative activity to give them opportunities for them to do intensive practice of giving instructions using classroom English. This study aims to describe how peer modeling of Classroom English in peer teaching activities are used by student teachers of English Education Department of Universitas Muria Kudus to prepare them for a program of field teaching practicum at schools. Peer modeling is believed to be able to reduce psychological gap among students during their simulation of teaching using Classroom English. Student teachers will not feel awkward physiologically to give feedback to their friends‘ performance. The study finds out that the student teachers of English Education Department of Universitas Muria Kudus show good effort of using better Classroom English.

  20. Periodontal Emergencies in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Reena; Ide, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Diagnosing and managing periodontal emergencies is a common part of general dental practice. This article summarises the presentation, aetiology and management of the key periodontal emergencies, including gingival abscess, periodontal abscess, peri-coronitis/peri-coronal abscess, perio-endo lesion/ abscess, necrotising gingivitis and periodontitis, acute herpetic gingivostomatitis, acute physical/chemical/thermal injury and subgingival root fracture.

  1. Pronunciation and phonetics a practical guide for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adam

    2014-01-01

    This engaging, succinct text is an introduction to both phonetics and phonology as applied to the teaching of pronunciation to English language learners. Section 1 selectively covers the main areas of phonetics and phonology, without going into any area in more depth than the average English language teacher requires or that the average English language teacher trainee can handle. Section 2 focuses on practical issues related to learners and how they learn languages, and what represents good practice in terms of classroom activities for pronunciation—including aspects such as targets, motiva

  2. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    -2019. The hypotheses and anticipated perspectives will be discussed at the conference. Conclusion This project will contribute with solid knowledge on diagnostic approaches for management of infections in Danish general practice. The results will create a base for targeted interventions aiming to optimize diagnostic......Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase....... A questionnaire comprising a discrete choice experiment will allow us to investigate the relative importance of selected factors (e.g. microbiological diagnostics, point-of-care tests, patients' expectations) in the management of infectious diseases. Results This PhD project is scheduled to be carried out in 2016...

  3. Technology Integration by General Education Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, Marie Simone

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing population of English language learners (ELLs) in elementary schools across the United States, and a current academic achievement gap between ELLs and non-ELLs. Researchers have found that integration of Web 2.0 tools has benefitted ELLs in language learning settings, outside of the general classroom. The research problem…

  4. An investigation of the effectiveness of the modular general English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation of the effectiveness of the modular general English language teaching preparatory program at a Turkish university. ... and should be replaced by a more manageable and feasible system considering specific contextual constraints, such as the number of instructors, classrooms and teaching resources. Also ...

  5. General types of idiomatic verbal units in English and Swahili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Людмила Алексеевна Семенкова

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the comparative analysis of the idiomatic verbal units-word combination of the two typologically different languages - English and Swahili: As a result a number of general syntactic types of their idiomatic verbal units are determined.

  6. General dentist orthodontic practice in foreign legal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Toshio Maruo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: General dentist orthodontic practice is a controversial issue and this paper aims to analyze it comparing foreign laws to Brazilian Legal System. METHODS: Regulations and scientific texts concerning orthodontic practice by general dentists, in Portuguese or English language, were sought. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Portugal clearly forbids general dentist orthodontic practice; United States of America do not clearly forbid general dentist orthodontic practice, but do regulate and promote campaigns to encourage public to seek specialist service; in Australia and England, corrective orthodontics are offered both by orthodontists and general dentists; it was not possible to evaluate how orthodontic services are provided in Eastern Europe; and the fact that general dentists are forbidden to practice corrective orthodontics in Brazilian Legal System is compatible to other countries policy.

  7. The role of ESP courses in general English proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Cigan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is the study of the interaction between learning English for Specific Purposes (ESP, in particular, English for the Financial Sector, and general English proficiency. The research examines the effects of an ESP course being taught for a year on the students' general English proficiency.Two sets of tests were prepared for that purpose and administered to 30 first-year students of finance and law. The students took the placement test twice, at the beginning and at the end of the school year. To monitor test performance over a research period, a parallel form measuring the same competences was administered at the beginning of the second semester. In the test development process a special consideration has been paid to the level of difficulty and its relation to the students' prior educational context. Drawing on the National State Matura exams the test is set at Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR Level B2. As regards its content the test is comprised of reading comprehension tasks (multiple matching, multiple-choice cloze, gapped text and grammar tasks aiming to examine lexical and grammatical competence.There were two major assumptions in this study: 1 Learning ESP can improve students' general English proficiency, and 2 There is a more substantial improvement in lexical competence as compared to the improvement in grammatical competence.There is strong evidence in support of the first hypothesis, whereas for the second one the results were ambiguous. After major findings are presented and discussed, implications for ESP teaching are given in closing.

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Action Research Practices of English as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Action Research Practices of English as Foreign Language. (EFL) Teachers at Two Ethiopian Public Universities: Implications for Personal and Professional Improvement. Firdissa Jebessa Aga. Abstract. The study intended to assess EFL teachers' actual practice of action research and the concomitant ...

  9. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  10. Learning Transfer in English for General Academic Purposes Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Zarei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article was launched to investigate if learning from an English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP writing course transfers to other writing contexts. The study focused on the issue of transfer across disciplines, tasks, and two languages (English and Persian. The data were collected through interviews and writing samples from the participants’ own EGAP class and their other courses in the university (non-EGAP. The interviews were transcribed and coded for the self-reports of learning transfer, and the writing samples were analyzed for the 10 learning outcomes already instructed in the class. The results demonstrated that transfer of learning was variably achieved within interview-based transcriptions and writing samples, though to a varying degree. Showing high degree of conformity and a roughly similar general regularity, both series of data indicate that learning transfer does occur, though inconsistently, across disciplines, tasks, and the two languages.

  11. How Do Binus University Undergraduate Students Value English in the General, Academic, and ELT Context?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almodad B. Asmani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Article  explored the issues of the reasons and ways Indonesian undergraduate students taking English subjects at Binus University valued English, particularly in relation to its roles and influences as the dominant language and as the world’s lingua franca, and how these could give impacts on the ELT (English Language Teaching purposes at Binus University. The study used the quantitative approach to find out the pattern of the ways they valued English in the general, academic and ELT contexts. The analysis of the quantitative results showed that there was a tendency that non-computer students value English relatively higher than computer students in terms of linguistically imperialistic ideas and macroacquisition views, while English itself tended to be respected by all students for both reasons of material/non-material benefits as well as international influences. In summary, teacher resources, teaching techniques, curriculum design, material content and assessment format should put these findings into consideration so as to make the best teaching methodology for ELT practices at Binus University. 

  12. Weight Changes in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus

    2017-06-01

    This PhD thesis is about weight changes. What determines long-term weight changes in the adult general population? Is it possible that weight loss may not always be healthy? The present clinical guidelines for general practice advice most overweight persons and patients with type 2 diabetes to lose weight. Are the guidelines based on firm evidence?   METHODS: The back-bone of the thesis is constituted by three scientific articles based on three different population based cohort studies. Multivariable modeling and other epidemiological methods were used.   RESULTS: Article 1 examined weight changes in the general population in relation to smoking status, and proposed a graphical 'smoking cessation weight change model', demonstrating the importance of time, age and smoking status in relation to long-term weight changes. Article 2 suggested new methods to improve the processing of dietary data. It was demonstrated how median imputation for missing values and assumptions about standard portion sizes were inferior to stochastic methods conditioning on information about physiology of the individual. Article 3 evaluated the influence of prospectively planned intentional weight loss on long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therapeutic intentional weight loss supervised by a medical doctor was not associated with reduced morbidity or mortality. In the general population the dietary intake of fructose and soft drinks sweetened with sugar was not associated with weight change over 9 years. Weight gain rates were large in young adults and incrementally smaller in middle aged adults. Subjects more than 60 years lost weight on average. Historical weight data suggest that the body weight increases throughout life to the age of 60-65years. A study with simulated data indicates that bias in baseline BMI may misleadingly have favored weight loss in earlier cohort studies of intentional weight loss and mortality.   DISCUSSION: The findings regarding

  13. Intercultural Communicative Competence: Exploring English Language Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tony Johnstone; Sachdev, Itesh

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the beliefs and practices of experienced teachers in the USA, UK and France relating to the application of a model of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) to English language programmes. Broadly, "intercultural" approaches to language learning and teaching are strongly advocated in both the…

  14. Bilingual School Psychologists' Assessment Practices with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored bilingual school psychologists' assessment practices with students identified as English language learners (ELL). One thousand bilingual National Association of School Psychologist members were recruited nationwide, and 276 participated. Among those conducting language proficiency assessments of ELLs, many (58%) use…

  15. Turkish Prospective English Teachers' Reflections on Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mine; Geçikli, Merve; Yesilyurt, Savas

    2016-01-01

    This study is an attempt to present the reflections of prospective English teachers in Turkey on teaching practice over their experiences and perceptions. A mixed-method research design was conducted through the use of a questionnaire involving a 5-Likert scale and one open-ended question. The participants were 120 senior students at ELT…

  16. English Language Teaching Curriculum in Iran: Planning and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atai, Mahmood Reza; Mazlum, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates English language teaching (ELT) curriculum planning in Iran's Ministry of Education and its implementation by teachers. We studied programme evaluation; needs analysis; the ELT-specific documents; communication channels between planning and practice levels; teacher evaluation and student assessment; interpretation…

  17. English Language Learners: Effective Teaching Strategies, Practices for FCS Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Barbara N.; Rehm, Marsha L.

    2011-01-01

    English language learners represent the fastest growing segment of the U.S. school-age population, raising the question of how best to teach this new and challenging group of students. The research and scholarly literature has identified a number of instructional strategies and classroom practices that have been shown to be effective in teaching…

  18. The Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communication Competence in Oral English Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main problems and difficulties in current college English oral English teaching practice, illustrates the relationship between oral English teaching and cross-cultural communication competence. On the one hand, cross-cultural communication plays an essential role in oral English teaching; besides, oral English teaching…

  19. Trading Culture: Practical Background for Azerbaijani-English Poetry Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Mandaville A.; Naghiyeva Sh.

    2011-01-01

    Where translation theory often argues the difficulties of translation—whether or not and under what conditions translation is possible—the authors take a more practical approach. Examining the translation of poetry from Azerbaijani to English, two very different languages and poetic traditions, the authors discuss key linguistic, political, cultural considerations and demonstrate some effective practical strategies. They approach translation as a fundamentally human endeavor and the work of a...

  20. INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATION OF LEGAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE UNITS IN PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenova, E.V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article the variety of borrowings, internationalisms, phraseological units, idioms in the professional-oriented texts is considered. It opens an opportunity to understand the statement of a thought and laconicism of its expression, including the field of jurisprudence. The research objective is demonstration the ways of interpretation and application of legal English language units in practice through characteristic features of English legal terminology. Particular attention is paid to the peculiarities of phraseological units and their translation in oral and written speech.

  1. Practical Application of Mind Map to Learning English

    OpenAIRE

    HONKE, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    [Abstract]There have been various learning methods and new methods have always been introduced to the English language learners. However, there is no the best or the only method for your learning English. You can choose some out of them t o suit your learning style or purpose. It is worth trying all possibilities in your choice. One of the new possibilities is Mind Map. It is an expressive method of thinking developed by the British educator Tony Buzan. It is practically the diagram looks lik...

  2. Intercultural communication in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wieringen, Joke C M; Harmsen, Johannes A M; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2002-03-01

    Little is known about the causes of problems in communication between health care professionals and ethnic-minority patients. Not only language difficulties, but also cultural differences may result in these problems. This study explores the influence of communication and patient beliefs about health (care) and disease on understanding and compliance of native-born and ethnic-minority patients. In this descriptive study seven general practices located in a multi-ethnic neighbourhood in Rotterdam participated. Eighty-seven parents who visited their GP with a child for a new health problem took part: more than 50% of them belonged to ethnic-minorities. The consultation between GP and patient was recorded on video and a few days after the consultation patients were interviewed at home. GPs filled out a short questionnaire immediately after the consultation. Patient beliefs and previous experiences with health care were measured by different questionnaires in the home interview. Communication was analysed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System based on the videos. Mutual understanding between GP and patient and therapy compliance was assessed by comparing GP's questionnaires with the home interview with the parents. In 33% of the consultations with ethnic-minority patients (versus 13% with native-born patients) mutual understanding was poor. Different aspects of communication had no influence on mutual understanding. Problems in the relationship with the GP, as experienced by patients, showed a significant relation with mutual understanding. Consultations without mutual understanding more often ended in non-compliance with the prescribed therapy. Ethnic-minority parents more often report problems in their relationship with the GP and they have different beliefs about health and health care from native-born parents. Good relationships between GP and patients are necessary for mutual understanding. Mutual understanding has a strong correlation with compliance

  3. General English Attrition and Its Significance for Business English Teaching/Learning of Prospective Economists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Čepon

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes some of the findings of a large-scale study of the foreign language needs of economics students (Čepon 2007. It focuses on the rationale behind the lengthy period of disuse of general English (GE during economics students’ first year of undergraduate study. The article presents evidence for processes of GE attrition that slowly set in and are deemed to be particularly detrimental to economics. It is also important to determine exactly which language needs are essential for the future professional development of the economics graduates. It is hoped that this will spur foreign language policy renewal.

  4. Theory and practice: Science for undergraduates of limited English proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Judith W.

    1993-06-01

    Between 1980 and 1990, the total number of Asian, Hispanic, American Indian, and foreign undergraduates increased by more than 50% at public and private, four-year and two-year colleges. Many of these students may be of limited English proficiency, suggesting that the traditional science lecture/lab format may need modification to incorporate the theory of second language acquisition as it pertains to the practice of content instruction. Various methods exist to improve science instruction for limited English proficient undergraduates. These included the adjunct and tutorial models, sheltered or bridge science instruction, faculty development, and science instruction in the students' native language. Any plan for science education reform at the collegiate level or for increasing minority participation in science must address the needs of the growing population of undergraduates who speak English as a second language.

  5. Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching......Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching...

  6. Methodological practicalities in analytical generalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the existing literature on qualitative methodologies tend to discuss analytical generalization at a relatively abstract and general theoretical level. It is, however, not particularly straightforward to “translate” such abstract epistemological principles into more...

  7. Safe sedation in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mari Jansen van Rensburg, MB ChB, MMed (Anes), Dip in Sedation. Private practice, Paarl, Western Cape; Honorary Lecturer, University of the Western Cape, Bellville. Mari Jansen van Rensburg obtained both her MB ChB and MMed (Anes) degrees at the University of the Free State, and obtained the Diploma in Sedation.

  8. [Psychotropic drugs in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Alexander

    2014-06-18

    The article presents a user-friendly overview of psychotropic drugs which are helpful for the prescription in a primary care practice. The author recommends to get familiar with just a small selection of drugs first and second line. This means to know well about their effectiveness, short-and long-term side effects, interactions with other drugs and the necessary monitoring that should be done.

  9. [Tetanus prophylaxis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, F.S.; Wiersma, T.J.; Beaujean, D.; Burgmeijer, R.J.; Timen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In response to the report 'Immunisation against tetanus following injuries' from the Dutch Health Council, the Dutch College of General Practitioners, the National Coordinating Body for the Control of Infectious Diseases and The Netherlands Vaccine Institute have drawn up guidelines for tetanus

  10. Nutrition communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.M.E.; Hiddink, G.J.; Koelen, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are frequently confronted with patients who suffer from obesity or other nutrition-related diseases, such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. There is increasing evidence that nutrition communication is effective in changing nutrition behaviour. Moreover, it is widely

  11. Multiple sclerosis: management in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Foets, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A descriptive study on 118 MS patients in general practice, to describe the family physician's role in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. METHOD: Random sample of 103 general practices (161 family physicians) throughout The Netherlands with a total list of

  12. The construction of practice and identity in primary English language teaching in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Duc Chinh

    2017-01-01

    Teacher identity has become an emergent theme in language teaching research. Research studies on language teacher identity have focused on teachers in secondary and tertiary education. Language teachers at primary schools have not been at the centre of research attention. To fill the gap, this study explores the construction of practice and identity in primary school English language teaching in Vietnam. The study drew on the theories of teacher identity in both general education and language...

  13. Organization and change in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl

    primary care. One purpose is to give more freedom to the patients to choose care-givers. Another is to create a more competitive health care system. These reforms will be evaluated in a research project to be presented. Chairman: John Sahl Andersen MESH-terms: Delivery of Health Care, Health Care Reform......Organization and change in general practice Abstract for a symposium at Nordic Congress for General Practice Thursday 14 May at 15.30-17.00 General practice is under increasing pressure to assume new tasks, adopt new technologies and engage in new organizational structures. However, in a field....... Introducing new technologies for quality improvement in general practice – a case study. This presentation explores an attempt to standardize, monitor, and improve the quality of diabetes care in general practice. The presentation focus on how the GPs’ have perceived and received the new model. Rikke Dalsted...

  14. THE PERCEPTION OF GENERAL AMERICAN ENGLISH BY SPEAKERS OF SOUTHERN DIALECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LANE, HARLAN; AND OTHERS

    RECENT LINGUISTIC RESEARCH SHOWS THAT THE SPEECH PATTERNS OF SOUTHERN NEGROES CONSTITUTE A LEGITIMATE DIALECT OF ENGLISH WITH PHONOLOGICAL AND GRAMMATICAL RULES SOMEWHAT DIFFERENT FROM GENERAL AMERICAN ENGLISH (GAE). AN EXPERIMENT WAS DESIGNED TO DETERMINE WHETHER THOSE ASPECTS OF THE NEGRO DIALECT WHICH SET IT APART FROM OTHER ENGLISH DIALECTS…

  15. A New Outlook on EAP Literacies: General and Specific English Territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    In designing an EAP (English for Academic Purposes) course it is necessary that we consider several factors: students' objectives, needs, levels and interests, course and institution's goals, and availability of resources. In this paper it is strived to elucidate the differences between EGP (English for General purposes) and ESP (English for…

  16. How community based is general practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, D; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: One of the potentially strong points of general-practice-based primary care is that it is accessible within local communities. As the arm of clinical medicine with the broadest reach into the community, primary care clinicians are well-positioned to understand local needs and design programmes that address community health. This paper analyses variations in the degree to which general practices indeed work community based. Geographical factors, patient factors, and practice factor...

  17. The epidemiology of teaching and training General Practices in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot L; Gay, Simon P; McKinley, Robert K

    2016-11-01

    There is no national picture of teaching and training practices or the communities they serve. We aimed to describe the association between general practices' engagement with education and their characteristics, locality and patients' health-status and satisfaction. This data linkage study of all English practices calculated odds ratios for teaching and training status and practice, locality and patient variables. Teaching and training practices are larger than practices which do neither (mean list size (SD) 7074 (3736), 10112 (4934), and 5327 (3368) respectively, p teach. Practices in rural areas (1.68 (1.43-1.98)), with more GPs (1.22 (1.27-1.39)), more full time equivalent GPs (2.68 (1.64-4.40)), fewer male GPs (0.17 (0.13-0.22)) and a higher proportion of White British people in their locality (1.34 (1.02-1.75)) were more likely to train. Teaching and training practices had higher patient satisfaction (0.293 (0.190, 0.397) and (0.563 (0.442, 0.685)) respectively and quality and outcomes framework scores (0.507 (0.211, 0.804)) and (0.996 (0.650, 1.342)) respectively than those which did not. Educationally engaged practices are unrepresentative in serving less ethnically diverse and (for training practices) less urban environments. Investment is needed to increase the proportion of educational practices in diverse urban localities.

  18. Principles and Practices of Teaching English as an International Language. New Perspectives on Language and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Aya, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book critically examines current ELT practices vis-a-vis the use of English as an international lingua franca. It bridges the gap between theoretical discussion and the practical concerns of teaching English as an international language (EIL), and presents diverse approaches for preparing competent users of English in international contexts.…

  19. Generalizing and Skepticism: Bringing Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, David A.; Ellsworth, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical arguments rely on examples without necessarily addressing all cases. Students should be skeptical of empirical evidence and should seek more secure arguments for generalizations, such as those that explain why a generalization is true for all cases. Generalizing on the basis of patterns in data is an important mathematical practice;…

  20. Guidelines for computer security in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Peter; Pleteshner, Catherine; Bhend, Heinz; Brouns, Johan

    2007-01-01

    As general practice becomes increasingly computerised, data security becomes increasingly important for both patient health and the efficient operation of the practice. To develop guidelines for computer security in general practice based on a literature review, an analysis of available information on current practice and a series of key stakeholder interviews. While the guideline was produced in the context of Australian general practice, we have developed a template that is also relevant for other countries. Current data on computer security measures was sought from Australian divisions of general practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with general practitioners (GPs), the medical software industry, senior managers within government responsible for health IT (information technology) initiatives, technical IT experts, divisions of general practice and a member of a health information consumer group. The respondents were asked to assess both the likelihood and the consequences of potential risks in computer security being breached. The study suggested that the most important computer security issues in general practice were: the need for a nominated IT security coordinator; having written IT policies, including a practice disaster recovery plan; controlling access to different levels of electronic data; doing and testing backups; protecting against viruses and other malicious codes; installing firewalls; undertaking routine maintenance of hardware and software; and securing electronic communication, for example via encryption. This information led to the production of computer security guidelines, including a one-page summary checklist, which were subsequently distributed to all GPs in Australia. This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making

  1. Computers in general practice: the patient's voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of answers to a questionnaire on the use of computers in general practice showed that 19 per cent of patients in two practices in Staffordshire would be worried if their general practitioner used a computer to store medical records. Twenty-seven per cent of patients would be unwilling to speak frankly about personal matters to their general practitioner if he or she used a computer and 7 per cent said that they would change to another doctor. Fifteen per cent stated that their general practitioner already had information about them that they would not want to be included in a computerized record of their medical history. PMID:7328555

  2. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first......This PhD dissertation is a product of my PhD project carried out in collaboration between DTU Management Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark, Research Unit for General Practice at University of Southern Denmark, and Research Unit for General Practice at University of Copenhagen...

  3. Accreditation in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Pedersen, Line B; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    practice and mortality. All outcomes relate to quality indicators included in the Danish Healthcare Quality Program, which is based on general principles for accreditation. DISCUSSION: The consequences of accreditation and standard-setting processes are generally under-researched, particularly in general......BACKGROUND: Accreditation is used increasingly in health systems worldwide. However, there is a lack of evidence on the effects of accreditation, particularly in general practice. In 2016 a mandatory accreditation scheme was initiated in Denmark, and during a 3-year period all practices, as default......, should undergo accreditation according to the Danish Healthcare Quality Program. The aim of this study is primarily to evaluate the effects of a mandatory accreditation scheme. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is conducted as a cluster-randomized controlled trial among 1252 practices (clusters) with 2211...

  4. [Suicide risk assessment tools for adults in general medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, Pierre-Antoine; David, Michel

    2015-06-01

    It is estimated that almost half of suicide victims have consulted a general practitioner during the month preceding their act. The implementation of a suicide risk assessment tool validated in primary care is therefore needed in general medical practice. To review the suicide risk assessment tools for adults, to discuss their validity, and to suggest a pertinent tool which could be used in primary care. Research into scientific databases (keywords: psychiatric status rating scales; tools; questionnaires; risk assessment; suicide; attempted suicide; suicidal ideation; primary care; family practice; general practice) and into French and English language primary care journals. Review of publications and recommendations from health promotion and suicide prevention organizations, and from general practice and psychiatry learned societies. Two categories of suicide risk assessment tools have been found. On one hand, questionnaires aim at predicting suicidal behaviours (or their recurrence) using a risk score. They are interesting in research but of limited value in clinical practice because of their low specificity and individual predictive power. On the other hand, semi-directive interviews unable clinicians to explore the three dimensions of suicidality (levels of risk, urgency and danger), thus knowing to what extent the patient is suicidal and to adopt the appropriate preventive care strategy. Their use in clinical routine is highly recommended. The Grille d'estimation de la dangerosité d'un passage à l'acte suicidaire is the only interview to have been validated in primary care so far. It could be a pertinent tool in general practice. Preventing suicide in primary care requires the assessment of suicide risk using a semi-directive interview. We suggest a qualitative study to be carried out in general practice on the Grille d'estimation de la dangerosité d'un passage à l'acte suicidaire. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous Professional Development of English Language Teachers: Perception and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman Al Asmari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Professional development is considered as an essential element in enhancing the teaching and learning process to ensure student learning. Professional development can also be deemed as a cornerstone of teacher professionalism and quality. The governments and educational institutions invest significantly in Continuous Professional Development (CPD to improve teacher quality and to meet the changing needs of the students. To uncover the perceptions and practices of professional development in Saudi Arabia, a survey was conducted at Taif University English Language Centre. The sample consisted of 121 English language teachers from various countries and having varied educational and academic experiences. The survey comprised items relevant to learning approaches, concept of professional development, perceptions and feedback on CPD. The respondents supported lifelong learning and experiential learning leading towards learner centered approach. They perceived the CPD as a challenge to their existing knowledge and classroom practice. However, they expressed their concerns regarding indigenization of activities in CPDs, institutional support in conducting classroom activities, and follow up activities.  Keywords: Professional development, Teacher perception, ELT in Saudi Arabia

  6. Teacher's and Students' Beliefs on English for General Academic Purposes: The Case of Iranian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojour, Masoud Kermani; Heirati, Javad Kia

    2015-01-01

    This study was framed in the sociocultural theory to look into the evolution of L2 learners' beliefs about the general English course during a term. One hundred ninety-eight male and female university students and their general English course teacher were randomly selected as the participants of the study. Data were gathered through the…

  7. Health care and general practice across Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Jong, F.A.J.M. de; Mulder, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains an overview of general practice and primary care medicine in Europe. It includes a clear description of the rapidly changing situation in Eastern Europe, as far as this situation is clear at all. The book is meant for those who require a systematic general briefing on the

  8. Nigerian Journal of General Practice: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Nigerian Journal of General Practice is the official publication of the Association of General and Private Medical Practitioners of Nigeria. It is a multi-disciplinary, biannual, peer-reviewed biomedical journal that has been published since 1985. It invites scholarly manuscripts relevant to the broad ...

  9. Undertreatment of urinary incontinence in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning-van Beest, F.J.A.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.; Herings, R.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the urinary incontinence guidelines that are issued by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, treatment guidelines are related to the type of incontinence. It is unknown whether treatment of urinary incontinence in general practice complies with these guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To

  10. British view of Canadian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, G N

    1971-02-06

    The Canadian general practitioner is remunerated by an item-of-service system of payment which encourages servicing demands rather than needs, discourages delegation of work to paramedical workers, and involves his staff in a massive amount of paper work. He has an excellent hospital attachment, which unfortunately is overdone. His community facilities are piecemeal and his office organization is rudimentary. There are few incentives for good general practice in the community. He spends an inordinate amount of time examining well people. The university departments of general practice are extremely good and much should be heard from them very quickly. The patient's attitude towards his doctor is quite different from the one prevailing currently in Britain.I returned happily to British general practice.

  11. Ensuring Validity of Practical English Certification Test of Local Office of Education in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mun-koo; Chang, Hyung-ji

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at ensuring the validity of the Practical English Certification Test (PECT) of the Chung-nam Office of Education (COE) in Korea. Motivated by the demand for a developing localized English test to empower English learning in public education, the COE conducted the PECT for 38,544 students of elementary, middle and high schools…

  12. CALL English Courses in the General Studies Program : A Case Study in Iwate Prefectural University

    OpenAIRE

    Eishiro, Ito

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to define English language education at the university level, especially English courses in "Zengaku Kyotsu Kamoku" (Course Offered by the University General Studies Program) and to introduce an example of CALL English courses carried out in Iwate Prefectural University with the result of the survey for Ito's six courses dated between October 24 (Mon)-27 (Thu), 2005. CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) is an efficient and effective method of learning a foreign languag...

  13. General practice registrars - attitudes of older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Andrew; Jones, Sandra C; Phillipson, Lyn; Iverson, Don

    2010-06-01

    Previous research indicates that older patients may be less willing to consult general practice registrars (GPRs), reducing training opportunities in chronic/complex care. This survey explores older patients' attitudes in order to inform models of interaction that would be acceptable to patients. Ten training general practices distributed questionnaires for self completion to 50 patients aged 60 years and over. Chi-square, Spearman's rho and logistic regression were used for analysis. The response rate was 47%. Ninety-six percent wanted ongoing contact with their general practitioner if they saw a GPR. Twenty-four percent were comfortable with GPR chronic/complex care, increasing to 73% when there was contact with their usual GP during the consultation. This study quantifies a widespread reluctance among older patients to GPRs managing chronic/complex conditions, which could be significantly improved by maintaining a relational link with their regular GP. These results give guidance for training practices and warrant further investigation.

  14. Language wars: English education policy and practice in Bangladesh

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chowdhury, Raqib; Kabir, Ariful Haq

    2014-01-01

    ... system.In the backdrop of persistent nationalistic favouritism towards Bengali, English is still widely an area-specific language confined to academia, and English education is often still seen as a purely...

  15. Communicative Competence and General Studies in English in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is no more a hidden fact that students admitted into our universities and other tertiary institutions are quite deficient in the use of English. The incidence of examination malpractice is so glaring in our secondary school system that the result from the various examinations conducted in these schools are everything but ...

  16. Taming "Tyrannosaurus Rex": English Use in the Research and Publication Practices of Humanities Scholars in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteeva, Maria; McGrath, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the current position of English in the language ecology of Swedish academia, with a special focus on the humanities. Semi-structured interviews with 15 informants from the fields of Anthropology, General Linguistics and History were carried out to explore how non-native speakers of English experience using academic English in their…

  17. Dealing with bipolar disorder in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article: Dealing with bipolar disorder in general practice. 551. Vol 53 No 6. S Afr Fam Pract 2011 antisocial personality disorder, alcohol or substance misuse or dependence, and schizoaffective disorder.2. The diagnosis is frequently difficult to make, and may not be obvious, even to the most practised eye. In order ...

  18. General Practitioners' Familiarity, Attitudes and Practices with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their first line of action is to visit their family physician (GP), but the question that arises is whether these practitioners are ready to take on patients with ADHD. The aims of this study were to determine the familiarity, attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GPs) in South Africa with regard to ADHD in both children and ...

  19. Acute Neck Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Vos (Kees)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up of patients with acute neck pain in general practice. Patients above 18 years of age consulting their GP for non-specific acute neck pain lasting no longer than six weeks were invited to participate. Self-administered

  20. How community based is general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D. de; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: One of the potentially strong points of general-practice-based primary care is that it is accessible within local communities. As the arm of clinical medicine with the broadest reach into the community, primary care clinicians are well-positioned to understand local needs and design

  1. Comorbidity of chronic diseases in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Velden, J. van der; Lisdonk, E. van de; Eijk, J.T.M. van; Weel, C. van

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing number of elderly people in The Netherlands the prevalence of chronic diseases will rise in the next decades. It is recognized in general practice that many older patients suffer from more than one chronic disease (comorbidity). The aim of this study is to describe the extent of

  2. Prognostic factors for neckpain in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Windt, D. van der; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age,

  3. Healthy lifestyle interventions in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The upcoming series to be published in Family Practice regarding “lifestyle modification in chronic .... Specific dietary guidelines will be considered under .... clinical trial. Int J Cardiol 2007;118:312-20. 23. Toft UN, Kristoffersen LH, Aadahl M, von Huth SL, Pisinger C, Jorgensen T. Diet and exercise intervention in a general ...

  4. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Netherlands medicine is taught at 7 universities, while in a few years an 8th faculty will be in operation in Maastricht. Each faculty has a department for general practice. We will show you the set-up of the institutes of. Groningen, Utrecht, Nijmegen and Leyden. We are dealing with the education of all medical students ...

  5. General Practitioners' Familiarity, Attitudes and Practices with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this study were to determine the familiarity, attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GPs) in South Africa with regard to ADHD in both children and adults, and whether there are differences in children and adults with regard to depression and generalised anxiety disorders as comorbid disorders. The study ...

  6. Guidelines for computer security in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2007-06-01

    Conclusions This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making these guidelines relevant to local contexts should help maximise their uptake.

  7. Special care dentistry for general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Vicki; Sweeney, Petrina

    2013-01-01

    Although special care dentistry (SCD) is a fairly recent specialty, the principles and practice of SCD have been developed since the 1980s. Shared care of these patients with general dental practitioners remains vital to ensure that comprehensive care is provided. This article aims to discuss some of the patient groups commonly seen in SCD clinics and give an insight into the varied complex medical and social aspects of care which are managed as part of providing appropriate, safe and holistic care. Many patients who currently fall under the remit of special care dentistry could be treated safely in general dental practice. This article acts as an introduction to special care dentistry for general dental practitioners.

  8. Influence of population and general practice characteristics on prescribing of minor tranquilisers in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner AC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of generalised anxiety disorders is widespread in Great Britain. Previous small-scale research has shown variations in minor tranquiliser prescribing, identifying several potential predictors of prescribing volume. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between general practice minor tranquiliser prescribing rates and practice population and general practice characteristics for all general practices in England.Methods: Multiple regression analysis of minor tranquiliser prescribing volumes during 2004/2005 for 8,291 English general practices with general practice and population variables obtained from the General Medical Services (GMS statistics, Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, 2001 Census and 2004 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD. Results: The highest rates of minor tranquiliser prescribing were in areas with the greatest local deprivation while general practices situated in areas with larger proportions of residents of black ethnic origin had lower rates of prescribing. Other predictors of increased prescribing were general practices with older general practitioners and general practices with older registered practice populations.Conclusion: Our findings show that there is wide variation of minor tranquilisers prescribing across England which has implications regarding access to treatment and inequity of service provision. Future research should determine the barriers to equitable prescribing amongst general practices serving larger populations of black ethnic origin.

  9. Attitudes and immunisation practices of Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Despite the decline in vaccine-preventable diseases, immunisation rates remain important. Nurses working in general practice (GPN) are often the first contact for childhood and adult immunisations and so impact vaccine provision. This study sought to describe the current immunisation practices and attitudes of GPN prior to attending the Nurse Immuniser Training Program. Prior to undertaking a Nurse Immuniser Training Program, registered nurses completed a survey describing their demographics, immunisation practice and attitudes to immunisation. Ninety-five GPNs completed the survey. Approximately 98% of participants perceived vaccines to be safe, effective and necessary for child healthcare, while 56.4% of participants reported insufficient knowledge of the childhood immunisation schedule. The majority of participants' practices provided free influenza vaccinations for their general practitioners (GPs) (89.5%) and Practice Nurses (91.6%). However, only half of the participants had been immunised against influenza themselves in the previous three years. It is important for GPNs to be equipped with sufficient knowledge of immunisation to provide appropriate education and opportunistic intervention. However, nurses also need to be aware of their own vaccination status and its impact on their practice.

  10. Collaborative care for depression in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish...... context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an “active ingredient” in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two...... detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression...

  11. Rating scales in general practice depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Paykel, Eugene; Sireling, Lester

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our objective was to investigate to what extent the Clinical Interview for Depression (CID) used in the general practice setting covers clinically valid subscales (depression, anxiety, and apathy) which can measure outcome of antidepressant therapy as well as identifying subsyndromes...... within major depressive disorder. The CID was compared to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). METHODS: 146 patients from a previous study in general practice with the CID were investigated. The item response theory model established by Rasch was used to investigate the scalability (a scale......׳s psychometric adequacy) of the subscales, and principal component analysis was used to identify subsyndromes with the symptoms of major depression according to DSM-5 or ICD-10. RESULTS: Whereas the HAM-D17 was found not to have an acceptable scalability, the three brief CID subscales for depression (six items...

  12. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AIMS: To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD...... guidelines. METHODS: A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted...... were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. RESULTS: Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed...

  13. Carniola oživljena: Changing Practice in Citing Slovenian Regions in English Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald F. Reindl

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The past century has witnessed a striking change in the representation of Slovenia’s traditional regions in English texts. After the Second World War, Slovenians progressively replaced the traditional English exonyms for these regions with endonyms in English texts. This trend was accompanied by published works and teaching practice that increasingly insisted on the exclusive use of endonyms in English texts. However, following the dissolution of Yugoslavia and Slovenian independence, there has been a return to the traditional English exonyms. This article maps this changing practice through selected English texts from the past three centuries. It also addresses a number of pitfalls connected with the use of endonyms as well as persistent questions regarding the use of endonyms. Because English is a global language, the choices made by those writing in English directly affect how Slovenia and Slovenian identity are represented at the global level. As such, the conclusions of this paper apply directly to Slovenian-English translation practice and indirectly to Slovenian literature and culture conveyed through English translation.

  14. Reflective practice: assessment of assignments in English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Kavaliauskiené

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The construct alternative assessment has been widely used in higher education. It is often defined as any type of assessment of learners who provide a response to an assignment. The key features of alternative assessment are active participation of learners in self-evaluation of their performance, and the development of reflective thinking through reflective thinking (Schön, 1983. The success of alternative assessment in language teaching is predetermined by student’s performance and demonstrates learner’s language proficiency in contemporary communicative classrooms. This paper aims at researching the influence of students’ evaluations of various assignments for their linguistic development in English for Specific Purposes (ESP. The study uses learners’ assessment of different assignments and learners’ in-course and post-course written reflections on benefits to language mastery. Learners’ assignments included were contributions to portfolios (dossiers, such as essays and summaries, oral presentations, short impromptu talks, creative tasks, tests, and self-assessment notes (reflections on activities in learning ESP. Findings were obtained for two streams of the project participants. Results showed that self-assessment was beneficial for learners’ linguistic development. The context of learners’ reflections reveals that the attitudes to various assignments are affected by success or failure in students’ performance. Reflective practice might help teachers develop ways of dealing with previously identified difficulties and improve the quality of teaching.

  15. Legal Terms in General Dictionaries of English: The Civil Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many general language dictionaries contain specialized terms, including legal terms relating to civil lawsuits. The existing literature provides general discussions of scientific and technical terms in ordinary dictionaries but does not specifically address the inclusion of legal terms. This study examines four general dictionaries ...

  16. The practical use of lasers in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshkind, David M

    2008-09-01

    The use of lasers in general dentistry is now an accepted--and to some extent, expected--treatment modality. Laser use can be either an adjunct to other procedures or the main form of treatment itself. For many procedures, lasers are now becoming the treatment of choice by both clinicians and patients, and in some cases, the standard of care. Though there are as many uses for lasers in general practice as the imagination can provide, this manuscript will address those indications for use that have received marketing clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  17. [Dealing with diagnostic uncertainty in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübken, Magdalena; Oswald, Jana; Schneider, Antonius

    2013-01-01

    In general, the prevalence of diseases is low in primary care. Therefore, the positive predictive value of diagnostic tests is lower than in hospitals where patients are highly selected. In addition, the patients present with milder forms of disease; and many diseases might hide behind the initial symptom(s). These facts lead to diagnostic uncertainty which is somewhat inherent to general practice. This narrative review discusses different sources of and reasons for uncertainty and strategies to deal with it in the context of the current literature. Fear of uncertainty correlates with higher diagnostic activities. The attitude towards uncertainty correlates with the choice of medical speciality by vocational trainees or medical students. An intolerance of uncertainty, which still increases as medicine is making steady progress, might partly explain the growing shortage of general practitioners. The bio-psycho-social context appears to be important to diagnostic decision-making. The effect of intuition and heuristics are investigated by cognitive psychologists. It is still unclear whether these aspects are prone to bias or useful, which might depend on the context of medical decisions. Good communication is of great importance to share uncertainty with the patients in a transparent way and to alleviate shared decision-making. Dealing with uncertainty should be seen as an important core component of general practice and needs to be investigated in more detail to improve the respective medical decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. "The English Effect" on Amish Language and Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Tabetha

    2011-01-01

    Using Jack Goody and Ian Watt's theory of literacy as a normalizing agent, I show how the presence of the English language and "English Only" values and policies have affected the Amish and their home language, Pennsylvania Dutch, and their religious language, "High" German. These changes are seen as detrimental to the Amish…

  19. Communicative English Language Teaching in Egypt: Classroom Practice and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mona Kamal; Ibrahim, Yehia A.

    2017-01-01

    Following a "mixed methods" approach, this research is designed to examine whether teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in Egypt's public schools matches the communicative English language teaching (CELT) approach. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 50 classroom observations, 100 questionnaire responses from…

  20. Differential Influences of Parental Home Literacy Practices and Anxiety in English as a Foreign Language on Chinese Children's English Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Bonnie Wing-Yin; Chui, Barbie Hiu-Tung; Lai, Michael Wei-Chun; Kwok, Sylvia Y. C. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the differential influences of maternal and paternal factors on Chinese children's English as a foreign language development. It took into account both behavioral (i.e. parental home literacy practices, HLP; and children's vocabulary knowledge) and emotional (i.e. parental and children's foreign language reading anxiety,…

  1. Advisory External Defibrillator Availability in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, T; Bury, G

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the availability of advisory external defibrillators (AEDs) in Irish General Practice. The study utilised a computer generated random sample of Irish general practitioners and involved a postal questionnaire, with telephone follow up of non-responders. The cohort of GPs already known to possess an AED (via participation in the Merit Project) was excluded. 115 valid paper survey responses were received representing a response rate of 59%. 5 of the responding GPs identified themselves as Merit project participants and were excluded from data analysis. 74/110 GPs (67%) reported having one or more AED(s) available for use at their practice. 41/77 GPs (53%) who had not responded to the paper survey but were contactable by telephone had an AED available. When AED availability was examined by practice setting a higher proportion of rural and mixed settings had AEDs available than in urban and city areas. Cost was reported as the most common reason for not having an AED.

  2. A general dental practice research network: impact of oral health in general dental practice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, E J; Ward, N; Locker, D

    2003-06-14

    To measure the subjective impact of oral health in a group of patients attending general dental practices in the North West of England and to investigate the attributes of dentists and practices in order to examine how such attributes might relate to patients' subjective perceptions of oral health. Fifteen general dental practices conducting a simultaneous survey of attending patients and 15 practitioners from these practices providing information about their attitudes to treatment, prevention and various aspects of their surgery. General dental Patient subjective impact scores. Relationships between practice and practitioner variables and patients' subjectively perceived oral health. Fifteen practitioners with diverse practice attributes provided data on 718 patients. The mean total oral health impact score was 18.4. Twenty two per cent of patients had experienced pain in the four weeks before the survey and 11% had been unable to chew some foods. Fifty five per cent of the surveyed population had, in the previous year, worried about the appearance of their mouth and 65% had worried about their oral health in general. Dentists' beliefs were related to patient impact scores but practice attributes were not significantly associated with patients' impacts. Fourteen percent of the differences in patients' subjectively perceived oral health can be attributed to dentist attitudes and attributes. Further research regarding the influence of dentists personality and professional beliefs on patients well-being needs to be undertaken.

  3. Reflection into China's Business English Teaching Practices Based on GDUFS Graduates' Employment Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenzhong; Wu, Si; Guo, Tingting

    2009-01-01

    GDUFS, as one of China's top three foreign language universities with the longest history in business English teaching, has accumulated over 20-year experiences in this discipline. This research reflects into its business English teaching practices based on its graduates' employment status in recent years, and concludes that the students of…

  4. An Autoethnography of Teaching English to Young Learners: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Arda

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the researcher looked into his own theoretical and practical knowledge of teaching English to young learners through an autoethnographical research design. In order to understand to what extent these theory-driven conclusions "actually work" in primary school English language classrooms, the researcher recorded…

  5. Practices and Impeding Factors in the Teaching of English to Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to examine the practices and related impeding factors in the teaching of English to young learners in the ten first cycle (Grades 1-4) public primary schools of Nekemte town (Ethiopia). It employed lesson observations and interviews with the teachers involved in the teaching of English to young learners ...

  6. Teaching Strategies and Practices That Impact English Language Learners' Vocabulary and Language Proficiency in Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Jacqueline Rushin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify teaching strategies and practices that impact the vocabulary and language development for English Language Learners. Today, there are over 3.5 million non-English speaking students enrolled in public classrooms and the number has continued to climb over the past decade. Many ELL students live in poverty…

  7. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

     Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general...... or discomfort centred in the upper abdomen with or without nausea, vomiting, heartburn, acid regurgitation, early satiety or bloating. Patients were initially treated according to one of two management strategies. The patient was the unit of randomisation. Strategy 1:   Proton pump inhibitor (40 mg omeprazol......) for two weeks. If symptoms were unchanged after to weeks => referral to endoscopy. Later recurrence of symptoms => endoscopy (> 45 year) or management strategy according to helicobacter pylori status and/or clinical reflux (

  8. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  9. Dual antiplatelet therapy -- management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Rohan; Markham, Ryan; Adsett, Geoffrey

    2013-10-01

    Prasugrel and ticagrelor are two new antiplatelet agents being used in the management of acute coronary syndromes. The number of patients in the community managed on these medications is growing, and thus, it is essential that general practitioners have a good understanding of these agents and their evidence-based applications. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of common and new antiplatelet agents will be reviewed, along with the evidence supporting their use. Safety and side effect profiles will be discussed, and some common general practice case scenarios presented. Aspirin is still the mainstay of therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The addition of clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor can reduce morbidity and mortality in selected patients. Patient factors including bleeding risk, renal function and time since coronary stent insertion must be reviewed before these agents are initiated and before making any changes to the medication regimen.

  10. Anglo-Canadian Exchange in General Practice: British View of Canadian General Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, G. N.

    1971-01-01

    The Canadian general practitioner is remunerated by an item-of-service system of payment which encourages servicing demands rather than needs, discourages delegation of work to paramedical workers, and involves his staff in a massive amount of paper work. He has an excellent hospital attachment, which unfortunately is overdone. His community facilities are piecemeal and his office organization is rudimentary. There are few incentives for good general practice in the community. He spends an inordinate amount of time examining well people. The university departments of general practice are extremely good and much should be heard from them very quickly. The patient's attitude towards his doctor is quite different from the one prevailing currently in Britain. I returned happily to British general practice. PMID:5541730

  11. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  12. High School General Education English Teachers' Perception of IEP Accommodations for Students with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krones, Mary Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative design study was to better understand the experiences of high school general education English teachers who have students with Asperger Syndrome in their classes. More specifically, this researcher wanted to better understand the teacher's perception of the IEP-denoted accommodations the general education teachers…

  13. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”. Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders

  14. Provision of medical student teaching in UK general practices: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alex; Rosenthal, Joe; Al-Seaidy, Marwa; Gray, Denis Pereira; McKinley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care is increasingly provided in general practice. To meet this demand, the English Department of Health recommends that 50% of all medical students should train for general practice after qualification. Currently 19% of medical students express general practice as their first career choice. Undergraduate exposure to general practice positively influences future career choice. Appropriate undergraduate exposure to general practice is therefore highly relevant to workforce planning Aim This study seeks to quantify current exposure of medical students to general practice and compare it with past provision and also with postgraduate provision. Design and setting A cross-sectional questionnaire in the UK. Method A questionnaire regarding provision of undergraduate teaching was sent to the general practice teaching leads in all UK medical schools. Information was gathered on the amount of undergraduate teaching, how this was supported financially, and whether there was an integrated department of general practice. The data were then compared with results from previous studies of teaching provision. The provision of postgraduate teaching in general practice was also examined. Results General practice teaching for medical students increased from teaching in 1968 to 13.0% by 2008; since then, the percentage has plateaued. The total amount of general practice teaching per student has fallen by 2 weeks since 2002. Medical schools providing financial data delivered 14.6% of the clinical curriculum and received 7.1% of clinical teaching funding. The number of departments of general practice has halved since 2002. Provision of postgraduate teaching has tripled since 2000. Conclusion Current levels of undergraduate teaching in general practice are too low to fulfil future workforce requirements and may be falling. Financial support for current teaching is disproportionately low and the mechanism counterproductive. Central intervention may be required to solve

  15. Minimal intervention dentistry in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostek, A M; Walsh, L J

    2014-06-01

    Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) is a modern approach to the management of caries, which emphasizes prevention and early interception of disease, underpinned by an understanding of the role of the dental plaque biofilm in disease initiation and progression, and how this is affected by lifestyle and behavioral factors. The MID approach should be the standard of care in modern restorative dentistry, as it avoids over-zealous restorative interventions as well as supervised neglect. Incorporating the principles of MID into general dental practice for the management of dental caries involves using Caries Risk Assessment (CRA), as well as a minimally invasive restorative approach utilizing conservative caries removal methods, minimal cavity designs and the use of adhesive restorative materials. A range of methods now exist for measuring the contribution of risk factors to dental caries risk, allowing the clinician to target their interventions at the factors operating in the individual patient, by applying the concepts of ecological change to modify the biofilm, and motivational interviewing to alter patient lifestyle and dietary behaviour. This review discusses how the principles of MID are used for individual patient care, and suggests methods for implementation of MID into general dental practice.

  16. A qualitative study of collaboration in general practice: understanding the general practice nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To explore the nature of collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners in Australian general practice. There is international recognition that collaboration between health professionals can improve care coordination, enhance health outcomes, optimise the work environment and reduce healthcare costs. However, effective collaboration requires a clear understanding of each team member's role. A qualitative approach guided by Naturalistic Inquiry was used to elicit and interpret participant narratives. Eight general practitioners and fourteen registered nurses working in general practice were purposefully recruited. Data were collected via individual, semi-structured face-to-face interviews during February to May 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Data revealed three overarching themes. This study presents the data for the overarching theme 'Understanding the general practice registered nurse's role'. Many general practitioner participants lacked clarity around the role and scope of practice of the registered nurse. At the same time, nursing participants often articulated their role as an assistant rather than as an independent health professional. This limited collaboration and the nurses' role within the team. Collaboration was enhanced when general practitioners actively sought an understanding of the registered nurses scope of practice. Clarifying the nurses' role promotes collaboration and supports nurses to work to the full extent of their practice. This is important in terms of optimising the nurses' role within the team and reinforcing their professional identity. Identification of key issues around understanding the nurses' role may help inform strategies that improve collaboration and workplace relations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Inglês instrumental, inglês para negócios e inglês instrumental para negócios English for Specific Purposes/ESP, english for general business purposes and english for specific business purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Vian Jr.,Orlando

    1999-01-01

    This article aims, from a broader perspective, at (1) discussing some definitions of English for Specific Purposes currently used by theorists and practiotiners in the area, focusing on the implications, causes and consequences brought about by these studies, trying then to define, (2) what English for General Business Purposes is as well as its implications for teaching English in-companies and, from a narrower perspective, discuss what English for Specific Business Purposes and its main fea...

  18. Comparative Arabic and English Literacy: A Study of Female University Students' Practices in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Ababneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study of Arabic and English literacy skills and practices for Saudi female university students at their homes and at their school as indicated by the students themselves using literacy questionnaires. The study did not evaluate the proficiency of the students in any aspect of the language such as phonology, vocabulary, or grammar but rather compiled students' answers to the availability of literacy resources in English and in Arabic in their homes/school and the students' practices of literacy in both languages. Data was gathered by distributing two types of questionnaires (Arabic and English to 200 students of English major at the department of linguistics and translation at the University of Tabuk, which is a government university in Saudi Arabia. Supporting data of cultural and religious influences on literacy was obtained through the researcher's own notes and observations. The purpose of the questionnaires was to investigate mainly: the students' literacy practices and frequency of using Arabic and English and the literacy infrastructure and literacy resources available to the students at their homes and at their school. The students' answers to the questionnaires indicated that most students interacted using mainly Arabic and very little English at their homes and they used some English at their school, which is related to reading their school academic books, doing homework assignments, and having rare English conversations with their classroom teachers.

  19. French military general practitioner: ultrasound practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, Olga; De Regloix, S; Lefort, H; Delort, G; Domanski, L; Tourtier, J-P; Palmier, B

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound has been used in the field and in emergency departments for more than two decades. In a military setting, its use has grown rapidly as it has gained widespread acceptance among emergency physicians and as the range of diagnostic and triage applications has continued to expand. Technological changes have enabled ultrasound devices to become accessible to general practitioners (GP), and it could be of particular interest for military GPs in isolated environments. We have investigated both the training of French military GPs in the area of ultrasonography and the use of ultrasound devices, in daily practice and abroad, in isolated military settings. In 2011, a questionnaire was sent to all 147 in-the-field GPs of the French southeast regional military health service. The questionnaire evaluated the training of military GPs in ultrasonography, the use of ultrasound in France in daily practice, and during military operations in isolated environments abroad during 2010. The response rate was 52%. On the one hand, half the responding GPs had been specially trained in ultrasound, mainly (97%) in military institutes. On the other hand, only a quarter of doctors used ultrasound in daily practice. Among those GPs performing ultrasound examinations in France, 75% used it in 2010 during isolated operations abroad. Ultrasound examinations performed in such an austere environment were retrospectively declared useful to guide clinical reasoning (41% of examinations carried out), diagnosis (21%) and decision making as regards evacuation (11%). The challenge for the future is to make ultrasound courses mandatory for all military GPs going on overseas operations, to develop daily practice, and to investigate effective triage systems, combining both ultrasound imagery and physical examination. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Legal terms in general dictionaries of English: The civil procedure mystery

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Many general language dictionaries contain specialized terms, including legal terms relating to civil lawsuits. The existing literature provides general discussions of scientific and technical terms in ordinary dictionaries but does not specifically address the inclusion of legal terms. This study examines four general dictionaries of English to see how they treat civil procedure terms used in England and Wales in the light of the change of structure of and terminology used in civil proceedin...

  1. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    factors (microbiological diagnostics, point-of-care tests, patients’ expectations) in the management of infectious diseases. 3. Results This PhD project is scheduled to be carried out in 2016-2019. The hypotheses and anticipated perspectives will be discussed at the conference. 4. Conclusions The project...... will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria...

  2. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of preventive drugs. Qualitative interviews with patients experiencing discontinuation of preventive drugs addressing: Which attitudes do the patients have towards preventive drugs? Which thoughts do the patients have in relation to discontinuation of the drugs? How do they understand their own and the GP......’s role in the process of discontinuation? 2. Doctors’ views upon discontinuation of preventive drugs. Qualitative interviews with GPs and register studies addressing: How do GPs understand discontinuation of preventive medicine as a concept? What do GPs perceive to be the barriers to discontinuation...

  3. E-dietician in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl J.; Arendal, Cecilia; Glintborg, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    and access to an advanced internet community. The weight was objectively decided by inclusion and conclusion of the study. 22 (17 women and 5 men) completed the study. The average age was 41 years, the weight was 103 kg and the BMI was 36.7 kg/m2. After four months (42-168 days) of treatment and averagely 17......Obesity is according to WHO one of the greatest health challenges of our time. The aim of the pilot project was to investigate the weight loss efficacy and the cost of individual dietetic internet-based consultations in a Danish medical centre in combination with an internet community. A total...... of 46 obese patients in general practice were offered participation in a cohort study during May 15th to December 1st 2008. Patients from three different health centers were included. 32 patients gave informed consent to participate and were given access to weekly e-mail consultations with a dietician...

  4. Structuring for Success in the English Classroom: Classroom Practices in Teaching English, 1981-1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, IL.

    The 31 articles presented in this book illustrate the success of initiating structure in English classrooms, at both the secondary and the college levels. Reflecting the notion that clear guidelines and explicit expectations--greater structure--will help both teacher and student work toward common educational goals, the articles are arranged in…

  5. An Interpretive Study into Elementary School English Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sercan Uztosun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study seeks for understanding the relationship between Turkish elementary school English teachers’ espoused beliefs about the effective ways of teaching English and their self-reported practices. 6 teachers, who were working at different state schools in a town located in the Northwestern part of Turkey, were interviewed. Interpretation of the data revealed inconsistency between teachers’ beliefs and practices. Although there was a strong consensus that English should be taught communicatively, all participants reported that their teaching practices mainly focus on vocabulary and grammar. A number of factors hindering this consistency were mentioned such as exam-based educational policy, time constraints and overloaded syllabus. In the light of these, this study recommends changing the focus of current English testing system to using the language communicatively and implementing an adaptable curriculum where language learning objectives will be shifted from preparing students for the examinations to improving their competences in productive skills

  6. From Theory to Practice for Teachers of English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavadenz, Magaly

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and learning English in the US are complex processes that are not explained by language theories or methods alone. Concepts such as the relationship between language majority groups and language minority groups, language status, immigration, economics, language planning, and policies add to the complexity of language-learning situations.…

  7. Providing Business English Instruction: Thai Instructors' Practices and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratoomrat, Panadda; Rajprasit, Krich

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine how Business English courses are conducted in the Thai Higher Education, and to investigate students' perceptions toward the instructional management of the courses in their universities. The participants were four instructors, and one hundred and forty students enrolling in the courses of four universities in…

  8. The Problems in Rural English Teaching and the Optimization Path: A Study Based on the Chinese General Social Survey Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The new curriculum, new ideas and new requirements concerning English teaching have made the rural English teaching face unprecedented challenges. There are many problems contributing to the poor effect of rural English teaching, such as outdated teaching equipment, unreasonable curriculum design, insufficient teaching staff, asymmetrical teaching content, family education and students' personal problems. Based on the Chinese General Social Survey data, it is found that in terms of English re...

  9. Refugee experiences of general practice in countries of resettlement: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, I-Hao; Drillich, Ann; Schattner, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Refugees and asylum seekers often struggle to use general practice services in resettlement countries. To describe and analyse the literature on the experiences of refugees and asylum seekers using general practice services in countries of resettlement. Literature review using systematic search and narrative data extraction and synthesis methodologies. International, peer-reviewed literature published in English language between 1990 and 2013. Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, and CINAHL databases were searched using the terms: refugee, asylum seeker, experience, perception, doctor, physician, and general practitioner. Titles, abstracts and full texts were reviewed and were critically appraised. Narrative themes describing the refugee or asylum seeker's personal experiences of general practice services were identified, coded, and analysed. From 8722 papers, 85 were fully reviewed and 23 included. These represented the experiences of approximately 864 individuals using general practice services across 11 countries. Common narrative themes that emerged were: difficulties accessing general practice services, language barriers, poor doctor-patient relationships, and problems with the cultural acceptability of medical care. The difficulties refugees and asylum seekers experience accessing and using general practice services could be addressed by providing practical support for patients to register, make appointments, and attend services, and through using interpreters. Clinicians should look beyond refugee stereotypes to focus on the needs and expectations of the individual. They should provide clear explanations about unfamiliar clinical processes and treatments while offering timely management. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  10. An Investigation of Learning Transfer in English-for-General-Academic-Purposes Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This case study involved a detailed examination of learning transfer from an English-for-general-academic-purposes writing course to tasks that involve writing in other academic courses. Data were gathered over one academic year from 11 students enrolled in the writing course. These students participated in a series of interviews and provided…

  11. General Auditory Processing, Speech Perception and Phonological Awareness Skills in Chinese-English Biliteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin K. H.; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Cheung, Him; Wong, Simpson W. L.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the associations of general auditory processing, speech perception, phonological awareness and word reading in Cantonese-speaking children from Hong Kong learning to read both Chinese (first language [L1]) and English (second language [L2]). Children in Grades 2--4 ("N" = 133) participated and were administered…

  12. Validation of a Test Measuring Young Learners' General L2 English Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvén, Liss Kerstin; Sundqvist, Pia

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to present the validation of a test designed to assess young learners' general L2 English vocabulary knowledge, the Young Learner Vocabulary Assessment Test (YLVAT). YLVAT consists of 37 items selected from the K1-2 frequency levels of the Productive and Vocabulary Levels Tests. In the study, Swedish learners (N = 52, age 12) took…

  13. Concept of Best Practices in English Language Teaching to Pakistani ELT Fraternity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arif Soomro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Teaching industry of English as a second or foreign language has grown massively in recent times in Pakistan. There are many public sectors universities and English academies established all over Pakistan offering English language proficiency courses. Therefore, this wave led to conduct this research. The purpose of conducting this study was to investigate contemporary pedagogical techniques used for teaching and learning English and to introduce the concept of ESL /EFL Best Practices for effective language teaching in Pakistan. Purposive Sampling method was used to collect the information from respondents regarding their contemporary-used teaching techniques in ESL/EFL class. The questionnaire was implied as the main tool for data collection among twenty English language teachers from two public sector universities. The results of the study indicated that teachers were attached  with some outdated techniques and activities secondly, they also faced problems applying new techniques while teaching in a large multilevel classrooms, thirdly, teachers’ had willingness to adopt and employ innovative techniques in classrooms and lastly, the notion of ESL best practices was uncommon among them. Most of the teaching strategies do not create better learning environment, and learners do not interestingly participate due outdated activities. Therefore, the suggested solution was utilizing best practices that are based on modern techniques, approaches considerable for multiple levels depending upon the needs and developmental state of the individual learners. Keywords: pedagogical strategies, ESL/EFL Best Practices, Pakistani teachers, English teaching/learning

  14. Sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.W. van der; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting: Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  15. English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    have been maintained and intensified since then, as African and Indian scholarship demonstrates. Language plays a key role in education, the World Bank taking over where colonial regimes left off. Anglo-American efforts to maintain global English dominance have intensified since 1945 and are central...... to the present-day world ‘order’, as the postcolonial is subsumed under global empire, assisted by English linguistic neoimperialism. Some scholars who deny the existence of linguistic imperialism are reported on, and the complexity of language policy in European integration is demonstrated. The article......The article exemplifies and presents the characteristics of linguistic imperialism, linguistic capital accumulation following the same pattern as capitalist economic dominance. The text summarizes the way English was established in the colonial period. Many of the mechanisms of linguistic hierarchy...

  16. A survey of statistics in three UK general practice journal

    OpenAIRE

    Rigby, A S; Armstrong, G K; Campbell, M J; Summerton, N

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Many medical specialities have reviewed the statistical content of their journals. To our knowledge this has not been done in general practice. Given the main role of a general practitioner as a diagnostician we thought it would be of interest to see whether the statistical methods reported reflect the diagnostic process. Methods Hand search of three UK journals of general practice namely the British Medical Journal (general practice section), British Journal of General Pr...

  17. Violence in general practice: a gendered risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Mary Ann; Gabe, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    This article focuses on the extent to which violence against family doctors in England is experienced in gendered terms. It draws on data from two studies: a postal survey of 1,300 general practitioners (GPs) (62% response rate) and in-depth interviews with 26 doctors who have been assaulted or threatened; and 13 focus groups with primary care teams and 19 in-depth interviews with GPs who had expressed an interest in the topic of violence against doctors. Most GPs, regardless of gender, reported receiving verbal abuse over the last two years, often interpreted as a consequence of declining deference to professionals, while actual physical assaults and threats were much rarer and more likely to be reported by men. Overall, women GPs were much more likely to express concern about violence and to take personal precautions, although younger male GPs working in inner-city practices also had high levels of concern. The study shows how some aspects of family doctors' work has been organised on gendered lines and how these contribute to the differences in experience of violence. We suggest that the increasing proportion of women among family doctors may have implications for these, often tacit, organisational routines. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  18. Supervising the highly performing general practice registrar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon

    2014-02-01

    There is extensive literature on the poorly performing learner. In contrast, there is very little written on supervising the highly performing registrar. Outstanding trainees with high-level knowledge and skills can be a challenge for supervisors to supervise and teach. Narrative review and discussion. As with all learners, a learning-needs analysis is fundamental to successful supervision. The key to effective teaching of the highly performing registrar is to contextualise clinical knowledge and skills with the wisdom of accumulated experience. Moreover, supervisors must provide a stimulating learning environment, with regular opportunities for intellectual challenge. The provision of specific, constructive feedback is essential. There are potential opportunities to extend the highly performing registrar in all domains of general practice, namely communication skills and patient-centred care, applied knowledge and skills, population health, professionalism, and organisation and legal issues. Specific teaching strategies include role-play, video-consultation review, random case analysis, posing hypothetical clinical scenarios, role modelling and teaching other learners. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Approach of acute bronchitis in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, S

    2010-09-01

    Acute bronchitis is a frequent infection in general practice. Its origin is usually viral, but frequently, antibiotics are prescribed in this situation, without any clinical benefit. There are several reasons for this, the most important is probably the difficulty of GP's to distinguish on clinical ground alone between "viral type, meaning spontaneously healing ", and "bacterial type, meaning potentially dangerous" acute respiratory infections. The emergence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics is defined by the W.H.O. as a major problem of public health. One of the most important measures is the diminution of antibiotic prescriptions. The approach outlined here will help this purpose. The combination of four clinical parameters (fever acute bronchitis being sufficiently characteristic of "a viral type" of infection. In case of doubt, the measurement of the CRP, allows to avoid antibiotics if the value is normal (or slightly elevated). This approach is valuable in adults with an otherwise normal health, outside severe chronic illness (which could weaken immunity) and for adults <65 years of age.

  20. [Treatment of mastitis in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeng, Hedvig; Tufte, Elisabeth; Nylander, Gro

    2003-11-06

    This article presents an update on causes and management of mastitis in general practice. Published articles on the causes and management of mastitis were identified by Medline and Embase searches, and reviewed. In addition, clinical experience from The National Breast-Feeding Centre in Norway is included. Most studies report an incidence of mastitis of less than 20% though major methodological limitations make estimates difficult. Common symptoms of mastitis is a swollen, red, hot and painful breast, and systemic symptoms as fever occur frequently. Mastitis may be inflammatory or caused by microorganisms, and often secondary to milk stasis. Effective milk removal is a most essential part of the treatment and may make antibiotics superfluous. In most cases bacterial mastitis is caused by Staphylococcus aureus resistant to beta-lactamase sensitive antibiotics. Culture of the milk is necessary to determine the infecting organism and its antibiotic sensitivity. When antibiotics are warranted, dicloxacillin or cloxacillin are suggested as first-line drugs. The transfer of dicloxacillin/cloxacillin to breast milk is minimal. In most cases women with mastitis can continue to breast-feed also from the affected breast during treatment.

  1. China English and ELT for English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a general study of one of varieties of English--China English and its influence on English Language Teaching (ELT) for English majors. The status of English as an International language breaks the situation in which British English or American English is the sole standard. English becomes World Englishes, taking on a plural form,…

  2. Critical Literacy Practices in the EFL Context and the English Language Proficiency: Further Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Mei-yun

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a follow-up study that explored the relationship between EFL learners' critical literacy practices and the English language proficiency. It investigated four focal EFL learners' critical literacy practices in their dialogic interaction and also analyzed 39 students' views on their critical literacy learning. The four focal…

  3. The Practice of School Psychology in Quebec English Schools: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Cindy A.

    2016-01-01

    In Quebec, school psychology is alive and well. This article outlines current challenges and opportunities related to the practice of psychology in Quebec English schools. Changes to the practice of psychology in Quebec over the last decade have had an impact on the delivery of psychological services in schools. Modifications of the admission…

  4. Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Practices in Psychoeducational Reports for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Past researchers suggested there are a number of shortcomings in the psychoeducational evaluation process and practices used with English language learners (ELLs). In the present exploratory study, the authors descriptively examined the assessment practices used in the special education eligibility determination process for ELLs as documented in…

  5. Pedagogical practices in the training of efficient readings in English language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel-Coraspe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension is an important tool to professional and researchers’ training because it allows them to develop capacities, abilities and values for their efficient performance. The objective of this research is to analyze pedagogical practices in teaching of English language and its actions in the teaching-learning process, from identifying contradictions on the teaching-learning process of English reading. It will improve the didactic and methodological performance of a teacher and its social impact. This research points out the perfection of dynamics of teaching-learning process of reading written texts in English language.

  6. Using Naming Practices in the Developmental English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Linguistic behavior often reveals cultural practices. In fact, sociolinguistics is dedicated to researching how language use intersects with cultural and social identity (e.g., Coupland. and Jaworski, 2009). One aspect of language use that sociolinguistics focuses on is naming practices. The study of such practices is called onomastics. While…

  7. Elementary English Language Instruction: Colombian Teachers’ Classroom Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in terms of activities, materials, teacher and student roles are reported. Lastly, implications of this research project related to early foreign language instruction are highlighted. Key words: Public Elementary-English-Language Instruction, English-Foreign Language, Ethnography-Research-Method, Teaching-Methodology Este artículo presenta los resultados preliminares de una investigación etnográfica acerca de las estrategias metodológicas utilizadas por profesores de básica primaria que enseñan inglés como lengua extranjera en 7 escuelas públicas del área metropolitana del municipio de Medellín. En la primera parte se resalta la importancia de esta investigación en nuestro medio y en la segunda, de los 12 profesores participantes y un análisis de la metodología empleada por ellos con respecto a las actividades de clase, los materiales y el rol del estudiante y del profesor. Finalmente, se discuten algunas de las implicaciones de este proyecto de investigación en la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras a niños. Palabras claves: Inglés-Enseñanza-Básica Primaria, Lengua Extranjera-Inglés, Estudio Etnográfico-Investigación, Enseñanza-Metodología

  8. The Iranian EFL Students’ and Teachers’ Perception of Using Persian in General English Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Hashemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the perception of Iranian EFL learners and teachers towards employing Persian in EFL classes. The present study was a case study which investigated teachers’ and students’ perception toward effective use of L1 and L2 in General English classes at university level. The participants were 345students and 25 teachers at the University of Guilan, Rasht, Iran. Two research tools were used for gathering data: questionnaires and interviews. Analysis of the qualitative study and comparing the mean scores of two groups via Mann-whitny revealed that the perceptions of the teachers and the students differ from each other. Iranian EFL learners were willing to use their mother tongue. While, Iranian EFL teachers had a positive tendency to use more English than Persian in the General English classes. Teachers have to consider that the major medium of instruction must be English. They should use L1 judiciously in FL classrooms whenever possible and beneficial to relieve anxious, nervous, frightened, and reluctant students as well as learners with low self-esteem.

  9. FROM ENGLISH AS A GENERAL SCHOOL SUBJECT ONTO ENGLISH AS A MEDIUM FOR LEARNING SPECIFIC SUBJECTS: THE NEED TO SHIFT IN THE TEACHING ORIENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Aniroh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The teaching of ESP so far has been dominated by the belief that linguistic mastery of English is considered sufficient to deliver the contents of the subject matter concerned. This view seems to need a critical overview for verbal communication in general, let alone in ESP, requires both proficiency in the language and the contents. This implies that English teachers in ESP need to be equipped satisfactorily in English as well as the subject matter. An ESP teacher needs to possess a double competency. With this as a framework, the teaching of ESP accordingly will need to shift its focus from English in isolation to English as medium for subject matters exchanges.

  10. The Importance of SES, Home and School Language and Literacy Practices, and Oral Vocabulary in Bilingual Children's English Reading Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth R.; Páez, Mariela M.; August, Diane L.; Barr, Christopher D.; Kenyon, Dorry; Malabonga, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the role that socioeconomic status (SES), home and school language and literacy practices, and oral vocabulary play in the development of English reading skills in Latino English language learners (ELLs) and how these factors contribute differentially to English reading outcomes for children of different ages and in different…

  11. Confronting Unsuccessful Practices: Repositioning Teacher Identities in English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Amy; Hartman, Shana V.; Reynolds, Jeanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Teacher education programs attempt to prepare preservice teachers for the various challenges faced in the classroom. One particular challenge new teachers face is how to handle unsuccessful practices. This paper argues that confronting ineffective practices require that teachers respond to complex and dynamic challenges, making change difficult…

  12. Action Research Practices of English as Foreign Language (EFL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study intended to assess EFL teachers' actual practice of action research and the concomitant change to themselves and to their practices. Analysis of the data collected from EFL teachers and students at Jimma and Hawassa Universities using questionnaires and a Focus Group Discussion (FGD) guide has shown that ...

  13. Patient initiated aggression - prevalence and impact for general practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Pushpani; Forrest, Laura; McRae, Ian; Parker, Rhian

    2011-06-01

    Patient initiated aggression toward general practice staff can cause distress among staff, however, it is unknown how frequently practice staff experience patient aggression in the workplace. The aim of this study is to determine the national prevalence of patient aggression toward general practice staff. A clustered cross sectional survey involving general practice staff working in Australia. A questionnaire was posted to 1109 general practices nationally and 217 questionnaires were completed and returned (19.6% response rate). It was found that verbal aggression is commonly experienced by practice staff, particularly receptionists, whereas physical aggression is infrequent. Staff working in larger practices experience more verbal aggression and property damage or theft and it was reported that verbal aggression has a greater impact on staff wellbeing than physical aggression. This study provides some national evidence of the prevalence of patient aggression toward general practice staff. This may inform the development of policy and procedures.

  14. THE GENERAL METHODOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES OF COMBINED OPTIONAL ONLINE ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRAINING OF PRIMARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Zadorozhnaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the publication is to demonstrate the implementation of general methodological principles of optional elementary school online foreign languages learning on an example of a virtual course for students of the second and third grades.Methods. The methods involve pedagogical modeling and projecting; the experience of foreign and Russian methodists, teachers and researchers is analysed, generalized and adjusted to the modern realias.Results and scientific novelty. On the basis of the requirements of the state educational standard and interest of pupils in computer games, the author’s technique of the combined facultative educational activities integrated to training in English at elementary school is developed. Online training in the form of games (additional to the major classroom activities gives a possibility of the choice of tasks interesting to children, studying the material at optimum comfortable and individual speed; it is possible to perform the tasks at home excluding the stressful situations that are specific to school examination, and allows pupils to master most effectively personal, metasubject and object competences. In general context of quality improvement of the general education, the modernization of educational process assumes not only justification of its new maintenance, but also restructuring of scientific and methodical support which has to meet essential needs of teachers and pupils, to facilitate access to necessary specific information. The lack of methodical base of creation of electronic distance resources for foreign-language education of younger school students has motivated the author to create own methodical concept of online training taking into account age of pupils. The complex of the general methodical principles is thoroughly considered; based on the general methodical principles, the proposed modular technique of the organization of an online class is created and implemented. Interactive blocks are

  15. [Video consultation in general practice: need and feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schers, H.J.; Buitenhuis, E.; Besemer, Y.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether patients require video consultations in general practice and whether or not video consultation is feasible. DESIGN: Semi-structured interviews and a pilot study in practice. METHOD: We interviewed 25 visitors to the general practice on their views on video consultations

  16. Innovative practice: Conversational use of English in bilingual adults with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokorelias, Kristina M; Ryan, Ellen B; Elliot, Gail

    2017-02-01

    Regression to mother tongue is common in those with dementia. In two long-term care facilities, we explored the use of bilinguals' two languages for five older adults with mild-moderate dementia who have begun to regress to Greek. We also examined the role of Montessori DementiAbility Methods: The Montessori Way-based English language activities in fostering conversational use of English. Over 10 sessions, participants' vocabulary or grammatical structure in English did not improve. However, four of the five participants were able to maintain a conversation in English for longer periods of time. This study contributes to strategies for optimizing meaningful conversation for bilingual long-term care residents with dementia. Moreover, the data suggest a change in the policy and practice for dementia care so that there are more opportunities for residents to speak English in non-English mother-tongue facilities. Greater attention to the specific language needs of bilinguals in English-dominant settings would also be advisable.

  17. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    The currently used internal and external program evaluation processes for general practice residency and advanced education in general dentistry programs are discussed, noting accrediting and evaluation groups, criteria, and designs. A generalized evaluation plan is proposed. (MSE)

  18. Investigation Report on the Teaching of Practical English Writing of English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojuan

    2010-01-01

    The practical writing course aims at helping students have a comprehensive understanding of writing subjects and improve their abilities of analyzing and understanding texts. This paper has explored how writing textbooks are used in the writing course and pointed out that the aim should be to help students improve their ability of analysis and…

  19. Reflections on the history of general practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F; Zwar, Nicholas A

    2014-07-07

    General practice has experienced change over the past century driven by a variety of influences, the most important of which have been changes in the health needs of the population, the organisation of the workforce, and medicine itself. Over this time, general practice has developed as a profession through education and, ultimately, recognition of its specialist qualifications. There has been increasing organisational sophistication at the practice, regional and national levels. Despite contested scope of practice and vision of its future, general practice's place in the health system as a whole has been increasingly recognised and affirmed.

  20. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  1. Researching contexts, practices and pedagogies in English for academic purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Blaj-Ward, L

    2014-01-01

    This book is a point of reference for EAP professionals planning to conduct or commission research into learning, teaching, professional development or quality assurance in EAP. It draws on academic and professional debates to inspire further research and practical initiatives to enhance EAP provision.

  2. [Assessment of suicidal behaviour in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Viktor; Osváth, Péter; Ruzsics, István; Nagy, Tünde; Kovács, László; Varga, József; Fekete, Sándor; Kovács, Attila

    2006-02-12

    To assess the prevalence of suicidal behavior (wish to die, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts) and to determine the characteristics of suicide attempters in primary care, including screening for major mental disorders. A Hungarian urban general practitioner's district with 1248 inhabitants was screened for suicidal behavior as well as for major mental disorders. All the patients (n=382) who visited their general practitioner within a two-week period were asked to participate. 277 patients completed the Prime-MD questionnaire, an easy-to-use diagnostic instrument developed for general practitioners to recognize the most common psychiatric disorders, like depressive (major depressive disorder, minor depressive disorder), anxiety (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder), somatoform, eating and alcohol related disorders. Detailed data about suicidal thoughts and attempts were also collected by the structured questions of MINI-Plus diagnostic interview. Prevalence of suicide attempts in primary care was 2.9%. 9% of the patients had either suicidal thoughts or suicide attempts in the previous month. Suicidal patients were more ready to use psychotropic drugs, they assessed their health status more poorly, and had more mental symptoms than the control group (non-suicidal patients). 60% of suicidal patients and 11.5% of the investigated population had a current depressive episode. Beside depressive symptoms, anxiety disorders and alcohol problems were also more common among suicidal patients. The rate of previous psychiatric treatments was also higher in suicidal patients, who generally visited their general practitioners less frequently than non-suicidal patients. According to multivariate logistic regression, suicidal patients are more ready to take antidepressants, they tend to have more previous psychiatric treatments and suicidal attempts, and they visit their general practitioners less frequently and have a current depressive episode. Suicidal behavior and

  3. Reviving Oral Reading Practices with English Learners by Integrating Social-Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Rocio

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide background on integrating social-emotional learning (SEL) into classroom oral reading practices. The section that follows outlines some of the language and academic demands English learners (ELs) face at school. Another section considers the relationship between academic and social-emotional learning. The…

  4. Learning Together: Creating a Community of Practice to Support English Language Learner Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Megan Madigan; Martin-Beltran, Melinda; Daniel, Shannon M.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines an after-school, bilingual family literacy programme that brought together several groups to form a community of practice (CoP) that worked to support the literacy development of English language learners and their families. We explored the following question: How do parents, teachers, students, and other…

  5. Intercultural Communicative Competence: Beliefs and Practices of Adult English as a Second Language Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickley, Celeste; Rossiter, Marian J.; Abbott, Marilyn L.

    2014-01-01

    Effective and appropriate communication is critical for the successful integration of newcomers in Canada. In this paper, we describe the intercultural communicative competence beliefs and practices of 70 adult English as a second language (ESL) instructors. Responses to an online survey indicated a strong belief in the value of integrating…

  6. Developing a Practical Rating Rubric of Speaking Test for University Students of English in Parepare, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifa, Ammang; Rahman, Asfah; Hamra, Arifuddin; Jabu, Baso; Nur, Rafi'ah

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop a practical rating rubric of speaking ability in the classroom setting. This research study involves the English speaking lecturers at a number of higher education institutions in Parepare, Indonesia. The product is designed based on Research and Development (R&D) approach, which is adopted from Gall, Gall, and Borg…

  7. Best Practices: Engaging Limited English Proficient Students and Families. A Teaching Tolerance Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Poverty Law Center (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by two decades of historic immigration, American demographics are changing. Many school districts are often ill prepared to meet the needs of limited English proficient (LEP) students and families. This Teaching Tolerance booklet points administrators to best practices in the effort to create a supportive learning environment for all…

  8. An Investigation of Classroom Practices in Teaching Listening Comprehension at English Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Nurhafni

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the classroom practice in teaching listening comprehension at English Education Program of STKIP Tapanuli Selatan in 2016/2017 Academic Year is. The informants of this research were all of second semester students of STKIP Tapanuli Selatan in 2016/2017 academic year and a lecturer of listening…

  9. Improving EFL Learners' Pronunciation of English through Quiz-Demonstration-Practice-Revision (QDPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moedjito

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of Quiz-Demonstration-Practice-Revision (QDPR) in improving EFL learners' pronunciation of English. To achieve the goal, the present researcher conducted a one-group pretest-posttest design. The experimental group was selected using a random sampling technique with consideration of the inclusion criteria.…

  10. Exploring the Role of Music in Secondary English and History Classrooms through Personal Practical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, Christian Z.; Burenheide, Bradley J.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the development of utilizing music as a Personal Practical Theory (PPT) in the teaching of English and history. Specifically, the authors explore the nature of PPT's, the benefits of utilizing music, and the process through which teachers begin using a new approach in their pedagogy. Unique contributions are the application…

  11. Careers in academic general practice: problems, constraints, and opportunities.

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, A.; Allen, J; Styles, B; Gray, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    Changing priorities in the NHS have underlined the crucial importance of academic general practice in providing quality training and research to underpin developments in general practice. Unfortunately, several problems and constraints mean that the full potential of general practitioners to make a contribution to teaching and research has not been realised. These issues are examined and recommendations for improvements are made. Obstacles to career development for academics in general practi...

  12. Comparison of Oral Language Usage among English Language Learners Diagnosed with a Learning Disability and Those in General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pray, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The investigator compared the linguistic characteristics of Spanish and English language samples taken from English language learners (ELLs) diagnosed with an academic learning disability (LD) and ELLs in general education to determine if the errors and characteristics of their language use differ. There was a statistically significant difference…

  13. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of the Modular General English Language Teaching Preparatory Program at a Turkish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating existing foreign language programs on a regular basis is essential because program evaluation leads to more effective programs. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the modular intensive general English language teaching program applied at a university in Turkey by investigating students' and English instructors' perceptions of…

  14. The Interplay of the Global and the Local in English Language Learning and Electronic Communication Discourses and Practices in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsikopoulou, Bessie

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes dominant discourses and practices which permeate English language learning and information and communication technologies (ICT). Through the adoption of a critical discourse analytic perspective, and drawing on New Literacy Studies research, it discusses how English language learning and ICT practices have come to take…

  15. PRESERVICE TEACHERS’ BELIEFS AND PRACTICES IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Othman; Richard Kiely

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores ESL preservice teachers’ beliefs regarding teaching English to young learners, and examines the interplay between their beliefs and instructional practices. Seventy ESL preservice teachers at a university in Malaysia participated in the study. Data is drawn from semi-structured interviews and lesson plan analysis. The results indicated that the preservice teachers’ classroom practices did not often reflect their stated beliefs about young learners language learning. Althou...

  16. Academic Practice. Guidelines for Staff and Students - English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive...... kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system....

  17. Fate of manuscripts rejected by a non-English-language general medical journal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    published in English. Design Manuscripts rejected during a 4-year period were searched for in PubMed and Embase in order to assess the percentage of manuscripts subsequently published in other journals. In addition, characteristics of both the published manuscripts and the journals in which they were......Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether, where and when manuscripts were published following rejection by the Journal of the Danish Medical Association, a general medical journal published in Danish. Similar previous studies have focused on specialty/subspecialty journals...... evaluated. Results Of 198 rejected manuscripts, 21 (10.6%) were eventually published after a median of 685 days (range 209-1463). The majority of these were original research, published in English-language specialty/subspecialty journals. The median number of citations per article was 2-3 (IQR 0...

  18. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has for years been discussed whether practice staff should be involved in patient care in general practice to a higher extent. The research concerning task delegation within general practice is generally increasing, but the literature focusing on its influence on general practition......BACKGROUND: It has for years been discussed whether practice staff should be involved in patient care in general practice to a higher extent. The research concerning task delegation within general practice is generally increasing, but the literature focusing on its influence on general...... task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate....... They explored views and attitudes of the staff, encompassing nurses as well as practice managers. Only one of the included studies also explored general practitioners' views and attitudes, hence making it impossible to establish any syntheses on this relation. According to the studies, the staff's overall...

  19. Heart Failure Care in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasing health care problem worldwide, and a multidisciplinary approach with a general practitioner (GP) in the health care team is considered optimal. HF management has improved substantially over the last two decades, mainly for patients with HF with a reduced ejection

  20. A Snapshot Study of Current Practices among Sellers of Translation Services between Japanese and English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Stephen Crabbe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A two-part study was launched in light of the Japan Translation Federation’s 2012 statement in its guide, 翻訳で失敗しないために翻訳発注の手引き [lit. For not getting it wrong with translation: a guide to ordering translation], that “外国語の文書を母国語に翻訳するのがプロの原則です” [lit. It is a fundamental principle that professional translators work into their native languages] (Japan Translation Federation, 2012, p. 15. The key goal is to gauge the extent to which this 2012 statement is reflected in current practices among the sellers and buyers of translation services between Japanese and English. In this paper, which describes the first part of the study, the focus is on the practices of sellers of translation services between Japanese and English: specifically, professional freelance translators. Twenty-four professional freelance translators completed an online questionnaire. The results of this questionnaire, first, suggest that current practices among sellers of translation services between Japanese and English are consistent with the Japan Translation Federation’s 2012 statement and, second, broadly support secondary literature on L1 translation (translation into the first language and L2 translation (translation into the second language. Whilst this is only a snapshot of current practices among sellers of translation services between Japanese and English, the overall results are informative. In the second, follow-up part of the study the focus will be on the current practices of buyers of translation services between Japanese and English.

  1. [Euthanasia and general practice in Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M

    2014-09-01

    In Belgium, the GP can perform euthanasia or be called as a consultant. He must know the laws concerning the end of life and be able to explain his rights to his patients. He will know the best practices and techniques for euthanasia. If necessary, he will call help or refer to a more competent colleague. He negotiates with the patient an advanced care planning following the evolution of its pathologies and will witness its wishes regarding end of life against other institutions and doctors.

  2. Designing a Serious Game for General Practice Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, Jan; Batenburg, Ronald; Dalpiaz, Fabiano

    2016-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) have to professionally manage their practice. Studies on the quality of GP educational programs revealed that the majority of GP students are dissatisfied with what they learn about running an own general practice. They learn mostly theory from textbooks as opposed to

  3. Trends in prescribing antibiotics for children in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otters, H.B.M.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Schellevis, F.G.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A. van; Koes, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess changes in antibiotic prescribing patterns for children between 1987 and 2001, and to identify general practice characteristics associated with higher antibiotic prescribing rates. METHODS: Cross-sectional national survey of Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001. Data were

  4. Delegation to nurses in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bowling, Ann

    1981-01-01

    A random sample of general practitioners and their nursing staff was interviewed to examine the extent to which the doctors delegated medical tasks to the nurses and to analyse attitudes towards delegation. A significant minority of both doctors and nurses were reluctant to have minor clinical tasks delegated and a majority did not think that nurses should carry out delegated diagnostic procedures. Doctors and nurses who had completed their training since 1960 were more likely to favour deleg...

  5. Learning Diaries: Formation, Practice and Beliefs of an English Teacher on the Process of Learning French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Otávio Batista

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is a self-investigative study whose aim is to use the learning diary as a reflective tool on an English teacher’s own process of learning French. The data were collected during private and individual classes at a Language School in the South region of Brazil. Results showed that the English teacher theorizes on the French teacher’s classes; relates his own practice with that of the French teacher; and presents beliefs upon how the French Language should be learned.

  6. The development of professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the current role of general practice nurses and the scope of nursing practice to inform the development of national professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses. Increasing numbers of nurses have been employed in Australian general practice to meet the growing demand for primary care services. This has brought significant changes to the nursing role. Competency standards for nurses working in general practice were first developed in Australia in 2005, but limited attention has been placed on articulating the contemporary scope of practice for nurses in this setting. Concurrent mixed methods design. Data collection was conducted during 2013-2014 and involved two online surveys of Registered and Enrolled Nurses currently working in general practice, a series of 14 focus groups across Australia and a series of consultations with key experts. Data collection enabled the development of 22 Practice Standards separated into four domains: (i) Professional Practice; (ii) Nursing Care; (iii) General Practice Environment and (iv) Collaborative Practice. To differentiate the variations in enacting these Standards, performance indicators for the Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse and Registered Nurse Advanced Practice are provided under each Standard. The development of national professional practice standards for nurses working in Australian general practice will support ongoing workforce development. These Standards are also an important means of articulating the role and scope of the nurses' practice for both consumers and other health professionals, as well as being a guide for curriculum development and measurement of performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Health Promotion in General Medical Practice in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out among general medical practitioners in Ogun state to assess their attitude to and practice of health promotion in clinical practice. Although 91.1% of them indicated that health promotion is very important in clinical practice, only a quarter or less of them routinely asked or counseled their patients ...

  8. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...... understanding of the health care system but also strengthens the ability to collaborate with general practitioners upon entering another specialty. It also develops important medical and communicative competences. The training in general practice is considered beneficial for the development of professional...... identity. The educational environment in general practice is rated highly. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of family medicine in postgraduate basic training should be considered for all doctors....

  9. Computerisation of general practice in the Republic of Croatia: experience gained in general practice use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biserka Bergman-Markovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Well-organised medical records are the prerequisite for achieving a high level of performance in primary healthcare settings. Recording balanced structured and coded data as well as free text can improve both quality and organisation of work in the office. It provides a more substantiated support of financial transactions and accountancy, allows better communication with other facilities and institutions, and is a source of valuable scientific research material. This article is the result of an individual experience gained in general practice use of various programs/ systems employed within the family medicine frame, and the frame of evaluation of available and commonly- exploited program solutions. The use of various programs allows for systematic adjustments as to the increasingly complex requirements imposed on electronic medical records (EMRs. The experience of a general practitioner, presented in this paper, confirms the assumption that an adequate program to be employed with EMRs should be developed, provided that family medicine practitioners, that is, the final users, have been involved in each and every stage of its development, adjustment, implementation and evaluation.

  10. Prevalence of alcohol problems in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Todisco, N; Gluud, C

    1996-01-01

    The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and the response to a question about heavy alcohol consumption were used to assess the prevalence of alcohol problems in consecutive patients (77 males and 46 females) consulting a general practitioner in an urban area in the South of Italy (Castellam......The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and the response to a question about heavy alcohol consumption were used to assess the prevalence of alcohol problems in consecutive patients (77 males and 46 females) consulting a general practitioner in an urban area in the South of Italy...... (Castellammare di Stabia). Alcohol problems, which were defined by a cut-off score of 5 on the MAST and/or by heavy alcohol consumption (corresponding to at least 60 g of ethanol daily for males and 36 g of ethanol daily for females for at least 2 years), were identified in 54 patients [43.9%; 95% confidence...... interval (CI) 35.0-53.1%], 45 males (58.4%; 95% CI 46.6-69.6%) and nine females (19.6%; 95% CI 9.4-33.9%). The prevalence of MAST positive patients was 32.5% (95% CI 24.4-41.6%) in the total patient sample, 45.5% (95% CI 34.1-57.2%) among males and 10.9% (95% CI 3.6-23.6%) among females. The question about...

  11. Getting a handle on the general practice workforce in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teljeur, C; Tyrrell, E; Kelly, A; O'Dowd, T; Thomas, S

    2014-06-01

    General practice makes a critical contribution to healthcare in Ireland. However, there is a weak understanding of the general practice workforce in Ireland. The aim of this study is to estimate the number of general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses in Ireland. A variety of data sources was used to corroborate counts of general practitioners and practice nurses. Capture-recapture methods were used to estimate the hidden population of GPs not identified by the databases included. There are 2,954 general practitioners in Ireland, equivalent to 64.4 per 100,000 population. There are 1,700 practice nurses nationally, equivalent to 37.1 per 100,000 persons. There is substantial regional variation in the number of general practitioners and practice nurses per 100,000. To some extent, deficits in one discipline may be counterbalanced by a surplus in the other. In the absence of a centralised register, it is not possible to track the number of GPs or practice nurses working in Ireland at present. This is despite the fact that there are twice as many general practice visits per annum compared to hospital visits.

  12. The existential dimension in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP–patient encounter. Design: A qualitative methodology with semi...... and identity, connectedness to a society and to other people, the existential dimension was primarily reported integrated in connection with life-threatening diseases and death. Furthermore, integration of the existential dimension was characterized as unsystematic and intuitive. Communication about religious...... or spiritual questions was mostly avoided by GPs due to shyness and perceived lack of expertise. GPs also reported infrequent referrals of patients to chaplains. Conclusion: GPs integrate issues related to the existential dimension in implicit and non-standardized ways and are hindered by cultural barriers...

  13. Psychological stress and multimorbidity in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders

    2017-01-01

    and poor prognosis of physical diseases, including increased mortality. However, little is known on the physical consequences of sub‐threshold psychological stress, which is more common than psychiatric disorders in the background population and is highly prevalent in persons with multimorbidity....... Additionally, stress is a common reason for contacting the general practitioner (GP), and yet no guidelines for management and treatment exist. Aims The aim of this thesis was to investigate the consequences of psychological stress on the health while taking into account mental‐physical multimorbidity, i...... with a long‐term mortality increase of 40%. In absolute terms, stress was associated with more adverse outcomes among those with multimorbidity, and the combination of stress and multimorbidity seemed to result in less timely chronic care. Conclusions and perspectives Psychological stress was consistently...

  14. [Senior sports in science and general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolin, G S

    1988-09-15

    Aging does not just mean diminishing of abilities. It means gain of new qualities too. Modern sports medicine as well as medicine in general has developed its own specialty: sports medicine for seniors, establishing age specific possibilities in sports, and diminishing its possible negative outcomes to a minimum. The goal is not just to achieve physical results in seniors. What counts even more are psychohygienic possibilities in the sense of contentment, integration into family society, contacts to youth. Happily enough youngsters too articulate same opinions about sports for seniors. Thus sports of the aged is by no means just a matter for a single outsider who wants to demonstrate physical top performances. It is of important social value. It does not just regard sport associations but all of us: doctors, politicians, opinion leaders, present or future seniors.

  15. Communicative English in the Primary Classroom: Implications for English-in-Education Policy and Practice in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, M. Obaidul; Honan, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Globalisation and the global spread of English have led nation-states to introduce English into the early years of schooling to equip their citizens with communicative competence in order to compete within a global economy for individual and national development. In teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language, nations have adopted…

  16. Fate of manuscripts rejected by a non-English-language general medical journal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether, where and when manuscripts were published following rejection by the Journal of the Danish Medical Association, a general medical journal published in Danish. Similar previous studies have focused on specialty/subspecialty journals...... evaluated. Results Of 198 rejected manuscripts, 21 (10.6%) were eventually published after a median of 685 days (range 209-1463). The majority of these were original research, published in English-language specialty/subspecialty journals. The median number of citations per article was 2-3 (IQR 0...

  17. Legal terms in general dictionaries of English: The civil procedure mystery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    examines four general dictionaries of English to see how they treat civil procedure terms used in England and Wales in the light of the change of structure of and terminology used in civil proceedings that took place in 1999. Despite being based on large, up-to-date corpora the dictionaries contain some...... of the old terms but fail to include the new terms that have been in use for more than 15 years. Why this is the case is a mystery. However, some clues indicate that if they pay more attention to the link between dictionary functions, corpora and the data presented in dictionaries, lexicographers may be able...

  18. Elementary teachers' knowledge and practices in teaching science to English language learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santau, Alexandra O.

    Efforts to improve education---more concretely science education---by creating fundamental shifts in standards for students and teachers have been launched by educators and policy makers in recent years. The new standards for science instruction address improvements in student learning, program development, assessment, and professional development for teachers, with the goal to prepare US students for the academic demands of the 21st century. The study examined teachers' knowledge and practices in science instruction with English language learning (ELL) students. It also examined relationships among key domains of science instruction with ELL students, as well as profiles of teaching practices. The four domains included: (1) teachers' knowledge of science content, (2) teaching practices to promote scientific understanding, (3) teaching practices to promote scientific inquiry, and (4) teaching practices to support English language development during science instruction. The study was part of a larger 5-year research and development intervention aimed at promoting science and literacy achievement of ELL students in urban elementary schools. The study involved 32 third grade, 21 fourth grade, and 17 fifth grade teachers participating in the first-year implementation of the intervention. Based on teachers' questionnaire responses, classroom observation ratings, and post-observation interviews, results indicated that (1) teachers' knowledge and practices were within the bounds of the intervention, but short of reform-oriented practices and (2) relationships among the four domains existed, especially at grade 5. These findings can provide insights for professional development and future research, along with accountability policies.

  19. Specialization and the Current Practices of General Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Marquita R; Dodgion, Christopher M; Kwok, Alvin C; Hu, Yue-Yung; Havlena, Jeff A; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Kent, K Craig; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of specialization on the practice of general surgery has not been characterized. Our goal was to assess general surgeons’ operative practices to inform surgical education and workforce planning. Study Design We examined the practices of general surgeons identified in the 2008 State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) for three US states. Operations were identified using ICD-9 and CPT codes linked to encrypted physician identifiers. For each surgeon, total operative volume and the percentage of practice comprised of their most common operation were calculated. Correlation was measured between general surgeons’ case volume and the number of other specialists in a health service area. Results There were 1,075 general surgeons who performed 240,510 operations in 2008. The mean operative volume for each surgeon was 224 annual procedures. General surgeons performed an average of 23 different types of operations. For the majority of general surgeons, their most common procedure comprised no more than 30% of total practice. The most common operations, ranked by the frequency that they appeared as general surgeons’ top procedure, included: cholecystectomy, colonoscopy, endoscopy, and skin excision. The proportion of general surgery practice comprised of endoscopic procedures inversely correlated with the number of gastroenterologists in the health service area (Rho = - 0.50, p = 0.005). Conclusions Despite trends toward specialization, the current practices of general surgeons remain heterogeneous. This indicates a continued demand for broad-based surgical education to allow future surgeons to tailor their practices to their environment. PMID:24210145

  20. The Practice Nurse Mental Health in general practices: effects on diagnoses of alcohol abuse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abidi, L.; Oenema, A.; Verhaak, P.; Mheen, D. van de

    2017-01-01

    Background: As part of health policy aiming to improve early detection and treatment of mental illness in general practices, from 2008 mental health practice nurses were gradually introduced in general practices in the Netherlands. The current study aims to investigate the effect of the

  1. General practice ethnicity data: evaluation of a tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwelt P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is evidence that the collection of ethnicity data in New Zealand primary care is variable and that data recording in practices does not always align with the procedures outlined in the Ethnicity Data Protocols for the Health and Disability Sector. In 2010, The Ministry of Health funded the development of a tool to audit the collection of ethnicity data in primary care. The aim of this study was to pilot the Ethnicity Data Audit Tool (EAT in general practice. The goal was to evaluate the tool and identify recommendations for its improvement. METHODS: Eight general practices in the Waitemata District Health Board region participated in the EAT pilot. Feedback about the pilot process was gathered by questionnaires and interviews, to gain an understanding of practices’ experiences in using the tool. Questionnaire and interview data were analysed using a simple analytical framework and a general inductive method. FINDINGS: General practice receptionists, practice managers and general practitioners participated in the pilot. Participants found the pilot process challenging but enlightening. The majority felt that the EAT was a useful quality improvement tool for handling patient ethnicity data. Larger practices were the most positive about the tool. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that, with minor improvements to the toolkit, the EAT has the potential to lead to significant improvements in the quality of ethnicity data collection and recording in New Zealand general practices. Other system-level factors also need to be addressed.

  2. PRESERVICE TEACHERS’ BELIEFS AND PRACTICES IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Othman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores ESL preservice teachers’ beliefs regarding teaching English to young learners, and examines the interplay between their beliefs and instructional practices. Seventy ESL preservice teachers at a university in Malaysia participated in the study. Data is drawn from semi-structured interviews and lesson plan analysis. The results indicated that the preservice teachers’ classroom practices did not often reflect their stated beliefs about young learners language learning. Although there was a strong consensus that English should be taught communicatively, the preservice teachers also employed structural based approach when teaching grammar. Contextual factors hindering this consistency were attributed to exam focused instruction and time constraints. Thus, this paper argues that reform in language teacher education need to address factors that hinder preservice teachers from implementing instructions which aligns with the theoretical beliefs espoused by their teacher training program.

  3. [The practice guideline 'Anemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Anaemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners will certainly be a support for the Dutch general practitioner. The inclusion of an algorithm to make a more precise diagnosis is an experiment that needs to be evaluated in the near future. However, many general

  4. PRACTICE OF USING PODCASTS AND VIDEOCASTS IN INTEGRATED BUSINESS ENGLISH TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana L. Gerasimenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to consider and assess (from theoretical and practical standpoints the implementation of podcasts and videocasts in the integrated teaching of two courses: Business English and Knowledge Management. The use of the above technologies enhances the learning motivation of students, provides them with possibilities to realize their intellectual and creative potential and contributes to their more efficient professional training. 

  5. Is it time to talk? Interpreter services use in general practice within Canterbury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seers, Kara; Cook, Lynley; Abel, Gillian; Schluter, Philip; Bridgford, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Effective communication is fundamental to successful health care service delivery, and has a positive impact on access, quality of care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction. Although there are a growing number of New Zealanders who do not speak English proficiently, underutilisation of trained interpreter services appears to be common in primary health care settings. To describe the pattern of interpreter service need and utilisation by general practice services, and to identify key barriers and enabling factors to the use of trained interpreters. A mixed methods study was employed. Census and Partnership Health Canterbury Te Kei o Te Waka (PHC) databases were combined, and quantitative analysis used to derive interpreter service need and utilisation patterns. Transcripts of focus groups and interviews from general practitioners, practice nurses and practice administration staff within the PHC were analysed, using qualitative methods to identify barriers and enablers to interpreter service use. For the years 2008-2010, approximately 10 742 consultations per year involved a non-Englishspeaking patient, yet in only approximately 74.8 (0.7%) consultations per year were interpreter services utilised. Analysis of focus groups and interviews identified four global themes that represented barriers for interpreter service utilisation; namely, practicalities, expectations, knowledge of service, and systems. The current use of interpreter services in PHC general practice appears to be significantly less than the need. In order to maximise health outcomes and reduce risk, strategies must be initiated to counter the barriers currently inhibiting interpreter service use, including adopting best practice policies.

  6. Developing General Cultural Literacy through Teaching English in a Russian University: Competence and Semiotic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Zolotareva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some of the issues of teaching English in a Russian university, which arouse as a result of introducing new educational standards and it discusses the ways of forming students’ general cultural competence by using authentic curricula, in order to meet the requirements of those standards. It also shows the importance of semiotics for acquisition a foreign language and culture, and reveals the worth of “personalia” as a culture language sign, as well as peculiarity of its functioning, which lies in its ability to represent social and cultural values and priorities in personal-precedential form, thus making a contribution to developingan individual’sconcept scheme and, consequently, general cultural literacy.

  7. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  8. Microbiological contamination of spirometers - an exploratory study in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, K.L.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Holton, C.; Crockett, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an important tool when diagnosing chronic respiratory conditions in general practice. However, the equipment may harbour pathogenic micro-organisms and cross-transmission of aerolised pathogens could occur if hygiene measures are insufficient. METHODS: We assessed

  9. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  10. Case stories in general practice: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Flottorp, Signe; Stensland, Per

    2012-01-01

    To explore the interactive process of sharing case stories in small-group activity in general practice. Qualitative focus group study. Peer-group meetings of doctors attending specialist training or continuous medical education in general practice. Twenty female and 30 male doctors working in general practice in Norway. The storyline of case presentations included detailed stories with emotional engagement, co-authored by other group members. The stories initiated discussions and reflections concerning patients' and doctors' perspectives, medical ethics as well as clinical problems. The safe atmosphere allowed testing out boundaries of socially shared knowledge. Sharing case stories in small groups in general practice initiated interaction that facilitated meaning-making, reflection and peer support.

  11. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands | Ten Cate | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. With the aid of a film the training in general practice is discussed at 4 of the 7 universities in the Netherlands: Groningen, Utrecht, Nijmegen and Leyden. The differences in training methods are shown.

  12. Investigating the Written Assessment Practices of Turkish Teachers of English at Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Kırkgöz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Since the late 1990s, Turkey has witnessed two major curriculum reforms in English language teaching at the primary level education. However, the situation of the assessment practices of the teachers has been unclear due to lack of relevant research, particularly in Turkish context.Purpose of Study: This study aims to investigate the written assessment practices of young English language learners in Grades 4-5 in state Turkish primary schools with a focus on comparing the question types posed by the teachers prior to and following the 2005 curriculum innovation in English language teaching (ELT in primary education in Turkey.Method: In order to identify the teachers’ written assessment practices, 100 written examination papers were collected from 25 teachers who had been teaching in grades 4 and 5 since 1997, the papers were analyzed with regard to the question types based on the categorization suggested by Brown and Hudson (1998, and descriptive statistics was used in comparing the question types.Findings: As a result, no major differences were found between the types of questions directed to 4th and 5th graders prior to and following the 2005 curriculum innovation. Conclusion and Recommendations: Additionally, constructed response question types grew noticeably in number, particularly when the examination papers prepared for 4th and 5th graders were compared prior to and after the 2005 curriculum innovation.

  13. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford-Young William

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP, have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Methods Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Results Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. Conclusion The NCSP

  14. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice - a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Elaine; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Oliver, Isabel; Randall, Sarah; Ford-Young, William; Beckwith, Philippa; McNulty, Cliodna

    2009-01-01

    Background General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP), have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Methods Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Results Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. Conclusion The NCSP should consider developing

  15. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Elaine; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Oliver, Isabel; Randall, Sarah; Ford-Young, William; Beckwith, Philippa; McNulty, Cliodna

    2009-10-12

    General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP), have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. The NCSP should consider developing a range of more discrete but eye

  16. Promoting mental health and preventing mental illness in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, S.; Jenkins, R.; Burch, T.; Nasir, L.C.; Fisher, B.; Giotaki, G.; Gnani, S.; Hertel, L.; Marks, M.; Mathers, N.; Millington-Sanders, C.; Morris, D.; Ruprah-Shah, B.; Stange, K.; Thomas, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper calls for the routine integration of mental health promotion and prevention into UK General Practice in order to reduce the burden of mental and physical disorders and the ensuing pressure on General Practice. The proposals & the resulting document (https://ethicscharity.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/rcgp_keymsg_150925_v5.pdf) arise from an expert ?Think Tank? convened by the London Journal of Primary Care, Educational Trust for Health Improvement through Cognitive Strategie...

  17. The Minimalist and Maximalist Approaches in the TEFLIN: Towards the Empowerment of the General Indonesian Learners of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Gunarwan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The point of departure of this paper is an assumption that the teaching of English in Indonesian public schools has not yielded the minimum expected result: English learners have not been empowered with the reading skill in English, let alone the other skills. Given that English has an elevated role to play in the new millennium, Indonesian learners should be empowered in this language for wider communica­tions. Two approaches are proposed, namely (1 the minimalist approach, in which reading ability is the sole objective of the teaching of English to students in general, the corrolary being the use of the translation method; and (2 the maximalist approach, in which "ordinary" students are taught along the line of the notion of Little English (much discussed in the 60's and 70's, whereas "the cream of the cream" are tutored in a special programme designed to make them English-Indonesian bilinguals. Hence, a new language policy of Indonesia should be developed and English curricula be reviewed and a national commission on the TEFLIN be set up to look into the matter in more depth and to suggest ways in which the teaching of this language in schools can really empower the learners in the context of human resources development.

  18. The Impact of English as a Global Language on Educational Policies and Practices in the Asia-Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the results of an investigation into the place of English in the curriculum in several countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The study indicates that the emergence of English as a global language is having considerable impact on policies and practices in all countries surveyed. However, it also reveals significant problems,…

  19. A survey of statistics in three UK general practice journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many medical specialities have reviewed the statistical content of their journals. To our knowledge this has not been done in general practice. Given the main role of a general practitioner as a diagnostician we thought it would be of interest to see whether the statistical methods reported reflect the diagnostic process. Methods Hand search of three UK journals of general practice namely the British Medical Journal (general practice section, British Journal of General Practice and Family Practice over a one-year period (1 January to 31 December 2000. Results A wide variety of statistical techniques were used. The most common methods included t-tests and Chi-squared tests. There were few articles reporting likelihood ratios and other useful diagnostic methods. There was evidence that the journals with the more thorough statistical review process reported a more complex and wider variety of statistical techniques. Conclusions The BMJ had a wider range and greater diversity of statistical methods than the other two journals. However, in all three journals there was a dearth of papers reflecting the diagnostic process. Across all three journals there were relatively few papers describing randomised controlled trials thus recognising the difficulty of implementing this design in general practice.

  20. General dentist characteristics associated with rural practice location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, Susan C; Kuthy, Raymond A; Kavand, Golnaz

    2013-08-01

    To examine whether there is a difference in the likelihood that a general dentist practices in a rural location based on individual characteristics, including dental school attended, birth state, practice arrangement, sex, and age. All private practice, general dentists in Iowa were included in this study. Data were extracted from the year 2010 version of the Iowa Dentist Tracking System, which monitors practice patterns of active dentists. Rurality of primary office location, categorized using Rural-Urban Commuting Area codes, served as the outcome variable. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to explain associations between rural practice location and dentist characteristics. Fifteen percent of the state's population resided in isolated small rural towns, but only 8% of general dentists practiced here. Approximately 17% of dentists in isolated small rural towns were age 40 or younger, compared to 32% of dentists in urban areas. Among male dentists, those who were born in Iowa (P = .002) were older (P = .020), and graduated from dental schools other than the University of Iowa (P = .009) were more likely to practice in rural areas than were their counterparts. Conversely, among female dentists, solo practice (P = .016) was the only variable significantly associated with rural practice location. The dentist workforce in rural areas of Iowa is dominated by older males who were born in Iowa. As this generation retires and increasing numbers of women enter the profession, state policy makers and planners will need to monitor changing trends in the rural workforce. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Identification of depression in a rural general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depression and coexisting generalised anxiety disorder in a rural general practice in the Orange Free State. ... that the coexistence of an anxiety disorder could confuse a general practitioner. Other authors,3,11 have ... pleasure in activities, apathy, or social withdrawal, sleep disorder, and appetite disorder or weight loss or ...

  2. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in a large sample of general practices in Denmark. We focussed on whether participation by general practitioners (GPs) in an educational programme could enhance the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and staging of the disease and improve adherence...

  3. Implant Dentistry in General Practice. Part 1: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ken

    2016-06-01

    This paper, the first of two, provides an introduction to implant dentistry for the general dental practitioner. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Implant placement and restoration is becoming more common place in general dental practice to the point where it may already be considered a routine treatment option.

  4. Positive experiences with a specialist as facilitator in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2012-01-01

    The use of facilitators for quality improvement in general practice has accelerated during the past decade. As general practitioners (GPs) or pharmacists have typically been used as facilitators, there is a lack of knowledge of how other professionals function as facilitators. This article explores...

  5. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    of atopic eczema in general practice. Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition characterised by dry, itchy skin associated with flares and remissions. .... atopy. This effect is lessened in the general population and neg- ligible in children without first- order atopic relatives. Breast- feeding should be strongly rec-.

  6. Identification of depression in a rural general practice | Strauss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major depression is underdiagnosed by general practitioners, but the reasons for this are not clear. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of major depression and coexisting generalised anxiety disorder in a rural general practice in the Orange Free State. It also assessed the predictive value of a screening ...

  7. Identification of depression in a rural general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major depression is underdiagnosed by general practitioners, but the reasons for this are not clear. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of major depression and coexisting generalised anxiety disorder in a rural general practice in the Orange Free State. It also assessed the predictive value of a screening ...

  8. Acute pain management in general practice: steps to effective pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pain is one of the most common complaints that general practitioners encounter in everyday practice. The swift and effective management of pain is a medical mandate, not only to fulfil an ethical obligation to the patient, but also to prevent long-term complications, such as chronic pain. General practitioners are often ...

  9. Acute pain management in general practice: Steps to effective pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pain is one of the most common complaints that general practitioners encounter in everyday practice. The swift and effective management of pain is a medical mandate, not only to fulfil an ethical obligation to the patient, but also to prevent long-term complications, such as chronic pain. General practitioners are often ...

  10. [Development of a pharmacological curriculum for general practice: Identifying and prescribing orally administered pharmacological substances with relevance for general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straßner, Cornelia; Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Flum, Elisabeth; Schwill, Simon; Brandt, Bettina; Steinhäuser, Jost

    2017-05-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are among the specialists who prescribe the highest number of medication. Therefore the improvement of pharmacological competencies is an important part of the GP specialist training. The self-concept of general practice stating that GPs are the first contact persons for all health problems makes it challenging to define and acquire competencies for specialist training. While the "Competence-based Curriculum" developed by the German College of General Practitioners and Family Physicians defines diagnoses, reasons for counselling and competencies which are essential for general practice, a similar orientation guide is lacking for the pharmacological field. The aim of this study is to define and characterize pharmacological substances which every GP should know so well that he or she is able to conduct counselling and monitoring. We analysed private and public health insurance prescriptions of all general practices participating in the CONTENT project in the period from 2009 to 2014. The analysis was limited to substances with oral application which were prescribed at least once by at least 25 % (n = 11) of the practices. While the 100 most frequent prescriptions were included due to their frequency, less frequently prescribed substances were assessed concerning their relevance for general practice in a rating procedure. The substances included were classified by diagnoses and reasons for counselling. We analysed 1,912,896 prescriptions from 44 practices and 112,535 patients on the basis of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. After applying the inclusion criteria, 453 substances were left, 302 of which were considered relevant for general practice and could be assigned to 45 diagnoses / reasons for counselling. The result of this study could be considered a working draft for a pharmacological curriculum for general practice, which may complement the "Competence-based Curriculum" in the medium term. Copyright

  11. Reasons why doctors choose or reject careers in general practice: national surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor; Goldacre, Raph; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Background Less than one-third of newly qualified doctors in the UK want a career in general practice. The English Department of Health expects that half of all newly qualified doctors will become GPs. Aim To report on the reasons why doctors choose or reject careers in general practice, comparing intending GPs with doctors who chose hospital careers. Design and setting Questionnaire surveys in all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years. Method Questions about specialty career intentions and motivations, put to the qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, and 2009, 1 year after qualification, and at longer time intervals thereafter. Results ‘Enthusiasm for and commitment to the specialty’ was a very important determinant of choice for intending doctors, regardless of chosen specialty. ‘Hours and working conditions’ were a strong influence for intending GPs (cited as having had ‘a great deal’ of influence by 75% of intending GPs in the first year after qualification), much more so than for doctors who wanted a hospital career (cited by 30%). Relatively few doctors had actually considered general practice seriously but then rejected it; 78% of the doctors who rejected general practice gave ‘job content’ as their reason, compared with 32% of doctors who rejected other specialties. Conclusion The shortfall of doctors wanting a career in general practice is not accounted for by doctors considering and rejecting it. Many do not consider it at all. There are very distinctive factors that influence choice for, and rejection of, general practice. PMID:23211266

  12. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners practice guideline 'The menopause'; reaction of the field of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on the menopause will not be any major cause for discussion. The hot issue of giving oestrogens to peri- and postmenopausal women to prevent osteoporosis or cardiovascular disease was already covered in the practice guideline on

  13. General practitioners and clinical practice guidelines: a reexamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Isabelle; Ventelou, Bruno; Guerville, Marc-André; Paraponaris, Alain; Verger, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    General practitioners' (GPs') use of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) may be influenced by various contextual and attitudinal factors. This study examines general attitudes toward CPGs to establish profiles according to these attitudes and to determine if these profiles are associated with awareness and with use of CPGs in daily practice. The authors conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey of 1,759 French GPs and measured (a) their general attitudes toward CPGs and (b) their awareness and use in daily practice of CPGs for six specific health problems. A bivariate probit model was used with sample selection to analyze the links between GPs' general attitudes and CPG awareness/use. The authors found three GP profiles according to their opinions toward CPGs and a positive association between these profiles and CPG awareness but not use. It is important to build awareness of CPGs before GPs develop negative attitudes toward them.

  14. Disambiguating with Bourdieu: unravelling policy from practice in the teaching of children with English as an additional language

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the use of Bourdieusian analysis for examining how policy and practice interact in the teaching of English and therefore in the development of children’s language and literacy; in particular how Bourdieusian analysis uncovers the ways in which teachers’ practice has been influenced unconsciously by centralised shaping of the curriculum for English in England while the pupil demographic in schools has become more linguistically diverse. Data were collected from interviews...

  15. Practical English Education for Natural Science and Technology through the Academic-Industrial Cooperation in Gunma University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozuka, Kazuo

    English education for specific purpose (ESP) , particularly for the field of natural sciences and technologies, has been attracting great interests in Japan because of the growing demands of the ability to use English in working place to the graduates in the filed. In Gunma University, we have launched a new style of ESP program tilted as “Collaboration between Academic and Industrial Sectors for Practical English Education” as a part of Good Practice Program supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, Japan (MEXT) since 2006. The program aims to steam up the ability of students to use English through a variety of activities including the presentation of scientific topics in English in a regular class work and the pseudo-conversation (role-playing) style training in a non-regular class work.

  16. The cost of immunising at the general practice level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nikki; Rouse, Paul; Airey, Stacey; Petousis-Harris, Helen

    2009-12-01

    Childhood immunisation is one of the most cost-effective activities in health care. However, New Zealand (NZ) has failed to achieve national coverage targets. NZ general practice is the primary site of service delivery and is funded on a fee-for-service basis for delivery of immunisation events. To determine the average cost to a general practice of delivering childhood immunisation events and to develop a cost model for the typical practice. A purposeful selection of 24 diverse practices provided data via questionnaires and a daily log over a week. Costs were modelled using activity-based costing. The mean time spent on an immunisation activity was 23.8 minutes, with 90.7% of all staff time provided by practice nurses. Only 2% of the total time recorded was spent on childhood immunisation opportunistic activities. Practice nurses spent 15% of their total work time on immunisation activity. The mean estimated cost per vaccination event was $25.90; however, there was considerable variability across practices. A 'typical practice' model was developed to better understand costs at different levels of activity. The current level of immunisation benefit subsidy is considerably lower than the cost of a standard vaccination event, although there is wide variability across practices. The costs of delivery exceeding the subsidy may be one reason why there is an apparently small amount of time spent on extra opportunistic activities and a barrier to increasing efforts to raise immunisation rates.

  17. Assessment practices in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula Vlanti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare teacher and student perceptions concerning assessment in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High Schools. It focuses on exploring teacher assessment practices and students’ view of these. The degree of agreement between teacher and student views can affect the results of instruction and learning. The central finding of the study was that English language teachers follow an approach that keeps a balance between the requirements of the Cross-Thematic Curriculum (DEPPS for performance assessment and the official specifications which define final achievement tests. Students understand the purpose of assessment and the importance of attitudes towards learning and have a clear picture of methods and tasks used for their assessment. On the basis of these research findings, a series of suggestions about teachers and teacher trainers are put forward, focusing on teacher professional development, which, in turn, will promote student involvement and responsibility for learning.

  18. Literacy practices, texts, and talk around texts: english language teaching developments in colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Valencia Giraldo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to provide a window into the complexity of classroom interaction in English language classes in public secondary schools in Colombia. It will show the relationship between what goes on in public schools and classrooms, the wider policy context, and recent reforms. Through a detailed analysis of data collected in two schools and the interaction that takes place between the two teachers and their students around and about texts, this artcicle provides insights into the specific nature of the literacy practices, the texts used, and the particular ways in which the teachers and learners made sense of these texts. It examines how the students are learning to read in English in these classes, and what the teachers understand by ‘doing reading’ and ‘reading comprehension’.

  19. Literacy in Social Studies: The Influence of Cognitive and Motivational Practices on the Reading Comprehension of English Learners and Non-English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada Barber, Ana; Buehl, Michelle M.; Beck, Jori S.; Ramirez, Erin M.; Gallagher, Melissa; Richey Nuland, Leila N.; Archer, Casey J.

    2018-01-01

    We examined the impact of cognitive and motivation practices within a social studies literacy intervention (United States History for Engaged Reading [USHER]) on Grade 6 English learners' (ELs) and non-ELs' history reading comprehension, cognitive strategy use, reading self-efficacy, and reading engagement. We used a switching replications…

  20. [The practice guideline 'Acute cough' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Acute cough' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners stresses the fact that a cough of less than 3 weeks' duration seldom heralds serious pathology. However, for sound reassurance of patients presenting with a cough of short duration, the general practitioner needs to

  1. A survey of audit activity in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearnshaw, H; Baker, R; Cooper, A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 1991, all general practices have been encouraged to undertake clinical audit. Audit groups report that participation is high, and some local surveys have been undertaken, but no detailed national survey has been reported. AIM: To determine audit activities in general practices and the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) regarding the future of clinical audit in primary care. METHOD: A questionnaire on audit activities was sent to 707 practices from 18 medical audit advisory group areas. The audit groups had been ranked by annual funding from 1992 to 1995. Six groups were selected at random from the top, middle, and lowest thirds of this rank order. RESULTS: A total of 428 (60.5%) usable responses were received. Overall, 346 (85%) responders reported 125.7 audits from the previous year with a median of three audits per practice. There was no correlation between the number of audits reported and the funding per GP for the medical audit advisory group. Of 997 audits described in detail, changes were reported as 'not needed' in 220 (22%), 'not made' in 142 (14%), 'made' in 439 (44%), and 'made and remeasured' in 196 (20%). Thus, 635 (64%) audits were reported to have led to changes. Some 853 (81%) of the topics identified were on clinical care. Responders made 242 (42%) positive comments on the future of clinical audit in primary care, and 152 (26%) negative views were recorded. CONCLUSION: The level of audit activity in general practice is reasonably high, and most of the audits result in change. The number of audits per practice seems to be independent of the level of funding that the medical audit advisory group has received. Although there is room for improvement in the levels of effective audit activity in general practice, continued support by the professionally led audit groups could enable all practices to undertake effective audit that leads to improvement in patient care. PMID:9624769

  2. Prevalence of anal symptoms in general practice: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournu, Géraldine; Abramowitz, Laurent; Couffignal, Camille; Juguet, Frédéric; Sénéjoux, Agnès; Berger, Stéphane; Wiart, Anne-Laure; Bernard, Marc; Provost, Françoise; Pillant-Le Moult, Hélène; Bouchard, Dominique; Aubert, Jean-Pierre

    2017-08-03

    Anal disorders are largely underestimated in general practice. Studies have shown patients conceal anal symptoms leading to late diagnosis and treatment. Management by general practitioners is poorly described. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of anal symptoms and their management in general practice. In this prospective, observational, national study set in France, all adult patients consulting their general practitioner during 2 days of consultation were included. Anal symptoms, whether spontaneously revealed or not, were systematically collected and assessed. For symptomatic patients, the obstacles to anal examination were evaluated. The general practitioner's diagnosis was collected and a proctologist visit was systematically proposed in case of anal symptoms. If the proctologist was consulted, his or her diagnosis was collected. From October 2014 to April 2015, 1061 patients were included by 57 general practitioners. The prevalence of anal symptoms was 15.6% (95% CI: 14-18). However, 85% of these patients did not spontaneously share their symptoms with their doctors, despite a discomfort rating of 3 out of 10 (range 1-5). Although 65% of patients agreed to an anal examination, it was not proposed in 45% of cases with anal symptoms. Performing the examination was associated with a significantly higher diagnosis rate of 76% versus 20% (p anal symptoms are significant in general practice despite the impact on quality of life. Anal examination is seldom done. Improved training of general practitioners is required to break the taboo.

  3. Undergraduate medical students' rating of clerkship in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldevi, M

    1995-06-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing demand for more involvement of general practice in undergraduate medical education. General practice and primary care can contribute with a relevant clinical content but also be a major resource in facilitating of professional development of the medical student. In the reformed undergraduate medical education of the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden, general practice has been given an important and extensive role. To evaluate the students' opinion on the recurrent clerkships in general practice a written questionnaire was given to all students after each clerkship. In the autumn of 1992, 74% of the 115 students answered this questionnaire. The questionnaire was focused on qualities regarded as important for creating the best educational milieu for the professional development of the student. Factor analysis of the different questionnaire headings showed a good construct validity. The distinct constituent elements were those of the clerkship structure, the amount of tutoring, and the student-tutor relationship. The students' overall satisfaction was high. It was not gender-related, nor did it fall with increasing semester stage. It was mainly determined by the qualitative clerkship and provider factors. The strongest of these was the 'quality of tutoring' whereas the 'quantity of tutoring' was weakest. Considering that the general practitioners were relatively inexperienced as educators, these results were both gratifying and promising, although they indicate a need for further improvement of the competence of the tutoring general practitioners.

  4. Experience of contractual change in UK general practice: a qualitative study of salaried GPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; McDonald, Ruth; Harrison, Stephen; Sanders, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Background General practice in the UK underwent major change in 2004, with the introduction of new contracts and a significant element of pay for performance. Although salaried GPs form an increasing proportion of the general practice workforce, little is known of their experiences. Aim To explore the views and experiences of salaried GPs working in English general practice. Design and setting Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews in 17 practices across England, between July 2007 and September 2009. Method Interviews were conducted with 23 salaried GPs. A topic guide included questions on motivations for a career in general practice, descriptions of their daily working environment and duties, practice relationships, and future aspirations. Results The new ability to opt out of out-of-hours responsibilities was deemed positive for the profession but not a major driver for choosing medical speciality. Views regarding the impact of the Quality and Outcomes Framework were ambivalent. Differences in pay were regarded as largely reflective of differences in responsibility between salaried GPs and principals. Most participants reported conducting varied work in collaborative practices. Participants held varying career aspirations. Conclusion Salaried GPs' working experiences were dependent upon personal aspirations and local context. Most salaried GPs were reportedly content with their current position but many also had aspirations of eventually attaining GP principal status. The current lack of available partnerships threatens to undo recent positive workforce progress and may lead to deep dissatisfaction within the profession and a future workforce crisis. Further large-scale quantitative work is required to assess the satisfaction and future expectations of those in salaried posts. PMID:22520916

  5. High School English Teachers' and Students' Perceptions, Attitudes and Actual Practices of Continuous Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigzaw, Abiy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined high school teachers' and students' perceptions, attitudes and actual practices of continuous assessment. The participants of the study were 41 teachers and 808 students in Injabara General and Preparatory, Tilili General Secondary, Mengesha Jembere General Secondary, and Dangila Preparatory schools in West Gojjam, Ethiopia.…

  6. Examining University Students' Scholarly Publication in English Journals: A Case for Postgraduate Students' Written Literacy Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Marjan Vosoughi; Sue-San Ghahremani Ghajar; Atefeh Navarchi

    2017-01-01

    This  research  aimed  to  screen  'essay  writing'  difficulties  that  non-native  university students  at  postgraduate  levels  usually  experience  regarding  scholarly  publication  in mainstream, English journals. Two sets of variables including written literacy competencies in Persian and English languages were mapped over language uses (General vs. Academic). Initial screenings  from  one  hundred  Iranian  students  at  PhD  and  MA  levels  with  publication experiences  in  both  ...

  7. Clinical indications for antibiotic use in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    from electronic prescriptions are accessible and available to provide an overview of drug use, in casu antibiotic prescriptions, in Danish general practice. These clinical indications may be further explored in detail to assess rational drug use and congruence with guidelines, but validation......Objective: To assess the availability and applicability of clinical indications from electronic prescriptions on antibiotic use in Danish general practice. Design: Retrospective cohort register-based study including the Danish National Prescription Register. Setting: Population-based study...... of routine electronic antibiotic prescriptions from Danish general practice. Subjects: All 975,626 patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription at outpatient pharmacies during the 1-year study period (July 2012 to June 2013). Main outcome measures: Number of prescriptions per clinical indication. Number...

  8. Implementation of an Arranged Preventive Consultation in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram; Kirkegaard, Pia; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    Background: In 2006 an arranged preventive consultation (0106-service) was implemented in Danish general practice. The purpose of the consultation is an attempt to improve the systematic prevention of the main chronic lifestyle diseases. Aim: This study examines the GP's experiences...... with the arranged preventive consultation with focus on facilitators and barriers in the implementation of the consultation. Material & Method: Semi-structured interviews with 10 GPs and nurses in general practice. Results & Conclusions: Economically lucrative services are not an isolated motivation for the GPs....../nurses, but must be accompanied with a basic belief in the effect of preventive consultations in general practice. The better payment of the 0106-service is used to spend more time per consultation and it makes the GPs/nurses feel rewarded for the preventive work they perform. The consultation frames a social...

  9. Antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice 2004-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic consumption in the primary care sector is often perceived as synonymous with consumption in general practice despite the fact that few countries stratify the primary care sector by providers' medical specialty. We aimed to characterize and quantify antibiotic use in Danish...... general practice relative to the entire primary care sector. Methods: This was a registry-based study including all patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription between July 2004 and June 2013 at a Danish community pharmacy. Antibiotic use was expressed as DDDs and treatments/1000 inhabitants....../day (DIDs and TIDs, respectively) and assessed according to antibiotic spectrum (narrow versus broad) and their anatomical therapeutic classification codes in total as well as in six age groups. Results: The contribution of general practice to the entire antibiotic use in the primary care sector declined...

  10. Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Mental Illness in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Steve; Jenkins, Rachel; Burch, Tony; Calamos Nasir, Laura; Fisher, Brian; Giotaki, Gina; Gnani, Shamini; Hertel, Lise; Marks, Marina; Mathers, Nigel; Millington-Sanders, Catherine; Morris, David; Ruprah-Shah, Baljeet; Stange, Kurt; Thomas, Paul; White, Robert; Wright, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    This paper calls for the routine integration of mental health promotion and prevention into UK General Practice in order to reduce the burden of mental and physical disorders and the ensuing pressure on General Practice. The proposals & the resulting document (https://ethicscharity.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/rcgp_keymsg_150925_v5.pdf) arise from an expert 'Think Tank' convened by the London Journal of Primary Care, Educational Trust for Health Improvement through Cognitive Strategies (ETHICS Foundation) and the Royal College of General Practitioners. It makes 12 recommendations for General Practice: (1) Mental health promotion and prevention are too important to wait. (2) Work with your community to map risk factors, resources and assets. (3) Good health care, medicine and best practice are biopsychosocial rather than purely physical. (4) Integrate mental health promotion and prevention into your daily work. (5) Boost resilience in your community through approaches such as community development. (6) Identify people at increased risk of mental disorder for support and screening. (7) Support early intervention for people of all ages with signs of illness. (8) Maintain your biopsychosocial skills. (9) Ensure good communication, interdisciplinary team working and inter-sectoral working with other staff, teams and agencies. (10) Lead by example, taking action to promote the resilience of the general practice workforce. (11) Ensure mental health is appropriately included in the strategic agenda for your 'cluster' of General Practices, at the Clinical Commissioning Groups, and the Health and Wellbeing Board. (12) Be aware of national mental health strategies and localise them, including action to destigmatise mental illness within the context of community development.

  11. A Definition of Family Medicine and General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, M Jawad

    2018-01-01

    Definitions of general practice and family medicine have tended to be difficult to understand. We propose a new definition that is brief and clear. General practice / family medicine is defined as the medical specialty that manages common and long-term illnesses in children and adults, focusing on overall health and well-being. The definition should be followed by local examples of diseases within the scope of primary care such as asthma, diabetes as well as end-of-life care. This definition is based on the concept of common illnesses, reflecting the reality that family physicians manage most health conditions in a community. Unlike 'comprehensive care', common illnesses is a scope of practice that is familiar and credible to laypersons. The new definition focuses on a unique and enduring attribute of the specialty: holistic care. This core characteristic of general practice encompasses patient-centred care and continuity across the family lifecycle. By being sharply focused, the definition can guide the nature of clinical care in general practice as well as the content of undergraduate and postgraduate training in family medicine.

  12. Integrating Mobile Phones into the EFL Foundation Year Classroom in King Abdulaziz University/KSA: Effects on Achievement in General English and Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrisat, Abdulhafeth A.; Mahmoud, Salameh Saleem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of ten teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) oriented features of mobile phones in the English language classroom on the achievement of foundation-year students in King Abdulaziz University (KAU) in General English. The study also explores students' attitudes towards this new method of teaching. The study…

  13. Theory–practice dichotomy: Prospective teachers' evaluations about teaching English to young learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Nihat ŞAD

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at examining the prospective teachers. evaluations about the implementation of the primary ELT curriculum. Also it is aimed to inquire the possible problems and difficulties in teaching English to children. The study is based on qualitative case study design. Qualitative data were collected using participant journaling method from 31 preservice teachers who kept reflective journals throughout their observations of five mentor teachers. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis method by coding and creating categories/themes. Results showed that actual practices do not adequately meet the curricular and theoretical requirements in terms of objectives, content, learning-teaching experiences and evaluation. This theory-practice dichotomy about teaching English to children mainly includes the problems such as non-communicative objectives, failure to appeal students emotionally, overdominance of coursebooks and grammar content over communicative content, use of restricted methodology, ineffective use of technology and materials, insecure (coercive, aggressive, and discriminative classroom atmosphere, lack of or inproper use of game activities, lack of group or pair work, failure to consider individual differences, lack or inappropriate integration of language skills, improper process evaluation, inadequate feedback, and traditional evaluation practices.

  14. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolter, R.; Freund, T.; Ledig, T.; Boll, B.; Szecsenyi, J.; Roos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the

  15. Professionalism in general practice: development of an instrument to assess professional behaviour in general practitioner trainees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, K. van de; Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to develop a new tool to assess professional behaviour in general practitioner (GP) trainees: the evaluation of professional behaviour in general practice (EPRO-GP) instrument. METHODS: Our study consisted of 4 phases: (1) development of a model of

  16. Building chronic disease management capacity in General Practice: The South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Koehne, Kristy; Verrall, Claire C; Szabo, Natalie; Bollen, Chris; Parker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on the implementation experience of the South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative in order to establish what is needed to support the development of the chronic disease management role of practice nurses. The Initiative was delivered between 2007 and 2010 to recruit, train and place 157 nurses across 147 General Practices in Adelaide. The purpose was to improve chronic disease management in General Practice, by equipping nurses to work as practice nurses who would coordinate care and establish chronic disease management systems. Secondary analysis of qualitative data contained in the Initiative evaluation report, specifically drawing on quarterly project records and four focus groups conducted with practice nurses, practice nurse coordinators and practice nurse mentors. As evidenced by the need to increase the amount of support provided during the implementation of the Initiative, nurses new to General Practice faced challenges in their new role. Nurses described a big learning curve as they dealt with role transition to a new work environment and learning a range of new skills while developing chronic disease management systems. Informants valued the skills development and support offered by the Initiative, however the ongoing difficulties in implementing the role suggested that change is also needed at the level of the Practice. While just over a half of the placement positions were retained, practice nurses expressed concern with having to negotiate the conditions of their employment. In order to advance the role of practice nurses as managers of chronic disease support is needed at two levels. At one level support is needed to assist practice nurses to build their own skills. At the level of the Practice, and in the wider health workforce system, support is also needed to ensure that Practices are organisationally ready to include the practice nurse within the practice team.

  17. The role of counsellors in general practice. A qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Sibbald, B; Addington-Hall, J.; Brenneman, D; Obe, P. F.

    1996-01-01

    Counselling services in general practice are now widespread but little is known about their nature or role. We therefore carried out in-depth telephone interviews with a representative sample of 72 general practitioners and 60 of their counsellors who had participated in a previous national survey of counselling services in England and Wales. Our aim was to gain greater insight into the functioning of these services in order to determine the most appropriate focus for future research and deve...

  18. Discourse analysis in general practice: a sociolinguistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessa, J; Malterud, K

    1990-06-01

    It is a simple but important fact that as general practitioners we talk to our patients. The quality of the conversation is of vital importance for the outcome of the consultation. The purpose of this article is to discuss a methodological tool borrowed from sociolinguistics--discourse analysis. To assess the suitability of this method for analysis of general practice consultations, the authors have performed a discourse analysis of one single consultation. Our experiences are presented here.

  19. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbakel, Natasha J; de Bont, Antoinette A; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-12-01

    When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an intervention for improving safety culture. To gain insight into how two interventions affected patient safety culture in everyday practice. After conducting a randomised control trial of two interventions, this was a qualitative study conducted in 30 general practices to aid interpretation of the previous quantitative findings. Interviews were conducted at practice locations (n = 27) with 24 GPs and 24 practice nurses. The theory of communities of practice--in particular, its concepts of a domain, a community, and a practice--was used to interpret the findings by examining which elements were or were not present in the participating practices. Communal awareness of the problem was only raised after getting together and discussing patient safety. The combination of a questionnaire and workshop enhanced the interaction of team members and nourished team feelings. This shared experience also helped them to understand and develop tools and language for daily practice. In order for patient safety culture to improve, the safety culture questionnaire was more successful when accompanied by a practice workshop. Initial discussion and negotiation of shared goals during the workshop fuelled feelings of coherence and belonging to a community wishing to learn about enhancing patient safety. Team meetings and day-to-day interactions enhanced further liaison and sharing, making patient safety a common and conscious goal. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  20. Nutrition Counselling Practices among General Practitioners in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Dumic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic non-communicable diseases are a significant public health problem and imbalanced nutrition is one of the most significant risk factor for them. The objective of this study was to examine Croatia’s general practitioners’ nutrition counselling practice and determine the factors that influence such practice. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 444 (17.0% randomly selected general practitioners (GPs in Croatia from May to July 2013 via a 32-item anonymous questionnaire. Study showed that 77.0% of participants had provided nutrition counselling exclusively to patients with specific health risks; 18.7% participants had provided nutrition counselling for all patients, regardless of their individual risks, while 4.3% had not provide nutrition counselling. As the most significant stimulating factor for implementing nutrition counselling in their daily work with patients, 55.6% of the participants identified personal interest regarding nutrition and the effects it has on health. The latter factor was more frequently emphasized among female general practitioners (p < 0.001 and general practitioners without chronic diseases (p < 0.001. The most significant barrier for nutrition counselling was lack of time (81.6%. It is necessary to make additional efforts to increase the frequency of nutrition counselling provided by general practitioners in Croatia. The majority of Croatian general practitioners could increase their nutrition counselling practice in order to promote balanced nutrition and improve the overall health status of their patients.

  1. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  2. Self-efficacy, foreign language anxiety as predictors of academic performance among professional program students in a general English proficiency writing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M C; Lin, Huey-Ju

    2009-10-01

    Questionnaires were administered to 120 students. Cluster analysis was used to examine whether specific groups could be described by a writing self-efficacy scale, English writing anxiety scale, and a written General English Proficiency Test. Three clusters were observed. Demographic variables were compared for each cluster, including age, sex, program of study, years of English instruction, native language, and number of English speaking acquaintances. Efforts to reduce writing anxiety and promote writing self-efficacy could enhance writing scores of participants.

  3. The Extend of Adaptation Bloom's Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain In English Questions Included in General Secondary Exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram Alzu'bi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at analyzing English questions of the Jordanian Secondary Certificate Examinations via Blooms' cognitive levels. An analysis sheet was prepared by the researcher for the purpose of the study, which was ensured to be valid and reliable. The whole questions of the general secondary examinations for English course in both levels (level three and level four during 2010-2013 composed the sample of the study. Frequencies and percentages were tabulated to facilitate the analysis of the results. The result of the study revealed that the total percentage of the first three levels (comprehension, knowledge, and analysis is (69.6 but the total percentage of the last three levels (application, synthesis, and evaluation is (30.4 so it indicated that the English questions included in general secondary examinations emphasize low order thinking levels. The researcher recommended that the questions designers should improve their questioning techniques in writing questions of exams.

  4. Early lexical development in English- and Korean-speaking children: language-general and language-specific patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M; McGregor, K K; Thompson, C K

    2000-06-01

    The present study examined the composition of the early productive vocabulary of eight Korean- and eight English-learning children and the morpho-syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic characteristics of their caregivers' input in order to determine parallels between caregiver input and early lexical development. Vocabulary acquisition was followed using maternal diary and checklists for the Korean-learning children (from a mean age of 1;6 to 1;9) and for the English-learning children (from a mean age of 1;4 to 1;8). Results showed that both Korean-learning and English-learning children acquired significantly more nouns than verbs at the 50-word mark. However, Korean children learned significantly more verbs than did English-learning children. The relative ease with which Korean learners, as compared to English learners, acquired verbs parallels several differences in the linguistic and socio-pragmatic characteristics of the input addressed to them. Korean-speaking caregivers presented more activity-oriented utterances, more verbs, and more salient cues to verbs than did English-speaking caregivers. These data suggest that both general and language-specific factors shape the early lexicon.

  5. Pure tone audiometry: comparison of general practice and hospital services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael C.F.; Cable, Hugh R.; Wilmot, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Pure tone audiometry was obtained for both ears of 32 children by a general practitioner using a simple audiometer in his surgery, and by audiometricians in a hospital department on the same day. Comparing the worst hearing threshold at any of the three tested frequencies, the general practitioner did not find any ears to hear more than 10 dB better than the hospital (no false negatives). However, there were six false positives (9%) where the general practitioner identified an apparent hearing loss of greater than 15 dB. It is concluded that pure tone audiometry could be carried out accurately in the practice. PMID:3267745

  6. neurological practIce analysis in neurosciences design general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    206. SA MEDICAL JOURNAL VOLUME 63 5 FEBRUARY 1983 neurological. •. practIce. - analysis in neurosciences design general. Task programme problems in. R. F. GLEDHILL ... components of competence are critical incident analysis and task analysis. ... confident approach to these patients. The other study, which.

  7. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  8. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitioners in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice of general practicioners (GP's) in the Free State regarding the management of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Methods: Four hundred and nineteen GP's were identified in the Free State. Each GP was ...

  9. Nutritional deficiency in general practice: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Weel, van C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency is an independent risk factor for mortality. Despite its clinical relevance, the prevalence in a primary care setting is poorly documented. We performed a systematic review of reported prevalence and clinical assessment of nutritional deficiency in general practice.

  10. Potentials and pitfalls for nutrition counselling in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.; Bakx, J.C.; Weel, van C.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper was based on collaborative research efforts from Wageningen University and the University Medical Centre St Radboud in The Netherlands and describes the rationale for web-based nutrition counselling applications in general practice as well as some of the frequently used models and

  11. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  12. Practice Characteristics of Graduates of Postdoctoral General Dentistry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Lonny J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 391 dentists completing a postdoctoral general dentistry program and 369 not participating in such a program revealed 75% of program participants were trained in civilian programs and the remainder in either military or Veterans Administration training programs. Employment patterns, treatment settings, and patterns of practice or…

  13. The British Telecom radiopaging service in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports a new radiopaging service supplied by British Telecom that will eventually cover the whole United Kingdom. The use of this service by a three-man practice is described. The service is considered to be a major development in communications that will be of interest to most general practitioners. PMID:7328548

  14. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lack of social support is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased effect of prevention. Frequent attenders to primary care are characterised by poorer social conditions than other patients in general practice, but we do not know whether this is due to socia...

  15. Digital Competence: general problems and experimental practices concerning highschools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gris

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current social context Information and Communication Technologies (ICT are more and more present and pervasive and the European institutions enter the Digital Competence in the Key Competences for Lifelong Learning. In this focus we are deepened the general problems of Digital Competence and competence-based education and to describe experimental practices concerning highschools.

  16. Management of bibliographic information by Dutch researchers in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, AAH; Jong, BMD

    Background. As a result of changes in information technology and the rapid growth of publications methods of searching the literature have changed. Systematic searching of the growing literature has become very important. It is not known whether researchers in general practice search systematically,

  17. Prognostic factors for neck pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Deville, W.L.J.M.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age,

  18. Respiratory Diseases in Children: studies in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis covers various aspects of the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of various respiratory symptoms and diseases in children frequently encountered in general practice. These respiratory tract symptoms and diseases can be categorized into symptoms and

  19. Electronic medical records and quality of prescriptions in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opondo, D.O.

    2018-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, we set out to improve quality of prescribing to elderly patients in general practice. Our focus was on the use of computer technology in quality improvement. We formulated three main research questions pertaining to the following studies. First, we studied the current quality of

  20. Nontraumatic Knee Complaints in Adults in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Belo (Janneke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn general practice, knee complaints (traumatic and nontraumatic) take second place after back pain in the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (19/1000 patients per year), mostly presented as knee pain or functional loss of the knee joint. Of these complaints, approximately 20% are

  1. General practice - engaging the online social networking revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Lau, Annie; Dennis, Sarah

    2010-11-01

    Current Australian health, hospital and primary care reforms, emphasise e-health strategies, including online communities and the electronic Person Controlled Health Record (ePCHR), as a means to improving patient support and self management of chronic disease. However, the benefits and risks of these tools to general practice are poorly understood.

  2. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  3. The quality and outcomes framework: QOF - transforming general practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillam, Stephen; Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan

    2011-01-01

    ... comprehensive scheme of its kind in the world. Champions claim the QOF advances the quality of primary care; detractors fear the end of general practice as we know it. The introduction of the QOF provides a unique opportunity for research, analysis and re ection. This book is the rst comprehensive analysis of the impact of the QOF, examining the claims and counter-claims ...

  4. Implementation of Advanced Access in general practice: postal survey of practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Stephen; Montgomery, Alan; Banks, Jon; Salisbury, Chris; Sampson, Fiona; Pickin, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Advanced Access has been strongly promoted as a means of improving access to general practice. Key principles include measuring demand, matching capacity to demand, managing demand in different ways and having contingency plans. Although not advocated by Advanced Access, some practices have also restricted availability of pre-booked appointments. This study compares the strategies used to improve access by practices which do or do not operate Advanced Access. Postal survey of practices. Three hundred and ninety-one practices in 12 primary care trusts. Questionnaires were posted to practice managers to collect data on practice characteristics, supply and demand of appointments, strategies employed to manage demand, and use of Advanced Access. Two hundred and forty-five from 391 (63%) practices returned a questionnaire and 162/241(67%) claimed to be using Advanced Access. There were few differences between characteristics of practices operating Advanced Access or not. Both types of practice had introduced a wide range of measures to improve access. The proportion of doctors' appointments only available for booking on the same day was higher in Advanced Access practices (40 versus 16%, difference = 24%, 95% CI = 16% to 32%). Less than half the practices claiming to operate Advanced Access ((63/140; 45%) used all four of this model's key principles. The majority of practices in this sample claim to have introduced Advanced Access, but the degree of implementation is very variable. Advanced Access practices use more initiatives to measure and improve access than non-Advanced Access practices.

  5. Nurses in Australian general practice: implications for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Salamonson, Yenna; Ollerton, Richard; Griffiths, Rhonda

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic and employment characteristics of Australian practice nurses and explore the relationship between these characteristics and the nurses' role. Nursing in general practice is an integral component of primary care and chronic disease management in the United Kingdom and New Zealand, but in Australia it is an emerging specialty and there is limited data on the workforce and role. National postal survey embedded in a sequential mixed method design. 284 practice nurses completed a postal survey during 2003-2004. Descriptive statistics and factor analysis were utilized to analyse the data. Most participants were female (99%), Registered Nurses (86%), employed part-time in a group practice, with a mean age of 45.8 years, and had a hospital nursing certificate as their highest qualification (63%). The tasks currently undertaken by participants and those requiring further education were inversely related (R2 = -0.779). Conversely, tasks perceived to be appropriate for a practice nurse and those currently undertaken by participants were positively related (R2 = 0.8996). There was a mismatch between the number of participants who perceived that a particular task was appropriate and those who undertook the task. This disparity was not completely explained by demographic or employment characteristics. Extrinsic factors such as legal and funding issues, lack of space and general practitioner attitudes were identified as barriers to role expansion. Practice nurses are a clinically experienced workforce whose skills are not optimally harnessed to improve the care of the growing number of people with chronic and complex conditions. Relevance to clinical practice. Study data reveal a need to overcome the funding, regulatory and interprofessional barriers that currently constrain the practice nurse role. Expansion of the practice nurse role is clearly a useful adjunct to specialist management of chronic and complex disease

  6. The role of counsellors in general practice. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, B; Addington-Hall, J; Brenneman, D; Obe, P F

    1996-11-01

    Counselling services in general practice are now widespread but little is known about their nature or role. We therefore carried out in-depth telephone interviews with a representative sample of 72 general practitioners and 60 of their counsellors who had participated in a previous national survey of counselling services in England and Wales. Our aim was to gain greater insight into the functioning of these services in order to determine the most appropriate focus for future research and development. Interviews were semi-structured and focused on service initiation and duration; counsellors' background and training; working arrangements including sources of funding; types of clients; communication between general practitioners and counsellors; perceived advantages and disadvantages to general practitioners, counsellors, and clients; goals, barriers, and proposed changes. Approximately two thirds of counsellors were employed by district health authorities and attached to practices. One third were employed by the practice with the financial assistance of family health services authorities. Practice-employed counsellors appeared a relatively new service innovation whose growth was facilitated by the general practitioner contract of 1991. Practice-employed counsellors were preferred to practice-attached staff in that general practitioners had greater control over the selection of counsellors and their working arrangements. Problems with interprofessional communication were noted in relation to counsellors' wishes to maintain patient confidentiality by not exchanging information about patients with general practitioners. Counsellors received referrals principally from general practitioners and occasionally from other primary health care staff. Self-referral by patients was rare. The problems for which patients were most commonly referred were: stress/anxiety, relationship problems, depression, and bereavement. The principal therapeutic styles were Rogerian counselling

  7. The Predominance Of Integrative Tests Over Discrete Point Tests In Evaluating The Medical Students' General English Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam Heydarpour Meymeh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Multiple choice tests are the most common type of tests used in evaluating the general English knowledge of the students in most medical universities, however the efficacy of these tests are not examined precisely. Wecompare and examine the integrative tests and discrete point tests as measures of the English language knowledge of medical students.Methods: Three tests were given to 60 undergraduate physiotherapy and Audiology students in their second year of study (after passing their general English course. They were divided into 2 groups.The first test for both groups was an integrative test, writing. The second test was a multiple - choice test 0.(prepositions for group one and a multiple - choice test of tensesfor group two. The same items which were mostfi-equently used wrongly in thefirst test were used in the items of the second test. A third test, a TOEFL, was given to the subjects in order to estimate the correlation between this test and tests one and two.Results: The students performed better in the second test, discrete point test rather than the first which was an integrative test. The same grammatical mistakes in the composition were used correctly in the multiple choice tests by the students.Conclusion:Our findings show that student perform better in non-productive rather than productive test. Since being competent English language user is an expected outcome of university language courses it seems warranted to switch to integrative tests as a measure of English language competency.Keywords: INTEGRATIVE TESTS, ENGLISH LANGUAGE FOR MEDICINE, ACADEMIC ENGLISH

  8. Earphone English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Francisca

    2002-01-01

    Describes Earphone English, a student club sponsored through a partnership between Berkeley High School and the Berkeley Public Library that offers students whose primary language is not English to practice their spoken and aural English skills. Discusses the audiobooks used in the program and the importance of multicultural content and age…

  9. Participatory design of a preliminary safety checklist for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Ferguson, Julie; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; de Wet, Carl; McNab, Duncan; Kelly, Moya; McKay, John; Atkinson, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The use of checklists to minimise errors is well established in high reliability, safety-critical industries. In health care there is growing interest in checklists to standardise checking processes and ensure task completion, and so provide further systemic defences against error and patient harm. However, in UK general practice there is limited experience of safety checklist use. To identify workplace hazards that impact on safety, health and wellbeing, and performance, and codesign a standardised checklist process. Application of mixed methods to identify system hazards in Scottish general practices and develop a safety checklist based on human factors design principles. A multiprofessional 'expert' group (n = 7) and experienced front-line GPs, nurses, and practice managers (n = 18) identified system hazards and developed and validated a preliminary checklist using a combination of literature review, documentation review, consensus building workshops using a mini-Delphi process, and completion of content validity index exercise. A prototype safety checklist was developed and validated consisting of six safety domains (for example, medicines management), 22 sub-categories (for example, emergency drug supplies) and 78 related items (for example, stock balancing, secure drug storage, and cold chain temperature recording). Hazards in the general practice work system were prioritised that can potentially impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of patients, GP team members, and practice performance, and a necessary safety checklist prototype was designed. However, checklist efficacy in improving safety processes and outcomes is dependent on user commitment, and support from leaders and promotional champions. Although further usability development and testing is necessary, the concept should be of interest in the UK and internationally. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  10. [Implementation and evaluation of quality circles in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, B; Härter, M; Niebling, W; Dieter, G; Berger, M

    1995-08-01

    In the beginning of 1993, society of panel doctors Südbaden, Germany, has constituted a group of experts from the Department of General Medicine of the university hospital and practising general practitioners (GPs) to develop an organisational and conceptional framework for setting up quality circles. At present, 23 quality circles with 6-12 participants are holding regular meetings every 4 to 8 weeks in the region of Südbaden. The group members, who are all physicians working in primary health care, are selecting and discussion topics which are important in general practice. In order to facilitate the discussions, the research group has developed predefined guidelines covering a wide range of common and important conditions in general practice (Hypertension, sleeping disorders, diabetes mellitus, COPD, dementia, lower back pain, cardio-vascular disease, depression, headache, vertigo etc). In presenting these structurized guidelines, the moderator prompts and encourage the group members to identify common problems in their own practices. The use of these guidelines in, quality circles and research may provide a starting point for developing consensus guidelines. The quality circle projects is given as systematic evaluation for both participants and moderators at different levels. Main objectives of the assessment are the recruitment, motivation and the specific goals of general practitioners to participate in quality circles. Currently, we are evaluating the development of quality circle for a period of 18 months.

  11. Open-access ultrasound referrals from general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct access referral for radiological investigations from General Practice (GP) provides an indispensable diagnostic tool and avoids the inherently long waiting time that referral through a hospital based specialty would entail. Improving access to hospital based radiology services is one of Health Information and Quality Authority\\'s key recommendations in its report on patient referrals from general practice. This study aimed to review all GP referrals for ultrasound investigations to a tertiary referral teaching hospital over a seven month period with respect to their demographics, waiting times and diagnostic outcomes. 1,090 ultrasounds originating in general practice were carried out during the study period. Positive findings were recorded in 332 (30.46%) examinations. The median waiting time from receipt of referral to the diagnostic investigation was 56 days (range 16 - 91 years). 71 (6.5%) patients had follow-up imaging investigations while recommendation for hospital based specialty referral was made in 35 cases (3.2%). Significant findings included abdominal aortic aneurysms, metastatic disease and lymphoma. Direct access to ultrasound for general practitioners allows the referring physician to make an informed decision with regard to the need for specialist referral. We believe these findings help support the case for national direct access to diagnostic ultrasound for general practitioners.

  12. The Effect of Instruction Based on Multiple Intelligences Theory on the Attitude and Learning of General English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Habib; Moinnzadeh, Ahmad; Kassaian, Zohreh; Ketabi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is investigating the effect of instruction based on Multiple intelligence (MI) theory on attitude and learning of General English course among students of Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah Branch in the second semester of educational year of 2010-2011. 61 male and female students in two different classes…

  13. How Are Spoken Skills Assessed in Proficiency Tests of General English as a Foreign Language? A Preliminary Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Varela, Mª Luisa; Palacios, Ignacio M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines some of the best known proficiency tests in English, with particular focus on the oral component. Attention is paid to the following issues, among others: the weighting of oral elements in testing, the criteria used for the assessment of oral skills and the relation of these to the general guidelines in the "Common…

  14. The Performance of Native Speakers of English and ESL Speakers on the Computer-based TOEFL and GRE General Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research on the construct validity of the paper-based version of the TOEFL and extend it to the computer-based TOEFL. Two samples of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test-takers were used: native speakers of English specially recruited to take the computer-based TOEFL, and ESL…

  15. Cross-linguistic generalization in the treatment of two sequential Spanish-English bilingual children with speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina; Goldstein, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of bilingual service delivery on treatment of speech sound disorders (SSDs) in bilingual children is largely unknown. Bilingual children with SSDs are typically provided intervention in only one language, although research suggests dual-language instruction for language disorders is best practice for bilinguals. This study examined cross-linguistic generalization of bilingual intervention in treatment of two 5-year-old sequential bilingual boys with SSDs (one with Childhood Apraxia of Speech), hypothesizing that selecting and treating targets in both languages would result in significant overall change in their English and Spanish speech systems. A multiple baseline across behaviours design was used to measure treatment effectiveness for two targets per child. Children received treatment 2-3 times per week for 8 weeks and in Spanish for at least 2 of every 3 days. Ongoing treatment performance was measured in probes in both languages; overall speech skills were compared pre- and post-treatment. Both children's speech improved in both languages with similar magnitude; there was improvement in some non-treated errors. Treating both languages had an overall positive effect on these bilingual children's speech. Future bilingual intervention research should explore alternating treatments designs, efficiency of monolingual vs bilingual treatment, different language and bilingual backgrounds, and between-group comparisons.

  16. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... included in the first audit and 2394 in the second audit. We observed a significantly increased utilisation of spirometry from the first (52.7%) to the second audit (71.4%) (p improvement in other parameters describing the quality of management. We conclude that participation in an educational...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  17. GP 'grand round' - a hospital tradition modified for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Tracy; Skinner, Lesley; Emery, Jon

    2010-04-01

    The hospital 'grand round' concept was applied to a general practice continuing professional development activity. Interactive learning sessions were developed to deliver evidence based medicine clinical education for general practitioners and general practice learners (registrars/medical students). The acceptability of the GP grand round format was examined through analysis of participant responses to learning objectives. The article explores some of the issues associated with delivery of small group case based discussion. Evaluations demonstrated that participants in the grand round valued the opportunity to interact with other participants in a small group format, exchanged and shared knowledge and had their learning needs met. The overall quality of the learning experience for the majority of participants was either good or excellent. The application of vertically integrated continuing professional development through a grand round format appears acceptable and effective.

  18. Preparing English Language Learners for the Mainstream: Academic Language and Literacy Practices in Two Junior High School ESL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Megan Madigan

    2011-01-01

    The growing numbers of English language learners (ELLs) in U.S. K-12 public schools have raised many questions about how to best educate these students. Much of the research on teaching ELLs has discussed the kinds of practices that should be used to increase ELLs' school achievement, but few studies have documented the actual practices that…

  19. Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs, Attitudes, Knowledge Base, and Practices in Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The research centered on secondary mathematics teachers' beliefs, attitudes, knowledge base, and practices in meeting the academic and language needs of English language learners. Using socio-cultural theory and social practice theory to frame the study, the research design employed a mixed methods approach incorporating self-reported surveys,…

  20. Staff and Student Perceptions of English Language Policies and Practices in "International" Universities: A UK Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jennifer; Wingate, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a small qualitative study which aimed to gain an understanding of how lecturers and international students perceive the English language policies and practices at their institutions. The findings show that most participants perceive current policies and practices as unfair. However, there were discrepancies in lecturers' and…

  1. General practice based teaching exchanges in Europe. Experiences from the EU Socrates programme 'primary health care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weel, Chris; Mattsson, Bengt; Freeman, George K; de Meyere, Marc; von Fragstein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of international exchange of medical students for general practice. The experience is based on the EU Socrates programme 'Primary Health Care' that offers, since 1992, clinical attachments and research electives in primary care. This programme involves 11 university departments of general practice/primary care in eight countries: Austria - Vienna; Belgium - Gent; Germany Düsseldorf; Italy - Monza, Udine; Netherlands Nijmegen; Slovenia - Ljubljana; Sweden - Göteborg; and the UK - Edinburgh, Imperial College London and Nottingham. More than 150 students have taken part in the programme, most in the last four years. For clinical attachment communication to patients is essential, and students should be able to speak the language of the host university. A research elective in primary care is less demanding and requires students' ability to communicate in English. Despite marked differences in health care structure in the countries involved, it is quite possible to provide a valuable teaching environment in general practice, and the experience gained by students in the exchanges more than equals that what they would gain at home. The added value is in experiencing the influence of another health care system and of working in another academic primary care centre. A substantial number of research electives have been published in international peer reviewed scientific journals with the student as first (occasionally second) author and staff members of the student's host and home university as co-authors. A further benefit of the exchange programme lies in the transfer teaching innovations between universities.

  2. Electrocardiogram interpretation in general practice: relevance to prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, W A; Saltissi, S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess, in the context of their possible role in prehospital thrombolysis, the ability of general practitioners to recognise acute transmural myocardial ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram. DESIGN--150 doctors (every fifth name) were selected from the alphabetical list of 750 on Merseyside general practitioner register and without prior warning were asked to interpret a series of six 12 lead electrocardiograms. Three of these showed acute transmural ischaemia/infarction, one was normal, and two showed non-acute abnormalities. Details of doctors' ages, postgraduate training, and clinical practice were sought. SETTING--General practitioners' surgeries and postgraduate centres within the Merseyside area. PARTICIPANTS--106 general practitioners (mean age 45 years) agreed to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Accuracy of general practitioners' interpretations of the six electrocardiograms. RESULTS--82% of general practitioners correctly recognised a normal electrocardiogram. Recognition of acute abnormalities was less reliable. Between 33% and 61% correctly identified acute transmural ischaemia/infarction depending on the specific trace presented. Accurate localisation of the site of the infarct was achieved only by between 8% and 30% of participants, while between 22% and 25% correctly interpreted non-acute abnormalities. Neither routine use of electrocardiography nor postgraduate hospital experience in general medicine was associated with significantly greater expertise. CONCLUSION--The current level of proficiency of a sample of general practitioners in the Merseyside area in recognising acute transmural ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram suggests that refresher training is needed if general practitioners are to give prehospital thrombolysis. Images PMID:8398491

  3. My Name Is Maria: Supporting English Language Learners in the Kindergarten General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Martina

    2011-01-01

    For many young children who are English language learners (ELLs), the transition from home to kindergarten can be challenging. Music teachers face the challenge of working with all individuals in a student population and often engage with children who represent home environments whose native language is not English. As ELL students adjust to the…

  4. Osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee in Dutch general practice and physiotherapy practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.J.; Swinkels, I.C.; Dorsman, S.A.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe demographic characteristics and the treatment process of patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) or knee OA treated in Dutch general practice (GP) and/or physiotherapy practice. Additionally, to investigate whether there are differences in characteristics between referred and

  5. Pharmacist services provided in general practice clinics: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edwin C K; Stewart, Kay; Elliott, Rohan A; George, Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Integration of pharmacists into primary care general practice clinics has the potential to improve interdisciplinary teamwork and patient care; however this practice is not widespread. The aim of this study was to review the effectiveness of clinical pharmacist services delivered in primary care general practice clinics. A systematic review of English language randomized controlled trials cited in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts was conducted. Studies were included if pharmacists had a regular and ongoing relationship with the clinic; delivered an intervention aimed at optimizing prescribing for, and/or medication use by, clinic patients; and were physically present within the clinic for all or part of the intervention, or for communication with staff. The search generated 1484 articles. After removal of duplicates and screening of titles and abstracts against inclusion criteria, 131 articles remained. A total of 38 studies were included in the review and assessed for quality. Seventeen studies had common endpoints (blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, cholesterol and/or Framingham risk score) and were included in meta-analyses. Twenty-nine of the 38 studies recruited patients with specific medical conditions, most commonly cardiovascular disease (15 studies) and/or diabetes (9 studies). The remaining 9 studies recruited patients at general risk of medication misadventure. Pharmacist interventions usually involved medication review (86.8%), with or without other activities delivered collaboratively with the general practitioner (family physician). Positive effects on primary outcomes related to medication use or clinical outcomes were reported in 19 studies, mixed effects in six studies, and no effect in 13 studies. The results of meta-analyses favored the pharmacist intervention, with significant improvements in blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, cholesterol and Framingham

  6. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Diagnosis of breast cancer': reaction from the field of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    In the revised practice guideline on the diagnosis of breast cancer, the general practitioner has an important role when, during screening, a woman is found to have an abnormality, before, during and after treatment. Breast clinics allow the situation to be dealt with rapidly, but patients also need

  7. Putting dementia awareness into general practice : The CADIF approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentzek, Michael; Vollmar, Horst Christian; Wilm, Stefan; Leve, Verena

    2017-05-01

    International studies show that dementia is often recognized at later stages in general practice. Pure knowledge-sharing interventions could not change this in a sustainable manner. Concepts for changing attitudes of general practitioners (GPs) are required. What barriers affect GPs' recognition of and diagnostic approach to dementia? What recommendations for a GP-specific diagnostic procedure can be derived from this? Metasynthesis of qualitative studies with GPs on barriers to dementia recognition, explication of the "frailty" concept and the diagnostic approach described therein and the development of an approach in cases of suspected cognitive decline in a multiprofessional team. A metasynthesis of qualitative studies revealed a lack of a general practice framework in the diagnostic approach of GPs, characterized by poor patient-centeredness and confusion of early detection, diagnostics and disclosure. The embedding of cognitive decline into the geriatric triad is intended to promote the focus on everyday function and quality of life, i.e. on caring instead of curing. The proposed concept for a transfer into practice emphasizes increased awareness for cognitive warning signs among practice personnel, a geriatric and personal approach to the patient, as well as follow-up assessment and monitoring. In contrast to early recognition, awareness initially does not imply an active search for cognitive deficits with questions and tests but a vigilance for red flags. The described scheme is a component of a complex intervention for attitude change among GPs towards dementia.

  8. Codeswitching Techniques: Evidence-Based Instructional Practices for the ASL/English Bilingual Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jean F.; Rusher, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a perspective on emerging bilingual deaf students who are exposed to, learning, and developing two languages--American Sign Language (ASL) and English (spoken English, manually coded English, and English reading and writing). The authors suggest that though deaf children may lack proficiency or fluency in either language during…

  9. Student Preferences and Expectations: Some Practical Tips for Designers of English Enhancement Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marine; Li, Tilo

    2018-01-01

    As one of the essential skills for success in work and studies, English communication is often made a key component in the GE curriculum of tertiary study programmes. In addition to the provision of required English proficiency courses, many tertiary institutions have established English centres of some description to promote English learning on…

  10. Form-focused instruction and the acquisition of tense by Dutch-speaking learners of English: Experimental studies into the effects of input practice and output practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ureel, J.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    What is the difference between ‘I have done a lot of work this morning’ and ‘I did a lot of work this morning?’ Are sentences such as ‘I have seen him yesterday’ and ‘Who has invented the telephone?’ grammatically correct in present-day English? These are a few examples of the challenges that learners and teachers of English as a second language face when acquiring and teaching tense in English in instructional settings (e.g., grammar classes). The concept of practice as a necessary component...

  11. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vedsted

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner’s (GP’s work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without. In a questionnaire study (2004, we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8% GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Analyses using logistic regression were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, job satisfaction, minutes per consultation, practice organisation, working hours, number of listed patients per GP, number of contacts per GP, continuing medical education- (CME- activities, and clusters of GPs. In all, 8% of GPs had open access and the prevalence of burnout was 24%. GPs with walk-in open access were more likely to suffer from burnout. Having open access was associated with a 3-fold increased likelihood of burnout (OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.1–8.8, P=0.035. Although the design cannot establish causality, it is recommended to closely monitor possible negative consequences of open access in general practice.

  12. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges...... and is expected to accelerate, in part because of the GP age structure, with many GPs retiring and new GPs not wanting to practice alone. This latter workforce trend is pointing toward a new model with employed GPs, particularly in rural areas....

  13. Health literacy--a new concept for general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert J; Stocks, Nigel P; Wilson, David H; Hill, Catherine L; Gravier, Susan; Kickbusch, Ilona; Beilby, Justin J

    2009-03-01

    Health literacy is the ability to understand and interpret the meaning of health information in written, spoken or digital form and how this motivates people to embrace or disregard actions relating to health. This article aims to describe the concept of health literacy, its importance and its applications in the general practice setting. Australia trails behind other western countries in practical applications of health literacy. Health literacy underpins the efficiency of consultations, health promotion efforts, and self management programs. Recognition of the health literacy status of individuals allows use of appropriate communication tools. This can save time and effort and improve patient satisfaction and health outcomes.

  14. Variation in Direct Access to Tests to Investigate Cancer: A Survey of English General Practitioners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Nicholson

    Full Text Available The 2015 NICE guidelines for suspected cancer recommend that English General Practitioners have direct access to diagnostic tests to investigate symptoms of cancer that do not meet the criteria for urgent referral. We aimed to identify the proportion of GPs in England with direct access to these tests.We recruited 533 English GPs through a national clinical research network to complete an online survey about direct access to laboratory, radiology, and endoscopy tests in the three months leading up to the release of the 2015 NICE guidance. If they had direct access to a diagnostic test, GPs were asked about the time necessary to arrange a test and receive a report. Results are reported by NHS sub-region and, adjusting for sampling, for England as a whole.Almost all GPs reported direct access to x-ray and laboratory investigations except faecal occult blood testing (54%, 95% CI 49-59% and urine protein electrophoresis (89%, 95% CI 84-92%. Fewer GPs had direct access to CT scans (54%, 95% CI 49-59% or endoscopy (colonoscopy 32%, 95% CI 28-37%; gastroscopy 72%, 95% CI 67-77%. There was significant variation in direct access between NHS regions for the majority of imaging tests-for example, from 20 to 85% to MRI. Apart from x-ray, very few GPs (1-22% could access radiology and endoscopy within the timescales recommended by NICE. The modal request to test time was 2-4 weeks for routine radiology and 4-6 weeks for routine endoscopy with results taking another 1-2 weeks.At the time that the 2015 NICE guideline was released, local investment was required to not only provide direct access but also reduce the interval between request and test and speed up reporting. Further research using our data as a benchmark is now required to identify whether local improvements in direct access have been achieved in response to the NICE targets. If alternative approaches to test access are to be proposed they must be piloted comprehensively and underpinned by robust

  15. A General Investigation of the In-Service Training of English Language Teachers at Elementary Schools in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Melek KOÇ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a critical diagnosis of in-service teacher-training activities offered to English-language teachers in Turkey and aims to investigate whether those teachers are satisfied with the activities. Thirty-two English-language teachers participated in this study. Data were collected from 32 elementary-school teachers of English as a foreign language, using a general evaluation form prepared by the researcher. The results indicate that the teachers are not satisfied with their in-service teacher-training activities and that in-service training does not fulfil their needs. The study also proposes an in-service teacher training model in distance format.

  16. Traumatic and Non-traumatic Knee Complaints in General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Kastelein, Marlous

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGeneral practitioners (GPs) are frequently consulted by patients with various types of knee complaints. The incidence of these knee complaints presented in Dutch general practice is about 13.7 per 1000 registered patients per year with a prevalence of 19.0 per 1000 patients per year. About 80% of these knee complaints are of non-­‐traumatic origin. The most common non-­‐traumatic diagnosis varies with age; adolescents and young adults suffer mostly from patellofemoral pain syndrom...

  17. Older patients' attitudes to general practice registrars - A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Andrew; Phillipson, Lyn; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2009-11-01

    Research suggests that older patients may be reluctant to engage general practice registrars (GPRs) in their care. The authors undertook a qualitative study of the attitudes of older patients to GPRs to investigate this issue. Thirty-eight patients aged 60 years and over from three training practices participated in semistructured telephone interviews, which explored patients responses to GPRs. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using a template analysis approach. Analysis of the interviews produced five major themes concerning patients' attitudes to GPRs: 'desire for continuity', 'desire for access', 'openness', 'trust' and a 'desire for meaningful communication'. Older patients' attitudes to GPRs cannot be viewed in isolation from their relationship with their usual general practitioner, and this needs to be taken into account when engaging GPRs in the care of older patients. Systems need to be developed to maintain relational and informational continuity with older patients' 'regular' GP.

  18. Screening for type 2 diabetes in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, P.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    The presented studies were conducted within the framework of the international ADDITION study (Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care), a randomised controlled trial in 3,057 screen-detected type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of ADDITION is to evaluate whether screening for type 2 diabetes in general practice is feasible and subsequent intensified, multifactorial treatment beneficial. Intensified treatment consisted of pharmacolo...

  19. Treatment of heart failure in Dutch general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bosch Wil JHM

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the relation between the prescription rates of selected cardiovascular drugs (ACE-inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and combinations, sociodemographic factors (age, gender and socioeconomic class and concomitant diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular accident, heart valve disease, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and asthma/COPD among patients with heart failure cared for in general practice. Methods Data from the second Dutch National Survey in General Practice, conducted mainly in 2001. In this study the data of 96 practices with a registered patient population of 374.000 were used. Data included diagnosis made during one year by general practitioners, derived from the electronic medical records, prescriptions for medication and sociodemographic characteristics collected via a postal questionnary (response 76% Results A diagnosis of HF was found with 2771 patients (7.1 in 1000. Their mean age was 77.7 years, 68% was 75 years or older, 55% of the patients were women. Overall prescription rates for RAAS-I, beta-blockers and diuretics were 50%, 32%, 86%, respectively, whereas a combination of these three drugs was prescribed in 18%. Variations in prescription rates were mainly related to age and concomitant diseases. Conclusion Prescription is not influenced by gender, to a small degree influenced by socioeconomic status and to a large degree by age and concomitant diseases.

  20. Management of acute rhinosinusitis in Danish general practice: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen JG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Jens Georg HansenDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkPurpose: To evaluate whether the ongoing debate over diagnostic problems and treatment choices for acute rhinosinusitis has had any influence on the management of the disease.Methods: We randomly selected 300 Danish general practitioners (GPs from the files of the Research Unit for General Practice at Aarhus University. Invitations to participate and a questionnaire were sent to the GPs by mail.Results: A total of 149 (49% GPs answered the questionnaire. When asked about symptoms, the highest priority was given to sinus pain and signs of tenderness. The most frequent examinations were objective examination of the ear-nose-throat (ENT, palpation of the maxillofacial area, and C-reactive protein point-of-care testing (or CRP rapid test. Nearly all GPs prescribed local vasoconstrictors, and in 70% of cases, antibiotics were prescribed. Phenoxymethylpenicillin was the preferred antibiotic. Use of the CRP rapid test, years in practice, or employment in an ENT department did not have a significant impact on the diagnostic certainty and antibiotic prescribing rate.Conclusion: The clinical diagnoses are based on a few symptoms, signs, and the CRP rapid test. Other examinations, including imaging techniques, are seldom used. Phenoxymethylpenicillin is the preferred antibiotic, and the GPs' diagnostic certainty was 70%.Keywords: general practice, acute rhinosinusitis, diagnosis, treatment, antibiotic

  1. Medical students, early general practice placements and positive supervisor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Margaret; Upham, Susan; King, David; Dick, Marie-Louise; van Driel, Mieke

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Community-based longitudinal clinical placements for medical students are becoming more common globally. The perspective of supervising clinicians about their experiences and processes involved in maximising these training experiences has received less attention than that of students. Aims This paper explores the general practitioner (GP) supervisor perspective of positive training experiences with medical students undertaking urban community-based, longitudinal clinical placements in the early years of medical training. Methods Year 2 medical students spent a half-day per week in general practice for either 13 or 26 weeks. Transcribed semi-structured interviews from a convenience sample of participating GPs were thematically analysed by two researchers, using a general inductive approach. Results Identified themes related to the attributes of participating persons and organisations: GPs, students, patients, practices and their supporting institution; GPs' perceptions of student development; and triggers enhancing the experience. A model was developed to reflect these themes. Conclusions Training experiences were enhanced for GPs supervising medical students in early longitudinal clinical placements by the synergy of motivated students and keen teachers with support from patients, practice staff and academic institutions. We developed an explanatory model to better understand the mechanism of positive experiences. Understanding the interaction of factors enhancing teaching satisfaction is important for clinical disciplines wishing to maintain sustainable, high quality teaching.

  2. Clinical psychology in general practice: a controlled trial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earll, Louise; Kincey, John

    1982-01-01

    A controlled trial study is described in which 50 consecutive potential referrals for psychological treatment from one general practice were randomly allocated either to behavioural treatment or no-treatment conditions. Treatment-group patients received treatment from a clinical psychologist working within the practice; the control-group patients continued to be managed by their general practitioner. The patients' use of NHS resources was assessed during the treatment period (or its equivalent for the control group) and at a follow-up comparison point, when the patients' subjective ratings of their progress were also obtained. Between referral and the end of treatment the treated group received significantly less psychotropic medication than the control group. This difference was not, however, maintained at the longer-term follow-up. No differences in general practice consultation rates, in the subjective ratings of psychological distress, in control orientation or life satisfaction were found between the two groups, but the level of patient satisfaction was high. Implications for the design of future studies and for psychological health care delivery systems are discussed. PMID:7086742

  3. Webster's word power essential students' companion general knowledge of the English language

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Helps the student with facts and resource on English grammar, specialist subjects from art to physics, with sections on world facts, Latin and Greek words; Chemical elements; Greek alphabet; the scientific classification of animal; help on essay writing and composition.

  4. Preparation for practice: a novel role for general practice in pre-foundation assistantships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter S J; Gormley, Gerard J; Hart, Nigel D

    2017-07-01

    Hospital-based undergraduate assistantships are now widely established in medical school curricula. They are considered to improve graduates' preparedness for practice in their role as a foundation doctor. Foundation doctors play a key team role in ensuring patient safety during complex transitions across the hospital/primary care interface, and their self-reported preparedness for practice still varies considerably. We sought to explore what spending one week of the pre-foundation assistantship in General Practice might add. We solicited reflective audio diaries from final year students during a one-week pilot attachment delivered during the post-finals, pre-foundation assistantship period, and performed an iterative thematic analysis on the acquired data. From this attachment in General Practice, students described diverse learning, resulting in improved preparedness for (hospital) foundation practice across several domains, impacting positively on how they might approach patients in the future. Self-confidence improved due to affirming outcomes and tutor mentorship. Students deepened their understanding of community healthcare and General Practice; and seeing the 'Patient Journey' across the interface from the patient's perspective helped them contextualise their forthcoming role as foundation doctors in managing it. We believe that this novel intervention distinctively contributed to preparedness for practice. It aligns with published recommendations about extending the current assistantship model. We suggest it should be incorporated more widely into pre-foundation assistantship curricula.

  5. Recall of general and medical vocabulary and text structure knowledge: An experimental study of English for Medical Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarein-Dolab S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: A 3-unit course is dedicated to general language in medical universities and the vocabulary and text structure of the courses have usually no relation to medical language. We examine whether teaching general language will be as effective as medical language as assessed through recall of general and medical vocabulary and text structure knowledge. Methods: an experimental study was designed, in that, the third year students who had participated in the 3-unit general language classes in the first year of their General Practitioner (GP program were selected and sat for a 60 MCQ tests. The 60 MCQ tests consisted of 30 questions of general language, 25 vocabulary and 5 comprehension questions and also 30 questions of medical language, 25 technical and semi-technical vocabulary and 5 comprehension questions. In all, 145 medical students attended the exam which took 40 minutes to accomplish. Results: The results of the study indicated that memory retention was significantly lower in general language than medical language. The technical and semi-technical vocabulary items were significantly better recalled and the medical text was significantly better understood by the participants. Conclusion: A 3-unit course in general language may be a futile effort since the students will not be exposed to the same vocabulary and text structure knowledge in later years of their GP program. It is recommended that the focus of all the university English courses be on the medical language. Key words: Medical Vocabulary, English For Specific Purposes, ESP

  6. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  7. The validity of dietary assessment in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P; Barnett, J; Margetts, B; Kinmonth, A L; Gabbay, J; Thompson, R; Warm, D; Warwick, H; Wooton, S

    1999-03-01

    To validate a range of dietary assessment instruments in general practice. Using a randomised block design, brief assessment instruments and more complex conventional dietary assessment tools were compared with an accepted "relative" standard--a seven day weighed dietary record. The standard was checked using biomarkers, and by performing test-retest reliability in additional subjects (n = 29). Agreement with weighed record. Percentage agreement with weighed record, rank correlation from scatter plot, rank correlation from Bland-Altman plot. Reliability of the weighed record. Practice nurse treatment room in a single suburban general practice. Patients with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (n = 61) or age/sex stratified general population group (n = 50). Brief self completion dietary assessment tools based on food groups caten during a week show reasonable agreement with the relative standard. For % energy from fat and saturated fat, non-starch polysaccharide, grams of fruit and vegetables and starchy foods consumed the range of agreement with the standard was: median % difference -6% to 12%, rank correlation 0.5 to 0.6. This agreement is of a similar order to the reliability of the weighed record, as good as or better than test standard agreement for more time consuming instruments, and compares favourably with research instruments validated in other settings. Under-reporting of energy intake was common (40%) and more likely if subjects were obese (body mass idex (BMI) > or = 30 60% under-reported; BMI < 30 29%, p < 0.001). Under-reporting of absolute energy intake is common, particularly among obese patients. Simple self assessment tools based on food groups, designed for practice nurse dietary assessment, show acceptable agreement with a standard, and suggest such tools are sufficiently accurate for clinical work, research, and possibly population dietary monitoring.

  8. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  9. Quality of Disease Management and Risk of Mortality in English Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusheiko, Mark; Gravelle, Hugh; Martin, Stephen; Smith, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether better management of chronic conditions by family practices reduces mortality risk. Two random samples of 5 million patients registered with over 8,000 English family practices followed up for 4 years (2004/5-2007/8). Measures of the quality of disease management for 10 conditions were constructed for each family practice for each year. The outcome measure was an indicator taking the value 1 if the patient died during a specified year, 0 otherwise. Cross-section and multilevel panel data multiple logistic regressions were estimated. Covariates included age, gender, morbidity, hospitalizations, attributed socio-economic characteristics, and local health care supply measures. Although a composite measure of the quality of disease management for all 10 conditions was significantly associated with lower mortality, only the quality of stroke care was significant when all 10 quality measures were entered in the regression. The panel data results suggest that a 1 percent improvement in the quality of stroke care could reduce the annual number of deaths in England by 782 [95 percent CI: 423, 1140]. A longer study period may be necessary to detect any mortality impact of better management of other conditions. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Do quality indicators for general practice teaching practices predict good outcomes for students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Maggie; Potts, Jessica; McKinley, Bob

    2016-07-01

    Keele medical students spend 113 days in general practices over our five-year programme. We collect practice data thought to indicate good quality teaching. We explored the relationships between these data and two outcomes for students; Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores and feedback regarding the placements. Though both are surrogate markers of good teaching, they are widely used. We collated practice and outcome data for one academic year. Two separate statistical analyses were carried out: (1) to determine how much of the variation seen in the OSCE scores was due to the effect of the practice and how much to the individual student. (2) to identify practice characteristics with a relationship to student feedback scores. (1) OSCE performance: 268 students in 90 practices: six quality indicators independently influenced the OSCE score, though without linear relationships and not to statistical significance. (2) Student satisfaction: 144 students in 69 practices: student feedback scores are not influenced by practice characteristics. The relationships between the quality indicators we collect for practices and outcomes for students are not clear. It may be that neither the quality indicators nor the outcome measures are reliable enough to inform decisions about practices' suitability for teaching.

  11. Management of osteoarthritis in general practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Harrison, Christopher; Tropea, Joanne; Hinman, Rana S; Britt, Helena; Bennell, Kim

    2014-04-01

    To describe management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip (OA-hip) and knee (OA-knee) by Australian general practitioners (GPs). We analyzed data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health program, from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2010. Patient and GP characteristics and encounter management data were extracted. Data were classified by the International Classification of Primary Care, version 2, and summarized using descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals around point estimates. There were 489,900 GP encounters at which OA was managed (rate of 26.4 per 1,000 encounters). OA-hip was managed at a rate of 2.3 per 1,000 encounters (n = 1,106, 8.6% OA) and OA-knee at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 (n = 3,058, 23.7% OA). The encounter management rate per 1,000 for OA-hip was higher among non-metropolitan dwellers (2.85 per 1,000 versus 1.97 per 1,000) and lower for non-English-speaking people (1.53 per 1,000 encounters versus 2.39 per 1,000). The rate for OA-knee was higher for non-English-speaking background (8.50 per 1,000 encounters versus 6.24 per 1,000) and lower among indigenous people (3.16 per 1,000 encounters versus 6.46 per 1,000). Referral to an orthopedic surgeon was the most frequently used nonpharmacologic management (OA-knee 17.4 per 100 contacts and OA-hip 17.7 per 100), followed by advice, education, and counselling. As first-line treatment, medication prescription rates (OA-knee 78.7 per 100 contacts and OA-hip 73.2 per 100) were substantially higher than rates of lifestyle management (OA-knee 20.7 per 100 contacts and OA-hip 14.8 per 100). OA-hip and OA-knee encounters and management differ. Nonpharmacologic treatments as first-line management were low compared with pharmacologic management rates, and surgical referral rates were high. However, lack of longitudinal data limits definitive assessment of appropriateness of care. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. [General practice quality circles in the large city. Participation by Hamburg general physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkohl, M; Niemann, D

    1997-01-01

    Quality circles (peer review) will play an increasing and important role in ambulatory care when they are based on voluntary participation and in a setting of open discussion. Goal is the further qualification of physicians by critical reflections on their practice based on learning processes and the experiences of the participants. Reported are experiences from the unit for primary care and health service research of the Hamburg University on implementing quality circles. Engagement in quality assurance may be helpful in the shaping and professionalisation of general practice.

  13. [Clerkship in general practice--organized for learning?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, Sarah Frandsen; Braend, Anja Maria Lyche; Lindbaek, Morten

    2008-11-06

    Clerkship in general practice has been considered removed from the fifth year at the University of Oslo for economical reasons. During the autumn 2007, we evaluated the clerkship after the implementation of a new feedback tool, StudPEP. This study presents how the clerkship was organized for learning based on pedagogical advice for effective learning. 79 of 81 students completed a questionnaire regarding the clerkship. After five independent tutor-observed consultations, the students recorded their patients' diagnosis, age and gender, in a total of 363 consultations. The students received eight patients per day on average during their last week of clerkship. On average, they had their own office during 64 % of their clerkship, but 19 % had their own office in less than a third of the time. The tutor observed 42 % of the students during more than six consultations in addition to the five compulsory ones, but 23 % of the students were only observed during the five compulsory sessions. The students were generally content with the feedback from their tutor, but 20 % gave critical answers. The students recorded 167 different diagnoses from all the chapters in the International Classification of Primary Care. The clerkship is well organized for learning medicine in general practice. There is a potential for quality improvement and this article presents suggestions from educational literature.

  14. Education for Adult English Language Learners in the United States: Trends, Research, and Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaetzel, Kirsten; Young, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Adult English language learners comprise a substantial proportion of the adult education population in the United States. In program year 2006-2007, 46% of participants enrolled in state-administered adult education programs were in English as a second language (ESL) classes. This percentage does not include English language learners enrolled in…

  15. A Mobile Game-Based English Vocabulary Practice System Based on Portfolio Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2017-01-01

    English learning has become a vital educational strategy in many non-English-speaking countries. Vocabulary is a critical element for language learners. Therefore, developing sufficient vocabulary knowledge enables effective communication. However, learning a foreign language is difficult and stressful. In addition, memorizing English vocabulary…

  16. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient- and practice-related factors associated with potential drug interactions. Methods: A register analysis study in general practices in the county of Funen, Denmark. Prescription data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database (Odense University...... Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  17. The climate change challenge for general practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Rochelle; Randerson, Rebecca; Blashki, Grant

    2011-04-29

    Climate change is one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. Despite some inherent uncertainties in making predictions about climate change, there is wide scientific consensus that global warming is occurring; that it is largely due to manmade greenhouse gas emissions; and that it will have substantial health implications for the future. The predicted health impacts of climate change are now clearer for New Zealand, and general practitioners can take action to mitigate these impacts and adapt to the future environment. Actions required involve a combination of 'top-down' and 'ground-up' approaches; effective leadership and policy from our health institutions and, importantly, individual practice initiatives that transform these goals into practical outcomes.

  18. Three years' experience of electrocardiography in a general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, John M.

    1974-01-01

    Electrocardiography has a useful place in general-practice cardiology: (1) by bringing to light unexpected findings thereby altering the diagnostic spectrum and, in some cases at least, management. (2) by acting as a monitor in the continuing management of patients suffering from some forms of cardiovascular disease, and, in particular, from essential hypertension. In 1970 the purchase of a `Cambridge Transrite' 4-2 battery two-speed electrocardiograph made it possible to test the value of this working tool in a practice population of about 5,300 patients. Before this, members of the medical staff of the Department who needed electrocardiograms for any of their patients made the appointments with the Cardiology Department, The Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, or, later, with the nearby Family Doctor Centre of the Scottish Home and Health Department. PMID:1133807

  19. Practical Production Work within an Integrated English and Media Curriculum: Acquisition of Theory or Creative Exploration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemin, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Investigates ways of introducing media theory into the GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) practical production module in Media Studies. Describes how the author developed and critiqued his approach to what he taught and how it should be assessed. Argues that the subtlest understandings of audience were gained as students reflected…

  20. Prevalence, aetiology and management of heart failure in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, F S; Crowley, T S; Bundred, P E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a high level of morbidity and mortality among patients with heart failure. Management of the condition has changed substantially in recent years. However, there is little information on the management of heart failure in general practice. AIM: A study was carried out in 1994 to assess the prevalence, aetiology and management of heart failure in a general practice setting. METHOD: A retrospective review was undertaken of the manual and computerized medical records of patients in two group practices in Liverpool (combined patient population of 17 400). RESULTS: A total of 266 patients with heart failure were identified (a prevalence of 15 per 1000). The two practices had 2747 patients who were aged 65 years and over and 221 of these had heart failure (prevalence of 80 per 1000). The principal aetiological factor considered responsible for heart failure was: coronary heart disease in 45% of patients, hypertension 18%, valve disease 9%, cor pulmonale 7%, cardiomyopathy 2% and a metabolic problem 2% (aetiology unknown in 17% of cases). Urea and electrolytes had been checked in the last year in 59% of patients. Chest x-ray and electrocardiography had been performed in 89% and 80% of patients, respectively, and echocardiography in 30%. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were being prescribed to 33% of patients. CONCLUSION: The study found a high prevalence of heart failure among patients aged 65 years and over. Coronary heart disease was considered to be the main aetiological factor. Patients were being investigated mainly by means of chest x-ray and electrocardiography. Most patients with heart failure were not receiving treatment with ACE inhibitors. Evaluation of heart failure by clinical criteria alone is now deemed insufficient. Echocardiography should be used routinely to assess cardiac dysfunction. Patients with confirmed left ventricular dysfunction will benefit from treatment with ACE inhibitors unless contraindications exist. The

  1. Computer based learning in general practice--options and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, K A; McGlade, K

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the 30 departments of general practice in the UK revealed that only three are currently making use of any form of computer based learning materials for teaching their undergraduate students. One of the reasons for the low level of usage is likely to be the relatively poor availability of suitable courseware and lack of guidance as to how to utilise what is available. This short paper describes the types of courseware that are available and the advantages and disadvantages of using acquired courseware as opposed to writing your own. It also considers alternative strategies for making computer based learning (CBL) courseware available to students.

  2. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... influence on intubation conditions, and should be chosen on other grounds. Ketamine should be considered in haemodynamically compromised patients. Opioids may be used to reduce the stress response following intubation. For optimal intubation conditions, succinylcholine 1-1.5 mg/kg is preferred. Outside...

  3. Prevalence of myofascial pain in general internal medicine practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Skootsky, S A; Jaeger, B.; Oye, R K

    1989-01-01

    Myofascial pain is a regional pain syndrome characterized in part by a trigger point in a taut band of skeletal muscle and its associated referred pain. We examined a series of 172 patients presenting to a university primary care general internal medicine practice. Of 54 patients whose reason for a visit included pain, 16 (30%) satisfied criteria for a clinical diagnosis of myofascial pain. These patients were similar in age and sex to other patients with pain, and the frequency of pain as a ...

  4. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergård, Jens

    2012-01-01

    ) an after-hours system staffed by GPs on a rota basis; (4) a mixed capitation and fee-for-service system; and (5) GPs are self-employed, working on contract for the public funder based on a national agreement that details not only services and reimbursement but also opening hours and required postgraduate...... education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges...

  5. An Investigation of School Psychologists' Assessment Practices of Language Proficiency with Bilingual and Limited-English-Proficient Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Salvador Hector; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of the language proficiency assessment practices of 859 school psychologists, when working with bilingual or limited English proficient students, found that 62 percent of school psychologists conducted their own assessments and most often used the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised or the Test de Vocabulario en Imagenes Peabody.…

  6. Simultaneous and Comparable Numerical Indicators of International, National and Local Collaboration Practices in English-Medium Astrophysics Research Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, David I.; Alcaraz, M. Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report an investigation on collaboration practices in research papers published in the most prestigious English-medium astrophysics journals. Method: We propose an evaluation method based on three numerical indicators to study and compare, in absolute terms, three different types of collaboration (international, national and…

  7. Television, Language, and Literacy Practices in Sudanese Refugee Families: "I Learned How to Spell English on Channel 18"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kristen H.; Moses, Annie M.

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explored the ways in which media, particularly television, connected with English language and literacy practices among Sudanese refugees in Michigan. Three families with young children participated in this study. Data collection included participant observation, interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months, with…

  8. The Effects of a Professional Development Program on English as a Foreign Language Teachers' Efficacy and Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortaçtepe, DenIz; Akyel, Ayse S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is twofold: (1) to investigate the relationship between the efficacy of teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) and their self-reported practice of communicative language teaching (CLT) and (2) to examine the impact of an in-service teacher education program on teachers' efficacy and self-reported and…

  9. Assessment Practices of Multi-Disciplinary School Team Members in Determining Special Education Services for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Garrett; O'Neill, Rob; Bermingham, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team members were surveyed to identify the frequency with which they use recommended assessment practices, how they interpret assessment information, and their confidence working with English Language Learners (ELLs) for the purpose of determining possible eligibility to receive special education services. Results of this study…

  10. Does age modify the relationship between morbidity severity and physical health in English and Dutch family practice populations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, U.T.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lewis, M.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Bouter, L.M.; Croft, P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the co-influences of age and morbidity severity on physical health in adult family practice populations. Methods: Morbidity data in a 12-month period for 7,833 older English consulters aged 50 years and over and 6,846 Dutch consulters aged 18 years and over was linked to

  11. Converging Recommendations for Culturally Responsive Literacy Practices: Students with Learning Disabilities, English Language Learners, and Socioculturally Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Susan V.; Rao, Shaila; Protacio, Maria Selena

    2015-01-01

    This study examines culturally responsive pedagogy across the fields of special education, multicultural literacy education, and teaching English language learners. A systematic review of recommendations identified culturally responsive practices in five key areas: dialogue, collaboration, visual representation, explicit instruction, and inquiry.…

  12. Awareness of Christian College Professors Concerning English Language Learners in the Content-Based Classroom and Implementation of Effective Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedding, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to understand Christian college professors' levels of awareness to the needs of English Language Learners (ELLs) in content-based classrooms and to identify effective practices for language learning that are being implemented, a quantitative study using descriptive research was carried out. A survey was used to collect data to…

  13. What Teachers Want: A Statewide Survey of Reading and English Language Arts Teachers' Instructional Materials, Preferences, and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Susan; Larson, Mindy; McElhone, Dot; Davis, Dennis S.; Lauritzen, Carol; Villagómez, Amanda; Yeigh, Maika; Landon-Hays, Melanie; LeJeune, Marie; Scales, W. David

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the results of a survey of a representative sample of 1,206 elementary reading and English Language Arts teachers in Oregon to learn (1) what materials are currently being used, (2) what materials teachers would prefer, and (3) what instructional practices teachers use. Qualitative data included 365 comments and 34 interviews…

  14. The English-Medium Fever in Pakistan: Analyzing Policy, Perceptions and Practices through Additive Bi/Multilingual Education Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, Syed Abdul; Dumanig, Francisco Perlas; David, Maya Khemlani

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses the crisis of English teaching in Pakistan. The study examines stakeholders' perceptions and classroom practices to identify theoretical fault lines and institutional/pedagogical challenges in the low-fee schools. We deem such research critical in the backdrop of public's heavy reliance and feverish pursuit of low-fee…

  15. Effective School Practices Which Foster Academic Success for English Language Learners: Perceptions of Elementary School Principals and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of implementation and importance of the 7 domains of effective school practice for English language learners (ELLs) (Williams, Hakuta, & Haertel, 2007) as perceived by principals and teachers of elementary schools serving ELL populations of 40% or greater that met AYP goals and…

  16. Does age modify the relationship between morbidity severity and physical health in English and Dutch family practice populations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, U.T.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lewis, M.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Vet, H.C. de; Bouter, L.M.; Croft, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the co-influences of age and morbidity severity on physical health in adult family practice populations. METHODS: Morbidity data in a 12-month period for 7,833 older English consulters aged 50 years and over and 6,846 Dutch consulters aged 18 years and over was linked to

  17. Primary non-adherence to prescribed medication in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Kristján; Halldórsson, Matthías; Thengilsdóttir, Gudrún

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary non-adherence refers to the patient not redeeming a prescribed medication at some point during drug therapy. Research has mainly focused on secondary non-adherence. Prior to this study, the overall rate of primary non-adherence in general practice in Iceland was not known....... OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of primary non-adherence, test whether it is influenced by a moderate increase in patient copayment implemented in 2010 and examine the difference between copayment groups (general versus concession patients). METHODS: A population-based data linkage study, wherein...... prescriptions issued electronically by 140 physicians at 16 primary health care centres in the Reykjavik capital area during two periods before and after increases in copayment were matched with those dispensed in pharmacies, the difference constituting primary non-adherence (population: 200&emsp14...

  18. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Rexvid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available General practitioners (GPs and social workers (SWs are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT. It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed in that GPs were sceptical whilst SWs took a more pragmatic view. Furthermore the results suggest that SWs might experience professional benefits by adopting an adherent approach to the increased dissemination of risk reduction technologies (RRT. GPs, however, did not seem to experience such benefits. Keywords: Profession, risk, social worker, general practitioner, risk reduction technologies, evidence-based practice/medicine 

  19. [Associations with Muslim patients in general practice surgeries--a survey among German general practicioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenthaler, A; Hiltner, H; Eissler, M

    2014-07-01

    Due to the increasing numbers of Muslims in Germany(1)--about 4.3 million at the moment--more Muslim patients are medicated in the practices of family doctors. Their heterogeneous cultural and religious backgrounds are nontheless unknown and unfamiliar for the treating general practitioner. Based on the daily experiences of the latter and in order to capture their development of intercultural competence, in the present study a brainwriting with general practitioners was conducted to record their spontaneous associations with Muslim patients. Individually and without exchange 90 general practitioners (66 male, 24 female) listed subjective thoughts regarding "Muslim patients" on a prepared sheet of paper. Additionally, sex, age, number of years as physician in a private practice and the frequency of treatment of Muslim patients in their own practice were requested. The content of the notes were evaluated using MAXQDA and were clustered in the categories of "language", "company", "violence", "men"/"women", "psychosomatic medicine", "compliance", "understanding of illness", "physical examination" and "head scarf". The ideas listed show that the majority of interviewed general practitioners regarded the treatment of Muslim patients as difficult. They associate Muslim patients with communication problems, a different type of disease understanding and a fear of contact, which hampers the examination situation. Less frequently, positive associations and unproblematic examination situations were noted. Due to a lack of knowledge about cultural and religious contexts Muslim patients are often described by using stereotypes. This underlines the necessity to foster intercultural competences and self-reflection in daily practice and its systematic inclusion in medical education. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Feasibility of guidelines for the management of threatened miscarriage in general practice/family medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, M.; Wijkel, D.; Haan, M. de; Grol, R.; Sips, F.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: to determine the feasiblity in daily practice of guidelines on threatened miscarriage for general practice. The guidelines on threatened miscarriage were issued in 1989 by the Dutch College of General Practitioners. Methods: prospective recording of appointments by 86 general

  1. Improving population-based cervical cancer screening in general practice : effects of a national strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Mulder, J; Tacken, M A; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a Dutch national prevention programme, aimed at general practitioners (GPs), on the adherence to organizational guidelines for effective cervical cancer screening in general practice. To identify the characteristics of general practices determining success.

  2. Best Practices for Implementing Inquiry-Based Science Instruction for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Erica

    This applied dissertation was designed to provide better access to current information to link literacy and science. Students frequently used literacy skills to gather information and communicate understanding of scientific concepts to others. Science became applicable through the tools associated with literacy. There was a need for instruction that integrated language development with science content. This research focused on revealing the instructional trends of English language learners science teachers in the United Arab Emirates. The researcher introduced the questionnaire surveys in the form of a professional development session. The participants were asked to complete the questionnaire concurrently with the descriptive presentation of each component of the sheltered instruction observation protocol (SIOP) model. Completing the SIOP Checklist Survey provided data on the type of constructivist strategies (best practices) teachers were utilizing and to what degree of fidelity the strategies were being implemented. Teachers were encouraged to continue to use these services for curriculum enrichment and as an additional source for future lesson plans. An analysis of the data revealed authentic learning as the most common best practice used with the most fidelity by teachers. The demographic subgroup, teaching location, was the only subgroup to show statistical evidence of an association between teaching location and the use of problem-based learning techniques in the classroom. Among factors that influenced the degree of teacher fidelity, teachers' expectation for student achievement had a moderate degree of association between the use of scaffolding techniques and co-operative learning.

  3. Clinical usefulness of teleradiology in general dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical usefulness of teleradiology in general dental practice. Two hundred and seventy five cases were submitted for inquiry to the case presentation board of the website of The Korean Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology for a 5 year periods. The diagnosis results of those cases were analyzed according to the disease classification, the correlation with the patient's chief complaint, the necessity of additional examinations or treatments, the image modalities, and the number of dentists inquiring. Differential diagnoses of normal anatomic structures were the most frequently submitted cases, covering 15.6% of all cases. Among 275 cases, 164 cases required no additional treatments or examinations. Panoramic radiographs were the most frequently submitted images, accounting for 248 inquiries. The 275 cases were submitted by 96 dentists. Fifty-two dentists wrote one inquiry, and 44 inquired 2 or more times. The average inquiry number of the latter group was 5.0 cases. A teleradiology system in general dental practice could be helpful in the differential diagnosis of common lesions and reduce unnecessary costs.

  4. Emergency medicine and "acute" general practice: comparing apples with oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, S; Cunningham, P; Talbot-Stern, J; Walker, S

    2000-01-01

    Emergency Departments (EDs) operate at the interface between the inpatient and ambulatory sectors of health care. Because of shared funding between the Commonwealth and States for ambulatory care, there has been intense focus on the ED patient population, and the potential to shift the locus of care for non-inpatients. One of the frequently cited models for the provision of after-hours GP services is the Balmain General Practice Casualty (GPC). This paper analyses the GPC model, looking in detail at casemix, clinical quality, waiting times and cost-effectiveness. It is argued that the services provided and the casemix of the patient population of GPC and EDs are distinctly different. Cost-effectiveness for GPC has not been objectively established. Health service planning should recognise the distinct but complementary roles of general practice and emergency medicine. Evaluation of alternative models of service provision should critically examine the available evidence, and comparisons should be based on a precise analysis of equivalent services.

  5. The Reliability of General Certificate of Education Examination English Composition Papers in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeju, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study was an attempt to evaluate the West African Examinations Council efforts in terms of the extent to which its marking procedures have ensured high reader reliability for the English Language Essay examination, a test which was designed to measure writing ability. (Author)

  6. Readiness of US General Surgery Residents for Independent Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Brian C; Bohnen, Jordan D; Williams, Reed G; Meyerson, Shari L; Schuller, Mary C; Clark, Michael J; Meier, Andreas H; Torbeck, Laura; Mandell, Samuel P; Mullen, John T; Smink, Douglas S; Scully, Rebecca E; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Auyang, Edward D; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul E; Choi, Jennifer N; Foley, Eugene F; Dimick, Justin B; Choti, Michael A; Soper, Nathaniel J; Lillemoe, Keith D; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Dunnington, Gary L; DaRosa, Debra A; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates the current state of the General Surgery (GS) residency training model by investigating resident operative performance and autonomy. The American Board of Surgery has designated 132 procedures as being "Core" to the practice of GS. GS residents are expected to be able to safely and independently perform those procedures by the time they graduate. There is growing concern that not all residents achieve that standard. Lack of operative autonomy may play a role. Attendings in 14 General Surgery programs were trained to use a) the 5-level System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning (SIMPL) Performance scale to assess resident readiness for independent practice and b) the 4-level Zwisch scale to assess the level of guidance (ie, autonomy) they provided to residents during specific procedures. Ratings were collected immediately after cases that involved a categorical GS resident. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and supplemented with Bayesian ordinal model-based estimation. A total of 444 attending surgeons rated 536 categorical residents after 10,130 procedures. Performance: from the first to the last year of training, the proportion of Performance ratings for Core procedures (n = 6931) at "Practice Ready" or above increased from 12.3% to 77.1%. The predicted probability that a typical trainee would be rated as Competent after performing an average Core procedure on an average complexity patient during the last week of residency training is 90.5% (95% CI: 85.7%-94%). This falls to 84.6% for more complex patients and to less than 80% for more difficult Core procedures. Autonomy: for all procedures, the proportion of Zwisch ratings indicating meaningful autonomy ("Passive Help" or "Supervision Only") increased from 15.1% to 65.7% from the first to the last year of training. For the Core procedures performed by residents in their final 6 months of training (cholecystectomy, inguinal/femoral hernia repair, appendectomy, ventral

  7. English grammar in use a self-study reference and practice book for intermediate learners of English : with answers and CD-ROM

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    English Grammar in Use Fourth edition is an updated version of the world's best-selling grammar title. It has a fresh, appealing new design and clear layout, with revised and updated examples, but retains all the key features of clarity and accessibility that have made the book popular with millions of learners and teachers around the world. The CD-ROM contains lots of additional practice exercises to consolidate learning, ideal for self-study but also suitable for reinforcement work in the classroom. An online version and book without answers are available separately.

  8. The psychometric properties of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 scale in Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sarah D; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Roesch, Scott C; Champagne, Brian R; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-07-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale (GAD-7) is a self-report questionnaire that is widely used to screen for anxiety. The GAD-7 has been translated into numerous languages, including Spanish. Previous studies evaluating the structural validity of the English and Spanish versions indicate a unidimensional factor structure in both languages. However, the psychometric properties of the Spanish language version have yet to be evaluated in samples outside of Spain, and the measure has not been tested for use among Hispanic Americans. This study evaluated the reliability, structural validity, and convergent validity of the English and Spanish language versions of the GAD-7 for Hispanic Americans in the United States. A community sample of 436 Hispanic Americans with an English (n = 210) or Spanish (n = 226) language preference completed the GAD-7. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the goodness-of-fit of the unidimensional factor structure of the GAD-7 across language-preference groups. Results from the multiple-group CFA indicated a similar unidimensional factor structure with equivalent response patterns and item intercepts, but different variances, across language-preference groups. Internal consistency was good for both English and Spanish language-preference groups. The GAD-7 also evidenced good convergent validity as demonstrated by significant correlations in expected directions with the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Physical Health domain of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF assessment. The unidimensional GAD-7 is suitable for use among Hispanic Americans with an English or Spanish language preference.

  9. Poetry in general practice education: perceptions of learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William; Freeman, Elaine

    2008-08-01

    There has been little research into poetry-based medical education. Few studies consider learners' perceptions in depth. To explore general practice registrars' (GPRs) perceptions of two poetry-based sessions. GPRs in one general practice vocational training scheme experienced two poetry sessions. In one, the facilitator selected poems; in the other, poems were chosen by registrars. Poems were read and discussed, with emphasis on personal response. Data were obtained through in-depth semi-structured interviews with six registrars. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Identification of individual ideas and shared themes enabled exploration of the registrars' experiences. Registrars described how poetry helped them explore emotional territory. They recognized a broadening of education, describing how poems helped them consider different points of view, increasing their understanding of others. Vicarious experience, development of empathy and self-discovery were also reported. Participants speculated on how this might impact on patient care and professional practice. Facilitator-selected poems provided variety and ambiguity, provoking discussions with clinical relevance. Learner-selected poems enabled involvement, self-revelation and understanding of peers and developed emotional expression. These registrars reported difficulties expressing feelings in the culture of science-based medical training. Poetry sessions may provide an environment for emotional exploration, which could broaden understanding of self and others. Poetry-based education may develop emotional competence. The participants recognized development of key skills including close reading, attentive listening and interpretation of meaning. These skills may help doctors to understand individual patient's unique experience of illness, encouraging personalized care that respects patients' perspectives.

  10. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grol Richard

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. Methods Secondary analysis of data from 239 general practices, collected in practice visits between 2003 to 2006 in the Netherlands using a comprehensive set of measures of practice management. Data were collected by a practice visitor, a trained non-physician observer using patients questionnaires, doctors and staff. For this study we selected five measures of practice performance as outcomes and six measures of GP workload and job stress as predictors. A total of 79 indicators were used out of the 303 available indicators. Random coefficient regression models were applied to examine associations. Results and discussion Workload and job stress are associated with practice performance. Workload: Working more hours as a GP was associated with more positive patient experiences of accessibility and availability (b = 0.16. After list size adjustment, practices with more GP-time per patient scored higher on GP care (b = 0.45. When GPs provided more than 20 hours per week per 1000 patients, patients scored over 80% on the Europep questionnaire for quality of GP care. Job stress: High GP job stress was associated with lower accessibility and availability (b = 0.21 and insufficient practice management (b = 0.25. Higher GP commitment and more satisfaction with the job was associated with more prevention and disease management (b = 0.35. Conclusion Providing more time in the practice, and more time per patient and experiencing less job stress are all associated with perceptions by patients of better care and better practice performance. Workload and job stress should be assessed by using list size adjusted data in order to realise better quality of care. Organisational development using

  11. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hombergh, Pieter; Künzi, Beat; Elwyn, Glyn; van Doremalen, Jan; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel

    2009-07-15

    The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. Secondary analysis of data from 239 general practices, collected in practice visits between 2003 to 2006 in the Netherlands using a comprehensive set of measures of practice management. Data were collected by a practice visitor, a trained non-physician observer using patients questionnaires, doctors and staff. For this study we selected five measures of practice performance as outcomes and six measures of GP workload and job stress as predictors. A total of 79 indicators were used out of the 303 available indicators. Random coefficient regression models were applied to examine associations. Workload and job stress are associated with practice performance.Workload: Working more hours as a GP was associated with more positive patient experiences of accessibility and availability (b = 0.16). After list size adjustment, practices with more GP-time per patient scored higher on GP care (b = 0.45). When GPs provided more than 20 hours per week per 1000 patients, patients scored over 80% on the Europep questionnaire for quality of GP care.Job stress: High GP job stress was associated with lower accessibility and availability (b = 0.21) and insufficient practice management (b = 0.25). Higher GP commitment and more satisfaction with the job was associated with more prevention and disease management (b = 0.35). Providing more time in the practice, and more time per patient and experiencing less job stress are all associated with perceptions by patients of better care and better practice performance. Workload and job stress should be assessed by using list size adjusted data in order to realise better quality of care. Organisational development using this kind of data feedback could benefit both patients and GP.

  12. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  13. PRACTICAL VALUE OF UNDERSTANDING THE MINDSET OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    Noora Abdul Kader

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mind set of students and teachers seeks much more importance in the present scenario. The present study is intended to find the type of mindset of secondary school students in learning English language on the select areas and also made an attempt to find out the effect of fixed mindset of students on the attitude of students towards English language. Understanding the mind set of secondary school English teachers regarding the performance and attitude of students in learning...

  14. A Mobile Game-Based English Vocabulary Practice System Based on Portfolio Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ting-Ting Wu; Yueh-Min Huang

    2017-01-01

    .... However, learning a foreign language is difficult and stressful. In addition, memorizing English vocabulary is often considered boring, and learners may lack motivation for learning activities...

  15. Learning General English in a Blended Mode: Analysis of Students’ Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Pundziuvienė

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology has the capacity to enhance a foreign language learning process of students, but it is not always an easy task to determine how much of a traditional classroom and distance learning should be integrated into the teaching process. The research methodology is based on a small scale qualitative and quantitative analysis among the students attending the English language courses provided by the Centre of Foreign Languages at Vytautas Magnus University.The paper reports on the results of the survey that presents the students’ attitudes on traditional and blended learning of the English language. The paper also deals with the topic that is sometimes ignored in much of the distance education literature: students’ distressing experiences due to communication breakdowns and technical difficulties.

  16. Teaching English to the Vietnamese -- Textbooks. General Information Series, No. 5. Indochinese Refugee Education Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Arlington, VA.

    The purpose of this bulletin is to give the American with no prior experience in teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) some idea of the range of EFL textbooks, and what they are like. It points out that most EFL texts published in America in the last 15 years are based on the audio-lingual method and that they are developed with one of the…

  17. Theory and interpretation in qualitative studies from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    of the interpretative paradigm. Associations between paradigms, philosophies, methodologies and methods are examined and different strategies for theoretical commitment presented. Finally, I discuss the impact of theory for interpretation and the development of general practice knowledge.  Main points: A scientific...... theory is a consistent and soundly based set of assumptions about a specific aspect of the world, predicting or explaining a phenomenon. Qualitative research is situated in an interpretative paradigm where notions about particular human experiences in context are recognized from different subject...... positions. Basic theoretical features from the philosophy of science explain why and how this is different from positivism. Reflexivity, including theoretical awareness and consistency, demonstrates interpretative assumptions, accounting for situated knowledge. Different types of theoretical commitment...

  18. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  19. Prognostic factors in adults with knee pain in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, J N; Berger, M Y; Koes, B W; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A

    2009-02-15

    To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a physical examination performed. Knee symptoms were assessed by self-report questionnaires at 3-month intervals. After 1 year the physical examination was repeated. Multivariate prognostic regression models of patient characteristics, symptom characteristics, and physical examination were used to predict persisting knee symptoms after 1 year. Areas under receiving operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were used to determine the predictive value of the model. To assess the added predictive value of symptom characteristics and physical examination, these models were added to the model of patient characteristics. The improvement was expressed as the difference between the 2 AUCs. In the multivariate prognostic model of patient characteristics, age >60 years, educational level, kinesophobia, and comorbidity of the skeletal system were associated with persistent knee symptoms after 1 year (AUC 0.67). Of the symptom characteristics, history of nontraumatic knee symptoms, bilateral symptoms, and duration of symptoms >3 months were associated (AUC 0.73). For determinants of physical examination, crepitus of passive extension was associated (AUC 0.55). The added value of the symptom characteristics model to the patient characteristics model was 0.09 (AUC 0.76). Physical examination added no further value. Symptom characteristics are the strongest predictors of persisting knee symptoms at 1-year followup. Physical examination has no added value in predicting persistent knee symptoms in general practice.

  20. The motivation to teach as a registrar in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampy, Harish; Agius, Steven; Allery, Lynne A

    2013-07-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) states that teaching should be an integral part of the doctor's role and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) have incorporated teaching outcomes into the GP training curriculum. However, there are suggestions that the teaching role of a GP trainee declines as they move from hospital posts to the registrar community year. Using doctors in training as near-peer tutors offers multiple advantages. Trainees themselves benefit as teaching others is a strong driver of the tutor's own learning. In addition there are also practical incentives to mobilising this under-utilised pool of primary care clinical teachers given the continuing shift of focusing medical education in the community. This study forms part of a larger body of work exploring the attitudes and perceived learning needs of GP registrars with regards to developing a teaching role. A primary area of investigation was trainees' motivation to teach. This paper describes our attempts to establish: a) how strongly motivated are GP registrars to take on teaching roles? b) in consequence how strongly motivated are they to learn more about teaching? c) what are the factors which affect motivation to teach? Three themes emerged from the data. First, teaching was felt to be of low priority in comparison to competing clinical learning needs. Secondly, the clinical dominance to both formative and summative assessment during training further compounded this situation. Thirdly, registrars identified a number of practical barriers and incentives that influenced their teaching engagement. This included potential negative views from trainers as to their trainee's ability and requirement to be involved with teaching activities.By understanding and addressing these issues, it is hoped that GP trainees' engagement with teaching activities can be better engendered with subsequent benefits for both the trainee and those they teach.

  1. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in a rural general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Tomiak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction.[/b] Cardiovascular disease (CVD prophylaxis in general practice, especially in rural areas, is a major organizational challenge. [b]Objective.[/b] The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of CVD risk factors in the studied population, and to identify the effect of the number of planned prophylactic consultations on selected clinical parameters, risk factors, and total cardiovascular risk on the SCORE scale (Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation. [b]Materials and method.[/b] The study included patients of a rural general practice, aged 35–55 years, with at least one modifiable CVD risk factor. Medical history was obtained, a physical examination performed, blood glucose levels, lipid profile, BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure measured and the SCORE cardiovascular risk at baseline and at the end of the study calculated. All participants were provided with targeted specific education. Analysis was performed in two groups of patients (1 and 2, where group 1 had one more prophylactic consultation than Group 2. [b]Results.[/b] The results at baseline and a year later were compared in pharmacologically untreated patients, 26 in Group 1 and 34 in Group 2. In Group 1, which had had more prophylactic consultations, a statistically significant decrease was found in the mean systolic blood pressure: 131.000–124.782 (p= 0.02721, mean diastolic blood pressure: 86.846–83.462 (p=0.01111, and a statistically significant decrease in total cardiovascular risk on the SCORE scale (p=0.0478. [b]Conclusions.[/b] The higher number of preventive consultations had an impact on a statistically significant decrease in mean blood pressure and mean SCORE value. The year-long cardiovascular disease prophylaxis programme proved less effective than expected, and neither a decrease in body weight nor an improvement in lipid metabolism was achieved in any of the groups.

  2. [Evaluation of lercanidipine in the general practice setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, N R; Canelada, J A; Iglesias, M; Angulo, E; López Acedo, A; Díaz Olea, E; Cidoncha, F; Guerras, M; Fuentes, J; Garrido, J; Lapie, J; Peña, J; Aguilar, A; Hidalgo, P

    2003-06-01

    To determine the efficacy and tolerability of a long-acting dihydropyridine in the clinical settings of general practice. 110 essential hypertensives were included (age 62.3 +/- 10.8 years, 51 men and 53 women, 38/ obese -IMC >30 kg/m2, ten diabetics). 104 patients ended the followup. Patients were treated with lercanidipine 10 mg once daily in the morning. Follow-up lasted 6 months. When blood pressure was not controlled (BP < 140/90 mmHg) in any visit, a second drug was added, excluding calcium channel blockers. Antiadrenergic drugs were recommended. If patients were not controlled ittwo consecutive visits they were excluded from follow-up. Significant reductions in both systolic (baseline 157.4 +/- 11.7 vs 131.1 +/- 6.8 mmHg, p < 0,001) and diastolic BP (baseline 94.7 +/- 5.8 vs 80.0 +/- 5.5 mmHg, p < 0,001) were attained at six months. Mean SBP decrease was 26.7 mmHg and mean DBP reduction was 15.6 mmHg. At the study end, 84.3/ of the patients achieved a BP < 140/90 mmHg. Thirty patients needed a second drug to become controlled (26 at the study end). The overall incidence of adverse effects was 4,4/ (n=6) and just three patients withdrew the treatment due to untoward effects. Plasmatic cholesterol lowered from 225.3 +/- 41.0 to 216.7 +/- 25.3 mg/dl (p = 0,03) and urate decreased from 5.6 +/- 1.6 to 5.1 +/- 1.4 mgldl, p = 0,03). Lercanidipine is a calcium channel blockers of high efficacy and low incidence of adverse effects in the clinical settings of general practice. It seems to have a positive metabolic effects on plasmatic levels of cholesterol and urate.

  3. English as a Foreign Language Instructors’ Induction: Early Practices of Language Teachers Teaching at Tertiary Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Öztürk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the nature of the induction process of English as a foreign language (EFL teachers teaching at tertiary level through individual interviews. In order to gather intended data, fifteen novice instructors teaching at four different public universities in Ankara were interviewed on a basis of two criteria: (a having 1 to 3 years of teaching experience, and (b teaching at higher education level. The data gathered from the interviews were transcribed, coded, and categorized under themes in a qualitative research tradition. Subsequently the Şndings were interpreted. The findings were organized around research questions and there appeared four main themes: (1 nature of induction process; (2 common concerns of novice teachers; (3 possible adaptation challenges; and (4 practices to overcome difŞculties. The results revealed that pre-service education, especially of the graduates of nonEducation Faculties, did not adequately respond to the needs of the novice teachers in induction period. Considering this insufŞcient preparation and unsatisfactory pedagogical formation processes, an effective teacher education program as well as a contributing teacher induction program was claimed to be adopted by higher education institutions

  4. English as a Foreign Language Instructors’ Induction: Early Practices of Language Teachers Teaching at Tertiary Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Öztürk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the nature of the induction process of English as a foreign language (EFL teachers teaching at tertiary level through individual interviews. In order to gather intended data, fifteen novice instructors teaching at four different public universities in Ankara were interviewed on a basis of two criteria: (a having 1 to 3 years of teaching experience, and (b teaching at higher education level. The data gathered from the interviews were transcribed, coded, and categorized under themes in a qualitative research tradition. Subsequently the findings were interpreted. The findings were organized around research questions and there appeared four main themes: (1 nature of induction process; (2 common concerns of novice teachers; (3 possible adaptation challenges; and (4 practices to overcome difficulties. The results revealed that pre-service education, especially of the graduates of non-Education Faculties, did not adequately respond to the needs of the novice teachers in induction period. Considering this insufficient preparation and unsatisfactory pedagogical formation processes, an effective teacher education program as well as a contributing teacher induction program was claimed to be adopted by higher education institutions.

  5. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hombergh, P. van den; Kunzi, B.; Elwyn, G.; Doremalen, J.H.M. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data

  6. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  7. Policy implementation in practice: the case of national service frameworks in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath; Harrison, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    National Service Frameworks are an integral part of the government's drive to 'modernise' the NHS, intended to standardise both clinical care and the design of the services used to deliver that clinical care. This article uses evidence from qualitative case studies in three general practices to illustrate the difficulties associated with the implementation of such top-down guidelines and models of service. In these studies it was found that, while there had been little explicit activity directed at implementation overall, the National Service Framework for coronary heart disease had in general fared better than that for older people. Gunn's notion of 'perfect implementation' is used to make sense of the findings.

  8. Minimum Intervention Treatment Plan (MTIP):practical implementation in general dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Domejean-Orliaguet, S; Banerjee, Avijit; Gaucher, C; MILETIC, I; Basson, M; Reich, E; Blique, M; Zalba, J; Lavoix, L; Roussel, F; Khandelwal, P

    2009-01-01

    The Minimum Intervention (MI) concept is well described in the literature and summarizes the clinical rationale for the preventive and cause-related approach in the management of dental caries. The GC Europe "MI Advisory Board" which is a Pan-European group of clinical academics and general dental practitioners aims to present an evidence-based, patient-centred MI treatment approach for use in routine dental practice. This treatment methodology is based on four phases of treatment planning: M...

  9. Description of a practice model for pharmacist medication review in a general practice setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mette; Hallas, Jesper; Hansen, Trine Graabæk

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practical descriptions of procedures used for pharmacists' medication reviews are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To describe a model for medication review by pharmacists tailored to a general practice setting. METHODS: A stepwise model is described. The model is based on data from the medical chart...... and clinical or laboratory data. The medication review focuses on the diagnoses of the patient instead of the individual drugs. Patient interviews are not part of the model. The model was tested in a pilot study by conducting medical reviews on 50 polypharmacy patients (i.e. receiving 7 or more drugs...... no indication (n=47, 23%). Most interventions were aimed at cardiovascular drugs. CONCLUSION: We have provided a detailed description of a practical approach to pharmacists' medication review in a GP setting. The model was tested and found to be usable, and to deliver a medication review with high acceptance...

  10. Massachusetts Charter Public Schools: Best Practices Serving English Language Learners. White Paper No. 140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candal, Cara Stillings

    2015-01-01

    In recent years many charter public schools in Massachusetts have increased the number of English language learners (ELLs) that they enroll. A 2010 amendment to the charter school law has made it easier for charter schools to recruit English language learners. The success that many charter schools have had with this subset of students defies…

  11. Critical Teacher Talk: Successful English for Academic Purposes Classroom Practices in a Global Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namsook

    2016-01-01

    Drawn on the sociocultural paradigm, I examined teacher-student communication with emphasis on teacher's talk and its role on international students' learning English as a Second Language in an English for Academic Purposes classroom in a global campus in the U.S. Developmental data analyses of class observations, teacher and student interviews,…

  12. Reasons behind the Failure of Teaching Sudan Practical Integrated National English (SPINE 5) in Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the development of English language learning and curriculum design, English language series became a very important issue that affects education globally and in Sudan. In specific, this study reports reasons behind the failure of teaching SPINE 5 (which is one of SPINE series) from the teachers' point of view. In Bahry Locality in…

  13. Mainstream Teachers of English Learners in the Southeast: A Multiple Case Study Analysis of Scaffolding Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Sonya Maldonado

    2013-01-01

    English learners are one of the fasting growing populations of students in the United States, particularly in the Southeast. Little is known about how teachers in this region support the instructional needs of English learners in a mainstream classroom, despite reports that they receive limited preparation and professional development to meet the…

  14. Turkish Pre-Service Teachers' Reflective Practices in Teaching English to Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Muzeyyen Nazli

    2016-01-01

    The course "Teaching English to Young Learners" is the first stage where pre-service teachers are introduced to a child's world, developmental characteristics, needs, interests as well as teaching and learning techniques for these learners in English language teaching pre-service teacher education programmes in Turkey. This action…

  15. Classroom Practices in Early Foreign Language Teaching in Denmark: On the Role of Quantity and Quality of Exposure to English inside the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    this background, my thesis investigates the role of classroom practices in early English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching by posing the following research questions: • Will there be differences between earlier (age 7) and later (age 9) starters of English language learning in their rate of learning and short...... the onset of English classes in Danish primary schools was lowered from 3rd to 1st grade. The participants in the studies conducted in this thesis are 264 Danish Young Learners. About half of these students have started learning English in the 3rd grade, as it was usual before the 2014 school reform......, the other half consists of the first generation of Danish Young Learners starting English lessons in the 1st grade. Data in the form of multiple-choice English tests and video-recordings of classroom interaction was collected during the Young Learners’ first two years of instructed English lessons. Against...

  16. Sterilization of re-usable instruments in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A J; Bagg, J; Hurrell, D; McHugh, S

    2007-10-27

    To examine the methods used for sterilisation of re-usable instruments in general dental practice, including the installation, commissioning and testing of benchtop steam sterilisers. This was an observational study in which the policies and procedures for sterilising instruments were viewed directly by trained surveyors at practice premises. Information relating to the installation, commissioning and testing of benchtop steam sterilisers was also collected by interview and observation of records. Data were recorded onto a standardised data collection form prepared for automated reading. Data were available fom 179 surgeries surveyed. Dental practices reprocess a range of instruments from critical to non-critical. The most common type of benchtop steam steriliser is a type N, or bowl and instrument (B&I) steriliser (88%). The remainder were type B, or vacuum sterilisers, though one surgery had access to a hot air steriliser. Sterilisers were usually installed by manufactures or suppliers (69%). Only 51% of sterilisers were tested on installation and 26% were commissioned, of which 38% were tested to SHTM 2010 standard. In most cases it was difficult to determine from the documentation available whether daily, weekly, quarterly or annual testing was undertaken in accordance with recognised standards. Written instructions for the operation of the steriliser were unavailable in 61% of practices. Insurance cover for pressure vessels was available in 79% of the surgeries with a B&I steriliser. In many instances there was inadequate separation of clean and dirty areas for segregating processed from unprocessed instruments. Ninety-six percent of surgeries did not have a procedure for the identification and traceability of instruments used on patients. There was no documentation of staff training in the use of sterilisers in 90% of surgeries. There has been significant uptake of the use of steam sterilisation to reprocess used dental instruments. However, there are

  17. Variation in spirometry utilization between trained general practitioners in practices equipped with a spirometer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.E.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Jacobs, A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hartman, J.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore spirometry utilization among general practitioners and identify practitioner and practice-related factors associated with spirometry utilization. DESIGN: Multivariate multilevel cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey. SETTING: Some 61 general practices involved in a

  18. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care: data from general practice research and registration networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, C.A.M. van; Laar, F.A. van de; Waal, M.W.M. de; Okkes, I.M.; Akker, M. van den; Veen, W.J. van der; Schellevis, F.G.; Staveren, W.A. van; Binsbergen, J.J. van; Weel, C. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. METHODS: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  19. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care : data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wayenburg, CAM; van de Laar, FA; de Waal, MWM; Okkes, IM; van den Akker, M; van der Veen, WJ; Schellevis, FG; van Staveren, WA; van Binsbergen, JJ; van Weel, C

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  20. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care: data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Waal, de M.W.M.; Okkes, I.M.; Akker, van den M.; Veen, van der W.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Weel, van C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  1. SOAP Methodology in General Practice/Family Medicine Teaching in Practical Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Neto, Isabel

    2016-12-30

    Medical records in General Practice/Family Medicine are an essential information support on the health status of the patient and a communication document between health professionals. The development of competencies in General Practice/Family Medicine during pre-graduation must include the ability to make adequate medical records in practical context. As of 2012, medicine students at the University of Beira Interior have been performing visits using the Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan - SOAP methodology, with a performance evaluation of the visit, with the aim to check on which Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan - SOAP aspects students reveal the most difficulties in order to define improvement techniques and to correlate patient grade with tutor evaluation. Analysing the evaluation data for the 2015 - 2016 school year at the General Practice/Family Medicine visit carried out by fourth year students in medicine, comparing the averages of each item in the Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan - SOAP checklist and the patient evaluation. In the Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan - SOAP, 29.7% of students are on the best grade quartile, 37.1% are on the best competencies quartile and 27.2% on the best patient grade quartile. 'Evolution was verified/noted' received the worst grades in Subjective, 'Record of physical examination focused on the problem of the visit' received the worst grades in Objective, 'Notes of Diagnostic reasoning / differential diagnostic' received de worst grades in Assessment and 'Negotiation of aims to achieve' received the worst grades in Plan. The best tutor evaluation is found in 'communication'. Only one single study evaluated student´s performance under examination during a visit, with similar results to the present one and none addressed the patient's evaluation. Students revealed a good performance in using the Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan - SOAP. The findings represent the beginning of the

  2. [Argentinean general practitioners' practice and counseling regarding physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Cardona, Lorena; Trejo-Varón, Ruby; Barengo, Noel C

    2013-01-01

    Investigating general practitioners' (GP) physical activity and to what extent their own physical activity affects counselling their patients in clinical practice. This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study; sample size was 115 (82 women and 33 men). The survey involved using a self-administered questionnaire at the GPs' annual congress in 2011, using a specially-designed, on-line questionnaire. This questionnaire revealed that about 76% of the female GPs did give advice concerning physical activity to their patients while the respective prevalence in men was 33 %. Regarding advice concerning physical activity to patients having non-communicable diseases, 73 % of women GPs always seemed to recommend physical activity for them while the corresponding prevalence in men was 27 %. Around 97 % (n=62) of the female GPs and 93 % (n=25) of male GPs asked their patients about their physical activity pattern; however, this study revealed that only 35 % (n=23) of male and 46 % (n=12) of female GPS were actually familiar with the latest recommendations concerning physical activity. No relationship was found between GPs' physical activity level and their counselling in practice concerning physical activity or their current knowledge of the topic. The study showed that GPs stated that physical activity was important for their patients, although few of them engaged in types of physical activity during their leisure-time. There would thus seem to be an urgent need for training GPs in prescribing physical activity at primary healthcare level to increase their patients' involvement in some form of physical activity.

  3. English Second Language (ESL) students as new members of a community of practice: Some thoughts for learning and assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kate Cockcroft; Ruksana Osman; Anisa Kajee

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on English second language (ESL) students’ experiences of academic writing in a university setting. It draws on the notion of community of practice to explain that it is not sufficient for academic literacy courses to concern themselves only with the questions relating to the development of student academic literacy. Rather they should also be concerned with how students learn in social contexts and what knowledge is included and what knowledge is excluded. Such an orient...

  4. Comparative Difficulties with Non-Scientific General Vocabulary and Scientific/Medical Terminology in English as a Second Language (ESL) Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heming, Thomas A; Nandagopal, Shobha

    2012-11-01

    Medical education requires student comprehension of both technical (scientific/medical) and non-technical (general) vocabulary. Our experience with "English as a second language" (ESL) Arab students suggested they often have problems comprehending scientific statements because of weaknesses in their understanding of non-scientific vocabulary. This study aimed to determine whether ESL students have difficulties with general vocabulary that could hinder their understanding of scientific/medical texts. A survey containing English text was given to ESL students in the premedical years of an English-medium medical school in an Arabic country. The survey consisted of sample questions from the Medical College Admission Test (USA). Students were instructed to identify all unknown words in the text. ESL students commenced premedical studies with substantial deficiencies in English vocabulary. Students from English-medium secondary schools had a selective deficiency in scientific/medical terminology which disappeared with time. Students from Arabic-medium secondary schools had equal difficulty with general and scientific/medical vocabulary. Deficiencies in both areas diminished with time but remained even after three years of English-medium higher education. Typically, when teaching technical subjects to ESL students, attention is focused on subject-unique vocabulary and associated modifiers. This study highlights that ESL students also face difficulties with the general vocabulary used to construct statements employing technical words. Such students would benefit from increases in general vocabulary knowledge.

  5. Comparative Difficulties with Non-Scientific General Vocabulary and Scientific/Medical Terminology in English as a Second Language (ESL) Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heming, Thomas A.; Nandagopal, Shobha

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Medical education requires student comprehension of both technical (scientific/medical) and non-technical (general) vocabulary. Our experience with “English as a second language” (ESL) Arab students suggested they often have problems comprehending scientific statements because of weaknesses in their understanding of non-scientific vocabulary. This study aimed to determine whether ESL students have difficulties with general vocabulary that could hinder their understanding of scientific/medical texts. Methods: A survey containing English text was given to ESL students in the premedical years of an English-medium medical school in an Arabic country. The survey consisted of sample questions from the Medical College Admission Test (USA). Students were instructed to identify all unknown words in the text. Results: ESL students commenced premedical studies with substantial deficiencies in English vocabulary. Students from English-medium secondary schools had a selective deficiency in scientific/medical terminology which disappeared with time. Students from Arabic-medium secondary schools had equal difficulty with general and scientific/medical vocabulary. Deficiencies in both areas diminished with time but remained even after three years of English-medium higher education. Conclusion: Typically, when teaching technical subjects to ESL students, attention is focused on subject-unique vocabulary and associated modifiers. This study highlights that ESL students also face difficulties with the general vocabulary used to construct statements employing technical words. Such students would benefit from increases in general vocabulary knowledge. PMID:23275846

  6. The identification of the general practice registrar needing assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDoctors undertaking vocational training in general practicein Australia may require assistance, in addition to thenormal training offered as part of their training programme.Issues requiring assistance may go undetected for a periodof time. Delay in the identification of issues leads to delay inthe provision of the assistance. The aim of this study is todetermine the most common reasons registrars requireextra assistance, and how these issues are identified. Thefindings of this study will provide direction for 21 regionallybased training providers (RTPs to develop improved toolsto ensure earlier detection of registrars requiring assistance.MethodThis study is based on qualitative research methods, usingsemi-structured interviews with senior medical educationstaff of four regional general practice training providers inVictoria, Australia.ResultsIssues identified included language and cultural issues,applied knowledge and skills, attitude and professionalism,and health and family issues.The principal method that training providers identifiedissues was via the GP supervisor. This was predominantly byinformal communication, rather than formal evaluationsheets. Other methods included the external clinicalteaching visit and other training formative assessments.These more formalised procedures were more likely toidentify issues later than desired. They were also used as away of clarifying suspected problems. The selection processwas not felt to be helpful, and the examinations providedinformation too late.ConclusionAn increased awareness of the potential issues leading to aregistrar to require assistance enables identification andsubsequent action to occur in a more timely and moreuseful fashion. Informal communication between practicesand training programme staff should be encouraged toenable these issues to be dealt with early in training.

  7. Impact of social prescribing on general practice workload and polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, A M; McCauley, F; McCarron, M O

    2017-07-01

    Social prescribing has emerged as a useful tool for helping patients overcome some of the social and behavioural determinants of poor health. There has been little research on the impact of social prescribing on use of primary healthcare resources. This study sought to determine whether social prescribing activities influenced patient-general practitioner (GP) contacts and polypharmacy. Quality-improvement design with social prescribing activity interventions from an urban general practice in Northern Ireland. Patients over 65 years of age with a chronic condition who attended their GP frequently or had multiple medications were offered a social prescribing activity. Participants' contacts with GP and the new repeat prescriptions before and during the social prescribing activity were measured. The total number of repeat prescriptions per patient was compared at the time of referral and 6-12 months later. Indications for referral, primary diagnoses and reasons for declining participation in a social prescribing activity after referral were prospectively recorded. Sixty-eight patients agreed to participate but only 28 (41%) engaged in a prescribed social activity. There was no statistically significant difference in GP contacts (visits to GP, home visits or telephone calls) or number of new repeat prescriptions between referral and completion of 12 weeks of social prescribing activity. Similarly there was no statistically significant difference in the total number of repeat prescriptions between referral and 6-12 months after social prescribing activity in either intention to treat or per protocol analyses. Social prescribing participants had similar demographic factors. Mental health issues (anxiety and/or depression) were more common among participants than those who were referred but declined participation in a social prescribing activity (P = 0.022). While social prescribing may help patients' self-esteem and well-being, it may not decrease GP workload. Further

  8. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conway, R

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant\\'s confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant\\'s self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  9. An Analysis of English Language Learning Instruction Provided in Teacher Education and Inservice Training Programs for General and Special Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedano, Lidia E.

    2013-01-01

    It is essential that English language learners (ELLs) are able to effectively receive an education. Recent national data indicates that the achievement gap between English and non-English learners in school is approximately a two grade-level difference (NCES, 2012). The increase of students who are learning English and who have a disability is a…

  10. A comparison of disease prevalence in general practice in the Netherlands and in England & Wales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, D.; Schellevis, F.; Linden, M. van der; Westert, G.

    2006-01-01

    General practice-based morbidity surveys have been conducted in the Netherlands and in England and Wales primarily to estimate disease prevalence and examine health inequalities. We have compared disease prevalence in general practice reported in the second Dutch Natinal Survey of General Practice

  11. Language-general and language-specific influences on children's acquisition of argument structure: a comparison of French and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naigles, Letitia R; Lehrer, Nadine

    2002-08-01

    This research investigates language-general and language-specific properties of the acquisition of argument structure. Ten French preschoolers enacted forty sentences containing motion verbs; sixteen sentences were ungrammatical in that the syntactic frame was incompatible with the standard argument structure for the verb (e.g. *Le tigre va le lion = *The tiger goes the lion). Previous work (Naigles, Fowler & Helm, 1992, 1995; Naigles, Gleitman & Gleitman, 1993) indicated that English-speaking two-year-olds faced with such ungrammatical sentences consistently altered the usual meaning of the verb to fit the syntactic frame (frame compliance) whereas adults faced with the same sentences altered the syntax to fit the meaning of the verb (verb compliance). The age at which children began to perform Verb Compliantly varied by frame and by verb. The current study finds that the level of Verb Compliance in French five-year-olds largely mirrors that of English-speaking five-year-olds. The sole exception is the intransitive frame with an added prepositional phrase (e.g. *Le tigre amène près de la passerelle = *The tiger brings next to the ramp), which elicits a higher level of Verb Compliance among French kindergarteners than among their English learning peers. This effect may be due to the unambiguous interpretation of French spatial prepositions (i.e. next to has both locative and directional interpretations whereas près de supports only the locative interpretation). These data support the conclusion that the acquisition of argument structure is influenced by both language-general mechanisms (e.g. uniqueness, entrenchment) and language-specific properties (e.g. prepositional ambiguity).

  12. The existential dimension in general practice: identifying understandings and experiences of general practitioners in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette; Bjerrum, Lars; Gilså Hansen, Dorte; Olesen, Frede; Pedersen, Susanne S; Timm, Helle; Timmermann, Connie; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP-patient encounter. A qualitative methodology with semi-structured focus group interviews was employed. General practice setting in Denmark. Thirty-one GPs from two Danish regions between 38 and 68 years of age participated in seven focus group interviews. Although understood to involve broad life conditions such as present and future being and identity, connectedness to a society and to other people, the existential dimension was primarily reported integrated in connection with life-threatening diseases and death. Furthermore, integration of the existential dimension was characterized as unsystematic and intuitive. Communication about religious or spiritual questions was mostly avoided by GPs due to shyness and perceived lack of expertise. GPs also reported infrequent referrals of patients to chaplains. GPs integrate issues related to the existential dimension in implicit and non-standardized ways and are hindered by cultural barriers. As a way to enhance a practice culture in which GPs pay more explicit attention to the patients' multidimensional concerns, opportunities for professional development could be offered (courses or seminars) that focus on mutual sharing of existential reflections, ideas and communication competencies. Key points Although integration of the existential dimension is recommended for patient care in general practice, little is known about GPs' understanding and integration of this dimension in the GP-patient encounter. The existential dimension is understood to involve broad and universal life conditions having no explicit reference to spiritual or religious aspects. The integration of the existential dimension is delimited to patient cases where life-threatening diseases, life crises and unexplainable patient

  13. The Utilisation of the Internet by Palestinian English Language Teachers Focusing on Uses, Practices and Barriers and Overall Contribution to Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabilan, Muhammad Kamarul; Rajab, Belal Mousa

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a study designed to investigate the utilisation of the Internet by English Language teachers in Gaza focusing on uses, practices and barriers. A questionnaire was developed based on literature (Kabilan 2003; Kabilan & Mohamed Amin 2002) and was administered to 274 English language teachers in Gaza schools. Data reveal that…

  14. [Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on 'Vaginal bleeding'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Corlien J H; Meijer, Loes J; Janssen, C A H Ineke; Burgers, Jako S; Opstelten, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The revised Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on 'Vaginal bleeding' provides recommendations for abnormal bleeding in women in the reproduction phase of life and for post-menopausal bleeding. This guideline is closely attuned to the guideline on 'Heavy menstrual bleeding' of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Transvaginal sonography is not reliable for excluding endometrial carcinoma in women with abnormal vaginal bleeding treated with tamoxifen. The choice of medical treatment is determined in consultation with the patient. The following factors are assessed: severity and bother, long-term need for contraception, preference for cycle control, desire to have a child, pain during menstruation, comorbidity and use of medication. Treatment options are nonhormonal (NSAIDs, or tranexamic acid) or hormonal (a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, or combined oral contraceptive). In women of reproductive age, referral is indicated if medical treatment is not effective. Other indications are intracavitary abnormalities diagnosed by transvaginal sonography, tamoxifen use, persistent contact bleeding, and suspicion of coagulation disorders. Indications for referral for post-menopausal bleeding include: sonographic endometrial thickness > 4 mm, abnormal cervical cytology, tamoxifen use, irregular bleeding during use of hormone therapy for vasomotor symptoms and persistent or recurrent bleeding, regardless of endometrial thickness.

  15. Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, and Confidence of Australian General Practice Registrars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl A. Nowson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and confidence were assessed in General Practice Registrars (GPRs throughout Australia. Of approximately 6,000 GPRs invited to complete a nutrition survey, 93 respondents (2% completed the online survey, with 89 (20 males, 69 females providing demographic and educational information. Fifty-one percent had graduated from medical school within the last two years. From a list of 11 dietary strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk, respondents selected weight loss (84%, reducing saturated fats (90%, a maximum of two alcoholic drinks/day (82%, and increasing vegetables (83% as “highly appropriate” strategies, with only 51% indicating that salt reduction was “highly appropriate.” Two-thirds of registrars felt “moderately” (51% or “very” confident (16% providing nutrition advice. Most of them (84% recalled receiving information during training, but only 34% recalled having to demonstrate nutritional knowledge. The results indicate that this group of Australian GPRs understood most of the key dietary recommendations for reducing cardiovascular risk but lacked consensus regarding the recommendation to reduce salt intake and expressed mixed levels of confidence in providing nutritional advice. Appropriate nutrition education before and after graduation is recommended for GPRs to ensure the development of skills and confidence to support patients to make healthy dietary choices and help prevent chronic diseases.

  16. Critical Teacher Talk: Successful English for Academic Purposes Classroom Practices in a Global Campus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Namsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    ... in an English for Academic Purposes classroom in a global campus in the U.S. Developmental data analyses of class observations, teacher and student interviews, and documents led to finding multidimensional characteristics of Critical Teacher Talk (CTT...

  17. Assessment of general education teachers' Tier 1 classroom practices: contemporary science, practice, and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A; Fabiano, Gregory A; Jimerson, Shane R

    2013-12-01

    Progress monitoring is a type of formative assessment. Most work on progress monitoring in elementary school settings has been focused on students. However, teachers also can benefit from frequent evaluations. Research addressing teacher progress monitoring is critically important given the recent national focus on teacher evaluation and effectiveness. This special topic section of School Psychology Quarterly is the first to showcase the current research on measuring Tier 1 instructional and behavioral management practices used by prekindergarten and elementary school teachers in general education settings. The three studies included in the special section describe the development and validation efforts of several teacher observational and self-report measures of instruction and/or behavioral management. These studies provide evidence for the utility of such assessments for documenting the use of classroom practices, and these assessment results may be leveraged in innovative coaching models to promote best practice. These articles also offer insight and ideas for the next generation of teacher practice assessment for the field. Finally, the special topic is capped by a commentary synthesizing the current work and offers "big ideas" for future measurement development, policy, and professional development initiatives. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Relative roles of general and complementation language in theory-of-mind development: evidence from Cantonese and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Him; Hsuan-Chih, Chen; Creed, Nikki; Ng, Lisa; Ping Wang, Sui; Mo, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Complex complements are clausal objects containing tensed verbs (e.g., that she cried) or infinitives (e.g., to cry), following main verbs of communication or mental activities (e.g., say, want). This research examined whether English- and Cantonese-speaking 4-year-olds' complement understanding uniquely predicts their representation of other minds (i.e., theory of mind). Results showed that neither meaning of main verbs (communication vs. desire) nor complement structure (tensed vs. infinitival) affected the correlation between complement understanding and theory of mind. More important, the correlation became insignificant after controlling for general language comprehension. These findings led to the conclusion that the syntax of complement per se does not contribute uniquely to theory-of-mind development; general language comprehension is a more important factor to consider. Copyright 2004 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Spanish- and English-Speaking Pregnant Women's Views on cfDNA and Other Prenatal Screening: Practical and Ethical Reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Erin; Allyse, Megan A; Michie, Marsha

    2016-10-01

    The rapid clinical implementation of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening, a non-invasive method of prenatal genetic screening, has outpaced research on its social and ethical implications. This study is the first to compare the ethical and practical views of Spanish- and English-speaking pregnant women in the United States about cfDNA screening. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with diverse Spanish- and English-speaking women who had received prenatal care at a large academic medical center. Of the 24 interviewees, ten were Latinas who were interviewed in Spanish; English-language interviews were conducted with seven non-Hispanic Asian and seven non-Hispanic White women. Participants held positive opinions concerning the accuracy of cfDNA screening and often noted that it would enhance preparedness. Participants also expressed concerns about the possibility of inaccurate results and the potentially negative effects of cfDNA screening on the experience of pregnancy. Differences emerged between Spanish and English speakers in their portrayals of their relationships with prenatal health care providers, the extent to which they questioned providers' advice, their ethical concerns, and their informational needs. We emphasize the importance of customizing prenatal test counseling to the needs of the individual patient, providing educationally appropriate counseling and literature, and mitigating potential language barriers.

  20. Analysing institutional influences on teaching–learning practices of English as second language programme in a Pakistani university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ahmed Rind

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the institutional influences on the teaching–learning practices within English as Second Language (ESL programme in the University of Sindh (UoS, Pakistan. The study uses qualitative case study approach, basing its findings on documentary review, observations, and responses of teachers and students. The analysis of the data is informed by Bourdieusian notions of habitus, field and capital. The study found that UoS’s institutional policies and practices are shaped by its position in the field of higher education, which shape ESL teaching–learning practices. Specifically, UoS defines its capital as “higher education for all”, which in practice translates as admitting students from disadvantage groups. To meet English language needs of these students, UoS offers the ESL programme. However, teaching–learning practices of ESL are significantly influenced by UoS’s policies related to faculty hiring and development, ESL teachers and administration relationships, teacher-student ratio, assessment, quality assurance, and learning support resources.

  1. Organisational development in general practice: lessons from practice and professional development plans (PPDPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocking Paul

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice is becoming a key task within all health services. Primary medical care, as organised in the UK is composed of clinicians who work in independent partnerships (general practices that collaborate with other health care professionals. Although many practices have successfully introduced innovations, there are no organisational development structures in place that support the evolution of primary medical care towards integrated care processes. Providing incentives for attendance at passive educational events and promoting 'teamwork' without first identifying organisational priorities are interventions that have proved to be ineffective at changing clinical processes. A practice and professional development plan feasibility study was evaluated in Wales and provided the experiential basis for a summary of the lessons learnt on how best to guide organisational development systems for primary medical care. Results Practice and professional development plans are hybrids produced by the combination of ideas from management (the applied behavioural science of organisational development and education (self-directed adult learning theories and, in conceptual terms, address the lack of effectiveness of passive educational strategies by making interventions relevant to identified system wide needs. In the intervention, each practice participated in a series of multidisciplinary workshops (minimum 4 where the process outcome was the production of a practice development plan and a set of personal portfolios, and the final outcome was a realised organisational change. It was apparent during the project that organisational admission to a process of developmental planning needed to be a stepwise process, where initial interest can lead to a fuller understanding, which subsequently develops into motivation and ownership, sufficient to complete the exercise. The advantages of

  2. Organisational development in general practice: lessons from practice and professional development plans (PPDPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, G; Hocking, P

    2000-01-01

    Improving the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice is becoming a key task within all health services. Primary medical care, as organised in the UK is composed of clinicians who work in independent partnerships (general practices) that collaborate with other health care professionals. Although many practices have successfully introduced innovations, there are no organisational development structures in place that support the evolution of primary medical care towards integrated care processes. Providing incentives for attendance at passive educational events and promoting 'teamwork' without first identifying organisational priorities are interventions that have proved to be ineffective at changing clinical processes. A practice and professional development plan feasibility study was evaluated in Wales and provided the experiential basis for a summary of the lessons learnt on how best to guide organisational development systems for primary medical care. Practice and professional development plans are hybrids produced by the combination of ideas from management (the applied behavioural science of organisational development) and education (self-directed adult learning theories) and, in conceptual terms, address the lack of effectiveness of passive educational strategies by making interventions relevant to identified system wide needs. In the intervention, each practice participated in a series of multidisciplinary workshops (minimum 4) where the process outcome was the production of a practice development plan and a set of personal portfolios, and the final outcome was a realised organisational change. It was apparent during the project that organisational admission to a process of developmental planning needed to be a stepwise process, where initial interest can lead to a fuller understanding, which subsequently develops into motivation and ownership, sufficient to complete the exercise. The advantages of introducing expert external facilitation were clear

  3. Psychological distress among Vietnamese adults attending Vietnamese-speaking general practices in South Western Sydney: prevalence and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi; Dennis, Sarah; An, Huy; Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Liaw, Siaw Teng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of psychological distress among Vietnamese adults attending Vietnamese-speaking general practices and explore possible risk factors in this population.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Vietnamese adult patients was conducted at 25 general practices with Vietnamese-speaking general practitioners (GPs) in south-western Sydney between October 2012 and February 2013. Patients completed the Kessler (K10) scale and a demographic questionnaire, available in Vietnamese or English. Data were analysed using SPSS version 21.Results: Of the 350 patients invited to participate, 247 completed surveys (response rate 71%). One-quarter (25%) of participants had a very high K10 score for psychological distress, nearly twice that reported in the NSW Health Survey. Participants with high exposure to trauma were at increased risk of psychological distress (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 2.4-14.4; P speaking general practices is associated with exposure to trauma. This highlights the importance of personal, social and professional support in effective management. Vietnamese-speaking GPs who see Vietnamese or similar refugee groups should actively seek out a history of exposure to trauma, a past history of mental illness and the existence of support systems.

  4. Management of vertebral compression fracture in general practice: BEACH program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Z Megale

    opioid analgesics remains the common general practice approach for vertebral compression fractures management, despite the lack of evidence to support this. Clinical trials addressing management of these fractures are urgently needed to improve the quality of care patients receive.

  5. Tooth wear: prevalence and associated factors in general practice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Pashova, Hristina; Packard, J D; Zhou, Lingmei; Hilton, Thomas J

    2010-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of tooth wear and to investigate factors associated with tooth wear in patients from general practices in the Northwest United States. Data on the diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases during the previous year were collected in a survey with a systematic random sample of patients (n= 1530) visiting general dentists from the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) (n=80). Prevalence ratios (PRs) of moderate to severe occlusal and incisal tooth wear by patient characteristics were estimated using cluster-adjusted multiple binomial regression for adults (18+ years) and children/adolescents (3-17 years). For adults, the mean number of teeth with wear facets was 5.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) =4.6-6.2] and 51% of the adults had four or more teeth with wear. Participants 45-64 and 65+ years old were 1.3 (95% CI=1.1-1.6) and 1.4 (95% CI=1.1-1.8) times as likely to have 4+ teeth with moderate to severe wear facets as participants 18-44 years old. Adult males had a 20% (PR=1.2; 95% CI=1.1-1.4) higher prevalence of wear than adult females. Adults who were using, or had ever used occlusal splints had higher prevalence of tooth wear compared to those who never used such appliances (PR=1.3; 95% CI=1.0-1.5). Adults with any periodontal bone loss also had a 20% higher prevalence of wear than adults without periodontal disease (PR=1.2; 95% CI=1.0-1.4). For children/adolescents, the mean number of teeth with moderate to severe wear facets was 1.6 (95% CI=0.9-2.6) and 31% of the children had one or more teeth with wear facets. The adjusted prevalence ratio of tooth wear (1+ teeth with wear facets) for boys was 1.6 times as high (95% CI=1.1-2.4) as compared with girls. The prevalence of wear for children 12+ years old was 50% (PR=0.5; 95% CI=0.3-0.8) lower than that of children treatment, missing teeth, and race/ethnicity. Tooth wear is a prevalent condition in this population. Among adults, higher

  6. Code Switching in English Language Teaching (ELT) Teaching Practice in Turkey: Student Teacher Practices, Beliefs and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sezen Seymen

    2016-01-01

    Code switching involves the interplay of two languages and as well as serving linguistic functions, it has social and psychological implications. In the context of English language teaching, these psychological implications reveal themselves as teachers' thought processes. While the nature of code switching in language classrooms has been widely…

  7. Teaching and Learning English in Tanzania: Blessing or Curse? A Practical Review of Phan Le Ha's Teaching English as an International Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtallo, Godson Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper is inspired by the work of Phan Le Ha (2008) in her book titled Teaching English as an International Language: Identity, Resistance, and Negotiation in which she presented the way English language is taught in Vietnam and the emergence of conflicting classes of western-trained Vietnamese teachers of English versus non western trained…

  8. Perceptions of the role of general practice and practical support measures for carers of stroke survivors: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informal carers frequently suffer adverse consequences from caring. General practice teams are well positioned to support them. However, what carers of stroke survivors want and expect from general practice, and the practical support measures they might like, remain largely unexplored. The aims of this study are twofold. Firstly it explores both the support stroke carers would like from general practice and their reactions to the community based support proposed in the New Deal. Secondly, perceptions of a general practice team are investigated covering similar topics to carer interviews but from their perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 stroke carers and 10 members of a general practice team. Carers' experiences and expectations of general practice and opinions of support measures from recent government policy were explored. General practice professionals were asked about their perceived role and their perceptions of carers' support needs. Interviews were content analysed. Results Carers' expectations of support from general practice were low and they neither received nor expected much support for themselves. General practice was seen as reactive primarily because of time constraints. Some carers would appreciate emotional support but others did not want additional services. Responses to recent policy initiatives were mixed with carers saying these might benefit other carers but not themselves. General practice professionals' opinions were broadly similar. They recognise carers' support needs but see their role as reactive, focussed on stroke survivors, rather than carers. Caring was recognised as challenging. Providing emotional support and referral were seen as important but identification of carers was considered difficult. Time constraints limit their support. Responses to recent policy initiatives were positive. Conclusions Carers' expectations of support from general practice for

  9. Children’s Abstraction and Generalization of English Lexical Stress Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, Melissa A.; Oh, Grace E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated school-aged children’s internalization of the distributional patterns of English lexical stress as a function of vocabulary size. Sixty children (5;3 to 8;3) participated in the study. The children were asked to blend 2 individually-presented, equally-stressed syllables to produce disyllabic nonwords with different resulting structures in one of two frame sentences. The frame sentences were designed to elicit either a noun or verb interpretation of the nonword. Children’s receptive vocabulary was also assessed. The results indicated that children more readily blended syllable pairs that resulted in trochaic-compatible word structures than in iambic-compatible structures. This effect was strongest in young children with large vocabularies. As for stress placement, all children were sensitive to the effect of word structure, but only children with the largest vocabularies were sensitive to the biasing effect of grammatical category (noun = trochee; verb = iamb). The study results are discussed with reference to the observation that speech motor skills develop in tandem with lexical acquisition and the hypothesis that phonological knowledge emerges in part from abstraction across lexical representations. PMID:26027880

  10. Continuous quality improvement in small general medical practices: the attitudes of general practitioners and other practice staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geboers, H.J.A.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Montfort, P.A.P. van; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Continuous quality improvement (CQI) offers opportunities to improve care in small-scale office-based practice. Little is yet known about the implementation of CQI in small primary care practices. We studied the attitudes of physicians and staff in small family practices to a model of

  11. Communication practices and preferences between orthodontists and general dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibona, Kevin; Shroff, Bhavna; Best, Al M; Lindauer, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate similarities and differences in orthodontists' and general dentists' perceptions regarding their interdisciplinary communication. Orthodontists (N  =  137) and general dentists (N  =  144) throughout the United States responded to an invitation to participate in a Web-based and mailed survey, respectively. The results indicated that orthodontists communicated with general dentists using the type of media general dentists preferred to use. As treatment complexity increased, orthodontists shifted from one-way forms of communication (letters) to two-way forms of communication (phone calls; P orthodontists and general dentists reported that orthodontists' communication regarding white spot lesions was inadequate. When treating patients with missing or malformed teeth, orthodontists reported that they sought input from the general dentists at a higher rate than the general dentists reported (P Orthodontists' and general dentists' perceptions of how often specific types of media were used for interdisciplinary communication were generally similar. They differed, however, with regard to how adequately orthodontists communicated with general dentists and how often orthodontists sought input from general dentists. The methods and extent of communication between orthodontists and general dentists need to be determined on a patient-by-patient basis.

  12. Teaching English language learners in mainstream science classrooms: Teacher practice and educational opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Carlotta Dorothy

    2011-12-01

    Equal educational opportunity for English language learners (ELLs) has been a goal of the public educational system in the United States. Language policy reforms have increasedaccountability in order for schools to improve student achievement and measure the progress of ELLs. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires assessment and accountability. In this study, the number of ELLs has increased significantly at the high school level and school district as a whole. Along with the changing demographics, the findings reveal a district-wide policy of equalizing educational opportunity through equal treatment. Language policies provide critical decisions about how to measure what students know in all subjects. The assimilation model limited access to mainstream course content, produced inaccurate assessment results and grades. The science curriculum was only accessible through English and the use of the students' native languages was discouraged. The voices of the students were silenced and their academic achievement continues to lag behind their English-speaking peers.

  13. Experimenting clinical pathways in general practice: a focus group investigation with italian general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-06-15

    Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners' (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs' involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients' and professionals' satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. FOUR MAJOR THEMES EMERGED: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs' role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs' adherence and commitment. the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cantù and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers.

  14. Experimenting clinical pathways in general practice: a focus group investigation with Italian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Zannini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB, Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods. Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results. Four major themes emerged: i clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions. Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment.

  15. Training medical students in general practice: a qualitative study among general practitioner trainers in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P.J.C. Ramanayake

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Worldwide Family Medicine has gained an important place in the undergraduate medical curriculum over the last few decades and general practices have become training centers for students. Exposure to patients early in the disease process, out patient management of common problems, follow up of chronic diseases and psychosocial aspects of health and disease are educational advantages of community based training but such training could have varying impact on patients, students and trainers. This study explored the views of General Practitioner (GP trainers on their experience in training students. Methodology: This qualitative study was conducted among GP trainers of the faculty of medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, to explore their experience on wide range of issues related to their role as GP trainers. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes expressed were identified. Results: Altruistic reasons, self-satisfaction, self-esteem and opportunity to improve their knowledge were the motivations for their involvement in teaching. Teachers were confident of their clinical and teaching skills. They perceived that patients were willing participants of the process and benefited from it. There was a positive impact on consultation dynamics. Time pressure was the major problem and ideal number of trainees per session was two. They were willing to attend teacher training workshops to update their knowledge. Conclusions: GP trainers driven by altruistic reasons were willing participants of student training process. The perceived advantages of involvement of teaching for trainers and patients were an encouragement for potential trainers. University should organize training sessions for trainers which will boost their knowledge, confidence and teaching skills which will eventually benefit students.

  16. Linking Postdoctoral General Dentistry Programs with Private Practice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Richard G.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a small work group that met to discuss experiences with establishing and conducting dental education programs that had significant affiliation with private practice settings. Five programs in diverse areas were represented. Discussion covered program goals and objectives, support and commitment, practice/practitioner selection,…

  17. Technology Applied to ELT: Reviewing Practical Uses to Enhance English Teaching Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rojas Serrano

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author reports on some of the areas of technology currently used in the teaching and learning of languages, and reviews some of the uses of technological tools that are present in the English Adult Program and activities carried out at The Centro Colombo Americano (CCA in Bogota, Colombia. After briefly describing what is being applied worldwide in terms of what is being done at the CCA, some suggestions are offered in order to enhance the English teaching and learning processes through the use of new technologies.

  18. Relational coordination is associated with productivity in general practice: a survey and register based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Reventlow, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the association between relational coordination among the practice team in general practice and number of consultations performed in a general practice per staff, i.e. a proxy of productivity. We measured relational coordination using the Relational Coordination Survey...

  19. A General Investigation of the In-Service Training of English Language Teachers at Elementary Schools in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Ebru Melek

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a critical diagnosis of in-service teacher-training activities offered to English-language teachers in Turkey and aims to investigate whether those teachers are satisfied with the activities. Thirty-two English-language teachers participated in this study. Data were collected from 32 elementary-school teachers of English as a…

  20. Management and marketing for the general practice dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Earl; Bhatia, Sanjeev

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews trends in the dental marketplace. Marketing is an essential element of dentistry. Communicating treatment options with patients is one aspect of marketing. Treatment planning helps patients understand the relationships between oral health, occlusion, temporomandibular joint function, and systemic health. Through marketing, dental practice owners inform patients of ever-changing treatment modalities. Understanding treatment options allows patients to make better, informed choices. More options leads to a higher level of care and more comprehensive dental treatment. Managing a practice requires tracking its financial health. Economic statistics measure the effect of management decisions that mark the direction of a dental practice.

  1. Measuring Difficulty in English-Chinese Translation: Towards a General Model of Translation Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sanjun

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of a text's level of translation difficulty is critical for translator training and accreditation, translation research, and the language industry as well. Traditionally, people rely on their general impression to gauge a text's translation difficulty level. If the evaluation process is to be more effective and the…

  2. The Intersectional Potential of Queer Theory: An Example from a General Education Course in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the author describes how a pedagogical approach utilizing insights and principles from queer theory facilitated an intersectional analysis in a large lecture, general education course on "Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture" at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her goal in using queer theory's deconstructive…

  3. Duration of hormonal replacement therapy in general practice; a follow- up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.M.J. Groeneveld (Frans); F. Bareman (Frits); R. Barentsen (Ronald); H.J. Dokter (Heert); A.C. Drogendijk; A.W. Hoes (Arno)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To assess the mean duration of use of HRT in general practice and to identify determinants of the duration of HRT use. Methods: A general population of 1689 women aged 45-60 years and enlisted in five group practices of general practitioners were followed for 9 months to

  4. Organizing English Learner Instruction in New Immigrant Destinations: District Infrastructure and Subject-Specific School Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Megan; Lowenhaupt, Rebecca; Sweet, Tracy M.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of shifting demographics and standards-based reform, school districts in new immigrant destinations are charged with designing infrastructures that support teaching and learning for English learners (ELs) in core academic subjects. This article uses qualitative data and social network analysis to examine how one district in the…

  5. Policies and Practices of the Doctoral Programs in English Language Teaching in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Kemal Sinan; Kinik, Betul

    2015-01-01

    The present review focuses on the doctoral programs and dissertations in the field of English language teaching between the period 2010 and 2015 in Turkey to reveal how the latest reforms on higher education shaped the programs, supervisors, students and dissertations. This research focus requires immediate attention as there is not yet an…

  6. Helping Students Overcome Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety in the English Classroom: Theoretical Issues and Practical Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiplakides, Iakovos; Keramida, Areti

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that foreign language speaking anxiety is a common phenomenon in the teaching of English as a foreign language in Greece, teachers do not always identify anxious students, and often attribute their unwillingness to participate in speaking tasks to factors such as lack of motivation, or low performance. This article aims to…

  7. Dual Rubrics and the Process of Writing: Assessment and Best Practices in a Developmental English Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pireh, Diane Flanegan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents strategies for using two types of essay-writing rubrics in a developmental English class of students transitioning into college-level writing. One checklist rubric is student-facing, designed to serve as a guide for students throughout the writing process and as a self-assessment tool. The other checklist rubric is…

  8. Exploring How Institutional Structures and Practices Influence English Learners' Opportunity to Learn Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heafner, Tina L.; Plaisance, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Current research addresses the marginalization of social studies and trends in teaching English learners (ELs) in monolingual schools; however, few studies have examined the way in which support services provided to ELs impact their exposure to social studies instruction. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study:…

  9. Assessment and Intervention for English Language Learners with Primary Language Impairment: Research-Based Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieretti, Robert A.; Roseberry-McKibbin, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are experiencing the exciting challenge of serving increasing numbers of English Language Learners (ELLs) in U.S. schools. When ELLs struggle in school, they may be overreferred for speech-language services. SLPs are routinely expected to differentiate a language difference based on cultural, linguistic, and…

  10. Contrasting Identities: A Language Teacher's Practice in an English for Specific Purposes Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    For language teachers who are concerned about referring to their own and students' identities other than in the roles of "teacher" and "student" in the classroom, this conversation analytic study aims to give insights into the use of identity. Detailed analysis of the data of English for a Specific Purpose (ESP) classrooms…

  11. Developing an English for Specific Purpose Curriculum for Asian Call Centres: How Theory Can Inform Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of this article is the investigation of how current applied linguistic research into the nature of call centre communication breakdown in business processing outsourcing (BPO) sites such as India and the Philippines, can impact English communications training program content and design for this industry. It is argued that a…

  12. Ambiguities about English: Ideologies and Critical Practice in Vernacular-Medium College Classrooms in Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2005-01-01

    Situated amid tertiary-level institutions in the city of Ahmedabad, in Gujarat, India, this article explores how particular ideologies countering English inform pedagogic choices made by language teachers teaching in "vernacular-medium" (VM) college classrooms. The ideologies under discussion are two linked "thought…

  13. Collaboration in English Language Learner Teacher Education: Implications for Moving Theory into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Katie Erin

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study was developed to fill the gap in current research on what extent five teacher educators, from three Midwest and one Southwest teacher education program, are preparing English Language Learner (ELL) preservice teachers to collaborate in ELL teacher education. The results indicate that ELL teacher educators…

  14. Incorporating Cultural and Linguistic Diversity into Policy and Practice: Case Studies from an English Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Justine

    2017-01-01

    Global migration has increased the number of non-English speaking pupils in UK schools, challenging a system which is politically and ideologically monolingual. This article examines how staff at a UK primary school positioned newly arrived pupils and their families, both culturally and linguistically, in terms of Cummins' educator role…

  15. Teachers' Integration of Multimodality into Classroom Practices for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jayoung; Yi, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the proven benefits of multimodal teaching and learning (i.e., through visual, sound, movement, print-based text, and technology) for students, little is known about how teachers of English language learners (ELLs) integrate multimodality into their existing curriculums. In this study, the authors examined how two teachers who had limited…

  16. English Writing for International Publication in the Age of Globalization: Practices and Perceptions of Mainland Chinese Academics in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Ge

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Much scholarly attention has been given to the English writing and publishing practices of the academics in non-Anglophone countries, but studies on such practices in the humanities and social sciences (HSS have in general been limited. The case of Mainland Chinese HSS academics is potentially interesting. On the one hand, international publications in these disciplines have been on the increase, which are also encouraged by the national research policy of “going-out”. On the other hand, unlike those in science and technology (S&T, such practices in the HSS are still much less institutionalized at the local level. In the study reported in this article, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine academics in economics, sociology and archaeology from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS, and all nine participants had prior experience in international publishing. With a focus on participants’ experiences and perceptions, findings from this study demonstrated the relatively passive role participants played in their international publications, the importance of various resources in bringing forth these publications, and the relations between participants’ alignments with the local or international community and their voluntary investment in participating in their practices. Implications of the study were also discussed.

  17. New strategy planned to boost nurse numbers in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynton, Linsey

    2016-04-20

    A new practice nursing strategy is to be developed. NHS England has confirmed it will look at the recruitment and retention challenges facing primary care nursing, including ways to make the sector more attractive to newly qualified nurses.

  18. Teaching English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Netikšienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English for Specific Purposes and General English is analysed in the article. The scientific approach of a scientist M. Rosenberg is presented. The experience of teaching English for Specific Purposesat VGTU is alsopresented. The ideas and teaching methods from the classes of general English can be transferred to the classes of English for Specific Purposes.

  19. Why do some countries publish more than others? An international comparison of research funding, English proficiency and publication output in highly ranked general medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Jonathan P; Weinkauf, Justin G; Tsang, Monica; Sin, Don D

    2004-01-01

    National factor(s) influencing publication output in the highest ranked medical journals are largely unknown. We sought to examine the relationship between national research funding and English proficiency on publication output. We identified all original research articles appearing in the five highest ranked general medical journals between 1997 and 2001. Using the country of the corresponding author as the source nation for each article, we determined a standardized publication rate across developed nations. We used multiple regression techniques to determine the influence of national expenditures on research and scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), a surrogate for English proficiency, on publication output. There was a significant relationship of national spending on research and TOEFL scores to publication output of developed countries (p = 0.04; p < 0.01, respectively). These two variables explained approximately 71.5% of the variation in publication rate across developed nations around the world (R = 0.85; p < 0.01). Normalized for population size, English-speaking nations and certain northern European countries such as Denmark, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and Sweden had the highest rate of publication in the five highest ranked general medical journals, while Asian countries had generally low rates of publication. Research spending and English proficiency were strongly associated with publication output in the highest ranked general medical journals. While these data cannot be considered definitive due to their observational nature, they do suggest that for English-language medical journals, research funding and English proficiency may be important determinants of publication.

  20. Influences on final year medical students’ attitudes to general practice as a career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker JE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: General practice is under-represented in student career choices. This study aimed to identify and explore factors that influence the attitudes of final year medical students to general practice as a career. METHODS: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews of focus groups of final year undergraduate medical students at the University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. Thematic analysis and grounded theory were used to interpret the data. FINDINGS: General practitioners (GPs play a key role in influencing medical students’ attitudes to general practice as a career. Students identified their general practice placement during medical school training and personal contact with their own GP as principal factors. The media portrayal of general practice and the attitudes of friends and family were also influential. Students were positively influenced when they were made to feel part of the team, involved with consultations, allowed to carry out practical procedures under supervision, and witnessed what they perceived as good medical practice during clinical placements. Positive experiences often occurred later in training, when students felt more confident of their clinical abilities. While students reported occasional negative comments about general practice by some hospital doctors, these had a lesser role in influencing their perceptions of general practice compared with their own experiences, both as students and patients. CONCLUSION: GPs have a strong influence, positively and negatively, on the attitudes of medical students to general practice as a career. Effective influences include being made to feel welcome, involved, valued, and given legitimate roles during clinical placements.

  1. Practices, patients and (im)perfect data--feasibility of a randomised controlled clinical drug trial in German general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gágyor, Ildikó; Bleidorn, Jutta; Wegscheider, Karl; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2011-04-01

    Randomised controlled clinical (drug) trials supply high quality evidence for therapeutic strategies in primary care. Until now, experience with drug trials in German general practice has been sparse. In 2007/2008, the authors conducted an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (HWI-01) to assess the clinical equivalence of ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI). Here, we report the feasibility of this trial in German general practices and the implementation of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) standards as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) in mainly inexperienced general practices. This report is based on the experience of the HWI-01 study conducted in 29 German general practices. Feasibility was defined by 1) successful practice recruitment, 2) sufficient patient recruitment, 3) complete and accurate data collection and 4) appropriate protection of patient safety. The final practice recruitment rate was 18%. In these practices, 79 of 195 screened UTI patients were enrolled. Recruitment differed strongly between practices (range 0-12, mean 2.8 patients per practice) and was below the recruitment goal of approximately 100 patients. As anticipated, practice nurses became the key figures in the screening und recruitment of patients. Clinical trial demands, in particular for completing symptom questionnaires, documentation of source data and reporting of adverse events, did not agree well with GPs' documentation habits and required support from study nurses. In many cases, GPs and practice staff seemed to be overwhelmed by the amount of information and regulations. No sudden unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs) were observed during the trial. To enable drug trials in general practice, it is necessary to adapt the setup of clinical research infrastructure to the needs of GPs and their practice staff. Risk adaption of clinical trial

  2. Gender and Psychiatric Morbidity at First Contact in General Practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gender is a predictor of prevalence of psychiatric morbidity. The present study was to examine gender difference, prevalence and pattern of psychiatric morbidity among attendees of a general outpatient clinic in a tertiary hospital in sokoto, Nigeria. Methods: A total of 267,000 patients attended the general ...

  3. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected dat...

  4. Variation in clinical coding lists in UK general practice: a barrier to consistent data entry?

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Waize; Sobanna Anandarajah; Neil Dhoul; Simon de Lusignan

    2007-01-01

    Background Routinely collected general practice computer data are used for quality improvement; poor data quality including inconsistent coding can reduce their usefulness. Objective To document the diversity of data entry systems currently in use in UK general practice and highlight possible implications for data quality. Method General practice volunteers provided screen shots of the clinical coding screen they would use to code a diagnosis or problem title in the clinical consultatio...

  5. Preparedness of small animal veterinary practices to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited proficiency in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the preparedness of small animal veterinary personnel to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited English-language proficiency (LEP). Cross-sectional telephone survey. Data from 383 small animal veterinary practices. Telephone surveys were conducted with veterinarians and office or practice managers from a random sample of US small animal veterinary practices in 10 states to estimate the number of Spanish-speaking pet owners with LEP visiting these practices, proportion of practices that used services to facilitate communication with Spanish-speaking clients with LEP, and degree of veterinarian satisfaction with their communication with those clients. Responses were obtained from 383 of 1,245 (31%) eligible practices, of which 340 (89%) had Spanish-speaking clients with LEP and 200 (52%) had such clients on a weekly basis. Eight percent of practices had veterinary personnel who were conversant or fluent in spoken Spanish. Veterinarians who depended on clients' friends or family to translate were significantly less satisfied with client communication than were those who could converse in Spanish with clients directly. Availability of Spanish-speaking staff and offering of Spanish-language resources were associated with an increase in the number of Spanish-speaking clients with LEP seen on a weekly basis. Industry- and practice-generated Spanish-language materials were offered at 32% (124/383) and 21% (81/383) of practices, respectively; 329 (86%) practices had no Spanish-language marketing. Opportunities were identified for improving communication with pet owners with LEP in the veterinary clinical setting, which could ultimately positively impact patient well-being and client compliance.

  6. Note on the understanding of the generalized correspondence principle (in Polish & English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał KOKOWSKI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The author, referring to the text of Jan Woleński published on the pages of Prace Komisji Historii Nauki PAU in 2014, discusses the understanding of the generalized correspondence principle in the context of the following concepts: cumulativism (C.G. Hempel, P. Oppenhaim, E. Nagel, extreme anticumulativism (P. Feyerabend, T.S. Kuhn, dialectical cumulativism (W. Krajewski and the hypothetico­‑deductive method of correspondence ­oriented thinking as well as Copernicus’s methodology (M. Kokowski.

  7. Consultation length in general practice: cross sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deveugele, M.; Derese, A.; Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Bensing, J.; Maeseneer, J. de

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To compare determinants of consultation length discussed in the literature with those found in consultations with general practitioners from different European countries; to explore the determinants of consultation length, particularly the effect of doctors' and patients' perceptions of

  8. Dealing with major depression in general practice | Freeman | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MDD) at some point in their lives. MDD is a potentially disabling condition that affects many spheres of an individual's life and leads to marked social and occupational dysfunction. General practitioners are frequently required to diagnose and ...

  9. Benefits and harms of general health checks- lifelong learning in general practice: how to read and use scientific literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arreskov, Anne Beiter; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Nielsen, Kirsten Lykke

    Abstract title: Benefits and harms of general health checks - lifelong learning in general practice: how to read and use scientific literature Objectives After this workshop the participants will know the basics of how to read a systematic literature review and interpret a meta-analysis and be able...... will have a tool to assist life-long learning in practice. Based on the questions that arise in daily practice, we can learn by doing. What are the benefits and harms of general health checks? This workshop will invite participants to read the Cochrane review about general health checks and scrutinise...... checks and a paper about how to read a systematic review. Furthermore, a check list about which issues in the empirical paper to scrutinise will be distributed to the participants. Flow of session: • Lecture: Welcome and how to work in small groups – 15 minutes (plenary room) • Small groups: critical...

  10. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  11. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment (PST) provided by nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs) experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST) is a brief psychological

  12. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuders, B.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs) experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST) is a brief psychological

  13. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuders, B.; Oppen, van P.C.; Marwijk, van H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs) experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST) is a brief psychological

  14. Accuracy of diagnosing depression in general practice: the impact of comorbidity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuyen, J.; Volkers, A.C.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bos, G.A.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Aim: While major depression is one of the most prevalent disorders in general practice, it is often not accurately diagnosed by general practitioners (GPs). This can adversely affect patients’ lives, either through non-treatment (underdiagnosis) or unnecessary antidepressive treatment

  15. Examining University Students' Scholarly Publication in English Journals: A Case for Postgraduate Students' Written Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vosoughi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This  research  aimed  to  screen  'essay  writing'  difficulties  that  non-native  university students  at  postgraduate  levels  usually  experience  regarding  scholarly  publication  in mainstream, English journals. Two sets of variables including written literacy competencies in Persian and English languages were mapped over language uses (General vs. Academic. Initial screenings  from  one  hundred  Iranian  students  at  PhD  and  MA  levels  with  publication experiences  in  both  Persian  and  English  languages  gave  rise  to  some  fifty-five  participants randomly  selected  from  different  university  disciplines  (Humanities,  Engineering,  Medicine and Basic Sciences and diverse university settings (Public and Private across the country and classified  via  stratified  sampling.  A  validated  questionnaire  from  a  large-scale  project  called ENEIDA (Moreno, 2011 was used for collecting the required data. Two measures were used to assess  written  literacy  competencies  across  language  uses:  1  participants'  assumed,  self-reported written literacy competencies in using English and Persian languages for General and Academic  purposes  were  denoted  as  'perceived'  measures  and  2  further  supported  by  actual measures:  mostly  received  comments  from  reviewers  in  the  mainstream,  English  journals  by the  target  group  above.  Findings  were  discussed  in  the  light  of  recent  lines  of  enquiries  in Academic Literacy (AL trends بررسی تجربیات دانشجویان در نگارش وچاپ مقاله درمجلات انگلیسی زبان؛ مطالعه موردی بر روی فعالیت های سواد نوشتاری دانشجویان تحصیلات تکمیلی چکیده: هدف از نگارش مقاله حاضر انعکاس مشکلات رایج درخصوص نگارش و

  16. Integrating Geriatric Dentistry into General Practice Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Patrick M.; Shay, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The predoctoral dental curriculum cannot provide the depth of experience and knowledge needed for the increasing representation of geriatric patients in family dental practices. A curriculum model designed to enhance knowledge and refine clinical skills in caring for the elderly is proposed. (MSE)

  17. A General Scope of Practice for Professional School Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Kenneth G.

    The roles that school counselors play in schools can vary from school to school, from school district to district, and from state to state. To be effective in their positions as highly trained counseling and human development specialists, school counselors must be clear about their scope of practice. National standards for school counseling…

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitioners in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The questionnaire explored four themes: demographic data; attitudes to caring for children with ADHD; management of these children and knowledge and practice regarding the use of stimulants. Results: Three hundred and eighty four GP's were eligible to complete the questionnaire, of which 147 (38.2%) were returned, ...

  19. Gouty arthritis: An approach for general practice | Tikly | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 55, No 4 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  20. Nursing roles and responsibilities in general practice: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Léonie; Clendon, Jill; Nelson, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    Primary care nursing teams may now comprise registered nurses (usually termed practice nurses), nurse practitioners, physician assistants, enrolled nurses, and primary care practice assistants, clinical assistants, or nursing assistants. There is a need to understand how practitioners in the different roles work with patients in the changed environment. The aim of this study was to describe the different configurations of health professionals' skill-mix in three dissimilar primary care practices, their inter- and intra-professional collaboration and communication, and to explore the potential of expanded nursing scopes and roles to improve patient access. Document review, observation and interviews with key stakeholders were used to explore how health practitioners in three practice settings work together, including their delegation, substitution, enhancement and innovation in roles and interdisciplinary interactions in providing patient care. A multiphase integrative, qualitative and skill-mix framework analysis was used to compare findings related to nursing skill-mix across case studies. Three models of primary care provision, utilising different nursing skill-mix and innovations were apparent. These illustrate considerable flexibility and responsiveness to local need and circumstances. Enabling nurses to work to the full extent of their scope, along with some adjustments to the models of care, greater multidisciplinary cooperation and coordination could mitigate future workforce shortages and improve patient access to care.